WorldWideScience

Sample records for fr19oc10r hybrid retirement

  1. 76 FR 4244 - Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG36 Hybrid Retirement Plans Correction In rule document 2010-25941 beginning on page 64123 in the issue of Tuesday, October 19, 2010, make the following...

  2. 75 FR 64123 - Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG36 Hybrid Retirement Plans AGENCY: Internal Revenue... defined benefit pension plans. These regulations provide guidance on changes made by the Pension... plans. DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective on October 19, 2010. Applicability Date...

  3. 75 FR 64197 - Additional Rules Regarding Hybrid Retirement Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background This document contains proposed amendments to the Income Tax Regulations...(a) of PPA '06 added provisions to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, Public Law 93.... These regulations would provide guidance on changes made by the Pension Protection Act of 2006, as...

  4. It's time to retire. Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dychtwald, Ken; Erickson, Tamara; Morison, Bob

    2004-03-01

    Companies have been so focused on down-sizing to contain costs that they've largely neglected a looming threat to their competitiveness: a severe shortage of talented workers. The general population is aging and with it, the labor pool. People are living longer, healthier lives, and the birthrate is at a historical low. During the next 15 years, 80% of the native-born workforce growth in North America--and even more in much of Western Europe--is going to be in the over-50 age cohort. When these mature workers begin to retire, there won't be nearly enough young people entering the workforce to compensate. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a shortfall of 10 million workers in the United States in 2010, and in countries where the birthrate is well below the population replacement level (particularly in Western Europe), the shortage will hit sooner, be more severe, and remain chronic. The problem won't just be a lack of bodies. Skills, knowledge, experience, and relationships walk out the door every time somebody retires--and they take time and money to replace. And while the brain drain is beginning now, the problem is going to become much more acute in the next decade or so, when baby boomers--more than one-quarter of all Americans, amounting to 76 million people--start hitting their mid sixties. Based on the results of their yearlong research project, the authors of this article offer recommendations for gaining the loyalty of older workers and creating a more flexible approach to retirement that allows people to continue contributing well into their sixties and seventies. Companies can no longer afford to think of retirement as a onetime event, permanently dividing work life from leisure.

  5. Early Retirement Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Peter W.

    1984-01-01

    Early retirement programs offer individuals an alternative to the work ethic while allowing them to maintain job security. Examples are given of several early, partial, and phased retirement programs currently being used in universities and public school systems. (DF)

  6. Human Capital and Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Alders

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the relation between human capital and retirement when the age of retirement is endogenous. This relation is examined in a life-cycle earnings model. An employee works full time until retirement. The worker accumulates human capital by training- on-the-job and by

  7. 2012 Retirement Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Military retirements come in the form of pensions . Pensions are risk-free, tax- sheltered, inflation-adjusted annuities with options for spousal...that decision. We describe the REDUX/bonus option as an early, partial cash-out of the servicemember’s retirement pension that the member pays back... pension benefits) and we calculate the implied APR or interest rate for this loan. For example, an E-7 who retires at age 38 with 20 years of service

  8. Retirement Choice 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    military retirement will end up costing $4.5 To summarize, military pensions are risk-free, tax-sheltered, inflation- adjusted annuities with options...Ann Parcell—and from critical insights provided by Kathleen Utgoff (former Director of the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation), John Warner...servicemember’s retirement pension . This $30,000 cash-out will be “paid back” later in the form of reduced retirement checks. By providing

  9. Optimizing Early Retirement Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the military. The U.S. Army’s early retirement program is a temporary one designed to allow some soldiers to leave the service prior to 20 years of...whether it makes financial sense for an officer to select early retirement . A spreadsheet formulation is developed and used to indicate if and when...an officer should select early retirement . The program investigates the decision that various civilian salary levels and various assumed discount rates.

  10. Retirement with Perfect Insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Kula (Grzegorz)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper focuses on the relation between worker's productivity and retirement decision. Assuming that productivity follows geometric Brownian motion with drift, there exists such a level of productivity for which it is optimal to retire. The worker buys an insurance, which gives a cons

  11. Early Retirement Payoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.; Lovenheim, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    As public budgets have grown tighter over the past decade, states and school districts have sought ways to control the growth of spending. One increasingly common strategy employed to rein in costs is to offer experienced teachers with high salaries financial incentives to retire early. Although early retirement incentive (ERI) programs have been…

  12. Preparing for asset retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Randall W; Reinstein, Alan

    2003-04-01

    Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 143 requires organizations to recognize a liability for an asset retirement obligation when it is incurred--even if that occurs far in advance of the asset's planned retirement. For example, organizations must recognize future costs associated with medical equipment disposal that carries hazardous material legal obligations.

  13. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  14. Retirement routes and economic incentives to retire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin

    We estimate the effect of benefit rates on individuals’ retirement behaviour. Compared to most other studies in the field, the characterising feature of this paper is to use a cross-country panel data set of individuals (the European Community Household Panel, ECHP) to estimate economic effects a...

  15. Does Retirement Kill You? Evidence from Early Retirement Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coe, N.B.; Lindeboom, M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect that health has on the retirement decision has long been studied. We examine the reverse relationship, whether retirement has a direct impact on later-life health. To identify the causal relationship, we use early retirement window offers to instrument for retirement. We find no negative

  16. Does Retirement Kill You? Evidence from Early Retirement Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coe, N.B.; Lindeboom, M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect that health has on the retirement decision has long been studied. We examine the reverse relationship, whether retirement has a direct impact on later-life health. To identify the causal relationship, we use early retirement window offers to instrument for retirement. We find no negative

  17. Celebrating Stephen Robertson's retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Tait, J.; MacFarlane, A; Belkin, N.

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Robertson retired from the Microsoft Research Lab in Cambridge during the summer of 2013 after a long career as one of the most influential, well-liked and eminent researchers in Information Retrieval throughout the world.

  18. Retirement Information Center Blog

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A place for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to share information about retirement benefits for new, prospective, and current Federal employees, as well...

  19. Employment Trajectories Beyond Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Carola; Hochfellner, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Within the political and academic debate on working longer, post-retirement employment is discussed as an alternative to maintain older workers in the labor market. Our article enhances this discussion by studying determinants of transitions into post-retirement jobs within differing work environments of birth cohorts 1940-1942. We estimate proportional subhazard models accounting for competing risks using unique German social security data linked to pension accounts. Our findings suggest that individuals' preferences to take up post-retirement jobs are not mutually exclusive. Our study provides evidence that taking up post-retirement jobs is related to seeking financial security, continuity, and work ability, suggesting that public policy has to develop target-oriented support through a public policy mix of different measures aligned to the different peer groups in the labor market.

  20. 2014 Retirement Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    annuities with options for spousal benefits (such as the Survivor Benefit Plan) on the death of the member. Such private pension provisions are very...the course of a Marine’s lifetime. Military retirements come in the form of pensions . Pensions are risk-free, tax- sheltered, inflation-adjusted...best way to think about this is to consider REDUX’s $30,000 Career Status Bonus as an early cash-out of part of a Marine’s retirement pension . We can

  1. Mental retirement and schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Martinello, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We assess the validity of differences in eligibility ages for early and old age pension benefits as instruments for estimating the effect of retirement on cognitive functioning. Because differences in eligibility ages across country and gender are correlated with differences in years of schooling...... of the “mental retirement” effects which have recently been found...

  2. Safeguarding Your Retirement Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Louis R.

    1989-01-01

    Faculty members should consider becoming more involved in the oversight of their personal retirement funds. Both price and inflation risks are best controlled by taking a balanced or diversified approach to investing, with a portfolio based on a predetermined percentage of each type of investment. (MSE)

  3. Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Following the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 2 December 2008, please note that the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, i.e. until 31 March 2010. Further information is available on : https://hr-services.web.cern.ch/hr-services/services-Ben/prp/prp.asp HR Department, tel. 73903

  4. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical wo

  5. Claus Madsen Retires

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Walsh, J.

    2016-12-01

    Claus Madsen began at ESO as a photographer in 1980 and recently retired as senior advisor on international relations. During his career he authored several books, the most notable being a history of ESO from the late 1980s to the 50th anniversary in 2012. A brief appreciation of his career is presented.

  6. Planning Your Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guidebook on retirement planning helps potential retirees by raising important issues in such areas as changing roles and relationships, health and fitness, meaningful use of time, working options, financial and estate planning, and housing and lifestyle. The first section, on attitude and role adjustments, discusses support systems, changing…

  7. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is not strongly...

  8. Voluntary Incentive Early Retirement Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Dialogues, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Arrangements in educational institutions for voluntary early retirement programs are discussed. Retirement at any age can be a profound and stressful lifetime change; and it can also represent a welcome transition into newly satisfying and rewarding opportunities. The focus is on: mandatory retirement (exceptions and the new meaning of "early");…

  9. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the main auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via ...

  10. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place in the afternoons of 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Ind...

  11. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance ...

  12. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register ...

  13. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register ...

  14. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance ...

  15. Retired Worker Writes Novel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    SUN Junxian, a retired worker from the Huanghe Machine Building Company in Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, spent nearly 15 years writing her autobiographical novel White Snow. With the publication of this novel, Sun has won widespread praise throughout Xi’an. Readers think the novel is effective and true to life. The China Television Play Production Center plans to adapt the novel for a TV series and present it during the

  16. Retirement Choice 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    inflation. High-3 has full inflation protection because it changes yearly with the Consumer Price Index (CPI), whereas REDUX/bonus has less...considering changes in the military retirement system. As of 2015, however, military personnel who entered service after July 31, 1986 and who are...understand how the two plans differ by comparing plan descriptions (See Table 1), whereas others will prefer to look at the figures that follow, which

  17. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Human Resources is organising a preparation for retirement seminar which will take place on the four successive afternoons of 2 to 5 October 2007. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of one’s working life and the start of a new period of life. This period of transition and change is experienced differently from one individual to another. In any case, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above as well as those who have retired during the year have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of th...

  18. Retirement as Meaningful: Positive Retirement Stereotypes Associated with Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Reuben; Allore, Heather G.; Monin, Joan K.; Levy, Becca R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the association between retirement and health have produced mixed results. This may be due to previous studies treating retirement as merely a change in job status rather than a transition associated with stereotypes or societal beliefs (e.g., retirement is a time of mental decline or retirement is a time of growth). To examine whether these stereotypes are associated with health, we studied retirement stereotypes and survival over a 23-year period among 1,011 older adults. As predicted by stereotype embodiment theory, it was found that positive stereotypes about physical health during retirement showed a survival advantage of 4.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.88, p = .022) and positive stereotypes about mental health during retirement tended to show a survival advantage of 2.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.87, p = .034). Models adjusted for relevant covariates such as age, gender, race, employment status, functional health, and self-rated health. These results suggest that retirement preparation could benefit from considering retirement stereotypes. PMID:27346893

  19. Retirement as Meaningful: Positive Retirement Stereotypes Associated with Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Reuben; Allore, Heather G; Monin, Joan K; Levy, Becca R

    2016-03-01

    Studies examining the association between retirement and health have produced mixed results. This may be due to previous studies treating retirement as merely a change in job status rather than a transition associated with stereotypes or societal beliefs (e.g., retirement is a time of mental decline or retirement is a time of growth). To examine whether these stereotypes are associated with health, we studied retirement stereotypes and survival over a 23-year period among 1,011 older adults. As predicted by stereotype embodiment theory, it was found that positive stereotypes about physical health during retirement showed a survival advantage of 4.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.88, p = .022) and positive stereotypes about mental health during retirement tended to show a survival advantage of 2.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.87, p = .034). Models adjusted for relevant covariates such as age, gender, race, employment status, functional health, and self-rated health. These results suggest that retirement preparation could benefit from considering retirement stereotypes.

  20. Preparation for retirement seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

      The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Indico. &a...

  1. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a Preparation for Retirement Seminar, which will take place on 18 and 21 October 2011 in the afternoon in the Main Auditorium and on 19 October and 15 and 16 November 2011 in the afternoon in the Council Chamber. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned, you are ...

  2. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a Preparation for Retirement Seminar, which will take place on 18 and 21 October 2011 in the afternoon in the Main Auditorium and on 19 October and 15 and 16 November 2011 in the afternoon in the Council Chamber. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned, you are r...

  3. PRE-RETIREMENT PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Special Meeting concerning the TAXATION OF PENSIONS IN FRANCE Following the pre-retirement seminar held at CERN in March 2001, the Human Resources Division and the CERN Pensioners Association (GAC) are organising a special information session on the Taxation of CERN pensions in France The speaker will be S. Agarrat, a barrister specialising in tax law (practising in Lyon) and the meeting will take the form of a general presentation of the subject, followed by a question-and-answer session. This meeting is intended for CERN pensioners residing in France, as well as for staff due to retire from the Organization in 2001/2002. Registration is not necessary. The meeting will take place on Wednesday, 28 November 2001, from 4.30 p.m. to 6.30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium N.B.: Questions concerning the taxation rules applicable to salaries paid by CERN, in particular questions relating to the CRDS tax, will not be dealt with during this meeting.

  4. The XWHO directory retires

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    On 11 May a new web-based phonebook will take over from the 16-year old XWHO directory. It will provide access to basic contact information for people and services at CERN. A user-friendly interface will allow you to look for people and services using criteria such as first or last name, organisational unit and phone number. All requests submitted to the retired XWHO directory will be redirected to the new phonebook.   The new CERN Phonebook's user interface. CERN’s first electronic phonebook was created in 1995. The XWHO directory was first presented in July that year in a CERN Computer Newsletter (CNL) article entitled “Migrating the access to central directory services” by Miguel Marquina and Bernd Pollermann. Since then, it has been used by thousands of people at CERN and around the world looking for contact details of other members of the Organization. The XWHO directory is now retiring and is to be replaced by the new web-based CERN Phonebook. For several month...

  5. Retirement Options to Offer College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Daniel A.

    1982-01-01

    Retirement options available to institutions are outlined, including early retirement incentives, phased retirement, facilitating consulting opportunities, travel and outplacement services, maintaining community involvement, annuities, and pensions. Suggestions are made for increasing cost-effectiveness and fitting the options to local…

  6. 78 FR 68981 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... electronic business processes, must be set aside with respect to electronic retirement and insurance... RIN 3206-AM45 Electronic Retirement Processing AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Final... to electronic benefits processing under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), the...

  7. Retirement Options to Offer College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Daniel A.

    1982-01-01

    Retirement options available to institutions are outlined, including early retirement incentives, phased retirement, facilitating consulting opportunities, travel and outplacement services, maintaining community involvement, annuities, and pensions. Suggestions are made for increasing cost-effectiveness and fitting the options to local…

  8. Retirement as a Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, Phil; Ford, Geoff; Hodkinson, Heather; Hawthorn, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article draws upon a major qualitative empirical research investigation in Great Britain to explore the relationships between retirement and learning. Though retirement is frequently viewed as an event leading to a life stage, our data show that it can perhaps be best understood as a lengthy process. This process begins well before actual…

  9. Retirement Flexibility and Portfolio Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Y.; Bonenkamp, J.; Meijdam, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the interaction between retirement flexibility and portfolio choice in an overlapping-generations model. We analyse this interaction both in a partial-equilibrium and general-equilibrium setting. Retirement flexibility is often seen as a hedge against capital-market risks which

  10. Old European Couples' Retirement Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario; Ranzani, Marco

    This study investigates old European couples' retirement choices in order to bridge the gap between the European and the American literature. The typical European family approaching retirement is a dual-earner family: the dataset used in this paper reveals that 78 percent of working males is marr...

  11. 78 FR 33911 - Phased Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... knowledge and expertise with the next generation of Federal leaders via mentoring and role-modeling. Once... making an election of phased retirement, the procedures for electing phased retirement, the requirements... less than the 3-year period ending on the effective date of the employee's election of...

  12. Lassoing the Determinants of Retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Kock, Anders Bredahl; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    2016-01-01

    of the retirement decision. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of these estimators in microeconometrics to a problem of this type and scale. Furthermore, we investigate whether the factors influencing the retirement decision are stable over time, gender, and marital status. It is found......This article uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998. Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socioeconomic, financial, and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case...

  13. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  14. Metaphors for Retirement: Unshackled from Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Leisa D.; Bataille, Christine D.; Vough, Heather C.; Lee, Mary Dean

    2011-01-01

    This study uses metaphor analysis to examine the meanings of retirement for a group of 35 retired Canadian executives and managers. Our analysis identified eight metaphors relating to the meanings of retirement. The findings provide us with a range of insights into the experience of retirement, from loss of purpose and identity to liberation from…

  15. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  16. Retired RNs: perceptions of volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca-Bates, Katherine C; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done to explore the perceptions of volunteering among retired registered nurses (RNs) in Kansas. Participants were volunteers in formal nursing roles or were using their nursing knowledge and experience in non-nursing roles, such as church work. Regardless of the type of volunteer position, retired RNs reported that they use what they have learned as nurses when they volunteer. Volunteering benefits include enhanced self-worth, intellectual stimulation, reduced social isolation, and opportunities to help others. Increased paperwork, new technology, difficulty finding nursing-specific volunteer opportunities, resistance from health care organizations, and a lack of respect for what these nurses know are challenges and barriers to volunteering. Retired RNs have accumulated years of clinical nursing experience and can be helpful to employed nurses. Health care organizations should launch targeted efforts to recruit and utilize retired RN volunteers. Health care professionals who care for older adults should recommend volunteering as a healthful endeavor.

  17. Preparing for retirement - new seminars

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2015-01-01

    We would like to take the opportunity to inform you about a new programme related to retirement, organised by the Human Resources Department. Retirement marks the end of a career and the start of a new chapter in life.  In all cases, being well-informed and prepared is necessary to cope successfully with this transition. The programme has been developed for staff members and consists of two seminars: Leaving CERN (half day seminar): short presentations by internal speakers, focusing on what options CERN offers at the end of your career: organised once per year, next session scheduled on 24 November 2015, in the afternoon, enrolment and more information on Indico.   Preparation for retirement (2-day seminar): interactive workshop (in small groups) delivered by external experts, focusing on how to prepare psychologically as well as practically to cope with all the changes retirement brings: organised regularly in 2016, in English or ...

  18. Health and Retirement in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hagan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We use discrete-time hazard models with internationally comparable data from the full eight waves of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP to study the relationship between retirement and health in nine European countries. Our results provide new evidence of the relationship of health shocks to early retirement. The pattern of results across countries reflects international differences in the incentives created by social security systems.

  19. Retiring the central executive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Robert H

    2016-10-01

    Reasoning, problem solving, comprehension, learning and retrieval, inhibition, switching, updating, or multitasking are often referred to as higher cognition, thought to require control processes or the use of a central executive. However, the concept of an executive controller begs the question of what is controlling the controller and so on, leading to an infinite hierarchy of executives or "homunculi". In what is now a QJEP citation classic, Baddeley [Baddeley, A. D. (1996). Exploring the central executive. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 49A, 5-28] referred to the concept of a central executive in cognition as a "conceptual ragbag" that acted as a placeholder umbrella term for aspects of cognition that are complex, were poorly understood at the time, and most likely involve several different cognitive functions working in concert. He suggested that with systematic empirical research, advances in understanding might progress sufficiently to allow the executive concept to be "sacked". This article offers an overview of the 1996 article and of some subsequent systematic research and argues that after two decades of research, there is sufficient advance in understanding to suggest that executive control might arise from the interaction among multiple different functions in cognition that use different, but overlapping, brain networks. The article concludes that the central executive concept might now be offered a dignified retirement.

  20. [The surgeon at retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Castillo-Sánchez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Our vocation has called us to become physicians and we have learned and practiced surgery as part of our medical training and knowledge. Surgery is an art expressed during each intervention carried out with effectiveness and devotion; enjoying the pleasure to perform it without hurry, with harmony, fluency and cleanness. Therefore, medicine and surgery belong to the same vocation being at service of people with the clear mission to heal patients and if we favor it, this activity will get our attention firmly and forever. A physician is a sensitive person that understands the sadness and happiness consequence of his actions at the office, operating room, research and relationships with colleagues. This provides him a pleasant experience of practicing medicine and especially surgery. Medical and surgical professions produce an irresistible attraction and they are very rewarding experiences; however, as time goes by there are effects over physician's health. Surgeons will switch from an active professional role into a passive agent and will need to assess himself and answer if he is still in optimal conditions to practice medicine. Therefore, every surgeon must be prepared to grow old from the start and preserve his Faith once retirement has been accepted as the next step in his career.

  1. Preparation for retirement seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    (Health insurance and wealth and succession planning) During the preparation for retirement seminar in November 2009, the sessions on health insurance in Switzerland and in France unfortunately had to be postponed. Participants in the seminar also expressed interest in an information session on “How to manage your wealth and organize your succession”. The sessions on health insurance will be held on 16 March 2010 and those on managing wealth and succession on 18 March 2010. Programme for Tuesday 16 March 2010 (TH Theory Conference Room, Building 4/3-006): 09:00 Health insurance in Switzerland by Mr. Sandro Breitenstein, Service de l'Assurance Maladie du Canton de Genève 10:00 Coffee break 10:20 Health insurance in France by Mr. Dominique Curtiaud, Caisse Primaire d'Assurance Maladie de l'Ain Programme for Thursday 18 March 2010 (TH Theory Conference Room, Building 4/3-006): 09:00 How to manage your wealth and organize your succession in Switzerland by Mr. Jean-Marc W...

  2. Trusted counsellor retires

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    His astute counsel, knowing smile and distinguished eloquence will be missed by many. With a pang of regret, the man himself admits that 'CERN was like a drug for me'. Last week, Jean-Daniel Mandica retired, after 40 years of loyal service. He was the trusted counsellor of every Director of the Administration and Director-General for eighteen years, from 1986 to 2003. Head of the planning unit for the Directorate and the Administration from 1986 to 1996, he was then named Head of the Directorate Services Unit in 1996, a position he held until the end of 2003. Throughout that time, he conducted key tasks for the Organization, such as restructuring the Administration and carrying out audits. His role in the creation of Microcosm and his commitment to CERN's participation in the Universal Exposition at Seville in 1992 contributed in no small part to the spread of the Laboratory's fame. Jean-Daniel Mandica's incomparable knowledge of the Administration, sense of diplomacy and great ability to listen made him a v...

  3. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Military Retirement Budgeting and Costs Military retirement costs , which include all payments to current retirees and survivors, have been rising modestly...Since FY1985, the “accrual accounting ” concept has been used to budget for the costs of military retired pay. The unfunded liability resulting...from this Military Retirement Fund to current retirees. Individual retirees receive their retired pay from the Defense Finance and Accounting Service

  4. 20 CFR 404.1088 - Retirement payment to retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....1088 Section 404.1088 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... financial obligations to you (in his or her capacity as a partner) except to make the retirement payments... 31, 1977, D rendered no service to any trade or business carried on by the partnership. On or before...

  5. Foreign Service Retirement and Disability System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Foreign Service Retirement and Disability System (FSRDS) is the Foreign Service equivalent to the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) as described in 5 U.S.C....

  6. An Early Retirement Option for Australian Academics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Ray

    1987-01-01

    Issues of early retirement of college and university faculty are examined as they relate to Australia's aging faculty population, and the conditions necessary to promote early retirement successfully in this context are considered. (MSE)

  7. Early Retirement: A Need for Reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Institutions must provide good counseling regarding retirement program benefits, since when in doubt about their financial position faculty members are inclined to remain employed. Colleges should consider offering nonfinancial incentives for early retirement as well as financial. (MLW)

  8. Financial planning considerations at retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, R J

    1998-03-01

    The process of retirement planning is a difficult one for a physician. The Planning process should address the areas of Investment Planning, Estate Planning, and Risk Management. This article examines each of these dimensions with special emphasis on Modern Portfolio Theory as the basis for investment planning.

  9. The employer's perspective on retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Henkens; H.P. van Dalen

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the literature with respect to the role of employers in retirement processes of older workers and provide suggestions for future research. In the first part of this chapter we will review existing theoretical insights regarding the employers’ actions and attitudes toward o

  10. The employer's perspective on retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkens, C.J.I.M.; van Dalen, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the literature with respect to the role of employers in retirement processes of older workers and provide suggestions for future research. In the first part of this chapter we will review existing theoretical insights regarding the employers’ actions and attitudes toward o

  11. Lassoing the Determinants of Retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Kock, Anders Bredahl; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    This paper uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998.Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socio-economic, financially and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case t...

  12. Durable consumption, saving and retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; Hermansen, Mikkel Nørlem

    2014-01-01

    welfare in stationary equilibrium, we find that a redution in wealth locking-in in durables is not necessarily welfare improving due to the effects on bequest. From a social welfare perspective, individuals tend to choose too much financial savings, too little durable acquisition and too early retirement....

  13. Dr. Hermann otto Sleumer retired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1971-01-01

    On March 1st, 1971, Dr. Hermann Otto Sleumer, senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, retired on reaching the age of 65 years. I have expressly omitted to say ‘from active service’, because his work has gone on uninterruptedly and he even had objections against spending one afternoon, on Febr. 26

  14. Predictors of Retirement Satisfaction: A Path Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Yael

    1985-01-01

    Examined adjustment to retirement among 310 former industrial and service workers. Respondents had come to terms with retirement and enjoyed their more relaxed lifestyle. Dominant variables in the path model were retirees' satisfaction with specific aspects of retirement: giving up work, activities with family and friends, rest, and free time. (BH)

  15. Adjusting to Retirement: Considerations for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBauve, Bill J.; Robinson, Chester R.

    1999-01-01

    Examines retirement, while focusing on issues older adults face in adjusting to retirement, and suggests implications for counseling people who are making this transition. Discusses adjustment to retirement in terms of role, disengagement, activity, continuity, crisis, and compromise/negotiation theories. (Author/MKA)

  16. Back to School for Retired Baby Boomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Across the nation, schools increasingly are tapping into a vast resource pool--retired educators. The potential effects of the retirement boom--baby boomers reaching retirement age--have been well documented. An April 2009 "New York Times" article estimates that by 2013, more than one-third of the nation's 3.2 million teachers could…

  17. Early Retirement Incentive Programs for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Scott E.; McCarthy, Martha M.

    1989-01-01

    Despite their popularity, early retirement incentive programs (ERIPs) remain controversial. Although early retirement may be appealing to some teachers, others bristle at being shoved into retirement. Following a historical overview, this article summarizes recent state legislation and addresses ERIP legal status under the Age Discrimination in…

  18. Predictors of Early Retirement Among University Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Deborah J.; Greene, Vernon L.

    1987-01-01

    Interviews with faculty at a university having an incentive early retirement plan revealed that those choosing to retire early were in poorer health, faced smaller proportional income decrement upon retirement, were less satisfied with teaching assignments, and considered themselves lower in research productivity and higher in teaching and…

  19. Don't Shy from Retirement Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses faculty retirement policy at colleges and universities, particularly findings from a survey by the American Association of University Professors. Explores defined-contribution plans, terminal leaves, phased retirement programs, and prerequisites that can enhance faculty retirements. Also addresses how trustee boards can help with…

  20. Perceptions of pre-retired employees of a public university about retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Ariane Modos Figueira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to unveil the perceptions of pre-retired employees of a public university about retirement. Methods: qualitative research conducted with 16 pre-retired employees of a public university. Data were collected in monthly meetings in three focus groups that discussed aspects related to retirement and were analyzed by content analysis technique. Results: when identifying retirement as a possibility, pre-retired workers rescued the meaning of work, reflected on the life changes that retirement can lead and signaled the need for strategies for experiencing retirement. Conclusion: retirement brings up positive and negative perceptions, concerns and questions that reinforce the need to offer to pre-retired workers the opportunity to reflect on this stage of life and prepare to enjoy the post-career period with quality.

  1. 5 CFR 891.104 - Responsibilities of retirement offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and for paying the Government contributions to these retired employees. (d) Retirement offices are... required for Government contribution for these retired employees. (c) Retirement offices are responsible... for Government contributions to retired employees within the jurisdiction of the retirement office who...

  2. Reserves and cash flows under stochastic retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Kamille Sofie Tågholt; Nielsen, Jeppe Woetmann

    2016-01-01

    Uncertain time of retirement and uncertain structure of retirement benefits are risk factors for life insurance companies. Nevertheless, classical life insurance models assume these are deterministic. In this paper, we include the risk from stochastic time of retirement and stochastic benefit...... structure in a classical finite-state Markov model for a life insurance contract. We include discontinuities in the distribution of the retirement time. First, we derive formulas for appropriate scaling of the benefits according to the time of retirement and discuss the link between the scaling...

  3. Worries and plans as individuals approach retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoboski, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of an employment-based retirement plan is to provide a secure and adequate income for workers throughout retirement. In the defined contribution (DC) framework, asset accumulation is a means to the end, but not the end. Drawing retirement income from savings and paying for health care expenses in retirement are the two issues that concern individuals the most as they approach retirement. This article examines the attitudes of near-retirees regarding these risks and their plans for managing them. The author discusses how DC plan design can have a major impact on how individuals convert their retirement savings to retirement income; differences in survey responses between those who have consulted a financial advisor or other financial professional and those who have not; and the role of trust in implementing advice.

  4. Stealth Compensation via Retirement Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Bebchuk, Lucian Arye

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes an important form of "stealth compensation" provided to managers of public companies. We show how boards have been able to camouflage large amounts of executive compensation through the use of retirement benefits and payments. Our study illustrates the significant role that camouflage and stealth compensation play in the design of compensation arrangements. It also highlights the importance of having information about compensation arrangements not only publicly available b...

  5. Stealth Compensation Via Retirement Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian Arye Bebchuk; Fried, Jesse M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes an important form of "stealth compensation" provided to managers of public companies. We show how boards have been able to camouflage large amount of executive compensation through the use of retirement benefits and payments. Our study highlights the significant role that camouflage and stealth compensation play in the design of compensation arrangements. Our study also highlights the significance of whether information about compensation arrangements is not merely publicl...

  6. The effect of retirement on cognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Norma B; von Gaudecker, Hans-Martin; Lindeboom, Maarten; Maurer, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive impairment has emerged as a major driver of disability in old age, with profound effects on individual well-being and decision making at older ages. In the light of policies aimed at postponing retirement ages, an important question is whether continued labour supply helps to maintain high levels of cognition at older ages. We use data of older men from the US Health and Retirement Study to estimate the effect of continued labour market participation at older ages on later-life cognition. As retirement itself is likely to depend on cognitive functioning and may thus be endogenous, we use offers of early retirement windows as instruments for retirement in econometric models for later-life cognitive functioning. These offers of early retirement are legally required to be nondiscriminatory and thus, inter alia, unrelated to cognitive functioning. At the same time, these offers of early retirement options are significant predictors of retirement. Although the simple ordinary least squares estimates show a negative relationship between retirement duration and various measures of cognitive functioning, instrumental variable estimates suggest that these associations may not be causal effects. Specifically, we find no clear relationship between retirement duration and later-life cognition for white-collar workers and, if anything, a positive relationship for blue-collar workers.

  7. Teaching Teachers about Retirement and Investments: A Comparison of Three Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Thomas; Meyers, Derek J. H.; Smith, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    The authors describe a project that compared the effects of three interventions on the retirement investment knowledge of public school teachers in the Midwest. They interpret outcomes from three different interventions (online training, site-based workshop, and hybrid of online and site-based). While the study results indicate that program…

  8. Reconceptualizing retirement: A status-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershenson, David B

    2016-08-01

    The one thing on which essentially all retirement scholars agree is that there is no generally accepted definition of the term "retirement." Hence, it is not surprising that a plethora of competing models of the stages of retirement has been generated. To cut this Gordian knot, this paper proposes that the concept of statuses, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive or sequential, replace the idea of stages. Statuses better reflect observed human behavior and are more open to multicultural application, thus facilitating retirement research and clinical practice. The retirement statuses proposed here, which can exist in any combination or sequence, are retrenchment, exploration, try-out, involvement, reconsideration, and exiting (forming the acronym RETIRE).

  9. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  10. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments David F. Burrelli Specialist in Military Manpower Policy Barbara Salazar Torreon...00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Recent Developments Congressional Research Service Summary The military retirement system is a noncontributory, defined benefit system that has

  11. Financial Literacy and Retirement Savings in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The German pension reforms in 2001 and 2004 increased the importance of private supplemental savings for retirement. Calculating the appropriate retirement income needed and choosing the right product postulates some degree of financial knowledge, also referred to as financial literacy. This paper investigates the relationship between financial literacy and private retirement savings. Germans seem to have a good grasp of basic financial concepts. However, individuals with low education face s...

  12. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    a choice between two options (High-Three or Career Status Bonus/Redux) based on career expectations and the individual’s financial situation. Reserve...Military retirees, families , and veterans’ service organizations closely monitor potential future changes to the retirement system. When considering...facilities and programs. The active component retirement system provides a choice between two retirement options based on career expectations and

  13. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    active forces.  To provide economic security for former members of the armed forces during their old age. The active component retirement system...of strong economic performance. Table 1. DOD Retired Military Personnel, Survivors, and Program Costs, FY2005-FY2015 FY Retired Pay Recipients...30 The actual index used to adjust COLA is the CPI-W; the index for urban wage earners and clerical

  14. Early Retirement from Colleges and Universities: Considerations under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Larry E.

    1980-01-01

    Important considerations for institutions wanting to establish supplementary early retirement benefits to encourage the practice are outlined. Regulations concerning pension plans, tax-sheltered annuities, and deferred compensation are reviewed. Individually negotiated early retirement supplements are not recommended. (MSE)

  15. Retirement Planning Among Hispanics: In God's Hands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Luisa R; Aguila, Emma; Gongora, Arturo; Duru, O Kenrik

    2016-12-15

    We conducted a qualitative study on retirement preparedness among middle-aged and older low-income Hispanics in Los Angeles. Data were derived from four focus groups conducted in the greater Los Angeles area. Findings demonstrate how behavioral and cultural factors-family experiences, religiosity, and denial of retirement-explain the lack of savings and preparedness for retirement. Findings also indicate that the majority of participants want to be economically independent and to keep working until they are unable to do so. Participants helped their parents financially but did not feel comfortable asking their own children for help. Instead, participants placed their survival in retirement "in God's hands."

  16. Career's End: A Survey of Faculty Retirement Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed changes in retirement policies for tenured faculty at a large national sample of colleges and universities. Found variations in the characteristics of regular retirement programs, in the existence and nature of retirement-incentive and phased-retirement programs, in institutional policies relating to retired faculty, and in institutions'…

  17. Early Retirement. A New Issue in Higher Education: The Financial Consequences of Early Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Hans H.; Acton, Mary Ann

    This essay attempts to do the following: first, offer a definition of early retirement in order to establish boundaries for the discussion. Second, sketch some of the background and reasons why early retirement may be desirable; also it suggests why early retirement might not always be a constructive practice. Then the essay turns to the main…

  18. Measuring Years of Inactivity, Years in Retirement, Time to Retirement, and Age at Retirement Within the Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKOOG, GARY R.; CIECKA, JAMES E.

    2010-01-01

    Retirement-related concepts are treated as random variables within Markov process models that capture multiple labor force entries and exits. The expected number of years spent outside of the labor force, expected years in retirement, and expected age at retirement are computed—all of which are of immense policy interest but have been heretofore reported with less precisely measured proxies. Expected age at retirement varies directly with a person’s age; but even younger people can expect to retire at ages substantially older than those commonly associated with retirement, such as age 60, 62, or 65. Between 1970 and 2003, men allocated most of their increase in life expectancy to increased time in retirement, but women allocated most of their increased life expectancy to labor force activity. Although people can exit and reenter the labor force at older ages, most 65-year-old men who are active in the labor force will not reenter after they eventually exit. At age 65, the probability that those who are inactive will reenter the labor force at some future time is .38 for men and .27 for women. Life expectancy at exact ages is decomposed into the sum of the expected time spent active and inactive in the labor force, and also as the sum of the expected time to labor force separation and time in retirement. PMID:20879680

  19. PREPARATION FOR RETIREMENT - AVS SEMINAR

    CERN Multimedia

    Social Service

    2001-01-01

    The 500 or so participants in the fifth Preparation for Retirement seminar held at the end of March were unfortunately deprived of the planned session on the AVS due to the unavailability of the Director of the Caisse Cantonale Genevoise de Compensation (CCGC). We have since had formal confirmation that because of an extra workload due to important changes in the Swiss tax and social legislation and the implementation this summer of the maternity insurance in Geneva, the CCGC has suspended its participation in preparation for retirement seminars in the international organisations for the time being. Conscious of the necessity of offering a session dedicated to the AVS, it is with pleasure that we can inform you that one of our legal advisers, Mr Lorenz Stampfli, has accepted to lead this session. In order to allow for adequate preparation we have reserved the following date: Wednesday 26 September from 14.00 to 16.00 in the Main Amphitheatre The session will be open to all people already registered and any o...

  20. Planning for Retirement with a Tax-Sheltered Mutual Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Edward J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Greater attention has been focused on the role that employer-sponsored retirement plans and individual savings must play in ensuring retirement income security. Alternative tax retirement planning opportunities currently available to college personnel are explored. (MLW)

  1. The evolution of retirement: results of the 1999 Retirement Confidence Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostuw, P; Pierron, B; Yakoboski, P

    1999-12-01

    The ninth annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) shows continued evidence of progress in the drive for retirement income security for American workers. However, there are still hurdles to overcome. The RCS tracks Americans' retirement planning and saving behavior and their confidence regarding various aspects of their retirement. It also categorizes workers and retirees into distinct groups based on their individual views on retirement, retirement planning, and saving. The retirement envisioned by today's workers looks different in many respects from that now experienced by current retirees. Today's workers expect to work longer than current retirees actually worked before retiring--and many say they plan to work for pay after they retire. Twenty-four percent of workers reported that they are very confident they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement, and 45 percent reported that they are somewhat confident. However, there are indications that many may be falsely confident. The good news is that 70 percent of Americans are saving for retirement, and a growing percentage (49 percent) are going further and determining how much they need to save to fund their retirement. The bad news is that 30 percent of Americans have not begun to save for their retirement, and 51 percent have never tried to determine how much they need to save. Employers play a major role in ensuring adequate retirement preparation. Forty percent of all workers said they expect that money provided by their employer will be a major source of retirement income. Forty-six percent expect the money they put into a retirement plan at work to be a major source of income. The availability of a retirement plan at work is credited by 48 percent of savers as motivation to save. While worker education is a point of emphasis among both employers and policymakers, more remains to be done. For example, 59 percent of workers expect to be eligible for full Social Security benefits sooner than

  2. Retirement Plan Lawsuits: Preparing for the Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morahan, John; Turner, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Currently, higher education is being roiled by class-action lawsuits filed against high-profile institutions, including MIT, Yale and New York University, over management of their retirement plans. As the lawyers are deployed and the billable hours accrue, it is timely to examine how those who have responsibility for retirement plan…

  3. Mid-Career Change and Early Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carl V.

    1978-01-01

    An NSF study suggests that important qualitative changes in the faculty may be obtained through increased attention to mid-career change and early retirement programs. Interest in career options, early retirement alternatives, evaluation criteria, mid-career change alternatives, internship, fellowship programs, and retraining programs are…

  4. Subjective Well-Being Around Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abolhassani, Marzieh; Alessie, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of both retirement and unemployment on life satisfaction, using subjective satisfaction indicators from the German Socio-Economic Panel. Moreover, we analyze how accurate individuals anticipate changes in satisfaction around retirement, as well as the correlation betwee

  5. Leisure and the Retired Professor: Occupation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lorraine; Kolarik, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the leisure activities of retired professors, whose activity patterns in retirement may be different from those of other occupational groups because of their lifetime commitment to work. This interview study uses both quantitative and qualitative data to investigate: (a) the leisure and professional activities of…

  6. Retirement Policy. Overview. ERIC Digest No. 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkfield, Patricia Worthy

    While the Federal Government has been involved in the care of the elderly since the depression, a comprehensive and unified national retirement policy has never been established. Federal programs for the aged have avoided cutbacks, but adaptations in present retirement policy are required to meet the needs of young and old alike. Although public…

  7. Caregiving intensity and retirement status in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Josephine C; Laporte, Audrey; Van Houtven, Courtney H; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-02-01

    A number of OECD countries have implemented policies encouraging longer labour force participation in tandem with policies encouraging informal care provision in the community. To better understand how these policies may affect the available pool of caregivers and labour force participants, we need more evidence about how informal caregiving is related to retirement status and timing. We assessed the association between caregiving intensity and retirement status for individuals aged 55 to 69 using the Canadian 2007 General Social Survey, a cross-sectional survey with 23,404 individuals. We used multinomial logistic regressions to determine whether providing different intensities of informal care (i.e. hours of weekly care) was significantly associated with the likelihood that an individual was fully retired, had retired and returned to work, had never retired and was working part-time or full-time, or was a labour market non-participant. We found that higher intensity caregiving was associated with being fully retired (relative to working full-time) for men and women (relative risk ratios, 2.93 and 2.04, respectively). For women, high intensity caregiving was also associated with working part-time (1.84) and being a labour force non-participant (1.99). Male and female high intensity caregivers were more likely to be retired before age 65. Our results highlight the importance of measuring caregiving intensity and multiple paths to retirement, which are often overlooked in the caregiving and retirement literature. They also indicate that a policy context encouraging both later retirement and more informal care may not be reasonable without flexible work arrangement options.

  8. Social support, early retirement, and a retirement preference: a study of 10,489 Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elovainio, Marko; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Ojanlatva, Ansa; Korkeila, Katariina; Suominen, Sakari; Helenius, Hans; Koskenvuo, Markku

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine associations of social support with early retirement and reported retirement preference. Logistic regression analyses of early retirement (retired before the age of 55) were based on a cohort of 10,489 respondents (5960 female, 4529 male) aged 40-55 years. Analyses of retirement preference (planning of early retirement) were based on a sub-cohort of 7759 full-time employees (4233 female, 3526 male). The measures for social support were the social network size (number of close personal relationships) and social network heterogeneity (number of different roles as sources of social support). Among women, early retirement was associated with small social networks (OR 5.1, 95% CI = 2.8-9.2) and low social network heterogeneity (OR 9.1, 95% CI = 3.2-25.9). Among men, the corresponding associations were somewhat smaller (1.5; 0.9-2.6 and 8.0; 1.8-35.7, respectively). Adjustments for age, occupational training, and spouse at home did not considerably affect these associations. Among men, the association between social network heterogeneity and early retirement was not statistically significant after additional adjustments had been made for marital status and perceived health status. The characteristics of the social network were not associated with a retirement preference among employed men. Among women, the lack of social relations was associated with low retirement preference. Our findings suggested that social support is not independently associated with a retirement preference among men. Socially isolated women prefer retirement less often than other women do. Being retired before the age of 55 years may be predicted by limited social support or it may restrain one's possibilities to establish and maintain social relationships.

  9. RETIREMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN SENIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalia Alpízar Jiménez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in retirement is on the increase, especially given the rapid demographic changes and increasing life expectancy. Retirement is a process that requires a comprehensive approach and gerontological intervention. Since it is associated with old age it often implies a threat, particularly for those who have made work their source of identity. The impact of the transition from an active stage to a less active period may trigger some conditions that may be detrimental to the individual´s physical and emotional health. This happens because retirees have not undergone the appropriate retirement preparation and adaptation processes. Adaptation is therefore essential for retirement to be pleasant and for the retiree to enjoy a higher quality of life. Consequently, it is pertinent that all entities have programs aimed at providing proper orientation for the retirement process. In particular, the National University of Costa Rica has not implemented proper guidelines to address the retirees´ situation. Although actions have been taken on some occasions, they have not been followed up on. Within this context, it makes sense to have a retirement adaptation program designed to include gerontological aspects in the National University retirement process. From a holistic point of view, intervention contributes to a better acceptance of old age and its accompanying transitions, which are characterized by a series of losses, mainly including the loss of the employment role and status.

  10. Early retirement and mortality in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühntopf, Stephan; Tivig, Thusnelda

    2012-02-01

    Differences in mortality by retirement age have an important impact on the financing of pension insurance, yet no clear-cut results for Germany exist so far. We calculate mortality rates by retirement age from microdata on all German old-age pensioners and 1.84 million deceases. The life expectancies and survival probabilities at age 65 are estimated for population subgroups according to creditable periods because of disease and pension income. Early-retired men who reach the age of 65 years live significantly longer the later early retirement occurs; the life expectancy at age 65 ranges from 13 to 17.8 years. For each retirement age, mortality of men is higher the more periods of disease are credited in the pension insurance system. For a given length of credited periods of disease, mortality of early retirees decreases with the retirement age. 'Healthy worker selection effects' operating in the labour market may contribute to these results. The 'work longer, live longer'-result is found for each pension income quintile, which resolves the J-curve pattern found in the literature. The mortality of female old-age pensioners varies little with retirement age.

  11. Ageing, government budgets, retirement, and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    changes of taxes, government spending components and the retirement age in politico-economic equilibrium. Growth is driven by capital accumulation and productivity increases fueled by public investment. The closed-form solutions of the model predict taxation and the retirement age in OECD economies...... to increase in response to demographic ageing and per-capita growth to accelerate. If the retirement age were held constant, the growth rate in politico-economic equilibrium would essentially remain unchanged, due to a surge of social security transfers and crowding out of public investment....

  12. Attitudes toward Retirement and Preretirement Education among Nigerian Bank Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle A.; Bamiwuye, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Retirement is viewed as a passage that can result in psychological, physiological, and economic problems among some retirees. Adequate preparation for retirement through preretirement education, as practiced in the Western-European societies, has been found to ease transition into retirement and adjustment in retirement. Preretirement education is…

  13. "Mental retirement?" Trajectories of work engagement preceding retirement among older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Leijten, Fenna Rm; Hoekstra, Trynke; Geuskens, Goedele A; Burdorf, Alex; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Before actual retirement, employees may already distance themselves from work, which could be referred to as "mental retirement". However, trajectories of work motivation, ie, work engagement, have not been studied yet. The present study aimed to (i) identify different trajectories of work engagement among older workers approaching the retirement age, and (ii) examine their associations with actual retirement. Methods In total 3171 employees aged 55-62 years, who participated in the Dutch Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation were included in this study. Participants completed questionnaires in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Latent class growth mixture modeling was performed to identify groups of employees with similar three-year trajectories in work engagement. Logistic regression analyses were performed to study whether trajectory membership was associated with retirement. Results Of the 3171 employees, 16.2% made a transition from work to (early) retirement (N=513). Four trajectories of work engagement were identified: steady high (76.3%), steady low (12.7%), decreasing (6.2%), and increasing (4.8%). A steady low work engagement trajectory was associated with retirement [odds ratio (OR) 1.46], compared to a steady high work engagement trajectory. Although not statistically significant, an increasing work engagement trajectory seemed to be associated with retirement as well (OR 1.60). Conclusions This study did not support the concept of mental retirement before actual retirement, ie, a decrease in work engagement among those facing retirement. However, as one in eight employees did experience steady low work engagement in the years before retirement, interventions promoting work motivation are recommended to support the employability of these employees.

  14. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 9 November 2015 and approval by the Director-General, please note that:   the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2016 until 31 March 2017;   the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2016 until 31 December 2016. Further information is available from the following sites: - https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/progressive-retirement-programme-prp - https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/part-time-work-pre-retirement-measure-ptp Human Resources Department Tel.: 79257 / 73903

  15. Retirement responses to social security changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohmann, S F; Clark, R L

    1989-11-01

    Workers often retire at an age later than the age at which they accept Social Security benefits. This study employed a life-cycle model of individual utility to examine the effects of Social Security provisions on the timing of benefit acceptance and retirement. The behavioral responses of older workers are estimated with a two-equation logit model using data from the Retirement History Study. The results indicate that the legislated increase in the age of eligibility for full Social Security benefits beginning in the 21st century will have relatively small effects on the ages of retirement and benefit acceptance. The mandated decrease in the earnings test tax also is predicted to have only a small effect on the behavior of older persons.

  16. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  17. Survey and Analysis of Early Retirement Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alton L.; Coolidge, Herbert E.

    1974-01-01

    Presents data from a study of member institutions of the Association of American Universities to determine the extent to which early retirement is being used in the nation's higher education institutions. (Editor/PG)

  18. An Argument for Early Retirement Incentive Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenen, Leonard B.; Ernest, Robert C.

    1982-01-01

    Early retirement incentive programs are discussed as a humanitarian way of reducing payroll costs and rewarding long-tenured employees. The incentives to be considered, program communication, and problems found in incentive programs are addressed. (Author/MLF)

  19. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  20. Optimizing the aging, retirement, and pensions dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Bertocchi, Marida; Ziemba, William T.

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward guide focused on life cycle investing-namely aging, retirement, and pensions Life cycle investing and the implications of aging, retirement, and pensions continues to grow in importance. With people living longer, the relative and absolute number of retirees is growing while the number of workers contributing to pension funds is declining. This reliable resource develops a detailed economic analysis-at the micro (individual) and macro (economy wide) levels-which addresses issues regarding the economics of an aging population. Topics touched upon include retirement and the associated health care funding of the aged as well as social security and the asset classes that are considered asset-liability choices over time. The probability of achieving adequate return patterns from various investment strategies and asset classes is reviewed Shares rich insights on the aging, retirement, and pensions dilemma An assessment of the resources the real economy will be able to commit to non-workers is prov...

  1. Does retirement reduce the risk of mental disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kasper; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Madsen, Ida E.H.;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The effect of retirement on mental health is not well understood. We examined the prevalence of hospital treatment for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication before, during and after retirement in a Danish population sample. We hypothesised that retirement was followed...... in the years around retirement, but continued after retirement (retirement +2 years). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study did not confirm the hypothesis that retirement is beneficial for mental health measured by hospitalisation with depression and treatment with antidepressants. Although the temporary levelling...

  2. Micro modeling of retirement : decisions in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Börsch-Supan, Axel; Kohnz, Simone; Schnabel, Reinhold

    2002-01-01

    Early retirement in Germany is very costly and amplifies the burden which the German public pension system has to carry due to population aging. This paper shows that the German pension system provides strong incentives to retire early. The paper provides relatively robust econometric evidence for the strength of incentive effects on old age labor supply, using several specifications of incentive variables. The econometric estimates are used to simulate the individual responses to policy chan...

  3. Economic difficulties and subsequent disability retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Mauramo, Elina; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2015-03-01

    This study examined whether economic difficulties are associated with subsequent disability retirement while controlling for covariates. Survey data among middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki in 2000-2002 were linked with the Finnish Centre for Pensions register data on all-cause disability retirement among women (n=4816) and men (n=1354) until the end of 2010. Additionally, disability retirement due to musculoskeletal diseases and mental disorders (ICD-10) was examined among women. Frequency in difficulties paying pills and buying food and clothes, and covariates (occupational class, income, housing tenure, and work- and health-related covariates) were self-reported at baseline. Hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Frequent economic difficulties were associated with all-cause disability retirement after adjusting for age among both women (HR=2.11; 95% CI 1.63-2.73) and men (HR=2.69; 95% CI 1.65-4.41). Adjustment for covariates somewhat attenuated the associations, but they remained. Economic difficulties were also associated with disability retirement due to both mental disorders (HR=3.29; 95% CI 1.98-5.46) and musculoskeletal diseases (HR=1.85; 95% CI 1.24-2.75) among women. Adjustments made a minor contribution to the risk of disability retirement due to mental disorders, whereas the risk of disability retirement due to musculoskeletal diseases reduced after considering socioeconomic circumstances. Conclusions: economic difficulties are independently associated with disability retirement. Thus, they should be considered in attempts to tackle early exit from the labour market due to disability. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  4. Preparation à la retraite - Preparing for retirement

    CERN Document Server

    WHO/OMS Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Retirement implies an important change from a working environment to a new lifestyle. Every individual copes with this transition in his own way. In this video, registered already a few years ago, Dr. Sartorius from WHO addresses some of his colleagues close to retirement and explains what situations they can expect to encounter. We make this video available to CERN personnel to stimulate their own thinking on the subject.

  5. The Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission’s Blended Retirement Plan: Implications for Marine Corps Force Management Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Distribution Unlimited The Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission’s Blended Retirement Plan ...Implications for Marine Corps Force Management Objectives James Grefer, Ann Parcell, Robert P. Trost, Jared Huff, William Komiss, Robert Shuford, Omer...retirement system (BRS) on various U.S. Marine Corps force management objectives (FMOs). We estimated the effect of the retirement system changes on active

  6. RETIRED MATCHES AMONG MALE PROFESSIONAL TENNIS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Breznik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the effect of characteristics of various games and players on the proportion of retired tennis matches in the Open Era of tennis. The data included over 420,000 matches played among 17,553 tennis players in the period from 1968 to the end of 2010. The influence of the surface type was clearly confirmed, with the proportion of retired matches being higher on hard and clay courts compared to grass and carpet surfaces. Similarly, more retired matches were observed in outdoor venues than in indoor ones. The impact of other variables, tournament types, rounds at which the game was played and both players' ranks, is more ambiguous. Our interpretation of the obtained results is presented in the paper. Network analytic methods were applied to extract players with the most retired matches in their careers. Eventually, we defined a group of top tennis players and gave a more precise insight into retired matches in that group. Correspondence analysis was used to visually display the two-mode network of top players and the proportion of retired matches by surface type

  7. [The meaning of work during early retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrowicz, P; Fasang, A; Schömann, K; Staudinger, U M

    2010-10-01

    Since the mid-1990s, many German companies have used the part-time retirement scheme (Altersteilzeit) as an opportunity to release older workers. This was often consistent with the interests of the workers themselves. This paper explores whether workers who participate in this early retirement scheme would like to continue to work. A survey of all the workers in one company who participated in the part-time retirement scheme revealed that those already retired would more often like to continue working than employees who are still awaiting retirement. To a greater extent, early retirees would also like to return to work with shorter working hours or for a time-limited project. Results are explained with the affective forecasting bias that is based on the psychological decision theory and economic utility theory - the future utility of an action cannot be anticipated. The "reflective thinking" approach moreover invites the conclusion that the diverging interest of the two groups in continued employment may be due to the different stage of practical knowledge about the situation in (pre-)retirement.

  8. Is pre-retirement planning always good? An exploratory study of retirement adjustment among Hong Kong Chinese retirees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Dannii Y

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of four types of pre-retirement planning activities (financial, health, social life, and psychological planning) on retirement adjustment were investigated in a sample of Chinese retirees residing in Hong Kong. This study consisted of two phases of data collection, pre-retirement and post-retirement phases. Pre-retirement planning behaviors and psychological health (including attitudes toward retirement, adjustment to retirement, anxiety toward retirement, psychological well-being (PWB), and psychological distress) six months before and after retirement were measured. The final sample consisted of 90 Hong Kong Chinese retirees. Compared with the pre-retirement phase, retirees exhibited more positive attitudes toward retirement and better adjustment after they had actually retired, whereas their level of anxiety and psychological distress remained low over time. Pre-retirement planning was found to be predictive of changes in psychological health, though its impact was not always positive depending on the type of planning activities. In particular, greater psychological planning was associated with positive attitudes toward retirement and better PWB, whereas more social life planning activities were associated with greater psychological distress. In addition to financial and health planning, psychological planning activities should also be prompted to facilitate a smooth adjustment to retirement.

  9. Functional health decline before and after retirement : A longitudinal analysis of the Health and Retirement Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, Sander K. R.; Bultmann, Ute; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study are to examine the pattern of pre- and post-retirement changes in functional health and to examine the degree to which socioeconomic position (SEP) modifies pre- and post-retirement changes in functional health. Method: This longitudinal study was conducted using

  10. Mental retirement? Trajectories of work engagement preceding retirement among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Leijten, F.R.M.; Hoekstra, T.; Geuskens, G.A.; Burdorf, L.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Before actual retirement, employees may already distance themselves from work, which could be referred to as "mental retirement". However, trajectories of work motivation, ie, work engagement, have not been studied yet. The present study aimed to (i) identify different trajectories of

  11. The long goodbye: Age, demographics, and flexibility in retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K. Foot

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The current literature on retirement decisions has given inadequate attention to the impacts of increasing life expectancy. This paper examines workforce aging and retirement within a framework that not only includes age, but also integrates increasing life expectancy into the discussion. Employee preference surveys regarding choice in retirement are supported by the demographic and by work-time compression arguments for retirement flexibility. We outlinearguments why partial-retirement policies would be a practical and timely transition strategy for organizations and societies in a world of increasing life expectancies and aging workforces,especially when facing the imminent retirement of the large post-war baby-boom generation.

  12. The long goodbye: Age, demographics, and flexibility in retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary A. Venne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature on retirement decisions has given inadequate attention to the impacts of increasing life expectancy. This paper examines workforce aging and retirement within a framework that not only includes age, but also integrates increasing life expectancy into the discussion. Employee preference surveys regarding choice in retirement are supported by the demographic and by work-time compression arguments for retirement flexibility. We outlinearguments why partial-retirement policies would be a practical and timely transition strategy for organizations and societies in a world of increasing life expectancies and aging workforces,especially when facing the imminent retirement of the large post-war baby-boom generation.

  13. 'All those things together made me retire': qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; de Wind, Astrid; Westerman, Marjan J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; van der Beek, Allard J; Geuskens, Goedele A

    2013-05-28

    Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60-64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement ('push factors'), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement ('pull factors') included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and psychosocial job characteristics on the one hand, and

  14. Psychosocial work environment and retirement age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Jensen, Per H.; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2016-01-01

    . We used Cox proportional hazard regression to analyze the rate of early retirement. Results The study included 16 psychosocial work environment factors. The following 10 psychosocial factors were significant predictors of early retirement in covariate adjusted analyses: Low job satisfaction, low......, quantitative demands, emotional demands, role conflicts, social community between colleagues, and trust between colleagues. Conclusion Older employees with high job satisfaction, influence, possibilities for development, positive management relations, and jobs with no age discrimination remained longer...... influence in job, low possibilities for development, low role clarity, perceived age discrimination, low recognition from management, low workplace justice, poor trust in management, poor leadership quality, and poor predictability. No significant association with early retirement was found for work pace...

  15. Ageing, government budgets, retirement, and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    changes of taxes, government spending components and the retirement age in politico-economic equilibrium. Growth is driven by capital accumulation and productivity increases fueled by public investment. The closed-form solutions of the model predict taxation and the retirement age in OECD economies......We analyze the short and long run effects of demographic ageing - increased longevity and reduced fertility - on per-capita growth. The OLG model captures direct effects, working through adjustments in the savings rate, labor supply, and capital deepening, and indirect effects, working through...... to increase in response to demographic ageing and per-capita growth to accelerate. If the retirement age were held constant, the growth rate in politico-economic equilibrium would essentially remain unchanged, due to a surge of social security transfers and crowding out of public investment....

  16. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 27 November 2014 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2015 until 31 March 2016; the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2015 until 31 December 2015. Further information is available at the following sites: https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/node/447 https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/node/484 Human Resources Department Tel. 79257 / 73903

  17. Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie R. Agnew

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Financial literacy and numeracy are closely tied. Furthermore, financial literacy has been shown to relate to important financial behaviors. This study examines the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning using a measure that includes questions requiring numeracy. We implement a customized survey to a representative sample of 1,024 Australians. Overall, we find aggregate levels of financial literacy similar to comparable countries with the young, least educated, those not employed, and those not in the labor force most at risk. Our financial literacy measure is positively related to retirement planning in our sample.

  18. When do people want to retire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavernier, Wouter De; Roots, Ave

    2015-01-01

    control found in Eastern Europe. Moreover, the results suggest that Karasek’s job demand/control model fits better in Western than Eastern European countries. Another explanation is found at the country level, where the legal retirement age accounts for a major part of the gap in preferred retirement ages...... to explain this gap in terms of differences in working conditions and state-level legal conditions. Using the 2010 European Social Survey data on employed individuals aged 50-70 in 24 countries enriched with country-level information, we find that part of the explanation is found in the lower levels of job...

  19. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 2 December 2011 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2012 until 31 March 2013; and the Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2012 until 31 December 2012. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp.asp Tel.  73903 Human Resources Department

  20. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Department

    2011-01-01

    Following recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2011 until 31 March 2012; and the Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2011 until 31 December 2011. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp.asp Tel. 73903

  1. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 4 December 2012 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2013 until 31 March 2014; and the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2013 until 31 December 2013.   Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp_fr.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp_fr.asp   Human Resources Department Tel. 73903

  2. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 5 December 2013 and approval by the Director-General, please note that:   the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2014 until 31 March 2015; the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2014 until 31 December 2014. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp_fr.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp_fr.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 79257/ 73903

  3. Early Retirement Incentives and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D; Lovenheim, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    Early retirement incentives (ERIs) are increasingly prevalent in education as districts seek to close budget gaps by replacing expensive experienced teachers with lower-cost newer teachers. Combined with the aging of the teacher workforce, these ERIs are likely to change the composition of teachers dramatically in the coming years. We use exogenous variation from an ERI program in Illinois in the mid-1990s to provide the first evidence in the literature of the effects of large-scale teacher retirements on student achievement. We find the program did not reduce test scores; likely, it increased them, with positive effects most pronounced in lower-SES schools.

  4. The Importance of Resilience for Well-Being in Retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pimentel Nalin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the elderly population has prompted research on retirement. This study investigated the importance of resilience, economic satisfaction, the length of retirement, and planning to well-being during retirement of 270 participants. The majority of this sample were men (64%, and the mean age was 65 years (SD = 5.7. The participants were retired members of 10 public and private organizations in Rio de Janeiro. Factor analysis and hierarchical regression were performed. The results showed that determined resilience (mastery, adaptability, confidence and perseverance and socioeconomic satisfaction were the main predictors of well-being in retirement and explained 28% of this model. The findings suggest that well-being in retirement is closely related to socioeconomic satisfaction and determined resilience. Additional research should address the importance of resilience for the well-being of retirees who are or not members of retirement associations. Resilience attitudes should be promoted in Retirement Education Programs.

  5. Innovative Plans to Encourage Senior Faculty to Take Early Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreadbury, Connie

    1984-01-01

    Provides a review of some of the innovative programs university systems are using to encourage faculty to take early retirement, including bridge benefits, bonus plans, guaranteed part-time employment, rehearsal retirement, and 30-and-out plans. (JAC)

  6. 29 CFR 1625.9 - Prohibition of involuntary retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other provision of the Act makes it unlawful for a plan to permit individuals to elect early retirement at a specified age at their own option. Nor is it unlawful for a plan to require early retirement...

  7. Effects of three types of retirement preparation program: A qualitative study of civil servants in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leandro-França, C.; van Solinge, H.; Henkens, K.; Giardini Murta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of retirement planning programs are relatively scarce. Retirement preparation and planning programs may assist individuals to smooth the transition to retirement and subsequent adjustment. This qualitative study examines the effects of three retirement preparation progra

  8. Activities in Retirement: Individual Experience of Silver Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Maxin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of demographic change is a longer average remaining lifetime after retirement. Many people, however, remain able and willing to continue work after reaching the statutory retirement age. Given the predicted shortage of skilled workers in the future, post-retirement activities have the potential to contribute to both organisations and society. This article elaborates the prerequisites for productivity in retirement age and the changed nature of retirement at present.It also quantifies the extent to which activities are continued at retirement age. Paid employment still occurs beyond the applicable retirement age, whereby with increasing age, self-employed persons and assistant family members make up the lion’s share of the statistics. An empirical study shows the concrete situation of active retirees and the prerequisites for post-retirement activities. At the explorative level, individual experiences of the transition into retirement, the reasons for and the framework of post-retirement activities, motivational factors in job design, and physical and intellectual demands before and after retirement are characterised. The qualitative data indicate that retirement entails changes towards more flexible structures in everyday life. Decisive reasons for taking up post-retirement activities are the desire to help, pass on knowledge or remain active; personal development and contact with others; and gaining appreciation and recognition. Flexible job design and freedom to make decisions constitute major elements in shaping post-retirement working activities. Offering autonomy, skill variety, and task significance is important for the design of post-retirement activities. The paper closes with identifying relevant research fields and the concrete need to take action at individual,  organisational, and societal levels. All in all, the transition from working life to retirement should be made flexible enough to do greater justice to the

  9. "A One-Sector Neoclassical Growth Model with Endogenous Retirement"

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuyama, Kiminori

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends Diamond's OG model by allowing the agents to make the retirement decision. Earning a higher wage income when young not only enables the agents to save more. It also induces more agents to retire early and gives an additional incentive to save more for retirement. This leads to a higher capitallabor ratio in the following period, and hence the next generation of agents earns a higher wage income when young. Due to this positive feedback mechanism, endogenous retirement magni...

  10. Post Retirement: Is There Life after Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Lupo, Anita

    1992-01-01

    Issues concerning college faculty/staff retirement and coping with changes in lifestyle are discussed, including financial planning, psychological adjustment, relocating vs. maintaining current housing, planning for travel, health care, health and life insurance needs, maintenance of an acceptable standard of living, protecting resources against…

  11. Training access, reciprocity, and expected retirement age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montizaan, R.M.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether employers can induce employees to postpone retirement by offering access to training courses that maintain job proficiency. We use unique, matched employer-employee surveys for the Dutch public sector, which include detailed information on a wide range of HR practices

  12. Diversification: Midland/Odessa Health & Retirement Endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, P. K.

    In reaction to the economic risks associated with an over reliance on oil and gas exports, residents of the Midland/Odessa area of Texas began seeking diversification options for the local economy and, in 1986, formed the Midland/Odessa Health and Retirement Endeavor (MOHRE). This non-profit corporation was formed to examine the feasibility of…

  13. Retirement Financial Planning Among Professional Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilty, Keith M.; Behling, John H.

    1986-01-01

    Examined extent and patterns of financial planning among a range of professionals. Found that respondents (N=457) placed their primary emphasis on pensions (including Social Security) and continued work-related income, although four types of pre-retirement financial planning were identified. The most consistent predictor of the extent of planning…

  14. EXTENSION OF THE PROGRESSIVE RETIREMENT PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with the provisions agreed by the Finance Committee and Council in March and June 2000, respectively, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2001, for one year. Human Resources Division Tel. 72808/74128

  15. Health, Financial Incentives and Retirement in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Erdogan-Ciftci (Esen); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy); A. Lopez-Nicolas (Angel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe estimate the impact of health and financial incentives on the retirement transitions of older workers in Spain. Individual measures of pension wealth, peak and accrual values are constructed using labor market histories and health shocks are derived as changes in a composite health st

  16. On Expectations, Realizations and Partial Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrogiacomo, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates whether many people fear an unexpectedshock in their financial situation around retirement and whether therelated expectations and realizations match each other. We use theDutch Social Economic Panel survey data, where expectations aboutthe next year's financial situation are

  17. Mapping the Minds of Retirement Planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Hershey; K. Henkens; H.P. van Dalen (Hendrik)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis study explored the psychological mechanisms that underlie the retirement planning and saving tendencies of Dutch and American workers. Participants were 988 Dutch and 429 Americans, 25-64 years of age. Analyses were designed to: (a) examine the extent to which structural variables w

  18. 77 FR 66149 - Retirement of FASTforward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... FASTforward Technology AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service will revise... terminate the use of FASTforward TM technology as a Move Update option for commercial First-Class Mail... proposed rule in the Federal Register (77 FR 53830) to retire FASTforward technology. We received no formal...

  19. Dr. S. J. van Ooststroom retired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1971-01-01

    In January 1971 Dr. Simon Jan van Ooststroom, senior botanist of the Rijksherbarium, retired on reaching the age of 65, having been on the staff since November 1934. Though this event will to a certain extent change, but not interrupt, his work, it is nevertheless worth commemorating, as he has so

  20. Does Retiree Health Insurance Encourage Early Retirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyce, Steven; Schieber, Sylvester J; Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj; Wise, David A

    2013-08-01

    The strong link between health insurance and employment in the United States may cause workers to delay retirement until they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. However, some employers extend health insurance benefits to their retirees, and individuals who are eligible for such retiree health benefits need not wait until age 65 to retire with group health coverage. We investigate the impact of retiree health insurance on early retirement using employee-level data from 54 diverse firms that are clients of Towers Watson, a leading benefits consulting firm. We find that retiree health coverage has its strongest effects at ages 62 through 64. Coverage that includes an employer contribution is associated with a 6.3 percentage point (36.2 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 62, a 7.7 percentage point (48.8 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 63, and a 5.5 percentage point (38.0 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 64. Conditional on working at age 57, such coverage reduces the expected retirement age by almost three months and reduces the total number of person-years worked between ages 58 and 64 by 5.6 percent.

  1. The Cornell Staff Retirement Incentive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Kenneth T.; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Hallock, Kevin F.; Seeber, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate potential determinants of enrollment in an early retirement incentive program for non-tenure-track employees at a large university. Using administrative records on the eligible, population of employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements, historical employee count and layoff data by budget units, and public information on…

  2. Diversification: Midland/Odessa Health & Retirement Endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, P. K.

    In reaction to the economic risks associated with an over reliance on oil and gas exports, residents of the Midland/Odessa area of Texas began seeking diversification options for the local economy and, in 1986, formed the Midland/Odessa Health and Retirement Endeavor (MOHRE). This non-profit corporation was formed to examine the feasibility of…

  3. Saving Behavior and Portfolio Choice After Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, Raun; Alessie, Rob; Kalwij, Adriaan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on saving behavior and portfolio choice after retirement and provides a descriptive analysis of this behavior by Dutch elderly households. Studying saving behavior in the Netherlands is informative because of the very different institutional background compared to t

  4. Dr. Bakhuizen van den Brink retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1976-01-01

    On 11 September 1976 dr. Reinier Cornelis Bakhuizen van den Brink will reach the age of 65 and so he must retire from his position as a senior botanist at the Rijksherbarium. He has worked in our institute since December 1943, after having obtained his doctor’s degree in Utrecht. At the Rijksherbari

  5. Retirement and cognitive development in the Netherlands: Are the retired really inactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grip, Andries; Dupuy, Arnaud; Jolles, Jelle; van Boxtel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This paper uses longitudinal data to analyze the relation between retirement and cognitive development in the Netherlands. Controlling for individual fixed effects and lagged cognition, we find that retirees face lower declines in their cognitive flexibility than those who remain employed, which appears to be persistent 6 years after retirement. However, the information processing speed of low-educated retirees declines faster. The magnitude of both changes in cognition is such that retirees appear 5-6 years younger in terms of cognitive flexibility, and older in terms of information processing speed. We show that these relationships between retirement and cognitive development cannot be explained by (1) feeling relieved from routine work, (2) changes in mood, (3) changes in lifestyle, and (4) changes in blood pressure. The decline in information processing speed after retirement particularly holds for the low educated. This could increase the social costs of an aging society.

  6. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  7. The Information Seeking and Use Behaviors of Retired Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the information seeking and use behaviors of a group of US retired or near-retirement investors from everyday life information seeking and serious leisure perspectives. Although primarily qualitative, it also collects and analyzes quantitative data to describe retired investors' information preferences and use.…

  8. Partial Retirement and Pension Policy in Industrialized Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Denis; Turner, John

    2000-01-01

    Examines the advantages and disadvantages of partial retirement--the transitional period between full-time employment and complete retirement--including easing the transition, labor market effects, and financial implications for social security systems and employers. Reviews partial retirement policies in eight countries and concludes that there…

  9. Leisure Patterns among Retired Workers: Spillover or Compensatory Trends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Yael; Harpaz, Itzhak

    1982-01-01

    Compared leisure behavior patterns after retirement with those of preretirement. Examined data within the context of the spillover and compensatory hypotheses, with retirement representing a nonwork sphere. Findings revealed a spillover effect, characterized by a high degree of passive, solitary leisure behavior both before and after retirement.…

  10. The Information Seeking and Use Behaviors of Retired Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the information seeking and use behaviors of a group of US retired or near-retirement investors from everyday life information seeking and serious leisure perspectives. Although primarily qualitative, it also collects and analyzes quantitative data to describe retired investors' information preferences and use.…

  11. 78 FR 11551 - Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ..., 612, 619, 620, and 630 RIN 3052-AC41 Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits AGENCY... final rule regarding ``Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits,'' that require a non... regarding ``Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits,'' that require a non-binding, advisory...

  12. Retirement in Illinois Community Colleges, 1985-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David L.

    This analysis of retirement planning and early retirement incentive plans in Illinois community colleges was drawn from a study of early retirement plans at each of the state's 39 community colleges, and a follow-up survey to clarify information in the documents and determine colleges' plans for the future. After introductory comments on the issue…

  13. Joint Retirement of Couples : Evidence from a Natural Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, Hans; Hochguertel, Stefan; Zweerink, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate and explain the impact of early retirement of husbands on their wives’ probability to retire within one year, using administrative micro panel data that cover the whole Dutch population. We employ an instrumental variable approach in which the retirement choice of husbands is instrumente

  14. Retirement Financial Planning and the RN: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2015-10-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  15. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, E.M.M.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Flynn, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorpor

  16. A Longitudinal Study of Work After Retirement: Examining Predictors of Bridge Employment, Continued Career Employment, and Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Misty M; Beehr, Terry A; Lepisto, Lawrence R

    2016-09-01

    Older employees are increasingly accepting bridge employment, which occurs when older workers take employment for pay after they retire from their main career. This study examined predictors of workers' decisions to engage in bridge employment versus full retirement and career employment. A national sample of 482 older people in the United States was surveyed regarding various work-related and nonwork related predictors of retirement decisions, and their retirement status was measured 5 years later. In bivariate analyses, both work-related variables (career goal achievement and experienced pressure to retire) and nonwork-related variables (psychological distress and traditional gender role orientation) predicted taking bridge employment, but in multinomial logistic regression, only nonwork variables had unique effects. Few predictors differentiated the bridge employed and fully retired groups. Nonwork variables were salient in making the decision to retire, and bridge employment may be conceptually more similar to full retirement than to career employment.

  17. Risk Adjusted Valuation of the Current Military Retirement and the CY2018 Retirement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    personal discount rate and career retention curves. The results of this analysis suggest that the blended retirement system is the best choice for...perspective based on generalized data that facilitates a baseline course of action and creates discussion for a very personal choice . 44 Financial...U.S. military’s choice to transition to the blended retirement system in 2018. All service members will be grandfathered into the current system but

  18. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Upon the proposal of the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 25 November 2002, the Director-General has approved the extension for one year of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2003, and of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for requested effective dates commencing not later than 1 January 2004. Human Resources Division Tel. 72808/74128

  19. The Influence of the Early Retirement Process on Satisfaction with Early Retirement and Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocnik, Kristina; Tordera, Nuria; Peiro, Jose Maria

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the influence of the early retirement process on adjustment to early retirement, taking into account the roles of individual characteristics and social context in this process. We proposed a systematic model integrating perceived ability to continue working, organizational pressures toward early retirement and group…

  20. What is your savings personality? The 1998 Retirement Confidence Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoboski, P; Ostuw, P; Hicks, J

    1998-08-01

    This Issue Brief presents the findings of the 1998 Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS). The survey tracks Americans' retirement planning and saving behavior and their confidence regarding various aspects of their retirement. It also categorizes workers and retirees into six distinct groups, based on their very different views on retirement, retirement planning, and saving. The six personality types identified in the RCS are Deniers (10 percent of the population), Strugglers (9 percent), Impulsives (20 percent), Cautious Savers (21 percent), Planners (23 percent), and Retiring Savers (17 percent). The survey shows that working Americans have become more focused on retirement; 45 percent have tried to determine how much they need to save before they retire, up from 32 percent in 1996. Americans' growing attention to their retirement has not increased their retirement income confidence. Since 1993, the portion of working Americans who are very confident that they will have enough money to live comfortably throughout retirement has consistently ranged from 20 percent to 25 percent. Sixty-three percent of Americans have begun to save for retirement. Fifty-five percent of those not saving for retirement say it is reasonably possible for them to save $20 per week (over $1,000 per year). In addition, 57 percent of workers who have begun to save say that it is reasonably possible for them to save an additional $20 per week. The findings demonstrate the continuing need for broad-based educational efforts designed to make retirement savings a priority for individuals. The good news is the evidence that education can have a real impact at the individual level. For the first time the 1998 RCS examined retirement planning, saving, and attitudes across ethnic groups (African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, Asian-Americans, and whites). African-Americans are the least confident that they will have enough money to live comfortably in retirement. African-Americans and Hispanic

  1. Early Retirement in the Day-Care Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the role of working conditions and health for elderly female day-care teachers’ decision to enter early retirement. Entry into retirement is analysed in a duration framework that allows for unobserved heterogeneity in the baseline hazard. Data are from a Danish longitudinal data...... the child-to-teacher ratio or the size of the institution and early retirement (ERP). However, working conditions measured by the social background of the children and the share of trained day-care teachers have a significant effect on the probability of early retirement. Finally, a poor health condition...... is associated with a higher propensity to enter early retirement....

  2. Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Retire Tool When Deciding Between High 36 Retirement and Blended TSP Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    and portfolio growth are inherently intertwined. Armstrong found a direct link in his research between portfolio volatility and the “survival of the... portfolio at any given time horizon” (Armstrong, 2005, p. 10). Given that the HIGH-36 retirement system has little to no expected volatility , and... volatility , pension 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 115 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS

  3. Retirement intentions of dentists in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Sue

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian dental workforce is ageing and current shortages have been predicted to worsen with the retirement of the growing contingent of older dentists. However, these predictions have been based on retirement trends of previous generations and little is known about the retirement intentions of today's older dentists. Methods The Dentist Retirement Intentions Survey was mailed to 768 NSW Australian Dental Association members aged over 50 and achieved a response rate of 20%. T-tests, ANOVAs and multivariate regression were used to analyse the data. Results On average, participants intend to retire at the age of 66, although they would prefer to do so earlier (p Conclusions The current generation of older dentists intends to retire later than their predecessors. Most wish to remain involved in dentistry in some capacity following retirement, and may assist in overcoming workforce shortages, either by practising part time or training dental students.

  4. Predictors of life satisfaction in retired physicians and spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero Austrom, Mary; Perkins, Anthony J; Damush, Teresa M; Hendrie, Hugh C

    2003-03-01

    With the current demographic changes, adjustment to retirement has become a major concern for physicians. Yet information on adjustment to retirement gathered from retired physicians is sparse. Information on physician spouses following retirement is currently not available. Therefore, we conducted a survey of a multi-disciplinary group of retired physicians and their spouses on adjustment to retirement. A mail survey was sent to 1834 alumni who graduated from medical school prior to 1965. Responses were received from 795 (43 %) physicians and 455 spouses. Of the physicians, 678 indicated that they were retired or semi-retired. Life satisfaction was measured on a 9-point Likert scale. Levels of life satisfaction were high for both physicians and spouses. Approximately 88 % of both groups reported being mostly satisfied or better with their lives. Factors associated with better life satisfaction for physicians included better health, optimism, feelings of financial security, participation in activities and hobbies and a good sexual relationship. For spouses, good health, having a husband willing to help with chores, quality of relationships including sexual relationship and attending theatre or sporting events were associated with higher levels of life satisfaction. Spouses who had never worked reported higher levels of life satisfaction than spouses who had worked and were now retired. For changes in life satisfaction since physician retirement, predictors for both physicians and spouses were similar to those for life satisfaction. However, for physicians, both younger age and more years in retirement were independently associated with improved life satisfaction. Issues regarding loss of role and methods and reasons for retirement influenced satisfaction in the early retirees. For spouses, major challenges involved coping with changes in the marital relationship. Physicians and their spouses reported high levels of life satisfaction. The factors predicting life

  5. Land Retirement as a Habitat Restoration Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P. N.; Wallender, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    Use of intensive irrigation in arid and semi-arid areas usually leads to gradual salination of the soil leading to crop yield decline. The salination problem is mitigated by applying irrigation in excess of crop requirements, which leaches the excess salt load to the groundwater. Insufficient natural or man made drainage to dispose off this saline recharge to the groundwater leads to a gradual rise in the water table and eventual encroachment upon the root zone. This may ultimately make the land unfit for any economically productive activity. The abandoned land may even lead to desertification with adverse environmental consequences. In drainage basins with no surface outflow (sometimes called closed basins), land retirement has been proposed as a management tool to address this problem. Land retirement essentially entails intentionally discontinuing irrigation of selected farmlands with the expectation that the shallow water table beneath those lands should drop and the root zone salinity level should decrease. In the San Joaquin Valley of California, intensive irrigation in conjunction with a shallow underlying layer of clay, known as the Corcoran clay layer and absence of a drainage system caused the root zone to become highly saline and the shallow water table to rise. Land retirement would remove from production those farmlands contributing the poorest quality subsurface drain water. Based on numerical models results, it was expected that with land retirement of substantial irrigated lands with poor drainage characteristics, beneath which lies shallow groundwater with high salt load, the shallow water table beneath those lands should drop. A part of the retired lands could also be used for wildlife habitat. A potential negative side of the land retirement option that has to be considered is that in certain enabling evapotranspiration, soil and water table conditions, water will be drawn upwards and evaporated, leaving a deposit of salts on the surface and in

  6. [Heart morphologic state in retired fighter pilots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X E; Chen, Z G; Long, L; Zhai, D S; Zhao, X J; Fang, R Y

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To study the heart morphology in the retired fighter pilots, and to provide clinical evidence for protection combined G-loads (+ Gz), heat, noise, hypoxic and vibration stress induced cardiac structural damage. Method. Parameters of heart morphology were studied using Doppler echocardiography in 40 retired fighter pilots with 40 veteran cadres as control. Result. LVDd, LVDs, LADs, LVEDV, LVPWs and LVM in pilot group were somewhat higher than those in control group (NS); while IVSs and LVMI in pilot group were slightly lower than those in control group (NS); LVESV, aortic valve area, internal diameter of the ring and sinus in pilot group were significantly higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Analysis of the results revealed no pathomorphologic damage of the heart. It suggest that all the variations can be regarded as adaptive changes due to the effects of the combined environmental factors experienced in long time flying.

  7. Failure analysis of retired steam generator tubings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, J. S.; Hwang, S. S. and others

    2005-04-15

    Degradation of steam generator leads to forced outage and extension of outage, which causes increase in repair cost, cost of purchasing replacement power and radiation exposure of workers. Steam generator tube rupture incident occurred in Uljin 4 in 2002, which made public sensitive to nuclear power plant. To keep nuclear energy as a main energy source, integrity of steam generator should be demonstrated. Quantitative relationship between ECT(eddy current test) signal and crack size is needed in assesment of integrity of steam generator in pressurized water reactor. However, it is not fully established for application in industry. Retired steam generator of Kori 1 has many kinds of crack such as circumferential and axial primary water stress corrosion crack and outer diameter stress corrosion crack(ODSCC). So, it can be used in qualifying and improving ECT technology and in condition monitoring assesment for crack detected in ISI(in service inspection). In addition, examination of pulled tube of Kori 1 retired steam generator will give information about effectiveness of non welded sleeving technology which was employed to repair defect tubes and remedial action which was applied to mitigate ODSCC. In this project, hardware such as semi hot lab. for pulled tube examination and modification transportation cask for pulled tube and software such as procedure of transportation of radioactive steam generator tube and non-destructive and destructive examination of pulled tube were established. Non-destructive and destructive examination of pulled tubes from Kori 1 retired steam generator were performed in semi hot lab. Remedial actions applied to Kori 1 retired steam generator, PWSCC trend and bulk water chemistry and crevice chemistry in Kori 1 were evaluated. Electrochemical decontamination technology for pulled tube was developed to reduce radiation exposure and enhance effectiveness of pulled tube examination. Multiparameter algorithm developed at ANL, USA was

  8. What causes EBRI retirement readiness ratings to vary: results from the 2014 Retirement Security Projection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2014-02-01

    RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY IMPROVED SLIGHTLY IN 2013: Due to the increase in financial market and housing values during 2013, the probability that Baby Boomers and Generation Xers would NOT run short of money in retirement increases between 0.5 and 1.6 percentage points, based on the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) Retirement Readiness Ratings (RRRs). ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION IN AN EMPLOYER-SPONSORED DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN REMAINS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS FOR RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY: RRR values double for Gen Xers in the lowest-income quartile when comparing those with 20 or more years of future eligibility with those with no years of future eligibility, while those in the middle income quartiles experience increases in RRR values by 27.1-30.3 percentage points. FUTURE SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS MAKE A HUGE DIFFERENCE FOR THE RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY OF SOME HOUSEHOLDS, ESPECIALLY GEN XERS IN THE LOWEST-INCOME QUARTILE: If Social Security benefits are subject to proportionate decreases beginning in 2033 (according to the values in Figure 8), the RRR values for those households will drop by more than 50 percent: from 20.9 percent to 10.3 percent. LONGEVITY RISK AND STOCHASTIC HEALTH CARE RISK ARE ASSOCIATED WITH HUGE VARIATIONS IN RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY: For both of these factors, a comparison between the most "risky" quartile with the least risky quartile shows a spread of approximately 30 percentage points for the lowest income range, approximately 25 to 40 percentage points for the highest income range, and even larger spreads for those in the middle income ranges. A GREAT DEAL OF THE VARIABILITY IN RETIREMENT INCOME ADEQUACY COULD BE MITIGATED BY APPROPRIATE RISK-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES AT OR NEAR RETIREMENT AGE: For example, the annuitization of a portion of the defined contribution and IRA balances may substantially increase the probability of not running short of money in retirement. Moreover, a well-functioning market in long

  9. Starting Retirement on a Sound Footing

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The fifth pre-retirement seminar has been a great success. The various sessions covered questions relating to rules and regulations, as well as financial and health issues, health insurance, residence permits and the psychological aspects of retirement. You will no doubt have noticed that the car parks near the Main Building were particularly full last week. In fact it was almost impossible to find a parking spot. A prestigious speaker? A sensational lecture series? Nothing of the sort. It was all due to the pre-retirement seminar, the fifth of its kind since 1993, which never fails to be a success. 'We sent out a thousand invitations to CERN staff aged 55 and above and received 500 positive replies' says William Blair, who has been organising the seminars for the Human Resources (HR) Division for the last eight years in collaboration with the CERN Pensioners Association and the Staff Association. The Main Auditorium was not big enough to accommodate everyone and the discussions also had to be retransmitted l...

  10. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Eleanor M. M.; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Flynn, Matt

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorporating moderating and mediating variables into retirement models is needed. Drawing on comparative models of attitude to retirement, we hypothesized a direct relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age for workers with a high household income and an indirect relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for workers with a low or mean household income. We collected data from a sample of 590 United Kingdom workers aged 50+. Using conditional process analysis, we found that the underlying mechanisms in our research model differ according to socio-economic status. We found no direct effect between job satisfaction and intended retirement age. However, an indirect effect was observed between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for both low- and mean-household income individuals. Specifically, the relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude differed according to socio-economic group: for high-household income older workers, there was no relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. However, for low- and mean-household income older workers, we observed a negative relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. Otherwise stated, increases in job satisfaction for mean and low household income workers are likely to make the prospect of retirement less attractive. Therefore, we argue that utmost care must be taken around the conditions under which lower income employees will continue their work when getting older in order to protect their sustainable employability. PMID:28620329

  11. Retirement and physical activity: analyses by occupation and wealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sukyung; Domino, Marisa E; Stearns, Sally C; Popkin, Barry M

    2009-05-01

    Older adults close to retirement age show the lowest level of physical activity. Changes in lifestyle with retirement may alter physical activity levels. This study investigated whether retirement changes physical activity and how the effect differs by occupation type and wealth level. This longitudinal study used the Health and Retirement Study (1996-2002), U.S. population-based data. Analyses were conducted in 2007 and 2008. Physical activity was measured by a composite indicator of participation in either work-related or leisure-time physical activity. Fixed-effects regression models were used to account for confounders and unobserved heterogeneity. The dependent variable was a composite indicator of participation in regular physical activity either at work or during nonworking hours. Physical activity decreased with retirement from a physically demanding job but increased with retirement from a sedentary job. Occupation type interacted with wealth level, with the negative impact on physical activity of retirement exacerbated by lack of wealth and the positive effect of retirement on physical activity enhanced by wealth. Substantial differences in the effect of retirement on physical activity occurred across subgroups. As the number of people approaching retirement age rapidly increases, findings suggest that a growing segment of the nation's population may not sustain an adequate level of physical activity.

  12. Planning for retirement from medicine: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannor Silver, Michelle; Easty, Laura K

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests there are important personal and social consequences associated with inadequate retirement planning for physicians. We evaluated whether academic physicians felt satisfied with their retirement planning, and identified obstacles to retirement planning and a set of factors to facilitate retirement planning. We applied a sequential mixed-methods research design to explore and examine factors that facilitate academic physician retirement planning using data collected from multiple sources (including 7 focus groups, an internet-based survey and 23 in-depth interviews). We examined survey results regarding retirement planning satisfaction and preferences for complete versus gradual retirement. We used thematic analysis to examine verbatim transcripts and notes from the focus groups and interviews. Survey data (response rate 51%) indicated that 10% of respondents were very satisfied with their retirement planning and 89.5% would prefer to retire gradually rather than stop work completely. Key barriers to retirement planning that emerged included poor personal financial management, rigid institutional structures and professional norms. Facilitators included financial planning resources for physicians at multiple career stages, opportunities and resources for later-career transitions and later-career mentorship support for intergenerational collaboration, and recognition of retirees. Key findings highlight perceived barriers to retirement planning at various career stages in addition to factors that can enhance physicians' retirement planning, including creating gradual and flexible retirement options, supporting ongoing discussions about financial planning and later career transitions, and fostering a culture that continues to honour and involve retirees. Medical institutions could foster innovative models for later-career transitions from medicine in ways that address physicians' needs at various career stages, support gradual transitions from practice

  13. Baby boom generation at the retirement onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojilković Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden increase in the number of live births after the Second World War due to an increase in fertility rates has led to the formation of cohorts with specific characteristics or baby boom generation. This generation is unique in the history of the demographic phenomenon that has affected and affects the functioning of many segments of society. The aim of this paper is to assess structure of baby boomers who are few years away from retirement, using demographic data. Impact of baby boomer age structure of current and future retirees is described with a graphical display of current and projected age pyramid of baby boomers. Demographic pattern that women live longer than men is evident in the projected pyramid. In addition, the number of baby boomers will lead to a "younger" old population. The imbalance in the number of men and women pensioners, as well as older cohorts of women and female baby boomers was analyzed. As a result, an increasing trend of women's age pensioners who are members of the baby boom generation was clearly observed, which is opposite to the older cohort of women who often were family pensioners. Different circumstances and conditions in which female boomers lived and worked will form a new "pension model" because they will gain their benefits as well as men, for the first time in significant number, unlike their mothers, which gained the right to retire after they become widows. Number of women age pensioners is getting greater comparing to men, as the result of changes in the economic activities of women in the last half of the 20th century. When baby boomers retire and exit the working population, this will create a vacuum, because the numerically smaller generations will enter working population, while the sudden and very shortly, the number of population older than 60 or 65 will increase, most of them will likely to acquire the right to a pension. It is undeniable that baby boomers had impact on demographic structure

  14. Predictors of early retirement thoughts and intent to work after retirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mădălina Neacșiu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to see if job demands, job resources as well as self-efficacy can besuccessfully used as predictors for the up mentioned intentions. Data was collected from both blue collar andwhite - collar types of work. Questionnaires were applied to a sample of 64 employees. The hypotheses weretested by conducting a multiple hierarchical regression for both dependent variables. Results show that type ofwork was the only significant predictor in determining the intent to retire early or not. Additionally,psychological job demands as well as education level have been shown to significantly predict the intent to workafter retirement. The results highlight key aspects that both employer and employee should take intoconsideration when creating strategies for retirement. In doing so, we will be creating a much safer environmentin which employees can tackle this important milestone without increasing their changes of stress and/or othernegative outcomes.

  15. Travel: a long-range goal of retired women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Sara; Pierfelice, Loretta

    2003-09-01

    The authors surveyed retired persons (predominately women) with regard to their immediate, intermediate, and long-range activities following retirement. As predicted, leisure travel emerged as a frequent long-range goal for persons retired more than 5 years. The travel activity preferences of long-retired older women present challenges and opportunities to both researchers and marketers. Length of trips and frequency of trips have been predicted from regression models, with trip length in particular being well predicted by the problem of daily life hassles. A theoretical model of continued post-retirement travel is presented as a variant of Solomon's opponent process theory of affect (R. L. Solomon, 1980). The authors suggest that to the degree that places traveled to are varied and different, older people may remain stimulated and continue to enjoy retirement.

  16. Multi-life cycles utilization of retired satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Retired geosynchronous (GEO) communication satellites affect the GEO orbit environment in outer space. According to the new concept of modern design, the authors propose creatively a method of reusing retired GEO communication satellites, through adjusting retired GEO satellites to slightly inclined orbit geosynchronous (SIGSO) satellites. After these retired satellites are applied to the navigation and communication system, integrity of navigation system and positioning accuracy of the system is improved. Meanwhile, some transponders on these retired satellites can be used to establish a new satellite communication service, and initiate the study and utilization of the multi-life cycle for retired satellites. Experimental results show that this project has significant social value and can make remarkable economic benefit.

  17. Multi-life cycles utilization of retired satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI HuLi; AI GuoXiang; HAN YanBen; MA LiHua; CHEN JiBin; GENG JianPing

    2009-01-01

    Retired geosynchronous (GEO) communication satellites affect the GEO orbit environment in outer apace.According to the new concept of modern design,the authors propose creatively a method of reusing retired GEO communication satellites,through adjusting retired GEO satellites to slightly inclined orbit geosynchronous (SIGSO) satellites.After these retired satellites are applied to the navigation and communication system,integrity of navigation system and positioning accuracy of the system is improved.Meanwhile,some transponders on these retired satellites can be used to establish a new satellite communication service,and initiate the study and utilization of the multi-life cycle for retired satellites.Experimental results show that this project has significant social value and can make remarkable economic benefit.

  18. Military Retirement Fund Audited Financial Statements. Fiscal Year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    the payment of pensions to retired military personnel, annuities to eligible survivors, and special compensation for certain disabled retirees. C...Balance not yet Disbursed represents the amount of earned and accrued pension and annuity payments. The MRF balance represents benefits payable on...to pay pensions to retired military personnel and annuities to their survivors. The Military Retirement System is a single-employer, defined benefit

  19. THE LONG REACH OF EDUCATION: EARLY RETIREMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venti, Steven; Wise, David A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to draw attention to the long lasting effect of education on economic outcomes. We use the relationship between education and two routes to early retirement - the receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) and the early claiming of Social Security retirement benefits - to illustrate the long-lasting influence of education. We find that for both men and women with less than a high school degree the median DI participation rate is 6.6 times the participation rate for those with a college degree or more. Similarly, men and women with less than a high school education are over 25 percentage points more likely to claim Social Security benefits early than those with a college degree or more. We focus on four critical "pathways" through which education may indirectly influence early retirement - health, employment, earnings, and the accumulation of assets. We find that for women health is the dominant pathway through which education influences DI participation. For men, the health, earnings, and wealth pathways are of roughly equal magnitude. For both men and women the principal channel through which education influences early Social Security claiming decisions is the earnings pathway. We also consider the direct effect of education that does not operate through these pathways. The direct effect of education is much greater for early claiming of Social Security benefits than for DI participation, accounting for 72 percent of the effect of education for men and 67 percent for women. For women the direct effect of education on DI participation is not statistically significant, suggesting that the total effect may be through the four pathways.

  20. Health, Disability Insurance and Retirement in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Jørgensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There are large differences in labor force participation rates by health status. We examine to what extent these differences are determined by the provisions of Disability Insurance and other pension programs. Using administrative data for Denmark we find that those in worse health and with less...... schooling are more likely to receive DI. The gradient of DI participation across health quintiles is almost twice as steep as for schooling - moving from having no high school diploma to college completion. Using an option value model that accounts for different pathways to retirement, applied to a period...

  1. All those things together made me retire : Qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; Wind, A. de; Westerman, M.J.; Ybema, J.F.; Beek, A.J. van der; Geuskens, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early

  2. Paying for Retirement: Sex Differences in Inclusion in Employer-Provided Retirement Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines sex differences among Baby Boom workers in the likelihood of coverage by an employer-provided retirement plan. Design and Methods: This study used a sample of Baby Boom workers drawn from the 2009 Current Population Survey. Independent variables were selected to replicate as closely as possible those in two 1995…

  3. All those things together made me retire : Qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; Wind, A. de; Westerman, M.J.; Ybema, J.F.; Beek, A.J. van der; Geuskens, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early ret

  4. Baby boomers nearing retirement: the healthiest generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Neil E; Lang, Iain A; Henley, William; Melzer, David

    2010-02-01

    The baby-boom generation is entering retirement. Having experienced unprecedented prosperity and improved medical technology, they should be the healthiest generation ever. We compared prevalence of disease and risk factors at ages 50-61 years in baby boomers with the preceding generation and attributed differences to period or cohort effects. Data were from the Health Survey for England (HSE) from 1994 to 2007 (n = 48,563). Logistic regression models compared health status between birth cohorts. Age-period-cohort models identified cohort and period effects separately. Compared to the wartime generation, the baby-boomer group was heavier (3.02 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.42-3.63; p Baby boomers reported fewer heart attacks (OR = 0.61; CI, 0.47-0.79; p baby boomers are moving toward retirement with improved cardiovascular health. However, the baby-boomer cohort has a higher prevalence of mental illness diagnoses and shows no improvement in self-rated health compared to the wartime birth cohort. There remains substantial scope to reduce health risks and future disability.

  5. The Impact of Early Retirement on Perceptions of Life at Work and at Home: Qualitative Analyses of British Civil Servants Participating in the Whitehall II Retirement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mein, Gill; Ellison, George T. H.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined pathways to retirement and the role of circumstances at work and at home (including the introduction of financially-enhanced early retirement schemes) on retirement-related decision-making. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted within 2 years of retirement with 59 British civil servants participating in the Whitehall…

  6. Maintaining work-related personal ties following retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozijnsen, M.R.; Stevens, N.L.; Tilburg, T.G. van

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the consequences of retirement for the continuation of work-related personal ties. The hypothesis is that their inclusion in personal networks after retirement has become more likely because these relationships have become less role based in today's social-cultural context. Data

  7. Maintaining work-related personal ties following retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozijnsen, M.R.; Stevens, N.L.; Tilburg, van T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study examines the consequences of retirement for the continuation of work-related personal ties. The hypothesis is that their inclusion in personal networks after retirement has become more likely because these relationships have become less role based in today’s social-cultural conte

  8. Civic Engagement as a Retirement Role for Aging Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskie, Brian; Imhof, Sara; Cavanaugh, Joseph; Culp, Kennith

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Public attention directed toward the civic engagement of retired Americans has increased considerably. The purpose of this research was to define civic engagement as a retirement role and differentiate individuals who met this role definition from other retirees. Design and Methods: Retirees who met our definition of civic engagement were…

  9. Pathways to Retirement and Mortality Risk in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalwij, Adriaan; Alessie, Rob; Knoef, Marike

    2013-01-01

    The success of policies aimed at keeping older workers in employment until the statutory retirement age in part depends on the health of these workers. For this reason we examine to what extent pathways to statutory retirement other than employment are associated with adverse health conditions as me

  10. Between goals and expectations : Essays on pensions and retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bresser, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis looks at subjective ideas of individuals that are relevant to their retirement. The first chapter focuses on the relationship between expectations of the replacement rate of income at retirement and satisfaction with various aspects of one’s pension arrangements, such as the age at which

  11. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

  12. A Policy Analysis of Public School Retirement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tara; Teeter, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this policy analysis was to examine the Missouri Public School Retirement System (PSRS). The team investigated the under-funding of PSRS, relating to sustainability and the feasibility of the system's use of one lever, contribution rate, to stabilize the retirement system, and to meet actuary needs and governmental requirements. The…

  13. Ecstasy of Emptiness? Reflections of a Retired School Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzara, Judith R.

    2001-01-01

    A retired elementary principal who was actively tied to her community for decades explains how to put a positive spin on retirement. New retirees should treasure their gifts and talents, develop new ones, take advantage of travel opportunities, mentor a new principal, and/or go back to college. (MLH)

  14. Financial Planning for Retirement: An Imperative for Baby Boomer Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Kilpatrick, Beverly B.

    1998-01-01

    Many women fail to plan for retirement due to economic constraints, interrupted career paths, lower earnings, gender bias, gender-role socialization, self-esteem, role definition, locus of control, or risk tolerance. Retirement education must address women's specific issues regarding financial planning. (SK)

  15. Gradual Retirement in the Netherlands: An Analysis Using Administrative Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, Hans; Hochguertel, Stefan; Zweerink, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Gradual retirement by which individuals leave their career jobs and withdraw incrementally from the labor force is an important empirical phenomenon in the United States. We analyze the current state of gradual retirement in the Netherlands using administrative data that allow much more precise trac

  16. Economic Pressure and Marital Conflict in Retirement-Aged Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Jeffrey; Yorgason, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the relationship between economic difficulties and marital distress have generally excluded retirement-aged couples. Given the aging U.S. population and the upcoming retirement of the baby boom cohort, this research gap is problematic. To rectify this omission, this study uses longitudinal data from the National Survey of Families and…

  17. 76 FR 32243 - Federal Employees' Retirement System; Present Value Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... MANAGEMENT Federal Employees' Retirement System; Present Value Factors AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management... conform the present value factors to changes in the economic assumptions adopted by the Board of Actuaries of the Civil Service Retirement System. DATES: The revised present value factors apply to...

  18. 75 FR 35096 - Federal Employees' Retirement System; Present Value Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Federal Employees' Retirement System; Present Value Factors AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management... conform the present value factors to changes in demographic factors adopted by the Board of Actuaries of the Civil Service Retirement System. DATES: The revised present value factors apply to...

  19. 77 FR 16485 - Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... 12 CFR Parts 611, 612, 619, 620 and 630 RIN 3052-AC41 Compensation, Retirement Programs, and Related Benefits AGENCY: Farm Credit Administration. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of comment period. SUMMARY... investors. The proposed rule would require enhanced reporting of senior officer compensation and retirement...

  20. Financial Planning for Retirement: An Imperative for Baby Boomer Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Kilpatrick, Beverly B.

    1998-01-01

    Many women fail to plan for retirement due to economic constraints, interrupted career paths, lower earnings, gender bias, gender-role socialization, self-esteem, role definition, locus of control, or risk tolerance. Retirement education must address women's specific issues regarding financial planning. (SK)

  1. Early Retirement Is Not the Cat's Meow. The Endpaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Wayne S.

    1982-01-01

    Early retirement plans are perceived as being beneficial to school staff and financially advantageous to schools. Four out of the five assumptions on which these perceptions are based are incorrect. The one correct assumption is that early retirement will make affirmative action programs move ahead more rapidly. The incorrect assumptions are: (1)…

  2. Early Retirement Plans Blow in on the Recession's Ill Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1991-01-01

    Although estimating how many school districts offered early retirement plans during 1990-91 is difficult, the practice is fairly widespread and is generally initiated by states, not local school districts. Early retirement options (an alternative to massive layoffs) were offered teachers and administrators in New York City, Washington, D.C.,…

  3. Benefits and Problems of Early Retirement for Teachers and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Robert C.; And Others

    This study investigated several aspects of early retirement (prior to age 65) as reported by a selected group of Colorado educators from two large districts, one using the state system and the other its own local system of early retirement. Early retirees from these districts were surveyed by means of a three-part questionnaire: part 1 gathererd…

  4. Academia in Transition. Mid-Career Change or Early Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carl V.

    The impact of early retirement plans and career change on the professional and personal lives of professors and on the manpower and fiscal structures of the universities they serve is examined. The book is based on more than 50 accounts of academics who took early retirement options and a comprehensive review of incentive programs for early…

  5. [Costs of early retirement--the case of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouth, Johannes

    2004-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychic disorder that occurs at young age and often leads to a work disability. The disease not only induces direct costs in the health care system but also indirect costs that show up in the social security system. In this study, we apply statistics from the social security administration on early retirement due to disability. Over 6000-males and females per year retire with the diagnosis schizophrenia (classified as 295, ICD-9). The average retirement age is 39 for males and 42 for females. Schizophrenia is the most important single reason for early retirement before age 40. Of all male cases of disability retirement under the age of 40, 14.7 % are due to schizophrenia. The present discounted value of pensions paid out before the standard retirement age of 65 is 215 000 Euro for an average male. Moreover, the revenue loss in income taxes and payroll contributions amounts to 345 000 Euro. In the year 2000, a total of 125 000 persons under the age of 65, who originally entered retirement with the diagnosis schizophrenia, are estimated to be receiving a pension. The corresponding annual expenditures of the social security system reach 1.3 Billion Euro; the revenue loss (pay-roll plus income taxes) reaches 2 Billion Euro. Since only two thirds of the working age population is covered by the social security system, the costs of early retirement due to schizophrenia are underestimated by a factor of at least one third.

  6. Early retirement reform: Can it work? Will it work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dalen (Hendrik); K. Henkens

    2003-01-01

    textabstractEarly retirement from the labour force has become standard practice for most employees in the industrialised world. However, as a result of the rising costs of early retirement schemes, curbing the outflow of older workers from the labour force has become a central government policy obje

  7. Activity Involvement in Aging Women: Career Pattern and Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Carole Kovalic

    Some research has found that women's retirement from the labor force produces significant changes in their lives and requires further investigation. The effects of career pattern and retirement on activity involvement and life satisfaction for women who had been in the work force was investigated. Subjects were members of the Terman Study of the…

  8. 18 CFR 367.22 - Accounting for asset retirement obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amount recognized for the liability and an associated asset retirement cost must be stated at the fair value of the asset retirement obligation in the period in which the obligation is incurred. (b) The... measurement changes to the initial liability for the legal obligation recorded in account 230, Asset...

  9. The Value of Adaptive Regret Management in Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Jamie C.; Wrosch, Carsten; Pushkar, Dolores; Li, Karen Z. H.

    2013-01-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study examined the associations between regret management, everyday activities, and retirement satisfaction among recent retirees. We hypothesized that the regulation of a severe life regret can facilitate activity engagement and retirement satisfaction, but only if retirees manage their regrets adaptively by either…

  10. The impact of retirement on health: quasi-experimental methods using administrative data

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Elizabeth Mokyr; Cullen, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Background Is retirement good or bad for health? Disentangling causality is difficult. Much of the previous quasi-experimental research on the effect of health on retirement used self-reported health and relied upon discontinuities in public retirement incentives across Europe. The current study investigated the effect of retirement on health by exploiting discontinuities in private retirement incentives to test the effect of retirement on health using a quasi-experimental study design. Metho...

  11. Working experiences of Iranian retired nurses: a content analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the experiences of retired nurses can be useful in increasing self-confidence, motivation to work and work enthusiasm among nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the work experiences of Iranian retired nurses. A qualitative design was conducted using a content analysis approach. Purposive sampling was used to choose the study participants. Semi-structured interviews were held to collect the perspectives of 20 retired nurses (10 female and 10 male). Two main themes emerged in the data analysis: 'work problems and unpleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'exhausting work', 'insufficient salary', 'inappropriate relation' and 'unsuitable social position'; and 'job satisfaction and pleasant experiences in a sense' with subthemes 'divine satisfaction and religious belief', 'satisfaction of patients and their companions' and 'love of nursing profession and relaxation experience'. The findings indicate the challenges that nurses face after retirement. These experiences will help nurse managers to adopt appropriate measures to support nurses after retirement.

  12. Mental health and retirement savings: Confounding issues with compounding interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Vicki L; Fertig, Angela R

    2017-08-29

    The questionable ability of the U.S. pension system to provide for the growing elderly population combined with the rising number of people affected by depression and other mental health issues magnifies the need to understand how these household characteristics affect retirement. Mental health problems have a large and significant negative effect on retirement savings. Specifically, psychological distress is associated with decreasing the probability of holding retirement accounts by as much as 24 percentage points and decreasing retirement savings as a share of financial assets by as much as 67 percentage points. The magnitude of these effects underscores the importance of employer management policy and government regulation of these accounts to help ensure households have adequate retirement savings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Impact of Long-Term Care on Retirement Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Retirement wellness is the result of retiring at an appropriate age, saving enough and managing risks appropriately. One of the major risks that often is not addressed effectively is the long-term care (LTC) risk, i.e., the risk of needing help due to physical or cognitive limitations. In 2014, the Society of Actuaries issued a call for papers on the link between LTC and retirement security. This article will discuss the topic of LTC and retirement security broadly, drawing from several of the papers. Some of the topics include the impact of LTC on the individual, family members and caregivers; modeling results showing the impact of LTC on assets needed for a secure retirement; alternative methods of financing LTC; the link between housing decisions and LTC; and some ideas for the future.

  14. The conscientious retiree: The relationship between conscientiousness, retirement, and volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Anissa; Jackson, Joshua J; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined the relationship between conscientiousness, work status, and volunteering utilizing two large samples, the St. Louis Personality and Aging Network (SPAN) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It was hypothesized that conscientious adults who were retired would be more likely to volunteer because, after retirement, they gain a substantial amount of free time, while losing an outlet for their industrious and achievement-striving tendencies. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses revealed that conscientious, retired individuals were more likely to volunteer than conscientious, working individuals. Further analyses revealed that facets of conscientiousness provide differential information from the general trait. These findings indicate that volunteering during retirement fills an important niche for high-striving, conscientious individuals.

  15. The Impact of Health on Individual Retirement Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    2010-01-01

    of diagnosis matters, however. For men, the largest reduction in planned retirement age occurs for a diagnosis of lung disease while for women it occurs for musculo-skeletal disease. Except for cardiovascular disease, diagnosed disease is more influential in men's retirement planning than in women's. Our study......-reports of health conditions with diffuse symptoms to the study of labor market outcomes. On the other hand, self-reported cardiovascular disease such as high blood pressure does not appear to bias the estimated impact on planned retirement. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......We reassess the impact of health on retirement plans of older workers using a unique survey-register match-up which allows comparing the retirement effects of potentially biased survey self-reports of health to those of unbiased register-based diagnostic measures. The aim is to investigate whether...

  16. Retirement security: It's not just about the money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jacquelyn Boone; Matz-Costa, Christina; Smyer, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Retirement security is not just about the money. Although there are many guidelines for financial security, there are few for crafting a rewarding life in the new era of longevity and health. With the meaning of "retirement" being actively redefined, there is a gap between what older adults want and need and what their employers and policymakers are offering. Retirement security in its broadest sense requires programs and policies that encourage and support flexible work that allow some choice and control over when, where, and how work gets done, and which work tasks are assumed by which employees or work teams, self-employment, and formal and informal volunteer work. This article has 3 purposes: (a) to summarize the current context of retirement, (b) to identify barriers to psychological security in later life, and (c) to suggest how psychologists can support the rewriting of the retirement chapter for future retirees. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. The Last Adventure: Retirement Migration, Climate and "Amenities"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Božić

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising number of European retirement migrants on the Mediterranean coasts, especially in the EU countries shows that the practical and scientific relevance of the new forms of migration in Europe is on the rise. "Retirement migration" evolved from a descriptive term to a candidate for a scientific or a research concept, at least if the use of the term IRM (international retirement migration is considered. However, it is necessary to solve several problems before this term can really become a coherent concept, useful for the research and explanation of the "new" migration phenomena. The author claims that the studies usually do not distinguish clearly between the migration of the elderly and retirement migration. The naming of the concept in this case mixes the characteristics of the migrants with the reasons for migration. The author shows that the usually mentioned reasons for retirement migration cannot be clearly formulated as factors which explain retirement migration. Further on, retirement as such is not a pull, push or staying put factor. Migration rates of retired, although rising, are still lower than the migration rates of the working age population and the Mediterranean coasts are also a destination for professionals who have the means to detach the job from the working place. Only a combination of conditions that enable migration and migration decisions, as well as a combination of motives and perceptions of reasons for migration, can partially "explain" retirement migration. One of the problems that has to be solved before retirement migration is affirmed as a concept is the treatment of the temporal and spatial dimension of the mobility of the retirement migrants. The author shows that a clear positioning of retirement migration on the temporal scale of mobility is hardly possible. Retirement migration is too wide and too complex a phenomenon to be easily localised in the temporal continuum. A similar problem emerges when the

  18. Proposed Modification of the Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    After discussion at TREF on 29 October 2003, the Management proposes in this document a modification affecting one of the general principles of the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP), decided by the Council in December 1996 and introduced in April 1997. This modification would authorise the Director-General, in exceptional cases, as indicated in section 3 below, and, with the staff member's consent, to cancel his or her participation in the PRP and to reinstate the staff member in his or her original contractual situation. No modifications to the Staff Rules and Regulations are required. The proposal set out in section 3 of the present document is submitted by the Management, after consultation of the Governing Board of the Pension Fund, for recommendation by the Finance Committee to the Council and for approval by the Council, to enter into force as of 1 January 2004.

  19. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  20. Health, Disability Insurance and Retirement in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Jørgensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There are large differences in labor force participation rates by health status. We examine to what extent these differences are determined by the provisions of Disability Insurance and other pension programs. Using administrative data for Denmark we find that those in worse health and with less...... schooling are more likely to receive DI. The gradient of DI participation across health quintiles is almost twice as steep as for schooling - moving from having no high school diploma to college completion. Using an option value model that accounts for different pathways to retirement, applied to a period...... gradients in outcomes and behavior by health and schooling partially reflects the less educated having poorer health on average, but also that the less educated have worse job prospects and higher replacement rates due to a progressive formula for DI and other pension benefits....

  1. Middle-Ageo Women Face Early Retirement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    A woman worker in Shanghai recently wrote to the Shanghai Municipal Women’s Federation: "With the deepening of the economic reform, our factory has started to make huge reductions in the staff and has made it a rule that all women workers aged 45 or older must leave their posts and wait for retirement. I am one of them. Of course, society won’t progress if we don’t carry out the reform. But don’t the interests of society and the interests of women coincide? Where is the answer out for China’s women workers?" At the end of 1992 an investigation by the Women Workers Department under

  2. When do people want to retire? The preferred retirement age gap between Eastern and Western Europe explained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter de Tavernier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Debates surrounding working longer focus mainly on increasing legal and effective retirement ages, leaving the preferred retirement age largely overlooked. There is a large East-West divide in Europe regarding the latter, with individuals in Eastern Europe wanting to retire earlier. We aim to explain this gap in terms of differences in working conditions and state-level legal conditions. Using the 2010 European Social Survey data on employed individuals aged 50-70 in 24 countries enriched with country-level information, we find that part of the explanation is found in the lower levels of job control found in Eastern Europe. Moreover, the results suggest that Karasek’s job demand/control model fits better in Western than Eastern European countries. Another explanation is found at the country level, where the legal retirement age accounts for a major part of the gap in preferred retirement ages between East and West.

  3. How Do Management Fees Affect Retirement Wealth under Mexico's Personal Retirement Accounts System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Emma; Hurd, Michael D; Rohwedder, Susann

    2014-12-01

    In 1997, Mexico transformed its pay-as-you-go social security system to a fully funded system with personal retirement accounts, including management fees. This article examines changes in retirement wealth resulting from this new system. It shows that management fees have drained a significant proportion of individuals' retirement wealth and have increased the number of persons claiming a government-subsidized minimum pension, particularly from the time the system was introduced in 1997 until adjustment to management fees in 2008. Since 2008, retirement wealth accumulation has been similar to that of the previous system. En 1997, México transformó su sistema de pensiones basado en cotizaciones individuales a uno de ahorro para el retiro que incluyen cuotas por la administración de las cuentas. El presente estudio examina los cambios en el monto de las pensiones como resultado de la introducción del nuevo sistema. Los resultados muestran que las cuotas de administración han drenado una proporción significativa del ahorro para el retiro de los individuos por lo que ha aumentado el número de personas que solicita la pensión mínima garantizada subsidiada por el gobierno desde que se introdujo el sistema en 1997 hasta que se hicieron ajustes en las cuotas de administración de los fondos de pensiones en 2008. A partir de 2008, la acumulación del ahorro para el retiro ha sido similar que la del sistema anterior.

  4. Does retirement reduce the risk of myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kasper; Rugulies, Reiner; Rod, Naja Hulvej;

    2014-01-01

    adjusting for age, sex, income, occupational position, education, cohabitation and immigrant status. The participants were followed for up to 7 years. RESULTS: Of the study population, 3% were diagnosed with MI during follow-up. Retirement was associated with a modestly higher risk of MI with a hazard ratio......BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested that retirement may have beneficial effects on health outcomes. In this study we examined whether the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) was reduced following retirement in a Danish population sample. METHODS: Participants were 617 511 Danish workers, born...

  5. Social security and retirement decision: A positive and normative approach

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Social insurance for the elderly is judged responsible for the widely observed trend towards early retirement. In a world of laissez-faire or in a first-best setting, there would be no such trend. However, when first-best instruments are not available, because health and productivity are not observable, the optimal social insurance policy may imply a distortion on the retirement decision. The main point we make is that while there is no doubt that retirement systems induce an excessive bias t...

  6. The late shift: How retirement affects civic participation and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaard, L.B.D.

    2016-01-01

    How does retirement affect people’s lives? Is it good or bad for their well-being? What do they do after retiring? And what factors shape these outcomes of retirement? The primary aims of this dissertation are to provide a broad picture of how retirement influences people’s lives by concentrating on

  7. How Will Teachers Fare in Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan? Public Pension Project Brief 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid retirement plans that combine defined benefit pensions with 401(k) type, defined contribution accounts can play important roles in the reform of public-sector pensions. Summarizing results from our longer report ["How Will Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project" (2014)], this…

  8. What the 2008 stock market crash means for retirement security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrica, Barbara A; Smith, Karen E; Toder, Eric J

    2010-10-01

    The 2008 stock market crash raises concerns about retirement security, especially since the increased prevalence of 401(k) and similar retirement saving plans means that more Americans are now stakeholders in the equity market than in the past. Using a dynamic microsimulation model, this paper explores the ability of alternate future stock market scenarios to restore retirement assets. The authors find that those near retirement could fare the worst because they have no time to recoup their losses. Mid-career workers could fare better because they have more time to rebuild their wealth. They may even gain income if they buy stocks at low prices and get above-average rates of return. High-income groups will be the most affected because they are most likely to have financial assets and to be invested in the stock market.

  9. Effective succession planning strategies : minimizing the impact of mass retirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, S. [Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Nexen Inc. is a global exploration, production and chemical company with 2,500 employees world-wide. This presentation described the company's social and ethical responsibility to its employees and how it is preparing for the impending retirement of the baby boom generation. New approaches will be needed for succession planning, recruitment and training. Nexen Inc. will plan ahead to make sure that staffing needs are met through strategies such as phased retirement, changing organizational structure, changing job definitions, and part-time employees. Automation, outsourcing and changing roles and responsibilities are some of the other opportunities that are available for companies to change their organization structure due to the retirement of the workforce. Internal training strategies are being designed and implemented to prepare for the impact of retiring employees. figs.

  10. Perception of Persons near and above Retirement Age in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    and above who are also known as the elderly or seniors citizens. This is ... State, Nigeria. Keywords: Awareness,. Willingness to retire,. Elderly,. Old People's. Homes ... the elderly can have improved quality of life. ..... Depression in older home ...

  11. How do baby boomers' mobility patterns change with retirement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu; Haustein, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Baby boomers will comprise a considerable share of tomorrow's older population. Previous research has indicated higher travel activity and car use amongst baby boomers than amongst older cohorts. However, little evidence exists on the effects of boomers' ageing on the transportation system....... To analyse how retirement affects baby boomers' travel and the related future travel demand, we compared three groups, distinguished by employment status as ‘still working’, ‘early retirees’ and ‘recent retirees’, in a longitudinal setting. Data for 864 individuals were collected via standardised telephone...... interviews in 2009 and 2012. We find a clear tendency towards reducing the car use and mileage over time and as a consequence of retirement. Nevertheless, car use for leisure purposes increased after retirement. Whilst retirement had a bigger impact on men's than on women's car use, those women who continued...

  12. State and local retirement plans: innovation and renovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnes, D

    2001-07-01

    This Special Report/Issue Brief examines the universe of state and local retirement plans. It describes how these plans have developed and continue to evolve in a number of areas, including plan features, regulatory framework, governance, and asset management. While these retirement programs differ in many respects from private-sector plans, the disparity in some areas has narrowed. This report also includes a discussion of trends and the underlying forces for change. Public-sector retirement programs provide an important source of pension coverage in the United States, and are a significant part of the total retirement market: Combined public-sector retirement assets (state, local, and federal governments) comprised 29 percent of the $11.2 trillion U.S. retirement market in 1998. State and local plans are dominant in the public-sector retirement market, holding $2.7 trillion in assets, compared with $696 billion held by federal plans (both military and civilian). More than 16 million individuals are employed by state and local jurisdictions in the United States. State and local retirement plans share certain common features because of the environment in which they operate. Legal statutes, governance, and tradition all play a role in defining what is sometimes referred to as a "public-sector culture." Despite common features, there is considerable diversity among public-sector retirement plans. To attract and retain a skilled work force, public-sector employers have increased their use of defined contribution (DC) plans to supplement defined benefit (DB) plans (or, to a lesser extent, replace or serve as an alternative to them) and improve cost-of-living adjustments. At the same time, a combined federal-state regulatory framework has encouraged certain plan design features, unavailable in the private sector, which include multiple tiers for successive generations of employees in a single plan and different strategies to increase portability. State and local

  13. Department of Defenses 2015 Retirement Plan Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    incentive and recruitment bonuses. The base continuation pay will be equal to 12 2.5 times the SMs monthly basic pay (MCRMC, 2015). FERS employees do not...Department of Defense FERS Federal Employees Retirement System FY Fiscal Year FY16$ Fiscal Year 2016 Constant Dollars MCRMC Military...current retirement system rewards service members (SMs) who pursue a long term military career, it ignores the majority of SMs who fall short of the 20

  14. Fiscal Year 2014: Military Retirement Fund Audited Financial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 i Table of Contents Management’s Discussion and Analysis ...Management’s Discussion and Analysis Summary of the Military Retirement System For the Years Ended September 30, 2014 and 2013 REPORTING ENTITY The...funds to finance, on an actuarial basis, the liabilities of DoD under military retirement and survivor benefit programs. Within DoD, the

  15. Office of the Secretary of Defense Retirement Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    majority of officers are male. Data for life expectancies were extrapolated from the DOD Office of the Actuary Life Expectancy Rate. This rate was...All the data for annuity payments were based on the DOD Office of the Actuary Statistical Report on the Military Retirement System Fiscal Year 2013...represent the possible payouts at a certain YOS and rank. Information on estimated age of retirement and estimated life expectancy based on DOD actuary

  16. Military Retirement and Wealth Forecasting During DOD Manpower Drawdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    merit throughout the DoD as well as other organizations with similar retirement structures and pensions . The methodological approach also...Hurd & Rohwedder, 2010) such as choosing mutual funds with high fees; selecting high-cost mortgages; and selecting high-cost pension managers (Lusardi...RETIREMENT COMPENSATION 1. Direct Compensation Since 1986, the defined benefit compensation for Marine retirees is an annuity payment computed at

  17. Military Retirement: Reform for the 21st Century Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    monthly annuity . The servicemember receives this pension , regardless of age, based on a specific percentage of their retired computation base. This...percentage is determined by multiplying 2.5 times the number of years they serve up to 30 YOS, for a maximum of 75%. The pension received by a...30 years of service, 3 this does not increase the percentage used to determine the amount of their retirement pension . To the contrary, a

  18. The Need for Reforming the Department of Defense Retirement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    year vestment and immediate annuity is one of the best pension program available to a non-disabled employee in America. No other governmental of civil... pension programs have the potential to provide a retirement annuity for twice as long as the employment status. Even at a portion of the employment...such a way that is fair to current and retired service members it must grandfather the basic annuity . Furthermore, failure to act now will only delay

  19. Educational influences on early retirement through disability in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M; Buggy, C J; Codd, M B

    2015-06-01

    Studies suggest a higher prevalence of early retirement through disability among older people with lower educational attainment. There have been no national studies in Ireland on the factors that affect early withdrawal from the labour force through disability or long-term illness. To identify and analyse potential impacts of education on early retirement through disability in the over 50 age cohort of the Irish Labour force. We analysed the educational attainment of participants using The Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA). The group of interest were those aged 50-75 who had retired early. The sample was dichotomized on disability. Examination of interviewer-recorded information on background influences determining early retirement decisions included the following factors: age, gender, education, family and socio-economic circumstances, including parental education. A total of 334 of 1179 study subjects (28%) retired early through disability. Comparison of those retired early with and without disability showed a significantly higher frequency of lower educational attainment both personally and for parents. Men with lower educational attainment and from a non-professional background were more likely to retire early through disability. Non-professional disabled respondents with less well-educated parents had lower educational attainment than non-disabled respondents. Among TILDA participants, educational attainment appears to influence early retirement through disability. The sector of previous employment was also a significant factor. Behaviour, lifestyle and employment choice are influenced by educational level, which may affect cognitive ability to process health information. Factors affecting the education-disability relationship could include parental education, employment status and socio-economic characteristics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For

  20. The International Market Retirement Funds - Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Colomeischi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The current state of the global market pension was marked by the fact that pension systems in all countries have been strongly affected by the financial and economic crisis that broke out in the world, especially in 2008-2010. Its effects were felt primarily to pension schemes with definedcontributions (DC, the participants in these plans being increasingly skeptical about the ability to afford decent pensions. Type defined contribution plans requires, on the one hand, periods and higher contribution rates, and on the other investment plans and strategies for managing longevity risk appropriate to the market in which they operate and the characteristics of the participants in this market.Currently in the world there are many types of retirement plans, the most important criteria to classify them are pension plan administrator, the connection with the employer participants, method of calculation of the benefit, the perspective of the pension plan, the way the pension plan isfund or through the multi-pillar approach.Keywords: defined benefit (DB type, defined contribution (DC type, pension system, annuity rate

  1. Retirement Abroad as Women’s Aging Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesl Gambold

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the culture and lifestyle choices of retirees has never been so crucial. The aging baby boom population bubble means that by 2030 eighteen percent of the U.S. will be 65 or over. The lifestyle decisions of these individuals will have far-reaching implications culturally, politically and economically. Since more women are living their post-retirement lives alone and in economically challenging situations, this paper examines the mobility of older women in the form of international retirement migration as a strategy to ameliorate levels of economic and general well-being. Historically people have retired abroad for various reasons, but current practices suggest that retiring permanently in a foreign country has become an increasingly popular aging strategy. Retiring abroad does not come without serious challenges, however, as the strains of navigating the aging process are interwoven with living in a foreign culture. Based on research done in Mexico, and southern France, this paper highlights the efforts put forth by aging women to avoid the well-trodden path of retirement before them and to forge a new path, choose a new homeland, and perhaps, reinvent themselves a bit along the way.

  2. The determinants of male retirement in urban Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Lanza Queiroz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available I use matched and unmatched PME data to study the determinants of male's retirement over the past two decades. The PME is a very rich source of data, although not very used. The matched data consists of a series of short panel data constructed by matching individual records across adjacent years of the PME. Some patterns I find are not surprising. For example, probability of being retired increases monotonically with age, and the strong dependence of labor transition on other individual characteristics such as education. Some other patterns are more interesting and surprising. The labor force participation rates of older workers in the main metropolitan areas are lower than what is observed in the rest of the country. The main explanation is that workers in the main metropolitan areas had earlier enrollment into the system and they also have better access to early retirement benefits. I also observed an inverse U-shaped relation between education and retirement. Less and more educated workers have similar retirement patterns during the period studied. Last, I find that more educated workers, and those in the formal sector, have higher retirement probabilities than less educated and those in the informal labor market.

  3. The new world of retirement income security in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joseph F; Cahill, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    We have entered a new world of retirement income security in America, with older individuals more exposed to market risk and more vulnerable to financial insecurity than prior generations. This reflects an evolution that has altered the historical vision of a financially secure retirement supported by Social Security, a defined-benefit pension plan, and individual savings. Today, 2 of these 3 retirement income sources-pensions and savings-are absent or of modest importance for many older Americans. Retirement income security now often requires earnings from continued work later in life, which exacerbates the economic vulnerability of certain segments of the population, including persons with disabilities, the oldest-old, single women, and individuals with intermittent work histories. Because of the unprecedented aging of our society, further changes to the retirement income landscape are inevitable, but policymakers do have options to help protect the financial stability of older Americans. We can begin by promoting savings at all (especially younger) ages and by removing barriers that discourage work later in life. For individuals already on the cusp of retirement, more needs to be done to educate the public about the value of delaying the receipt of Social Security benefits. Inaction now could mean a return to the days when old age and poverty were closely linked. The negative repercussions of this would extend well beyond traditional economic measures, as physical and mental health outcomes are closely tied to financial security. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Military Retirement Reform: A Review of Proposals and Options for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    physically unfit to continue to serve, special retirement programs such as the Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA),5 and survivor benefits for...there are approximately 38,000 defined benefit plans today compared to about 114,000 in 1985. 5 The Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA) was...Report on the Military Retirement System: Fiscal Year 2010”, May 2010. a. The Early Retirement Authority (TERA) was used selectively during the post

  5. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement - testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  6. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement : testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Geuskens, G.A.; Ybema, J.F.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  7. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement : testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Geuskens, G.A.; Ybema, J.F.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  8. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement - testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  9. Knowledge of the Military Retirement System Among Naval Postgraduate School Officers and Analysis of Associated Retirement Information Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    on opposite sides of the coast (geo- bachelor no more!), and to Mojo for his ability to maintain sanity while I left him alone 18 hours a day...xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION The purpose of this thesis is twofold: to determine whether military retirement...CMEO to Cybersecurity ...why not include military retirement benefits. It would probably help retention. 165 email to member, set up mandatory

  10. Studying retirement from a career perspective. Are people who take charge of their career less inclined to retire?

    OpenAIRE

    De Coen, An; Forrier, Anneleen; Sels, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Many active ageing policies are inspired by the idea that sustainable careers may extend individuals’ working lives through their impact on career satisfaction and employability. However, empirical evidence on these assumptions remains scarce. Few studies on the transition to retirement take a career perspective. In this chapter, we investigate how career competencies influence the intention to retire through their impact on self-directedness, career satisfaction and employability. We there...

  11. Retirement planning and work-related variables in Chinese older nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-Cheng; Zhang, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Ying, Jie; Shi, Ying; Wang, Shou-Qi; Sun, Jiao

    2017-08-29

    To explore the situation of older nurses approaching retirement with regard to their retirement planning, and the relationship of their retirement planning behaviour with the job environment and job satisfaction under their current employment arrangements and other work-related variables. Nurse shortage has become a global phenomenon that can be alleviated by retaining older nurses in service. The Chinese government proposed the "Incremental Delay Retirement Age Policy." However, older nurses face delayed retirement but lack retirement plans. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among a convenience sample of older retiring nurses (n = 152; 84.92% response rate) recruited from every department of four large general hospitals in Changchun, Jilin Province from June to August 2016. The majority of the respondents presented poor retirement planning (n = 122, 80.3%). The independent variables of information exchange with patients, teamwork and personal growth and development explained approximately 16.6% of the variance in retirement planning. Nurse-patient communication and personal growth and development can promote retirement planning, but teamwork is negatively related to retirement planning. Retirement planning by Chinese older nurses is related to certain work-related variables. However, many other work-related variables were not associated with retirement planning and require further research. Overall, Chinese older retiring nurses must improve their retirement planning practices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Comparative Study on Retirement Process in Korea, Germany, and the United States: Identifying Determinants of Retirement Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Joonmo; Lee, Ayoung; Woo, Kwangho

    2016-10-01

    This study classifies the retirement process and empirically identifies the individual and institutional characteristics determining the retirement process of the aged in South Korea, Germany, and the United States. Using data from the Cross-National Equivalent File, we use a multinomial logistic regression with individual factors, public pension, and an interaction term between an occupation and an education level. We found that in Germany, the elderly with a higher education level were more likely to continue work after retirement with a relatively well-developed social support system, while in Korea, the elderly, with a lower education level in almost all occupation sectors, tended to work off and on after retirement. In the United States, the public pension and the interaction terms have no statistically significant impact on work after retirement. In both Germany and Korea, receiving a higher pension decreased the probability of working after retirement, but the influence of a pension in Korea was much greater than that of Germany. In South Korea, the elderly workers, with lower education levels, tended to work off and on repeatedly because there is no proper security in both the labor market and pension system.

  13. Dynamic Changes in Determinants of Inequalities in Health in Europe with Focus on Retired – with particular Regard to Retired Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Lauridsen, Jørgen Trankjær

    that health deteriorates with age, in particular for low income groups. Moreover, as income declines after retirement, elderly people tend to rank lower in the relative income ranking. Consequently, retirement status, and in particular early retirement due to health problems, is expected to contribute...

  14. Memoirs of an armchair astronaut (retired)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Arthur C.

    1993-11-01

    According to my biographer Neil McAleer, who now knows far more about me than I have any wish to, I joined the British Interplanetary Society (BIS) in the summer of 1934, when it was one year old and I was approaching seventeen. Much of the next two years was spent bombarding the Society's patient secretary, Leslie Johnson, with technical queries which he did his best to answer, and which I am sure would make embarrassing reading today. During this period I also made contact with another active BIS member, the science-fiction writer Eric Frank Russell, to whom I owe a great debt of gratitude for early encouragement. I wish I still possessed his amusing and often bawdy letters, written in the most beautiful script I have ever encountered. In 1936, escaping from the uncharted wilds of rural Somerset to the genteel environs of Whitehall (literally - my office was next door to Downing Street) I made contact with the London members of the BIS, as well as the local s.f. fans. There was a 90% overlap between the two groups, and until the outbreak of war rocketry and science fiction dominated my life, with H.M. Civil Service a very poor third. A quarter of a century later, I looked back on those days in an essay which appeared in Holiday Magazine (May, 1963) and which has since been reprinted in Voices from the Sky (1965), Astounding Days (1989) and By Space Possessed (1993). Any attempt to update it would now be both impossible and absurd: it preserves the spirit of the early Space Age like a fly in amber. Here, exactly as originally published, are 'Memoirs of an Armchair Astronaut (Retired)'.

  15. Hippocampal granule cells opt for early retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alme, C B; Buzzetti, R A; Marrone, D F; Leutgeb, J K; Chawla, M K; Schaner, M J; Bohanick, J D; Khoboko, T; Leutgeb, S; Moser, E I; Moser, M-B; McNaughton, B L; Barnes, C A

    2010-10-01

    Increased excitability and plasticity of adult-generated hippocampal granule cells during a critical period suggests that they may "orthogonalize" memories according to time. One version of this "temporal tag" hypothesis suggests that young granule cells are particularly responsive during a specific time period after their genesis, allowing them to play a significant role in sculpting CA3 representations, after which they become much less responsive to any input. An alternative possibility is that the granule cells active during their window of increased plasticity, and excitability become selectively tuned to events that occurred during that time and participate in later reinstatement of those experiences, to the exclusion of other cells. To discriminate between these possibilities, rats were exposed to different environments at different times over many weeks, and cell activation was subsequently assessed during a single session in which all environments were revisited. Dispersing the initial experiences in time did not lead to the increase in total recruitment at reinstatement time predicted by the selective tuning hypothesis. The data indicate that, during a given time frame, only a very small number of granule cells participate in many experiences, with most not participating significantly in any. Based on these and previous data, the small excitable population of granule cells probably correspond to the most recently generated cells. It appears that, rather than contributing to the recollection of long past events, most granule cells, possibly 90-95%, are effectively "retired." If granule cells indeed sculpt CA3 representations (which remains to be shown), then a possible consequence of having a new set of granule cells participate when old memories are reinstated is that new representations of these experiences might be generated in CA3. Whatever the case, the present data may be interpreted to undermine the standard "orthogonalizer" theory of the role of

  16. Wellbeing in retirement villages: eudaimonic challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Rebecca C; Robinson, Oliver C

    2014-12-01

    A retirement village consists of a collection of privately owned or leased flats or maisonettes for elderly adults that are supported by a central hub that provides catering, medical care and social activities. There have been studies of the psychological experience and impacts of such environments, however, there is lack of research that links the retirement village experience to overarching theories of eudaimonic wellbeing, and that uses qualitative methods to find out about how wellbeing manifests for the individual. This study used Ryff's (1989) model of wellbeing as a framework for analysis, while aiming to gain an in-depth understanding of the experiences and sources of wellbeing in residents of two retirement villages in the South East of England. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 18 residents. Thematic analysis revealed a dialectical tension to retirement village living: while facilitating all six core components of eudaimonic wellbeing as conceptualized by Ryff's model, individuals living within the retirement villages also experience challenges to wellbeing on the same dimensions. An integrative model of these tensions between positive and negative experiences is presented and discussed.

  17. The "third option": Oscilliatory migrations of retired guest workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonijević Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is focused on new migration tendencies of retired guest workers. This paper represents one part of a study conducted during 2014 in eastern Serbia and Vienna regarding life strategies of retired labor migrants. In domestic (Serbian social sciences this subject was neglected, but recently it has attracted global social scientific attention with an idea of interdisciplinary merge of migration and age studies. To the day, global literature has only covered retired migrant laborers return to their home countries, but recent studies show changes in migration tendencies of retired laborers of many different nationalities, who have spent their work age in Western Europe. These new migration patterns were called “oscillatory movement” or as a new, alternative “third option”. They are only a form of seasonal and circular migrations which present the most dominant fashion of modern migrant mobility in Europe. Therefore we wanted to see what is the situation with labor migrants from Serbia – do they return to Serbia once they retire or not, and what are their reasons for choosing to live on “two addresses”. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177035: Antropološko proučavanje Srbije – od kulturnog nasleđa do modernog društva

  18. Early-onset arthritis in retired National Football League players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Marshall, Stephen W; Callahan, Leigh F; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Injury has been identified as a potential risk factor for osteoarthritis. However, no previous study has addressed playing-career injuries and subsequent osteoarthritis in a large sample of former athletes. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and determinants of arthritis and osteoarthritis in retired professional football players. Self-reported arthritis prevalence and retrospectively-recalled injury history were examined in a cross-sectional survey of 2,538 retired football players. Football players reported a high incidence of injury from their professional playing days (52.8% reported knee injuries, 74.1% reported ligament/tendon injuries, and 14.2% reported anterior cruciate ligament tears). For those under 60 years, 40.6% of retired NFL players reported arthritis, compared with 11.7% of U.S. males (prevalence ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 3.3 to 3.7). Within the retired NFL player cohort, osteoarthritis was more prevalent in those with a history of knee injury (prevalence ratio = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.5 to 1.9) and ligament/tendon injury (prevalence ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.4 to 1.9). In males under the age of 60, arthritis is over 3 times more prevalent in retired NFL players than in the general U.S. population. This excess of early-onset arthritis may be due to the high incidence of injury in football.

  19. The determinants of male retirement in urban Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Lanza Queiroz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available I use matched and unmatched PME data to study the determinants of male’s retirement over the past two decades. The PME is a very rich source of data, although not very used. The matched data consists of a series of short panel data constructed by matching individual records across adjacent years of the PME. Some patterns I find are not surprising. For example, probability of being retired increases monotonically with age, and the strong  dependence of labor transition on otherindividual characteristics such as education. Some other patterns are more interesting and  surprising. The labor force participation rates of older workers in the main metropolitanareas are lower than what is observed in the rest of the country. The main explanation is that workers in the main metropolitan areas had earlier enrollment into the system andthey also have better access to early retirement benefits. I also observed an inverse  U-shaped relation between education andretirement. Less and more educated workers have similar retirement patterns during the period studied. Last, I find that more  educated workers, and those in the formal sector, have higher retirement probabilities than less educated and those in the informal labor market.

  20. The Role of Financial Education in Retirement Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ntalianis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Governments in many countries are facing the challenge of providing sufficient retirement incomes for apopulation that is ageing as a result of lower mortality and fertility rates. An ageing population placesconsiderable financial stress on government budgets as spending on welfare increases, further compoundedby a proportional reduction in working-age taxpayers. Exposure to financial education programs canpositively influence the retirement planning and savings behaviour of individuals. Research indicates thatseminars, written communications and website information are effective methods in communicating financialeducation. In this study an investigation is conducted into the views of retirement fund members regardingelements of financial education resources made available to them through their retirement fund. Four aspectsare investigated, that is, whether there are differences with respect to members’ views between the genders,older and younger members, levels of qualification, and size of superannuation balances. Empirical evidencesuggests that gender and age are important factors with females and younger people less likely to utiliseeducational information and more at risk of not accumulating sufficient funds for retirement.

  1. To stop or not to stop: an empirical assessment of the determinants of early retirement among active and retired senior teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Droogenbroeck, Filip; Spruyt, Bram

    2014-11-01

    While the official retirement age for most Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries is 65 years, the average employee in the majority of OECD countries retires considerably earlier. With the coming retirement of the baby boom generation, increasing life expectancy, and budget restrictions due to the financial crisis, most countries want to motivate employees to work longer. For these reasons, studying early retirement is highly relevant. In this article, we examine the determinants of early retirement among working and retired senior teachers between 45 and 65 years old in Flanders, Belgium. Although a widespread early exit culture exists among teachers and teacher shortages are expected in several countries, little attention has been given to the specific determinants of early retirement among teachers. Using multivariate linear regression analysis, we study the preferred retirement age of working teachers (n = 1,878) and the actual retirement age of retired teachers (n = 1,246). Financial factors, feelings of emotional exhaustion, and dissatisfaction with nonteaching-related workload (such as meetings and paperwork) have an important influence on the retirement decision. Results show that the majority of teachers make use of early exit schemes. This illustrates the existence of a widespread early exit culture among senior teachers in Flanders.

  2. Plan now to make your retirement active, productive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlepp, S

    1989-12-01

    In his book Planning to the Years Ahead, Lester I. Tenney, PhD, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, Tempe, links Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs to retirement planning. According to Maslow, economic and security needs can be achieved through a family environment (eg, food clothing, shelter), and social acceptance, self-worth, and self-satisfaction can be achieved from social interaction, work, or leisure activities. After the basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter have been achieved, people are able to move to the next level of achieving safety and security. The level of dependency that people have on satisfying these needs through work will determine how well they are at adapting to retirement. The more people depend on work alone, the harder will be the adjustment; people who are less dependent on work will find retirement easier to accept.

  3. Succession planning strategies : minimizing the impact of mass retirement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbens, J. [Direct Energy Marketing Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation described how the workforce in the energy industry will be affected by the impending retirement of the baby boom generation. New approaches will be needed for succession planning, recruitment and training. Energy companies will have to plan ahead to make sure that staffing needs are met. The strategies adopted by Direct Energy Marketing Ltd. were presented and compared with strategies adopted by Centrica's business units in the United Kingdom. Automation, outsourcing and changing roles and responsibilities are some of the opportunities that are available for companies to change their organization structure due to the retirement of the workforce. Internal training strategies are being designed and implemented to prepare for the impact of retiring employees. figs.

  4. Language-group Differences in Very Early Retirement in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study very early retirement as an indicator for poor health, with focus on a comparison between the two language groups in Finland. Extensive longitudinal data are analysed with the help of random effects probit models. As expected from previous studies of mortality differences, the rate of retirement is lower among Swedish-speakers than among Finnish-speakers, and this cannot be attributed to socio-demographic and regional factors. Swedish-speaking males have a risk of very early retirement that is about 25 per cent lower than that of Finnish-speaking males. Among females the corresponding difference is about 15 per cent. Our results also suggest that not accounting for unobserved individual heterogeneity will bias the effect of native language downwards.

  5. INTRODUCTION. TRANSITION INTO RETIREMENT IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Krzyżowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This issue of “Contributions to Humanities” presents various aspects of transitions to retirement in Europe, particularly in post-communist countries. The process of retirementis analysed from various points of view; to name afew: the political perspective and the challengesfaced by current public pension systems in ageing societies, the macro perspectivewhich analyses the structural reasons for (early retirement, and the micro perspective ofindividuals and their ways of experiencing and dealing with exit from the labour market.Therefore, for this issue we sought out an array of papers that extensively discuss the problemof retirement, and inevitably the problem of aging, in Eastern and Central Europe. Obviously,this publication examines only afraction of this broad problem and is by no means exhaustive,thus we hope that it will serve to stimulatethe further discussion.

  6. Occupational class inequalities in disability retirement after hospitalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietiläinen, Olli; Laaksonen, Mikko; Lahelma, Eero; Salonsalmi, Aino; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether hospitalisation is associated with increased risk of disability retirement differently across four occupational classes. 170,510 employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland were followed from 1990 to 2013 using national registers for hospitalisations and disability retirement. Increases in the risk of disability retirement after hospitalisation for any cause, cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, mental disorders, malignant neoplasms, respiratory diseases and injuries were assessed across four occupational classes: professional, semi-professional, routine non-manual and manual, using competing risks models. In general, hospitalisation showed a slightly more increased risk of disability retirement in the lower ranking occupational classes. Hospitalisation among women for mental disorders showed a more increased risk in the professional class (hazard ratio 14.73, 95% confidence interval 12.67 to 17.12) compared to the routine manual class (hazard ratio 7.27, 95% confidence interval 6.60 to 8.02). Occupational class differences were similar for men and women. The risk of disability retirement among women increased most in the routine non-manual class after hospitalisation for musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and most in the professional class after hospitalisation for cardiovascular diseases. The corresponding risks among men increased most in the two lowest ranking classes after hospitalisation for injuries. Ill-health as measured by hospitalisation affected disability retirement in four occupational classes differently, and the effects also varied by the diagnostic group of hospitalisation. Interventions that tackle work disability should consider the impact of ill-health on functioning while taking into account working conditions in each occupational class.

  7. The neoliberal political economy and erosion of retirement security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Larry; Luo, Baozhen

    2015-04-01

    The origins and trajectory of the crisis in the United States retirement security system have slowly become part of the discussion about the social, political, and economic impacts of population aging. Private sources of retirement security have weakened significantly since 1980 as employers have converted defined benefits precisions to defined contribution plans. The Center for Retirement Research (CRR) now estimates that over half of boomer generation retirees will not receive 70-80% of their wages while working. This erosion of the private retirement security system will likely increase reliance on the public system, mainly Social Security and Medicare. These programs, however, have increasingly become the targets of critics who claim that they are not financially sustainable in their current form and must be significantly modified. This article will focus on an analysis of these trends in the erosion of the United States retirement security system and their connection to changes in the United States political economy as neoliberal, promarket ideology, and policies (low taxes, reduced spending, and deregulation) have become dominant in the private and public sectors. The neoliberal priority on reducing labor costs and achieving maximum shareholder value has created an environment inimical to maintain the traditional system of pension and health care benefits in both the private and public sectors. This article explores the implications of these neoliberal trends in the United States economy for the future of retirement security. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Projection of retirement adequacy using wealth-need ratio: A case study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaudin, Ros Idayuwati; Ismail, Noriszura; Isa, Zaidi

    2015-02-01

    Adequacy of retirement income is very important to maintain a comfortable living standard during retirement. Under a life cycle model, assets are mainly accumulated during an individual's work life to finance consumption after retirement. A generally accepted goal of retirement planning is to provide enough income during retirement to prevent the level of living from dropping much below the pre-retirement level. Retirement wealth can be defined as adequate if the total retirement income is equal or greater than the desired total retirement consumption (or needs). In this study, retirement adequacy is projected using the Malaysian Household Income Survey (HIS) 2009 data which is based on 5881 sample of households and contains information on income, demographic and socioeconomic status of each household. Besides the projection of retirement adequacy, a regression of the ratio of projected wealth to needs (or wealth-needs ratio) is performed to investigate the demographic and socioeconomic determinants of retirement adequacy in Malaysia. The results show that 69% of households in Malaysia are adequately prepared for retirement.

  9. THE YOUNG GENERATION’S ATTITUDE TOWARD RETIREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judyta Przyłuska-Schmitt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show the attitudes of young people towards insurers and insurance services offered on the Web. This relates to a number of questions. Does the quality of an insurance offer influence insurance awareness and reflect the demand for retirement? To what extent do social problems of pension systems affect the need for an additional pension among young people? Are life insurance companies trusted?The article uses the results of studies conducted by the Insurance Institute of the University of Applied Sciences in Cologne, and the German Audit Bureau of Circulations (IVW for the “retirement security sales campaign” and the Social Diagnosis 2013.

  10. Australian baby boomers face retirement during the global financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Hal; Wells, Yvonne; O'Loughlin, Kate; Heese, Karla

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact in Australia of the global financial crisis on the baby boom cohort approaching later life. Data from national focus groups of people aged 50 to 64 years (N = 73), conducted in late 2008, found widespread but variable concern and uncertainty concerning work and retirement plans and experiences. A national survey (N = 1,009) of those aged 50 to 64 years in mid-2009 reported lower levels of financial satisfaction compared with other life domains; many planned to postpone retirement. Findings are interpreted in the context of policies and markets that differed significantly from those in the United States, notwithstanding the global nature of the financial crisis.

  11. Impact of the severity of trauma on early retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlman, Michael Bilde; Lohse, Nicolai; Sørensen, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    . SETTING: Level-one urban trauma centre. PARTICIPANTS: Patients aged 18-64 years entering the trauma centre in Copenhagen during 1999-2007 who were alive after three days were followed until early retirement, death or emigration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was early retirement, defined...... and gender. RESULTS: Of all 6687 patients admitted to the trauma centre, a total of 1722 trauma patients were included and followed for a median of 6.2 years (interquartile range (IQR) 3.7-9.1). Of these, 1305 (75.8%) were males, median age was 35.0 years (IQR 25.4-46.5), and median ISS was 16 (IQR 9...

  12. Hybrid Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    2003-01-01

    We review the status of hybrid baryons. The only known way to study hybrids rigorously is via excited adiabatic potentials. Hybrids can be modelled by both the bag and flux-tube models. The low-lying hybrid baryon is N 1/2^+ with a mass of 1.5-1.8 GeV. Hybrid baryons can be produced in the glue-rich processes of diffractive gamma N and pi N production, Psi decays and p pbar annihilation.

  13. The effect of pension rules on retirement monetary incentives with an application to pension reforms in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Sergi Jiménez-Martín; Sánchez Martín, Alfonso R.

    2001-01-01

    In this work we theoretically disentangle the effects of pension provisions on a variety of financial incentives to retirement, trying to reconcile them with some key Spanish retirement patterns. We find that the "average" individual, who is never affected by any cap of contributions or benefits, has weak incentives to retire early and strong incentives to retire at the normal retirement age. Alternatively, individuals at the bottom of the wage distribution have strong incentives to retire as...

  14. 5 CFR 831.616 - Elections by previously retired retiree with new title to an annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Survivor Annuities Elections at the... restored to earning capacity is subject to §§ 831.611 through 622 at the time that he or she retires...

  15. 26 CFR 11.408(a)(2)-1 - Trustee of individual retirement accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.408(a)(2)-1 Trustee of individual retirement accounts. A person may...

  16. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  17. 78 FR 66905 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Evaluating the Retired Mentors for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Evaluating the Retired Mentors for Teachers... desires to understand program impacts on teacher retention, performance, and teacher evaluations. The... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Evaluating the Retired...

  18. Small employers and the challenge of sponsoring a retirement plan: results of the 1998 Small Employer Retirement Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoboski, P; Ostuw, P

    1998-10-01

    Forty-two million individuals work for small employers; 9 million are participating in an employment-based retirement plan, while 33 million are not participating in a plan. This Issue Brief examines the barriers that prevent small employers from sponsoring a retirement plan, their level of knowledge about plans, and changes that might lead to plan sponsorship. It also examines the motivations of small employers that sponsor retirement plans. Small employers identify three main reasons for not offering a plan: employees' preferences for wages and/or other benefits, administrative costs, and uncertain revenue that makes it difficult to commit to a plan. Small employers without plans report being familiar with 401(k) and profit-sharing plans, but little else. Forty-seven percent report never having heard of the savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE), and 55 percent report never having heard of simplified employee pensions (SEPs). There is apparent misunderstanding about retirement plans among small employers that do not sponsor one, especially with regard to costs. For example, 35 percent do not know that a plan can be set up for less than $2,000. What changes would lead to serious consideration of retirement plan sponsorship? In order of reported importance: increased company profits (66 percent), a business tax credit (64 percent), reduced administrative requirements (50 percent), demand from employees (49 percent), allowing key executives to save more in the plan (49 percent), and easing, i.e., lengthening, of vesting requirements (40 percent). Many small employers that sponsor a retirement plan cite business reasons among their motivations. Sixty-eight percent cite a "positive effect on employee attitude and performance" as a major reason for offering a plan. Fifty-six percent cite a "competitive advantage in employee recruitment and retention" as a major reason. Small employers with a retirement plan report direct benefits from sponsorship, but many

  19. 5 CFR 839.303 - Is my employer required to find employees with a retirement coverage error?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) CORRECTION OF RETIREMENT COVERAGE ERRORS UNDER THE FEDERAL ERRONEOUS RETIREMENT COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Employer Responsibility to Notify...

  20. Impact of Retirement Choices of Early Career Marines: A Choice Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    impacts on retention/retirement. 3 E. LIMITS OF RESEARCH The military’s promise of a pension after 20 years of dedicated service has always been a...a military member retires with 20 years of service the member will immediately receive a monthly annuity for the rest of his life. The annuity is...retirement compensation annuity specified by the employer. 8 slight decrease in retirement pay. This plan was popular in the 1980s, when the plan was

  1. 12 CFR 615.5270 - Retirement of other equities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....5280 and 615.5290, or term stock at its stated maturity unless after the retirement the institution... at-risk stock to institution management if: (1) The board has determined that the institution's... institution's current financial condition and consistent with its long-term goals established in its...

  2. Retirement and Fixed Costs to Work: An Empirical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    heterogeneity related to these non-separabilities will lead to biases of the OLS estimators of structural parameters of demand systems conditioned on retirement. These estimates give bounds to the true fixed costs. We estimate the model with French data and compute the bounds of these structural parameters...

  3. Estate and business planning for the retiring physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Kenneth W; Vaughn, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    Retiring physicians have much to think about for estate planning purposes. The authors stand ready to help physicians sell or close their medical practice, navigate the 2010 Tax Act, take advantage of current planning opportunities, and prepare appropriate estate planning documents. Every estate is unique, so it is important to contact an estate planning advisor before taking any action.

  4. Depressive symptoms and early retirement intentions among Danish eldercare workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexo, Mette Andersen; Borg, Vilhelm; Sejbaek, Camilla Sandal

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression increases the risk of disability pension and represents a health related strain that pushes people out of the labour market. Although early voluntary retirement is an important alternative to disability pension, few studies have examined whether depressive symptoms incur...

  5. Financial literacy and retirement planning in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Maarten C. J.; Lusardi, Annamaria; Alessie, Rob J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of financial decisions that households now face has increased to unprecedented levels. At the same time, households seem to lack the financial knowledge to cope with these decisions, including how to save and invest adequately for retirement. In this paper, we examine the relationship

  6. Preferred Supportive Services for Middle to Higher Income Retirement Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Victor; Gelwicks, Louis E.

    1981-01-01

    Reports the service and facility feature preferences for retirement housing of middle and upper income elderly. Mandatory services and activities which require physical exertion were rejected, while security, convenient retail services, public transportation, and emergency health services are preferred. Underscores the importance of supportive…

  7. 12 CFR 615.5260 - Retirement of eligible borrower stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 615.5260 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL... equities for which such eligible borrower stock is exchanged in connection with a merger, consolidation, or... merger, consolidation or other reorganization or a transfer of territory. (2) Retirement in the...

  8. Perceptions of Sport Retirement by Current Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Brandy Sue

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the problem of college student-athletes retiring from their sports unprepared for life outside of sanctioned athletics. The purpose was to identify if a current student-athlete believes he/she is prepared for a career life after competitive college athletics and who the student-athlete feels should provide guidance into the…

  9. Essays on Subjective Survival Probabilities, Consumption, and Retirement Decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutlu Koc, Vesile

    2015-01-01

    Recent pension reforms in industrialized countries are, in part, motivated by the increased life expectancy. As individuals are expected to take more responsibility in their retirement planning and savings decisions, it is important to understand whether they are aware of improvements in life

  10. The Quality of Life of Retired Reengaged Academics in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejechi, Eucharia Onyema

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life (QL) of retired academics reengaged in some Nigerian Universities was studied using physical health, subjective happiness, life satisfaction and psychological well-being domains and a measure based on control, autonomy, self-realization and pleasure (CASP) as indicators. Satisfactory QL was indicated all respondents (greater…

  11. 47 CFR 32.1438 - Deferred maintenance and retirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... unprovided-for loss in service value of telecommunications plant for extraordinary nonrecurring retirement not considered in depreciation and the cost of extensive replacements of plant normally chargeable to... replacements, the amount chargeable to operating expenses and the period over which in its judgment the...

  12. Pathways through which health influences early retirement: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Wind (Astrid); G.A. Geuskens (Goedele); K.G. Reeuwijk (Kerstin); M.J. Westerman (Marjan); J.F. Ybema (Jan Fekke); A. Burdorf (Alex); P.M. Bongers (Paulien); A.J. van der Beek (Allard)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Due to the aeging of the population, there is a societal need for workers to prolong their working lives. In the Netherlands, many employees still leave the workforce before the official retirement age of 65. Previous quantitative research showed that poor self-perceived heal

  13. Do Early Outs Work Out? Teacher Early Retirement Incentive Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Herb R.; Repa, J. Theodore

    1993-01-01

    School districts offer teacher early retirement incentive plans (TERIPs) as an opportunity to hire less expensive teachers, reduce fringe benefits costs, and eliminate teaching positions. Discusses reasons for teachers to accept TERIP, and describes a computer model that allows school officials to calculate and compare costs incurred if an…

  14. Teaching Time Value of Money Using an Excel Retirement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Fernando; Mulig, Liz; Rhame, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The time value of money (TVM) is required knowledge for all business students. It is traditionally taught in finance and accounting classes for use in various applications in the business curriculum. These concepts are also very useful in real life situations such as calculating the amount to save for retirement. This paper details a retirement…

  15. 42 CFR 408.42 - Deduction from railroad retirement benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Deduction From Monthly Benefits § 408.42 Deduction from railroad retirement benefits. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee... benefits or a civil service annuity, or both. (b) Action when benefits are suspended. If the...

  16. 75 FR 35098 - Federal Employees' Retirement System; Normal Cost Percentages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... requests for actuarial assumptions and data to the Board of Actuaries, care of Gregory Kissel, Actuary... determined. Recently, the Board of Actuaries of the Civil Service Retirement System concluded that there.... The Board reviewed statistical data prepared by the OPM actuaries and considered trends that...

  17. Military Retirement: Alternate Final Pay and Cost of Living Indexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    LIST OF TABLES Table 1.  Military Retirement System Multipliers (from DOD Office of the Actuary , 2012...10  Table 2.  Number of Retirees by Rank (from DOD Office of the Actuary , 2012...Expectancy (from DOD Office of the Actuary , 2012) ..23  Table 5.  HI-3 Valuation in Millions of Dollars

  18. Northwest to Accelerate Retirement of Dc10 Aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Northwest Airlines announced that it will accelerate the retirement of its remaining 12DC10-30 aircraft in service. The airline said that during the next seven months,it will replace DC10 aircraft with new Airbus A330s and Boeing 747-400aircraft being returned to service.Currently, seven routes are served with the DC10.

  19. Pension privatisation and the financialisation of retirement provision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deken, J.

    2011-01-01

    Privatisation is often at the centre of debates on welfare state reform in general, and of studies of changes in systems of retirement provision in particular. It therefore somehow comes as a surprise that only few attempts have been undertaken to define what exactly is involved in this form of

  20. What is an Adequate Standard of Living During Retirement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binswanger, J.; Schunk, D.

    2008-01-01

    Many economists and policy-makers argue that households do not save enough to maintain an adequate standard of living during retirement. However, there is no consensus on the answer to the underlying question what this standard should be, despite the fact that it is crucial for the design of saving

  1. Pathways through which health influences early retirement: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Wind (Astrid); G.A. Geuskens (Goedele); K.G. Reeuwijk (Kerstin); M.J. Westerman (Marjan); J.F. Ybema (Jan Fekke); A. Burdorf (Alex); P.M. Bongers (Paulien); A.J. van der Beek (Allard)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Due to the aeging of the population, there is a societal need for workers to prolong their working lives. In the Netherlands, many employees still leave the workforce before the official retirement age of 65. Previous quantitative research showed that poor self-perceived

  2. The Implications of the Elimination of Mandatory Retirement for Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Charles B.

    1990-01-01

    Eliminating mandatory retirement for tenured professors will force institutions to reassess their relationships with older faculty. Institutions should not abolish or modify existing tenure policies, which might erode academic freedom, but should instead adopt and consistently apply performance review procedures. (Author/MSE)

  3. Retirement Prospects of the Baby Boom Generation: A Different Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterlin, Richard A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined average economic status of baby boom cohorts as they approach retirement using data on their life cycle income experience. Findings suggest that baby boomers are likely to enter old age in better economic position than preboom cohorts because of deferred marriages, reduced childbearing, and increased labor force participation of wives…

  4. 76 FR 32241 - Civil Service Retirement System; Present Value Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... MANAGEMENT Civil Service Retirement System; Present Value Factors AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management... instrumentalities. This notice is necessary to conform the present value factors to changes in the economic...: The revised present value factors apply to survivor reductions or employee annuities that commence...

  5. 75 FR 35093 - Civil Service Retirement System; Present Value Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Civil Service Retirement System; Present Value Factors AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management... instrumentalities. ] This notice is necessary to conform the present value factors to changes in demographic factors... revised present value factors apply to survivor reductions or employee annuities that commence on or...

  6. Pension privatisation and the financialisation of retirement provision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deken, J.

    2011-01-01

    Privatisation is often at the centre of debates on welfare state reform in general, and of studies of changes in systems of retirement provision in particular. It therefore somehow comes as a surprise that only few attempts have been undertaken to define what exactly is involved in this form of inst

  7. The role of life histories in retirement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.

    2016-01-01

    In most developed countries, populations are aging rapidly due to the long-term decline of fertility and increasing longevity. Extending the working lives of older individuals is often perceived as a key policy response to population aging, putting the issue of retirement high on the policy as well

  8. Probing the Future of Mandatory Retirement in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Peter; Kerr, Don; Beaujot, Roderic

    2006-01-01

    The future of mandatory retirement is at least partly driven by changing demographics. In Canada, these demographics include slowing population growth, rapid aging, declining rates of labour force participation, and slowing labour force growth. After reviewing the demographic trends and considering alternate scenarios in labour force…

  9. 5 CFR 831.1203 - Basic requirements for disability retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... retirement. 831.1203 Section 831.1203 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... be incompatible with either useful and efficient service or retention in the position. (3) The... service, or with the former employing agency or the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) within 1...

  10. Older employees’ desired retirement age: a JD-R perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frins, W.; Ruysseveldt, J. van; Dam, K. van; Bossche, S.N.J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Using the job demands-resources (JD-R) model as a theoretical framework, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how job demands and job resources affect older employees’ desired retirement age, through an energy-depletion and a motivational process. Furthermore, the importance of gain

  11. 18 CFR 35.18 - Asset retirement obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... obligation on its books must provide a schedule, as part of the supporting work papers, identifying all cost components related to the asset retirement obligations that are included in the book balances of all accounts..., with its filing under § 35.12 or § 35.13, a detailed study supporting the amounts proposed to...

  12. Early retirement and non-employment after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Kuosma, E; Taskila, T

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether workplace support, sociodemographic factors and co-morbidity are associated with early retirement or non-employment due to other reasons among breast cancer survivors. We also compared quality of life and chronic symptoms (pain, fatigue, anxiety and depression) among...

  13. Do single women value early retirement more than single men?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danø, Anne Møller; Ejrnæs, Mette; Husted, Leif

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to analyse why a large fraction of single elderly people choose to retire early. A structural model directly based on the individual decision of labour supply is estimated on a sample of singles, where singles are defined as those who are living alone. We find that inco...

  14. Does retirement flexibility provide a hedge against macroeconomics risks?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Y.; Bonenkamp, J.; Meijdam, Lex

    2017-01-01

    Retirement flexibility is often seen as a hedge against macroeconomic risks such as capital market risks, which justifies more risky asset portfolios. This paper analyses the robustness of this claim in both a partial equilibrium and general equilibrium setting. We show that this positive

  15. The afterlife for retiring deans and other senior medical administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Richard L

    2008-11-01

    Career options for individuals leaving the administrative role as dean of a school of medicine or other senior administrative positions are considered. Options discussed include retirement and a variety of other positions both within schools of medicines and in other venues. Many opportunities exist for a challenging and fulfilling career path after leaving the role as a senior administrator in an academic medical center.

  16. 18 CFR 367.2300 - Account 230, Asset retirement obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Other Noncurrent Liabilities § 367.2300 Account 230, Asset... retirement obligations. 367.2300 Section 367.2300 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF...

  17. Financial literacy and retirement planning in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Maarten C. J.; Lusardi, Annamaria; Alessie, Rob J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of financial decisions that households now face has increased to unprecedented levels. At the same time, households seem to lack the financial knowledge to cope with these decisions, including how to save and invest adequately for retirement. In this paper, we examine the relationship

  18. Danish Private Sector Wage Policies and Male Retirement Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Lanot, Gauthier

    1996-01-01

    Theories of efficient labour contracts highlight the role of the employer in designing tenure-remuneration profiles which can address the problem of asymmetric information regarding worker effort. This is in contrast to most empirical studi es of retirement behaviour which have focussed on indivi...

  19. Financial literacy and retirement preparation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alessie, Rob; van Rooij, Maarten; Lusardi, Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    We present new evidence on financial literacy and retirement preparation in the Netherlands based on two surveys conducted before and after the onset of the financial crisis. We document that while financial knowledge did not increase from 2005 to 2010, in 2010 significantly more individuals report

  20. 5 CFR 837.803 - Cancellation of retirement by judicial or administrative authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cancellation of retirement by judicial or administrative authority. 837.803 Section 837.803 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Canceled Retirements § 837.803 Cancellation of retirement by judicial or administrative authority....

  1. An Introduction to Cost-of-Living Adjustments in Public Retirement Plans: Details Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Penelope R.; Jennings, William P.; Phillips, G. Michael

    2016-01-01

    While financial planning students are expected to be able to understand client retirement plans, subtle differences in cost-of-living adjustments can have major impact on the success of client retirement plans. This teaching note compares the cost-of-living adjustments in the largest government sponsored retirement systems and a hypothetical…

  2. 42 CFR 426.420 - Retiring or revising an LCD under review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retiring or revising an LCD under review. 426.420... DETERMINATIONS Review of an LCD § 426.420 Retiring or revising an LCD under review. (a) A contractor may retire an LCD or LCD provision under review before the date the ALJ issues a decision regarding that...

  3. Effect of Marital Status on Living Arrangements and Housing Preferences of Retired Women Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elaine; Pynoos, Jon

    The Foundation to Assist California Teachers (FACT) is a non-profit organization which owns and operates retirement housing for teachers. To identify the demand for additional retirement housing facilities and explore "shared housing" alternatives, retired women teachers (N=2,740) in California completed a mail questionnaire which assessed: (1)…

  4. Toward Building a Sustainable Retirement System for Private Colleges and Universities in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi P.

    2010-01-01

    As retiring personnel of Japan's private higher educational institutions (HEIs) take a large portion of the accumulated retirement funds at their career exit today, their younger colleagues are left with a bleak future with a quickly depleting reserve for their own retirement allowances. The fact that many insolvent organizations are on the verge…

  5. 29 CFR 4044.55 - XRA when a participant must retire to receive a benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false XRA when a participant must retire to receive a benefit. 4044.55 Section 4044.55 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY... Expected Retirement Age § 4044.55 XRA when a participant must retire to receive a benefit. (a...

  6. Retirement in the Post-Revocation Context at One Canadian University: Experiences of Phasing and Delaying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Mia Quint; Finlay, Sara-Jane; Hillan, Edith

    2015-01-01

    This research study is a phenomenological exploration of academics from one Canadian university who either are participating in a phased retirement program or have delayed their retirement beyond the normal retirement age of 65. It is based on face-to-face interviews with 24 professors, male and female, between the ages of 55 and 69, from an array…

  7. 78 FR 13913 - Submission for Review: Application for Refund of Retirement Deductions (CSRS), SF 2802 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Application for Refund of Retirement Deductions (CSRS), SF 2802 and Current... Retirement System, SF 2802A AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SF 2802 is used to support the payment of monies from the Retirement Fund....

  8. 78 FR 66972 - Submission for Review: Designation of Beneficiary: Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), SF 2808

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Designation of Beneficiary: Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), SF 2808... collection request (ICR) 3206-0142, Designation of Beneficiary: Civil Service Retirement System, SF 2808. As... Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other...

  9. How sensitive are retirement decisions to financial incentives? : A stated preference analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A.H.O.; Vonkova, H.

    We study the effects of financial incentives on retirement decisions using stated preference data. Dutch survey respondents were given hypothetical retirement scenarios describing age(s) of (partial and full) retirement and replacement rate(s). A stylized model is estimated in which utility is the

  10. Factors Influencing Pediatrician Retirement: A Survey of American Academy of Pediatrics Chapter Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsza, Mary E; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Simon, Harold K; Pendergass, Thomas W; Mulvey, Holly J

    2017-09-01

    To assess the factors that may influence physicians' desire to retire through an analysis of data collected through the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) State Pediatrician Workforce Survey. An electronic survey was sent to retired and nonretired US pediatricians who held AAP membership. The respondents were asked about the importance of 12 factors that would influence or had influenced their decision to retire. The physicians who were not yet retired also were asked: "If you could afford to today, would you retire from medicine?" The survey was completed by 8867 pediatricians. Among the nonretired respondents, 27% reported that they would retire today if it were affordable. Increasing regulation of medicine, decreasing clinical autonomy, and insufficient reimbursement were rated as very important factors by >50% of these pediatricians. Among retired pediatricians, 26.9% identified the effort to keep up with clinical advances and changes in practice as a very important factor in their decision to retire. Younger physicians were significantly more likely to rate maintenance of certification requirements, insufficient reimbursement, lack of professional satisfaction, and family responsibilities as very important factors. Rural pediatricians were more interested in retiring than those working in academic settings. There were no sex differences. Twenty-seven percent of pediatricians in practice today would retire today if it were affordable. Identifying and addressing the important factors that influence a pediatrician's desire to retire can potentially reduce the retirement rate of pediatricians and thus increase access to care for children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Marital Status on Living Arrangements and Housing Preferences of Retired Women Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elaine; Pynoos, Jon

    The Foundation to Assist California Teachers (FACT) is a non-profit organization which owns and operates retirement housing for teachers. To identify the demand for additional retirement housing facilities and explore "shared housing" alternatives, retired women teachers (N=2,740) in California completed a mail questionnaire which assessed: (1)…

  12. A Preliminary Investigation of Factors Affecting Appraisal of the Decision to Take Early Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowan, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines why individuals elect to take the early retirement package offered by their employer, as well as factors affecting their appraisal of that decision. Results suggest that all early retirement decisions are not voluntary. Individuals who do not wish to retire and who had lower self-esteem, fewer financial resources, and plans to continue…

  13. The Role of the Spouse in Early Retirement Decisions for Older Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene

    This paper investigates the determinants of older workers’ early retirement behavior in Denmark. Instead of considering dual retirement we recognize the importance of the spouse in the early retirement decision by assessing the effect of a rich number of spousal variables. Given the grouped nature...

  14. 18 CFR 367.4031 - Account 403.1, Depreciation expense for asset retirement costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Depreciation expense for asset retirement costs. 367.4031 Section 367.4031 Conservation of Power and Water... § 367.4031 Account 403.1, Depreciation expense for asset retirement costs. This account must include the depreciation expense for asset retirement costs included in service company property....

  15. Goal Clarity and Financial Planning Activities as Determinants of Retirement Savings Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawski, Robert S.; Hershey, Douglas A.; Jacobs-Lawson, Joy M.

    2007-01-01

    Retirement counselors, financial service professionals, and retirement intervention specialists routinely emphasize the importance of developing clear goals for the future; however, few empirical studies have focused on the benefits of retirement goal setting. In the present study, the extent to which goal clarity and financial planning activities…

  16. Does retirement reduce the risk of mental disorders? A national registry-linkage study of treatment for mental disorders before and after retirement of 245 082 Danish residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Kasper; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Madsen, Ida E H; Bonde, Jens Peter; Rugulies, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The effect of retirement on mental health is not well understood. We examined the prevalence of hospital treatment for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication before, during and after retirement in a Danish population sample. We hypothesised that retirement was followed by reduced prevalence of hospital treatment for depression and antidepressant purchase. Methods Participants were 245 082 Danish workers who retired between 2000 and 2006. Information on retirement, hospital treatment and antidepressant purchases were obtained from Danish national registers. The yearly prevalence of hospital treatment for depression and antidepressant purchases was estimated in relation to the year of retirement from 5 years prior to the retirement year to 5 years after retirement. Using logistic regressions with generalised estimating equations we analysed the trends in prevalence before, during and after the retirement. Results Two of 1000 participants were hospitalised with depression in the year of their retirement and 63 of 1000 purchased antidepressant medication during the retirement year. The prevalence of hospital treatment for depression increased before and around retirement, followed by a slight decline from 2 years after retirement with the prevalence of hospitalisation dropping from 0.21%(retirement +2 years) to 0.16% (retirement +5 years). For antidepressants, we observed a steady increase in purchases before retirement (retirement −2 years). This increase levelled off in the years around retirement, but continued after retirement (retirement +2 years). Conclusions Overall, this study did not confirm the hypothesis that retirement is beneficial for mental health measured by hospitalisation with depression and treatment with antidepressants. Although the temporary levelling off of the increase in antidepressant treatment around time of retirement might indicate a beneficial effect, this possible effect was only short-term. PMID

  17. Time to retire--time to die? A prospective cohort study of the effects of early retirement on long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Hilke; Müller, Rolf; Helmert, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    In a long-term prospective cohort study we try to assess selective and protective impacts of early retirement on life expectancy. The results are based on the members of a compulsory German health insurance fund (Gmünder Ersatzkasse). We analyzed 88,399 men and 41,276 women who retired between the ages of 50 and 65 from January 1990 to December 2004. Our main outcome measures are hazard ratios for death adjusted for age, sex, marital and socioeconomic status, year of observation, age at retirement, hospitalization, and form of retirement scheme. We found a significantly higher mortality risk among pensioners with reduced earning capacities than among old-age pensioners who either left the labor market between the ages of 56 and 60 or between 61 and 65. The youngest male and female pensioners who left the labor market between the ages of 51 and 55 because of their reduced earning capacity faced the highest mortality risk. But healthy people who retire early do not experience shorter long-term survival than those who retire late. On the contrary, if we take into consideration the amount of days spent in hospital during the last 2 years prior to retirement, early retirement in fact lowers mortality risks significantly by 12% for men and by 23% for women. Thus with respect to mortality, early retirement reflects both selective and protective processes. First of all, individuals with poor health and lower survival chances are filtered out of the labor market. However, healthy pensioners may be protected during retirement. For the former, early retirement is a necessity, for the latter it is an asset. Pension reformers should take health differentials into consideration when cutting back pension programs and increasing retirement age.

  18. A comparison of early retirement pensions in the United States and Russia: the pensions of musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John; Guenther, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Early retirement pensions for particular occupations free national policy to establish the social security early retirement age at a later age that is more appropriate for the population as a whole. This paper focuses on early retirement pensions in the United States and the Russian Federation. While comparing early retirement pensions generally, the paper provides a more detailed discussion of the pensions for musicians. While this is an unconventional group to choose for the study of pensions, study of their pensions yields insights into the principles underlying retirement age policy in the two countries.

  19. Is an early retirement offer good for your health? Quasi-experimental evidence from the army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Daniel; Johansson, Per; Josephson, Malin

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies empirically the consequences on health of an early retirement offer. To this end we use a targeted retirement offer to military officers 55 years of age or older. Before the offer was implemented, the normal retirement age in the Swedish defense was 60 years of age. Estimating the effect of the offer on individuals' health within the age range 56-70, we find support for a reduction in both mortality and in inpatient care as a consequence of the early retirement offer. Increasing the mandatory retirement age may thus not only have positive government income effects but also negative effects on increasing government health care expenditures.

  20. Change and persistence of personal identities after the transition to retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuscher, Ursina

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the question of how retired people's self-image differs from that of working people, and what factors predict people's self-definition as professionals or retirees. Seven hundred ninety-two Swiss persons aged 58-70 (386 men, 406 women; 349 not retired, 443 retired) were asked to rate the importance of different self-description domains (such as profession, family-roles, personal values, etc.). Results indicated that the profession domain remains important for self-description even after retirement, to the extent that retirement status does not predict the importance of the professional identity at all. Rather, consistent with social identity theory, the importance of the profession for self-description is best predicted by the status of the (former or current) job. The importance of the retirement status for self-definition is predicted best by a positive attitude toward aging. In general, retired respondents rated more domains of self-description as important than did not-yet-retired respondents, and no domain was less important after retirement. In other words, identity diversity was higher for the retired than for the not-yet-retired persons. In addition, high identity diversity correlated with a high satisfaction across different life domains.

  1. Hybrid vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J.G.W. [Electrical Machines (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    The reasons for adopting hybrid vehicles result mainly from the lack of adequate range from electric vehicles at an acceptable cost. Hybrids can offer significant improvements in emissions and fuel economy. Series and parallel hybrids are compared. A combination of series and parallel operation would be the ideal. This can be obtained using a planetary gearbox as a power split device allowing a small generator to transfer power to the propulsion motor giving the effect of a CVT. It allows the engine to run at semi-constant speed giving better fuel economy and reduced emissions. Hybrid car developments are described that show the wide range of possible hybrid systems. (author)

  2. Perceived financial retirement preparedness and its correlates: a national study in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel-Karpas, Dikla; Werner, Perla

    2014-01-01

    Studies suggest that a large proportion of adults do not manage to save enough for retirement. Correlates of retirement saving behaviors have yet to be fully understood. The goal of this study was to examine perceived financial preparedness for retirement and its correlates. We studied the effect of perceived financial knowledge and involvement, social and institutional support, and attitudes toward retirement in a national sample of 227 non-retired Israeli adults (mean age = 44; 53% female; 81% Jewish). Results indicated that only about 20% perceived themselves as financially prepared for retirement. The main correlates of financial preparedness were financial knowledge and involvement in financial activities. The results show that a large proportion of the Israeli population feel underprepared for retirement. Those who perceive themselves as having high levels of financial knowledge are less predisposed to feel underprepared. Future research should examine the relationship between perceived financial preparedness and actual savings.

  3. Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal; Nexo, Mette A.; Borg, Vilhelm

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Western countries are experiencing an ageing and shrinking workforce in the eldercare sector. This study investigated whether 12 different work-related factors are associated with early retirement intentions of employees in the Danish eldercare sector. We tested whether three hypotheses...... explained the increase of early retirement intention: (i) high job demands (four factors) and low resources (four factors); (ii) low job attitude (three factors); and (iii) high physical strain (one factor). METHODS: We included 2444 employees (aged 45-57 years) from two waves (T1 and T2) from a prospective...... study. Multinomial logistic regression models showed whether 12 work-related factors (T1) were associated with early retirement intention (T2); very early retirement intention and early retirement intention vs. normal retirement intention. RESULTS: Only 14% of the participants wished to retire...

  4. Developing and Implementing an Early Retirement Incentive Program for Marin County School Districts. Vol. 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzy, Byron W.

    In creating an early retirement incentive program for the Marin County (California) schools, the author examined the early retirement ethic, other early retirement plans in the public and private sectors, the impact of early retirement on Social Security benefits, opposition to such programs, and the factors in the California school districts that…

  5. An Examination of Early Retirement Plans for Faculty at Four-Year Private Colleges in New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M. Patricia

    College faculty early retirement plans at four-year private colleges in New England are compared to determine requirements for an early retirement policy. Findings from survey responses from 82 colleges included: 20 of the colleges had an early retirement plan; 90% of schools with an early retirement plan had a tenure policy; 25% of the schools…

  6. Depressive symptoms and concussions in aging retired NFL players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-08-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression).

  7. Depressive Symptoms and Concussions in Aging Retired NFL Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C.; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-01-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression). PMID:23644673

  8. Hypoconnectivity and Hyperfrontality in Retired American Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, Adam; MacDonald, Alex; Owen, Adrian M.

    2013-10-01

    Recent research has raised concerns about the long-term neurological consequences of repetitive concussive and sub-concussive injuries in professional players of American Football. Despite this interest, the neural and psychological status of retired players remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the performances and brain activation patterns of retired National Football League players (NFL alumni) relative to controls using an fMRI-optimised neuropsychological test of executive function. Behaviourally, the NFL alumni showed only modest performance deficits on the executive task. By contrast, they showed pronounced hyperactivation and hypoconnectivity of the dorsolateral frontal and frontopolar cortices. Critically, abnormal frontal-lobe function was correlated with the number of times that NFL alumni reported having been removed from play after head injury and was evident in individual players. These results support the hypothesis that NFL alumni have a heightened probability of developing executive dysfunction and suggest that fMRI provides the most sensitive biomarker of the underlying neural abnormality.

  9. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  10. Information architecture: Standards adoption and retirement process service action plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this Service Action Plan is to announce, as well as provide, a high-level outline of a new Departmental process for the adoption and retirement of information technology standards. This process supports the implementation of a Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture. This plan was prepared with the Department of Energy information technology standards customers and stakeholders in mind. The process described in this plan will be serviced primarily by staff from the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Information Management with assistance from designated program and site Information Technology Standards Points of Contact. We welcome any comments regarding this new Departmental process and encourage the proposal of information technology standards for adoption or retirement.

  11. Sustainability literacy of older people in retirement villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian; Skitmore, Martin; Buys, Laurie; Hu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia's central business district (CBD). Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  12. A Retirement and A Reservation: A Retrospective Autobiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sok K

    2012-01-01

    A retirement is a rite of passage that requires careful planning, because it forces a retiree to make a shift in the paradigm in life. For 37 years, I was a healing professional, a breadwinner, and a working spouse. I am now a jobless loner, an inactive pensioner, and a homebound spouse. In this retrospective autobiography, I suggest a few points to help my younger colleagues to better their upcoming retirement: professional, financial, social, and familial. To overcome Erikson's identity crisis, I volunteered to be a wounded healer at Warm Springs Indian Reservation. My volunteer medical service at Warm Springs Indian Reservation was a good antidote to creatively overcome my postretirement blues. PMID:22745621

  13. Comparing Military Retirement to the California Highway Patrol Pension Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    the 2012 Actuarial Cost Analysis performed by CalPERS (Glazier, 2012) . DOD promotion estimates are based on the professional experience of the author...the military retirement system fiscal year 2011, Alexandria, VA: DoD Office of the Actuary . Glazier, R. (2012). Actuarial Cost analysis proposal for... develop solutions to military problems. The unique risks to which service members are exposed require a different analogue to ensure a successful

  14. Labour Supply Response of a Retirement Earnings Test Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Hernæs, Erik; Jia, Zhiyang

    2009-01-01

    Norwegian administrative data are used to evaluate the impact of a doubling of the threshold in the earnings test on the labour force activity. We find no impact on labour market participation, but positive effects on earnings. The effect increases with exposure to the reform and is stronger for individuals with earnings around the threshold and with high education. Individuals who remain active until retirement age respond more to the reform than those who left labour force earlier. The resu...

  15. Utilization of Decision Analysis for Service Member Retirement Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    model formula is: RPR (Retirement Pay Redux) = (.4+.035(n-20))*(x*(1+pr)n-15) This calculation is essentially the same as the High 3 –it just allows...total at 61 = 12* RPR *[(1+r-.01)62-(a+n-15)-1]/r This will be used to add to the pay from years 62-77 because the base pay changes at year 62

  16. Report of the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-29

    LIST OF ACRONYMS PAGE XIII LIST OF ACRONYMS ACRONYM DEFINITION AAFES Army Air Force Exchange System AAP American Academy of Pediatrics ...members should receive mandatory health benefits seminars when they register one or more dependents, and when they are nearing retirement from the...Facilities,” JAMA Surgery , 149, no. 9 (September 2014): E5, http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1888411. 207 See, e.g., Army Health System

  17. Urinary cadmium levels in active and retired coal miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isermann, Julia; Prager, Hans-Martin; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Janasik, Beata; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Dufaux, Bertinus; Meyer, Hans-Friedrich; Widera, Agata; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis, based upon 24 publications, showed a significantly elevated risk for urinary bladder cancer amongst miners. In European underground hard coal mining areas, an increased risk for urinary bladder cancer development was noted among hard coal miners, in particular in three investigations in the greater Dortmund area. However, the cause remains unclear. As cadmium (Cd), which was reported to be a bladder carcinogen in humans and is a constituent of coal, the aim of this study was to determine urinary Cd levels in active and retired hard coal miners and assess whether hard coal miners demonstrated elevated metal levels. In total, 103 retired and 25 active hard coal miners as well as 18 controls without any history of hard coal mining were investigated for urinary Cd levels. Urinary Cd concentrations, in addition to other elements, were analyzed in spot urines by ICP-MS-based multi-element analysis in a Department for Forensic and Clinical Toxicology. Limit of detection (LOD) for Cd was 0.5 μg/L. Reference value for occupationally non-exposed working age population was 0.8 μg/L. In total, 49% of all underground coal miners were exposed to coal dust, 12% to grinded rock, and 39% to both. Urinary Cd levels in retired as well as active coal miners and controls were clearly below the Biological Exposure Index. Urinary Cd concentration is a suitable biomarker to evaluate the metallic load of the body, as the half-life is > than 10 years. The detected urinary Cd levels in retired and active coal miners indicated underground hard coal miners were not apparently exposed to Cd to a occupationally-relevant concentration.

  18. Reserve Retirement Equality: Treating Reserves Fairly While Saving Taxpayer Dollars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    Reserves’ sacrifices are every bit as significant as their regular counterparts, their military retirement annuity is not: many Regulars draw...outlays in check while meeting the goal of treating all of our fighting men and women equally. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Pension , deferred compensation...KEY TERMS: Pension , Deferred Compensation, Budget CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified Perhaps at no time in its history has the United States asked

  19. Yao Ming's Retirement from the NBA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小侠

    2011-01-01

    China's towering basketball star Yao Ming has announced his decision to retire from the National Basketball Association after a series of injuries made it impossible for him to continue to compete. Yao Ming says he's not leaving basketball, however, and will continue to work for his former Chinese team, the Shanghai Sharks as well as with his charity group the Yao Foundation.

  20. Retirement Transition in Ballet Dancers: "Coping Within and Coping Without"

    OpenAIRE

    Roncaglia, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Retirement transitions in ballet dancers have been under researched. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of career transition in ballet dancers, from a life course perspective. Drawing upon existing transition models (SCHLOSSBERG, 1981) and sport literature (TAYLOR & OGILVIE, 1994), the paper investigates how ballet dancers cope (or not) with the transition and explores the different factors influencing the coping process. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interv...

  1. Relocating to retirement living: an occupational perspective on successful transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Emily; McNamara, Beverley

    2013-12-01

    Older adults are increasingly relocating to alternative housing options, such as retirement villages. Relocations can be stressful and these environmental transitions can cause significant disruption to the person-environment and occupational fit, thus influencing health, well-being and quality of life. There is a lack of literature from an occupational therapy perspective in relation to healthy older adults seeking to relocate. This study aimed to identify issues healthy older adults face when relocating to retirement living, what strategies they used during this process, how they maintained a sense of home, and the potential for occupational therapy involvement. Sixteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with participants recruited from retirement living facilities across three stages of relocation; 'Decision', 'Early Days', and 'Established'. A grounded theory approach was used to code and analyse the data. Having control over the decisions surrounding relocation, being proactive rather than reactive and preparing sufficiently for the move all contributed to a positive post-location adjustment. Four main themes emerged from the narratives: timing of decision making, new beginnings, continuity, and strategies for change. This study contributes to literature surrounding how older adults occupy and make meaning of the spaces they call home and also enriches literature regarding environmental transitions. Relocation can be a disruptive process and occupational therapists are uniquely placed to facilitate healthy ageing throughout this transition using preventative and community-based occupational therapy. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Coping strategies during and after spaceflight: Data from retired cosmonauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedfeld, Peter; Brcic, Jelena; Johnson, Phyllis J.; Gushin, Vadim

    2015-05-01

    Coping is a dynamic physiological and psychological process in response to perceived environmental stress that functions to restore physiological homeostasis and reduce negative affect [1]. Thematic content analysis was employed for references to 13 well-established coping strategies in interviews with 20 retired long-duration male cosmonauts. As in previous research with other space samples [2,3] the retired cosmonauts mentioned Problem-Oriented strategies more frequently than Emotion-Oriented ones. In the present sample, Seeking Social Support, Planful Problem Solving and Endurance/Obedience/Effort were the top three most mentioned coping strategies. Cosmonauts who had spent more than a year in space, compared to those who had spent less than a year, mentioned using Planful Problem Solving more as they recalled their career and retirement. Examining changes over time, spaceflight had a positive effect on Accepting Responsibility. Endurance/Obedience/Effort steadily decreased over time, while we found an inverted-U pattern for Distancing and Self-Control. Additional results in relation to other astronaut samples and the relationship between coping and post-flight growth are discussed.

  3. Preparation for Retirement Seminar – A few places left

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    There are a few places left for the preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the four successive afternoons of 2 to 5 October 2007. Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above, as well as those who have retired during the year, who have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Indico at the following address: http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=16835 You may register for all the sessions or only for the subjects of interest to you. If you envisage retiring in the coming two or three years, I strongly encourage you to register for this seminar. All related information is available on Indico. Enrico CHIAVERI H...

  4. Preparation for Retirement Seminar – A few places left

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    There are a few places left for the preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the four successive afternoons of 2 to 5 October 2007. Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above as well as those who have retired during the year have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the main auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Indico at the following address: http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=16835 You may register for all the sessions or only for the subjects of interest to you. If you envisage retiring in the coming two or three years, I strongly encourage you to register for this seminar. All related information is available on Indico. Enrico CHIAVERI Head, H...

  5. Is There Chronic Brain Damage in Retired NFL Players? Neuroradiology, Neuropsychology, and Neurology Examinations of 45 Retired Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Ira R; Viano, David C; Haacke, E Mark; Kou, Zhifeng; LeStrange, Danielle G

    2014-09-01

    Neuropathology and surveys of retired National Football League (NFL) players suggest that chronic brain damage is a frequent result of a career in football. There is limited information on the neurological statuses of living retired players. This study aimed to fill the gap in knowledge by conducting in-depth neurological examinations of 30- to 60-year-old retired NFL players. In-depth neurological examinations of 30- to 60-year-old retired players are unlikely to detect objective clinical abnormalities in the majority of subjects. A day-long medical examination was conducted on 45 retired NFL players, including state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI]), comprehensive neuropsychological and neurological examinations, interviews, blood tests, and APOE (apolipoprotein E) genotyping. Level 3. Participants' histories focused on neurological and depression symptoms, exposure to football, and other factors that could affect brain function. The neurological examination included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) evaluation of cognitive function and a comprehensive search for signs of dysarthria, pyramidal system dysfunction, extrapyramidal system dysfunction, and cerebellar dysfunction. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) measured depression. Neuropsychological tests included pen-and-paper and ImPACT evaluation of cognitive function. Anatomical examination SWI and DTI MRI searched for brain injuries. The results were statistically analyzed for associations with markers of exposure to football and related factors, such as body mass index (BMI), ethanol use, and APOE4 status. The retired players' ages averaged 45.6 ± 8.9 years (range, 30-60 years), and they had 6.8 ± 3.2 years (maximum, 14 years) of NFL play. They reported 6.9 ± 6.2 concussions (maximum, 25) in the NFL. The majority of retired players had normal clinical mental status and central

  6. Forced Retirement from Professional Rugby Union is Associated with Symptoms of Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Craig; Kerkhoffs, Gino; Lambert, Mike I; Gouttebarge, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Rugby has a higher injury burden than other popular sports, such as football. Athletes who are forced to retire as a result of injury are associated with poor mental health. With its high injury burden, professional rugby players might be at risk of mental health conditions associated with injury-related forced retirement. This study aimed to compare mental health between former professional rugby players who were and weren't forced to retire. A questionnaire including the 4DSQ (distress), GHQ-12 (anxiety/depression), PROMIS short-form (sleep disturbance) and AUDIT-C (alcohol misuse) was completed by retired professional players from Ireland, France and South Africa. The questionnaire asked players whether or not they were forced to retire, as well as the reason for retirement. Players forced to retire were more than twice as likely to report symptoms of distress in comparison to those that retired voluntarily (odds ratio: 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-3.6, prugby players that were forced to retire may require support structures and longitudinal monitoring. Future studies should begin monitoring players during their careers to accurately assess the effect of retirement on mental health. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Working conditions as risk factors for disability retirement: a longitudinal register linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahelma Eero

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early retirement due to disability is a public health and work environment problem that shortens working careers. Transition to disability retirement is based on ill-health, but working conditions are also of relevance. We examined the contributions of work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions to subsequent disability retirement. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Information on working conditions was obtained from the baseline surveys conducted in 2000, 2001 and 2002. These data were linked with register data on disability retirement and their main diagnoses obtained from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Follow up by the end of 2008 yielded 525 disability retirement events. The analysed data included 6525 participants and 525 disability retirement events. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Results Several working conditions showed own associations with disability retirement before adjustment. After adjustment for all working conditions, the primary risk factors for all-cause disability retirement were physical workload among women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.57-2.59 and men (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.18-3.38, and low job control among women (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.99. In addition, for disability retirement due to musculoskeletal causes, the risk factors were physical workload and low job control. For disability retirement due to mental causes the risk factors were computer work and low job control. Furthermore, occupational class was a risk factor for disability retirement due to all causes and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusions Among various working conditions, those that are physically demanding and those that imply low job control are potential risk factors for disability retirement. Improving the physical working environment and enhancing control over

  8. Legacy system retirement plan for HANDI 2000 business management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.E.

    1998-09-29

    The implementation of the Business Management System (BMS) will replace a number of systems currently in use at Hanford. These systems will be retired when the replacement is complete and the data from the old systems adequately stored and/or converted to the new system. The replacement is due to a number of factors: (1) Year 2000 conversion: Most of the systems being retired are not year 2000 compliant. Estimates on making these systems compliant approach the costs of replacing with the enterprise system. (2) Many redundant custom-made systems: Maintenance costs on the aging custom developed systems is high. The systems also have overlapping functionality. Replacement with an enterprise system is expected to lower the maintenance costs. (3) Shift inefficient/complex work processes to commercial standards: Many business practices have been developed in isolation from competitive pressures and without a good business foundation. Replacement of the systems allows an opportunity to upgrade the business practices to conform to a market driven approach. (4) Questionable legacy data: Significant amount of data contained within the legacy systems is of questionable origin and value. Replacement of the systems allows for a new beginning with a clean slate and stronger data validation rules. A number of the systems being retired depend on hardware and software technologies that are no longer adequately supported in the market place. The IRM Application Software System Life Cycle Standards, HNF-PRO-2778, and the Data Systems Review Board (DSRB) define a system retirement process which involves the removal of an existing system from active support or use either by: ceasing its operation or support; or replacing it with a new system; or replacing it with an upgraded version of the existing system. It is important to note, that activities associated with the recovery of the system, once archived, relates to the ability for authorized personnel to gain access to the data and

  9. Does More Respect from Leaders Postpone the Desire to Retire? Understanding the Mechanisms of Retirement Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Wöhrmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The demographic trends (i.e., low birth rates and increasing longevity pose challenges with regard to the increase of the average employee age along with a lack of skilled personnel on the labor market. Society, organizations, and individuals are confronted with the question on how to prolong working lives in the future. Based on socioemotional selectivity theory, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between respectful leadership and older workers’ desired retirement age. In particular, we took a closer look at job satisfaction, subjective health, and work-to-private life conflict as underlying mechanisms. Further, we tested for the moderating role of occupational self-efficacy as an auxiliary condition for the assumed relationships of respectful leadership. We tested our hypothesized model using data from 1,130 blue- and white-collar workers aged 45–65 years. The results of structural equation modeling indicated that respectful leadership was positively related to older workers’ desired retirement age and that this relationship was mediated by subjective health and work-to-private life conflict but not by job satisfaction. The findings add to the literature on resources in retirement decision-making; notably, they highlight the importance of leadership behavior for older workers’ motivation and socioemotional needs.

  10. Pensions at a glance 2011 retirement-income systems in OECD and G20 countries

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2011-01-01

    The theme of this fourth edition of Pensions at a Glance is pensions, retirement and life expectancy. Many countries have increased pension ages in the face of population ageing and longer lives. Some have introduced an automatic link between pensions and life expectancy. Improvements to the incentives to work rather than retire are also a common part of recent pension-reform packages. However, ensuring that there are enough jobs for older workers remains a challenge. An in-depth look at these important policy issues is provided by five special chapters on: pension ages, retirement behaviour, pension incentives to retire, the demand for older workers and linking pensions to life expectancy. This edition updates information on the key features of pension provision in OECD countries and provides projections of retirement income for today’s workers. It offers an expanded range of 34 indicators, covering the design of national retirement-income provision, pension entitlements, incomes of older people, the fin...

  11. Health, Education, and the Post-Retirement Evolution of Household Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poterba, James; Venti, Steven; Wise, David A

    2013-01-01

    We explore the relationship between education and the evolution of wealth after retirement. Asset growth following retirement depends in part on health capital and financial capital accumulated prior to retirement, which in turn are strongly related to educational attainment. These "initial conditions" at retirement can have a lingering effect on subsequent asset evolution. We aim to disentangle the effects of education that operate through health and financial pathways (such as Social Security benefits and the general level of health) prior to retirement from the effects of education that impinge directly on asset evolution after retirement. We also consider the additional effects of education that are not captured through these pathways. We find a substantial effect of education on asset growth through each of the pathways as well as a substantial additional effect not captured by the identified pathways.

  12. Predisposing factors for early retirement in patients with schizophrenia in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Reinhard; Friedel, Heiko; Erfurth, Andreas; Angermayer, Matthias; Clouth, Johannes; Eichmann, Florian

    2008-08-01

    Although early retirement causes major changes in the life of schizophrenic patients and is among the major cost factors to be covered by payers, the causes leading to early retirement of schizophrenic patients have not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the objective of this retrospective non-interventional case-control study was to generate hypotheses on predisposing factors for early retirement in schizophrenia. Logistic regression was used to explore potential predisposing parameters with regard to their effect on the outcome early retirement. As the study results indicate, schizophrenia severity, assistance or care in the patient's everyday life, age and antipsychotic treatment with typical antipsychotics are linked to the occurrence of early retirement. Further research should be planned to confirm or refute the hypotheses determined in this retrospective analysis and to determine whether atypical antipsychotics could help to avoid early retirement and to improve the situation of schizophrenic patients.

  13. [Prevalence of alcoholism in the profile of disability retirement among employees of a federal university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Riany Moura Rocha; Abreu, Angela Maria Mendes; Pinto, Jorge Eduardo da Silva Soares

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the causes of morbidity among servers retired for disability in a federal university; identify the socio-demographic and occupational profile of the retired for disability in general and for alcoholism; and make an association between these causes. This was a retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study; the population consisted of all servers retired for disability registered at the university. The total disability retirees was of 553 servers, especially in cases of retirement for psychiatric disorders (35.6%) as the leading cause of disability, and alcoholism led to the retirement of 9% of retirees. It was concluded that the highest percentage of disability retirement was composed of workers concentrated in the university hospital.

  14. Trajectories of antidepressant medication before and after retirement: the contribution of socio-demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Taina; Lahelma, Eero; Martikainen, Pekka

    2013-05-01

    The association between retirement and mental health is assumed to depend on socio-demographic factors, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. We examined antidepressant medication before and after retirement by age, gender, living arrangements, and social class. The material comprised nationally representative register data from Finland. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate changes in antidepressant medication 7.5 years before and after disability (N = 42,937) and old-age (N = 19,877) retirement in 1997-2007 by socio-demographic factors. No changes in antidepressant medication (mean DDD/3-month period) were observed around old-age retirement regardless of the socio-demographic factors. After a slight initial increase in antidepressant medication there was a substantial rise 1.5-0 years before disability retirement, after which there was a marked decrease, particularly during the first 3 years. These effects were less pronounced in retirement due to somatic causes. Age was the strongest modifying factor in retirement due to both depression and somatic causes, with a stronger increase and limited decrease in antidepressant medication among the younger age groups. The post-retirement decrease was also somewhat stronger among men, and among those in higher social classes and those living with a spouse in depression-related retirement. In somatic causes, the pre-retirement increase was stronger among those in higher social classes. Prevention and rehabilitation of mental-health problems in association with work disability should focus particularly on young adults, among whom the strong increase in antidepressant medication before disability retirement, and the continued high levels of medication after the transition signify long periods of morbidity and premature retirement.

  15. Malaysia's ageing population : Viability of employment trust fund for retirement village

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Chwee Tin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to analyse the Feasibility of Retirement Village for Malaysia.s Ageing Population. The analysis process involves assessing the level of awareness and opinion in the respondents of the demand for Retirement Village in Malaysia using survey method. At the macro level perspective, an overview analysis of the social, economic, political and technical knowhow of implementing and operating a Retirement Village has been taken into consideration to verify the advantages and disadvanta...

  16. The impact of retirement on age related cognitive decline - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Annette; Nexø, Mette Andersen; Borg, Vilhelm

    2017-01-01

    related cognitive decline. METHOD: We conducted a systematic literature review, following the principles of the PRISMA statement, of longitudinal studies on the association between retirement and cognition. RESULTS: Only seven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We found weak evidence...... knowledge gap in regards to the impact of retirement on cognitive decline. More knowledge on the association between retirement and age related cognitive decline as well as knowledge on the mechanisms behind these associations is needed....

  17. To Resign or Not Resign...The Use of Senior Officer Retirements as a Political Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    opinion on these matters. Degree of sacrifice. Some argue that an early retirement and early departure from the highest Air Force officer position would...resigned instead of taking early retirement . When asked about this option, Gen Fogleman did not view his actions as political in nature and instead did...dissent for political reasons, and others as an early retirement for someone who lost touch with the civilian leaders he was supposed to serve. His

  18. Yearly Data for Spoken Language Preferences of Social Security Retirement and Survivor Claimants (2016 Onwards)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This data set provides annual volumes for language preferences at the national level of individuals filing claims for Retirement and Survivor benefits from federal...

  19. Does financial self-efficacy explain gender differences in retirement saving strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Bernadette E; Carrozza, Mark; Ritchey, P Neal

    2003-01-01

    Research indicates that women remain less financially prepared for retirement than are men. Little research has examined the gender difference in use of retirement plans. The present research assessed the gender difference in use of employer-sponsored and private retirement plans, and sought to account for this difference. Social status and human capital factors, occupation and industry of employment, and sense of financial self-efficacy were expected to account for gender differences. Findings indicated gender has no relationship with use of private retirement plans. However, females were found to be less likely to use an employer-sponsored plan, and this was largely accounted for by gender differences in occupation.

  20. A prospective study found impaired left ventricular function predicted job retirement after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn E; Sørensen, Henrik T; Skagen, Knud

    2004-01-01

    admission. Data about work outcome after 4 years were collected by telephone interviews. RESULTS: Fifty percent were retired by the end of follow-up. Moderately or severely reduced LVEF (35%) increased the risk of retirement almost twofold (risk ratio RR=1.8, 95% confidence interval CI=1.3-2.5). After...... adjusting for confounding factors, reduced LVEF was an independent predictor of retirement. Based on a stratified analysis, being female (RR=3.90, 95% CI=1.18-12.62) or having heavy physical job demands (RR=3.83, 95% CI=1.02-14.30) had a more pronounced impact on retirement for patients with LVEF 35...

  1. Social Security Administration Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (RSDI) Improper Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset shows improper payment experience for the Social Security Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program paid to workers, their dependents, and...

  2. Immunization and Hedging of Post Retirement Income Annuity Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyu Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing post retirement benefits requires access to appropriate investment instruments to manage the interest rate and longevity risks. Post retirement benefits are increasingly taken as a form of income benefit, either as a pension or an annuity. Pension funds and life insurers offer annuities generating long term liabilities linked to longevity. Risk management of life annuity portfolios for interest rate risks is well developed but the incorporation of longevity risk has received limited attention. We develop an immunization approach and a delta-gamma based hedging approach to manage the risks of adverse portfolio surplus using stochastic models for mortality and interest rates. We compare and assess the immunization and hedge effectiveness of fixed-income coupon bonds, annuity bonds, as well as longevity bonds, using simulations of the portfolio surplus for an annuity portfolio and a range of risk measures including value-at-risk. We show how fixed-income annuity bonds can more effectively match cash flows and provide additional hedge effectiveness over coupon bonds. Longevity bonds, including deferred longevity bonds, reduce risk significantly compared to coupon and annuity bonds, reflecting the long duration of the typical life annuity and the exposure to longevity risk. Longevity bonds are shown to be effective in immunizing surplus over short and long horizons. Delta gamma hedging is generally only effective over short horizons. The results of the paper have implications for how providers of post retirement income benefit streams can manage risks in demanding conditions where innovation in investment markets can support new products and increase the product range.

  3. Active and retired public employees' health insurance: potential data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Melinda Sandler

    2014-12-01

    Employer-provided health insurance for public sector workers is a significant public policy issue. Underfunding and the growing costs of benefits may hinder the fiscal solvency of state and local governments. Findings from the private sector may not be applicable because many public sector workers are covered by union contracts or salary schedules and often benefit modifications require changes in legislation. Research has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently large and representative data on public sector employees. This article highlights data sources researchers might utilize to investigate topics concerning health insurance for active and retired public sector employees.

  4. Hybrid Metaheuristics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to provide a state of the art of hybrid metaheuristics. The book provides a complete background that enables readers to design and implement hybrid metaheuristics to solve complex optimization problems (continuous/discrete, mono-objective/multi-objective, optimization under uncertainty) in a diverse range of application domains. Readers learn to solve large scale problems quickly and efficiently combining metaheuristics with complementary metaheuristics, mathematical programming, constraint programming and machine learning. Numerous real-world examples of problems and solutions demonstrate how hybrid metaheuristics are applied in such fields as networks, logistics and transportation, bio-medical, engineering design, scheduling.

  5. Cavum Septum Pellucidum in Retired American Pro-Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Raquel C; Hess, Christopher P; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Possin, Katherine L; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Kramer, Joel H; Berger, Mitchel S; Yaffe, Kristine; Miller, Bruce; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies report that cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) is frequent among athletes with a history of repeated traumatic brain injury (TBI), such as boxers. Few studies of CSP in athletes, however, have assessed detailed features of the septum pellucidum in a case-control fashion. This is important because prevalence of CSP in the general population varies widely (2% to 85%) between studies. Further, rates of CSP among American pro-football players have not been described previously. We sought to characterize MRI features of the septum pellucidum in a series of retired pro-football players with a history of repeated concussive/subconcussive head traumas compared with controls. We retrospectively assessed retired American pro-football players presenting to our memory clinic with cognitive/behavioral symptoms in whom structural MRI was available with slice thickness ≤2 mm (n=17). Each player was matched to a memory clinic control patient with no history of TBI. Scans were interpreted by raters blinded to clinical information and TBI/football history, who measured CSP grade (0-absent, 1-equivocal, 2-mild, 3-moderate, 4-severe) and length according to a standard protocol. Sixteen of 17 (94%) players had a CSP graded ≥2 compared with 3 of 17 (18%) controls. CSP was significantly higher grade (pfootball players compared with patients without a history of TBI.

  6. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia’s central business district (CBD. Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  7. Information theory in econophysics: stock market and retirement funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Eugenio; Saravia, G.; Astete, J.; Díaz, J.; Erribarren, R.; Riadi, F.

    2013-03-01

    Information theory can help to recognize magnetic phase transitions, what can be seen as a way to recognize different regimes. This is achieved by means of zippers specifically designed to compact data in a meaningful way at is the case for compressor wlzip. In the present contribution we first apply wlzip to the Chilean stock market interpreting the compression rates for the files storing the minute variation of the IPSA indicator. Agitated days yield poor compression rates while calm days yield high compressibility. We then correlate this behavior to the value of the five retirement funds related to the Chilean economy. It is found that the covariance between the profitability of the retirement funds and the compressibility of the IPSA values of previous day is high for those funds investing in risky stocks. Surprisingly, there seems to be no great difference among the three riskier funds contrary to what could be expected from the limitations on the portfolio composition established by the laws that regulate this market.

  8. Hybrid intermediaries

    OpenAIRE

    Cetorelli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    I introduce the concept of hybrid intermediaries: financial conglomerates that control a multiplicity of entity types active in the "assembly line" process of modern financial intermediation, a system that has become known as shadow banking. The complex bank holding companies of today are the best example of hybrid intermediaries, but I argue that financial firms from the "nonbank" space can just as easily evolve into conglomerates with similar organizational structure, thus acquiring the cap...

  9. Hybrid composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available effect was observed for the elongation at break of the hybrid composites. The impact strength of the hybrid composites increased with the addition of glass fibres. The tensile and impact properties of thermoplastic natural rubber reinforced short... panels made from conventional structural materials. Figure 3 illustrates the performance of cellular biocomposite panels against conventional systems used for building and residential construction, namely a pre- cast pre-stressed hollow core concrete...

  10. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement--testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement Model. This study aims to investigate whether data support the model and how it could be improved. Employees aged 58-62 years (N=1862), who participated in the first three waves of the Dutch Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM) were included. Determinants were assessed at baseline, central explanatory variables after one year, and early retirement after two years. Structural equation modeling was applied. Testing the Early Retirement Model resulted in a model with good fit. Health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors were related to the ability, motivation and/or opportunity to work (significant β range: 0.05-0.31). Lower work ability (β=-0.13) and less opportunity to work (attitude colleagues and supervisor about working until age 65: β=-0.24) predicted early retirement, whereas the motivation to work (work engagement) did not. The model could be improved by adding direct effects of three determinants on early retirement, ie, support of colleagues and supervisor (β=0.14), positive attitude of the partner with respect to early retirement (β=0.15), and not having a partner (β=-0.13). The Early Retirement Model was largely supported by the data but could be improved. The prolongation of working life might be promoted by work-related interventions focusing on health, work ability, the social work climate, social norms on prolonged careers, and the learning environment.

  11. The impact of health on individual retirement plans: self-reported versus diagnostic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    2009-01-01

    of diagnosis matters, however. For men, the largest reduction in planned retirement age occurs for a diagnosis of lung disease while for women it occurs for musculo-skeletal disease. Except for cardiovascular disease, diagnosed disease is more influential in men's retirement planning than in women's. Our study...

  12. From employee to retiree: Life histories and retirement in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation aims to improve our understanding of work to retirement transitions in the Netherlands, by taking a life course perspective. Specifically it focuses on the associations between educational, work, health, and family experiences earlier in life and retirement-related outcomes. Differ

  13. 5 CFR 352.309 - Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... life insurance. 352.309 Section 352.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Organizations § 352.309 Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance. (a) Agency action. An employee... entitled to retain coverage for retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance purposes if he or...

  14. 7 CFR 3.47 - Offset against amounts payable from Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Offset against amounts payable from Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund. 3.47 Section 3.47 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DEBT... debtor's anticipated or future benefit payments under the Civil Service Retirement and Disability...

  15. 38 CFR 8.5 - Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. 8.5 Section 8.5 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Premiums § 8.5 Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. Deductions from...

  16. A modeling framework for optimal long-term care insurance purchase decisions in retirement planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aparna; Li, Lepeng

    2004-05-01

    The level of need and costs of obtaining long-term care (LTC) during retired life require that planning for it is an integral part of retirement planning. In this paper, we divide retirement planning into two phases, pre-retirement and post-retirement. On the basis of four interrelated models for health evolution, wealth evolution, LTC insurance premium and coverage, and LTC cost structure, a framework for optimal LTC insurance purchase decisions in the pre-retirement phase is developed. Optimal decisions are obtained by developing a trade-off between post-retirement LTC costs and LTC insurance premiums and coverage. Two-way branching models are used to model stochastic health events and asset returns. The resulting optimization problem is formulated as a dynamic programming problem. We compare the optimal decision under two insurance purchase scenarios: one assumes that insurance is purchased for good and other assumes it may be purchased, relinquished and re-purchased. Sensitivity analysis is performed for the retirement age.

  17. 20 CFR 416.1144 - If you live in a nonprofit retirement home or similar institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....1144 If you live in a nonprofit retirement home or similar institution. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section the following definitions apply: (1) Nonprofit retirement home or similar institution... private nonprofit organization and which does not provide you with— (i) Services which are (or could...

  18. Ageing, retirement and changes in vegetable consumption in France: findings from the prospective GAZEL cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessz, Marie; Guéguen, Alice; Goldberg, Marcel; Czernichow, Sébastien; Zins, Marie

    2015-09-28

    The aim of this study was to describe the change in vegetable consumption with ageing and the transition to retirement. Study subjects were the participants of the GAZEL prospective cohort (Gaz and Électricité de France) aged 40-49 years at inclusion in 1989 who retired between 1991 and 2008 (12,942 men and 2739 women). Four FFQ were completed from 1990 to 2009. We used multiple imputation by chained equations in order to avoid dropping incomplete cases. The OR for eating vegetables everyday was estimated as a function of ageing, retirement status and the place of lunch before retirement through generalised estimating equations. Analyses were stratified by sex, and models were adjusted for confounders, including current spousal status. In 1990, 17.7% of men and 31% of women reported eating vegetables daily. The odds of consuming vegetables everyday increased with ageing for both men and women. The usual place of lunch was home for less than half the sample before retirement and for almost every respondent after retirement. For those who changed their place of lunch, the association between being retired and the odds of eating vegetables daily was positive and significant. We found that, in this cohort, vegetable consumption increased with ageing. Retirement had an indirect effect on vegetable consumption mediated by changes in the place of lunch.

  19. 75 FR 35919 - Investment Company Advertising: Target Date Retirement Fund Names and Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... designed to make it easier for investors to hold a diversified portfolio of assets that is rebalanced... portfolio that applies generally accepted investment theories, is diversified so as to minimize the risk of... retirement portfolios. Effective management of a retirement portfolio can be a challenging task, requiring...

  20. Labor supply and retirement policy in an overlapping generations model with stochastic fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen Jørgensen, Ole; Hougaard Jensen, Svend E.

    Using a stochastic general equilibrium model with overlapping generations, this paper studies a policy rule for the retirement age aiming at offsetting the effects on the supply of labor following fertility changes. The authors find that the retirement age should increase more than proportionally...

  1. Promoting Later Planned Retirement : The Differential Impact of Construal Level Interventions for Younger and Older Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.G. van Schie (Ron); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); A.C.D. Donkers (Bas)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIndividuals’ planned retirement age is affected by a trade-off between financial costs (a feasibility oriented consideration) and the number of years in retirement (a desirability oriented consideration). Previous research shows that construal level interventions (i.e., activating a

  2. The importance of financial incentives on retirement choices : New evidence for Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloni, Michele; Alessie, Rob

    2009-01-01

    This study exploits a new dataset to quantify the effect of financial incentives on retirement choices. This dataset contains-for the first time for Italy-information on seniority. The effects of marginal incentives and social security wealth (SSW) on retirement go in the expected direction; when em

  3. POSTPONING RETIREMENT AND ECONOMIC GROWTH%延迟退休和经济增长

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商胜武; 蹇明; 刘春晖; 杜娟

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of postponing retirement on economic growth in an aging society by using the infinite overlapping generations model constructed by Blanchard (1985) in a simple endogenous growth framework. It shows that postponing retirement may decelerate economic growth.

  4. 78 FR 53704 - Employee Retirement Benefit Plan Returns Required on Magnetic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... maintaining a pension, annuity, stock bonus, profit-sharing, or other funded plan of deferred compensation, or....'' P is required to file 40 Forms 1099-R, ``Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement, Profit... (including Forms 1099-R ``Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement, Profit-Sharing Plans,...

  5. 5 CFR 839.101 - What is the Federal Erroneous Retirement Coverage Corrections Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the Federal Erroneous Retirement Coverage Corrections Act? 839.101 Section 839.101 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... retirement deductions, (3) Payment of lost earnings on employee make-up contributions to the Thrift...

  6. Expectancy Theory Prediction of the Preference to Remain Employed or to Retire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eran, Mordechai; Jacobson, Dan

    1976-01-01

    Vroom's expectancy theory model to predict older worker's choices between employment or retirement hypothesized that a person's preference would be a function of differences between instrumentality of employment and retirement for attainment of outcomes, multiplied by the valence of each outcome, summed over outcomes. Results supported the…

  7. Predicting long-term sickness absence and early retirement pension from self-reported work ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sell, Lea; Bültmann, Ute; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported work ability and long-term term of sickness absence or early retirement from the labour market.......The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported work ability and long-term term of sickness absence or early retirement from the labour market....

  8. Antecedents and Consequences of Retirement Planning and Decision-Making: A Meta-Analysis and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Moriano, Juan Antonio; Depolo, Marco; Alcover, Carlos-Maria; Morales, J. Francisco

    2009-01-01

    In this study, meta-analytic procedures were used to examine the relationships between retirement planning, retirement decision and their antecedent and consequences. Our review of the literature generated 341 independent samples obtained from 99 primary studies with 188,222 participants. A small effect size (ES) for antecedents of retirement…

  9. 5 CFR 841.708 - Special provisions affecting retired military reserve technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... military reserve technicians. 841.708 Section 841.708 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... ADMINISTRATION Cost-of-Living Adjustments § 841.708 Special provisions affecting retired military reserve technicians. (a) Military reserve technicians who retire as a result of a medical disability are excepted...

  10. Mental retirement and its relations with obsolenscence training and job enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, G.A.; Sanders, J.M.A.F.; Kraan, K.O.; Liebregts, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mental retirement may occur when workers approach the end of their career and stop investing in new knowledge and social relationships at work. If workers stop investing in new knowledge, their skills may lose economic value and become obsolete. The processes of mental retirement itself a

  11. A Case Study of the Development of an Early Retirement Program for University Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronister, Jay L.; Trainer, Aileen

    1985-01-01

    To offset declining enrollments, financial constraints, younger faculties, and high tenure ratios, some institutions are considering early retirement programs to facilitate faculty turnover. A University of Virginia faculty committee reviewed several early retirement options and selected a cost-effective bridging program with ample incentives and…

  12. Ageing and unused capacity in Europe : is there an early retirement trap?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelini, Viola; Brugiavini, Agar; Weber, Guglielmo

    2009-01-01

    We address the issue of how early retirement may interact with limited use of financial markets in producing financial hardship later in life, when some risks (such as long-term care) are not insured. We argue that the presence of financially attractive early retirement schemes in a world of imperfe

  13. Expectancy Theory Prediction of the Preference to Remain Employed or to Retire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eran, Mordechai; Jacobson, Dan

    1976-01-01

    Vroom's expectancy theory model to predict older worker's choices between employment or retirement hypothesized that a person's preference would be a function of differences between instrumentality of employment and retirement for attainment of outcomes, multiplied by the valence of each outcome, summed over outcomes. Results supported the…

  14. Knowing When to Retire: The First Step towards Financial Planning in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Tan Hoe; Yoong, Folk Jee

    2011-01-01

    This article draws upon expected retirement age cohorts as a main determinant to financial planning preparation in Malaysia. The return rate was 55% from 600 questionnaires distributed. Five hypotheses were analyzed using hierarchical and stepwise regression analysis. The results revealed that expected retirement age cohort variables made…

  15. Gradual retirement, financial incentives, and labour supply of older workers : evidence from a stated preference analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.; Montizaan, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Using data from a stated preferences experiment in the Netherlands, we find that replacing full-time pension schemes with schemes that offer gradual retirement opportunities induce workers to retire one year later on average. Total life-time labour supply, however, decreases with 3.4 months because

  16. Gradual retirement, financial incentives, and labour supply of older workers: Evidence from a stated preference analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.; Montizaan, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Using data from a stated preferences experiment in the Netherlands, we find that replacing full-time pension schemes with schemes that offer gradual retirement opportunities induce workers to retire one year later on average. Total life-time labour supply, however, decreases with 3.4 months because

  17. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  18. Teaching retirement financial literacy in an undergraduate gerontology classroom: broadening the concept of the tripod or three-legged stool of retirement income utilizing active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hallie E; Brown, Pamela Pitman

    2015-01-01

    The three-legged stool concept is widely used in gerontological and geriatric education as an explanation on how one should fiscally approach his or her retirement. Financial managers, planners, retirees, business owners, even the Social Security Administration uses this metaphor of fiscal soundness in retirement planning. Gerontologists are moving away from the "tripod of retirement income" and "three-legged stool" term, as more often market work is needed for financial security. This activity focuses on the tripod or three-legged stool concepts of retirement planning using active learning, allowing the students to work collaboratively in a group, reflect upon the activity, and most importantly have fun. The game also allows for an expansion of the tripod concepts into the four pillars of economic security, broaching the use of personal assets and the possible need for longer employment. Game scenarios also emphasize macro- and microlevel forces, such as race, gender, health status, education, or marital status, which can influence timing of retirement or the level of retirement income available. The authors include instructions on how to set up the learning experience including worksheets, as well as reflection questions posed throughout the process.

  19. Gender and Relationship Status Interaction and Likelihood of Return to Work Post-Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settels, Jason; McMullin, Julie

    2017-09-01

    Population aging is an issue of mounting importance throughout the industrialized world. Concerns over labour force shortages have led to policies that prolong working life. Accordingly, present-day workforce participation patterns of older individuals are extensively varied. This study utilized the 2007 General Social Survey to examine factors associated with post-retirement paid work, focusing on the interaction between gender and relationship status, among Canadians aged 50 to 74 who had retired at least once. We find that although being in a relationship is associated with a higher likelihood of post-retirement work for men, the opposite is true for women. Our findings suggest that the gendered association between relationship status and post-retirement work results partly from the gendered associations between relationship status and one's motivation for learning and community involvement, career orientation, and sense of independence. Gendered meanings of relationship status are thus revealed through analysis of post-retirement work.

  20. Review of community facilities in Australian retirement villages: A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Skitmore, Martin; Zuo, Jian; Buys, Laurie

    2015-09-01

    Facilities in retirement villages form a supportive environment for older residents. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the provision of these facilities in retirement villages, which are regarded as a viable accommodation option for the increasing ageing population in Australia. A content analysis of facilities in 124 retirement villages operated by 22 developers in Queensland and South Australia was conducted. The most widely provided facilities are community centres, libraries, barbeque facilities, hairdressers/salons and billiards/snooker/pool tables. Commercial operators provide more facilities than not-for-profit organisations, and larger retirement villages normally have more facilities due to the economies of scale involved. The results of the study provide a useful reference for providing facilities within retirement villages that may support the quality lifestyles of older residents. © 2014 ACOTA.

  1. Differential changes in body mass index after retirement by occupation: hierarchical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Sindelar, Jody L; Wu, Ran; Gallo, William T

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines whether retirement differentially affects body mass index (BMI) patterns by occupation; occupation embodies differences in on-the-job physical demands as well as socioeconomic characteristics that could lead to variation in post-retirement BMI. We use 12 years of national data from the US and hierarchical linear models to compare BMI trajectories among four broad occupational classes. We find that those in service and other blue-collar occupations have significant increases in the slopes of their BMI trajectories after retirement, whereas participants in white-collar occupations exhibit no change. This may be due to differences in the physical requirements across blue and white collar jobs or differences in health habits post-retirement. Retirement may provide an opportunity to help prevent obesity in older individuals, especially blue collar workers.

  2. RETIREMENT PENSIONS IN LITHUANIA: 25 YEARS AND STILL IN TRANSIT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona Skucaite

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adequate social security system is one of key elements of any modern society. Retirement pensions are usually attributed to the area of social security and – as such – pension system has multiple objectives, for example, to smooth income during lifetime of individual, to address poverty issues and similar. Due to ageing population and other circumstances many countries face difficulties when providing retirement pensions solely as part of social security system. Lithuania is not an exception, so – as in many other European countries – pension reform was implemented during the period of 2003 – 2004. Design of retirement pensions before and after reform is presented in this paper. Impact of reform for estimated amount of pensions and public finances as well as main areas of uncertainty are discussed. Un sistema de seguridad social adecuado es uno de los elementos clave en cualquier sociedad moderna. Las pensiones de jubilación se vinculan normalmente a la esfera de la Seguridad Social y, como tal, el sistema de pensiones tiene múltiples objetivos: la distribución de los ingresos durante la vida de los individuos o hacer frente al riesgo de pobreza, entre otros. A raíz del envejecimiento de la población y de otras circunstancias, algunos países presentan dificultades cuando la prestación de las pensiones de jubilación se plantea únicamente como una parte de la Seguridad Social. Lituania no es una excepción y así –como otros países europeos- implantó una reforma de las pensiones durante el período 2003-2004. En este artículo se presenta el diseño de estas pensiones antes y después de la reforma y se discute su impacto en cuanto al importe estimado de pensiones y las finanzas públicas, así como se refieren las principales áreas de incertidumbre.

  3. 5 CFR 839.301 - What should I do if I am not sure whether I am or was in the wrong retirement plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) CORRECTION OF RETIREMENT COVERAGE ERRORS UNDER THE FEDERAL ERRONEOUS RETIREMENT COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Employer Responsibility to...

  4. The Process of Retirement Planning Scale (PRePS): development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noone, Jack H; Stephens, Christine; Alpass, Fiona

    2010-09-01

    Although a substantial proportion of the western population is approaching retirement age, little is known about how they are preparing for the future. Much attention has been paid to the consumption of educational material and retirement wealth in the present literature, but the process of retirement planning has been ignored. S. L. Friedman and E. K. Scholnick's (1997) theoretical model provided the basis for a comprehensive measure of retirement planning. According to their process theory, individuals develop an understanding of the problem, set goals, make a decision to start preparing, and finally undertake the behaviors needed to fulfill their goals. Fifty-two items were developed to assess each stage of the planning process for financial, health, lifestyle, and psychosocial retirement planning. These were tested on a population sample of 1,449 New Zealanders aged 49-60. Confirmatory factor analysis, bivariate correlations, and hierarchical regression provided support for the valid use of the measure. Necessary antecedents, such as the tendency to look to the future, and locus of control were significantly related to the Process of Retirement Planning Scale (PRePS). The PRePS also outperformed retirement planning measures used in the Health and Retirement Study (F. T. Juster & R. Suzman, 1995) after controlling for socioeconomic and psychological variables. This measure will enable social policy makers to determine which stages of retirement planning require support and intervention. The PRePS will also help to determine which domains of retirement planning predict well-being in later life and the factors which differentiate those who are planning from those who are not.

  5. Effect of retirement on alcohol consumption: longitudinal evidence from the French Gazel cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Zins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of retirement on alcohol consumption. The objectives were to examine changes in alcohol consumption following retirement, and whether these patterns differ by gender and socioeconomic status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We assessed alcohol consumption annually from 5 years before to 5 years after retirement among 10,023 men and 2,361 women of the French Gazel study. Data were analyzed separately for men and women, using repeated-measures logistic regression analysis with generalized estimating equations. Five years prior to retirement, the prevalence of heavy drinking was about 16% among men, and not patterned by socioeconomic status. Among women, this prevalence was 19.5% in managers, 14.7% in intermediate occupations, and 12.8% in clerical workers. Around retirement, the estimated prevalence of heavy drinking increased in both sexes. In men, this increase was 3.1 percentage points for managers, 3.2 in intermediate occupations, 4.6 in clerical workers, and 1.3 in manual workers. In women, this increase was 6.6 percentage points among managers, 4.3 in intermediate occupations, and 3.3 among clerical workers. In men the increase around retirement was followed by a decrease over the following four years, not significant among manual workers; among women such a decrease was also observed in the non-managerial occupations. It is difficult to assess the extent to which the results observed in this cohort would hold for other working populations, other conditions of employment, or in other cultural settings. A plausible explanation for the increase in heavy drinking around retirement could be that increased leisure time after retirement provides more opportunities for drinking, and not having to work during the day after may decrease constraints on drinking. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings of increased consumption around retirement suggest that information about negative effects of alcohol consumption should be

  6. 'I'd rather keep running to the end and then jump off the cliff.' Retirement decisions: who decides?

    OpenAIRE

    Vickerstaff, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Government in the UK, as elsewhere in Europe, is keen to encourage individuals to delay their retirement, work for longer and save more for their retirement. This article argues that much of this public discussion is based on the debatable premise that most people are actively choosing to leave work ‘early’. Research on retirement decisions hitherto has concentrated on individual factors, which dispose towards early retirement and has neglected the role of the employer in determining retireme...

  7. 42 CFR 426.478 - Retiring or revising an LCD during the Board's review of an ALJ's decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retiring or revising an LCD during the Board's... DETERMINATIONS AND LOCAL COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an LCD § 426.478 Retiring or revising an LCD during the Board's review of an ALJ's decision. A contractor may retire or revise an LCD during the...

  8. 5 CFR 831.664 - Post-retirement survivor election deposits that were partially paid before October 1, 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post-retirement survivor election... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Survivor Annuities Survivor Election Deposits § 831.664 Post-retirement survivor election deposits that...

  9. The Effects of Workforce-Shaping Incentives on Civil Service Retirement: Evidence from the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    probability of retirement. These policies are the special voluntary separation incentive program (VSIP) or "buyout," the voluntary early retirement authority...VERA) or early retirement option, and the retention allowance. The first two programs are intended to increase the financial incentive to leave

  10. Retirement options under the Swedish national pension system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, M D

    1982-11-01

    This article reviews the retirement options available to Swedes aged 60 to 64 under their national pension system. Summaries of the various options are followed by an analysis of the relative attractiveness of each option using hypothetical 60-year-old workers with varying characteristics. The proportion of 60- to 64-year-old Swedes selecting each option corresponds closely to the relative attractiveness orderings computed for these hypothetical workers. Sweden has a unique pension alternative called the partial pension program that allows workers aged 60-64 to reduce their hours of work to within prescribed limits and receive a pension equal to half the earnings they lost. The Swedish experience with this popular pension is described in some detail.

  11. Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions.

  12. Retirement in the Context of the Changes of Working Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noêmia Lazzareschi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims: (i to present work relations that emerged from the process of flexibility labour markets in the 90 and the distinction between the processes of  flexibility, deregulation and news precarious labor relations, understood by most authors as part of the neoliberal reforms of the last decades of the twentieth century. This distinction  is necessary because, in Brazil, labor relations are rigidly regulated since the promulgation of the Consolidation of Labor Laws in 1943 and have always been precarious; (ii to present social security reforms undertaken by governments Fernando Henrique Cardoso and  Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and the new reform bill and its impact on the calculation of the value of retirement in the context of the changes of working conditions that made new labor relations.  

  13. Concussion Frequency Associates with Musculoskeletal Injury in Retired NFL Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, Brian; Golightly, Yvonne M; Mihalik, Jason P; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Concussion is commonly associated with immediate and persistent alterations in motor function affecting postural control and gait. Patients with lower extremity joint injury have demonstrated functional alterations in the cerebral cortex, suggesting that musculoskeletal injury may be linked to alterations in brain function. Therefore, we examined the associations between concussion frequency and lower extremity musculoskeletal injury sustained during professional careers of National Football League (NFL) players in a cross-sectional study. An inclusive health history survey was mailed to 3647 NFL players who retired during 1930-2001. Respondents reported total concussion frequency (zero, one, two, or three or more) and presence (yes/no) of specific knee and ankle musculoskeletal injury during their NFL career. Separate logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between concussion frequency and each musculoskeletal injury type, adjusting for number of years played in the NFL, body mass index while playing in the NFL, and playing position. Data from 2429 players (66.6% response rate) were available for analysis. Nearly 61% reported experiencing a concussion while competing in the NFL. Meniscal tear was the most commonly reported musculoskeletal injury (32%). Compared with NFL players who did not sustain a concussion, retired NFL players with one, two, or three or more concussions had between 18% and 63%, 15% and 126%, and 73% and 165% higher odds of reporting various musculoskeletal injuries, respectively. A history of concussions was associated with a history of musculoskeletal injuries during NFL careers. These data suggest that a higher number of concussions is linked with higher odds of reporting a musculoskeletal injury.

  14. Evaluation of oral health status of retirement-age population in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidzis, Aldis; Cema, Ingrida; Krasta, Ingrida; Brinkmane, Anda; Kalnins, Imants

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Latvian government Health care financing regulations do not envisage free dental care in nursing homes. Consequently, in this situation arises need to carry out comparative evaluation of oral health status and quantity indicators of dental prosthodontics among retirement-age population in Latvia. The aim of the study was to estimate oral health and dental prosthodontics indicators among retirement-age population in Latvia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. We examinated 465 retirement-age inhabitants in Latvia. We assessed dental status, quantity and quality of the existing complete dental prostheses. We also evaluated the DMF-T index. RESULTS. Oral health indicators among Latvian retirement-age population are better than those for nursing homes residents in the same age group. Complete dental prostheses used by nursing homes residents do not meet denture's quality criteria. Retirement-age patients have oral hygiene problems. CONCLUSIONS. DMF-T index among Latvian retirement-age population is lower than among residents of nursing homes. The major component of DMF-T index is the number of lost teeth. The assessment of dental prostheses among residents of nursing homes showed unsatisfactory results. Retirement-age population in Latvia needs treatment of oral mucosal diseases, improvement of oral hygienic measures and increase of amount of dental prosthodontics.

  15. Does Organizational Justice Modify the Association Between Job Involvement and Retirement Intentions of Nurses in Finland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulander, Juhani; Sinervo, Timo; Elovainio, Marko; Heponiemi, Tarja; Helkama, Klaus; Aalto, Anna-Mari

    2016-10-01

    Given the growing aging population in Finland, retaining health staff to care for them is important. In an exploration of predictors of quitting before the typical retirement age, which ranges from 63 to 68 years in Finland, we examined whether organizational justice moderated the association between job involvement and retirement intentions among nurses 50 years and over. The sample was 446 nurses (70% practical nurses) working in 134 assisted living facilities providing 24-hour care for older residents in Finland. Job involvement was measured with the Job Involvement Questionnaire, and organizational justice with a scale that tapped its three dimensions: distributive justice, procedural justice, and interactional justice. In covariance analyses, low organizational justice and low job involvement were associated with a higher likelihood of retirement intention. Both interactional justice and procedural justice moderated the association of job involvement with retirement intentions. Among nurses with low job involvement, those who experienced unjust treatment, that is, low interactional justice, and evaluated organizational procedures as unjust had significantly stronger retirement intentions than nurses with high levels of interactional and procedural justice. Distributive justice was associated with retirement intentions in both high and low job-involved respondents. Organizational justice may act as a buffer against retirement intention as one consequence of nurses' low job involvement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. TRENDS IN RETIREMENT SAVING: EVIDENCE FROM AN ONLINE SURVEY OF ROMANIAN HOUSEHOLDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GURAN (TEODORESCU ILEANA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the population aging and the demographic crisis throughout Europe and the developed world, the public pension systems will become increasingly strained as the proportion of pensioners to the working population will continue to increase. Empirical evidence shows that individuals fail to save enough for retirement to compensate for the less than optimal level of public pensions, and thus are facing the risk of a decrease in the standard of living in their post-retirement years. This larger context makes the study of retirement saving behavior an important matter. The objective of this paper is to document current trends in retirement saving behavior from the data collected through an online survey of Romanian households. The survey was distributed as an online questionnaire that collected 1285 of responses. The survey’s objective was to document households’ financial situation, as well as other psychological and social factors that might explain saving behavior. The analysis of the survey results indicates that there is a gap between intentions and actions when it comes to retirement saving. This gap and the resulting suboptimal retirement saving rates are explained in behavioral economics literature by anomalies in the inter-temporal choices of individuals, subject to self-control issues. We will see to what extent this gap is due to self-control issues and to what extent it is explained by the current financial situation of individuals. We will also conclude about possible retirement saving behavior influencing factors and motives.

  17. Psychological transition and adjustment processes related to retirement: influence on cognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotz, Catherine; Matharan, Fanny; Amieva, Hélène; Pérès, Karine; Laberon, Sonia; Vonthron, Anne-Marie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Adam, Stéphane; Letenneur, Luc

    2016-08-29

    To investigate the relationship between psychological transition and adjustment to retirement and cognitive performances in older adults. The study's sample was taken from the Approche Multidisciplinaire Intégrée cohort, a French prospective study of retirees from agriculture, aged 65 and over, living in rural settings in southwestern France. The cross-sectional analyses were conducted on a sample of 590 elderly people without dementia at baseline and for whom information on perception of the work setting, experience of the retirement transition and adaptation to retirement life (nine variables) as well as neuropsychological measures (global cognitive functioning, episodic memory, verbal fluency, attention and psychomotor speed) were available at first visit. Multivariable linear regression analyses, including nine variables related to retirement and adjusted for potential confounding factors, indicated that three of them - positive consideration of former work situation, development of new activities during retirement and good adaptation to free time - were associated with better cognitive performances. We found that several factors proved to be determinants of good cognitive functioning at retirement and could serve as a basis for the development of more efficient intervention programs aimed at helping retirees to maintain good cognitive functioning after retirement.

  18. Vertical and horizontal trust at work as predictors of retirement intentions: the Finnish Public Sector Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muurinen, Charlotte; Laine, Matti; Pentti, Jaana; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Oksanen, Tuula

    2014-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of trust towards the supervisor (vertical trust) and trust towards co-workers (horizontal trust) with retirement intentions. The participants were 14 840 women and men working in the municipal sector in 2000-12 (Finnish Public Sector Study). Trust (vertical trust towards the supervisor and horizontal trust towards co-workers) and retirement intentions were assessed in repeated surveys. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between baseline trust and retirement intentions at 3.7 years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, health, psychological distress, health risk behaviors, personality factors, and psychosocial factors were included as covariates. Of the participants, 67.0% trusted their supervisor and 54.9% trusted their co-workers. Employees who trusted their supervisor (odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.67) and employees who trusted their co-workers (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.70) at baseline were less likely to have strong retirement intentions at follow-up compared to those who did not trust. These associations largely persisted after adjusting for all covariates and taking into account baseline retirement intentions. In conclusion, trust in the supervisor and co-workers predicted retirement intentions. These observational findings suggest that increasing trust in the workplace may contribute to lengthening working careers and preventing early retirement.

  19. Vertical and horizontal trust at work as predictors of retirement intentions: the Finnish Public Sector Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Muurinen

    Full Text Available This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of trust towards the supervisor (vertical trust and trust towards co-workers (horizontal trust with retirement intentions. The participants were 14 840 women and men working in the municipal sector in 2000-12 (Finnish Public Sector Study. Trust (vertical trust towards the supervisor and horizontal trust towards co-workers and retirement intentions were assessed in repeated surveys. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between baseline trust and retirement intentions at 3.7 years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, health, psychological distress, health risk behaviors, personality factors, and psychosocial factors were included as covariates. Of the participants, 67.0% trusted their supervisor and 54.9% trusted their co-workers. Employees who trusted their supervisor (odds ratio (OR 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.53-0.67 and employees who trusted their co-workers (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.70 at baseline were less likely to have strong retirement intentions at follow-up compared to those who did not trust. These associations largely persisted after adjusting for all covariates and taking into account baseline retirement intentions. In conclusion, trust in the supervisor and co-workers predicted retirement intentions. These observational findings suggest that increasing trust in the workplace may contribute to lengthening working careers and preventing early retirement.

  20. Stream sediment sources in midwest agricultural basins with land retirement along channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Christensen, Victoria G.; Richardson, William B.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Gellis, Allen C.; Kieta, K. A.; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2014-01-01

    Documenting the effects of agricultural land retirement on stream-sediment sources is critical to identifying management practices that improve water quality and aquatic habitat. Particularly difficult to quantify are the effects from conservation easements that commonly are discontinuous along channelized streams and ditches throughout the agricultural midwestern United States. Our hypotheses were that sediment from cropland, retired land, stream banks, and roads would be discernible using isotopic and elemental concentrations and that source contributions would vary with land retirement distribution along tributaries of West Fork Beaver Creek in Minnesota. Channel-bed and suspended sediment were sampled at nine locations and compared with local source samples by using linear discriminant analysis and a four-source mixing model that evaluated seven tracers: In, P, total C, Be, Tl, Th, and Ti. The proportion of sediment sources differed significantly between suspended and channel-bed sediment. Retired land contributed to channel-bed sediment but was not discernible as a source of suspended sediment, suggesting that retired-land material was not mobilized during high-flow conditions. Stream banks were a large contributor to suspended sediment; however, the percentage of stream-bank sediment in the channel bed was lower in basins with more continuous retired land along the riparian corridor. Cropland sediments had the highest P concentrations; basins with the highest cropland-sediment contributions also had the highest P concentrations. Along stream reaches with retired land, there was a lower proportion of cropland material in suspended sediment relative to sites that had almost no land retirement, indicating less movement of nutrients and sediment from cropland to the channel as a result of land retirement.

  1. Overweight and obesity in young and middle age and early retirement: the ARIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Denise K; Cai, Jianwen; Stevens, June

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between weight status in young and middle age and early retirement in African-American and white men and women. Data were from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Analyses were restricted to participants aged 45-55 years at baseline (n = 6,483). Associations between weight status at age 25 and ages 45-55 and age at early retirement (prior to age 65) over 9 years of follow-up were examined using proportional hazard regression analyses in models stratified by race and gender. Models were adjusted for education, household income, health insurance status, occupation, occupational physical activity, marital status, smoking, and field center. Between 18.7 and 21.6% of African-American and white men and women reported retiring prior to age 65. Although not always statistically significant, overweight and obesity were associated with early retirement in all but white women. Overweight (BMI >or= 25 kg/m(2)) at age 25 was significantly associated with early retirement in African-American women (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.62 (1.17-2.23)) and white men (1.32 (1.12-1.57)). There was also a trend between overweight at age 25 and early retirement in African-American men (1.43 (0.99-2.07)). Obesity (BMI >or= 30 kg/m(2)) in middle age was significantly associated with early retirement in white men only (1.32 (1.03-1.69)). Furthermore, overweight at age 25 and obesity at ages 45-55 were associated with early retirement for health reasons among African-American and white men and women. In conclusion, analyses of the economic impact of obesity may need to consider its effects on early retirement.

  2. Crash and Wait? The impact of the Great Recession on Retirement Planning of Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brooke Helppie

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from pre- and post-crash surveys from the Cognitive Economics study to examine the impact of recent stock and labor market wealth losses on the planned retirement ages of older Americans. Regression estimates imply that the average wealth loss between July 2008 and May/June 2009 is associated with an increase in planned retirement age of approximately 2.5 months. Furthermore, pessimism about future stock market returns is found to amplify the impact of wealth losses on retirement timing. PMID:23413315

  3. Retiree Health Insurance for Public School Employees: Does it Affect Retirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread provision of retiree health insurance for public sector workers, little attention has been paid to its effects on employee retirement. This is in contrast to the large literature on health-insurance-induced “job-lock” in the private sector. I use the introduction of retiree health insurance for public school employees in combination with administrative data on their retirement to identify the effects of retiree health insurance. As expected, the availability of retiree health insurance for older workers allows employees to retire earlier. These behavioral changes have budgetary implications, likely making the programs self-financing rather than costly to taxpayers. PMID:25479889

  4. The Early Retirement of Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Early Retirement of Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force *EDITED by DR. RICHARD H. KOHN Editorial Abstract: Air...Force chief of staff Gen Ronald Fogleman’s early retirement in 1997 has caused great speculation. Was this a “resignation in protest”? Here for the...COVERED 00-00-2001 to 00-00-2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Early Retirement of Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 5a

  5. Smoking and subsequent risk of early retirement due to permanent disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Osler, Merete; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2004-01-01

    on early retirement due to chronic disease. The objective of the study is to determine the effects of smoking behaviour on early retirement due to permanent disability in a large sample of the general population. METHODS: Follow-up study based on data from three longitudinal population studies conducted...... ratio of 5.66 (1.88-17.00) and 5.61 (2.11-14.92) in heavily smoking men and women, respectively, who were below age 60. CONCLUSIONS: Smokers are at considerably higher risk of early retirement due to chronic disease. In addition to the burden of disease, this leads to social and economic problems...

  6. Retired women and volunteering: the good, the bad, and the unrecognized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesteruk, Olena; Price, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine varied attitudes and practices toward volunteering in later life, as shared by a group of 40 retired women. We categorize women based on their engagement in retirement and label the categories according to societal expectations as follows: traditional volunteers as "good," nonvolunteers as "bad," and caregiving volunteers as "unrecognized." Using critical gerontology and a feminist framework, we juxtapose the lived experiences of retired women with a prevailing discourse on successful aging and civic engagement. We advocate for societal recognition of caregiving as a valuable form of volunteering, as well as the need to respect multiple ways in which older women experience and find meaning in later life.

  7. 5 CFR 839.701 - Is it correct that even though I had a qualifying retirement coverage error under the FERCCA, I...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... coverage? Under the FERCCA, the types of retirement coverage errors listed in § 839.241 trigger a right to make a retirement coverage election. The following chart summarizes the types of errors that do not... qualifying retirement coverage error under the FERCCA, I may not have a choice of retirement coverage?...

  8. Opinions Toward Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Interventions to Stimulate Active Living During Early Retirement: A Qualitative Study in Recently Retired Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Delfien; Mertens, Lieze; Cardon, Greet; De Cocker, Katrien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to obtain qualitative information about physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB)and their determinants, and about recently retired adults' needs regarding PA interventions. Four focus group interviews were organized. The most commonly reported PA types were walking, cycling, swimming and fitness. The most commonly reported SB were reading, TV viewing, and computer use. Car use was limited. Most adults agreed their habits had changed during retirement. The most striking PA determinant was the feeling of being a 'forgotten group' and therefore having too few tailored PA initiatives available. Furthermore, participants were not aware of the negative health effects of SB and not motivated to decrease their SB. Concerning new PA interventions, very diverse ideas were put forward, reflecting the diversity of the target group. It seems that a dynamic intervention in which participants can choose which PA type they want to increase is preferable for recently retired adults.

  9. Effects of receipt of Social Security retirement benefits on older women's employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Martie; Heath, Claudia J

    2016-09-14

    Labor force participation of women has declined since 1999; however, labor force participation of women 62+ has increased. The 2000-2006 waves of Health and Retirement Study (HRS) data, the initial years of the continuing upward trajectory, were used to test the effects of receipt of Social Security retirement benefits on older women's employment. The models tested: (a) the effect of receipt of Social Security retirement benefits on whether employed; and (b) for women receiving Social Security retirement benefits, the effect of age elected receipt of benefits on whether employed. Both models included the effects of human capital characteristics and income sources. Receipt of Social Security benefits, pension income, and current age reduced the likelihood of employment; while educational level, good to excellent health, and nonmarried marital status increased the likelihood of employment. The older the woman was when she elected Social Security benefits, the more likely she was to be employed.

  10. Retirement Migration as a Community Development Option. Attracting Retirees as a Community Development Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Annabel Kirschner; Glasgow, Nina L.

    1990-01-01

    Cook explores the feasibility of a strategy to attract retirees to rural areas using amenities, service availability, and cost-of-living factors. Glasgow examines growth in nonmetropolitan retirement counties and considers strategies for community development. (SK)

  11. 100 years of applied psychology research on individual careers: From career management to retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Wanberg, Connie R

    2017-03-01

    This article surveys 100 years of research on career management and retirement, with a primary focus on work published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Research on career management took off in the 1920s, with most attention devoted to the development and validation of career interest inventories. Over time, research expanded to attend to broader issues such as the predictors and outcomes of career interests and choice; the nature of career success and who achieves it; career transitions and adaptability to change; retirement decision making and adjustment; and bridge employment. In this article, we provide a timeline for the evolution of the career management and retirement literature, review major theoretical perspectives and findings on career management and retirement, and discuss important future research directions. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. 26 CFR 54.4974-2 - Excise tax on accumulations in qualified retirement plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section 408(a) (including a Roth IRA described in section 408A); (e) An individual retirement annuity described in section 408(b) (including a Roth IRA described in section 408A); or (f) Any other...

  13. 76 FR 6112 - Federal Benefit Payments Under Certain District of Columbia Retirement Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Payments Under Certain District of Columbia Retirement Plans AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION... teachers, police officers, and firefighters. Benefits for service after that date, and certain other... Columbia teachers, police officers, and firefighters. See 75 FR 71047. [[Page 6113

  14. 45 CFR 1627.7 - Tax sheltered annuities, retirement accounts and pensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pensions. 1627.7 Section 1627.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL... accounts and pensions. No provision contained in this part shall be construed to affect any payment by a..., retirement account, or pension fund. ...

  15. 76 FR 55213 - Technical Amendments to Federal Employees' Retirement System; Present Value Conversion Factors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... RIN 3206-AM29 Technical Amendments to Federal Employees' Retirement System; Present Value Conversion...--Present Value Conversion Factors for Earlier Commencing Date of Annuities of Current and Former Spouses...

  16. Voluntary Early Retirement Is a Painless Way to Prune Your Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    The steps necessary to establish most voluntary early retirement incentive plans include establishing a variable-rate incentive, a minimum qualifying salary, a minimum qualifying age, and a method of payment. (Author/IRT)

  17. Work and Family Characteristics as Predictors of Early Retirement in Married Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Bettina; Korunka, Christian; Hoonakker, Peter; Raymo, James M

    2010-01-01

    This study presents an integrative model of early retirement using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The model extends prior work by incorporating work-family conflict to capture the interaction between the work and family domains and by assuming proximal and distal predictors of early retirement. More precisely, the model suggests that family and job demands and resources predict family-to-work and work-to-family conflict, respectively. All of these factors are presumed to have only indirect effects on retirement timing via the intervening effect of quality of life measures, that is, marital satisfaction, job satisfaction and health. The authors assume that these three factors constitute predictors of early retirement in addition to socioeconomic status and the availability of a pension plan and health insurance. The model was tested with structural equation modeling techniques, and the results were supportive. Therefore, the proposed model offers a general framework for the integration of previous research findings.

  18. Making the End as Good as the Beginning: Financial Planning and Retirement for Women Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Debra J; Shenaq, Deana; Thakor, Manisha

    2016-10-01

    Financial planning is critically important to ensure financial security both during a plastic surgical career and in retirement. Unfortunately, plastic surgery training includes very little in the way of financial planning. The information that is available in the literature is mostly geared toward men. Women, with longer lifespans and more family care responsibilities, have unique needs when it comes to financial planning. Adequate attention must also be paid to life after retirement. A plastic surgical career can be all-encompassing, and thus women need to carefully plan volunteer activities, new hobbies, and even a second career to make their retirement years fulfilling and enjoyable. Key points regarding financial planning during the various phases of a woman plastic surgeon's career are discussed. Options for retirement are presented.

  19. Reversing Early Retirement in GermanyA Longitudinal Analysis of the Effects of Recent Pension Reforms on the Timing of the Transition to Retirement and on Pension Incomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Buchholz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effects and risks of recent pension reforms in Germany. While German pension policy systematically supported early retirement for many years in order to relieve the regulated labour market in times of economic stagnation, there has been a substantial change of the pension policy paradigm in the more recent past. Latest reforms expect older people to prolong working life. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP and applying micro-level longitudinal research methods, this contribution shows that the recent reversal of early retirement in Germany has been at the price of growing social inequalities in old age.

  20. The Uniformed Services' Thrift Savings Plan and Military Retirement Compensation package options

    OpenAIRE

    Batchelder, Craig D.; Lombard, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    MBA Professional Report Military service members are a diverse population, and have numerous different financial situations and needs. While the current total military retirement compensation package is by many accounts fair, adding flexibility and value to the system would benefit both the military and individuals. This report surveys the total military retirement compensation package, and then focuses on one component of the system: the Uniformed Services' Thrift Savings Plan (TSP). As...

  1. Joint associations of smoking and physical activity with disability retirement: a register-linked cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Lahti, Jouni

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the risk of disability retirement by smoking and physical activity, and particularly whether the risk due to smoking is affected by the level of physical activity. Additionally, the contribution of baseline health, sociodemographic and work-related factors to the joint associations of smoking and physical activity with disability retirement was considered. Design Cohort study. Setting Helsinki, Finland. Participants Employees of the City of Helsinki, aged 40–60 years at...

  2. United States Military Non-Disabled Retirement Pay: Let it Stand!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    military force must be young and vibrant: Most civilian sector pension plans require employees to reach normal retirement age (typically 62-65...to be eligible for an unreduced retirement annuity . However most civilian employers do not require youth and vigor of their employees, nor are they...during the extended field service required over the period 1812- 1861. While the law provided a pension of one-half pay for disabled officers, there

  3. Asset rich cash poor in the economic downturn: the financial challenges facing retired older people

    OpenAIRE

    Hean, Sarah; Worswick, Louise; Fenge, Lee-Ann; Wilkinson, Charlie; Fearnley, Stella; Ersser, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Older people are thought to be particularly vulnerable during times of economic downturn. Little is currently understood of the impact of the current economic downturn on the financial circumstances and wellbeing of retired people and the nature of the services and support needed to enable them to cope financially and maintain their wellbeing and quality of life. Retired people are not a homogenous group. Therefore, this study explores the impact of the downturn on a specific group: house own...

  4. Estimation of retired mobile phones generation in China: A comparative study on methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road 18, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Yang, Jianxin, E-mail: yangjx@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road 18, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Lu, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road 18, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Song, Xiaolong [Shanghai Cooperative Centre for WEEE Recycling, Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, Jinhai Road 2360, Pudong District, Shanghai 201209 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The sales data of mobile phones in China was revised by considering the amount of smuggled and counterfeit mobile phones. • The estimation of retired mobile phones in China was made by comparing some relevant methods. • The advanced result of estimation can help improve the policy-making. • The method suggested in this paper can be also used in other countries. • Some discussions on methodology are also conducted in order for the improvement. - Abstract: Due to the rapid development of economy and technology, China has the biggest production and possession of mobile phones around the world. In general, mobile phones have relatively short life time because the majority of users replace their mobile phones frequently. Retired mobile phones represent the most valuable electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) in the main waste stream because of such characteristics as large quantity, high reuse/recovery value and fast replacement frequency. Consequently, the huge amount of retired mobile phones in China calls for a sustainable management system. The generation estimation can provide fundamental information to construct the sustainable management system of retired mobile phones and other waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). However, the reliable estimation result is difficult to get and verify. The priority aim of this paper is to provide proper estimation approach for the generation of retired mobile phones in China, by comparing some relevant methods. The results show that the sales and new method is in the highest priority in estimation of the retired mobile phones. The result of sales and new method shows that there are 47.92 million mobile phones retired in 2002, and it reached to 739.98 million in China in 2012. It presents an increasing tendency with some fluctuations clearly. Furthermore, some discussions on methodology, such as the selection of improper approach and error in the input data, are also conducted in order to

  5. Joint associations of smoking and physical activity with disability retirement: a register-linked cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Lahti, Jouni

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the risk of disability retirement by smoking and physical activity, and particularly whether the risk due to smoking is affected by the level of physical activity. Additionally, the contribution of baseline health, sociodemographic and work-related factors to the joint associations of smoking and physical activity with disability retirement was considered. Design Cohort study. Setting Helsinki, Finland. Participants Employees of the City of Helsinki, aged 40–60 years at baseline in 2000–2002, were followed up using complete register data from the Finnish Centre of Pensions until the end of 2010 (n=6390, with a consent to register linkage from 74%). Primary outcome measure All-cause disability retirement (ICD-10). Results Altogether, 608 employees (9.5%) retired due to disability during the follow-up. Cox regression models were fitted to examine the joint associations of smoking and physical activity with subsequent disability retirement. Never-smokers, ex-smokers and moderate smokers who were inactive or moderately active had an increased risk of disability retirement, but if they were vigorously active, they had no excess risk. Instead, all heavy smokers (15 or more cigarettes per day among women, and 20 or more among men), irrespective of physical activity, had an increased risk of disability retirement. The examined associations attenuated but remained for ex-smokers and heavy smokers after adjustments for gender, age, socioeconomic position, mental and physical workload, problem drinking, body mass index and self-rated health. No gender interactions were found. Conclusions Vigorous physical activity might help prevent disability retirement not only among never-smokers, but even among ex-smokers and moderate smokers. However, among heavy smokers, physical activity is not sufficient to eliminate the adverse effects of smoking on health and work ability. PMID:26224014

  6. Predictors of early retirement after cancer rehabilitation-a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, A; Barth, J; Gaspar, M; Leibbrand, B; Kegel, C-D; Bootsveld, W; Friedrich, M; Hartung, T J; Berger, D; Koch, U

    2016-06-23

    This longitudinal study was designed to assess patients' desire for early retirement and investigate which cancer-related and psychosocial characteristics are associated with early retirement. We assessed 750 cancer patients at the beginning (t0 ) and end (t1 ) of, and 12 months after (t2 ) inpatient cancer rehabilitation. At t0 , 22% had a desire to retire early. These patients reported significantly longer sick leave periods, less favourable workplace environments, lower work ability, higher psychological distress and lower quality of life than other patients. At t2 , 12.5% of patients received temporary or permanent early retirement pensions. Of all patients with a desire for early retirement at t0 , 43% had returned to work at t2 . This subgroup had a significantly lower physical quality of life than other patients returning to work. The most influential predictors of early retirement were being on sick leave (OR = 6.50, 95% CI = 1.97-21.47) and a desire for early retirement (OR = 5.61, 95% CI = 2.73-11.52). Inverse predictors of early retirement were cancer remission (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.10-0.53), perceived productivity (OR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.18-0.83), work satisfaction (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.17-0.77) and mental quality of life (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.91-0.98). This underlines the need for cancer-specific multi-professional rehabilitation and occupational therapy programmes.

  7. Effects of Companies’ Initiatives to Reduce Early Retirement Among Older Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tove Midtsundstad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although active ageing policy and practice vary between countries, we believe that knowledge about the effects of Norwegian companies’ initiatives to delay early retirement is of interest for all countries striving to increase the employment rates of older workers. Since the agreement on a more inclusive working life (IW agreement was signed in 2001, the Norwegian government and social partners have encouraged companies to develop a more senior-friendly policy and implement special measures to retain older workers. In this article, we evaluate the effects of such measures. Our research question is, have preventive measures offered by companies to employees aged 62 years and older contributed to reduced rates of early retirement? We use a ‘difference-in-differences’ approach and examine whether measures at the company level to counteract early retirement actually affect older employees’ retirement decisions, controlling for different individual and enterprise factors. This is done by comparing changes and differences in the individual likelihood of early retirement on the contractual pension (AFP scheme and disability pension in the period 2002–2007 among employees 62 years of age in businesses with and without the corresponding preventive measures/instruments. The analyses show that the likelihood that a 62-year-old worker will retire on the AFP scheme has increased from 2002 to 2007. This applies equally to 62-year-old employees in enterprises that have enacted special measures to retain older workers as well as 62-year-olds in enterprises that have not enacted any such measures. On the other hand, the likelihood that a 62-year-old worker will retire because of disability decreased from 2002 to 2007, among employees in both the intervention enterprises and the control enterprises. However, when controlling for other relevant characteristics of individuals and enterprises, the analysis indicates that the measures as such have had no

  8. The association between psychosocial work environment, attitudes towards older workers (ageism) and planned retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Sannie; Rugulies, Reiner; Løngaard, Katja

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account.......The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account....

  9. Methodology for the analysis and retirement of assets: Power transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Gómez-Ramírez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The following article consists of the development of a methodology of the area of the engineering of high voltage for the analysis and retirement of repaired power transformers, based on engineering criteria, in order to establish a correlation between the conditions of the transformer from several points of view: electrical, mechanical, dielectrics and thermal. Realizing an analysis of the condition of the question, there are two situations of great transcendency, first one, the international procedure are a “guide” for the acceptance of new transformers, by what they cannot be applied to the letter for repaired transformers, due to the process itself of degradation that the transformer has suffered with to happen of the years and all the factors that they were carrying to a possible repair. Second one, with base in the most recent technical literature, there have been analyzed articles, which analyze the oil dielectrics and the paper, which correlations are established between the quality of the insulating paper and the furan concentrations in the oils. To finish, great part of the investigation till now realized, it has focused in the analysis of the transformer, from the condition of the dielectric oil, so in most cases, there is not had the possibility of realizing a forensic engineering inside the transformer in operation and of being able this way, of analyzing the components of design who can compromise the integrity and operability of the same one.

  10. Helga Schmal retires after 36 years' service at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Helga Schmal retired from CERN on 7 May after completing 36 years of talented service to the Organization. Of German nationality, Helga was born in the Rheinland and came to CERN on 1 April 1965. She has had a remarkable career at CERN. From her beginnings as a secretary in the NPA Division and subsequently in the Department of Theoretical Physics, in 1972 she went on to become assistant to Director-General Willibald Jentschke and in 1976 to Director-General for Research Léon Van Hove. In 1981 Herwig Schopper also requested Helga to become his assistant on his appointment as Director-General. With this breadth of top-level experience behind her, in 1988 Helga took over management of the Council Secretariat, whose task it is to prepare for the Council sessions and meetings of its Committees and, within that framework, to ensure good relations between the Delegates of the Member States and the Organization. During this period she was also secretary to ICFA, a function which she performed with equal s...

  11. Trajectories of Work Disability and Economic Insecurity Approaching Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Kim M; Willson, Andrea E

    2017-07-08

    In this article, we examine the connection between trajectories of work disability and economic precarity in late midlife. We conceptualize work disability as a possible mechanism linking early and later life economic disadvantage. We model trajectories of work disability characterized by timing and stability for a cohort of Baby Boomers (22-32 in 1981) using 32 years of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and latent class analysis. Measures of childhood disadvantage are included as predictors of work disability trajectories, which are subsequently included in logistic regression models predicting four economic outcomes (poverty, asset poverty, home ownership, and pension ownership) at ages 54-64. Childhood disadvantage selected individuals into five distinct classes of work disability that differed in timing and stability. All of the disability trajectories were associated with an increased risk of economic insecurity in late midlife compared to the never work disabled. This study contributes to the aging literature through its incorporation of the early life origins of pathways of disability and their links to economic outcomes approaching retirement. Findings suggest work disability is anchored in early life disadvantage and is associated with economic insecurity later in life.

  12. Should the mini-mental state examination be retired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnero-Pardo, C

    2014-10-01

    Short cognitive tests are routinely used in clinical practice to detect and screen for cognitive impairment and dementia. These cognitive tests should meet minimum criteria for both applicability and psychometric qualities. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is the most frequently applied short cognitive test, and the article introducing it remains a milestone in the history of medicine. Its main advantages are its widespread use and the extensive empirical evidence that supports it. However, the MMSE has important shortcomings, including lack of standardisation, its lack of suitability for illiterate subjects, the considerable effect of socio-educational variables on results, and its limited effectiveness for detecting cognitive impairment. Lastly, since the test is copyright-protected, using it is necessarily either costly or fraudulent. Newer available instruments do not share these shortcomings and have demonstrated greater diagnostic accuracy for detecting cognitive impairment and dementia, as well as being more cost-effective than the MMSE CONCLUSION: It is time to acknowledge the MMSE's important role in the history of medicine and grant it a deserved and honourable retirement. Its place will be taken by more effective instruments that require less time, are user-friendly and free of charge, can be applied to all individuals, and yield more equitable outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Retirement Transition in Ballet Dancers: "Coping Within and Coping Without"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Roncaglia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Retirement transitions in ballet dancers have been under researched. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of career transition in ballet dancers, from a life course perspective. Drawing upon existing transition models (SCHLOSSBERG, 1981 and sport literature (TAYLOR & OGILVIE, 1994, the paper investigates how ballet dancers cope (or not with the transition and explores the different factors influencing the coping process. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews from fourteen international ballet dancers were used adopting an idiographic approach through interpretative phenomenological analysis and tenets of grounded theory methodology. The results identified a main theme "Coping strategies: Coping within & without" and eight sub-categories: Denial, alienation, indecision, severance, acceptance, letting go, renegotiation and reconstruction. The individual can experience different responses, which trigger different coping processes and subsequently different types of support are sought. Finally the paper briefly discusses some of the implications for future career development and career guidance. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs100210

  14. Down with Retirement: Implications of Embodied Cognition for Healthy Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Bernhard; Kibele, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and neurocognitive approaches to human healthy aging attribute age-related decline to the biologically caused loss of cognitive-control functions. However, an embodied-cognition approach to aging implies a more interactive view according to which cognitive control emerges from, and relies on a person's active encounters with his or her physical and social environment. We argue that the availability of cognitive-control resources does not only rely on biological processes but also on the degree of active maintenance, that is, on the systematic use of the available control resources. Unfortunately, there is evidence that the degree of actual use might systematically underestimate resource availability, which implies that elderly individuals do not fully exploit their cognitive potential. We discuss evidence for this possibility from three aging-related issues: the reduction of dopaminergic supply, loneliness, and the loss of body strength. All three phenomena point to a downward spiral, in which losses of cognitive-control resources do not only directly impair performance but also more indirectly discourage individuals from making use of them, which in turn suggests underuse and a lack of maintenance-leading to further loss. On the positive side, the possibility of underuse points to not yet fully exploited reservoirs of cognitive control, which calls for more systematic theorizing and experimentation on how cognitive control can be enhanced, as well as for reconsiderations of societal practices that are likely to undermine the active maintenance of control resources-such as retirement laws.

  15. Down with retirement: implications of embodied cognition for healthy aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Hommel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive and neurocognitive approaches to human healthy aging attribute age-related decline to the biologically-caused loss of cognitive-control functions. However, an embodied-cognition approach to aging implies a more interactive view according to which cognitive control emerges from, and relies on a person’s active encounters with his or her physical and social environment. We argue that the availability of cognitive-control resources does not only rely on biological processes but also on the degree of active maintenance, that is, on the systematic use of the available control resources. Unfortunately, there is evidence that the degree of actual use might systematically underestimate resource availability, which implies that elderly individuals do not fully exploit their cognitive potential. We discuss evidence for this possibility from three aging-related issues: the reduction of dopaminergic supply, loneliness, and the loss of body strength. All three phenomena point to a downward spiral, in which losses of cognitive-control resources do not only directly impair performance but also more indirectly discourage individuals from making use of them, which in turn suggests underuse and a lack of maintenance—leading to further loss. On the positive side, the possibility of underuse points to not yet fully exploited reservoirs of cognitive control, which calls for more systematic theorizing and experimentation on how cognitive control can be enhanced, as well as for reconsiderations of societal practices that are likely to undermine the active maintenance of control resources—such as retirement laws.

  16. Hybrid microelectronic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.

    Various areas of hybrid microelectronic technology are discussed. The topics addressed include: basic thick film processing, thick film pastes and substrates, add-on components and attachment methods, thin film processing, and design of thick film hybrid circuits. Also considered are: packaging hybrid circuits, automating the production of hybrid circuits, application of hybrid techniques, customer's view of hybrid technology, and quality control and assurance in hybrid circuit production.

  17. The association between psychosocial work environment, attitudes towards older workers (ageism) and planned retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sannie; Rugulies, Reiner; Løngaard, Katja; Borg, Vilhelm; Thielen, Karsten; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account. In the fall and winter of 2008, self-report data on work environment, health, workability and retirement plans were collected in a representative national sample (n = 3,122) of Danish employees 50 years or older. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyse associations in a cross-sectional design. Predictor variables were standardized. In analyses adjusted for socio-demography, socio-economy, health, workability and work performance, 4 out of 6 examined psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities, lack of predictability) were significantly associated with plans of early retirement (OR: 1.10-1.13). Stratified on gender, three psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities) remained significant for men (OR: 1.15-1.25) and none for women. In particular was the association between retirement plans and ageism highly significant in the male subgroup, but no association was found in the female subgroup. Ageism, lack of recognition and lack of development possibilities are associated with older male workers' retirement plans in our analyses. Workability has the strongest association with retirement plans for both genders.

  18. Goal clarity and financial planning activities as determinants of retirement savings contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawski, Robert S; Hershey, Douglas A; Jacobs-Lawson, Joy M

    2007-01-01

    Retirement counselors, financial service professionals, and retirement intervention specialists routinely emphasize the importance of developing clear goals for the future; however, few empirical studies have focused on the benefits of retirement goal setting. In the present study, the extent to which goal clarity and financial planning activities predict retirement savings practices was examined among 100 working adults. Path analysis techniques were used to test two competing models, both of which were designed to predict savings contributions. Findings provide support for the model in which retirement goal clarity is a significant predictor of planning practices, and planning, in turn, predicts savings tendencies. Two demographic variables-income and age-were also revealed to be important elements of the model, with income accounting for roughly half of the explained variance in savings contributions. The results of this study have implications for the development of age-based models of planning, as well as implications for retirement counselors and financial planners who advise workers on long-term saving strategies.

  19. Job demands and resources and their associations with early retirement intentions through recovery need and work enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Schreurs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Job characteristics play a major role in shaping employees’ early retirement decisions.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to examine the mechanisms through which job characteristics associate with early retirement intention, using the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R model as a theoretical framework.Motivation of the study: Early retirement presents a threat to existing health and pension systems, and to organisational functioning. Therefore, it is important to examine how workrelated factors contribute to early retirement decisions.Research design, approach and method: Two parallel processes were theorised to shape early retirement intention: a health impairment process (i.e. job demands → recovery need → early retirement intention and a motivational process (i.e. job resources → work enjoyment → early retirement intention. Survey data were collected from a heterogeneous sample of 1812 older workers (age > 45. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.Main findings: Job demands and job resources were both associated with work enjoyment, which was associated with early retirement intention. Recovery need did not add to the prediction of early retirement intention.Practical/managerial implications: To retain older workers, companies should promote work conditions and practices that keep older workers motivated. Good health may be a necessary condition for retaining older workers, but it does not appear to be a sufficient one.Contribution/value-add: The results suggest that – for early retirement intention – the motivational process is more prominent than the health impairment process.

  20. Sense of coherence and intentions to retire early among Finnish women and men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahelma Eero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that age, physical and mental health status and working circumstances, along with different socio-economic and psychosocial factors affect the retirement process. However, the role of psychological resources, such as sense of coherence (SOC, on the retirement process is still poorly understood. This study investigated the associations between SOC and intentions to retire early and whether these associations were explained by socio-economic, psychosocial and work and health related factors. Methods The data were derived from the Finnish Health and Social Support (HeSSup Study. The information was gathered from postal surveys in 1998 (baseline and in 2003 (follow-up. The analyzed data consisted of 7409 women and 4866 men aged 30-54 at baseline. SOC and background factors including childhood circumstances, language, education, working circumstances, social support, health behaviour and somatic and mental health status were assessed at baseline. The intentions to retire early were assessed at follow-up using logistic regression analysis. Results SOC was associated with intentions to retire early among both genders. Socio-economic, psychosocial and work and health behaviour related factors did not influence the association between SOC and intentions to retire early among women and men reporting somatic or mental illness. Further, the association between SOC and intentions to retire early remained among (somatically and mentally healthy men. Among healthy women the association was weaker and statistically non-significant. Among unhealthy women, the odds ratios of SOC was 0.97 (CI 95% 0.96-0.98 and 0.97 among ill men (CI 95% 0.96-0.98, i.e., each additional SOC score reduced the risk of intentions by 3% among both genders. Conclusion Unhealthy employees with low SOC and low education were in the greatest risk to have reported intentions to retire early. SOC had an independent effect on intentions to