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Sample records for fr-i radio source

  1. The disc-dominated host galaxy of FR-I radio source B2 0722+30

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A; Holt, J; Brogt, E; Van Moorsel, G

    2009-01-01

    We present new observational results that conclude that the nearby radio galaxy B2 0722+30 is one of the very few known disc galaxies in the low-redshift Universe that host a classical double-lobed radio source. In this paper we use HI observations, deep optical imaging, stellar population synthesis modelling and emission-line diagnostics to study the host galaxy, classify the Active Galactic Nucleus and investigate environmental properties under which a radio-loud AGN can occur in this system. Typical for spiral galaxies, B2 0722+30 has a regularly rotating gaseous disc throughout which star formation occurs. Dust heating by the ongoing star formation is likely responsible for the high infrared luminosity of the system. The optical emission-line properties of the central region identify a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (LINER)-type nucleus with a relatively low [OIII] luminosity, in particular when compared with the total power of the Fanaroff & Riley type-I radio source that is present in t...

  2. Direct And Reprocessed Gamma-Ray Emission of Kpc-Scale Jets in FR I Radio Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; /SLAC; Kneiske, T.M.; /Adelaide U.; Kataoka, J.; /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-09

    We discuss the contribution of kiloparsec-scale jets in FR I radio galaxies to the diffuse {gamma}-ray background radiation. The analyzed {gamma}-ray emission comes from inverse-Compton scattering of starlight photon fields by the ultrarelativistic electrons whose synchrotron radiation is detected from such sources at radio, optical and X-ray energies. We find that these objects, under the minimum-power hypothesis (corresponding to a magnetic field of 300 {micro}G in the brightest knots of these jets), can contribute about one percent to the extragalactic {gamma}-ray background measured by EGRET. We point out that this result already indicates that the magnetic fields in kpc-scale jets of low-power radio galaxies are not likely to be smaller than 10 {micro}G on average, as otherwise the extragalactic {gamma}-ray background would be overproduced.

  3. What determines the properties of the X-ray jets in FR-I radio galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Harwood, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    We present the first large sample investigation of the properties of jets in Fanaroff and Riley type I radio galaxies (FR-I) based on data from the Chandra archive. We explore relations between the properties of the jets and the properties of host galaxies in which they reside. We find previously unknown correlations to exist, relating photon index, volume emissivity, jet volume and luminosity, and find that the previously long held assumption of a relationship between luminosities at radio and X-ray wavelengths is linear in nature when bona fide FR-I radio galaxies are considered. In addition, we attempt to constrain properties which may play a key role in determination of the diffuse emission process. We test a simple model in which large-scale magnetic field variations are primarily responsible for determining jet properties; however, we find that this model is inconsistent with our best estimates of the relative magnetic field strength in our sample. Models of particle acceleration should attempt to accou...

  4. A Multiwavelength Study of a Young, Z-shaped, FR I Radio Galaxy NGC 3801

    CERN Document Server

    Hota, Ananda; Ohyama, Youichi; Saikia, D J; Dinh-V-Trung,; Croston, J H

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a multi-wavelength study of a merger candidate, NGC3801, hosting a young FR I radio galaxy, with a Z-shaped structure. Analysing archival data from the VLA, we find two HI emission blobs on either side of the host galaxy, suggesting a 30 kpc sized rotating gas disk aligned with stellar rotation, but rotating significantly faster than the stars. Broad, faint, blue-shifted absorption wing and an HI absorption clump associated with the shocked shell around the eastern lobe are also seen, possibly due to an jet-driven outflow. While 8.0 um dust and PAH emission, from Spitzer and near and far UV emission from GALEX is seen on a large scale in an S-shape, partially coinciding with the HI emission blobs, it reveals a ~2 kpc radius ring-like, dusty, starforming structure in the nuclear region, orthogonal to the radio jet axis. Its similarities with Kinematically Decoupled Core galaxies and other evidences have been argued for a merger origin of this young, bent jet radio galaxy.

  5. New insights into the evolution of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 270 (NGC 4261) from VLA and GMRT radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kolokythas, Konstantinos; Giacintucci, Simona; Raychaudhury, Somak; Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Worrall, Diana M; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 240 MHz observations of the nearby luminous FR I radio source 3C 270, in the group-central elliptical NGC 4261. Combining these data with reprocessed Very Large Array (VLA) 1.55 and 4.8 GHz observations, we produce spectral index maps that reveal a constant spectral index along the jets and a gradual steepening from the ends of the jets through the lobes towards the nucleus. A Jaffe & Perola (JP) model fitted to the integrated spectrum of the source gives an asymptotic low-frequency index of $\\alpha_{inj}=0.53_{-0.02}^{+0.01}$, while JP models fitted to the observed spectral index trend along the lobes allow us to estimate radiative ages of $\\sim29$ Myr and $\\sim37$ Myr for the west and east lobes respectively. Our age estimates are a factor of two lower than the 75-Myr upper limit derived from X-ray data (O'Sullivan et al. 2011). We find unlikely the scenario of an early supersonic phase in which the lobe expanded into the ISM at approximately Mach 6 (350...

  6. Radio source evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Perucho, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Baldwin (1982) wrote that "the distribution of sources in the radio luminosity, P, overall physical size, D, diagram" could be considered as "the radio astronomer's H-R diagram". However, unlike the case of stars, not only the intrinsic properties of the jets, but also those of the host galaxy and the intergalactic medium are relevant to explain the evolutionary tracks of radio radio sources. In this contribution I review the current status of our understanding of the evolution of radio sources from a theoretical and numerical perspective, using the P-D diagram as a framework. An excess of compact (linear size < 10 kpc) sources could be explained by low-power jets being decelerated within the host galaxy, as shown by recent numerical simulations. These decelerated jets could also explain the population of the radio sources that have been recently classified as FR0. I will discuss the possible tracks that radio sources may follow within this diagram, and some of the physical processes that can explain the d...

  7. Radio frequency ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Shen Guan Ren; Gao Fu; LiuNaiYi

    2001-01-01

    The study on Radio Frequency Ion Source is mainly introduced, which is used for CIAE 600kV ns Pulse Neutron Generator; and obtained result is also presented. The RF ion source consists of a diameter phi 25 mm, length 200 mm, coefficient of expansion =3.5 mA, beam current on target >=1.5 mA, beam spot =100 h.

  8. Relics of Double Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarakanath, K S

    2009-01-01

    We have formed a new sample which consists of extended extragalactic radio sources without obvious active galactic nuclei (AGN) in them. Most of these sources appear to be dead double radio sources. These sources with steep spectra ($\\alpha < $ -1.8; S $\\propto \

  9. The nuclear accretion in the FR I radio galaxy IC4296 from CHANDRA and VLBA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, S; Comastri, A; Fabbiano, G; Fiore, F; Vignali, C; Morganti, R; Trinchieri, G

    2003-01-01

    A high angular resolution study of the nucleus of the FR I galaxy IC4296 using Chandra ACIS-S and VLBA observations is presented, with the aim of studying the nature of the accretion process. Pointlike and hard X-ray emission is found, well described by a moderately absorbed power law of Gamma=1.48^{+0.42}_{-0.34}; no iron fluorescence line from cold material is detected. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity is 2.4\\times 10^{41} erg/s, that is \\sim 400 times lower than the accretion luminosity resulting from the estimated Bondi mass accretion rate and a radiative efficiency of 10%. On the parsec scale a jet and a counter-jet extend out from a central unresolved ``core'' in the 8.4 GHz image. Their orientation is in good agreement with that of the large scale jets and their bulk speed is relativistic. The parsec scale spectrum is convex over 2-22 GHz. The observed nuclear luminosity is not likely to be reconciled with the accretion luminosity by assuming that Compton thick material surrounds the nucleus. Low radiative ef...

  10. Making Faranoff-Riley I radio sources. I. Numerical hydrodynamic 3D simulations of low-power jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaglia, S.; Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Capetti, S.; Mignone, A.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Extragalactic radio sources have been classified into two classes, Fanaroff-Riley I and II, which differ in morphology and radio power. Strongly emitting sources belong to the edge-brightened FR II class, and weakly emitting sources to the edge-darkened FR I class. The origin of this dichotomy is not yet fully understood. Numerical simulations are successful in generating FR II morphologies, but they fail to reproduce the diffuse structure of FR Is. Aims: By means of hydro-dynamical 3D simulations of supersonic jets, we investigate how the displayed morphologies depend on the jet parameters. Bow shocks and Mach disks at the jet head, which are probably responsible for the hot spots in the FR II sources, disappear for a jet kinetic power ℒkin ≲ 1043 erg s-1. This threshold compares favorably with the luminosity at which the FR I/FR II transition is observed. Methods: The problem is addressed by numerical means carrying out 3D HD simulations of supersonic jets that propagate in a non-homogeneous medium with the ambient temperature that increases with distance from the jet origin, which maintains constant pressure. Results: The jet energy in the lower power sources, instead of being deposited at the terminal shock, is gradually dissipated by the turbulence. The jets spread out while propagating, and they smoothly decelerate while mixing with the ambient medium and produce the plumes characteristic of FR I objects. Conclusions: Three-dimensionality is an essential ingredient to explore the FR I evolution becausethe properties of turbulence in two and three dimensions are very different, since there is no energy cascade to small scales in two dimensions, and two-dimensional simulations with the same parameters lead to FRII-like behavior.

  11. The spectra of jet bases in FR I radio galaxies: implications for particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, R A

    2013-01-01

    We present accurate, spatially resolved imaging of radio spectra at the bases of jets in eleven low-luminosity (Fanaroff-Riley I) radio galaxies, derived from Very Large Array (VLA) observations. We pay careful attention to calibration and to the effects of random and systematic errors, and we base the flux-density scale on recent measurements of VLA primary amplitude calibrators by Perley & Butler (2013). We show images and profiles of spectral index over the frequency range 1.4 - 8.5 GHz, together with values integrated over fiducial regions defined by our relativistic models of the jets. We find that the spectral index decreases (the spectrum flattens) with distance from the nucleus in all of the jets. The mean spectral indices are 0.66 +/- 0.01 where the jets first brighten abruptly and 0.59 +/- 0.01 after they recollimate. The mean change in spectral index between these locations, which is independent of calibration and flux-density scale errors and is therefore more accurately and robustly measured,...

  12. Classical radio source propagating into outer H I disc in NGC 3801

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Burnett, C.; Morganti, R.; Struve, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of a large-scale disc of neutral hydrogen (H I) in the nearby Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxy NGC 3801 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The H I disc (34 kpc in diameter and with ?) is aligned with the radio jet axis. This makes NGC 3801 an ideal system

  13. Classical radio source propagating into outer HI disc in NGC 3801

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Burnett, C.; Morganti, R.; Struve, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of a large-scale disc of neutral hydrogen (H I) in the nearby Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxy NGC 3801 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The H I disc (34 kpc in diameter and with ?) is aligned with the radio jet axis. This makes NGC 3801 an ideal system

  14. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  15. High Energy Gamma-rays from FR I Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Marek

    2003-07-22

    Thanks to Hubble and Chandra telescopes, some of the large scale jets in extragalactic radio sources are now being observed at optical and X-ray frequencies. For the FR I objects the synchrotron nature of this emission is surely established, although a lot of uncertainties--connected for example with the particle acceleration processes involved--remain. In this paper we study production of high energy {gamma}-rays in FR I kiloparsec-scale jets by inverse-Compton emission of the synchrotron-emitting electrons. We consider different origin of seed photons contributing to the inverse-Compton scattering, including nuclear jet radiation as well as ambient, stellar and circumstellar emission of the host galaxies. We discuss how future detections or non-detections of the evaluated {gamma}-ray fluxes can provide constraints on the unknown large scale jet parameters, i.e. the magnetic field intensity and the jet Doppler factor. For the nearby sources Centaurus A and M 87, we find measurable fluxes of TeV photons resulting from synchrotron self-Compton process and from comptonization of the galactic photon fields, respectively. In the case of Centaurus A, we also find a relatively strong emission component due to comptonization of the nuclear blazar photons, which could be easily observed by GLAST at energy {approx} 10 GeV, providing important test for the unification of FR I sources with BL Lac objects.

  16. Optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe II emission is strong while [O III] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad Hβ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad Hβ component of 4C 12.50 is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  17. Optical Spectroscopy of Four Young Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe {\\sc ii} emission is strong while [O {\\sc iii}] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad H$\\beta$ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad H$\\beta$ component of \\astrobj{4C 12.50} is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  18. Chandra observations of the hybrid morphology radio sources 3C 433 and 4C 65.15: FR IIs with asymmetric environments

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, B P

    2009-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of the hybrid morphology radio sources 3C 433 and 4C 65.15, two members of the rare class of objects possessing an FR I jet on one side of the core and an FR II lobe on the other. The X-ray spectrum of 3C 433 shows intrinsic absorption (with a column density of N_H=8e22 cm-2), such as is typical of FR II narrow-line radio galaxies. There is excess X-ray emission below 2 keV containing contributions from diffuse soft X-ray emission (likely hot gas with kT~1.2 keV) as well as from the nucleus. The core of 3C 433 is extended in hard X-rays, presumably due to X-ray emission from the inner-jet knot on the FR I side that is apparent in the radio map. It is possible that the X-ray emission from this inner-jet knot is absorbed by the dust known to be present in the host galaxy. The spectrum of 4C 65.15 can be modeled with a simple power law with perhaps mild intrinsic absorption (N_H=1.3e21 cm-2). X-ray emission is detected at the bend in the FR I jet. This X-ray jet emission lies abov...

  19. Structures of the magnetoionic media around the FR I radio galaxies 3C 31 and Hydra A

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, R A; Parma, P; Murgia, M

    2008-01-01

    We use high-quality VLA images of the Fanaroff & Riley Class I radio galaxy 3C 31 at six frequencies in the range 1365 to 8440MHz to explore the spatial scale and origin of the rotation measure (RM) fluctuations on the line of sight to the radio source. We analyse the distribution of the degree of polarization to show that the large depolarization asymmetry between the North and South sides of the source seen in earlier work largely disappears as the resolution is increased. We show that the depolarization seen at low resolution results primarily from unresolved gradients in a Faraday screen in front of the synchrotron-emitting plasma. We establish that the residual degree of polarization in the short-wavelength limit should follow a Burn law and we fit such a law to our data to estimate the residual depolarization at high resolution. We show that the observed RM variations over selected areas of 3C 31 are consistent with a power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations in front of 3C 31 whose power-law slope ch...

  20. Infrared imaging of WENSS radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Villani, D

    1999-01-01

    We have performed deep imaging in the IR J- and K-bands for three sub-samples of radio sources extracted from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, a large low-frequency radio survey containing Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS), Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Flat Spectrum (FS) sources. We present the results of these IR observations, carried out with the ARcetri Near Infrared CAmera (ARNICA) at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), providing photometric and morphologic information on high redshift radio galaxies and quasars. We find that the radio galaxies contained in our sample do not show the pronounced radio/IR alignment claimed for 3CR sources. IR photometric measurements of the gravitational lens system 1600+434 are also presented.

  1. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  2. Optically Faint Radio Sources: Reborn AGN?

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, Mercedes E; Lobo, Catarina; Antón, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    We have discovered a number of relatively strong radio sources in the field-of-view of SDSS galaxy clusters which present no optical counterparts down to the magnitude limits of the SDSS. The optically faint radio sources appear as double-lobed or core-jet objects on the FIRST radio images and have projected angular sizes ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 arcmin. We have followed-up these sources with near-infrared imaging using the wide-field imager HAWK-I on the VLT. K_s-band emitting regions, about 1.5 arcsec in size and coincident with the centers of the radio structures, were detected in all the sources, with magnitudes in the range 17-20 mag. We have used spectral modelling to characterize the sample sources. In general, the radio properties are similar to those observed in 3CRR sources but the optical-radio slopes are consistent with moderate to high redshift (z<4) gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources. Our results suggest that these unusual objects are galaxies whose black hole has been recently re-ignited but r...

  3. Steep Spectrum Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tracy E.

    2012-05-01

    Steep spectrum radio emission associated with galaxy clusters comes from compact central active galactic nuclei (AGN) driven radio sources in dense cool core clusters as well as from large regions of diffuse (halo and relic) emission associated with dynamically complex merging systems. These radio halos and relics are best traced at low radio frequencies where details of their morphology, location and spectral index distribution can be used to probe the underlying acceleration mechanism(s) as well as important details of large scale structure formation. Low frequency radio observations also play an important role in the study of AGN feedback into the intracluster medium and the regulation of cooling cores. While spectacular results are coming from the current generation of low frequency instruments, there will soon be a new revolution in studies of steep spectrum sources with the upcoming generation of low frequency interferometers on Earth and ultimately the moon.

  4. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Middelberg, Enno; Hales, Christopher A; Seymour, Nick; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Huynh, Minh T; Lenc, Emil; Mao, Minnie Y

    2010-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6um when using sensitive Spitzer observations with uJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8GHz and 8.6GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spec...

  5. Intermittent radio galaxies and source statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S

    1997-01-01

    We suggest that extragalactic radio sources are intermittent on timescales of 10^4-10^5 yr. Using a simple spherical model of a cocoon/shock system, it is found that inactive sources fade rapidly in radio luminosity but the shock in the ambient medium continues to expand supersonically, thereby keeping the whole source structure intact during the inactive phases. The fading of inactive sources, and the effect of the intermittency on the expansion velocity, can readily explain the observed over-abundance of small radio sources. In particular, the plateau in the observed distribution of sizes found by O'Dea & Baum (1997) can be interpreted as being due to intermittency. The model predicts that very young sources will be particularly radio luminous, once the effects of absorption have been accounted for. Furthermore, it predicts the existence of a significant number of faint `coasting' sources. These might be detectable in deep, low-frequency radio maps, or via the X-ray and optical emission line properties ...

  6. Statistical properties of extragalactic radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiang-Shui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a large sample of extragalactic radio sources is analysed to show their statistical properties. The core and total radio powers are used to determine the core-dominance parameter for galaxies, BL Lacertae objects and quasars; mutual correlations between core radio power, total radio power, redshift and core dominance parameter are 0examined for different subclasses. A statistically significant correlation between the total and core radio power is confirmed. There are no obvious correlations between core-dominance parameter and the total power for our whole sample and quasars, but there is a statistically significant anti-correlation for our galaxy sample. Some discussions and comparison of the correlations with those obtained by other authors are also given.

  7. The kpc-scale radio source population

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto, Pedro; Gonzalez-Serrano, J. Ignacio; Edge, Alastair C.; Gizani, Nectaria A. B.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael

    1999-01-01

    We are conducting a multi-wavelength (radio, optical, and X-ray) observational campaign to classify, morphologically and physically, a sample of 55 flat-spectrum radio sources dominated by structure on kpc-scales. This sample contains 22 compact-/medium-sized symmetric object candidates, a class of objects thought to be the early stages of the evolution of radio galaxies. The vast majority of the remaining objects have core-plus-one-sided-jet structures, half of which present sharply bent jet...

  8. Radio Source Morphology: 'nature or nuture'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Julie; Emonts, Bjorn; O'Sullivan, Shane

    2012-10-01

    Radio sources, emanating from supermassive black-holes in the centres of active galaxies, display a large variety of morphological properties. It is a long-standing debate to what extent the differences between various types of radio sources are due to intrinsic properties of the central engine (`nature') or due to the properties of the interstellar medium that surrounds the central engine and host galaxy (`nurture'). Settling this `nature vs. nurture' debate for nearby radio galaxies, which can be studied in great detail, is vital for understanding the properties and evolution of radio galaxies throughout the Universe. We propose to observe the radio galaxy NGC 612 where previous observations have detected the presence of a large-scale HI bridge between the host galaxy and a nearby galaxy NGC 619. We request a total of 13 hrs in the 750m array-configuration to determine whether or not the 100 kpc-scale radio source morphology is directly related to the intergalactic distribution of neutral hydrogen gas.

  9. Radio spectra of the WMAP catalog sources

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, S A

    2003-01-01

    Compiled radio spectra are presented for 208 extragalactic sources from the catalog created from the WMAP satellite all-sky survey data in a range of 23-94 GHz taken during the first year of its operation in orbit. 205 out of 208 WMAP sources are reliably identified with radio sources from other catalogs, including also four out of five sources unidentified by the WMAP survey authors. We have found 203 WMAP sources to have optical identification: 141 quasars, 29 galaxies, 19 active galactic nuclei, 19 BL Lac-type objects and one planetary nebula, IC418. Simultaneous measurements of flux densities for 26 sources at five frequencies, 2.3, 3.9, 7.7, 11.2 and 21.7 GHz, were made with the radio telescope RATAN-600 in 2003 March. 25 sources were detected at all the frequencies, and only one, WMAP0517-0546, unidentified in other catalogs was not detected in our observations and is likely to be spurious. Using the database CATS we found a large number of identifications in different radio catalogs and in several long...

  10. Faint Radio Sources and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Haarsma, D B; Windhorst, R A; Richards, E A; 10.1086/317225

    2010-01-01

    The centimeter-wave luminosity of local radio galaxies correlates well with their star formation rate. We extend this correlation to surveys of high-redshift radio sources to estimate the global star formation history. The star formation rate found from radio observations needs no correction for dust obscuration, unlike the values calculated from optical and ultraviolet data. Three deep radio surveys have provided catalogs of sources with nearly complete optical identifications and nearly 60% complete spectroscopic redshifts: the Hubble Deep Field and Flanking Fields at 12h+62d, the SSA13 field at 13h+42d, and the V15 field at 14h+52d. We use the redshift distribution of these radio sources to constrain the evolution of their luminosity function. The epoch dependent luminosity function is then used to estimate the evolving global star formation density. At redshifts less than one, our calculated star formation rates are significantly larger than even the dust-corrected optically-selected star formation rates;...

  11. Intraday Variability in Northern Hemisphere Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Krichbaum, T P; Fuhrmann, L; Cimo, G; Witzel, A

    2001-01-01

    We summarize results from flux density monitoring campaigns performed with the 100 meter radio-telescope at Effelsberg and the VLA during the past 15 yrs. We briefly discuss some of the statistical properties of the rapid variability from now more than 40 high declination sources, which show Intraday Variability (IDV). In general, IDV is more pronounced for sources with flat radio spectra and compact VLBI structures. The frequency dependence of the variability pattern varies with source and observing time. For 0917+62, we present new VLBI images, which suggest that the variability pattern is modified by the occurrence of new jet components. For 0716+71, we show the first detection of IDV at millimeter wavelengths (32 GHz). For the physical interpretation of the IDV phenomenon, a complex source and frequency dependent superposition of interstellar scintillation and source intrinsic variability should be considered.

  12. Brightness temperature for 166 radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Yong Huang; Yu-Hai Yuan; Jiang-He Yang; Yi Liu; Jun Tao; Ying Gao; Tong-Xu Hua; Rui-Guang Lin; Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jing-Yi Zhang; Yi-Ping Qin

    2009-01-01

    Using the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio frequencies (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz), we determined the short-term variability timescales for 166 radio sources. The timescales are 0.15d (2007+777) to 176.17d (0528-250) with an average timescale of △tobs=17.1±16.5d for the whole sample. The timescales are used to calculate the brightness temperatures, TB. The value of log TB is in the range of log TB = 10.47 to 19.06 K. In addition, we also estimated the boosting factor for the sources. The correlation between the polarization and the Doppler factor is also discussed.

  13. Radio frequency driven multicusp sources (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1998-02-01

    The radio frequency (rf)-driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the superconducting super collider injector. The source can routinely provide 30 mA of H˜ beam at 0.1% duty factor. By adding a minute quantity of cesium to the discharge, H- beam current in excess of 100 mA and e/H˜1 has been achieved. The rf-driven H˜ source is being further developed for 6% duty factor operation to be used in the national spallation neutron source. Application of the rf-driven multicusp source has been extended to radioactive ion beam production, ion projection lithography, and compact neutron tubes.

  14. Radio frequency source coding made easy

    CERN Document Server

    Faruque, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces Radio Frequency Source Coding to a broad audience. The author blends theory and practice to bring readers up-to-date in key concepts, underlying principles and practical applications of wireless communications. The presentation is designed to be easily accessible, minimizing mathematics and maximizing visuals.

  15. Pulsating Radio Sources near the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staelin, D H; Reifenstein, E C

    1968-12-27

    Two new pulsating radio sources, designated NP 0527 and NP 0532, were found near the Crab Nebula and could be coincident with it. Both sources are sporadic, and no periodicities are evident. The pulse dispersions indicate that 1.58 +/- 0.03 and 1.74 +/- 0.02 x 10(20) electrons per square centimeter lie in the direction of NP 0527 and NP 0532, respectively.

  16. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia); Shabala, S. S., E-mail: L.Godfrey@curtin.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2013-04-10

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  17. Rapid variability of extragalactic radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Witzel, A.; Krichbaum, T.; Hummel, C.A.; Alberdi, A.; Schalinski, C.

    1989-02-02

    Since its discovery more than 20 years ago, variability of extragalactic radio sources on timescales of weeks to years has been the subject of many investigations. We have examined the variability of these sources on timescales of hours at wavelengths of 6 and 11 cm using the 100-m telescope of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie and report the results for two sources. The quasar QSO0917 + 62 showed variations with amplitudes of up to 23% in /similar to/ 24 hours, which were correlated at the two wavelengths; in the BL Lac object 0716 + 71 we found variations with amplitudes of 7-11%. We discuss intrinsic effects, gravitational lensing and scattering in the interstellar medium as possible explanations for rapid radio variability.

  18. The correlation function of radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Loan, A J; Lahav, O

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources in the Green Bank and Parkes-MIT-NRAO 4.85 GHz surveys by measuring the angular two-point correlation function w(\\theta). Excluding contaminated areas, the two surveys together cover 70 per cent of the whole sky. We find both surveys to be reasonably complete above 50 mJy. On the basis of previous studies, the radio sources are galaxies and radio-loud quasars lying at redshifts up to z \\sim 4, with a median redshift z \\sim 1. This provides the opportunity to probe large-scale structures in a volume far larger than that within the reach of present optical and infrared surveys. We detect a clustering signal w(\\theta) correlation function in comoving coordinates \\xi(r_c,z) = ( r_c / r_0 )^{-\\gamma} (1+z)^{\\gamma-(3+\\epsilon)}, where \\gamma = 1.8, and the redshift distribution N(z) of the radio galaxies, we constrain the r_0--\\epsilon parameter space. For `stable clustering' (\\epsilon = 0), we find the correlation length r_0 \\approx 18 Mpc/h, larger than ...

  19. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H{sup {minus}} beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Radio frequency driven multicusp sources (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road-MS 5/119, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The radio frequency (rf)-driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the superconducting super collider injector. The source can routinely provide 30 mA of H{sup {approximately}} beam at 0.1{percent} duty factor. By adding a minute quantity of cesium to the discharge, H{sup {minus}} beam current in excess of 100 mA and e/H{approximately}1 has been achieved. The rf-driven H{approximately} source is being further developed for 6{percent} duty factor operation to be used in the national spallation neutron source. Application of the rf-driven multicusp source has been extended to radioactive ion beam production, ion projection lithography, and compact neutron tubes.{copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Radio frequency multicusp ion source development (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K. N.

    1996-03-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider injector. It has been demonstrated that the source can meet the H- beam current and emittance requirements for this application. By employing a porcelain-coated antenna, a clean plasma discharge with very long-life operation can be achieved. Today, the rf source is used to generate both positive and negative hydrogen ion beams and has been tested in various particle accelerator laboratories throughout the world. Applications of this ion source have been extended to other fields such as ion beam lithography, oil-well logging, ion implantation, accelerator mass spectrometry and medical therapy machines. This paper summarizes the latest rf ion source technology and development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  2. The distribution of radio plasma in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Katherine M

    2005-03-15

    The influence of jet-ejected plasma has been an important theme of this meeting; I draw attention to the prevalence of jet-ejected plasma, in particular that which has not been properly accounted for in the past. There are three strands to this paper: important emission which is prominent only at the lowest radio frequencies; relic radio plasma which must exist if even the most basic aspects of radio source evolutionary models are correct; and evidence that some 'radio-quiet' quasars could be FR-I radio sources.

  3. Relativistic Hotspots in FR II Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Alex M.; Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Gawronski, M. P.; Cederbloom, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a list of six FR II radio sources that are candidates to possess hotspots with modestly relativistic (v/c > 0.2) bulk velocities, in contrast to the vast majority of FR II radio sources that possess non-relativistic hotspot bulk velocities (e.g., v/c = 0.03+/- 0.02 from Scheuer 1995). These objects display arm- length and flux-ratio asymmetries between lobes that self-consistently indicate relativistic motion. The candidates are selected from the FIRST 1.4 GHz survey (including but not limited to the catalog of FR II quasars of de Vries et al. 2006) with the requirement that the radio core have a spectroscopic SDSS counterpart. We find no significant difference in the number of neighboring sources within 300 projected kpc of the candidate sources and randomly selected nearby regions. The deprojected and light travel-time corrected lobe distances are not abnormal for FR II sources, and neither are the core-to-lobe flux ratios after correcting for lobe beaming. We briefly consider four possibilities for these type of objects: (i) environmental interactions randomly mimicking relativistic effects, (ii) a restarted jet causing the near hotspot to brighten while the far hotspot still appears faint, (iii) observation during a short interval common to FR II lifetimes during which the hotspot decelerates from relativistic to non-relativistic velocities, and (iv) innately unusual characteristics (e.g., a mass-loaded jet) driving relativistic bulk velocities in the hotspots of a small fraction (< 1%) of FR II objects. We favor the last interpretation but cannot rule out the alternatives. We also comment on the useful external constraints such objects provide to the evaluation of hotspot X-ray emission mechanisms.

  4. Forthcoming mutual events of planets and astrometric radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Z; Tsekmejster, S

    2013-01-01

    Radio astronomy observations of close approaches of the Solar system planets to compact radio sources as well as radio source occultations by planets may be of large interest for planetary sciences, dynamical astronomy, and testing gravity theories. In this paper, we present extended lists of occultations of astrometric radio sources observed in the framework of various astrometric and geodetic VLBI programs by planets, and close approaches of planets to radio sources expected in the nearest years. Computations are made making use of the EPOS software package.

  5. Artificial calibration source for ALMA radio interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Hills, Richard; Whyborn, Nicholas D.; Asayama, Shinichiro; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Iguchi, Satoru; Corder, Stuartt A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) radio interferometer has some different types of antennas which have a variation of gain and leakages across the primary beam of an individual antenna. We have been developing an artificial calibration source which is used for compensation of individual difference of antennas. In a high-frequency antenna, using astronomical sources to do calibration measurement would be extremely time consuming, whereas with the artificial calibration source becomes a realistic possibility. Photonic techniques are considered to be superior to conventional techniques based on electronic devices in terms of wide bandwidth and high-frequency signals. Conversion from an optical signal to a millimeter/sub-millimeter wave signal is done by a photo-mixer.

  6. Radio source stability and geodetic VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The observation of the Earth's rotation by VLBI is conditioned by the celestial reference frame that should be as stable as possible. The selection of the most stable sources therefore constitutes a major step in the construction of a celestial reference frame since their stability prevents time deformation of the axes with time. The assessment of astrometric stability, i.e., the time stability the radiocenter location as detected by the VLBI, is one of the methods that were used in previous ICRF realizations (works of M. Feissel-Vernier and ICRF2). We think the same method should be addressed for the construction of the ICRF3. We analyzed the radio source time series obtained from the analysis of the data from the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program of the IVS. We used several utils based on basic statistics and more advanced methods (Allan variance) in order to provide a preliminary classification of sources.

  7. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  8. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, A D Cameron M J; Norris, R P; Mao, M Y; Middelberg, E

    2011-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50% duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  9. Synergy Between Radio and Optical Telescopes: Optical Followup of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. H. Ishwara-Chandra

    2013-06-01

    Distance measurement is a must to characterize any source in the sky. In the radio band, it is rarely possible to get distance or redshift measurements. The optical band is the most used band to get distance estimate of sources, even for those originally discovered in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. However, the spectroscopic redshift measurements even for fairly bright radio sample is grossly incomplete, implying un-explored discovery space. Here we discuss the scope of optical follow up of radio sources, in particular the radio loud AGNs, from the present generation radio telescopes.

  10. The Dynamic Evolution of Young Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    An, Tao; 10.1088/0004-637X/760/1/77

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of symmetric extragalactic radio sources can be characterized by four distinct growth stages of the radio luminosity versus size of the source. The interaction of the jet with the ambient medium results in the formation and evolution of sources with non-standard (flaring) morphology. In addition, cessation or restarting of the jet power and obstruction of the jet will also result in distinct morphological structures. The radio source population may thus be classified in morphological types that indicate the prevailing physical processes. Compact symmetric objects (CSOs) occupy the earliest evolutionary phase of symmetric radio sources and their dynamical behavior is fundamental for any further evolution. Analysis of CSO dynamics is presented for a sample of 24 CSOs with known redshift and hotspot separation velocity and with a large range of radio power. Observables such as radio power, separation between two hotspots, hotspot separation velocity, and kinematic age of the source are found to be ...

  11. Planck early results. XIV. ERCSC validation and extreme radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.; Savolainen, P.;

    2011-01-01

    by Planck. The ERCSC source positions and flux density scales are found to be consistent with the ground-based observations. We present and discuss the spectral energy distributions of a sample of "extreme" radio sources, to illustrate the richness of the ERCSC for the study of extragalactic radio sources...

  12. Planck early results: Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Aatrokoski, J; Aghanim, N; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Angelakis, E; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Berdyugin, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Burrows, D N; Cabella, P; Capalbi, M; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cavazzuti, E; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Cutini, S; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Dickinson, C; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fuhrmann, L; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; King, O; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Krichbaum, T P; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lavonen, N; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Linden-V\\ornle, M; Lindfors, E; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Michelson, P F; Mingaliev, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Monte, C; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Nestoras, I; Netterfield, C B; Nieppola, E; Nilsson, K; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pavlidou, V; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perri, M; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rainó, S; Reach, W T; Readhead, A; Rebolo, R; Reeves, R; Reinecke, M; Reinthal, R; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, J; Riller, T; Riquelme, D; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Saarinen, J; Sandri, M; Savolainen, P; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sievers, A; Sillanpää, A; Smoot, G F; Sotnikova, Y; Starck, J -L; Stevenson, M; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Takalo, L; Tammi, J; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Thompson, D J; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tornikoski, M; Torre, J -P; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Turunen, M; Umana, G; Ungerechts, H; Valenziano, L; Valtaoja, E; Varis, J; Verrecchia, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; Wu, J; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zensus, J A; Zhou, X; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalog (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, moving in the relativistic jet, shape the radio spectra. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper, physical modelli...

  13. A catalogue of ULX coincidences with FIRST radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Sutil, J R; Martí, J; Garrido, J L; Pérez-Ramírez, D; Luque-Escamilla, P

    2006-01-01

    We search for ultra luminous X-ray source (ULXs) radio counterparts located in nearby galaxies in order to constrain their physical nature. Our work is based on a systematic cross-identification of the most recent and extensive available ULX catalogues and archival radio data. A catalogue of 70 positional coincidences is reported. Most of them are located within the galaxy nucleus. Among them, we find 11 new cases of non-nuclear ULX sources with possibly associated radio emission.

  14. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are co...

  15. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.;

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are co...

  16. A new connection between the opening angle and the large-scale morphology of extragalactic radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Martin; Riley, Julia; Hopton, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In the case of an initially conical jet, we study the relation between jet collimation by the external pressure and large-scale morphology. We first consider the important length-scales in the problem, and then carry out axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations that include, for certain parameters, all these length-scales. We find three important scales related to the collimation region: (i) where the sideways ram-pressure equals the external pressure, (ii) where the jet density equals the ambient density, and (iii) where the forward ram-pressure falls below the ambient pressure. These scales are set by the external Mach-number and opening angle of the jet. We demonstrate that the relative magnitudes of these scales determine the collimation, Mach-number, density and morphology of the large scale jet. Based on analysis of the shock structure, we reproduce successfully the morphology of Fanaroff-Riley (FR) class I and II radio sources. Within the framework of the model, an FR I radio source must have a large intr...

  17. Coherence Inherent in an Incoherent Synchrotron Radio Source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok K. Singal

    2011-12-01

    We show that a partial coherence due to antenna mechanism can be inherently present in any compact synchrotron source, which resolves many long-standing problems in the spectra and variability of compact extragalactic radio sources.

  18. On the HI column density - radio source size anti-correlation in compact radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, S J; Glowacki, M; Whiting, M T; Sadler, E M

    2013-01-01

    Existing studies of the atomic hydrogen gas content in distant galaxies, through the absorption of the 21-cm line, often infer that the total column density is anti-correlated with the linear extent of the background radio source. We investigate this interpretation, by dissecting the various parameters from which the column density is derived, and find that the relationship is driven primarily by the observed optical depth, which, for a given absorber size, is anti-correlated with the linear size. Therefore, the inferred anti-correlation is merely the consequence of geometry, in conjunction with the assumption of a common spin temperature/covering factor ratio for each member of the sample, an assumption for which there is scant observational justification. While geometry can explain the observed correlation, many radio sources comprise two radio lobes and so we model the projected area of a two component emitter intercepted by a foreground absorber. From this, the observed optical depth/linear size relations...

  19. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-12-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, ( u, v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and clean-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System ( aips) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications ( casa). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  20. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-10-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, (u,v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and uc(clean)-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System (uc(aips)) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications (uc(casa)). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  1. The brightness and spatial distributions of terrestrial radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R; Zaroubi, S; Koopmans, L V E; Wijnholds, S J; Abdalla, F B; Brouw, W N; Ciardi, B; Iliev, I T; Harker, G J A; Mellema, G; Bernardi, G; Zarka, P; Ghosh, A; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Hassall, T E; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Macario, G; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Meulman, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rafferty, D; Reich, W; van Nieuwpoort, R; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O

    2013-01-01

    Faint undetected sources of radio-frequency interference (RFI) might become visible in long radio observations when they are consistently present over time. Thereby, they might obstruct the detection of the weak astronomical signals of interest. This issue is especially important for Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) projects that try to detect the faint redshifted HI signals from the time of the earliest structures in the Universe. We explore the RFI situation at 30-163 MHz by studying brightness histograms of visibility data observed with LOFAR, similar to radio-source-count analyses that are used in cosmology. An empirical RFI distribution model is derived that allows the simulation of RFI in radio observations. The brightness histograms show an RFI distribution that follows a power-law distribution with an estimated exponent around -1.5. With several assumptions, this can be explained with a uniform distribution of terrestrial radio sources whose radiation follows existing propagation models. Extrapolation of t...

  2. Arcsecond-Scale Radio Jets of Ultra-High-Energy Synchrotron Peak BL Lacs (UHBLs)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhongzu Wu; Shengxu Yang; Minfeng Gu

    2014-09-01

    We present the arcsecond-scale jet structure and related radio properties for a sample of 9 UHBLs selected from Nieppola et al. (2006) with log(peak/Hz) > 20. Our preliminary results show that most of the UHBLs have compact structures, and their core dominance parameters are much larger than FR-I radio galaxies, suggesting that beaming may be prevalent in the jets of these sources.

  3. Large-scale HI in nearby radio galaxies : segregation in neutral gas content with radio source size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; van der Hulst, J. M.; van Moorsel, G.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a study of neutral hydrogen ( HI) in a complete sample of nearby non-cluster radio galaxies. We find that radio galaxies with large amounts of extended HI (M-HI >= 109 M-circle dot) all have a compact radio source. The host galaxies of the more extended radio sources, all of Fa

  4. The host galaxies of micro-Jansky radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Luchsinger, K M; Jones, K M; Mauduit, J C; Pforr, J; Surace, J A; Vaccari, M; Farrah, D; Gonzales-Solares, E; Jarvis, M J; Maraston, C; Marchetti, L; Oliver, S; Afonso, J; Cappozi, D; Sajina, A

    2015-01-01

    We combine a deep 0.5~deg$^2$, 1.4~GHz deep radio survey in the Lockman Hole with infrared and optical data in the same field, including the SERVS and UKIDSS near-infrared surveys, to make the largest study to date of the host galaxies of radio sources with typical radio flux densities $\\sim 50 \\;\\mu$Jy. 87% (1274/1467) of radio sources have identifications in SERVS to $AB\\approx 23.1$ at 3.6 or 4.5$\\mu$m, and 9% are blended with bright objects (mostly stars), leaving only 4% (59 objects) which are too faint to confidently identify in the near-infrared. We are able to estimate photometric redshifts for 68% of the radio sources. We use mid-infrared diagnostics to show that the source population consists of a mixture of star forming galaxies, rapidly accreting (cold mode) AGN and low accretion rate, hot mode AGN, with neither AGN nor starforming galaxies clearly dominating. We see the breakdown in the $K-z$ relation in faint radio source samples, and show that it is due to radio source populations becoming domi...

  5. The death of FRII radio sources and their connection with radio relics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Kaiser, Christian R.; Cotter, Garret

    2002-01-01

    Radio relic sources in galaxy clusters are often described as the remnants of powerful radio galaxies. Here we develop a model for the evolution of such relics after the jets cease to supply energy to the lobes. This includes the treatment of a relic overpressured with respect to its gaseous surroundings even after the jets switch off. We also determine the radio emission of relics for a large variety of assumptions. We take into account the evolution of the strength of the magnetic field during the phase of relativistic particle injection into the lobes. The resulting spectra show mild steepening at around 1 GHz but avoid any exponential spectral cut-offs. The model calculations are used to fit the observed spectra of six radio relics. The quality of the fits is excellent for {\\it all} models discussed. Unfortunately, this implies that it is virtually impossible to determine any of the important source parameters from the observed radio emission alone.

  6. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  7. Radio sources near the core of globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, D

    1999-01-01

    We present ATCA radio images of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae made at 1.4and 1.7 GHz and provide an analysis of the radio sources detected within 5arcmin of the cluster centre. 11 sources are detected, most of which areclustered about the core of 47 Tuc. Both of the pulsars in 47 Tuc whosepositions are known can be identified with sources in the 1.4 GHz image. Thesource distribution has a characteristic radius of ~100 arcsec, larger than the23 arcsec radius of the cluster core. We compare source positions with thepositions of nine X-ray sources and find no correspondence.

  8. Forthcoming Occultations of Astrometric Radio Sources by Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, Victor; Malkin, Zinovy; Tsekmeister, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Astrometric observations of radio source occultations by solar system bodies may be of large interest for testing gravity theories, dynamical astronomy, and planetary physics. In this paper, we present an updated list of the occultations of astrometric radio sources by planets expected in the coming years. Such events, like solar eclipses, generally speaking can only be observed in a limited region. A map of the shadow path is provided for the events that will occurr in regions with several VLBI stations and hence will be the most interesting for radio astronomy experiments.

  9. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, A; Middelberg, E; Seymour, N; Spitler, L R; Emonts, B H C; Franzen, T M O; Hunstead, R; Intema, H T; Marvil, J; Parker, Q A; Sirothia, S K; Hurley-Walker, N; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Callingham, J R; Deshpande, A A; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B -Q; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hindson, L; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Zheng, Q; Chippendale, A P; Harvey-Smith, L; Heywood, I; Indermuehle, B; Popping, A; Sault, R J; Whiting, M T

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z > 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio...

  10. AGN content of X-ray, IR and radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a number of surveys and identification works related to X-ray, IR and radio sources and searched for extragalactic ones. Among them, most interesting are Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Starburst (SB) Galaxies. Some 4500 AGN have been revealed from ROSAT BSC and FSC sources, and many more are hidden ones; those showing evidence of activity but with no emission lines in optical wavelengths. We estimated AGN content of X-ray sources as 52.9%. IR sources contain thousands of SBs, and most important are those having signs of interaction and/or merging. We have carried out optical identifications of IRAS point sources, and 1278 IR galaxies have been revealed, including LIRGs and ULIRGs. We have also combined IRAS PSC and FSC catalogs and compiled its extragalactic sample, which allowed to estimate AGN content among IR sources as 23.7%. Extragalactic radio sources contain bright galaxies, AGN and SBs. We have studied the border between AGN and normal galaxies by radio/optical flux ratios to establish which objects may be attributed to AGN based on radio properties. Interestingly, absolute majority of objects associated with both X-ray and radio sources are AGN.

  11. "Normal" FRII Radio Galaxies as a Probe of the Nature of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, Dharam Vir; Kraft, Ralph P

    2008-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength radio study of a sample of nearby Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) radio galaxies, matched with the sample of known X-shaped radio sources in size, morphological properties and redshift, using new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data and archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA). Our principal aim in this paper is to provide a control sample for earlier studies of samples of `X-shaped' radio sources, which have similar luminosities and small-scale radio structures to our targets but exhibit large-scale extensions to their lobes that more typical FRII sources lack; earlier spectral work with the GMRT has suggested that these `wings' sometimes have flat spectral indices at low frequencies, in contrast to expectations from models in which the wings are formed hydrodynamically or by jet reorientation. In our new observations we find that almost all of our target FRII radio galaxies show standard spectral steepening as a function of distance from the hotspot at the low frequen...

  12. The Fermi-LAT view of young radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ammando, F; Giroletti, M

    2015-01-01

    Compact Symmetric Objects (CSO) are considered to be the young version of Fanaroff-Riley type I and type II radio galaxies, with typical sizes smaller than 1 kpc and ages of the order of a few thousand years. Before the launch of the Fermi satellite, young radio sources were predicted to emerge as a possible new gamma-ray emitting population detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). After more than 6 years of Fermi operation the question of young radio sources as gamma-ray emitting objects still remains open. In this contribution we discuss candidate gamma-ray emitting CSO and future perspective for detecting young radio sources with Fermi-LAT.

  13. GMRT observations of X-shaped radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, D V; Lal, Dharam Vir

    2006-01-01

    We present results from a study of X-shaped sources based on observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). These observations were motivated by our low frequency study of 3C 223.1 (Lal & Rao 2005), an X-shaped radio source, which showed that the wings (or low-surface-brightness jets) have flatter spectral indices than the active lobes (or high-surface-brightness jets), a result not easily explained by most models. We have now obtained GMRT data at 240 and 610 MHz for almost all the known X-shaped radio sources and have studied the distribution of the spectral index across the sources. While the radio morphologies of all the sources at 240 and 610 MHz show the characteristic X-shape, the spectral characteristics of the X-shaped radio sources, seem to fall into three categories, namely, sources in which (A) the wings have flatter spectral indices than the active lobes, (B) the wings and the active lobes have comparable spectral indices, and (C) the wings have steeper spectral indices than t...

  14. A Database of Phase Calibration Sources and their Radio Spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, Dharam V; Sherkar, Sachin S

    2016-01-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, (u,v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and clean-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curve...

  15. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of their optical and infrared faintness, it is very challenging to study IFRS at these wavelengths. However, IFRS are relatively bright in the radio regime with 1.4 GHz flux densities of a few to a few tens of mJy. Therefore, the radio regime is the most promising wavelength regime in which to constrain their nature. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Methods: We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. Results: We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep (α IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least % of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by the steep SEDs and the compact morphology of IFRS. The detailed multi

  16. Planck intermediate results: XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.

    2016-01-01

    ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.......5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at high frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations...

  17. Radio Implementation of a Testbed For Cognitive Radio Source Localization Using USRPS and GNU Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    pp. 116–130, 2009. [4] R.A. Rashid , M.A. Sarijari, N. Fisal, S.K.S. Yusof and N.H. Mahalin, “Spectrum sensing measurement using GNU Radio and...USRP software radio platform,” in Proc. 7th Int. Conf. Wireless and Mobile Commun., Luxembourg, 2011. [5] R.A. Rashid , M.A. Sarijari, N. Fisal...Sarijari, A. Marwanto, N. Fisal, S.K.S. Yusof and R.A Rashid , “Energy detection sensing based on GNU Radio and USRP: An analysis study,” in Proc

  18. Antenna array characterization via radio interferometry observation of astronomical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Colegate, T M; Hall, P J; Padhi, S K; Wayth, R B; de Vaate, J G Bij; Crosse, B; Emrich, D; Faulkner, A J; Hurley-Walker, N; Acedo, E de Lera; Juswardy, B; Razavi-Ghods, N; Tingay, S J; Williams, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an in-situ antenna characterization method and results for a "low-frequency" radio astronomy engineering prototype array, characterized over the 75-300 MHz frequency range. The presence of multiple cosmic radio sources, particularly the dominant Galactic noise, makes in-situ characterization at these frequencies challenging; however, it will be shown that high quality measurement is possible via radio interferometry techniques. This method is well-known in the radio astronomy community but seems less so in antenna measurement and wireless communications communities, although the measurement challenges involving multiple undesired sources in the antenna field-of-view bear some similarities. We discuss this approach and our results with the expectation that this principle may find greater application in related fields.

  19. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  20. Evidence for Infrared-Faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-Loud AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Huynh, M T; Siana, B; Middelberg, E

    2010-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift (z > 1) AGN.

  1. Radio Properties of Low Redshift Broad Line Active Galactic Nuclei Including Multiple Component Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the radio properties of a low redshift (z FRIIs. From these data we find an FRI/FRII luminosity dividing line like that found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974), where we use our core-only sources as proxies for FRIs, and our multi-component sources for the FRIIs. We find a bimodal distribution for the radio loudness (R = L(radio)/L(opt)) where the lower radio luminosity core-only sources appear as a population separate from the multi-component extended sources, compared with no evidence for bimodality when just the core-only sources are used. We also find that a log(R) value of 1.75 is well suited to separate the FRIs from the FRIIs, and that the R bimodality seen here is really a manifestation of the FRI/FRII break originally found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974). We find modest trends in the radio loud fraction as a function of Eddington ratio and black hole mass, where the fraction of RL AGNs decreases with increasing Eddington ratio, and increases when the black hole mass is above 2 x 108 solar masses.

  2. Orientation of the cores of hybrid morphology radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ceglowski, Maciej; Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The FRI/FRII dichotomy is a much debated issue in the astrophysics of extragalactic radio sources. Study of the properties of HYbrid MOrphology Radio Sources (HYMORS) may bring crucial information and lead to a step forward in understanding the origin of FRI/FRII dichotomy. HYMORS are a rare class of double-lobed radio sources where each of the two lobes clearly exhibits a different FR morphology. This article describes follow-up high resolution VLBA observations of the five discovered by us HYMORS. The main aim of the observations was to answer the questions of whether the unusual radio morphology is connected to the orientation of objects towards the observer. We obtained the high resolution radio maps of five hybrid radio morphology objects with the VLBA at C-band and L-band. Two of them revealed milliarcsecond core-jet structures, the next two objects showed hints of parsec-scale jets, and the last one remained point-like at both frequencies. We compared properties of observed milliarcsecond structures of...

  3. HOST GALAXIES OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springmann, A.; Cheung, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, active galaxies that emit much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies has an “X”-or winged-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being a realignment of the black hole within the AGN and the second positing that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium, causing backflow and producing secondary wings. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, the distribution of the stellar mass is compared to the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN. Results show elliptical host galaxies with an orthogonal offset between the semi-major axis of the host galaxy and the secondary radio wings, which lends support to the hydrodynamical model. However, results also show circular host galaxies with radio wings, making the realignment scenario a more likely model to describe the formation of these X-shaped radio sources.

  4. Radio sources - Very, Very Long Baseline Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. H.

    1983-03-01

    With resolution of a thousandth of an arcsecond, the radio technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) provides astronomers with their highest-resolution view of the universe. Data taken with widely-separated antennas are combined, with the help of atomic clocks, to form a Michelson interferometer whose size may be as great as the earth's diameter. Extraordinary phenomena, from the birth of stars as signaled by the brilliant flashes of powerful interstellar masers to the 'faster-than-light' expansion of the cores of distant quasars, are being explored with this technique. However, earth-bound VLBI suffers from several restrictions due to the location of the component antennas at fixed places on the earth's surface. The use of one or more antennas in space in concert with ground-based equipment will greatly expand the technical and scientific capabilities of VLBI, leading to a more complete and even higher resolution view of cosmic phenomena.

  5. Radio Continuum Sources Associated with AB Aur

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, L F; Ho, P T P; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2006-01-01

    We present high angular resolution, high-sensitivity Very Large Array observations at 3.6 cm of the Herbig Ae star AB Aur. This star is of interest since its circumstellar disk exhibits characteristics that have been attributed to the presence of an undetected low mass companion or giant gas planet. Our image confirms the continuum emission known to exist in association with the star, and detects a faint protuberance that extends about $0\\rlap.{''}3$ to its SE. Previous theoretical considerations and observational results are consistent with the presence of a companion to AB Aur with the separation and position angle derived from our radio data. We also determine the proper motion of AB Aur by comparing our new observations with data taken about 17 years ago and find values consistent with those found by Hipparcos.

  6. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C S; Feain, I J; Franzen, T M O

    2015-01-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 \\& 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We have used rotation measure synthesis to identify Faraday complex polarized sources --- i.e. objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behaviour indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday simple polarized sources (i.e. sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12\\% of polarized sources at $\\sim1'$ resolution, but demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations...

  7. Spectral structure of X-shaped radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, D V; Lal, Dharam Vir

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope low frequency data for an X-shaped source, 3C 223.1 has revealed an unusual result as discussed earlier by Lal & Rao (2004, MNRAS in press). The radio morphologies of it at 240 and 610 MHz show a well-defined X-shaped structure with a pair of active jets along the north-south axis and a pair of wings along the east-west axis, that pass symmetrically through the undetected radio core. The wings (or low surface brightness jet) seem to have flatter spectral index with respect to the high surface brightness jet. This clearly shows the value of mapping the sample of X-shaped sources at low frequencies. Here we present our preliminary results for two more such sources.

  8. Degree of Polarization and Source Counts of Faint Radio Sources from Stacking Polarized Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Stil, J. M.; Keller, B. W.; George, S. J.; Taylor, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    We present stacking polarized intensity as a means to study the polarization of sources that are too faint to be detected individually in surveys of polarized radio sources. Stacking offers not only high sensitivity to the median signal of a class of radio sources, but also avoids a detection threshold in polarized intensity, and therefore an arbitrary exclusion of source with a low percentage of polarization. Correction for polarization bias is done through a Monte Carlo analysis and tested ...

  9. ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM,

    Science.gov (United States)

    MERCURY ( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), PERIODIC VARIATIONS, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES...EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SOURCES), GALAXIES, BLACKBODY RADIATION, BRIGHTNESS, TEMPERATURE, MARS( PLANET ), JUPITER( PLANET ), SATURN( PLANET

  10. The spectral structure and energetics of powerful radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Harwood, J J; Croston, J H; Stroe, A; Morganti, R; Orru, E

    2014-01-01

    Determining the energy spectrum of an electron population can give key insights into the underlying physics of a radio source; however, the lack of high resolution, broad-bandwidth observations has left many ambiguities in our understanding of radio galaxies. The improved capabilities of telescopes such as the JVLA and LOFAR mean that within the bandwidth of any given observation, a detailed spectral shape can now be produced. We present recent investigations of powerful FR-II radio galaxies at GHz and MHz frequencies and show for the first time their small-scale spectral structure. We highlight problems in traditional methods of analysis and demonstrate how these issues can now be addressed. We present the latest results from low frequency studies which suggest a potential increase in the total energy content of radio galaxy lobes with possible implications for the energetics of the population as a whole.

  11. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  12. Probing radio source environments via HI and OH absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, N; Saikia, D J; Ghosh, T; Jeyakumar, S; Gupta, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of HI and OH absorption measurements towards a sample of radio sources using the Arecibo 305-m telescope and the GMRT. In total, 27 radio sources were searched for associated 21-cm HI absorption. One totally new HI absorption system was detected against the radio galaxy 3C258, while five previously known HI absorption systems, and one galaxy detected in emission, were studied with improved frequency resolution and/or sensitivity. Our sample included 17 GPS and CSS objects, 4 of which exhibit HI absorption. This detection rate of ~25% compares with a value of ~40% by Vermeulen et al. for similar sources. We detected neither OH emission nor absorption towards any of the sources that were observed at Arecibo, and estimate a limit on the abundance ratio of N(HI)/N(OH)>4x10^6 for 3C258. We have combined our results with those from other available HI searches to compile a sample of 96 radio sources consisting of 27 GPS, 35 CSS, 13 flat spectrum and 21 large sources. The HI absorption detectio...

  13. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (10 keV).

  14. Autonomous robotic platforms for locating radio sources buried under rubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasu, A. S.; Anchidin, L.; Tamas, R.; Paun, M.; Danisor, A.; Petrescu, T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the use of autonomous robotic platforms able to locate radio signal sources such as mobile phones, buried under collapsed buildings as a result of earthquakes, natural disasters, terrorism, war, etc. This technique relies on averaging position data resulting from a propagation model implemented on the platform and the data acquired by robotic platforms at the disaster site. That allows us to calculate the approximate position of radio sources buried under the rubble. Based on measurements, a radio map of the disaster site is made, very useful for locating victims and for guiding specific rubble lifting machinery, by assuming that there is a victim next to a mobile device detected by the robotic platform; by knowing the approximate position, the lifting machinery does not risk to further hurt the victims. Moreover, by knowing the positions of the victims, the reaction time is decreased, and the chances of survival for the victims buried under the rubble, are obviously increased.

  15. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources are at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Andreas; Norris, Ray P; Sharp, Rob; Spitler, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Context. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for High-redshift Radio Galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between these classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study diffcult. So far, no redshift is known for an original IFRS which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims. This work tests the hypothesis that IFRS follow the relation between 3.6 um flux density and redshift found for HzRGs. Furthermore, redshifts will enable us to reveal the intrinsic radio and infrared properties of IFRS and we will test the current suggestions that IFRS are high-redshift radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Methods. A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and lo...

  16. Planck intermediate results: XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.;

    2016-01-01

    Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous gro...

  17. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  18. Tailed Radio Sources in the CDFS Field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Dehghan; M. Johnston-Hollitt; M. Mao; R. P. Norris; N. A. Miller; M. Huynh

    2011-12-01

    Using 1.4 GHz ATCA & VLA images with 5.5 GHz ATCA data, we present a sample of 12 bent-tailed galaxies over the 4 deg2 area of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). We find 10 new sources, one of which is possibly the highest red-shift bent-tailed galaxy detected at ∼ 2.

  19. Planck early results. XIV. ERCSC validation and extreme radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.; Savolainen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Planck's all-sky surveys at 30-857 GHz provide an unprecedented opportunity to follow the radio spectra of a large sample of extragalactic sources to frequencies 2-20 times higher than allowed by past, large-area, ground-based surveys. We combine the results of the Planck Early Release Compact So...

  20. Probing the bias of radio sources at high redshift

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Passmoor, S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the clustering of dark matter and that of luminous matter is often described using the bias parameter. Here, we provide a new method to probe the bias of intermediate-to-high-redshift radio continuum sources for which...

  1. Broadband Radio Polarimetry and Faraday Rotation of 563 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1‧ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  2. BROADBAND RADIO POLARIMETRY AND FARADAY ROTATION OF 563 EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Franzen, T. M. O., E-mail: craiga@physics.usyd.edu.au [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2015-12-10

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1′ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases.

  3. Saddle antenna radio frequency ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudnikov, V., E-mail: vadim@muonsinc.com; Johnson, R. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Santana, M.; Piller, C.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Breitschopf, J. [TLU, Seguin, Texas 78155 (United States); Dudnikova, G. [UMD, College Park, Maryland 32611 (United States); Institute of Computational Technologies SBRAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Existing RF ion sources for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H{sup +} and H{sup −} ion generation ∼3–5 mA/cm{sup 2} kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) surface plasma source (SPS) described here was developed to improve H{sup −} ion production efficiency, reliability, and availability. In SA RF ion source, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm{sup 2} kW. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to ∼1.2 kW in the plasma with production up to Ic = 7 mA. A stable long time generation of H{sup −} beam without degradation was demonstrated in RF discharge with AlN discharge chamber.

  4. Dense plasma focus (DPF) accelerated non radio isotopic radiological source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusnak, Brian; Tang, Vincent

    2017-01-31

    A non-radio-isotopic radiological source using a dense plasma focus (DPF) to produce an intense z-pinch plasma from a gas, such as helium, and which accelerates charged particles, such as generated from the gas or injected from an external source, into a target positioned along an acceleration axis and of a type known to emit ionizing radiation when impinged by the type of accelerated charged particles. In a preferred embodiment, helium gas is used to produce a DPF-accelerated He2+ ion beam to a beryllium target, to produce neutron emission having a similar energy spectrum as a radio-isotopic AmBe neutron source. Furthermore, multiple DPFs may be stacked to provide staged acceleration of charged particles for enhancing energy, tunability, and control of the source.

  5. Planck intermediate results. XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Bendo, G J; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Israel, F P; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Pearson, T J; Peel, M; Perdereau, O; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at high frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations, while sources with clear signatures of evolving shocks appear to be limited to the strongest outbursts.

  6. CENSORS: A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources. I. Sample definition, radio data and optical identifications

    CERN Document Server

    Best, P N; Röttgering, H J A; Rengelink, R B; Brookes, M H; Wall, J

    2003-01-01

    A new sample of radio sources, with the designated name CENSORS (A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources), has been defined by combining the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) at 1.4 GHz with the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) Patch D, a 3 by 2 degree region of sky centred at 09 51 36.0, -21 00 00 (J2000). New radio observations of 199 NVSS radio sources with NVSS flux densities S(1.4GHz) > 7.8mJy are presented, and compared with the EIS I-band imaging observations which reach a depth of I~23; optical identifications are obtained for over two-thirds of the ~150 confirmed radio sources within the EIS field. The radio sources have a median linear size of 6 arcseconds, consistent with the trend for lower flux density radio sources to be less extended. Other radio source properties, such as the lobe flux density ratios, are consistent with those of brighter radio source samples. From the optical information, 30-40% of the sources are expected to lie at redshifts z >~ 1.5. One of the key goals of this survey is to accuratel...

  7. Low Frequency Spectral Structure of X-shaped Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, D. V.; Rao, A. P.

    2005-12-01

    X-shaped radio galaxies are attributed to be formed by galactic mergers as the black holes of two galaxies fall into the merged system and form a bound system. Recent analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope low frequency data for an X-shaped source, 3C 223.1 has revealed an unusual result (Lal & Rao 2004). The radio morphologies of it at 240 and 610 MHz show well defined X-shape with a pair of active jets along the north-south axis and a pair of wings along the east-west axis, that pass symmetrically through the undetected radio core. The wings (or low surface brightness jets) have flatter spectral indices with respect to the high surface brightness jets, which confirms the earlier marginal result obtained at high frequency by Dennett-Thorpe et al. (2002). Although unusual, it is a valuable result which puts stringent constraints on the formation models and nature of these sources. We present preliminary results for two such sources.

  8. Radiative excitation of molecules near powerful compact radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Philip R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rees, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper, Barvainis & Antonucci searched for and failed to detect CO J = 1 goes to 0 absorption from the obscuring torus in the nearby powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A. We show that a plausible explanation for the lack of absorption (assuming that the ionization parameter within the torus is low enough for the gas to be molecular) is that radiative excitation of the CO molecules by the nonthermal radio continuum increases the excitation temperature of the lower rotational levels substantially, reducing the optical depths. The excitation temperature may approach the brightness temperature of the radio source at high enough flux-to-density ratios. Heating of the gas by the nonthermal excitation may also be important. We discuss the region of parameter space in which this excitation mechanism will be important and the implications for observations of obscuring tori.

  9. COMPACT RADIO SOURCES APPARENTLY ASSOCIATED WITH EXTENDED GALACTIC SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Trejo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reportamos observaciones hechas con el VLA de la línea de 21 cm del HI hacia dos fuentes compactas que podrían estar asociadas con fuentes galácticas extendidas. En el caso de la nebulosa planetaria PHR 1735-333 observamos HI en absorción hacia una fuente de radio no térmica recientemente descubierta en la región, la cual se propuso estaba físicamente asociada con la nebulosa planetaria. Sin embargo, el análisis del espectro de HI en absorción sugiere una distancia mayor para esta fuente no térmica. En el caso del candidato a remanente de supernova SNR G3.8+0.3 obtuvimos espectros de HI en absorción hacia ella y hacia la fuente compacta de radio localizada en su centro. Concluimos que SNR G3.8+0.3 es más distante que la fuente compacta y que por lo tanto no están asociadas físicamente.

  10. Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources as Likely Counterparts of Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources (Research Note)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    Many sources in the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue are still unidentified since they lack an optical counterpart. An important tool that can help in identifying and classifying these sources is the cross-correlation with radio catalogues, which are very sensitive and positionally accurate. Moreover, the radio properties of a source, such as the spectrum or morphology, could provide further insight into its nature. In particular, flat-spectrum radio sources at high Galactic latitudes are likely to be AGN, possibly associated to a blazar or to the compact core of a radio galaxy. Here we present a small sample of 6 sources extracted from the fourth INTEGRAL/IBIS catalogue that are still unidentified or unclassified, but which are very likely associated with a bright, flat-spectrum radio object. To confirm the association and to study the source X-ray spectral parameters, we performed X-ray follow-up observations with Swift/XRT of all objects. We report in this note the overall results obtained from this search and discuss the nature of each individual INTEGRAL source. We find that 5 of the 6 radio associations are also detected in X-rays; furthermore, in 3 cases they are the only counterpart found. More specifically, IGR J06073-0024 is a flat-spectrum radio quasar at z = 1.08, IGR J14488-4008 is a newly discovered radio galaxy, while IGR J18129-0649 is an AGN of a still unknown type. The nature of two sources (IGR J07225-3810 and IGR J19386-4653) is less well defined, since in both cases we find another X-ray source in the INTEGRAL error circle; nevertheless, the flat-spectrum radio source, likely to be a radio loud AGN, remains a viable and, in fact, a more convincing association in both cases. Only for the last object (IGR J11544-7618) could we not find any convincing counterpart since the radio association is not an X-ray emitter, while the only X-ray source seen in the field is a G star and therefore unlikely to produce the persistent emission seen by INTEGRAL.

  11. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  12. INTERPLANETARY SCINTILLATION RADIO SOURCES DETECTED WITH THE MEXICAN ARRAY RADIO TELESCOPE (MEXART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Ambriz, J. C.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Andrade-Mascote, E.; Carrillo-Vargas, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) has an antenna composed by 4096 full-wavelength dipoles, covering about 9800 square meters. The instrument is primary devoted to carry out observations of compact stelar radio sources presenting Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) at 140 MHz. The IPS technique is a very useful tool to perform observations of large-scale solar wind density disturbances in the inner heliosphere at heliocentric ranges where no other instruments can cover. These observations can help to track the evolution of CMEs and shocks in the interplanetary medium. We present the first catalog of IPS sources detected with the MEXART. We show the power spectrum analysis to obtain information of solar wind velocity and density.

  13. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  14. Optical counterpart positions of extragalactic radio sources and connecting optical and radio reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Z.; Gumerov, R.; Jin, W.; Khamitov, I.; Maigurova, N.; Pinigin, G.; Tang, Z.; Wang, S.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the results of an investigation of astrometric positions of extragalactic radio sources from a list for the International Celestial Reference Frame. About 300 fields around extragalactic radio sources were observed during the years 2000-2003. The observations were performed mainly using two telescopes equipped with CCD cameras at TUG, Turkey (Russian-Turkish Telescope - RTT150) and at YAO (1 m telescope), (Kunming, China). The mean accuracies of the measured positions are 38 mas in right ascension and 35 mas in declination. A comparison between the measured optical positions determined using the UCAC2 catalog and the radio positions from the current ICRF shows that the overall optical-minus- radio offsets are -4 and +15 mas for right ascension and declination, respectively. The formal internal errors of these mean offsets are 4 mas. The results of optical positions with respect to the reference catalogue 2MASS are also given. A search for a relation between optical and radio reference frames indicates that the orientation angles are near zero within their accuracy of about 5 mas. The link accuracy becomes 3 mas when our observations are combined with other studies. Tables 2 and 3 giving the positions are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/510/A10Present address: İstanbul Kültür University, Ataköy Yerleşkesi, 34156 Istanbul, Turkey

  15. X-ray Radio Correlation In Black Hole Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R

    2006-01-01

    We examine the X-ray - radio correlation in Galactic black hole sources. We highlight some of the results which extend the flux-flux relations to sources with very high accretion rates. Some of the recent results indicate that the synchrotron process is unlikely to be the mechanism responsible for the X-ray emission, particularly at high accretion rates. We present a truncated accretion disk scenario and argue that accretion rate and accretion disk geometry ultimately act as a driver of the X-ray - radio correlation. We stress the importance of wide-band X-ray spectral measurements to understand the disk-jet connection and briefly outline some attempts made in the Indian context to build instruments for wide-band X-ray spectroscopy.

  16. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  17. GPS & CSS radio sources and space-VLBI

    OpenAIRE

    Snellen, I. A. G.

    2008-01-01

    A short overview is given of the status of research on young extragalactic radio sources. We concentrate on Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI), and space-VLBI results obtained with the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP). In 2012, VSOP-2 will be launched, which will allow VLBI observations at an unprecedented angular resolution. One particular question VSOP-2 could answer is whether some of the High Frequency Peakers (HFP) are indeed the youngest objects in the family of GPS and CS...

  18. Variability of GPS Radio Sources at 5 GHz

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lang Cui; Xiang Liu; Jun Liu

    2011-03-01

    We carry out flux monitoring on a sample of 169 Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources at 5 GHz and find that about one-third of them show considerable Inter-Month Variability (IMV), and these IMV phenomena are likely to be caused by interstellar scintillation (ISS). Furthermore, we find that those showing IMV tend to be point-like or core-jet structures at VLBI scale.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS observations of the host galaxies of powerful radio sources : Does size matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Barthel, PD; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Lehnert, MD

    2000-01-01

    We present near-infrared J- and K-band imaging of a sample of powerful radio source host galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS2 camera. These sources have been selected on their double-lobed radio structure and include a wide range of projected radio source sizes. The largest projected

  20. GPS and CSS Radio Sources and Space-VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellen, I.

    2009-08-01

    A short overview is given of the status of research on young extragalactic radio sources. We concentrate on Very Long Baseline Interferometric (VLBI), and space-VLBI results obtained with the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP). In 2012, VSOP-2 will be launched, which will allow VLBI observations at an unprecedented angular resolution. One particular question VSOP-2 could answer is whether some of the High Frequency Peakers (HFP) are indeed the youngest objects in the family of GPS and CSS sources. VSOP-2 observations can reveal their angular morphology and determine whether any are Ultra-compact Symmetric Objects.

  1. Model for the radio source Sagittarius B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosachinskii, I.; Khersonskii, V.

    1981-07-01

    A dynamical model is proposed for the gas cloud surrounding the radio source Sgr B2. The kinematic behavior of the gas in the source is interpreted in terms of a contracting core and a rotating outer envelope. The cloud initially would have been kept stable by turbulent motion, whose energy would be dissipated into heat by magnetic viscosity. This process should operate more rapidly in the dense core, which would begin to collapse while the envelope remains stable. The initial cloud parameters and various circumstances of the collapse are calculated, and estimates are obtained for the conditions in the core at the time of its fragmentation into clumps of stellar mass.

  2. Non-thermal emission from extragalactic radio sources a high resolution broad band (radio to X-rays) approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, G

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the study of extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on the importance of the spatial resolution at different wavelengths, and of the combination of observations at different frequency bands. In particular, a substantial step forward in this field is now provided by the new generation X-ray telescopes which are able to image radio sources in between 0.1--10 keV with a spatial resolution comparable with that of the radio telescopes (VLA) and of the optical telescopes. After a brief description of some basic aspects of acceleration mechanisms and of the radiative processes at work in the extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on a number of recent radio, optical and X-ray observations with arcsec resolution, and discuss the deriving constraints on the physics of these sources.

  3. The Unusual Galactic Center Radio Source N3

    CERN Document Server

    Ludovici, Dominic A; Morris, Mark R; Mutel, Robert; Mills, Elisabeth A C; Toomey, James E; Ott, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Here we report on new, multi-wavelength radio observations of the unusual point source "N3" that appears to be located in the vicinity of the Galactic Center. VLA observations between 2 and 50 GHz reveal that N3 is a compact and bright source (56 mJy at 10 GHz) with a non-thermal spectrum superimposed upon the non-thermal radio filaments (NTFs) of the Radio Arc. Our highest frequency observations place a strict upper limit of 65 x 28 mas on the size of N3. We compare our observations to those of Yusef-Zadeh & Morris (1987) and Lang et al. (1997) and conclude that N3 is variable over long time scales. Additionally, we present the detection of a compact molecular cloud located adjacent to N3 in projection. CH3CN, CH3OH, CS, HC3N, HNCO, SiO, SO, and NH3 are detected in the cloud and most transitions have FWHM line widths of ~20 km/s. The rotational temperature determined from the metastable NH3 transitions ranges from 79 K to 183 K depending on the transitions used. We present evidence that this molecular cl...

  4. The Identification of EGRET Sources with Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mattox, J R; Molnár, L; Hartman, R C; Patnaik, A R

    1996-01-01

    We present a method to assess the reliability of the identification of EGRET sources with extragalactic radio sources. We verify that EGRET is detecting the blazar class of AGN. However, many published identifications are found to be questionable. We provide a table of 42 blazars which we expect to be robust identifications of EGRET sources. This includes one previously unidentified EGRET source, the lensed AGN PKS 1830-210 near the direction of the Galactic center. We provide the best available positions for 16 more radio sources which are also potential identifications for previously unidentified EGRET sources. All high Galactic latitude EGRET sources (b>3 degrees) which demonstrate significant variability can be identified with flat spectrum radio sources. This suggests that EGRET is not detecting any type of AGN other than blazars. This identification method has been used to establish with 99.998% confidence that the peak gamma-ray flux of a blazar is correlated with its average 5 GHz radio flux. An even ...

  5. Modelling the spectral evolution of classical double radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Manolakou, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral evolution of powerful double radio galaxies (FR II's) is thought to be determined by the acceleration of electrons at the termination shock of the jet, their transport through the bright head region into the lobes and the production of the radio emission by synchrotron radiation in the lobes. Models presented to date incorporate some of these processes in prescribing the electron distribution which enters the lobes. We have extended these models to include a description of electron acceleration at the relativistic termination shock and a selection of transport models for the head region. These are coupled to the evolution of the electron spectrum in the lobes under the influence of losses due to adiabatic expansion, by inverse Compton scattering on the cosmic background radiation and by synchrotron radiation. The evolutionary tracks predicted by this model are compared to observation using the power/source-size (P-D) diagram. We find that the simplest scenario, in which accelerated particles suff...

  6. CLUSTERING AND PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES AROUND HIGH REDSHIFT RADIO SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Bornancini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the clustering properties of galaxies in the eld 0:5 < z < 1:5 Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS radio sources selected from SUMSS and NVSS surveys. We nd a comoving correlation length of r0 = 14:0+.- 2:8 h-1 Mpc. We compare our ndings with those obtained in a cosmological N-body simulation populated with GALFORM semi-analytic galaxies. We nd that clusters of galaxies with masses in the range M = 1013:4-14:2 h-1 M have a cluster-galaxy cross-correlation amplitude comparable to those found between USS hosts and galaxies. These results suggest that distant radio galaxies are excellent tracers of galaxy overdensities and pinpoint the progenitors of present day rich clusters of galaxies.

  7. High-frequency radio polarization measurements of WMAP point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, N; Battye, R A; Gabuzda, D; Taylor, A C

    2009-01-01

    We present polarization measurements at 8.4, 22, and 43 GHz made with the VLA of a complete sample of extragalactic sources stronger than 1 Jy in the 5-year WMAP catalogue and with declinations north of -34 degrees. The observations were motivated by the need to know the polarization properties of radio sources at frequencies of tens of GHz in order to subtract polarized foregrounds for future sensitive Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. The total intensity and polarization measurements are generally consistent with comparable VLA calibration measurements for less-variable sources, and within a similar range to WMAP fluxes for unresolved sources. A further paper will present correlations between measured parameters and derive implications for CMB measurements.

  8. Sparse source configurations in radio tomography of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursiainen, S.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2014-07-01

    Our research targets at progress in non-invasive imaging of asteroids to support future planetary research and extra-terrestrial mining activities. This presentation concerns principally radio tomography in which the permittivity distribution inside an asteroid is to be recovered based on the radio frequency signal transmitted from the asteroid's surface and gathered by an orbiter. The focus will be on a sparse distribution (Pursiainen and Kaasalainen, 2013) of signal sources that can be necessary in the challenging in situ environment and within tight payload limits. The general goal in our recent research has been to approximate the minimal number of source positions needed for robust localization of anomalies caused, for example, by an internal void. Characteristic to the localization problem are the large relative changes in signal speed caused by the high permittivity of typical asteroid minerals (e.g. basalt), meaning that a signal path can include strong refractions and reflections. This presentation introduces results of a laboratory experiment in which real travel time data was inverted using a hierarchical Bayesian approach combined with the iterative alternating sequential (IAS) posterior exploration algorithm. Special interest was paid to robustness of the inverse results regarding changes of the prior model and source positioning. According to our results, strongly refractive anomalies can be detected with three or four sources independently of their positioning.

  9. A Selection of Giant Radio Sources from NVSS

    CERN Document Server

    Proctor, D D

    2016-01-01

    Results of the application of pattern recognition techniques to the problem of identifying Giant Radio Sources (GRS) from the data in the NVSS catalog are presented and issues affecting the process are explored. Decision-tree pattern recognition software was applied to training set source pairs developed from known NVSS large angular size radio galaxies. The full training set consisted of 51,195 source pairs, 48 of which were known GRS for which each lobe was primarily represented by a single catalog component. The source pairs had a maximum separation of 20 arc minutes and a minimum component area of 1.87 square arc minutes at the 1.4 mJy level. The importance of comparing resulting probability distributions of the training and application sets for cases of unknown class ratio is demonstrated. The probability of correctly ranking a randomly selected (GRS, non-GRS) pair from the best of the tested classifiers was determined to be 97.8 +/- 1.5%. The best classifiers were applied to the over 870,000 candidate p...

  10. Airborne system for detection and location of radio interference sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audone, Bruno; Pastore, Alberto

    1992-11-01

    The rapid expansion of telecommunication has practically saturated every band of Radio Frequency Spectrum; a similar expansion of electrical and electronic devices has affected all radio communications which are, in some way, influenced by a large amount of interferences, either intentionally or unintentionally produced. Operational consequences of these interferences, particularly in the frequency channels used for aeronautical services, can be extremely dangerous, making mandatory a tight control of Electromagnetic Spectrum. The present paper analyzes the requirements and the problems related to the surveillance, for civil application, of the Electromagnetic Spectrum between 20 and 1000 MHz, with particular attention to the detection and location of radio interference sources; after a brief introduction and the indication of the advantages of an airborne versus ground installation, the airborne system designed by Alenia in cooperation with Italian Ministry of Post and Telecommunication, its practical implementation and the prototype installation on board of a small twin turboprop aircraft for experimentation purposes is presented. The results of the flight tests are also analyzed and discussed.

  11. GMRT study of X-shaped radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lal, Dharam Vir; Hardcastle, M J; Cheung, C C; Bhatnagar, S; Kraft, R P; Lobanov, A P; Zensus, A J

    2007-01-01

    Context. The nature of X-shaped sources is a matter of considerable debate in the literature: it has even been proposed that they provide evidence for black-hole-mergers/spin-reorientation, and therefore constrain the rate of strong gravitational wave events. Aim. To explore the nature of these X-shaped radio galaxies. Method. We conduct a systematic study of a large sample of known and newly discovered X-shaped sources along with a comparison sample. We used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope with resolution of $\\sim6^{\\prime\\prime}$ to $\\sim15^{\\prime\\prime}$ at 610 MHz and 240 MHz in the dual-frequency mode. Preliminary Result. Based on our careful analysis and estimation of the possible systematic errors, the known X-shaped sources divide into the following three categories: (i) the wings have flatter spectral indices than the active lobes, (ii) the wings and the active lobes have comparable spectral indices, and (iii) the wings have steeper spectral indices than the active lobes. In addition, based on o...

  12. Searching for Compact Radio Sources Associated with UCHII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masqué, Josep M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Trinidad, Miguel A.; Kurtz, Stan; Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodríguez-Rico, Carlos A.; Loinard, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Ultra-compact (UC)H ii regions represent a very early stage of massive star formation. The structure and evolution of these regions are not yet fully understood. Interferometric observations showed in recent years that compact sources of uncertain nature are associated with some UCH ii regions. To examine this, we carried out VLA 1.3 cm observations in the A configuration of selected UCH ii regions in order to report additional cases of compact sources embedded in UCH ii regions. With these observations, we find 13 compact sources that are associated with 9 UCH ii regions. Although we cannot establish an unambiguous nature for the newly detected sources, we assess some of their observational properties. According to the results, we can distinguish between two types of compact sources. One type corresponds to sources that are probably deeply embedded in the dense ionized gas of the UCH ii region. These sources are photoevaporated by the exciting star of the region and will last for 104–105 years. They may play a crucial role in the evolution of the UCH ii region as the photoevaporated material could replenish the expanding plasma and might provide a solution to the so-called lifetime problem of these regions. The second type of compact sources is not associated with the densest ionized gas of the region. A few of these sources appear resolved and may be photoevaporating objects such as those of the first type, but with significantly lower mass depletion rates. The remaining sources of this second type appear unresolved, and their properties are varied. We speculate on the similarity between the sources of the second type and those of the Orion population of radio sources.

  13. The polarimetric multi-frequency radio sources properties

    CERN Document Server

    Galluzzi, V

    2016-01-01

    The polarization properties of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies higher than 20 GHz are still poorly constrained. However, their characterization would provide invaluable information about the physics of the emission processes and is crucial to estimate their contamination as foregrounds of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular power spectrum on scales 200 mJy (at 20 GHz) carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array between 5.5 and 38 GHz. The analysis clearly shows that polarization properties cannot be simply inferred from total intensity ones, as the spectral behaviors of the two signals are typically different.

  14. Hollow metal target magnetron sputter type radio frequency ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, N., E-mail: mwada@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610–0321 (Japan); Tsubouchi, N. [Kansai Institute, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Osaka 563–8577 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A 70 mm diameter 70 mm long compact ion source equipped with a hollow sputtering target has been designed and tested. The hollow sputtering target serves as the radio frequency (RF) plasma excitation electrode at 13.56 MHz. A stable beam of Cu{sup +} has been extracted when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. In the extracted beam, Cu{sup +} had occupied more than 85% of the total ion current. Further increase in Cu{sup +} ions in the beam is anticipated by increasing the RF power and Ar pressure.

  15. Young radio sources: the duty-cycle of the radio emission and prospects for gamma-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M; Giovannini, G; Giroletti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary stage of a powerful radio source originated by an AGN is related to its linear size. In this context, compact symmetric objects (CSOs), which are powerful and intrinsically small objects, should represent the young stage in the individual radio source life. However, the fraction of young radio sources in flux density-limited samples is much higher than what expected from the number counts of large radio sources.This indicates that a significant fraction of young radio sources does not develop to the classical Fanaroff-Riley radio galaxies,suggesting an intermittent jet activity. As the radio jets are expanding within the dense and inhomogeneous interstellar medium,the ambient may play a role in the jet growth, for example slowing down or even disrupting its expansion when a jet-cloud interaction takes place. Moreover, this environment may provide the thermal seed photons that scattered by the lobes' electrons may be responsible for high energy emission, detectable by Fermi-LAT.

  16. A Selection of Giant Radio Sources from NVSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    Results of the application of pattern-recognition techniques to the problem of identifying giant radio sources (GRSs) from the data in the NVSS catalog are presented, and issues affecting the process are explored. Decision-tree pattern-recognition software was applied to training-set source pairs developed from known NVSS large-angular-size radio galaxies. The full training set consisted of 51,195 source pairs, 48 of which were known GRSs for which each lobe was primarily represented by a single catalog component. The source pairs had a maximum separation of 20\\prime and a minimum component area of 1.87 square arcmin at the 1.4 mJy level. The importance of comparing the resulting probability distributions of the training and application sets for cases of unknown class ratio is demonstrated. The probability of correctly ranking a randomly selected (GRS, non-GRS) pair from the best of the tested classifiers was determined to be 97.8 ± 1.5%. The best classifiers were applied to the over 870,000 candidate pairs from the entire catalog. Images of higher-ranked sources were visually screened, and a table of over 1600 candidates, including morphological annotation, is presented. These systems include doubles and triples, wide-angle tail and narrow-angle tail, S- or Z-shaped systems, and core-jets and resolved cores. While some resolved-lobe systems are recovered with this technique, generally it is expected that such systems would require a different approach.

  17. Sparse source approaches to radio tomography of asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursiainen, Sampsa

    Currently, there is a growing interest towards non-invasive imaging of asteroids to support future planetary research and extra-terrestrial mining activities. This presentation concentrates on our recent developments regarding radio tomography in which the signal velocity (refractive index) distribution inside an asteroid is to be recovered from radio frequency data gathered by an orbiter. The tomography approach in question is closely related to that of the CONSERT experiment aiming at recovery of a comet nucleus structure as a part of the ROSETTA mission. The focus will be on a sparse distribution of signal sources that can be necessary in the challenging in situ environment and within tight payload limits. The general goal in our recent research has been to approximate the minimal number of source positions needed for robust localization of anomalies caused, for example, by an internal void. Characteristic to the localization problem are the large relative changes in signal speed caused by the high refractive index of typical asteroid minerals (e.g. basalt), meaning that a signal path can include strong refractions and reflections. The inversion strategy applied combines a hierarchical Bayesian inverse model and the iterative alternating sequential (IAS) posterior exploration algorithm. Methods relying on ray tracing and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) forward simulation have been utilized in forward (data) simulation. Both simulated and real experimental data have been utilized. Special interest has been paid to robustness of the inverse results regarding changes of the prior model and source positioning. The results have been encouraging: strongly refractive anomalies can be detected already with two sources independently of their positioning, and the robustness has been observed to increase rapidly along with the number of sources.

  18. Extragalactic radio sources with sharply inverted spectrum at metre wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Gopal-Krishna,; Mhaskey, Mukul; Ranadive, Pritesh; Wiita, Paul J; Goyal, A; Kantharia, N G; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of a systematic search for the rare extragalactic radio sources showing an inverted (integrated) spectrum, with spectral index $\\alpha \\ge +2.0$, a previously unexplored spectral domain. The search is expected to yield strong candidates for $\\alpha \\ge +2.5$, for which the standard synchrotron self-absorption (characterized by a single power-law energy distribution of relativistic electron population) would not be a plausible explanation, even in an ideal case of a perfectly homogeneous source of incoherent synchrotron radiation. Such sharply inverted spectra, if found, would require alternative explanations, e.g., free-free absorption, or non-standard energy distribution of relativistic electrons which differs from a power-law (e.g., Maxwellian). The search was carried out by comparing two sensitive low-frequency radio surveys made with sub-arcminute resolution, namely, the WISH survey at 352 MHz and TGSS/DR5 at 150 MHz. The overlap region between these two surveys contains 7056 ...

  19. New redshift determinations for three 3C radio sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaldi, V.

    2017-01-01

    I report the new redshift determinations of three radio sources 3C 196.1, 3C 268.2 and 3C 303.1 by using GMOS/Gemini North long-slit optical spectroscopy. The details of the observations are summarized in the following table (the B600 grating was used for the three observations): Object | RA(J2000) | DEC(J2000) | Date of obs. | width-slit(arcsec) | PA(deg) | Exp.Time(sec) 3C 196.1 | 8:15:27.8 | -03:08:27 | Mar 2012 | 0.5 | 50 | 2560 3C 268.2| |12:00:59.1 | 31:33:28 | Feb 2011 | 0.5 | 165 | 2576 3C 303.1 | 14:43:14.5 | 77:07:28 | Feb 2012 | 1 | 145 | 2560 The three of the sources have extended regions of ionized gas that do not obey a spherical distribution.

  20. Model of the Sgr B2 radio source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosachinskii, I.V.; Khersonskii, V.K. (AN SSSR, Spetsial' naya Astrofizicheskaya Observatoriya)

    The dynamical model of the gas cloud around the radio source Sagittarius B2 is suggested. This model describes the kinematic features of the gas in this source: contraction of the core and rotation of the envelope. The stability of the cloud at the initial stage is supported by the turbulent motion of the gas, turbulence energy dissipates due to magnetic viscosity. This process is occurring more rapidly in the dense core and the core begins to collapse but the envelope remains stable. The parameters of the primary cloud and some parameters (mass, density and size) of the collapse are calculated. The conditions in the core at the moment of its fragmentation into masses of stellar order are established.

  1. Ultra Steep Spectrum radio sources in the Lockman Hole: SERVS identifications and redshift distribution at the faintest radio fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Afonso, J; Ibar, E; Grossi, M; Simpson, C; Chapman, S; Jarvis, M J; Rottgering, H; Norris, R P; Dunlop, J; Ivison, R J; Messias, H; Pforr, J; Vaccari, M; Seymour, N; Best, P; González-Solares, E; Farrah, D; Fernandes, C A C; Huang, J -S; Lacy, M; Marastron, C; Marchetti, L; Mauduit, J -C; Oliver, S; Rigopoulou, D; Stanford, S A; Surace, J; Zeimann, G

    2011-01-01

    Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z>~2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 microJy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 micron from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) is used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6](AB)=19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of...

  2. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, O.; Pursimo, T.; Johnston, Helen M.; Stanford, Laura M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Jauncey, David L.; Zenere, Katrina A.

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ˜160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  3. Multifrequency polarimetry of a complete sample of PACO radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, V.; Massardi, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Casasola, V.; Gregorini, L.; Trombetti, T.; Burigana, C.; De Zotti, G.; Ricci, R.; Stevens, J.; Ekers, R. D.; Bonavera, L.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Liuzzo, E.; López-Caniego, M.; Mignano, A.; Paladino, R.; Toffolatti, L.; Tucci, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present high-sensitivity polarimetric observations (σP ≃0.6 mJy) in six bands covering the 5.5-38 GHz range of a complete sample of 53 compact extragalactic radio sources brighter than 200 mJy at 20 GHz. The observations, carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, achieved a 91 per cent detection rate (at 5σ). Within this frequency range, the spectra of about 95 per cent of sources are well fitted by double power laws, both in total intensity and in polarization, but the spectral shapes are generally different in the two cases. Most sources were classified as either steep- or peaked-spectrum but less than 50 per cent have the same classification in total and in polarized intensity. No significant trends of the polarization degree with flux density or with frequency were found. The mean variability index in total intensity of steep-spectrum sources increases with frequency for a 4-5 yr lag, while no significant trend shows up for the other sources and for the 8 yr lag. In polarization, the variability index, which could be computed only for the 8 yr lag, is substantially higher than in total intensity and has no significant frequency dependence.

  4. THE LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO CATALOG OF FLAT-SPECTRUM SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Cowperthwaite, Philip S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Funk, S., E-mail: fmassaro79@gmail.com [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A well known property of the γ-ray sources detected by Cos-B in the 1970s, by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 1990s, and recently by the Fermi observations is the presence of radio counterparts, particularly for those associated with extragalactic objects. This observational evidence is the basis of the radio-γ-ray connection established for the class of active galactic nuclei known as blazars. In particular, the main spectral property of the radio counterparts associated with γ-ray blazars is that they show a flat spectrum in the GHz frequency range. Our recent analysis dedicated to search blazar-like candidates as potential counterparts for the unidentified γ-ray sources allowed us to extend the radio-γ-ray connection in the MHz regime. We also showed that blazars below 1 GHz maintain flat radio spectra. Thus, on the basis of these new results, we assembled a low-frequency radio catalog of flat-spectrum sources built by combining the radio observations of the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey and of the Westerbork in the southern hemisphere catalog with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky survey (NVSS). This could be used in the future to search for new, unknown blazar-like counterparts of γ-ray sources. First, we found NVSS counterparts of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio sources, and then we selected flat-spectrum radio sources according to a new spectral criterion, specifically defined for radio observations performed below 1 GHz. We also described the main properties of the catalog listing 28,358 radio sources and their logN-logS distributions. Finally, a comparison with the Green Bank 6 cm radio source catalog was performed to investigate the spectral shape of the low-frequency flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies.

  5. Extragalactic radio sources with hybrid morphology: implications for the Fanaroff-Riley dichotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    We provide observational and theoretical perspectives on the currently much debated issue of the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological dichotomy of extragalactic radio sources. In this context we introduce a new, albeit rare, class of double radio sources in which the two lobes exhibit clearly different FR morphologies. It is argued that such `HYbrid MOrphology Radio Sources', or HYMORS, could be used to effectively constrain the theoretical mechanisms proposed for the FR dichotomy. Basically, th...

  6. Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Barr, E D; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; Edwards, P G; Stevens, J; Brem, C; Jameson, A; Burke-Spolaor, S; Johnston, S; Bhat, N D R; Chandra, P; Kudale, S; Bhandari, S

    2015-01-01

    "Perytons" are millisecond-duration transients of terrestrial origin, whose frequency-swept emission mimics the dispersion of an astrophysical pulse that has propagated through tenuous cold plasma. In fact, their similarity to FRB 010724 had previously cast a shadow over the interpretation of "fast radio bursts," which otherwise appear to be of extragalactic origin. Until now, the physical origin of the dispersion-mimicking perytons had remained a mystery. We have identified strong out-of-band emission at 2.3--2.5 GHz associated with several peryton events. Subsequent tests revealed that a peryton can be generated at 1.4 GHz when a microwave oven door is opened prematurely and the telescope is at an appropriate relative angle. Radio emission escaping from microwave ovens during the magnetron shut-down phase neatly explain all of the observed properties of the peryton signals. Now that the peryton source has been identified, we furthermore demonstrate that the microwaves on site could not have caused FRB 01072...

  7. Dispersion Measure Variation of Repeating Fast Radio Burst Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2017-09-01

    The repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 was recently localized in a dwarf galaxy at a cosmological distance. The dispersion measure (DM) derived for each burst from FRB 121102 so far has not shown significant evolution, even though an apparent increase was recently seen with newly detected VLA bursts. It is expected that more repeating FRB sources may be detected in the future. In this work, we investigate a list of possible astrophysical processes that might cause DM variation of a particular FRB source. The processes include (1) cosmological scale effects such as Hubble expansion and large-scale structure fluctuations; (2) FRB local effects such as gas density fluctuation, expansion of a supernova remnant (SNR), a pulsar wind nebula, and an H ii region; and (3) the propagation effect due to plasma lensing. We find that the DM variations contributed by the large-scale structure are extremely small, and any observable DM variation is likely caused by the plasma local to the FRB source. In addition to mechanisms that decrease DM over time, we suggest that an FRB source in an expanding SNR around a nearly neutral ambient medium during the deceleration (Sedov–Taylor and snowplow) phases or in a growing H ii region can increase DM. Some effects (e.g., an FRB source moving in an H ii region or plasma lensing) can produce either positive or negative DM variations. Future observations of DM variations of FRB 121102 and other repeating FRB sources can provide important clues regarding the physical origin of these sources.

  8. Interstellar Scintillation Observations of 146 Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rickett, B

    2005-01-01

    From 1979--1996 the Green Bank Interferometer was used by the Naval Research Laboratory to monitor the flux density from 146 compact radio sources at frequencies near 2 and 8 GHz. We filter the ``light curves'' to separate intrinsic variations on times of a year or more from more rapid interstellar scintilation (ISS) on times of 5--50 d. Whereas the intrinsic variation at 2 GHz is similar to that at 8 GHz (though diminished in amplitude), the ISS variation is much stronger at 2 than at 8 GHz. We characterize the ISS variation by an rms amplitude and a timescale and examine the statistics of these parameters for the 121 sources with significant ISS at 2 GHz. We model the scintillations using the NE2001 Galactic electron model assuming the sources are brightness-limited. We find the observed rms amplitude to be in general agreement with the model, provided that the compact components of the sources have about 50% of their flux density in a component with maximum brightness temperatures $10^{11}$--$10^{12}$K. Th...

  9. A radio monitoring survey of ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Körding, E.; Colbert, E.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a radio monitoring campaign to search for radio emission from nearby ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). These sources are bright off-nuclear X-ray point sources with luminosities exceeding LX > 1039 erg s-1. A well-defined sample of the 9

  10. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the Small Magellanic Cloud, part II: Point sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new catalogue of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC. This catalogue contains sources previously not found in 2370 MHz (λ=13 cm with sources found at 1400 MHz (λ=20 cm and 843 MHz (λ=36 cm. 45 sources have been detected at 13 cm, with 1560 sources at 20 cm created from new high sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC at 20 cm from paper I. We also created a 36 cm catalogue to which we listed 1689 radio-continuum sources.

  11. The environment of radio sources in the VLA-COSMOS Survey field

    CERN Document Server

    Malavasi, Nicola; Ciliegi, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier; Pozzetti, Lucia; Zucca, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the correlation among environmental density and radio AGN presence up to $z = 2$. Using data from the photometric COSMOS survey and its radio 1.4 GHz follow-up (VLA-COSMOS), a sample of radio AGNs has been defined. The environment was studied using the richness distributions inside a parallelepiped with base side of 1 Mpc and height proportional to the photometric redshift precision. Radio AGNs are found to be always located in environments significantly richer than those around galaxies with no radio emission. Moreover, a distinction based on radio AGN power shows that the significance of the environmental effect is only maintained for low-power radio sources. The results of this work show that denser environments play a significant role in enhancing the probability that a galaxy hosts a radio AGN and, in particular, low-power ones.

  12. ULTRA STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES IN THE LOCKMAN HOLE: SERVS IDENTIFICATIONS AND REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION AT THE FAINTEST RADIO FLUXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso, J.; Bizzocchi, L.; Grossi, M.; Messias, H.; Fernandes, C. A. C. [Observatorio Astronomico de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Simpson, C. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Chapman, S.; Gonzalez-Solares, E. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Jarvis, M. J. [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Rottgering, H. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Oort Gebouw, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Norris, R. P. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Dunlop, J.; Best, P. [SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Pforr, J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Vaccari, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Padova, vicolo Osservatorio 3, 35122 Padova (Italy); Seymour, N. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Huang, J.-S., E-mail: jafonso@oal.ul.pt [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); and others

    2011-12-20

    Ultra steep spectrum (USS) radio sources have been successfully used to select powerful radio sources at high redshifts (z {approx}> 2). Typically restricted to large-sky surveys and relatively bright radio flux densities, it has gradually become possible to extend the USS search to sub-mJy levels, thanks to the recent appearance of sensitive low-frequency radio facilities. Here a first detailed analysis of the nature of the faintest USS sources is presented. By using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Very Large Array radio observations of the Lockman Hole at 610 MHz and 1.4 GHz, a sample of 58 USS sources, with 610 MHz integrated fluxes above 100 {mu}Jy, is assembled. Deep infrared data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m from the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) are used to reliably identify counterparts for 48 (83%) of these sources, showing an average total magnitude of [3.6]{sub AB} = 19.8 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts for 14 USS sources, together with photometric redshift estimates, improved by the use of the deep SERVS data, for a further 19 objects, show redshifts ranging from z = 0.1 to z = 2.8, peaking at z {approx} 0.6 and tailing off at high redshifts. The remaining 25 USS sources, with no redshift estimate, include the faintest [3.6] magnitudes, with 10 sources undetected at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m (typically [3.6] {approx}> 22-23 mag from local measurements), which suggests the likely existence of higher redshifts among the sub-mJy USS population. The comparison with the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies models indicates that Fanaroff-Riley type I radio sources and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei may constitute the bulk of the faintest USS population, and raises the possibility that the high efficiency of the USS technique for the selection of high-redshift sources remains even at the sub-mJy level.

  13. THE ABUNDANCE OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES. I. VLA SURVEY OF 52 SOURCES WITH OFF-AXIS DISTORTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David H.; Cohen, Jake P.; Lu, Jing [Department of Physics MS-057, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-0911 (United States); Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi, E-mail: roberts@brandeis.edu [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Cheung identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here, we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1″. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, 7 were observed at 1.4 and 5 GHz, and 1 was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey red images for 48 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% of sources might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that could have formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following an interruption and axis flip. The remaining 20% are in neither of these categories. The implications of this result for the gravitational wave background are discussed in Roberts et al.

  14. New Pulkovo combined catalogues of the radio source positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Yulia; Malkin, Zinovy

    2012-08-01

    Catalogues of radio source positions (RSC) obtained from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations serve as the realizations of the IAU International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) since 1998. With increasing of the volume and improving the accuracy of VLBI observations with time, development of advanced methods of the RSC construction is a topical problem to realize the full potential of VLBI technology. This task becomes more and more important nowadays in view of expected during coming years realization of the VLBI2010 network and highly accurate GAIA catalogue of optical positions of extragalactic objects. One of the commonly used methods of improving the accuracy of the source position catalogues is construction of a combined catalogue. In this paper, we present new Pulkovo combined catalogues PUL(2012)C01 and PUL(2012)C02 which have been constructed mainly following the strategy developed by Sokolova & Malkin (2007, A&A, 474, 665). Besides using more data, several developments were realized such as improved method of determination of the optimal number of the expansion terms, more careful investigation of the stochastic errors of input catalogues, improved weighting scheme, additional test of the quality of the individuals and combined RSC, etc. The PUL(2012)C01 catalogue is aimed at stochastic improvement of the ICRF2, the PUL(2012)C02 catalogue is constructed in the independent system. Results of comparison of our combined catalogues with individual catalogues and ICRF2 are presented.

  15. Comet plasma densities deduced from refraction of occulted radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.S. (Commonwealth Department of Science, Ionospheric Prediction Service, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia); Nelson, G.J. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Div. of Radiophysics, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia)

    1979-04-01

    Observations of the occultation of radio sources by comet plasma tails are used to derive the electron density and density gradients in the tails. Occultations of source Culgoora-1 0300+16 by Comet Kohoutek and of Culgoora-1 2313-14 by Comet West were measured by radioheliograph at 80 MHz. After corrections for ionospheric refraction, a 2 arcmin anomaly was observed in the declination of 0300+16, attributed to refraction by the tail of Comet Kohoutek, while none was observed for Comet West. The maximum electron density in the tail of Comet Kohoutek is calculated to be 2 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, while that of Comet West is 5 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, with density gradients of about 0.05 per cu cm per km. The direction of refraction observed suggests that the tail of Kohoutek is either highly asymmetric about its axis or has the form of a hollow, cylindrical plasma sheath. The high electron densities observed in Kohoutek may indicate the presence of undetected ion species or a low ionization loss rate.

  16. Constraining the Redshift Evolution of FIRST Radio Sources in RCS1 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Megan B; Yee, H K C; Barrientos, L Felipe

    2010-01-01

    We conduct a statistical analysis of the radio source population in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift by matching radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) catalog with 618 optically-selected galaxy clusters from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1). The number of excess radio sources (above the background level) per cluster is 0.14 +/- 0.02 for clusters with 0.35 1.5 sigma) in the number of radio sources per unit of cluster mass for the galaxy clusters with 0.35 4.1 X 10^(24) W/Hz) radio sources per unit (10^14 solar masses) mass, which we measure to be 0.031 +/- 0.004. We further characterize the population of galaxy cluster-related radio sources through visual inspection of the RCS1 images, finding that although the radio activity of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) also does not strongly evolve between our high and low redshift samples, the lower-redshift, richest clusters are more likely to host radio-loud BCGs than the higher-redshift, rich est...

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: mm-monitoring of radio sources IV. (Reuter+ 1997)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuter, H.-P.; Kramer, C.; Sievers, A.; Paubert, G.; Moreno, R.; Greve, A.; Leon, S.; Panis, J. F.; Ruiz-Moreno, M.; Ungerechts, H.; Wild, W.

    1997-01-01

    Radio flux densities are presented for 118 extra galactic radio sources monitored at 90, 142 and 230GHz with the IRAM 30m telescope during1993-1994. For the most frequently observed sources we show light curves including 30 m-measurements published in previous papers, Steppe et al.(1988A&AS...75..31

  18. A Radio Monitoring Survey of Ultra-Luminous X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Koerding, E; Falcke, H

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a radio monitoring campaign to search for radio emission from nearby ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). These sources are bright off-nuclear X-ray point sources with luminosities exceeding L_X > 10^39 erg/sec. A well-defined sample of the 9 nearest ULXs has been monitored eight times during 5 months with the Very Large Array in A and B configuration. Our limiting sensitivity is approximately 0.15 mJy (4 sigma) for radio flares and around 60 uJy for continuous emission. In M82 two ULXs seem to have coincident compact radio sources, which are probably supernova remnants. No continuous or flaring radio emission has been detected from any other ULX. Thus, ULXs do not generally emit steady-state radio emission above radio powers of 1.5 10^17 W/Hz. The non-detections of the continuous emission are consistent with beamed or unbeamed radio emission from accreting black holes of <= 10^3 Msol based on the radio/X-ray correlation. Other published radio detections (M82, NGC 5408) are also d...

  19. Infrared point sources aligned with the SgrA(asterisk) non-thermal radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, W. A.; Forrest, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Assembled 0.7-5.0 micron observational data for two point sources approximately aligned with the compact nonthermal radio source SgrA(asterisk) in the Galactic center, thus far interpreted as being from the same object on the basis of their position and spectral continuity, are presently given alternative interpretations. While the object must be a hot star surrounded by a circumstellar dust cloud if it is a foreground star, a Galactic center position calls for an unorthodox extinction curve which suggests that the IR emission may be the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot star or star cluster, or perhaps a thermal accretion disk.

  20. JVLA Observations of IC 348SW: Compact Radio Sources and their Nature

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L F; Palau, A

    2014-01-01

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, of which seven are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797 we detect at its center a double radio source, separated by $\\sim3"$. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  1. Effect of asymmetry of the radio source distribution on the apparent proper motion kinematic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, Oleg; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912369

    2009-01-01

    A new list of physical characteristics of 4261 astrometric radio sources, including all 717 ICRF-Ext.2 sources has been compiled. Comparison of our data of optical characteristics with the official International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) list showed significant discrepancies for about half of 667 common sources. We also found that asymmetry in the radio sources distribution between hemispheres could cause significant correlation between the vector spherical harmonics, especially if the case of sparse distribution of the sources with high redshift. We identified radio sources having many-year observation history and lack redshift. This sources should be urgently observed at large optical telescopes. The list of optical characteristics created in this paper is recommended for use as a supplement material for the next International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) realization. It can be also effectively used for cosmological studies and planning of observing programs both in radio and o...

  2. JVLA observations of IC 348 SW: Compact radio sources and their nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Palau, Aina, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: l.zapata@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: a.palau@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-20

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, 7 of which are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797, we detect a double radio source at its center, separated by ∼3''. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  3. Steep-spectrum sources and the duty cycle of the radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M

    2010-01-01

    It is currently accepted that intrinsically compact and bright radio sources characterized by a convex spectrum peaking at frequencies ranging from 100 MHz to a few GHz are young objects. Following the evolutionary models, these objects would evolve into the population of classical radio galaxies. However, the fraction of young radio sources in flux density-limited samples is much larger than what expected from the number counts of large radio sources. This may suggest that for some reason a significant fraction of young objects would never become large radio galaxies with sizes up to a few Mpc. The discovery of the young radio source PKS 1518+047 characterized by an uncommonly steep spectrum confirms that the radio emission may switch off shortly after its onset. Then the source spectrum steepens and evolves due to energy losses. If the interruption is not temporary, the fate of the fading sources is to disappear at frequencies lower than those explored by current radio telescopes. Fossils of past activities...

  4. Occultations of Astrophysical Radio Sources as Probes of (Exo)Planetary Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2017-05-01

    The passage of a radio signal through a planetary atmosphere, ionosphere, or magnetosphere affects the polarization, frequency, and power of the radio signal. Radio occultations are a common experiment used to measure planetary atmospheres, but they traditionally rely on radio transmissions from a spacecraft near the planet. We explore whether similar measurements of planetary and exoplanetary environments can be made using distant astrophysical radio sources such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, and masers. We find that occultations by solar system planets, such as Jupiter, can be used to measure planetary magnetic field strength, plasma density, and neutral density. Based on the number of known distant astrophysical radio sources, occultations by solar system planets are likely to occur often. Occultations are most likely when the solar system planets are near the intersection of the ecliptic and galactic planes. For even the closest exoplanetary systems, the low probability of alignment of the Earth, an exoplanet, and a suitable distant astrophysical radio source presents a considerable challenge. The concentration of both exoplanets and galactic radio sources in the galactic plane may alleviate this challenge somewhat, but it still appears formidable. An alternative type of occultation may be more promising for exoplanets: high-resolution radio imaging of an exoplanet as it transits in front of its parent star.

  5. GPS/CSS radio sources and their relation to other AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Sadler, Elaine M

    2015-01-01

    We are entering a new era of sensitive, large-area and multi-frequency radio surveys that will allow us to identify Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources over a wide range in radio luminosity and study them within the context of the overall radio-source populations to which they belong. 'Classical' GPS/CSS objects are extremely luminous radio sources with a compact double morphology, commonly thought to represent the earliest stages in the life cycle of powerful radio galaxies (e.g. O'Dea 1998). It is now becoming easier to identify GPS/CSS candidates with much lower radio luminosity - particularly in the nearby Universe. These less powerful objects, with typical 1.4 GHz radio luminosities of $10^{23}$ to $10^{25}$ W/Hz, include peaked-spectrum radio sources with a core-jet morphology on parsec scales as well as high-frequency GPS-like peaked components embedded within lower-frequency extended emission. In the latter case, the presence of a young GPS component may not ...

  6. VLBI observations of the CORALZ sample: young radio sources at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    de Vries, N; Schilizzi, R T; Mack, K -H; Kaiser, C R

    2009-01-01

    Young radio-loud active galactic nuclei form an important tool to investigate the evolution of extragalactic radio sources. To study the early phases of expanding radio sources, we have constructed CORALZ, a sample of 25 compact ($\\theta<2"$) radio sources associated with nearby ($z<0.16$) galaxies. In this paper we determine the morphologies, linear sizes, and put first constraints on the lobe expansion speeds of the sources in the sample. We observed the radio sources from the CORALZ sample with MERLIN at 1.4 GHz or 1.6 GHz, the EVN at 1.6 GHz, and global VLBI at 1.6 GHz and/or 5.0 GHz. Radio maps, morphological classifications, and linear sizes are presented for all sources in the CORALZ sample. We have determined a first upper limit to the expansion velocity of one of the sources, which is remarkably low compared to the brighter GPS sources at higher redshifts, indicating a relation between radio luminosity and expansion speed, in agreement with analytical models. In addition we present further stro...

  7. Long-term variability of extragalactic radio sources in the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X; Lopez-Caniego, M; Dickinson, C; Pearson, T J; Fuhrmann, L; Krichbaum, T P; Partridge, B

    2013-01-01

    Combining measurements taken using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) from 2001 to 2008 with measurements taken using Planck from 2009 to 2010, we investigate the long-term flux density variability of extragalactic radio sources selected from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue. The single-year, single-frequency WMAP maps are used to estimate yearly-averaged flux densities of the sources in the four WMAP bands: Ka (33 GHz), Q (41 GHz), V (61 GHz), and W (94 GHz). We identify 82, 67, 32, and 15 sources respectively as variable at greater than 99% confidence level in these four bands. The amplitudes of variation are comparable between bands, and are not correlated with either the flux densities or the spectral indices of the sources. The number counts of WMAP Ka-band sources are stable from year to year despite the fluctuation caused by individual source variability. Most of our sources show strong correlation in variability between bands. Almost all the sources that show variability ...

  8. An effect of stimulated radiation processes on radio emission from extended sources

    CERN Document Server

    Prigara, F V

    2003-01-01

    Both the standard theory of thermal radio emission and the synchrotron theory encounter some difficulties. The most crucial for the former one is nonpossibility to explain the radio spectrum of Venus in the decimeter range (Ksanfomality 1985). The radio spectra of planetary nebulae at high frequencies also are not comfortably consistent with the standard theory (Siodmiak & Tylenda 2001). Here we show that the account for an induced character of radiation processes sufficiently improves the predictions of the standard theory. Moreover, the developed here theory of radio emission from non-uniform gas gives the radio spectra of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and radio galaxies, which are normally attributed to the synchrotron emission. It is important, in this aspect, that the synchrotron self-absorption produces a change in the polarization position angle across the spectral peak. No such a change was detected in gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources (Mutoh et al. 2002). Besides, the flat or sligh...

  9. The Abundance of X-Shaped Radio Sources I. VLA Survey of 52 Sources With Off-Axis Distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, David H; Lu, Jing; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Cheung (2007) identified a sample of 100 candidate X-shaped radio galaxies using the NRAO FIRST survey; these are small-axial-ratio extended radio sources with off-axis emission. Here we present radio images of 52 of these sources that have been made from archival Very Large Array data with resolution of about 1 arcsec. Fifty-one of the 52 were observed at 1.4 GHz, seven were observed at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz, and one was observed only at 5 GHz. We also present overlays of the SDSS red images for 41 of the sources, and DSS II overlays for the remainder. Optical counterparts have been identified for most sources, but there remain a few empty fields. Our higher resolution VLA images along with FIRST survey images of the sources in the sample reveal that extended extragalactic radio sources with small axial ratios are largely (60%) cases of double radio sources with twin lobes that have off-axis extensions, usually with inversion-symmetric structure. The available radio images indicate that at most 20% sources might...

  10. Radio spectra of bright compact sources at z > 4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, Rocco; van Velzen, Sjoert; Intema, Huib T.; Müller, Cornelia; Frey, Sándor; Coppejans, Deanne L.; Cseh, Dávid; Williams, Wendy L.; Falcke, Heino; Körding, Elmar G.; Orrú, Emanuela; Paragi, Zsolt; Gabányi, Krisztina É.

    2017-05-01

    High-redshift quasars are important to study galaxy and active galactic nuclei evolution, test cosmological models and study supermassive black hole growth. Optical searches for high-redshift sources have been very successful, but radio searches are not hampered by dust obscuration and should be more effective at finding sources at even higher redshifts. Identifying high-redshift sources based on radio data is, however, not trivial. Here we report on new multifrequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of eight z > 4.5 sources previously studied at high angular resolution with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Combining these observations with those from the literature, we construct broad-band radio spectra of all 30 z > 4.5 sources that have been observed with VLBI. In the sample we found flat, steep and peaked spectra in approximately equal proportions. Despite several selection effects, we conclude that the z > 4.5 VLBI (and likely also non-VLBI) sources have diverse spectra and that only about a quarter of the sources in the sample have flat spectra. Previously, the majority of high-redshift radio sources were identified based on their ultrasteep spectra. Recently, a new method has been proposed to identify these objects based on their megahertz-peaked spectra. No method would have identified more than 18 per cent of the high-redshift sources in this sample. More effective methods are necessary to reliably identify complete samples of high-redshift sources based on radio data.

  11. RADIO MONITORING OF THE PERIODICALLY VARIABLE IR SOURCE LRLL 54361: NO DIRECT CORRELATION BETWEEN THE RADIO AND IR EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbrich, Jan, E-mail: jan.forbrich@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Department of Astrophysics, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Muzerolle, James [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star-forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 over roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of ∼100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of the order of a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27 ± 5 μJy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, 53 ± 11 μJy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.

  12. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an active galactic nuclei (AGN). Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≲ 1 mJy). Aims: The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties by making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). Methods: We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 μm IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. Results: We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that IR-detected IFRSs are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z ≳ 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S1.4 GHz 100 μJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios >500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios ( 100-200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.

  13. Fast neutral outflows in nearby radio galaxies : a major source of feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Oosterloo, T.; Holt, J.; Emonts, B.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Fast (~1000 km/s) outflows of neutral gas (from 21-cm HI absorption) are detected in strong radio sources. The outflows occur, at least in some cases, at distances from the radio core that range between few hundred parsecs and kpc. These HI outflows likely originate from the interaction be

  14. The distribution of some intrinsic parameters of head-tail radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of a sample comprising 44 head-tail galaxies for which radio observations have been published are presented. The distributions of the absolute photographic magnitude, the radio power at 610 MHz, and opening-angle of these sources are presented confirming the results of Owen and

  15. The distribution of some intrinsic parameters of head-tail radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of a sample comprising 44 head-tail galaxies for which radio observations have been published are presented. The distributions of the absolute photographic magnitude, the radio power at 610 MHz, and opening-angle of these sources are presented confirming the results of Owen and Rudnic

  16. Cluster candidates around low power radio-galaxies at z~1-2 in COSMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Castignani, Gianluca; Celotti, Annalisa; Norman, Colin; De Zotti, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    We search for high redshift ($z\\sim$1-2) galaxy clusters using low luminosity radio galaxies (FR~I) as beacons and our newly developed Poisson Probability Method (PPM) based on photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. We use a sample of 32 FR~Is within the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field from Chiaberge et al. (2009) catalog. We derive a reliable subsample of 21 {\\it bona fide} Low Luminosity Radio Galaxies (LLRGs) and a subsample of 11 High Luminosity Radio Galaxies (HLRGs), on the basis of photometric redshift information and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) radio fluxes. The LLRGs are selected to have 1.4~GHz rest frame luminosities lower than the fiducial FR~I/FR~II divide. This also allows us to estimate the comoving space density of sources with $L_{1.4}\\simeq 10^{32.3}\\,\\hbox{erg}\\,\\hbox{s}^{-1}\\,\\hbox{Hz}^{-1}$ at $z\\simeq 1.1$, which strengthens the case for a strong cosmological evolution of these sources. In the fields of the LLRGs and HLRGs we find evidence that 14 and 8 of them ...

  17. Magnetic field disorder and Faraday effects on the polarization of extragalactic radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lamee, Mehdi; Farnes, Jamie S; Carretti, Ettore; Gaensler, B M; Haverkorn, Marijke; Poppi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization catalog of 533 extragalactic radio sources with 2.3 GHz total intensity above 420 mJy from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey, S-PASS, with corresponding 1.4 GHz polarization information from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, NVSS. We studied selection effects and found that fractional polarization, $\\pi$, of radio objects at both wavelengths depends on the spectral index, source magnetic field disorder, source size and depolarization. The relationship between depolarization, spectrum and size shows that depolarization occurs primarily in the source vicinity. The median $\\pi_{2.3}$ of resolved objects in NVSS is approximately two times larger than that of unresolved sources. Sources with little depolarization are $\\sim2$ times more polarized than both highly depolarized and re-polarized sources. This indicates that intrinsic magnetic field disorder is the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed low fractional polarization of radio sources at high frequencies. We predict that numbe...

  18. Effect of asymmetry of the radio source distribution on the apparent proper motion kinematic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, O.; Malkin, Z.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Information on physical characteristics of astrometric radio sources, such as magnitude and redshift, is of great importance for many astronomical studies. However, data usually used in radio astrometry is often incomplete and outdated. Aims: Our purpose is to study the optical characteristics of more than 4000 radio sources observed by the astrometric VLBI technique since 1979. We also studied the effect of the asymmetry in the distribution of the reference radio sources on the correlation matrices between vector spherical harmonics of the first and second degrees. Methods: The radio source characteristics were mainly taken from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). Characteristics of the gravitational lenses were checked with the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey. SIMBAD and HyperLeda databases were also used to clarify the characteristics of some objects. Also we simulated and investigated a list of 4000 radio sources evenly distributed around the celestial sphere. We estimated the correlation matrices between the vector spherical harmonics using the real as well as modelled distribution of the radio sources. Results: A new list OCARS (optical characteristics of astrometric radio sources) of 4261 sources has been compiled. Comparison of our data of optical characteristics with the official International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) list showed significant discrepancies for about half of the 667 common sources. Finally, we found that asymmetry in the radio source distribution between hemispheres could cause significant correlation between the vector spherical harmonics, especially in the case of sparse distribution of the sources with high redshift. We also identified radio sources having a many-year observation history and lack of redshift. These sources should be urgently observed with large optical telescopes. Conclusions: The list of optical characteristics created in this paper is recommended for use as a

  19. The relationship between the radio core dominance parameter and the spectral index in different classes of extragalactic radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Jiang-He Yang; Jing Pan; Tong-Xu Hua

    2011-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have two major classes,namely radio loud AGNs and radio quiet AGNs.A small subset of the radio-loud AGNs is called blazars,which display extreme observational properties,such as rapid variability,high Iuminosity,high and variable polarization,and superluminal motion.All of those observational properties are probably due to a relativistic beaming effect with the jet pointing close to the line of sight.Observations suggest that the orientation can be expressed by a core-dominance parameter,R.The R,to some extent,is associated with the beaming effect.Blazars are believed to be unified with Fanaroff & Riley type I/Ⅱ (FRI/Ⅱ)radio galaxies.In this work,we collected relevant observations from the literature for a sample of 1223 AGNs including 77 BL Lacertae objects,495 quasars,460 galaxies,119 FRs and 72 unidentified sources,and calculated the core-dominance parameters and spectral indexes,discussed the relationship between the two parameters,and gave some discussions.Our analysis suggests that the core-dominance parameters in BL Lacertae objects are larger than those in quasars and galaxies,and the radio spectral indexes in BL Lacertae objects are lower than those in quasars and galaxies.We also found that the core-dominance parameter-spectral index correlation exists for a large sample presented in this work,which may come from a relativistic beaming effect.

  20. Determinations of Key Physical Parameters Related to Classical Double Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, L; Guerra, E J; Wan, Lin; Daly, Ruth A.

    2000-01-01

    Multi-frequency radio observations of the radio bridge of a powerful classical double radio source can be used to determine: the beam power of the jets emanating from the AGN; the total time the source will actively produce jets that power large-scale radio emission; the thermal pressure of the medium in the vicinity of the radio source; and the total mass, including dark matter, of the galaxy or cluster of galaxies traced by the ambient gas that surrounds the radio source. Empirical determinations of each of these quantities are obtained and analyzed for 22 radio sources. Typical beam powers are about $10^{45} {erg s}^{-1}$. The characteristic or total time the AGN will actively produce a collimated outflow is estimated. Typical total lifetimes are $\\sim (10^7$ to $10^8$) years. Total masses, and mass-density profiles, similar to those of low-redshift clusters of galaxies are obtained. Thus, some clusters of galaxies, or cores of clusters, exist at redshifts of one to two. A new method of estimating the ther...

  1. The faint radio source population at 15.7 GHz - II. Multi-wavelength properties

    CERN Document Server

    Whittam, I H; Green, D A; Jarvis, M J; Vaccari, M

    2015-01-01

    A complete, flux density limited sample of 96 faint ($> 0.5$ mJy) radio sources is selected from the 10C survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. We have matched this sample to a range of multi-wavelength catalogues, including SERVS, SWIRE, UKIDSS and optical data; multi-wavelength counterparts are found for 80 of the 96 sources and spectroscopic redshifts are available for 24 sources. Photometric reshifts are estimated for the sources with multi-wavelength data available; the median redshift of the sample is 0.91 with an interquartile range of 0.84. Radio-to-optical ratios show that at least 94 per cent of the sample are radio loud, indicating that the 10C sample is dominated by radio galaxies. This is in contrast to samples selected at lower frequencies, where radio-quiet AGN and starforming galaxies are present in significant numbers at these flux density levels. All six radio-quiet sources have rising radio spectra, suggesting that they are dominated by AGN emission. These results confirm the conclusions o...

  2. Accretion Disk Model of Short-Timescale Intermittent Activity in Young Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Czerny, Bozena; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Nikiel-Wroczynski, Blazej; Stawarz, Lukasz

    2009-01-01

    We associate the existence of short-lived compact radio sources with the intermittent activity of the central engine caused by a radiation pressure instability within an accretion disk. Such objects may constitute a numerous sub-class of Giga-Hertz Peaked Spectrum sources, in accordance with the population studies of radio-loud active galaxies, as well as detailed investigations of their radio morphologies. We perform the model computations assuming the viscosity parametrization as proportional to a geometrical mean of the total and gas pressure. The implied timescales are consistent with the observed ages of the sources. The duration of an active phase for a moderate accretion rate is short enough (< 10^3-10^4 years) that the ejecta are confined within the host galaxy and thus these sources cannot evolve into large size radio galaxies unless they are close to the Eddington limit.

  3. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    CERN Document Server

    Riggi, S; Leto, P; Cavallaro, F; Bufano, F; Schillirò, F; Trigilio, C; Umana, G; Buemi, C S; Norris, R P

    2016-01-01

    Automated source extraction and parameterization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper we present a new algorithm, dubbed CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parameterization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, including also different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at ...

  4. HI in radio galaxies: prospects for upcoming wide-field surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, Bjorn; Struve, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We present results of an ongoing systematic study of the large-scale properties of neutral hydrogen (HI) gas in nearby radio galaxies. Our main goal is to investigate the importance of gas-rich galaxy mergers and interactions among radio-loud AGN. From an HI study of a complete sample of classical low-power radio galaxies we find that the host galaxies of extended Fanaroff & Riley type-I radio sources are generally HI poor (< 10E8 M_sun) and show no indications for gas-rich galaxy mergers or ongoing gas-rich interactions. In contrast, the host galaxies of a significant fraction of low-power compact radio sources contain enormous discs/rings of HI gas (with sizes up to 190 kpc and masses up to 2 x 10E10 M_sun). This segregation in HI mass with radio source size likely indicates that these compact radio sources are either confined by large amounts of gas in the central region, or that their fueling is inefficient and different from the fueling process of classical FR-I radio sources. To a first order, th...

  5. VLA survey of the CDFS: the nature of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, P; Fomalont, E; Miller, N; Norman, C; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the multiwavelength properties of 266 cataloged radio sources identified with 20 and 6 cm VLA deep observations of the CDFS at a flux density limit of 42 \\mu Jy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz. These new observations probe the faint end of both the star formation and radio galaxy/AGN population. X-ray data, including upper limits, turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub--millijansky sky, contrary to some previous results. We have also uncovered a population of distant AGN systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. The AGN include radio galaxies, mostly of the low-power, Fanaroff-Riley I type, and a significant radio-quiet component, which amounts to approximately one fifth of the total sample. We also find that ...

  6. VLBA observations of radio faint Fermi-LAT sources above 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lico, R; Orienti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2016-01-01

    The first Fermi-LAT High-energy source catalog (1FHL), containing gamma-ray sources detected above 10 GeV, is an ideal sample to characterize the physical properties of the most extreme gamma-ray sources. We investigate the pc scale properties of a sub-sample of radio faint 1FHL sources with the aim to confirm the proposed blazar associations, by revealing a compact high brightness temperature radio core, and we propose new low-frequency counterparts for the unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGS). Moreover, we increase the number of 1FHL sources with high resolution observations to explore the possible connection between radio and gamma rays at E >10 GeV. We observed 84 1FHL sources, mostly blazars of High Synchrotron Peaked (HSP) type, in the northern sky with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. These sources lack high resolution radio observations and have at least one NVSS counterpart within the 95% confidence radius. For those sources without a well identified radio counterpart we exploit the VLBA...

  7. Observations and properties of candidate high frequency GPS radio sources in the AT20G survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock1, Paul J; Mahony, Elizabeth K; Ricci, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to obtain 40 GHz and 95 GHz observations of a number of sources that were selected from the Australia Telescope Compact Array 20 GHz (AT20G) survey . The aim of the observations was to improve the spectral coverage for sources with spectral peaks near 20 GHz or inverted (rising) radio spectra between 8.6 GHz and 20 GHz. We present the radio observations of a sample of 21 such sources along with optical spectra taken from the ANU Siding Spring Observatory 2.3m telescope and the ESO-New Technology Telescope (NTT). We find that as a group the sources show the same level of variability as typical GPS sources, and that of the 21 candidate GPS sources roughly 60% appear to be genuinely young radio galaxies. Three of the 21 sources studied show evidence of being restarted radio galaxies. If these numbers are indicative of the larger population of AT20G radio sources then as many as 400 genuine GPS sources could be contained within the AT20G with up to 25% of them ...

  8. HerMES: Disentangling active galactic nuclei and star formation in the radio source population

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, J I; Symeonidis, M; Bock, J; Cooray, A; Farrah, D; Guo, K; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Oliver, S J; Roseboom, I G; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Vaccari, M; Wardlow, J L

    2015-01-01

    We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ~50 uJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that r...

  9. Multifrequency VLA observations of PKS 0745 - 191 - The archetypal 'cooling flow' radio source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-, 20-, 6- and 2-cm VLA observations of the high-radio-luminosity cooling-flow radio source PKS 0745 - 191 are presented. The radio source was found to have a core with a very steep spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5) and diffuse emission with an even steeper spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5 to -2.3) without clear indications of the jets, hotspots, or double lobes found in the other radio sources of comparable luminosity. It is inferred that the energy to power the radio source comes from the central engine, but the source's structure may be heavily influenced by the past history of the galaxy and the inflowing intracluster medium. It is shown that, while the radio source is energetically unimportant for the cluster as a whole, it is important on the scale of the cooling flow. The mere existence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields within a substantial fraction of the volume inside the cooling radius has important consequences for cooling-flow models.

  10. Polarised radio sources : a study of luminosity, redshift and flux density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Julie Kristen

    2011-05-01

    Results of deep polarisation imaging at 1.4 GHz with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the DRAO Planck Deep Fields project are presented. This deep extragalactic field covers 15.16 deg2 centred at a2000 = 16h14m and d2000 = 54560, has an angular resolution of 4200-6200 at the field centre, and reaches a sensitivity of 55 mJy beam-1 in Stokes I and 45 mJy beam-1 in Stokes Q and U. There are 958 radio sources in Stokes I of which 136 are detected in polarisation. The Euclidean-normalized polarised differential source counts are determined down to 400 mJy. These counts indicate that sources have a higher percentage polarisation at fainter Stokes I flux density levels than for brighter sources. The majority of the polarised sources are steep-spectrum objects with a mean spectral index of -0.77, and there is no correlation between fractional polarisation and spectral index. Of the polarised sources, 77% show structure at the arc-second scale whereas only 38% of the sources with no detectable polarisation show such structure. This indicates that polarised sources tend to have structure at arcsecond scales and that the polarised emission is most likely not beamed. This confirms that the polarised radio sources tend to be lobe-dominated radio galaxies. The median percentage polarisation for resolved sources is 6.8%, while it is 4.4% for compact objects. Radio sources in the DRAO deep field have been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey of the European Large Area ISO Survey North 1 field. In the redshift range of 0.04 FRIIs, which are seen to populate the polarized source counts at fainter flux density levels. There is no correlation between redshift and percentage polarisation for this sample. However, there is a correlation between increasing percentage polarisation and decreasing luminosity for polarised radio sources.

  11. Large-scale HI in nearby radio galaxies (II): the nature of classical low-power radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, B H C; Struve, C; Oosterloo, T A; van Moorsel, G; Tadhunter, C N; van der Hulst, J M; Brogt, E; Holt, J; Mirabal, N

    2010-01-01

    An important aspect of solving the long-standing question as to what triggers various types of Active Galactic Nuclei involves a thorough understanding of the overall properties and formation history of their host galaxies. This is the second in a series of papers that systematically study the large-scale properties of cold neutral hydrogen (HI) gas in nearby radio galaxies. The main goal is to investigate the importance of gas-rich galaxy mergers and interactions among radio-loud AGN. In this paper we present results of a complete sample of classical low-power radio galaxies. We find that extended Fanaroff & Riley type-I radio sources are generally not associated with gas-rich galaxy mergers or ongoing violent interactions, but occur in early-type galaxies without large (> 10^8 M_sun) amounts of extended neutral hydrogen gas. In contrast, enormous discs/rings of HI gas (with sizes up to 190 kpc and masses up to 2 x 10^10 M_sun) are detected around the host galaxies of a significant fraction of the compac...

  12. The optical spectra of X-shaped radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Landt, Hermine; Healey, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    X-shaped radio galaxies are defined by their peculiar large-scale radio morphology. In addition to the classical double-lobed structure they have a pair of low-luminosity wings that straddles the nucleus at almost right angles to the active lobes, thus giving the impression of an 'X'. In this paper we study for the first time the optical spectral properties of this object class using a large sample (~50 sources). We find that the X-shaped radio population is composed roughly equally of sources with weak and strong emission line spectra, which makes them, in combination with the well-known fact that they preferentially have radio powers intermediate between those of Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) and type II (FR II) radio galaxies, the archetypal transition population. We do not find evidence in support of the proposition that the X-shape is the result of a recent merger: X-shaped radio sources do not have unusually broad emission lines, their nuclear environments are in general not dusty, and their host galaxie...

  13. High energy emission from flat-spectrum radio sources with ˜ kpc-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Pedro

    Active Galactic Nuclei emit a substantial portion of their bolometric luminosities in X-rays. For example, the knots in radio jets are prominent sources of synchrotron X-rays while the hotspots of the brightest FRIIs emit self-synchrotron or Inverse Compton radiation. Most high-energy studies on flat-spectrum radio sources have been conducted for blazars which are dominant at γ-rays.Augusto et al. (1998) have built a sample of 55 flat-spectrum radio sources dominated by structures (knots, hotspots, etc.) ˜0.1-2 kpc away from the nucleus. Seventeen (31%) of these are detected in X-rays (they tend to be the radio strongest) evenly splitting, morphologically, both at optical (radio) bands: nine QSO/BLLac (core-jets) on one-side; eight Galaxy/Sy2 (CSO/MSO/FRII) on the other. We have identified five confirmed compact/medium symmetric objects (CSO/MSOs) as X-ray emitters. A comparable type of source to CSO/MSOs is the physically similar (1-15 kpc) compact steep spectrum source (CSS), 28/129 (22%) of which are detected in X-rays, from a literature-selected sample (the percentage is smaller than for the 55-source sample due to a lower ). A 95% conf. level relation is found for CSSs: S_X ∝ (S4.85)0.6 and we found undistinguishable radio/X-ray properties for both the 55-source and CSS samples: clearly, their similar morphologies (e.g. knots in jets) stand up stronger than their radical radio spectrum differences.Only two sources among the 55 (4%) have γ-ray detections and they seem quite abnormal (in αxγ values, at least)-one of them is in a Sy2, not in a blazar.

  14. Radio Astronomical Polarimetry and Point-Source Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straten, W.

    2004-05-01

    A mathematical framework is presented for use in the experimental determination of the polarimetric response of observatory instrumentation. Elementary principles of linear algebra are applied to model the full matrix description of the polarization measurement equation by least-squares estimation of nonlinear, scalar parameters. The formalism is applied to calibrate the center element of the Parkes Multibeam receiver using observations of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and the radio galaxy 3C 218 (Hydra A).

  15. The Radio Structure of Source 1803÷784

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprikov, A. A.

    Results of processing of data of ground-space VLBI experiment titled V053 are presented. These observations were made in 1997 October with 10 antennas of American interferometer VLBA and with Japan space telescope VSOP (VLBI Space Orbit Program). Data were transferred from the NRAO archive and processed with the software "Astro Space Locator" (ASL for Windows). The main result is radio image of the known quasar 1803+784. Properties of the ground-space VLBI data processing are discussed.

  16. Planck early results. XIII. Statistical properties of extragalactic radio sources in the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The data reported in Planck's Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) are exploited to measure the number counts (dN/dS) of extragalactic radio sources at 30, 44, 70, 100, 143 and 217 GHz. Due to the full-sky nature of the catalogue, this measurement extends to the rarest and brightest sou...

  17. High-energy sources at low radio frequency: the Murchison Widefield Array view of Fermi blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Giroletti, M; D'Abrusco, R; Lico, R; Burlon, D; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Morgan, J; Pavlidou, V; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bhat, R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; Ewall-Rice, A; Emrich, D; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hindson, L; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Feng, L; Jacobs, D; Kurdryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio arrays are opening a new window for the study of the sky, both to study new phenomena and to better characterize known source classes. Being flat-spectrum sources, blazars are so far poorly studied at low radio frequencies. We characterize the spectral properties of the blazar population at low radio frequency compare the radio and high-energy properties of the gamma-ray blazar population, and search for radio counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources. We cross-correlated the 6,100 deg^2 Murchison Widefield Array Commissioning Survey catalogue with the Roma blazar catalogue, the third catalogue of active galactic nuclei detected by Fermi-LAT, and the unidentified members of the entire third catalogue of gamma-ray sources detected by \\fermilat. When available, we also added high-frequency radio data from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz catalogue. We find low-frequency counterparts for 186 out of 517 (36%) blazars, 79 out of 174 (45%) gamma-ray blazars, and 8 out of 73 (11%) gamma-ray bl...

  18. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, V.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Kale, R.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to z > 0.3. Here, we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235, and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036, and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic, or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters, we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper limits on their radio powers. We also use archival Chandra X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio powers of the first four MACS clusters are consistent with their expected values in the LX-P1.4 GHz plot. However, we found ultrasteep spectrum radio halo in the MACSJ0417.5-1154 cluster whose rest-frame cut-off frequency is at ˜900 MHz. The remaining two clusters whose radio powers are ˜11 times below the expected values are most likely to be in the `off-state' as has been postulated in some of the models of radio halo formation.

  19. Radio spectrum evolution and magnetic field in extreme GPS radio sources. The case of RXJ1459+3337

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The knowledge of the properties of the youngest radio sources is very important in order to trace the earliest phase of the evolution of the radio emission. RXJ1459+3337, with its high turnover frequency (~25 GHz) provides a unique opportunity to study this class of extreme objects. Methods: High-sensitivity multi-frequency VLA observations have been carried out to measure the flux-density with high accuracy, while multi-frequency VLBA observations were performed, aimed at determining the pc-scale structure. Archival ROSAT data have been used to infer the X-ray luminosity. Results: The comparison between our new VLA data and those available in the literature shows a steady increment of the flux-density in the optically-thick part of the spectrum and a decrement of the turnover frequency. In the optically-thin regime, the source flux density has already started to decrease. Such a variability can be explained in terms of an adiabatically-expanding homogeneous radio component. The frequency range spanned ...

  20. Radio monitoring of the periodically variable IR source LRLL 54361: No direct correlation between the radio and IR emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Forbrich, Jan; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A; Muzerolle, James; Gutermuth, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 during roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of $\\sim$100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of order a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27$\\pm$5 $\\mu$Jy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, $53\\pm$11 $\\mu$Jy, suggesting that variabi...

  1. On the origin of two unidentified radio/X-ray sources discovered with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Federico; Combi, Jorge A.; Medina, María C.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We aim at clarifying the nature of the emission of two spatially related unidentified X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton telescope at intermediate-low Galactic latitude Methods: We use the imaging and spectral capabilities of XMM-Newton to study the X-ray properties of these two sources. In addition, we complement our study with radio data obtained at different frequencies to analyze a possible physical association between the sources. Results: Observations reveal a point-like source aligned with elongated diffuse emission. The X-ray spectra of these sources is best-fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index Γ ~ 1.7 for the point-like source and ~2.0 for the extended source. Both sources show nonthermal radio-continuum counterparts that might indicate a physical association. In addition, from the available data, we did not detect variability on the point-like source in several timescales. Two possible scenarios are analyzed: one Galactic and one extra-Galactic. First, based on HI line absorption, assuming a Galactic origin, we infer a distance upper bound of ≲2 kpc, which poses a constraint on the height over the Galactic plane of ≲200 pc and on the linear size of the system of ≲2.3 pc. In this case, the X-ray luminosities are ≳1032 erg s-1 and ≳7.5 × 1032 erg s-1, for the point-like and extended sources, respectively. Second, an extra-Galactic nature is discussed, where the point-like source might be the core of a radio galaxy and the extended source its lobe. In this case, we compare derived fluxes, spectral indices, and spatial correlation with those typical from the radio galaxy population, showing the feasibility of this alternative astrophysical scenario. Conclusions: From the available observational evidence, we suggest that the most promising scenario to explain the nature of these sources is a system consisting of a one-sided radio galaxy, where the point-like source is an active galactic nucleus and the extended source

  2. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup

  3. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parekh, Viral; Kale, Ruta; Intema, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to $z$ $>$ 0.3. Here we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235 and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036 and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper-limits on their radio powers. We also use archival {\\it Chandra} X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio power...

  4. Radio Follow-up on All Unassociated Gamma-Ray Sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, Frank K.; Petrov, Leonid; Taylor, Gregory B.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2017-04-01

    The third Fermi Large Area Telescope γ-ray source catalog (3FGL) contains over 1000 objects for which there is no known counterpart at other wavelengths. The physical origin of the γ-ray emission from those objects is unknown. Such objects are commonly referred to as unassociated and mostly do not exhibit significant γ-ray flux variability. We performed a survey of all unassociated γ-ray sources found in 3FGL using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and Very Large Array in the range 4.0–10.0 GHz. We found 2097 radio candidates for association with γ-ray sources. The follow-up with very long baseline interferometry for a subset of those candidates yielded 142 new associations with active galactic nuclei that are γ-ray sources, provided alternative associations for seven objects, and improved positions for another 144 known associations to the milliarcsecond level of accuracy. In addition, for 245 unassociated γ-ray sources we did not find a single compact radio source above 2 mJy within 3σ of their γ-ray localization. A significant fraction of these empty fields, 39%, are located away from the Galactic plane. We also found 36 extended radio sources that are candidates for association with a corresponding γ-ray object, 19 of which are most likely supernova remnants or H ii regions, whereas 17 could be radio galaxies.

  5. On the nature of bright compact radio sources at z>4.5

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Rocco; Cseh, Dávid; Müller, Cornelia; Paragi, Zsolt; Falcke, Heino; Gabányi, Krisztina É; Gurvits, Leonid I; An, Tao; Titov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift radio-loud quasars are used to, among other things, test the predictions of cosmological models, set constraints on black hole growth in the early universe and understand galaxy evolution. Prior to this paper, 20 extragalactic radio sources at redshifts above 4.5 have been imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Here we report on observations of an additional ten z>4.5 sources at 1.7 and 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN), thereby increasing the number of imaged sources by 50%. Combining our newly observed sources with those from the literature, we create a substantial sample of 30 z>4.5 VLBI sources, allowing us to study the nature of these objects. Using spectral indices, variability and brightness temperatures, we conclude that of the 27 sources with sufficient information to classify, the radio emission from one source is from star formation, 13 are flat-spectrum radio quasars and 13 are steep-spectrum sources. We also argue that the steep-spectrum sources are off-axis ...

  6. Tracking Type III Radio Burst Sources in the Solar Corona by Heliographic Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.

    We present the preliminary results of heliographic measurements of solar type III radio bursts in the low-frequency range (16.5-33 MHz) using the UTR-2 radio heliograph. The radio astronomy tools permit us to obtain two-dimensional spatial structures of burst sources in dependence of frequency and time. Each heliogram consists of 40 pixels (beams) as a result of the serial sweep in UV-plane wherein signals of each beam are recorded in a dynamic spectrum with both high temporal (˜ 2.482 ms) and top spectral (˜ 4 kHz) resolutions. The rate of output heliograph is one image per 3 seconds. Over a session in April, 2013 many type III radio and IIIb-III bursts were observed. On the heliograms the source motion direction in the upper corona is clearly detectable. The heliogram features are discussed.

  7. Thin Circular Disc Shells of Radio Sources Around Supernova Remnant G16.2-2.7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞志尧

    2002-01-01

    We propose a new model of distinct thin circular disc shells to analyse the radio map of the supernova remnant (SNR) G16.2-2.7 from NRAO VLA Sky Survey at 1.4 GHz and the radio sources around it. It is obtained that the 20 radio sources around the SNR G16.2-2.7 distribute on the four thin circular disc shells. The results support the shell-like structure strongly and further indicate that the shell-like structure is several thin circular disc shells. Because the shell-like structure dominates the total sample, our result is important for research of the radio morphology of SNRs.

  8. Fast neutral outflows in nearby radio galaxies: a major source of feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T; Holt, J; Emonts, B; Morganti, Raffaella; Tadhunter, Clive; Oosterloo, Tom; Holt, Joanna; Emonts, Bjorn

    2007-01-01

    Fast (~1000 km/s) outflows of neutral gas (from 21-cm HI absorption) are detected in strong radio sources. The outflows occur, at least in some cases, at distances from the radio core that range between few hundred parsecs and kpc. These HI outflows likely originate from the interaction between radio jets and the dense surrounding medium. The estimated mass outflow rates are comparable to those of moderate starburst-driven superwinds. The impact on the evolution of the host galaxies is discussed.

  9. Fast Neutral Outflows in Nearby Radio Galaxies: A Major Source of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.; Oosterloo, T.; Holt, J.; Emonts, B.

    2007-10-01

    Fast (˜ 1000 km/s) outflows of neutral gas (from 21-cm HI absorption) are detected in strong radio sources. The outflows occur, at least in some cases, at distances from the radio core that range between few hundred parsecs and kpc. These HI outflows likely originate from the interaction between radio jets and the dense surrounding medium. The estimated mass outflow rates are comparable to those of moderate starburst-driven superwinds. The impact on the evolution of the host galaxies is discussed.

  10. May axion clusters be sources of fast radio bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, Maxim S

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts can be caused by some phenomena related to 'new physics'. One of the most prominent candidates of the kind are axion miniclusters which can undergo conversion into photons in magnetospheres of neutron stars. In this short research note this scenario is investigated and important caveats are examined. First, tidal disruption of miniclusters can considerably extend the time span of conversion process, making it impossible to reach necessary $\\mathcal{O}$(ms) level. Second, existing observations at two widely separated frequencies imply that axion-related scenarios can hardly explain entirety of FRBs.

  11. Search for correlated radio and optical events in long-term studies of extragalactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomphrey, R. B.; Smith, A. G.; Leacock, R. J.; Olsson, C. N.; Scott, R. L.; Pollock, J. T.; Edwards, P.; Dent, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    For the first time, long-term records of radio and optical fluxes of a large sample of variable extragalactic sources have been assembled and compared, with linear cross-correlation analysis being used to reinforce the visual comparisons. Only in the case of the BL Lac object OJ 287 is the correlation between radio and optical records strong. In the majority of cases there is no evidence of significant correlation, although nine sources show limited or weak evidence of correlation. The results do not support naive extrapolation of the expanding source model. The general absence of strong correlation between the radio and optical regions has important implications for the energetics of events occurring in such sources.

  12. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  13. A Radio Survey of Seven Southern X-ray Luminous Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Slee, O B; McIntyre, V J; Tsarevsky, G S

    2008-01-01

    The Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) has been used at 1.38 and 2.38 GHz to survey seven southern Abell clusters of galaxies with high X-ray luminosities: A2746, A2837, A3126, A3216, A3230, A3827 and A3836. The clusters have also been surveyed at 0.843 GHz with the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST). We have listed a complete 1.38-GHz sample of 149 radio sources within the Abell circles centred on their X-ray centroids. We compare their identification fractions, emitted 1.38-GHz and optical powers, radio spectral indices and radial variation in projected source density with those of the radio-selected samples of Slee et al. (1998). We compare our fractional radio luminosity function with that of the radio-selected samples of Ledlow and Owen (1996) and Slee et al. (1998). Three significant differences are noted between X-ray and radio-selected samples of clusters; (1) the X-ray sample has an excess of flat-spectrum radio sources; (2) the fractional radio luminosity function for the FR I sou...

  14. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources in the SERVS deep fields: Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Alessandro; Norris, Ray P; Spitler, Lee R; Mignano, Arturo; Lacy, Mark; Morganti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S_{1.4GHz} >= 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an AGN. Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest ones (S_{1.4GHz} 4). We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 mum IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for, and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that they are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z >= 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S_{1.4GHz} ~ 100 muJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z ~ 2) dust-enshrouded...

  15. On Asymmetries in Powerful Radio Sources and the Quasar/Galaxy Unification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. I. Onah; A. A. Ubachukwu; F. C. Odo

    2014-12-01

    We utilize the distributions of fractional separation difference () as asymmetry parameter, linear size () and core-to lobe luminosity ratio () as orientation indicators, to investigate a consequence of radio source orientation and relativistic beaming effects in a sample of powerful non-symmetric extragalactic radio sources. In this scenario, radio sources viewed at small orientation angles to the line-of-sight are expected to show a high degree of asymmetry in observed radio structures due to relativistic beaming, with foreshortened projected linear sizes. A simple consequence of this is the - anti-correlation. Results show a tight correlation ( > 0.8) between the total and core radio luminosities and a clear - anti-correlation ( ∼ -0.5). The observed - anti-correlation is consistent with average orientation angle ≈ 48° and a maximum Lorentz factor ∼ 2 for the sample, with minimum angular separation of 26° between radio galaxies and quasars. However, there is no clear - correlation. While the results are consistent with quasar/galaxy unification via orientation, intrinsic asymmetry also seems to play a major role.

  16. Radio Wavelength Constraints on the Sources of the Far Infrared Background

    CERN Document Server

    Haarsma, D B

    1998-01-01

    The cosmic far infrared background detected recently by the COBE-DIRBE team is presumably due, in large part, to the far infrared (FIR) emission from all galaxies. We take the well-established correlation between FIR and radio luminosity for individual galaxies and apply it to the FIR background. We find that these sources make up about half of the extragalactic radio background, the other half being due to AGN. This is in agreement with other radio observations, which leads us to conclude that the FIR-radio correlation holds well for the very faint sources making up the FIR background, and that the FIR background is indeed due to star-formation activity (not AGN or other possible sources). If these star-forming galaxies have a radio spectral index between 0.4 and 0.8, and make up 40 to 60% of the extragalactic radio background, we find that they have redshifts between roughly 1 and 2, in agreement with recent estimates by Madau et al. of the redshift of peak star-formation activity. We compare the observed e...

  17. Extended Radio Sources and the Diffuse Medium in the Coma / A1367 Supercluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaffe, W. J.; Gavazzi, G.; Valentijn, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of extended, thermally confined radio sources in rich clusters provided estimates of the pressure and temperature in the cluster medium that confirmed the values obtained from X-ray studies. The authors have now found some extended sources in the Coma-A1367 supercluster that may yield simila

  18. Diffuse radio sources in the cluster of galaxies Abell 548b

    CERN Document Server

    Feretti, L; Bacchi, M; Giovannini, G; Govoni, F; Slee, O B; Tsarevsky, G S

    2006-01-01

    We report extensive VLA and ATCA observations of the two diffuse radio sources in the cluster of galaxies Abell 548b, which confirm their classification as relics. The two relics (named A and B) show similar flux density, extent, shape, polarization and spectral index and are located at projected distances of about 430 and 500 kpc from the cluster center, on the same side of the cluster's X-ray peak. On the basis of spectral indices of discrete radio sources embedded within the diffuse features, we have attempted to distinguish emission peaks of the diffuse sources from unrelated sources. We have found that both relics, in particular the B-relic, show possible fine structure, when observed at high resolution. Another diffuse source (named C) is detected close in projection to the cluster center. High-resolution images show that it contains two discrete radio sources and a diffuse component, which might be a candidate for a small relic source. The nature and properties of the diffuse radio sources are discusse...

  19. The Population of KPC-Scale Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Pedro; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Browne, Ian W. A.

    In this paper we present a subsample of 55 flat-spectrum radio sources dominated by (~ 100 mas) kpc-scale structure, selected from a parent sample of 1665 VLA sources. Most are core-jets and 23 are CSO/MSO candidates. Properties of the subsample are discussed.

  20. The VLA-COSMOS Survey: III. Further Catalog Analysis and the Radio Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Bondi, M; Schinnerer, E; Smolcic, V; Jahnke, K; Carilli, C; Zamorani, G

    2008-01-01

    The VLA-COSMOS Large Project has imaged the 2 sq.deg. COSMOS field with a resolution of 1.5 arcsec and a sensitivity of about 11 microJy (1 sigma) yielding to a catalog of about 3600 radio sources. In this paper we present a further analysis of the VLA-COSMOS Large Project catalog of radio sources aimed to: 1) quantify and correct for the effect of bandwidth smearing in the catalog, 2) determine the incompleteness produced by the noise bias and the resolution bias in the new catalog and 3) derive the radio source counts at 1.4 GHz. The effect of bandwidth smearing on the radio sources in the catalog was quantified comparing the peak and total flux densities in the final mosaic and in each of the individual pointings where the source was closest to the center of the field. We find that the peak flux densities in the original VLA-COSMOS Large Project catalog have to be divided by a factor about 0.8 or 0.9, depending on the distance from the mosaic center. The completeness of the radio catalog has been tested us...

  1. The Catalog of Positions of Optically Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources OBRS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, L.

    2011-01-01

    It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make it possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500,000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal of making comparisons between coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments and the coordinate system constructed from analysis of global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of the rotation, zonal errors, and non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures is needed to validate both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with decl. > -10deg was observed with the Very Long Baseline Array and European VLBI Network (EVN) with the primary goal of producing images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 mag in the V band, and they were previously detected by the EVN. In this paper, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations using an absolute astrometry method. The catalog of positions for 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in the range of 0.3.7 mas, with a median of 1.1 mas.

  2. Deep 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field - III. The radio properties of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Garn, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of source which are bright at radio frequencies, but do not appear in deep infrared images. We report the detection of 14 IFRSs within the Spitzer extragalactic First Look Survey field, eight of which are detected near to the limiting magnitude of a deep R-band image of the region, at R ~ 24.5. Sensitive Spitzer Space Telescope images are stacked in order to place upper limits on their mid-infrared flux densities, and using recent 610-MHz and 1.4-GHz observations we find that they have spectral indices which vary between alpha = 0.05 and 1.38, where we define alpha such that S = S_0 nu^(- alpha), and should not be thought of as a single source population. We place constraints on the luminosity and linear size of these sources, and through comparison with well-studied local objects in the 3CRR catalogue demonstrate that they can be modelled as being compact ( 4).

  3. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin' ya [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Finke, Justin [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuyuki, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  4. A Radio Nebula Surrounding the Ultra-luminous X-ray Source in NGC 5408

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Cornelia C; Corbel, Stephane; Mercer, Allison

    2007-01-01

    New radio observations of the counterpart of the ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 5408 show for the first time that the radio emission is resolved with an angular size of 1.5 to 2.0 arcseconds. This corresponds to a physical size of 35-46 pc, and rules out interpretation of the radio emission as beamed emission from a relativistic jet. In addition, the radio spectral index of the counterpart is well determined from three frequencies and found to be alpha=-0.8 pm 0.2. The radio emission is likely to be optically-thin synchrotron emission from a nebula surrounding the X-ray source. The radio luminosity of the counterpart is 3.8 x 10^34 erg/s and the minimum energy required to power the nebula is ~1 x 10^49 erg. These values are two orders of magnitude larger than in any Galactic nebula powered by an accreting compact object.

  5. A Complete Sample of Megaparsec Size Double Radio Sources from SUMSS

    CERN Document Server

    Saripalli, L; Subramanian, R; Boyce, E

    2005-01-01

    We present a complete sample of megaparsec-size double radio sources compiled from the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). Almost complete redshift information has been obtained for the sample. The sample has the following defining criteria: Galactic latitude |b| > 12.5 deg, declination 5 arcmin. All the sources have projected linear size larger than 0.7 Mpc (assuming H_o = 71 km/s/Mpc). The sample is chosen from a region of the sky covering 2100 square degrees. In this paper, we present 843-MHz radio images of the extended radio morphologies made using the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST), higher resolution radio observations of any compact radio structures using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and low resolution optical spectra of the host galaxies from the 2.3-m Australian National University (ANU) telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. The sample presented here is the first in the southern hemisphere and significantly enhances the database of known giant radio sou...

  6. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  7. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  8. New Radio Continuum Observations of the Compact Source Projected Inside NGC 6334A

    CERN Document Server

    Rodr'\\iguez, Luis F; Dzib, Sergio A; Loinard, Laurent; Kurtz, Stanley E

    2013-01-01

    A handful of HII regions are known to exhibit a compact radio source near their centers. The nature of these compact radio sources is not well established. We present the analysis of new as well as archival Very Large Array observations of the compact source projected near the center of the NGC 6334A HII region, part of the NGC 6334 complex. We show that the compact source is time variable on a scale of years and determine for one epoch a non-thermal spectrum, suggestive of synchrotron emission. We propose that this source could be the wind interaction region of a massive binary system that could be the ionizing source of NGC 6334A.

  9. Position and morphology of the compact non-thermal radio source at the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaide, J. M.; Alberdi, A.; Bartel, N.; Clark, T. A.; Corey, B. E.; Elosegui, P.; Gorenstein, M. V.; Guirado, J. C.; Kardashev, N.; Popov, M.

    1992-01-01

    We have determined with VLBI the position of the compact nonthermal radio source at the Galactic Center, commonly referred to as SgrA*, in the J2000.0 reference frame of extragalactic radio sources. We have also determined the size of SgrA* at 1.3, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelengths and found that the apparent size of the source increases proportionally to the observing wavelength squared, as expected from source size broadening by interstellar scattering and as reported previously by other authors. We have also established an upper limit of about 8 mJy at 3.6 cm wavelength for any ultracompact component. The actual size of the source is less than 15 AU. Fourier analysis of our very sensitive 3.6 cm observations of this source shows no significant variations of correlated flux density on time scales from 12 to 700 s.

  10. Deriving Kinetic Luminosity Functions from the Low-Frequency Radio Luminosity Functions of FRII Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinska, Anna D.; Uttley, P.; Kaiser, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    FRII radio galaxies are relatively simple systems which can be used to determine the influence of jets on their environments. Even simple analytical models of FRII evolution can link the observed lobe luminosities and sizes to fundamental properties such as jet power and density of the ambient medium; these are crucial for understanding AGN feedback. However, due to strong flux selection effects interpreting FRII samples is not straightforward. To overcome this problem we construct Monte Carlo simulations to create artificial samples of radio galaxies. We explore jet power and external density distributions by using them as the simulation input parameters. Further, we compute radio luminosity functions (RLF) and fit them to the observed low-frequency radio data that cover redshifts up to z 2, which gives us the most plausible distributions of FRIIs' fundamental properties. Moreover, based on these RLFs, we obtain the kinetic luminosity functions of these powerful sources.

  11. A VLA Survey for Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.; Mann, Rita K.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2016-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC). We mosaicked 34 arcmin2 at 1.3 cm, 70 arcmin2 at 3.6 cm and 109 arcmin2 at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected young stellar objects and 190 Hubble Space Telescope-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source, we fitted a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from submillimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm data, to search for and quantify the variability of our sources.

  12. A radio survey of supersoft, persistent and transient X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, R P; Tzioumis, A K

    1998-01-01

    We present a radio survey of X-ray sources in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 6.3 and 3.5 cm. Specifically, we have observed the fields of five LMC and two SMC supersoft X-ray sources, the X-ray binaries LMC X-1, X-2, X-3 & X-4, the X-ray transient Nova SMC 1992, and the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 0525-66. None of the targets are detected as point sources at their catalogued positions. In particular, the proposed supersoft jet source RXJ 0513-69 is not detected, placing constraints on its radio luminosity compared to Galactic jet sources. Limits on emission from the black hole candidate systems LMC X-1 and X-3 are consistent with the radio behaviour of persistent Galactic black hole X-ray binaries, and a previous possible radio detection of LMC X-1 is found to almost certainly be due to nearby field sources. The SNR N49 in the field of SGR 0525-66 is mapped at higher resolution than previously, but there is still no evidence for any enhanced emission or...

  13. CCD surface photometry of radio galaxies: Pt. 1. FR class I and II sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, F.N.; Laing, R.A.

    1989-05-01

    CCD surface photometry of 47 radio galaxies in the R-band is reported. The goal of the programme is to study the relationship of the properties of the parent galaxies to the radio structure and, in particular, to look for differences between Fanaroff and Riley (FR) class I and II sources. In order to clarify some ambiguous cases in the FR classification, we define Classical Double, Twin Jet and Fat Double sources. We describe our definitions of these three classes and their relation to the FR classification. (author).

  14. On Application of the 3-Cornered Hat Technique to Radio Source Position Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Z.

    2013-08-01

    So called ``3-cornered hat'' method (3CH) was originally developed for estimation of the stability of frequency standards (Gray1974). It was then applied for investigation of the noise level of various data, in particular, astronomical and geodetic time series and radio source position catalogs. However, despite this method is widely used, its application is not straightforward because it requires a reliable estimate of the correlations between series under investigation. Neglecting correlations often produces unacceptable results, like negative variances. In this work, we investigate a new possibility to estimate correlations between radio source position catalogs (RSC) obtained from VLBI observations.

  15. The radio and optical counterpart of the new Fermi LAT flaring source J0109+6134

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.; Peracaula, M.

    2010-02-01

    Following the recent ATELs #2414, #2416 and #2420 concerning the Fermi-LAT, AGILE and Swift/XRT consistent detections of the new gamma-ray flaring source J0109+6134, we wish to remind that the proposed radio counterpart (VCS2 J0109+6133/GT 0106+613) was extensively observed nearly two decades ago by different authors in the context of the GT catalogue of Galactic Plane radio sources (Taylor and Gregory 1983, AJ, 88, 1784; Gregory and Taylor 1986, AJ 92, 371).

  16. Relativistic jet models for two low-luminosity radio galaxies: evidence for backflow?

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, R A

    2012-01-01

    We show that asymmetries in total intensity and linear polarization between the radio jets and counter-jets in two lobed Fanaroff-Riley Class I (FR I) radio galaxies, B2 0206+35 (UGC 1651) and B2 0755+37 (NGC 2484), can be accounted for if these jets are intrinsically symmetrical, with decelerating relativistic outflows surrounded by mildly relativistic backflows. Our interpretation is motivated by sensitive, well-resolved Very Large Array imaging which shows that both jets in both sources have a two-component structure transverse to their axes. Close to the jet axis, a centrally-darkened counter-jet lies opposite a centrally-brightened jet, but both are surrounded by broader collimated emission that is brighter on the counter-jet side. We have adapted our previous models of FR I jets as relativistic outflows to include an added component of symmetric backflow. We find that the observed radio emission, after subtracting contributions from the extended lobes, is well described by models in which decelerating o...

  17. Investigating the EGRET-radio galaxies link with INTEGRAL: the case of 3EG J1621+8203 and NGC 6251

    CERN Document Server

    Foschini, L; Grandi, P; Grenier, I A; Guainazzi, M; Hermsen, W; Palumbo, G G C; Rodríguez, J; Chaty, S; Corbel, S; Cocco, G D; Kuiper, L; Malaguti, G

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of an INTEGRAL AO2 observation of the error contours of the EGRET source 3EG J1621+8203 is presented. The only source found inside the error contours for energies between 20 and 30 keV at 5 sigma detection significance is the FR I radio galaxy NGC 6251. This supports the identification of NGC 6251 with 3EG J1621+8203. The observed flux is higher and softer than observed in the past, but consistent with a variable blazar-like spectral energy distribution.

  18. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA∕kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  19. Radio Searches of Fermi LAT Sources and Blind Search Pulsars: The Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, P S; Parent, D; Bhattacharya, D; Bhattacharyya, B; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Theureau, G; Ferrara, E C; Harding, A K; Thompson, D J; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Gupta, Y; Roy, J; Hessels, J W T; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Shannon, R; Kerr, M; Michelson, P F; Romani, R W; Kramer, M; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Smith, D A; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2012-01-01

    We present a summary of the Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium (PSC), an international collaboration of radio astronomers and members of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration, whose goal is to organize radio follow-up observations of Fermi pulsars and pulsar candidates among the LAT gamma-ray source population. The PSC includes pulsar observers with expertise using the world's largest radio telescopes that together cover the full sky. We have performed very deep observations of all 35 pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of the LAT data, resulting in the discovery of radio pulsations from four of them. We have also searched over 300 LAT gamma-ray sources that do not have strong associations with known gamma-ray emitting source classes and have pulsar-like spectra and variability characteristics. These searches have led to the discovery of a total of 43 new radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and four normal pulsars. These discoveries greatly increase the known population of MSPs in the Galactic disk...

  20. Radio Sources in the NCP Region Observed with the 21 Centimeter Array

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Qian; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Gu, Jun-Hua; Xu, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of 624 radio sources detected around the North Celestial Pole (NCP) with the 21 Centimeter Array (21CMA), a radio interferometer dedicated to the statistical measurement of the epoch of reionization (EoR). The data are taken from a 12 h observation made on 2013 April 13, with a frequency coverage from 75 to 175 MHz and an angular resolution of ~ 4 arcmin. The catalog includes flux densities at eight sub-bands across the 21CMA bandwidth and provides the in-band spectral indicies for the detected sources. To reduce the complexity of interferometric imaging from the so-called 'w' term and ionospheric effect, the present analyses are restricted to the east-west baselines within 1500 km only. The 624 radio sources are found within 5 degrees around the NCP down to ~ 10 mJy with a completeness of roughly 80%. Our source counts are compared, and also exhibit a good agreement with deep low-frequency observations made recently with the GMRT and MWA. In particular, for fainter radio sources below ~ ...

  1. A VLA Survey For Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, Patrick D; Mann, Rita K; Williams, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    We present Karl G. Janksy Very Large Array (VLA) 1.3 cm, 3.6 cm, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster. We mosaicked 34 square arcminutes at 1.3 cm, 70 square arcminutes at 3.6 cm and 109 square arcminutes at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected YSOs and 190 HST-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source we fit a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from sub-millimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm ...

  2. Astronomers Detect Powerful Bursting Radio Source Discovery Points to New Class of Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers at Sweet Briar College and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have detected a powerful new bursting radio source whose unique properties suggest the discovery of a new class of astronomical objects. The researchers have monitored the center of the Milky Way Galaxy for several years and reveal their findings in the March 3, 2005 edition of the journal, “Nature”. This radio image of the central region of the Milky Way Galaxy holds a new radio source, GCRT J1745-3009. The arrow points to an expanding ring of debris expelled by a supernova. CREDIT: N.E. Kassim et al., Naval Research Laboratory, NRAO/AUI/NSF Principal investigator, Dr. Scott Hyman, professor of physics at Sweet Briar College, said the discovery came after analyzing some additional observations from 2002 provided by researchers at Northwestern University. “"We hit the jackpot!” Hyman said referring to the observations. “An image of the Galactic center, made by collecting radio waves of about 1-meter in wavelength, revealed multiple bursts from the source during a seven-hour period from Sept. 30 to Oct. 1, 2002 — five bursts in fact, and repeating at remarkably constant intervals.” Hyman, four Sweet Briar students, and his NRL collaborators, Drs. Namir Kassim and Joseph Lazio, happened upon transient emission from two radio sources while studying the Galactic center in 1998. This prompted the team to propose an ongoing monitoring program using the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which operates the VLA, approved the program. The data collected, laid the groundwork for the detection of the new radio source. “Amazingly, even though the sky is known to be full of transient objects emitting at X- and gamma-ray wavelengths,” NRL astronomer Dr. Joseph Lazio pointed out, “very little has been done to look for radio bursts, which are often easier for astronomical objects to produce

  3. Do the compact radio sources in NGC 253 and M82 fade over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, James S.; Antonucci, Robert R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 has been observed at a third epoch at 6 cm, and a second epoch at 3.6 cm, using the highest resolution configuration of the Very Large Array (VLA). Over a total time span of 4 yr between 1987 and 1991, no new compact radio sources have appeared. The flux density limit ranges from 3 mJy (3 times the power of Cas A) for most of the main body of the source to approximately 0.3 mJy off the diffuse source surrounding the nucleus. Furthermore, there is no evidence for significant source fading over 4 yr, in contrast to the result reported by Kronberg & Sramek (1985) for M82. More recent data suggest that, except for the strongest source in that galaxy, the compact radio sources in M82 may not be fading after all. If this suggestion proves correct, supernova rates of 0.2-0.3/yr in M82, estimated based on the assumed source fading, are incorrect. More accurate limits on source fading indicate that the current rate of production of radio supernovae in M82 is no greater than 0.1/yr, while that in NGC 253 is no greater than 0.25/yr.

  4. The sub-mJy radio sky in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: source population

    CERN Document Server

    Bonzini, M; Mainieri, V; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2013-01-01

    The sub-mJy radio population is a mixture of active systems, that is star forming galaxies (SFGs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We study a sample of 883 radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz in a deep Very Large Array survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) that reaches a best rms sensitivity of 6 microJy. We have used a simple scheme to disentangle SFGs, radio-quiet (RQ), and radio-loud (RL) AGNs based on the combination of radio data with Chandra X-ray data and mid-infrared observations from Spitzer. We find that at flux densities between about 30 and 100 microJy the radio population is dominated by SFGs (~60%) and that RQ AGNs become increasingly important over RL ones below 100 microJy. We also compare the host galaxy properties of the three classes in terms of morphology, optical colours and stellar masses. Our results show that both SFG and RQ AGN host galaxies have blue colours and late type morphology while RL AGNs tend to be hosted in massive red galaxies with early type morphology....

  5. Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA): Imaging solar, magnetospheric, and astrophysical sources at < 15 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R.; MacDowall, R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Reiner, M. J.; Bale, S.; Jones, D.; Kasper, J.; Weiler, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA) is a mission to perform aperture synthesis imaging of low frequency solar, magnetospheric, and astrophysical radio bursts. The primary science targets are coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which drive radio emission producing shock waves. A space-based interferometer is required, because the frequencies of observation (SIRA mission serves as a lower frequency counterpart to LWA, LOFAR, and similar ground-based radio imaging arrays. SIRA will require 12 to 16 microsatellites to establish a sufficient number of baselines with separations on the order of kilometers. The microsat constellation consists of microsats located quasi-randomly on a spherical shell, initially of radius 5 km or less. The baseline microsat is 3-axis stabilized with body-mounted solar arrays and an articulated, earth pointing high gain antenna. A retrograde orbit at 500,000 km from Earth was selected as the preferred orbit because it reduces the downlink requirement while keeping the microsats sufficiently distant from terrestrial radio interference. Also, the retrograde orbit permits imaging of terrestrial magnetospheric radio sources from varied perspectives. The SIRA mission serves as a pathfinder for space-based satellite constellations and for spacecraft interferometry at shorter wavelengths. It will be proposed to the NASA MIDEX proposal opportunity in mid-2005.

  6. FIRST "Winged" and X-shaped Radio Source Candidates: II. New Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, C C; Landt, Hermine; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Jordán, Andrés

    2008-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations of X-shaped radio sources with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and Multiple-Mirror Telescope, focused on the sample of candidates from the FIRST survey presented in Paper I (Cheung 2007). A total of 27 redshifts were successfully obtained, 21 of which are new, including that of a newly identified candidate source of this type which is presented here. With these observations, the sample of candidates from Paper I is over 50% spectroscopically identified. Two new broad emission-lined X-shaped radio sources are revealed, while no emission lines were detected in about one third of the observed sources; a detailed study of the line properties is deferred to a future paper. Finally, to explore their relation to the Fanaroff-Riley division, the radio luminosities and host galaxy absolute magnitudes of a spectroscopically identified sample of 50 X-shaped radio galaxies are calculated to determine their placement in the Owen-Ledlow plane.

  7. Discovery of millisecond pulsars in radio searches of southern Fermi LAT sources

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; Ray, P S; Ferrara, E C; Parkinson, P M Saz; Celik, O; Belfiore, A; Donato, D; Cheung, C C; Abdo, A A; Camilo, F; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Harding, A K; Kramer, M; Michelson, P F; Ransom, S M; Romani, R W; Smith, D A; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    Using the Parkes radio telescope we have carried out deep observations of eleven unassociated gamma-ray sources. Periodicity searches of these data have discovered two millisecond pulsars, PSR J1103-5403 (1FGL J1103.9-5355) and PSR J2241-5236 (1FGL J2241.9-5236), and a long period pulsar, PSR J1604-44 (1FGL J1604.7-4443). In addition we searched for but did not detect any radio pulsations from six gammaray pulsars discovered by the Fermi satellite to a level of - 0.04 mJy (for pulsars with a 10% duty cycle). Timing of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1103-5403 has shown that its position is 9' from the centroid of the gamma-ray source. Since these observations were carried out, independent evidence has shown that 1FGL J1103.9-5355 is associated with the flat spectrum radio source PKS 1101-536. It appears certain that the pulsar is not associated with the gamma-ray source, despite the seemingly low probability of a chance detection of a radio millisecond pulsar. We consider that PSR J1604-44 is a chance discovery o...

  8. Effective Spectral Indices of Core and Extended Emissions for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. S. Yang; J. H. Yang; J. J. Nie

    2014-09-01

    From some available literatures, a sample of 393 radio sources is selected. The core and extended spectral indices are calculated. Results show that the core spectral index is different from the extended spectral index with the middle values approximately being 0 and 0.8 respectively.

  9. FIRST "WINGED" AND X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCE CANDIDATES. II. NEW REDSHIFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, C. C.; Healey, Stephen E.; Landt, Hermine; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Jordan, Andres

    2009-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations of X-shaped radio sources with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and Multiple-Mirror Telescope, focused on the sample of candidates from the FIRST survey presented in a previous paper. A total of 27 redshifts were successfully obtained, 21 of which are new, incl

  10. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and Synchrotron Self Absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeyakumar, Solai

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of GPS and CSS radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser (2000) to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency -- linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  11. Morphological classification of radio sources for galaxy evolution and cosmology with SKA-MID

    CERN Document Server

    Makhathini, Sphesihle; Jarvis, Matt; Heywood, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Morphologically classifying radio sources in continuum images with the SKA has the potential to address some of the key questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution. In particular, we may use different classes of radio sources as independent tracers of the dark-matter density field, and thus overcome cosmic variance in measuring large-scale structure, while on the galaxy evolution side we could measure the mechanical feedback from FRII and FRI jets. This work makes use of a \\texttt{MeqTrees}-based simulations framework to forecast the ability of the SKA to recover true source morphologies at high redshifts. A suite of high resolution images containing realistic continuum source distributions with different morphologies (FRI, FRII, starburst galaxies) is fed through an SKA Phase 1 simulator, then analysed to determine the sensitivity limits at which the morphologies can still be distinguished. We also explore how changing the antenna distribution affects these results.

  12. The puzzling radio-loud QSO 3C 186: a gravitational wave recoiling black hole in a young radio source?

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaberge, M; Meyer, E T; Georganopoulos, M; Marinucci, A; Bianchi, S; Tremblay, G R; Hilbert, B; Kotyla, J P; Capetti, A; Baum, S A; Macchetto, F D; Miley, G; O'Dea, C P; Perlman, E S; Sparks, W B; Norman, C

    2016-01-01

    Context. Radio-loud AGNs with powerful relativistic jets are thought to be associated with rapidly spinning black holes (BHs). BH spin-up may result from a number of processes, including accretion of matter onto the BH itself, and catastrophic events such as BH-BH mergers. Aims. We study the intriguing properties of the powerful (L_bol ~ 10^47 erg/s) radio-loud quasar 3C 186. This object shows peculiar features both in the images and in the spectra. Methods. We utilize near-IR Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to study the properties of the host galaxy, and HST UV and SDSS optical spectra to study the kinematics of the source. Chandra X-ray data are also used to better constrain the physical interpretation. Results. HST imaging shows that the active nucleus is offset by 1.3 +- 0.1 arcsec (i.e. ~11 kpc) with respect to the center of the host galaxy. Spectroscopic data show that the broad emission lines are offset by -2140 +-390 km/s with respect to the narrow lines. Velocity shifts are often seen in QSO spec...

  13. New non-thermal galactic radio source with a possible binary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerst, E.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.

    1985-04-25

    A galactic object (G18.95-1.1), detected recently in a galactic plane survey, may belong to a new class of non-thermal radio sources that originate in accreting binary systems. The data on integrated flux density spectral index and the polarization, proves the non-thermal nature of the source. The morphology defies any classification as a supernova remnant. The authors suggest that the object is a binary system containing a compact component.

  14. The redshift of the gravitationally lensed radio source PKS1830-211

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic identification and the long awaited redshift measurement of the heavily obscured, gravitationally lensed radio source PKS 1830-211, which was first observed as a radio Einstein ring. The NE component of the doubly imaged core is identified, in our infrared spectrum covering the wavelength range 1.5-2.5 microns, as an impressively reddened quasar at z=2.507. Our redshift measurement, together with the recently measured time delay (Lovell et al.), means that we ar...

  15. 10C Survey of Radio Sources at 15.7 GHz: I - Observing, mapping and source extraction

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We have observed an area of approximatley 27 deg^2 to an rms noise level of less than 0.2 mJy at 15.7 GHz, using the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array. These observations constitute the most sensitive radio-source survey of any extent (greater than approximately 0.2 deg^2) above 1.4 GHz. This paper presents the techniques employed for observing, mapping and source extraction. We have used a systematic procedure for extracting information and producing source catalogues, from maps with ...

  16. Magnetic Field Disorder and Faraday Effects on the Polarization of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamee, Mehdi; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnes, Jamie S.; Carretti, Ettore; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Poppi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We present a polarization catalog of 533 extragalactic radio sources that have a 2.3 GHz total intensity above 420 mJy from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey, S-PASS, with corresponding 1.4 GHz polarization information from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, NVSS. We studied the selection effects and found that fractional polarization, π, of radio objects at both wavelengths depends on the spectral index, the source magnetic field disorder, the source size, and depolarization. The relationship between depolarization, spectrum, and size shows that depolarization occurs primarily in the source vicinity. The median {π }2.3 of resolved objects in NVSS is approximately two times larger than that of unresolved sources. Sources with little depolarization are ∼2 times more polarized than both highly depolarized and re-polarized sources. This indicates that intrinsic magnetic field disorder is the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed low fractional polarization of radio sources at high frequencies. We predict that number counts from polarization surveys will be similar at 1.4 GHz and at 2.3 GHz, for fixed sensitivity, although ∼10% of all sources may currently be missing because of strong depolarization. Objects with {π }1.4≈ {π }2.3≥slant 4 % typically have simple Faraday structures, so they are most useful for background samples. Almost half of flat-spectrum (α ≥slant -0.5) and ∼25% of steep-spectrum objects are re-polarized. Steep-spectrum, depolarized sources show a weak negative correlation of depolarization with redshift in the range 0 < z < 2.3. Previous non-detections of redshift evolution are likely due the inclusion of re-polarized sources as well.

  17. New 6 and 3-cm radio-continuum maps of the Small Magellanic Cloud - part II: Point source catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two new catalogues of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC. These catalogues contain sources found at 4800 MHz (λ=6cm and 8640 MHz (λ=3cm. Some 457 sources have been detected at 3cm with 601 sources at 6cm created from new high-sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC from Crawford et al. (2011.

  18. New 6 and 3-cm radio-continuum maps of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Part II - Point source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, G F; Filipović, M D; De Horta, A Y; Tothill, N F H; Collier, J D; Drasković, D; Galvin, T J; Payne, J L

    2012-01-01

    We present two new catalogues of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These catalogues contain sources found at 4800 MHz (lambda=6 cm) and 8640 MHz (lambda=3 cm). Some 457 sources have been detected at 3 cm with 601 sources at 6 cm created from new high-sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC from Crawford et al. (2011).

  19. Preparing old and recent radio source tables for the VO age: Current status

    CERN Document Server

    Andernach, H

    2009-01-01

    Independent of established data centers, and partly for my own research, I have been collecting the tabular data from nearly 1500 articles concerned with radio sources. Optical character recognition (OCR) was used to recover tables from nearly 600 of these. Tables from only 44 percent of these articles are available in the CDS or CATS catalog collections. This fraction is 62 percent for articles with over 100 sources. Surprisingly, these fractions are not better for articles published electronically since 2001, perhaps partly due to the fact that often tabular data are published in formats not useful for direct machine reading. The databases Simbad and NED recognize only about 60 percent of the bibliographic references corresponding to the existing electronic radio source lists, and the number of objects associated with these references is much smaller still. Both, object databases like NED and Simbad, as well as catalog browsers (VizieR, CATS) need to be consulted to obtain the most complete information on r...

  20. A new method of measuring radio source parameters of a partially polarized distributed source from spacecraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R.; Fainberg, J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental system is analyzed which is designed to determine the angular and polarization properties of low frequency radio sources from measurements made on a spinning spacecraft. The system has been optimized to provide high accuracies for sources at high as well as low elevation angles. Theoretical expressions are derived for the response of this system to a partially polarized point source. Integrations are then carried out to get the system response to a uniform circular distributed source. Data processing techniques are derived so that computer simulations can be carried out to investigate the accuracy of this technique. It is shown that using 24 measurements of a partially polarized source (with Q = U = V = 0.5), taken in one spacecraft rotation, the resulting rms errors in angular position are less than one degree and the errors in determining the Stokes parameters are generally 1-10% for a wide range of source elevations.

  1. The Population of Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Forbrich, Jan; Menten, Karl M; Reid, Mark J; Chandler, Claire J; Rau, Urvashi; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Wolk, Scott J; Meingast, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present a deep centimeter-wavelength catalog of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), based on a 30h single-pointing observation with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in its high-resolution A-configuration using two 1 GHz bands centered at 4.7 GHz and 7.3 GHz. A total of 556 compact sources were detected in a map with a nominal rms noise of 3 muJy/bm, limited by complex source structure and the primary beam response. Compared to previous catalogs, our detections increase the sample of known compact radio sources in the ONC by more than a factor of seven. The new data show complex emission on a wide range of spatial scales. Following a preliminary correction for the wideband primary-beam response, we determine radio spectral indices for 170 sources whose index uncertainties are less than +/-0.5. We compare the radio to the X-ray and near-infrared point-source populations, noting similarities and differences.

  2. A LOFAR view on the duty cycle of young radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brienza, M; Shulevski, A; Godfrey, L; Vilchez, N

    2015-01-01

    Compact Steep Spectrum, Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum and High Frequency Peak (CSS, GPS, HFP) sources are considered to be young radio sources but the details of their duty cycle are not well understood. In some cases they are thought to develop in large radio galaxies, while in other cases their jets may experience intermittent activity or die prematurely and remain confined within the host galaxy. By studying in a systematic way the presence and the properties of any extended emission surrounding these compact sources we can provide firmer constraints on their evolutionary history and on the timescales of activity of the radio source. Remnant emission from previous outbursts is supposed to have very low surface brightness and to be brighter at low frequency. Taking advantage of the unprecedented sensitivity and resolution provided by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) we have started a systematic search of new CSS, GPS and HFP sources with extended emission, as well as a more detailed study of some well-known of t...

  3. Fast neutral outflows in powerful radio galaxies: a major source of feedback in massive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    We report the detection of fast (~1000 km s-1), massive outflows of neutral gas observed - using the WSRT - as 21-cm H I absorption against the strong radio continuum of seven radio sources. The neutral outflows occur, in at least somes cases, at kpc distance from the nucleus, and they are most likely driven by the interactions between the expanding radio jets and the gaseous medium enshrouding the central regions. We estimate that the associated mass outflow rates are up to ~50 M⊙ yr-1, comparable (although at the lower end of the distribution) to the outflow rates found for starburst-driven superwinds in Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies (ULIRG). This suggests that massive, jet-driven outflows of neutral gas in radio-loud AGN can have as large an impact on the evolution of the host galaxies as the outflows associated with starbursts. A radio-loud phase of the AGN is likely a relatively common, albeit short, phase in the life of many (or even all) massive ellipticals. Jet-driven neutral outflows may represent one of the main feedback mechanisms in these galaxies.

  4. Fast neutral outflows in powerful radio galaxies: a major source of feedback in massive galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection of fast (~ 1000 km/s), massive outflows of neutral gas observed -- using the WSRT -- as 21-cm HI absorption against the strong radio continuum of seven radio sources. The neutral outflows occur, in at least somes cases, at kpc distance from the nucleus, and they are most likely driven by the interactions between the expanding radio jets and the gaseous medium enshrouding the central regions. We estimate that the associated mass outflow rates are up to ~50 M_sun/yr, comparable (although at the lower end of the distribution) to the outflow rates found for starburst-driven superwinds in Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies (ULIRG). This suggests that massive, jet-driven outflows of neutral gas in radio-loud AGN can have as large an impact on the evolution of the host galaxies as the outflows associated with starbursts. A radio-loud phase of the AGN is likely a relatively common, albeit short, phase in the life of many (or even all) massive ellipticals. Jet-driven neutral outflows may represent one ...

  5. INVESTIGATING PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PROTOSTELLAR JETS: THE TRIPLE RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCE IN SERPENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Valotto, Carlos [Instituto de Astronomía Teórica y Experimental, (IATE-UNC), X5000BGR Córdoba (Argentina); Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (IRyA-UNAM), 58089 Morelia, México (Mexico); Araudo, Anabella [University of Oxford, Astrophysics, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC-IEEC) and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB-IEEC), Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Anglada, Guillem [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Camino Bajo de Huétor 50, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Martí, Josep [Dept. de Física, EPS de Jaén, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, A3-402, E-23071 Jaén (Spain)

    2016-02-10

    While most protostellar jets present free–free emission at radio wavelengths, synchrotron emission has also been proposed to be present in a handful of these objects. The presence of nonthermal emission has been inferred by negative spectral indices at centimeter wavelengths. In one case (the HH 80-81 jet arising from a massive protostar), its synchrotron nature was confirmed by the detection of linearly polarized radio emission. One of the main consequences of these results is that synchrotron emission implies the presence of relativistic particles among the nonrelativistic material of these jets. Therefore, an acceleration mechanism should be taking place. The most probable scenario is that particles are accelerated when the jets strongly impact against the dense envelope surrounding the protostar. Here we present an analysis of radio observations obtained with the Very Large Array of the triple radio source in the Serpens star-forming region. This object is known to be a radio jet arising from an intermediate-mass protostar. It is also one of the first protostellar jets where the presence of nonthermal emission was proposed. We analyze the dynamics of the jet and the nature of the emission and discuss these issues in the context of the physical parameters of the jet and the particle acceleration phenomenon.

  6. Plasma ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H- source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, T.; Staples, J.W.; Thomae, W.; Reijonen, J.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Keller, R.

    2001-09-06

    The H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a cesiated, radio-frequency driven (2 MHz) multicusp volume source which operates at a duty cycle of 6% (1 ms pulses and 60 Hz). In pulsed RF driven plasma sources, ignition of the plasma affects the stability of source operation and the antenna lifetime. We are reporting on investigations of different ignition schemes, based on secondary electron generation in the plasma chamber by UV light, a hot filament, a low power RF plasma (cw, 13.56 MHz), as well as source operation solely with the high power (40 kW) 2 MHz RF. We find that the dual frequency, single antenna scheme is most attractive for the operating conditions of the SNS H{sup -} source.

  7. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* MERCURY ( PLANET ), (*RADIO ASTRONOMY, EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, SKY BRIGHTNESS, ANTENNAS...EPHEMERIDES, ASTROPHYSICS, JUPITER( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), BRIGHTNESS, ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE, INTENSITY, MEASUREMENT.

  8. The impact of the early stages of radio source evolution on the ISM of the host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A; Holt, J; Tzioumis, A K; Wills, K

    2002-01-01

    The study of both neutral and ionized gas in young radio sources is providing key information on the effect the radio plasma has on the ISM of these objects. We present results obtained for the compact radio sources PKS1549-79, 4C12.50 and PKS1814-63 and for the intermediate-size radio galaxy 3C459. At least in the first two, low ionisation optical emission lines and HI absorption appear to be associated with the extended, but relatively quiescent, dusty cocoon surrounding the nucleus. The [OIII] lines are, on the other hand, mostly associated with the region of interaction between the radio plasma and the ISM, indicating a fast outflow from the canter. A case of fast outflow (up to ~1000 km/s) is also observed in HI in the radio source 4C12.50. As the radio source evolves, any obscuring material along the radio axis is swept aside until, eventually, cavities (of the same kind as observed e.g. in Cygnus A) are hollowed out on either side of the nucleus. We may witness this phase in the evolution of a radio so...

  9. On the origin of X-shaped radio-sources new insights from the properties of their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Capetti, A; Rossi, P; Bodo, G; Zanni, C; Massaglia, S

    2002-01-01

    A significant fraction of extended radio sources presents a peculiar X-shaped radio morphology: in addition to the classical double lobed structure, radio emission is also observed along a second axis of symmetry in the form of diffuse wings or tails. We re-examine the origin of these extensions relating the radio morphology to the properties of their host galaxies. The orientation of the wings shows a striking connection with the structure of the host galaxy as they are preferentially aligned with its minor axis. Furthermore, wings are only observed in galaxies of high projected ellipticity. Hydrodynamical simulations of the radio-source evolution show that X-shaped radio-sources naturally form in this geometrical situation: as a jet propagates in a non-spherical gas distribution, the cocoon surrounding the radio-jets expands laterally at a high rate producing wings of radio emission, in a way that is reminiscent of the twin-exhaust model for radio-sources.

  10. Scheduling and calibration strategy for continuous radio monitoring of 1700 sources every three days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max-Moerbeck, Walter

    2014-08-01

    The Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40 meter telescope is currently monitoring a sample of about 1700 blazars every three days at 15 GHz, with the main scientific goal of determining the relation between the variability of blazars at radio and gamma-rays as observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The time domain relation between radio and gamma-ray emission, in particular its correlation and time lag, can help us determine the location of the high-energy emission site in blazars, a current open question in blazar research. To achieve this goal, continuous observation of a large sample of blazars in a time scale of less than a week is indispensable. Since we only look at bright targets, the time available for target observations is mostly limited by source observability, calibration requirements and slewing of the telescope. Here I describe the implementation of a practical solution to this scheduling, calibration, and slewing time minimization problem. This solution combines ideas from optimization, in particular the traveling salesman problem, with astronomical and instrumental constraints. A heuristic solution using well established optimization techniques and astronomical insights particular to this situation, allow us to observe all the sources in the required three days cadence while obtaining reliable calibration of the radio flux densities. Problems of this nature will only be more common in the future and the ideas presented here can be relevant for other observing programs.

  11. The REX survey a search for Radio Emitting X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Wolter, A; Ceca, R D; Gioia, I M

    1999-01-01

    We present the scientific goals, the strategy and the first results of the REX project, an effort aimed at creating a sizable and statistically complete sample of Radio Emitting X-ray sources (REX) using the available data from a VLA survey and the ROSAT PSPC archive. Through a positional cross-correlation of the two data sets we have derived a sample of about 1600 REX. Among the 393 REX identified so far a high fraction is represented by AGNs, typically radio loud QSOs and BL Lacs. The remaining sources are galaxies, typically radio galaxies isolated or in cluster. Thanks to the low flux limits in the radio and in the X-ray band and the large area of sky covered by the survey, we intend to derive a new complete and unbiased sample of BL Lacs which will contain both ``RBL'' and ``XBL'' type objects. In this way, the apparent dichotomy resulting from the current samples of BL Lacs will be directly analyzed in a unique sample. Moreover, the high number of BL Lacs expected in the REX sample (about 200) will allo...

  12. Solid state generator for powerful radio frequency ion sources in neutral beam injection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, W.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Franzen, P.

    2015-02-15

    Radio frequency ion sources used in neutral beam injection systems (NBI) of fusion machines are currently supplied by self-excited RF generators. These generators have both a low power efficiency and a limited frequency stability, therefore transistorized amplifiers are being considered for the power supply of the next generation of RF sources. A 75 kW generator, originally designed for broadcasting, has been tested with a negative ion source. High operational reliability and a very good matching to the plasma load has been demonstrated. These results make this generator type a very promising candidate for future NBI systems.

  13. Planck early results. XIII. Statistical properties of extragalactic radio sources in the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    and ACT surveys over small fractions of the sky. An analysis of source spectra, exploiting Planck's uniquely broad spectral coverage, finds clear evidence of a steepening of the mean spectral index above about 70 GHz. This implies that, at these frequencies, the contamination of the CMB power spectrum......The data reported in Planck's Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) are exploited to measure the number counts (dN/dS) of extragalactic radio sources at 30, 44, 70, 100, 143 and 217 GHz. Due to the full-sky nature of the catalogue, this measurement extends to the rarest and brightest...... sources in the sky. At lower frequencies (30, 44, and 70 GHz) our counts are in very good agreement with estimates based on WMAP data, being somewhat deeper at 30 and 70 GHz, and somewhat shallower at 44 GHz. Planck's source counts at 143 and 217 GHz join smoothly with the fainter ones provided by the SPT...

  14. On the origin of two unidentified radio/X-ray sources discovered with XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    García, Federico; Medina, María C; Romero, Gustavo E

    2015-01-01

    We aim at clarifying the nature of the emission of two spatially related unidentified X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton telescope at intermediate-low Galactic latitude. Observations reveal a point-like source aligned with elongated diffuse emission. The X-ray spectra are best-fitted by absorbed power laws with photon indices ~1.7 for the point-like and ~2.0 for the extended one. Both sources show nonthermal radio-continuum counterparts that might indicate a physical association. From the available data, we did not detect variability on the point-like source in several timescales. Two possible scenarios are analyzed: first, based on HI line absorption, assuming a Galactic origin, we infer a distance upper bound of 10^32 erg/s and >7.5 x 10^32 erg/s, for the point-like and extended sources, respectively; second, an extra-Galactic nature is discussed, where the point-like source might be the core of a radio galaxy and the extended source its lobe. In this case, we compare derived fluxes, spectral indices, a...

  15. Compact Radio Sources in Orion: New Detections, Time Variability, and Objects in OMC-1S

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, L A; Kurtz, S E; O'Dell, C R; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stanley E.

    2004-01-01

    We present the analysis of four 3.6 cm radio continuum archival observations of Orion obtained using the Very Large Array in its A-configuration, with $0\\rlap.{''}3$ angular resolution. The observations were made during the period 1994-1997. In a region of $4' \\times 4'$, we detect a total of 77 compact radio sources. Of the total of detected sources, 54 are detected in one or more of the individual observations and 36 of these show time variability (by more than 30%) between the observed epochs. A deep image made from averaging all data shows an additional 23 faint sources, in the range of 0.1 to 0.3 mJy. Of the total of 77 sources, 39 are new centimeter detections. However, only 9 of the 77 sources do not have a previously reported counterpart at near-infrared, optical, or X-ray wavelengths. In particular, we detect three faint sources in the OMC-1S region that may be related to the sources that power the multiple outflows that emanate from this part of the Orion nebula. %We discuss the nature of these sour...

  16. The MWA GLEAM 4Jy Sample; a new large, bright radio source sample at 151 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, C A; Seymour, N; White, S V; Murphy, Tara; Sadler, E M; Callingham, J R; Hunstead, R W; Hughes, J; Wall, J V; Bell, M E; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B-Q; Gaensler, B M; Hancock, P J; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Lenc, E; McKinley, B; Morgan, J; Offringa, A R; Procopio, P; Staveley-Smith, L; Wayth, R B; Wu, C; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines how the new GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA Survey (GLEAM, Wayth et al. 2015), observed by the Murchison Widefield Array covering the frequency range 72 - 231 MHz, allows identification of a new large, complete, sample of more than 2000 bright extragalactic radio sources selected at 151 MHz. With a flux density limit of 4 Jy this sample is significantly larger than the canonical fully-complete sample, 3CRR (Laing, Riley & Longair 1983). In analysing this small bright subset of the GLEAM survey we are also providing a first user check of the GLEAM catalogue ahead of its public release (Hurley-Walker et al. in prep). Whilst significant work remains to fully characterise our new bright source sample, in time it will provide important constraints to evolutionary behaviour, across a wide redshift and intrinsic radio power range, as well as being highly complementary to results from targeted, small area surveys.

  17. Ka-Band Monopulse Antenna Pointing Calibration Using Wideband Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buu, C.; Calvo, J.; Cheng, T.-H.; Vazquez, M.

    2010-08-01

    A new method of performing a system end-to-end monopulse antenna calibration using widely available wideband astronomical radio sources is presented as an alternative to the current method of using a spacecraft signal. Current monopulse calibration requires a spacecraft carrier signal to measure amplitude and phase differences in the monopulse feed and low-noise amplifiers (LNAs). The alternative method presented here will allow the ground station to perform monopulse calibrations during maintenance periods instead of spacecraft track time, and provide an end-to-end system check-out capability without requiring a spacecraft signal. In this article, we give an overview of the current calibration approach, describe a new method for calibrating with radio sources, and present results from field testing of this new method.

  18. The inverse-Compton ghost HDF 130 and the giant radio galaxy 6C 0905+3955: matching an analytic model for double radio source evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mocz, Philip; Blundell, Katherine M; Goodall, P T; Chapman, S C; Saikia, D J

    2011-01-01

    We present new GMRT observations of HDF 130, an inverse-Compton (IC) ghost of a giant radio source that is no longer being powered by jets. We compare the properties of HDF 130 with the new and important constraint of the upper limit of the radio flux density at 240 MHz to an analytic model. We learn what values of physical parameters in the model for the dynamics and evolution of the radio luminosity and X-ray luminosity (due to IC scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB)) of a Fanaroff-Riley II (FR II) source are able to describe a source with features (lobe length, axial ratio, X-ray luminosity, photon index and upper limit of radio luminosity) similar to the observations. HDF 130 is found to agree with the interpretation that it is an IC ghost of a powerful double-lobed radio source, and we are observing it at least a few Myr after jet activity (which lasted 5--100 Myr) has ceased. The minimum Lorentz factor of injected particles into the lobes from the hotspot is preferred to be $\\gamma\\sim10^...

  19. The faint source population at 15.7 GHz - I. The radio properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittam, I. H.; Riley, J. M.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Prandoni, I.; Guglielmino, G.; Morganti, R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Garrett, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied a sample of 296 faint (>0.5 mJy) radio sources selected from an area of the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. By matching this catalogue to several lower frequency surveys (e.g. including a deep GMRT survey at 610 MHz, a WSRT survey at 1.4 GHz, NVSS, FIRST

  20. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  1. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio PWN G141.2+5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula (PWN) (Kothes et al. 2014). We find a faint unresolved X-ray source coincident with the central peak of radio emission. Spectral fits to the 241 counts show that an absorbed power-law describes the data well, with absorbing column NH = 4.8 (2.6, 7.3) x 1021 cm-2 and photon index Γ = 1.6 (1.2, 2.1). (A black-body fit is slightly less favored statistically, and has an implausibly high temperature, kT = 0.9 keV.) For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is 1.8 (1.1, 3.0) x 1032 erg s-1. No extended emission is seen; a very conservative upper limit to Lx (nebula) is about the same luminosity as that observed from the point source. The radio luminosity is about 3 x 1030 erg s-1 the X-ray upper limit then gives Lx/Lr < 700, satisfied by almost all pulsar-wind nebulae. Both Lx and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. The steep radio spectrum (α ~ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts Lx (nebula) ~ 1 x 1033 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  2. SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3: a link between radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies and compact steep-spectrum radio sources?

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Ballo, L; Dallacasa, D; Della Ceca, R; Fanali, R; Foschini, L; Hamilton, T; Kraus, A; Maccacaro, T; Mack, K -H; Marchã, M J; Paulino-Afonso, A; Sani, E; Severgnini, P

    2014-01-01

    We present SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3, a new case of radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL NLS1) with a relatively high radio power (P1.4GHz=2.1x10^25 W Hz^-1) and large radioloudness parameter (R1.4=600+/-100). The radio source is compact with a linear size below ~1.4 kpc but, contrary to most of the RL NLS1 discovered so far with such a high R1.4, its radio spectrum is very steep (alpha=0.93) and not supporting a 'blazar-like' nature. Both the small mass of the central super-massive black-hole and the high accretion rate relative to the Eddington limit estimated for this object (3.2x10^7 Msun and 0.27, respectively, with a formal error of ~0.4 dex on both quantities) are typical of the class of NLS1. Through a modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the source we have found that the galaxy hosting SDSSJ143244.91+301435.3 is undergoing a quite intense star-formation (SFR=50 Msun y^-1) which, however, is expected to contribute only marginally (~1 per cent) to the observed radio emission. The radio propert...

  3. CSSs in a sample of B2 radio sources of intermediate strength

    CERN Document Server

    Saikia, D J; Spencer, R E; Mantovani, F; Salter, C J; Jeyakumar, S

    2002-01-01

    We present radio observations of 19 candidate compact steep-spectrum (CSS) objects selected from a well-defined, complete sample of 52 B2 radio sources of intermediate strength. These observations were made with the VLA A-array at 4.835 GHz. The radio structures of the entire sample are summarised and the brightness asymmetries within the compact sources are compared with those of the more extended ones, as well as with those in the 3CRR sample and the CSSs from the B3-VLA sample. About 25 per cent of the CSS sources exhibit large brightness asymmetries, with a flux density ratio for the opposing lobes of $>$5, possibly due to interaction of the jets with infalling material. The corresponding percentage for the larger-sized objects is only about 5 per cent. We also investigate possible dependence of the flux density asymmetry of the lobes on redshift, since this might be affected by more interactions and mergers in the past. No such dependence is found. A few individual objects of interest are discussed in th...

  4. Discovery of two millisecond pulsars in Fermi sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cognard, I; Johnson, T J; Smith, D A; Venter, C; Harding, A K; Wolff, M T; Cheung, C C; Donato, D; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Dumora, D; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of \\emph{Fermi Large Area Telescope} sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated \\emph{Fermi} sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously-detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR ...

  5. The Phoenix Deep Survey: X-ray properties of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakakis, A; Sullivan, M; Afonso, J; Georgantopoulos, I; Mobasher, B; Cram, L E

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use a 50ks XMM-Newton pointing overlapping with the Phoenix Deep Survey, a homogeneous radio survey reaching muJy sensitivities, to explore the X-ray properties and the evolution of star-forming galaxies. UV, optical and NIR photometry is available and is used to estimate photometric redshifts and spectral types for radio sources brighter than R=21.5mag (total of 82). Sources with R3.5sigma) is detected in the 0.5-2keV band corresponding to a mean flux of ~3e-16cgs for both subsamples. This flux translates to mean luminosities of ~5e40 and 1.5e41cgs for the z=0.240 and 0.455 subsamples respectively. Only a marginally significant signal (2.6sigma) is detected in the 2-8keV band for the z=0.455 subsample. We argue that the stacked signal above is dominated by star-formation. The mean L_X/L_B ratio and the mean L_X of the two subsamples are found to be higher than optically selected spirals and similar to starbursts. We also find that the mean L_X and L_1.4 of the faint radio sources studied her...

  6. Milky Way Scattering Properties and Intrinsic Sizes of AGN Cores Probed by VLBI Surveys of Compact Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pushkarev, A B

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the angular sizes of radio cores of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and analyzed their sky distributions and frequency dependencies to study synchrotron opacity in AGN jets and the strength of angular broadening in the interstellar medium. We have used archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data of more than 3000 compact extragalactic radio sources observed at frequencies, $\

  7. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, P.O. Box 3064350, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States); Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Buder, I. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kusaka, A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monsalve, R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Næss, S. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Newburgh, L. B. [Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Reeves, R. [CePIA, Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gundersen, J. O., E-mail: huffenbe@physics.fsu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  8. Forthcoming Close Angular Approaches of Planets to Radio Sources and Possibilities to Use Them as GR Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Z M; Tsekmeister, S D; 10.1134/S0038094609040054

    2009-01-01

    During close angular approaches of solar system planets to astrometric radio sources, the apparent positions of these sources shift due to relativistic effects and, thus, these events may be used for testing the theory of general relativity; this fact was successfully demonstrated in the experiments on the measurements of radio source position shifts during the approaches of Jupiter carried out in 1988 and 2002. An analysis, performed within the frames of the present work, showed that when a source is observed near a planet's disk edge, i.e., practically in the case of occultation, the current experimental accuracy makes it possible to measure the relativistic effects for all planets. However, radio occultations are fairly rare events. At the same time, only Jupiter and Saturn provide noticeable relativistic effects approaching the radio sources at angular distances of about a few planet radii. Our analysis resulted in the creation of a catalog of forthcoming occultations and approaches of planets to astromet...

  9. The Proper Motions of the Double Radio Source n in the Orion BN/KL Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis; Gómez, Laura; Menten, Karl M.; Lizano, Susana

    2017-01-01

    We have extended the time baseline for observations of the proper motions of radio sources in the Orion BN/KL region from 14.7 to 22.5 years. We present improved determinations for the sources BN and I. In addition, we address the proper motions of the double radio source n, that have been questioned in the literature. We confirm that all three sources are moving away at transverse velocities of tens of kilometers per second from a region in-between them, where they were located about 500 years ago. Source n exhibits a new component that we interpret as due to a one-sided ejection of free–free emitting plasma that took place after 2006.36. We used the highly accurate relative proper motions between sources BN and I to determine that their closest separation took place in the year 1475 ± 6, when they were within ∼100 au or less from each other in the plane of the sky.

  10. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  11. The first VLBI image of an Infrared-Faint Radio Source

    CERN Document Server

    Middelberg, E; Tingay, S; Mao, M Y; Phillips, C J; Hotan, A W

    2008-01-01

    Context: To investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  12. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Huffenberger, K M; Bischoff, C; Buder, I; Chinone, Y; Cleary, K; Kusaka, A; Monsalve, R; Næss, S K; Newburgh, L B; Reeves, R; Ruud, T M; Wehus, I K; Zwart, J T L; Dickinson, C; Eriksen, H K; Gaier, T; Gundersen, J O; Hasegawa, M; Hazumi, M; Miller, A D; Radford, S J E; Readhead, A C S; Staggs, S T; Tajima, O; Thompson, K L

    2014-01-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the Cosmic Microwave Background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, $>$40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are $\\sim$480 such sources within QUIET's four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30--40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At S/N $> 3$ significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only $1.3 \\pm 1.1$ detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization meas...

  13. The Proper Motions of the Double Radio Source n in the Orion BN/KL Region

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Luis F; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis; Gomez, Laura; Menten, Karl M; Lizano, Susana

    2016-01-01

    We have extended the time baseline for observations of the proper motions of radio sources in the Orion BN/KL region from 14.7 to 22.5 years. We present improved determinations for the sources BN and I. In addition, we address the proper motions of the double radio source n, that have been questioned in the literature. We confirm that all three sources are moving away at transverse velocities of tens of km s$^{-1}$ from a region in-between them, where they were located about 500 years ago. Source n exhibits a new component that we interpret as due to a one-sided ejection of free-free emitting plasma that took place after 2006.36. We used the highly accurate relative proper motions between sources BN and I to determine that their closest separation took place in the year 1475$\\pm$6, when they were within $\\sim$100 AU or less from each other in the plane of the sky.

  14. Classical radio source propagating into outer HI disc in NGC 3801

    CERN Document Server

    Emonts, Bjorn; Morganti, Raffaella; Struve, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of a large-scale disc of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the nearby Fanaroff & Riley type-I radio galaxy NGC 3801 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The HI disc (34 kpc in diameter and with M_HI = 1.3 x 10^9 M_sun) is aligned with the radio jet axis. This makes NGC 3801 an ideal system for investigating the evolution of a small radio source through its host galaxy's cold ISM. The large-scale HI disc is perpendicular to a known inner CO disc and dust-lane. We argue that the formation history of the large-scale HI disc is in agreement with earlier speculation that NGC 3801 was involved in a past gas-rich galaxy-galaxy merger (although other formation histories are discussed). The fact that NGC 3801 is located in an environment of several HI-rich companions, and shows indications of ongoing interaction with the nearby companion NGC 3802, strengthens this possibility. The large amounts of ambient cold ISM, combined with X-ray results by Croston et al (2007) on the presence of over...

  15. Another Shock for the Bullet Cluster, and the Source of Seed Electrons for Radio Relics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimwell, Timothy W,; Markevitch, Maxim; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E 0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2:30:11025 WHz(exp -1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster - a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re- )acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma - as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM - is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.

  16. A solar radio moving type Ⅳ burst of expanding arches type involving multi-sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Ruixiang(谢瑞祥); WANG; Min(汪敏); DUAN; Changchun(段长春); YAN; Yihua(颜毅华); R.; A.; Sych; A.; T.; Altyntsev

    2002-01-01

    A complex solar radio moving type IV burst was observed on 23 September 1998 with the broadband (1.0-2.0 GHz and 2.6-3.8 GHz) spectrometers with high temporal and spectral resolutions at National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC). Comparing to the high spatial resolution data of Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT), we find that this burst is a rare type of moving type IV burst which is caused by the expanding arches, and the spatial structure oscillations of the radio sources are related with the time structure pulsations of the radio emission. Furthermore, the burst is associated with the multiple quasi-periodic long-term pulsations, and this suggests the existence of multi-scale magnetic structures in a large expanding coronal arch. We think the moving type IV burst is due to the synchrotron emission of the energetic electrons trapped in the expanding arch, and the multiple quasi-periodic pulsations are due to the second harmonic plasma emission.

  17. A Statistical Method to Constrain Faint Radio Source Counts Below the Detection Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Afonso, Jose; Jarvis, Matt J

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical method based on a maximum likelihood approach to constrain the number counts of extragalactic sources below the nominal flux-density limit of continuum imaging surveys. We extract flux densities from a radio map using positional information from an auxiliary catalogue and show that we can model the number counts of this undetected population down to flux density levels well below the detection threshold of the radio survey. We demonstrate the capabilities that our method will have with future generation wide-area radio surveys by performing simulations over various sky areas with a power-law dN/dS model. We generate a simulated power-law distribution with flux densities ranging from 0.1 \\sigma to 2 \\sigma, convolve this distribution with a Gaussian noise distribution rms of 10 micro-Jy/beam, and are able to recover the counts from the noisy distribution. We then demonstrate the application of our method using data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters survey (FI...

  18. Coronal Sources of the Solar F$_{10.7}$ Radio Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Schonfeld, S J; Henney, C J; Arge, C N; McAteer, R T J

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the first solar full-disk F$_{10.7}$ (the radio flux at $10.7$ cm, $2.8$ GHz) image taken with the S-band receivers on the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in order to assess the relationship between the F$_{10.7}$ index and solar extreme ultra-violet (EUV) emission. To identify the sources of the observed $2.8$ GHz emission, we calculate differential emission measures (DEMs) from EUV images collected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and use them to predict the bremsstrahlung component of the radio emission. By comparing the bremsstrahlung prediction and radio observation we find that $8.1\\pm 0.5\\%$ of the variable component of the F$_{10.7}$ flux is associated with the gyroresonance emission mechanism. Additionally, we identify optical depth effects on the radio limb which may complicate the use of F$_{10.7}$ time series as an EUV proxy. Our analysis is consistent with a coronal iron abundance that is $4$ times the photospheric level.

  19. Relativistic jet with shock waves like model of superluminal radio source. Jet relativista con ondas de choque como modelo de radio fuentes superluminales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, A.; Gomez, J.L.; Marcaide, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the compact radio sources at milliarcsecond angular resolution can be explained in terms of shock waves propagating along bent jets. These jets consist of narrow-angle cones of plasma flowing at bulk relativistic velocities, within tangled magnetic fields, emitting synchrotron radiation. We have developed a numerical code which solves the synchrotron radiation transfer equations to compute the total and polarized emission of bent shocked relativistic jets, and we have applied it to reproduce the compact structure, kenimatic evolution and time flux density evolution of the superluminal radio source 4C 39.25 and to obtain its jet physical parameters. (Author) 23 ref.

  20. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  1. 3C380: a powerful radio source seen end-on

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, P.N. (Nuffield Radio Astronomy Labs., Jodrell Bank (UK)); Akujor, C.E. (Nuffield Radio Astronomy Labs., Jodrell Bank (UK) Nigeria Univ., Nsukka (Nigeria). Dept of Physics); Cornwell, T.J. (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, N.M. (USA)); Saikia, D.J. (Nuffield Radio Astronomy Labs., Jodrell Bank (UK) Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, GMRT Project, Pune (India))

    1991-01-01

    We present new VLA, MERLIN and VLBI observations of 3C380, a powerful compact steep-spectrum radio source with complex extended structure, and attempt to clarify whether it is a larger source seen end-on or whether is is intrinsically of galactic dimensions and distorted. The extended structure, which could be a pair of overlapping lobes, exhibits a strong depolarization asymmetry of the kind found in powerful double sources, while the core exhibits superluminal motion. 3C380 therefore has features to be expected of a Fanaroff-Riley class II source seen approximately end-on. However, from a detailed consideration of the new evidence we infer that the source is intrinsically small with an overall extent {le}60 kpc. (author).

  2. Radiative efficiency and content of extragalactic radio sources: Toward a universal scaling relation between jet power and radio power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bîrzan, L.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Carilli, C.L.; Wise, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    We present an analysis of the energetics and particle content of the lobes of 24 radio galaxies at the cores of cooling clusters. The radio lobes in these systems have created visible cavities in the surrounding hot, X-ray-emitting gas, which allow direct measurement of the mechanical jet power of

  3. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF 3C RADIO SOURCES WITH z < 0.3. II. COMPLETING THE SNAPSHOT SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Tremblay, G. R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Harris, D. E.; O' Dea, C. P. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kharb, P.; Axon, D. [Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Balmaverde, B.; Capetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Baum, S. A. [Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martine Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Grandi, P.; Torresi, E. [INAF-IASF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Risaliti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    We report on the second round of Chandra observations of the 3C snapshot survey developed to observe the complete sample of 3C radio sources with z < 0.3 for 8 ks each. In the first paper, we illustrated the basic data reduction and analysis procedures performed for the 30 sources of the 3C sample observed during Chandra Cycle 9, while here we present the data for the remaining 27 sources observed during Cycle 12. We measured the X-ray intensity of the nuclei and of any radio hot spots and jet features with associated X-ray emission. X-ray fluxes in three energy bands, i.e., soft, medium, and hard, for all the sources analyzed are also reported. For the stronger nuclei, we also applied the standard spectral analysis, which provides the best-fit values of the X-ray spectral index and absorbing column density. In addition, a detailed analysis of bright X-ray nuclei that could be affected by pile-up has been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in our sample except for 3C 319. Among the current sample, there are two compact steep spectrum radio sources, two broad-line radio galaxies, and one wide angle tail radio galaxy, 3C 89, hosted in a cluster of galaxies clearly visible in our Chandra snapshot observation. In addition, we also detected soft X-ray emission arising from the galaxy cluster surrounding 3C 196.1. Finally, X-ray emission from hot spots has been found in three FR II radio sources and, in the case of 3C 459, we also report the detection of X-ray emission associated with the eastern radio lobe as well as X-ray emission cospatial with radio jets in 3C 29 and 3C 402.

  4. A 5-GHz Southern Hemisphere VLBI Survey of Compact Radio Sources, 2

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Z Q; Moran, J M; Jauncey, D L; Reynolds, J E; Tzioumis, A K; Gough, R G; Ferris, R H; Sinclair, M W; Jiang, D R; Hong-Xing, Y; Liang, S G; Edwards, P G; Costa, M E; Tingay, S J; McCulloch, P M; Lovell, J E J; King, E A; Nicolson, G D; Murphy, D W; Meier, D L; Van Ommen, T D; White, G L

    1998-01-01

    We report the results of a 5-GHz southern-hemisphere snapshot VLBI observation of a sample of blazars. The observations were performed with the Southern Hemisphere VLBI Network plus the Shanghai station in 1993 May. Twenty-three flat-spectrum, radio-loud sources were imaged. These are the first VLBI images for 15 of the sources. Eight of the sources are EGRET (> 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources. The milliarcsecond morphology shows a core-jet structure for 12 sources, and a single compact core for the remaining 11. No compact doubles were seen. Compared with other radio images at different epochs and/or different frequencies, 3 core-jet blazars show evidence of bent jets, and there is some evidence for superluminal motion in the cases of 2 blazars. The detailed descriptions for individual blazars are given. This is the second part of a survey: the first part was reported by Shen et al. (AJ 114(1997)1999).

  5. A dynamical model for FR II type radio sources with terminated jet activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowska, Elżbieta

    2017-02-01

    Context. The extension of the KDA analytical model of FR II-type source evolution originally assuming a continuum injection process in the jet-IGM interaction towards a case of the jet's termination is presented and briefly discussed. Aims: The dynamical evolution of FR II-type sources predicted with this extended model, hereafter referred to as KDA EXT, and its application to the chosen radio sources. Methods: Following the classical approach based on the source's continuous injection and self-similarity, I propose the effective formulae describing the length and luminosity evolution of the lobes during an absence of the jet flow, and present the resulting diagrams for the characteristics mentioned. Results: Using an algorithm based on the numerical integration of a modified formula for jet power, the KDA EXT model is fitted to three radio galaxies. Their predicted spectra are then compared to the observed spectra, proving that these fits are better than the best spectral fit provided by the original KDA model of the FR II-type sources dynamical evolution.

  6. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2010-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  7. Occultations of Astrophysical Radio Sources as Probes of Planetary Environments: A Case Study of Jupiter and Possible Applications to Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2017-02-01

    Properties of planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres are difficult to measure from Earth. Radio occultations are a common method for measuring these properties, but they traditionally rely on radio transmissions from a spacecraft near the planet. Here, we explore whether occultations of radio emissions from a distant astrophysical radio source can be used to measure magnetic field strength, plasma density, and neutral density around planets. In a theoretical case study of Jupiter, we find that significant changes in polarization angle due to Faraday rotation occur for radio signals that pass within 10 Jupiter radii of the planet and that significant changes in frequency and power occur from radio signals that pass through the neutral atmosphere. There are sufficient candidate radio sources, such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, and masers, that occultations are likely to occur at least once per year. For pulsars, time delays in the arrival of their emitted pulses can be used to measure plasma density. Exoplanets, whose physical properties are very challenging to observe, may also occult distant astrophysical radio sources, such as their parent stars.

  8. Space reconstruction of the morphology and kinematics of axisymmetric radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Nhung, P. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-10-01

    The unprecedented quality of the observations available from the Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array (ALMA) calls for analysis methods making the best of them. Reconstructing in space the morphology and kinematics of radio sources is an underdetermined problem that requires imposing additional constraints for its solution. The hypothesis of rotational invariance, which is a good approximation to, or at least a good reference for the description of the gas envelopes of many evolved stars and protostars, is particularly efficient in this role. In the first part of the article, a systematic use of simulated observations allows us for identifying the main problems and for constructing quantities aimed at solving them. In particular the evaluation of the orientation of the star axis in space and the differentiation between expansion along the star axis and rotation about it are given special attention. The use of polar rather than Cartesian sky coordinates to display the results of the analysis is shown to often better match the morphology and kinematics of actual stars. The radial dependence of the gas density and temperature and the possible presence of velocity gradients are briefly considered. In the second part, these results are applied to a few stars taken as examples with the aim of evaluating their usefulness when applied to concrete cases. A third part takes stock of what precedes and formulates some guidelines for modelling the radio emission of axisymmetric radio sources, limited however to the mathematics and geometry of the problem, physics considerations being generally ignored.

  9. The Kinematic and Spectral Ages of the Compact Radio Source CTD 93

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, H; Asada, K; Kameno, S; Doi, A; Nagai, Hiroshi; Inoue, Makoto; Asada, Keiichi; Kameno, Seiji; Doi, Akihiro

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinematic and spectral ages of the Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) source CTD~93. Measurements of the hot spot separation over 8.5 yr show evidence of an increase. The separation rate along the source axis is 0.34$\\pm0.11c$ (H$_{0}$=72 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$), which results in a kinematic age of 2200$\\pm$700 yr. Assuming that two hot spots are moving apart at equal speeds, we derive an advance speed of 0.17$\\pm0.06c$. The radio lobe spectra show a high frequency steepening, as expected if energetic electrons lose energy by synchrotron radiation. The spectral break decreases with the distance from the hot spot in the northern component of CTD~93. This tendency is expected from the basic scenario of radio lobe evolution involving particle acceleration at the hot spots, with the radio lobes populated by high energy electrons which have leaked from the hot spots. Although a core-jet morphology for CTD~93 has previously been proposed, these results indicate that the morphology is similar ...

  10. Precision astrometry of pulsars and other compact radio sources in the globular cluster M15

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsten, Franz; Freire, Paulo; Kramer, Michael; Rottmann, Helge; Campbell, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    The globular cluster (GC) M15 (NGC 7078) is host to at least eight pulsars and two low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) one of which is also visible in the radio regime. Here we present the results of a multi-epoch global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) campaign aiming at i) measuring the proper motion of the known compact radio sources, ii) finding and classifying thus far undetected compact radio sources in the GC, and iii) detecting a signature of the putative intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) proposed to reside at the core of M15. We measure the sky motion in right ascension ($\\mu_{\\alpha}$) and declination ($\\mu_{\\delta}$) of the pulsars M15A and M15C and of the LMXB AC211 to be $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{M15A}}=(-0.54\\pm0.14,\\,-4.33\\pm0.25)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{M15C}}=(-0.75\\pm0.09,\\,-3.52\\pm0.13)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, and $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{AC211}}=(-0.46\\pm0.08,\\,-4.31\\pm0.20)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Based on these measur...

  11. New 20-CM Radio-Continuum Study of The Small Magellanic Cloud: Part II - Point Sources Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, G F; Crawford, E J; Tothill, N F H; Drasković, A Y De Horta D; Galvin, T J; Collier, J D; Payne, J L

    2011-01-01

    We present a new catalogue of point radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This catalogue also contains point sources previously not found in 2300 MHz (\\lambda=13 cm) with sources found at 1400 MHz (\\lambda=20 cm) and 843 MHz (\\lambda=36 cm). We found 1576 point sources at 20 cm image that is created from new high sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC from Paper I. Some 46 new point sources have been detected at 13 cm as an addition the Filipovi\\'c et al. (2002) catalogue. We also created a 36 cm catalogue to which we listed 1692 point radio-continuum sources. Follow up studies on these sources nature will be presented in Paper III of this series.

  12. Swift observations of unidentified radio sources in the revised Third Cambridge Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Liuzzo, E.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the Third Cambridge Catalogue (3CR) to increase the multifrequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) the field of view of 21 bright NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT filters at the position of the NVSS objects, confirming the scenario that all of them are heavily obscured. With this in mind, a spectroscopic campaign, preferably in the infrared band, will be necessary to establish the nature of the sources that we have finally identified.

  13. A Visualization Software for the Radio Sky and Radio-Source Distribution%射电天空与观测源分布可视化软件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻业钊; 韩金林

    2014-01-01

    Directions of radio sources and the Galactic radio background map need to be known before or during practical radio-astronomy observing runs .We have developed a simple visualization software to display the radio sky and the distribution of radio sources .The visualization software , which should be helpful to observers , is developed using the C language and the PGPLOT subroutine library for graphic utilities .It can be run under a Linux environment .This software can be used to display the radio sky at any user-set time;particularly , it can display the real-time radio sky .It allows users to add or remove observational sites , to select desired data of the Galactic radio background , and to modify object entries in radio-source lists for display .This software has rather good expandability .The software together with its source codes will be made freely available to all astronomical institutes and amateur astronomers in China .%射电天文观测需要事先对射电源分布及天空背景有清晰的了解。目前国内射电天文台站缺乏射电天空与观测源分布可视化软件来对射电天空背景和观测源进行显示。开发一款简洁、移植性强的可视化软件,方便观测者直观地了解射电天空,帮助他们制定合理的观测计划。该软件使用C语言及PGPLOT子函数库编写,在Linux系统下运行,实现了星空的实时查询和按时查询,并支持用户更改观测台站、天空背景和射电源表等。该软件具有很好的扩展能力,将面向国内各天文台站及天文爱好者开源发布。

  14. Folded Fields as the Source of Extreme Radio-Wave Scattering in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Goldreich, P; Goldreich, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A strong case has been made that radio waves from sources within about half a degree of the Galactic Center undergo extreme diffractive scattering. However, problems arise when standard (``Kolmogorov'') models of electron density fluctuations are employed to interpret the observations of scattering in conjunction with those of free-free radio emission. Specifically, the outer scale of a Kolmogorov spectrum of electron density fluctuations is constrained to be so small that it is difficult to identify an appropriate astronomical setting. Moreover, an unacceptably high turbulent heating rate results if the outer scale of the velocity field coincides with that of the density fluctuations. We propose an alternative model based on folded magnetic field structures that have been reported in numerical simulations of small-scale dynamos. Nearly isothermal density variations across thin current sheets suffice to account for the scattering. There is no problem of excess turbulent heating because the outer scale for the...

  15. Long-term Periodicity Analysis of Polarization Variation for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuhai Yuan

    2011-03-01

    We use the database of University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at three radio bands (4.8, 8 and 14.5 GHz) to analyse the long-term polarization variation in search of the possible periodicity. Using the power spectral analysis method (PSA), the Jurkevich method and the discrete correlation function (DCF) method, we find that there are 16 sources lying in periodicity. The results show the astrophysically meaningful periodicity covering 2.1 years to 16.2 years at 4.8 GHz, 2.8 years to 16.3 years at 8 GHz, and 1.8 years to 16.6 years at 14.5 GHz.

  16. Tomography of seismo-radio wave source regions for predicting imminent earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kozo

    1989-10-01

    To detect a seismo-electromagnetic effect in a noisy land area or a deep-sea area, two methods are proposed. In the land area, a steel casing pipe inserted in a deep borehole has been used as the linear element of a monopole antenna. This method is shown to be very effective in rejecting atmospherics. In the deep-sea area, man-made noise and atmospherics can be attenuated by using insulated cables extended along the seabed as a dipole antenna or a loop antenna. Taking advantage of the seismo-radio wave propagating directly through the Earth's crust, a tomography is proposed to describe a three-dimensional intensity distribution of seismo-radio wave sources by receiving the wave at four or more points simultaneously, to predict precisely an earthquake of magnitude seven or more.

  17. Unravelling lifecycles & physics of radio-loud AGN in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Kapińska, Anna D; Jackson, Carole A; An, Tao; Baan, Willem A; Jarvis, Matt J

    2014-01-01

    Radio-loud AGN (>10^{22} W/Hz at 1.4 GHz) will be the dominant bright source population detected with the SKA. The high resolution that the SKA will provide even in wide-area surveys will mean that, for the first time sensitive, multi-frequency total intensity and polarisation imaging of large samples of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) will become available. The unprecedented sensitivity of the SKA coupled with its wide field of view capabilities will allow identification of objects of the same morphological type (i.e. the entire FR I, low- and high-luminosity FR II, disturbed morphology as well as weak radio-emitting AGN populations) up to high redshifts (z~4 and beyond), and at the same stage of their lives, from the youngest CSS/GPS sources to giant and fading (dying) sources, through to those with restarted activity radio galaxies and quasars. Critically, the wide frequency coverage of the SKA will permit analysis of same-epoch rest-frame radio properties, and the sensitivity and resolution will a...

  18. A method of mapping compact structure in radio sources using VLBI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    A two-part technique is described for determining the angular structure of the compact components of radio sources from VLBI observations. With this technique, the source structure is first approximated, using both amplitudes and closure phases, by a model consisting of circularly symmetric Gaussian components located on a grid of positions on the sky. The second part begins by employing this model to predict the visibility phase corresponding to each observed visibility amplitude; these estimated visibility phases are then adjusted to agree with the observed closure phases. The resulting estimates of the visibility phases and the observed visibility amplitudes are then combined in a direct Fourier transform to produce a 'dirty' source map that is deconvolved via the CLEAN procedure on the basis of the point-source response. Some examples based on data generated from test models are provided.

  19. Subtraction of point sources from interferometric radio images through an algebraic forward modeling scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, G; Ord, S M; Greenhill, L J; Pindor, B; Wayth, R B; Wyithe, J S B

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for subtracting point sources from interferometric radio images via forward modeling of the instrument response and involving an algebraic nonlinear minimization. The method is applied to simulated maps of the Murchison Wide-field Array but is generally useful in cases where only image data are available. After source subtraction, the residual maps have no statistical difference to the expected thermal noise distribution at all angular scales, indicating high effectiveness in the subtraction. Simulations indicate that the errors in recovering the source parameters decrease with increasing signal-to-noise ratio, which is consistent with the theoretical measurement errors. In applying the technique to simulated snapshot observations with the Murchison Wide-field Array, we found that all 101 sources present in the simulation were recovered with an average position error of 10 arcsec and an average flux density error of 0.15%. This led to a dynamic range increase of approximately 3 orders of m...

  20. The Strongest 100 Point Radio Sources in the LMC at 1.4 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, J L; Filipovic, M D; Crawford, E J; De Horta, A Y

    2009-01-01

    We present the 100 strongest 1.4 GHz point sources from a new mosaic image in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations making up the mosaic were made over a ten year period and were combined with Parkes single dish data at 1.4 GHz to complete the image for short spacing. An initial list of co-identifications within 10" at 0.843, 4.8 and 8.6 GHz consisted of 2682 sources. Elimination of extended objects and artifact noise allowed the creation of a refined list containing 1988 point sources. Most of these are presumed to be background objects seen through the LMC; a small portion may represent compact H II regions, young SNRs and radio planetary nebulae. We find an average spectral index of -0.53 and present a 1.4 GHz image showing source location in the direction of the LMC.

  1. 3D-MHD simulations of the evolution of magnetic fields in FR II radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martin; Alexander, Paul

    2010-01-01

    3D-MHD numerical simulations of bipolar, hypersonic, weakly magnetized jets and synthetic synchrotron observations are presented to study the structure and evolution of magnetic fields in FR II radio sources. The magnetic field setup in the jet is initially random. The power of the jets as well as the observational viewing angle are investigated. We find that synthetic polarization maps agree with observations and show that magnetic fields inside the sources are shaped by the jets' backflow. Polarimetry statistics correlates with time, the viewing angle and the jet-to-ambient density contrast. The magnetic structure inside thin elongated sources is more uniform than for ones with fatter cocoons. Jets increase the magnetic energy in cocoons, in proportion to the jet velocity. Both, filaments in synthetic emission maps and 3D magnetic power spectra suggest that turbulence develops in evolved sources.

  2. An innovative blazar classification based on radio jet kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervet, O.; Boisson, C.; Sol, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Blazars are usually classified following their synchrotron peak frequency (νF(ν) scale) as high, intermediate, low frequency peaked BL Lacs (HBLs, IBLs, LBLs), and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), or, according to their radio morphology at large scale, FR I or FR II. However, the diversity of blazars is such that these classes seem insufficient to chart the specific properties of each source. Aims: We propose to classify a wide sample of blazars following the kinematic features of their radio jets seen in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Methods: For this purpose we use public data from the MOJAVE collaboration in which we select a sample of blazars with known redshift and sufficient monitoring to constrain apparent velocities. We selected 161 blazars from a sample of 200 sources. We identify three distinct classes of VLBI jets depending on radio knot kinematics: class I with quasi-stationary knots, class II with knots in relativistic motion from the radio core, and class I/II, intermediate, showing quasi-stationary knots at the jet base and relativistic motions downstream. Results: A notable result is the good overlap of this kinematic classification with the usual spectral classification; class I corresponds to HBLs, class II to FSRQs, and class I/II to IBLs/LBLs. We deepen this study by characterizing the physical parameters of jets from VLBI radio data. Hence we focus on the singular case of the class I/II by the study of the blazar BL Lac itself. Finally we show how the interpretation that radio knots are recollimation shocks is fully appropriate to describe the characteristics of these three classes.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources II (Petrov, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, L.

    2014-06-01

    The first VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) observing campaign in 2007 resulted in the detection of 398 targets with the European VLBI Network (EVN; Bourda et al., 2010, cat. J/A+A/520/A113). During the second observing campaign, a subset of 105 sources detected in the previous campaign was observed (Bourda et al., 2011, cat. J/A+A/526/A102). Their positions were derived by Petrov (2011, cat. J/AJ/142/105) and formed the OBRS-1 (Optically Bright extragalactic Radio Sources) catalog. The remaining sources were observed in the third campaign, called OBRS-2. During the OBRS-2 campaign, there were three observing sessions with 10 VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) stations and 5-6 EVN stations from this list: EFLSBERG, MEDICINA, ONSALA60, YEBES40M, DSS63, HARTRAO, and NOTO. Observations were made on 2010 Mar 23 (session ID gc034a), on 2011 Nov 8 (gc034bcd), and on 2011 Mar 15 (gc034ef). The OBRS-2 catalog presents precise positions of the 295 extragalactic radio sources as well as median correlated flux densities at 8.4 and 2.2GHz at baseline lengths shorter than 900km and at baseline lengths longer than 5000km. (1 data file).

  4. A Multiple System of Radio Sources at the Core of the L723 Multipolar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Rodriguez, Luis F; Torrelles, Jose M; Osorio, Mayra; Girart, Jose M

    2007-01-01

    We present high angular resolution Very Large Array multi-epoch continuum observations at 3.6 cm and 7 mm towards the core of the L723 multipolar outflow revealing a multiple system of four radio sources suspected to be YSOs in a region of only ~4 arcsecs (1200 AU) in extent. The 3.6 cm observations show that the previously detected source VLA 2 contains a close (separation ~0.29 arcsecs or ~90 AU) radio binary, with components (A and B) along a position angle of ~150 degrees. The northern component (VLA 2A) of this binary system is also detected in the 7 mm observations, with a positive spectral index between 3.6 cm and 7 mm. In addition, the source VLA 2A is associated with extended emission along a position angle of ~115 degrees, that we interpret as outflowing shock-ionized gas that is exciting a system of HH objects with the same position angle. A third, weak 3.6 cm source, VLA 2C, that is detected also at 7 mm, is located ~0.7 arcsecs northeast of VLA 2A, and is possibly associated with the water maser ...

  5. The design of high power, external antennas for radio frequency multicusp ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Roseberry, R. T.; Kang, Y.; Keller, R.

    2004-05-01

    The ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to deliver H- beam pulses of 45 mA to the SNS accelerator, with a pulse length of 1 ms and a repetition rate of 60 Hz. In order to achieve this performance the source must operate with both high peak rf power, ˜45 kW, and high average rf power, ˜3 kW, over an operational run period of 3 weeks. The most critical source component in this respect is the plasma-immersed, porcelain coated rf antenna which can be susceptible to damage during high power operation. The DESY group has developed an external antenna configuration utilizing an Al2O3 plasma chamber which has demonstrated a very long operational period exceeding 25 000 h. Their source operates with peak rf powers comparable to the SNS source but with greatly reduced average rf powers, ˜50 W. In order to explore the applicability of this external antenna concept to high average power ion sources like the SNS source, we have performed thermal, mechanical, and electromagnetic analyses of the Al2O3 plasma chamber. This article discusses the final design which has resulted from these studies as well as estimates of the power limitations of such devices.

  6. Swift observations of unidentified radio sources in the revised Third Cambridge Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, A; Cusumano, G; La Parola, V; Harris, D E; Paggi, A; Liuzzo, E; Tremblay, G R; Baum, S A; O'Dea, C P

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the 3CR cat- alogue to increase the multi-frequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the UVOT and the XRT telescopes the field of view of 21 bright NVSS sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a WISE infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT ...

  7. A study of the properties of twin radio arms of FR-II extragalactic radio sources within z≤1-II (dynamical properties)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Ubachukwu, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    We carried out a comparative study on the dynamical properties of the Longer Arm (LA) and the Shorter Arm (SA) of different classes of FR-II radio sources (Broad Line Radio Galaxies (BLRG), Quasars (Q), Narrow Line Radio Galaxies (NLRG) and Low Excitation Radio Galaxies (LERG)) based on self-similar model of time evolution of the radio lobes and hotspot properties of radio sources, using the power-law expression for the dependence of hotspot size (D_{hs}), the advance velocity of the hotspot (v_{hs}) and hotspot luminosity (PL) on the core-lobe length (DL). Using observational values of D_{hs}, PL and DL we constrained the exponents of these power-law relations for the LA and SA. We also estimated the hotspot pressure, (p_{hs}), cocoon pressure within the lobe (p_{cc}), the ratio of the hotspot pressure to the cocoon pressure (p_{hc}), the cocoon volume (Vcc), the energy density within the cocoon (u_{cc}), the equipartition magnetic field (B_{em}) in the lobe, the particle number density at the hotspot (n_{hs}), the external density profile (ρ _{ext}) and the kinetic jet power (Q_{jet}) for the LA and the SA. Linear regression analyses indicate a tight correlation between the D_{hs} and the DL of LA for all classes of radio sources with r˜0.5-0.8. Similar result was obtained for SA except for that of Q with r˜ 0.2. For P_{hs} and DL correlation, the result indicates a mild negative correlation that seems stronger for the SA (r˜-0.3 to -0.6) than LA (r˜-0.2 to -0.4) for all the different classes of radio sources. Comparing the values of ρ_{ext}, B_{em}, uB, p_{hs}, p_{cc}, Vcc, and u_{cc} between SA side and LA side, indicate that the SA values of the parameters are higher than those of LA; while (p_{hs}) showed higher values in LA than SA for all the different classes of radio sources. Generally, the hotspot has a larger volume on the LA side than on the SA side except for NLRG, while the hotspot of the SA side contains more particle per unit volume than the

  8. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Y; Shoji, T

    2012-02-01

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1∕5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A∕cm(2) level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  9. Scheduling and calibration strategy for continuous radio monitoring of 1700 sources every three days

    CERN Document Server

    Max-Moerbeck, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40 meter telescope is currently monitoring a sample of about 1700 blazars every three days at 15 GHz, with the main scientific goal of determining the relation between the variability of blazars at radio and gamma-rays as observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The time domain relation between radio and gamma-ray emission, in particular its correlation and time lag, can help us determine the location of the high-energy emission site in blazars, a current open question in blazar research. To achieve this goal, continuous observation of a large sample of blazars in a time scale of less than a week is indispensable. Since we only look at bright targets, the time available for target observations is mostly limited by source observability, calibration requirements and slewing of the telescope. Here I describe the implementation of a practical solution to this scheduling, calibration, and slewing time minimization problem. This solution combines ideas from optimization,...

  10. Diagnostics on the source properties of type II radio burst with spectral bumps

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, S W; Kong, X L; Li, G; Song, H Q; Feng, X S; Guo, F

    2013-01-01

    In recent studies (Feng et al., 2012; Kong et al., 2012), we proposed that source properties of type II radio bursts can be inferred through a causal relationship between the special shape of the type II dynamic spectrum (e.g., bump or break) and simultaneous extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white light imaging observations (e.g., CME-shock crossing streamer structures). As a further extension of these studies, in this paper we examine the CME event dated on December 31 2007 associated with a multiple type II radio burst. We identify the presence of two spectral bump features on the observed dynamic spectrum. By combining observational analyses of the radio spectral observations and the EUV-white light imaging data, we conclude that the two spectral bumps are resulted from CME-shock propagating across dense streamers on the southern and northern sides of the CME, respectively. It is inferred that the corresponding two type II emissions originate separately from the two CME-shock flanks where the shock geometries are...

  11. Radio Astronomy Demonstrator: Assessment of the Appropriate Sites through a GIS Open Source Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Duarte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of Portuguese radio astronomical capacitation towards participation in the Square Kilometer Array (SKA project, a site was selected for radio astronomical testing purposes and the development of a radio astronomical infrastructure. The site is within Herdade da Contenda (HC, a large national forest perimeter, located in Alentejo (Portugal. In order to minimize the impacts in the ecosystem and landscape, an application based on the Geographic Information System (GIS open source environment was created, the HC Environmental Integrated Management System. This application combines several functionalities and menus with different characterization methods allowing the creation of multiple maps regarding the HC characteristics, such as Digital Elevation Model (DEM, Land Use Land Cover (LULC, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, groundwater vulnerability, erosion risk, flood risk and forest fire risk. Other geographical information can be added if necessary (human heritage visualization and fauna and flora. A decision making support tool was also developed. It incorporates an algorithm running through a series of assigned weights and eliminatory factors to find the locations best suited for the infrastructure with minimal impact to the local ecosystem. In order to test the application and the decision making tool, several maps were used as input in order to decide which sites are more adequate. The application developed can be adopted for other protected or natural areas.

  12. Another shock for the Bullet cluster, and the source of seed electrons for radio relics

    CERN Document Server

    Shimwell, Timothy W; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B M; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2.3+/-0.1 x 10^25 W Hz^-1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster -- a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re-)acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming...

  13. Long term variability of radio sources in the frequencies of 22 GHz and 44 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botti, L.C.L.; Abraham, Z.

    1987-05-01

    The radio sources 3C273, OV236, Cen A and Sgr A were observed during a period of six years (1980-1986), in the frequencies of 22 GHz and 44 GHz, with the Itapetinga radiotelescope (Brazil). The objective of this work was the detection of variability in the intensity and in the shape of the spectra of the sources. All of them presented some variability, specially the quasar 3C273, which after a period of intense activity (1981-1985), returned to its quiescent level at the end of 1985. The increase of the flux density in these frequencies is associated to the ejection of new components by the central source in the quasar, as observed in the maps obtained by VLBI techniques. 17 references, 4 figures.

  14. Counting quasar--radio source pairs to derive the millijansky radio luminosity function and clustering strength to z=3.5

    CERN Document Server

    Fine, S; Johnston, R; Jarvis, M J; Mauch, T

    2015-01-01

    We apply a cross-correlation technique to infer the $S>3$mJy radio luminosity function (RLF) from the NRAO VLA sky survey (NVSS) to $z\\sim3.5$. We measure $\\Sigma$ the over density of radio sources around spectroscopically confirmed quasars. $\\Sigma$ is related to the space density of radio sources at the distance of the quasars and the clustering strength between the two samples, hence knowledge of one constrains the other. Under simple assumptions we find $\\Phi\\propto (1+z)^{3.7\\pm0.7}$ out to $z\\sim2$. Above this redshift the evolution slows and we constrain the evolution exponent to $<1.01$ ($2\\sigma$). This behaviour is almost identical to that found by previous authors for the bright end of the RLF potentially indicating that we are looking at the same population. This suggests that the NVSS is dominated by a single population; most likely radio sources associated with high-excitation cold-mode accretion. Inversely, by adopting a previously modelled RLF we can constrain the clustering of high-redshif...

  15. Probing Statistical Isotropy of Cosmological Radio Sources using Square Kilometre Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shamik Ghosh; Pankaj Jain; Gopal Kashyap; Rahul Kothari; Sharvari Nadkarni-Ghosh; Prabhakar Tiwari

    2016-12-01

    There currently exist many observations which are not consistent with the cosmological principle. We review these observations with a particular emphasis on those relevant for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). In particular, several different data sets indicate a preferred direction pointing approximately towards the Virgo cluster. We also observe a hemispherical anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) temperature fluctuations. Although these inconsistencies may be attributed to systematic effects, there remains the possibility that they indicate new physics and various theories have been proposed to explain them. One possibility, which we discuss in this review, is the generation of perturbation modes during the early pre-inflationary epoch, when the Universe may not obey the cosmological principle. Better measurements will provide better constraints on these theories. In particular, we propose measurement of the dipole in number counts, sky brightness, polarized flux and polarization orientations of radio sources. We also suggest test of alignment of linear polarizations of sources as a function of their relative separation. Finally we propose measurement of hemispherical anisotropy or equivalently dipole modulation in radio sources.

  16. The Lockman Hole project: LOFAR observations and spectral index properties of low-frequency radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mahony, E K; Prandoni, I; van Bemmel, I M; Shimwell, T W; Brienza, M; Best, P N; Brüggen, M; Rivera, G Calistro; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Harwood, J J; Heald, G; Jarvis, M J; Mandal, S; Miley, G K; Retana-Montenegro, E; Röttgering, H J A; Sabater, J; Tasse, C; van Velzen, S; van Weeren, R J; Williams, W L; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    The Lockman Hole is a well-studied extragalactic field with extensive multi-band ancillary data covering a wide range in frequency, essential for characterising the physical and evolutionary properties of the various source populations detected in deep radio fields (mainly star-forming galaxies and AGNs). In this paper we present new 150-MHz observations carried out with the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), allowing us to explore a new spectral window for the faint radio source population. This 150-MHz image covers an area of 34.7 square degrees with a resolution of 18.6$\\times$14.7 arcsec and reaches an rms of 160 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at the centre of the field. As expected for a low-frequency selected sample, the vast majority of sources exhibit steep spectra, with a median spectral index of $\\alpha_{150}^{1400}=-0.78\\pm0.015$. The median spectral index becomes slightly flatter (increasing from $\\alpha_{150}^{1400}=-0.84$ to $\\alpha_{150}^{1400}=-0.75$) with decreasing flux density down to $S_{150} \\sim$10 mJy b...

  17. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Sarkissian, J; Cromartie, H T; Johnston, S; Reynolds, J E; Wolff, M T; Freire, P C C; Bhattacharyya, B; Ferrara, E C; Keith, M; Michelson, P F; Parkinson, P M Saz; Wood, K S

    2015-01-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recentl...

  18. OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES), (* PLANETS , STARS, VENUS( PLANET ), MARS( PLANET ), MERCURY ( PLANET ), PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, GALAXIES, ASTROPHYSICS, TEMPERATURE, MEASUREMENT, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, ASTRONOMY, RADIO ASTRONOMY.

  19. Electrical and thermal analyses for the radio-frequency circuit of ITER NBI ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamengo, A. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: andrea.zamengo@igi.cnr.it; Recchia, M. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Padua, Via Gradenigo 6/A, 35131 Padova (Italy); Kraus, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bigi, M. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Martens, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Toigo, V. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    This paper covers specific electrical and thermal aspects of the radio-frequency (RF) circuit which supplies the ion source of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Neutral Beam Injector (NBI). Firstly, a matching circuit for the RF Antennas is presented and a possible solution for the matching components discussed, in relation to the anticipated equivalent circuit parameters of the RF driven plasma. Secondly, the thermal behaviour of the RF transmission line is analyzed, utilising finite element tools, to evaluate the RF line overtemperature under the heaviest foreseen operating conditions.

  20. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance Parameter for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. J. Nie; J. H. Yang

    2014-09-01

    Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investigated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, but it is not correlated with the extended flux density. When the core dominance parameter is higher than unity, it is not correlated with the core flux density, but it is linearly correlated with the extended flux density. Therefore, there are different results from different samples. The results can be explained using a relativistic beaming model.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The population of compact radio sources in ONC (Forbrich+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-08-01

    The observations were carried out with the Karl G. Jansky VLA of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory on 2012 September 30, October 2-5 under project code SD630. Data were taken using the VLA's C-band (4-8GHz) receivers in full polarization mode, with two 1GHz basebands centered at 4.736 and 7.336GHz to provide a good baseline for source spectral index determination. Apart from the first epoch, the field was simultaneously observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Mostly of interest for variability information, these data will be presented as part of a follow-up paper. (1 data file).

  2. A Decade of Developing Radio-Astronomy Instrumentation using CASPER Open-Source Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hickish, Jack; Ali, Zaki; Buch, Kaushal D; Chaudhari, Sandeep C; Chen, Hong; Dexter, Matthew; Domagalski, Rachel Simone; Ford, John; Foster, Griffin; George, David; Greenberg, Joe; Greenhill, Lincoln; Isaacson, Adam; Jiang, Homin; Jones, Glenn; Kapp, Francois; Kriel, Henno; Lacasse, Rich; Lutomirski, Andrew; MacMahon, David; Manley, Jason; Martens, Andrew; McCullough, Randy; Muley, Mekhala V; New, Wesley; Parsons, Aaron; Price, Daniel C; Primiani, Rurik A; Ray, Jason; Siemion, Andrew; Van Tonder, Verees'e; Vertatschitsch, Laura; Wagner, Mark; Weintroub, Jonathan; Werthimer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) has been working for a decade to reduce the time and cost of designing, building and deploying new digital radio-astronomy instruments. Today, CASPER open-source technology powers over 45 scientific instruments worldwide, and is used by scientists and engineers at dozens of academic institutions. In this paper we catalog the current offerings of the CASPER collaboration, and instruments past and present built by CASPER users and developers. We describe the ongoing state of software development, as CASPER looks to support a broader range of programming environments and hardware and ensure compatibility with the latest vendor tools.

  3. Source Regions of the Type II Radio Burst Observed During a CME-CME Interaction on 2013 May 22

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, P Mäkelä N; Akiyama, S; Krupar, V

    2016-01-01

    We report on our study of radio source regions during the type II radio burst on 2013 May 22 based on direction finding (DF) analysis of the Wind/WAVES and STEREO/WAVES (SWAVES) radio observations at decameter-hectometric (DH) wavelengths. The type II emission showed an enhancement that coincided with interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in sequence along closely spaced trajectories. The triangulation of the SWAVES source directions posited the ecliptic projections of the radio sources near the line connecting the Sun and the STEREO-A spacecraft. The WAVES and SWAVES source directions revealed shifts in the latitude of the radio source indicating that the spatial location of the dominant source of the type II emission varies during the CME-CME interaction. The WAVES source directions close to 1 MHz frequencies matched the location of the leading edge of the primary CME seen in the images of the LASCO/C3 coronagraph. This correspondence of spatial locations at both wavelengths confirms tha...

  4. A Search for Rapidly Spinning Pulsars and Fast Transients in Unidentified Radio Sources with the NRAO 43-Meter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Deborah; Langston, Glen; Gilpin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g. sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a differe...

  5. Towards large and powerful radio frequency driven negative ion sources for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, B.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.; Bonomo, F.; Fröschle, M.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.

    2017-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam system will be equipped with radio-frequency (RF) negative ion sources, based on the IPP Garching prototype source design. Up to 100 kW at 1 MHz is coupled to the RF driver, out of which the plasma expands into the main source chamber. Compared to arc driven sources, RF sources are maintenance free and without evaporation of tungsten. The modularity of the driver concept permits to supply large source volumes. The prototype source (one driver) demonstrated operation in hydrogen and deuterium up to one hour with ITER relevant parameters. The ELISE test facility is operating with a source of half the ITER size (four drivers) in order to validate the modular source concept and to gain early operational experience at ITER relevant dimensions. A large variety of diagnostics allows improving the understanding of the relevant physics and its link to the source performance. Most of the negative ions are produced on a caesiated surface by conversion of hydrogen atoms. Cs conditioning and distribution have been optimized in order to achieve high ion currents which are stable in time. A magnetic filter field is needed to reduce the electron temperature and co-extracted electron current. The influence of different field topologies and strengths on the source performance, plasma and beam properties is being investigated. The results achieved in short pulse operation are close to or even exceed the ITER requirements with respect to the extracted ion currents. However, the extracted negative ion current for long pulse operation (up to 1 h) is limited by the increase of the co-extracted electron current, especially in deuterium operation.

  6. AGN Feedback and Evolution of Radio Sources: Discovery of an X-ray Cluster Associated with z=1 Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Siemiginowska, A; La Massa, S; Burke, D; Aldcroft, T L; Bechtold, J; Elvis, M; Worrall, D M

    2005-01-01

    We report the first significant detection of an X-ray cluster associated with a powerful (L(bol) ~1e47 erg/sec) radio-loud quasar at high redshift (z=1.06). Diffuse X-ray emission is detected out to ~120 kpc from the CSS quasar 3C 186. A strong Fe-line emission at the z(rest)=1.06 confirms its thermal nature. We find that the CSS radio source is highly overpressured with respect to the thermal cluster medium by ~2-3 orders of magnitude. This provides direct observational evidence that the radio source is not thermally confined as posited in the ``frustrated'' scenario for CSS sources. Instead, the radio source may be young and at an early stage of its evolution. This source provides the first detection of the AGN in outburst in the center of a cooling flow cluster. Powerful radio sources are thought to be triggered by the cooling flows. The evidence for the AGN activity and intermittent outbursts comes from the X-ray morphology of low redshift clusters, which usually do not harbour quasars. 3C186 is a young a...

  7. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab

    2016-09-01

    We present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.

  8. On the comparison of energy sources: feasibility of radio frequency and ambient light harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, Alexander O; Lavrova, Olga; Coutsias, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    With growing interest in multi source energy harvesting including integrated microchips we propose a comparison of radio frequency (RF) and solar energy sources in a typical city. Harvesting devices for RF and solar energy will be competing for space of a compact micro or nano device as well as for orientation with respect to the energy source. This is why it is important to investigate importance of every source of energy and make a decision whether it will be worthwhile to include such harvesters. We considered theoretically possible irradiance by RF signal in different situations, typical for the modern urban environment and compared it with ambient solar energy sources available through the night, including moon light. Our estimations show that solar light energy dominates by far margin practically all the time, even during the night, if there is a full moon in the absence of clouds. At the same time, in the closed compartments or at the new moon RF harvesting can be beneficial as a source of "free" energ...

  9. Obscured flat spectrum radio active galactic nuclei as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, G.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; de Vries, K. D.; Gentile, G.; Tavares, J. León; Scholten, O.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vereecken, M.; Winchen, T.

    2016-11-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no significance. Therefore, in this article we consider a specific subclass of AGN for which an increased neutrino production is expected. This subclass contains AGN for which their high-energy jet is pointing toward Earth. Furthermore, we impose the condition that the jet is obscured by gas or dust surrounding the AGN. A method is presented to determine the total column density of the obscuring medium, which is probed by determining the relative x-ray attenuation with respect to the radio flux as obtained from the AGN spectrum. The total column density allows us to probe the interaction of the jet with the surrounding matter, which leads to additional neutrino production. Finally, starting from two different source catalogs, this method is applied to specify a sample of low redshift radio galaxies for which an increased neutrino production is expected.

  10. The Spiral Host Galaxy of the Double Radio Source 0313-192

    CERN Document Server

    Keel, W C; Owen, F N; Ledlow, M J; Keel, William C.; III, Raymond E. White; Owen, Frazer N.; Ledlow, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    We present new Hubble, Gemini-S, and Chandra observations of the radio galaxy 0313-192, which hosts a 350-kpc double source and jets, even though previous data have suggested that it is a spiral galaxy. We measure the bulge scale and luminosity, radial and vertical profiles of disk starlight, and consider the distributions of H II regions and absorbing dust. In each case, the HST data confirm its classification as an edge-on spiral galaxy, the only such system known to produce such an extended radio source of this kind. The Gemini near-IR images and Chandra spectral fit reveal a strongly obscured central AGN, seen through the entire ISM path length of the disk and showing X-ray evidence of additional absorption from warm or dense material close to the central object. We consider several possible mechanisms for producing such a rare combination of AGN and host properties, some combination of which may be at work. These include an unusually luminous bulge (suggesting a black hole of mass 0.5-0.9 billion solar m...

  11. Separation of Radio-Frequency Sources and Localization of Partial Discharges in Noisy Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Robles

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of partial discharges (PD can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD. Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO to minimize a distance function.

  12. Connection Between X-Ray Emission and Relativistic Jets in the Radio Galaxies 3C 111 and 3C 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Margo F.

    2005-01-01

    This work represents a part of a longterm study of the X-ray flux variability in radio galaxies and its relation to flux and structural changes in the associated radio jet. The work described here included: 1) continued study of the emission properties of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 120 known to exhibit a jet/disk connection from our past work; and 2) the commencement of monitoring of a second radio galaxy, the FR I1 object 3C 111 which was selected because of similar radio and X-ray properties to 3C 120, including the presence of Fe K a emission. The association between X-ray dips and new superluminal components, suggesting a picture in which the radio jet is fed by accretion events near the black hole, was identified in 3C 120 using combined RXTE and radio flux monitoring data and bi-monthly to monthly imaging data from the VLBA at 43 GHz. Such data were also obtained for both targets during the period described here. Specific goals were to more broadly investigate the X-ray dip/superluminal connection in 3C 120, thereby determining the epochs of X-ray minima and superluminal ejections more accurately (and hence more precisely determining the distance between the accretion disk and the core of the radio jet), and to determine whether a similar pattern is present in the data for a second radio galaxy. In 3C 111 a different time scale (longer time delays between X-ray dips and superluminal ejections) was expected due to the higher black hole mass implied by its higher radio luminosity: no black hole mass is published for this object but one can be determined from a PDS analysis of the RXTE data. The addition of the second source to the study would identify whether a similar connection was present in other sources and, if found, would provide important information on how time scale (and hence size scale) of accretion disk/jet systems depends on black hole mass. The grant included funding for the reduction and analysis of data obtained during the time period of Rossi

  13. The Statistics of Radio Astronomical Polarimetry: Bright Sources and High Time Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Van Straten, W

    2008-01-01

    A four-dimensional statistical description of electromagnetic radiation is developed and applied to the analysis of radio pulsar polarization. The new formalism provides an elementary statistical explanation of the modal broadening phenomenon in single pulse observations. It is also used to argue that the degree of polarization of giant pulses has been poorly defined in past studies. Single and giant pulse polarimetry typically involves sources with large flux densities and observations with high time resolution, factors that necessitate consideration of source-intrinsic noise and small-number statistics. Self noise is shown to fully explain the excess polarization dispersion previously noted in single pulse observations of bright pulsars, obviating the need for additional randomly polarized radiation. Rather, these observations are more simply interpreted as an incoherent sum of covariant, orthogonal, partially polarized modes. Based on this premise, the four-dimensional covariance matrix of the Stokes param...

  14. Variable Correlation Digital Noise Source on FPGA — A Versatile Tool for Debugging Radio Telescope Backends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Gupta, Yashwant; Ajith Kumar, B.

    Contemporary wideband radio telescope backends are generally developed on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) or hybrid (FPGA+GPU) platforms. One of the challenges faced while developing such instruments is the functional verification of the signal processing backend at various stages of development. In the case of an interferometer or pulsar backend, the typical requirement is for one independent noise source per input, with provision for a common, correlated signal component across all the inputs, with controllable level of correlation. This paper describes the design of a FPGA-based variable correlation Digital Noise Source (DNS), and its applications to built-in testing and debugging of correlators and beamformers. This DNS uses the Central Limit Theorem-based approach for generation of Gaussian noise, and the architecture is optimized for resource requirements and ease of integration with existing signal processing blocks on FPGA.

  15. Theoretical Models for Producing Circularly Polarized Radiation in Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, J F C; Wardle, John F. C.; Homan, Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the production of circular polarization in compact radio sources both by the intrinsic mechanism and by Faraday conversion. We pay particular attention to the magnetic field structure, considering partially ordered fiel ds and Laing sheets, and distinguishing between uniform and unidirectional fields. (The latter can be constrained b y flux conservation arguments.) In most cases, Faraday conversion is the more important mechanism. Conversion opera tes on Stokes U, which can be generated by internal Faraday rotation, or by magnetic field fluctuations, which can therefore produce circular polarization even in a pure pair plasma. We also show that the spectrum of circular pola rization in an inhomogeneous jet can be quite different from that in a uniform source, being flat or even inverted.

  16. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  17. On the population of remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies and implications for radio source dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Morganti, R.; Brienza, M.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this work is two-fold: (1) to quantify the occurrence of ultrasteep spectrum remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxies in a 74 MHz flux-limited sample, and (2) perform Monte Carlo simulations of the population of active and remnant FRII radio galaxies to confront models of remnant lobe evolution, and to provide guidance for further investigation of remnant radio galaxies. We find that fewer than 2 per cent of FRII radio galaxies with S74 MHz > 1.5 Jy are candidate ultrasteep spectrum remnants, where we define ultrasteep spectrum as α _74 MHz^1400 MHz > 1.2. Our Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that models involving Sedov-like expansion in the remnant phase, resulting in rapid adiabatic energy losses, are consistent with this upper limit, and predict the existence of nearly twice as many remnants with normal (not ultrasteep) spectra in the observed frequency range as there are ultrasteep spectrum remnants. This model also predicts an ultrasteep remnant fraction approaching 10 per cent at redshifts z population.

  18. A 350-MHz GBT Survey of 50 Faint Fermi Gamma-ray Sources for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, Jason W T; McLaughlin, Maura A; Ray, Paul S; Bangale, Priyadarshini; Ransom, Scott M; Kerr, Matthew; Camilo, Fernando; DeCesar, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.

  19. Multi-Source Self-Calibration: Unveiling the microJy Population of Compact Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Radcliffe, Jack F; Beswick, Rob J; Muxlow, Tom W B; Barthel, Peter; Deller, Adam T; Middelberg, Enno

    2016-01-01

    Context. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data are extremely sensitive to the phase stability of the VLBI array. This is especially important when we reach {\\mu}Jy r.m.s. sensitivities. Calibration using standard phase referencing techniques is often used to improve the phase stability of VLBI data but the results are often not optimal. This is evident in blank fields that do not have in-beam calibrators. Aims. We present a calibration algorithm termed Multi-Source Self-Calibration (MSSC) which can be used after standard phase referencing on wide-field VLBI observations. This is tested on a 1.6 GHz wide-field VLBI data set of the Hubble Deep Field-North and the Hubble Flanking Fields. Methods. MSSC uses multiple target sources detected in the field via standard phase referencing techniques and modifies the visibili- ties so that each data set approximates to a point source. These are combined to increase the signal to noise and permit self-calibration. In principle, this should allow residual phase ch...

  20. Multi-frequency polarimetry of a complete sample of PACO radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Galluzzi, V; Bonaldi, A; Casasola, V; Gregorini, L; Trombetti, T; Burigana, C; De Zotti, G; Ricci, R; Stevens, J; Ekers, R D; Bonavera, L; Alighieri, S di Serego; Liuzzo, E; Lopez-Caniego, M; Mignano, A; Paladino, R; Toffolatti, L; Tucci, M

    2016-01-01

    We present high sensitivity polarimetric observations in 6 bands covering the 5.5-38 GHz range of a complete sample of 53 compact extragalactic radio sources brighter than 200 mJy at 20 GHz. The observations, carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), achieved a 91% detection rate (at 5 sigma). Within this frequency range the spectra of about 95% of sources are well fitted by double power laws, both in total intensity and in polarisation, but the spectral shapes are generally different in the two cases. Most sources were classified as either steep- or peaked-spectrum but less than 50% have the same classification in total and in polarised intensity. No significant trends of the polarisation degree with flux density or with frequency were found. The mean variability index in total intensity of steep-spectrum sources increases with frequency for a 4-5 year lag, while no significant trend shows up for the other sources and for the 8 year lag. In polarisation, the variability index, that could...

  1. Magnetic Neutral Line-Associated Radio Sources and Evolution of the Active Region NOAA 7321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uralov, A. M.; Nakajima, H.; Zandanov, V. G.; Grechnev, V. V.

    1999-12-01

    We report evolution of the active region NOAA~7321 in which radio sources associated with magnetic neutral lines (so-called Neutral Line Associated Source, NLS) were studied on the basis of data of Nobeyama Radioheliograph. We provide physical interpretation of the NLS in terms of topological magnetic reconnection model and discuss their relation to evolution of the active region. Two kinds of the NLS were observed at 17~GHz, i.e. rising and stationary sources. Their presence was associated with substantial expansion of the active region's magnetosphere and accompanied by gradual evolution of spine-like structures visible in soft X-rays before long-duration flares. We suggest that the rising 17~GHz source corresponded to a ``horizontal'' current sheet moving upward which was not bright in soft X-rays. Bright X-ray spine was a boundary of that current sheet. Formation of X-points are believed to be responsible for the presence of low-lying stationary sources arranged along the photospheric neutral line.

  2. Precision astrometry of pulsars and other compact radio sources in the globular cluster M15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Franz; Vlemmings, Wouter; Freire, Paulo; Kramer, Michael; Rottmann, Helge; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-05-01

    The globular cluster (GC) M15 (NGC 7078) is host to at least eight pulsars and two low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), one of which is also visible in the radio regime. Here we present the results of a multi-epoch global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) campaign aiming at i) measuring the proper motion of the known compact radio sources; ii) finding and classifying thus far undetected compact radio sources in the GC; and iii) detecting a signature of the putative intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) proposed to reside at the core of M15. We measure the sky motion in right ascension (μα) and declination (μδ) of the pulsars M15A and M15C and of the LMXB AC211 to be (μα,μδ)M15A = (-0.54 ± 0.14, -4.33 ± 0.25) mas yr-1, (μα,μδ)M15C = (-0.75 ± 0.09, -3.52 ± 0.13) mas yr-1, and (μα,μδ)AC211 = (-0.46 ± 0.08, - 4.31 ± 0.20) mas yr-1, respectively. Based on these measurements we estimate the global proper motion of M15 to be (μα,μδ) = (-0.58 ± 0.18, -4.05 ± 0.34) mas yr-1. We detect two previously known but unclassified compact sources within our field of view. Our observations indicate that one them is of extragalactic origin while the other one is a foreground source, quite likely an LMXB. The double neutron star system M15C became fainter during the observations, disappeared for one year and is now observable again - an effect possibly caused by geodetic precession. The LMXB AC211 shows a double lobed structure in one of the observations indicative of an outburst during this campaign. With the inclusion of the last two of a total of seven observations we confirm the upper mass limit for a putative IMBH to be M•< 500 M⊙.

  3. Dependence of Fanaroff-Riley dichotomy of radio galaxies on luminosity and redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) I/II dichotomy of radio galaxies on their luminosities and redshifts. Because of a very strong redshift-luminosity correlation (Malmquist bias) in a flux-limited sample, any redshift-dependent effect could appear as a luminosity related effect and vice versa. A question could then arise - do all the morphological differences seen in the two classes (FR I and II types) of sources, usually attributed to the differences in their luminosities, could these all as well be a result of mainly a cosmological evolutionary effect (e.g., due to the changing ambient density) with cosmic epoch? Even a sharp break in luminosity, seen among the two classes, could after all reflect a rather critical ambient density value. A doubt on these lines does not seem to have been raised in past and things have never been examined keeping this particular aspect in mind. We want to ascertain the customary prevalent view in the literature that the systematic differences in the two ...

  4. The parametrization of radio source coordinates in VLBI and its impact on the CRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbon, Maria; Heinkelmann, Robert; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Xu, Minghui; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Usually celestial radio sources in the celestial reference frame (CRF) catalog are divided in three categories: defining, special handling, and others. The defining sources are those used for the datum realization of the celestial reference frame, i.e. they are included in the No-Net-Rotation (NNR) constraints to maintain the axis orientation of the CRF, and are modeled with one set of totally constant coordinates. At the current level of precision, the choice of the defining sources has a significant effect on the coordinates. For the ICRF2 295 sources were chosen as defining sources, based on their geometrical distribution, statistical properties, and stability. The number of defining sources is a compromise between the reliability of the datum, which increases with the number of sources, and the noise which is introduced by each source. Thus, the optimal number of defining sources is a trade-off between reliability, geometry, and precision. In the ICRF2 only 39 of sources were sorted into the special handling group as they show large fluctuations in their position, therefore they are excluded from the NNR conditions and their positions are normally estimated for each VLBI session instead of as global parameters. All the remaining sources are classified as others. However, a large fraction of these unstable sources show other favorable characteristics, e.g. large flux density (brightness) and a long history of observations. Thus, it would prove advantageous including these sources into the NNR condition. However, the instability of these objects inhibit this. If the coordinate model of these sources would be extended, it would be possible to use these sources for the NNR condition as well. All other sources are placed in the "others" group. This is the largest group of sources, containing those which have not shown any very problematic behavior, but still do not fulfill the requirements for defining sources. Studies show that the behavior of each source can vary

  5. Planck intermediate results: VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2013-01-01

    of the Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between......We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources-infrared and radio sources-from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately...... the two populations. We find an approximately equal number of synchrotron and dusty sources between 217 and 353 GHz; at 353 GHz or higher (or 217 GHz and lower) frequencies, the number is dominated by dusty (synchrotron) sources, as expected. For most of the sources, the spectral indices are also derived...

  6. The MHz-peaked radio spectrum of the unusual gamma-ray source PMN J1603-4904

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, C; Schulz, R; Coppejans, R; Falcke, H; Intema, H; Kadler, M; Krauß, F; Ojha, R

    2016-01-01

    Context. The majority of bright extragalactic gamma-ray sources are blazars. Only a few radio galaxies have been detected by Fermi/LAT. Recently, the GHz-peaked spectrum source PKS 1718-649 was confirmed to be gamma-ray bright, providing further evidence for the existence of a population of gamma-ray loud, compact radio galaxies. A spectral turnover in the radio spectrum in the MHz to GHz range is a characteristic feature of these objects, which are thought to be young due to their small linear sizes. The multiwavelength properties of the gamma-ray source PMN J1603-4904 suggest that it is a member of this source class. Aims. The known radio spectrum of PMN J1603-4904 can be described by a power law above 1 GHz. Using observations from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 150, 325, and 610 MHz, we investigate the behaviour of the spectrum at lower frequencies to search for a low-frequency turnover. Methods. Data from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR) catalogue and archival GMRT observations were use...

  7. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  8. 15 years of VLBI observations of two compact radio sources in Messier 82

    CERN Document Server

    Beswick, R J; Fenech, D; Marti-Vidal, I; McDonald, A R; Muxlow, T W B; Pedlar, A; Riley, J D; Wills, K A

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a second epoch of 18cm global Very Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations, taken on 23 February 2001, of the central kiloparsec of the nearby starburst galaxy Messier 82. These observations further investigate the structural and flux evolution of the most compact radio sources in the central region of M82. The two most compact radio objects in M82 have been investigated (41.95+575 and 43.31+592). Using this recent epoch of data in comparison with our previous global VLBI observations and two earlier epochs of European VLBI Network observations we measure expansion velocities in the range of 1500-2000km/s for 41.95+575, and 9000-11000km/s for 43.31+592 using various independent methods. In each case the measured remnant expansion velocities are significantly larger than the canonical expansion velocity (500km/s) of supernova remnants within M82 predicted from theoretical models. In this paper we discuss the implications of these measured expansion velocities with respect to ...

  9. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Gastaldello, F; Giovannini, G; Govoni, F; Murgia, M; Barrena, R; Ettori, S; Trasatti, M; Vacca, V

    2015-01-01

    We present the study of the structure and dynamical status of the galaxy system A523. Our analysis is based on new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies (TNG), new photometric data (INT), X-ray data (Chandra archive), and radio data (VLA archive). We present the first measures of velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, 949 km/s, and global X-ray temperature of the hot ICM, 5.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system, M200 about 7-9 10E14 Msun. Our analysis of optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction, finds that they are (little) separated in velocity, and identifies the two dominant galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). We show that the X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offsetted from both the BCGs, and quantify the presence of substructure. We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large central radio source, its main ESE-WNW elongation perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation, and the prev...

  10. Power efficiency improvements with the radio frequency H{sup −} ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalvas, T., E-mail: taneli.kalvas@jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. [D-Pace, Inc., P.O. Box 201, Nelson, British Columbia V1L 5P9 (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    CW 13.56 MHz radio frequency-driven H{sup −} ion source is under development at the University of Jyväskylä for replacing an existing filament-driven ion source at the MCC30/15 cyclotron. Previously, production of 1 mA H{sup −} beam, which is the target intensity of the ion source, has been reported at 3 kW of RF power. The original ion source front plate with an adjustable electromagnet based filter field has been replaced with a new front plate with permanent magnet filter field. The new structure is more open and enables a higher flux of ro-vibrationally excited molecules towards the plasma electrode and provides a better control of the potential near the extraction due to a stronger separation of the main plasma from the plasma electrode. While the original system provided better control over the e{sup −}/H{sup −} ratio, the new configuration has led to a higher production efficiency of 1 mA H{sup −} at 1.75 kW RF power. The latest results and upgrade plans are presented.

  11. GMRT Detection of a New Wide-Angle Tail (WAT) Radio Source Associated with the Galaxy PGC 1519010

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. G. Kantharia; M. Das; Gopal-Krishna

    2009-03-01

    We report the serendipitous detection of a Wide-Angle Tail (WAT) radio galaxy at 240 and 610 MHz, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). This WAT is hosted by a cD galaxy PGC 1519010 whose photometric redshift given in the SDSS DR6 catalogue is close to the spectroscopic redshifts (0.105, 0.106 and 0.107) of three galaxies found within $4'$ of the cD. Using the SDSS DR6, we have identified a total of 37 galaxies within $15'$ of the cD, whose photometric redshifts are between 0.08 and 0.14. This strongly suggests that the cD is associated with a group of galaxies whose conspicuous feature is a north–south chain of galaxies (filament) extending to at least 2.6 Mpc. The ROSAT all-sky survey shows a faint, diffuse X-ray source in this direction, which probably marks the hot intracluster gas in the potential well of this group. We combine the radio structural information for this WAT with the galaxy clustering in that region to check its overall consistency with the models of WAT formation. The bending of the jet before and after its disruption forming the radio plume, are found to be correlated in this WAT, as seen from the contrasting morphological patterns on the two sides of the core. Probable constraints imposed by this on the models ofWAT formation are pointed out. We also briefly report on the other interesting radio sources found in the proximity of the WAT. These include a highly asymmetric double radio source and an ultra-steep spectrum radio source for which no optical counterpart is detected in the SDSS.

  12. The radio spectra of the compact sources in Arp 220: A mixed population of supernovae and supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, R; Diamond, P J; Thrall, H; Lonsdale, C J; Smith, H E; Parra, Rodrigo; Conway, John E.; Diamond, Philip J.; Thrall, Hannah; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Smith, Harding E.

    2006-01-01

    We report the first detection at multiple radio wavelengths (13, 6 and 3.6 cm) of the compact sources within both nuclei of the Ultra Luminous Infra-Red Galaxy Arp 220. We present the radio spectra of the 18 detected sources. In just over half of the sources we find that these spectra and other properties are consistent with the standard model of powerful Type IIn supernovae interacting with their pre-explosion stellar wind. The rate of appearance of new radio sources identified with these supernova events suggests that an unusually large fraction of core collapse supernovae in Arp 220 are highly luminous; possibly implying a radically different stellar initial mass function or stellar evolution compared to galactic disks. Another possible explanation invokes very short (~3 x 10^5 year) intense (~10^3 M_Sol year^-1) star formation episodes with a duty cycle of ~10%. A second group of our detected sources, consisting of the brightest and longest monitored sources at 18 cm do not easily fit the radio supernova ...

  13. Unification of Radio Galaxies and their Accretion Jet Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingwen Wu; Ya-Di Xu; Xinwu Cao

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the relation between black hole mass, bh, and jet power, jet, for a sample of BL Lacs and radio quasars. We find that BL Lacs are separated from radio quasars by the FR I/II dividing line in bh-jet plane, which strongly supports the unification scheme of FR I/BL Lac and FR II/radio quasar. The Eddington ratio distribution of BL Lacs and radio quasars exhibits a bimodal nature with a rough division at bol/Edd ∼ 0.01, which imply that they may have different accretion modes. We calculate the jet power extracted from advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), and find that it requires dimensionless angular momentum of black hole ≃ 0.9 - 0.99 to reproduce the dividing line between FR I/II or BL Lac/radio quasar if dimensionless accretion rate $\\dot{m} = 0.01$ is adopted, which is required by the above bimodal distribution of Eddington ratios. Our results suggest that black holes in radio galaxies are rapidly spinning.

  14. Wide low-mass binary model for the origin of axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kool, M. de; Heuvel, E.P.J. van den

    1985-10-17

    An accreting binary model has been proposed by recent workers to account for the origin of the axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources. The authors show that the only type of binary system that can produce the observed structural properties, is a relatively wide neutron star binary, in which the companion of the neutron star is a low-mass giant. Binaries of this type are expected to resemble closely the eight brightest galactic bulge X-ray sources as well as the progenitors of the two wide radio pulsar binaries.

  15. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Chen, Kevin [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628 (United States); Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM, 87131 (United States); Gough, Jonathan D. [Department of Chemistry, Lehman College, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Kanner, Jonah [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California CA 91125 (United States); Kavic, Michael [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  16. Structure on Interplanetary Shock Fronts: Type II Radio Burst Source Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Pulupa, M

    2007-01-01

    We present \\emph{in situ} observations of the source regions of interplanetary (IP) type II radio bursts, using data from the Wind spacecraft during the period 1996-2002. We show the results of this survey as well as in-depth analysis of several individual events. Each event analyzed in detail is associated with an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) and an IP shock driven by the ICME. Immediately prior to the arrival of each shock, electron beams along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and associated Langmuir waves are detected, implying magnetic connection to a quasiperpendicular shock front acceleration site. These observations are analogous to those made in the terrestrial foreshock region, indicating that a similar foreshock region exists on IP shock fronts. The analogy suggests that the electron acceleration process is a fast Fermi process, and this suggestion is borne out by loss cone features in the electron distribution functions. The presence of a foreshock region requires nonplanar st...

  17. Coronal turbulence and the angular broadening of radio sources - the role of the structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Ingale, M; Cairns, Iver

    2014-01-01

    The amplitude of density turbulence in the extended solar corona, especially near the dissipation scale, impinges on several problems of current interest. Radio sources observed through the turbulent solar wind are broadened due to refraction by and scattering off density inhomogeneities, and observations of scatter broadening are often employed to constrain the turbulence amplitude. The extent of such scatter broadening is usually computed using the structure function, which gives a measure of the spatial correlation measured by an interferometer. Most such treatments have employed analytical approximations to the structure function that are valid in the asymptotic limits $s \\gg l_{i}$ or $s \\ll l_{i}$, where $s$ is the interferometer spacing and $l_{i}$ is the inner scale of the density turbulence spectrum. We instead use a general structure function (GSF) that straddles these regimes, and quantify the errors introduced by the use of these approximations. We have included the effects of anisotropic scatteri...

  18. The fields of reference stars for optical positional observations of astrometric extragalactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement'eva, A. A.; Ryl'Kov, V. P.

    The Pulkovo programme (Pul ERS) and the techniques used to create a catalogue of coordinates and magnitudes for more than 7000 faint stars in 73 small fields around extragalactic radiosources (ERS) are described. Accurate positions of stars in the fields around ERS 2200+420 and ERS 2021+614 are given. The catalogue containing 223 stars is presented. The errors of coordinate reductions in the system of reference stars from the CMC catalogue are found to be 1.5-2.0 times smaller than for those in the system of the PPM catalogue. This programme (Pul ERS) is required for quick identification of the extragalactic radio sources and for obtaining their characteristics from observations with large telescopes and CCD detectors.

  19. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  20. A compiled catalogue of reference stars around 227 ICRF extragalactic radio sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryl'kov, V. P.; Narizhnaya, N. V.; Dement'eva, A. A.; Pinigin, G. I.; Maigurova, N. V.; Martinov, M. V.

    A compiled catalogue of21440 stars with magnitudes from 10 to 17 is prepared on the basis of original observations made from the end of the 20th to the beginning of the 21th century. The catalogue con tains 227 fields of the cetes tial sphere around extragalactic radio sources in a declination zone from -17 to +89°. The field size is 40' for both right ascension and declination. The internal accuracy of positions for both coordinates is not worse than 0.1". The comparison of stellar positions with the use of the UCAC2 and CMC13 catalogues shows that the average external accuracy is about 0.05-0.15" for the majority ofchosenfields of the compiled catalogue. The positions of 10795 stars up to +50° in declination are given at epoch J2000.0, whereas the positions of other stars are given at the epoch of an observation.

  1. Space reconstruction of the morphology and kinematics of axisymmetric radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Diep, P N; Hoai, D T; Nhung, P T; Thao, N T; Tuan-Anh, P; Darriulat, P

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented quality of the observations available from the Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array (ALMA) calls for analysis methods making the best of them. Reconstructing in space the morphology and kinematics of radio sources is an underdetermined problem that requires imposing additional constraints for its solution. The hypothesis of rotational invariance about a well-defined star axis, which is a good approximation to the description of the gas envelopes of many evolved stars and protostars, is particularly efficient in this role. In the first part of the article, a systematic use of simulated observations allows for identifying the main problems and for constructing quantities aimed at solving them. In particular the evaluation of the orientation of the star axis in space and the differentiation between expansion along the star axis and rotation about it are given special attention. The use of polar rather than Cartesian sky coordinates is shown to better match the morphology and kinematics...

  2. On the Spectral Index-Flux Density Relation for Large Samples of Radio Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Zhen Zhang; W. Reich; P. Reich; R. Wielebinski

    2003-01-01

    We present new statistical results on the spectral index-flux densityrelation for large samples of radio sources using archival data of the most sensitivesurveys, such as 6C, Miyun, WENSS, B3, NVSS, GB87. Instrumental selectioneffects and the completeness of the catalogs are discussed. Based on the spec-tral indices calculated for about 200 000 sources from the WENSS (327 MHz) andNVSS (1.4 GHz) catalogs, we obtained (1) The median spectral index increases fromαmed ~ -0.9 to αmed ~ -0.8 (Sν∝να), while S327 flux densities decrease from0.1 Jy down to 25 mJy. The median spectral indices nearly show no variation withinthe error bars when the flux density is larger than 0.1 Jy. (2) A dependence of thefraction of ultra-steep spectrum sources (USS, -1.5 ≤α<-1.0), steep spectrumsources (SSS, -1.0 ≤α< -0.5) and flat spectrum sources (FSS, -0.5 ≤α≤ 0.0) ispartly responsible for the spectral flattening. Another contribution to the spectralflattening comes from the variation of αmed of steep spectrum sources (α<-0.5)themselves which increases with decreasing flux densities. (3) The spectral flatteningfor faint sources (down to S327 ~ 20 mJy) with steep spectra (α<-0.5) suggeststhat αmed is correlated with luminosity rather than redshift according to the Con-don' model. (4) A strong spectral selection effect occurs when spectral indices arecalculated from samples with a large frequency separation.

  3. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Langston, Glen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  4. GMRT 610-MHz observations of the faint radio source population - and what these tell us about the higher radio-frequency sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittam, I. H.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Riley, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of 0.84 deg2 of the AMI001 field (centred on 00h23m10s, +31°53') with an rms noise of 18 μJy beam-1 in the centre of the field. A total of 955 sources are detected, and 814 are included in the source count analysis. The source counts from these observations are consistent with previous work. We have used these data to study the spectral index distribution of a sample of sources selected at 15.7 GHz from the recent deep extension to the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey. The median spectral index, α, (where S ∝ ν-α) between 0.08 < S_{15.7 GHz} / mJy < 0.2 is 0.32 ± 0.14, showing that star-forming galaxies, which have much steeper spectra, are not contributing significantly to this population. This is in contrast to several models, but in agreement with the results from the 10C ultradeep source counts; the high-frequency sky therefore continues to be dominated by radio galaxies down to S15.7GHz = 0.1 mJy.

  5. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - II. Spectral ageing and source dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Morganti, Raffaella; Croston, Judith H.; Brüggen, Marcus; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Shulevski, Aleksander; White, Glenn J.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the second in a series investigating Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies at low frequencies, we use LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations between 117 and 456 MHz, in addition to archival data, to determine the dynamics and energetics of two radio galaxies, 3C 452 and 3C 223, by fitting spectral ageing models on small spatial scales. We provide improved measurements for the physical extent of the two sources, including a previously unknown low surface brightness extension to the northern lobe of 3C 223, and revised energetics based on these values. We find spectral ages of 77.05^{+9.22}_{-8.74} and 84.96^{+15.02}_{-13.83} Myr for 3C 452 and 3C 223, respectively, suggesting a characteristic advance speed for the lobes of around 1 per cent of the speed of light. For 3C 452, we show that, even for a magnetic field strength not assumed to be in equipartition, a disparity of a factor of approximately 2 exists between the spectral age and that determined from a dynamical standpoint. We confirm that the injection index of both sources (as derived from the lobe emission) remains steeper than classically assumed values, even when considered on well-resolved scales at low frequencies. However, we find an unexpected sharp discontinuity between the spectrum of the hotspots and the surrounding lobe emission. We suggest that this discrepancy is a result of the absorption of hotspot emission and/or non-homogeneous and additional acceleration mechanisms; as such, hotspots should not be used in the determination of the underlying initial electron energy distribution.

  6. Kiloparsec-scale jets in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered kiloparsec-scale extended radio emission in three narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) in sub-arcsecond resolution 9 GHz images from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We find all sources show two-sided, mildly core-dominated jet structures with diffuse lobes dominated by termination hotspots. These span 20-70 kpc with morphologies reminiscent of FR II radio galaxies, while the extended radio luminosities are intermediate between FR I and FR II sources. In two cases the structure is linear, while a $45^{\\circ}$ bend is apparent in the third. Very Long Baseline Array images at 7.6 GHz reveal parsec-scale jet structures, in two cases with extended structure aligned with the inner regions of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Based on this alignment, the ratio of the radio core luminosity to the optical luminosity, the jet/counter-jet intensity and extension length ratios, and moderate core brightness temperatures ($\\lesssim10^{10}$ K), we conclude these jets are mildly relativistic ($\\beta\\...

  7. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Thin Films in Magnetized Radio Frequency Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingcun; Chen, Qiang; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Wang, Zhenduo

    Self-limiting deposition of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin films were accomplished by the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and O2 as precursor and oxidant, respectively, where argon was kept flowing in whole deposition process as discharge and purge gas. In here we present a novel plasma source for the atomic layer deposition technology, magnetized radio frequency (RF) plasma. Difference from the commercial RF source, magnetic coils were amounted above the RF electrode, and the influence of the magnetic field strength on the deposition rate and morphology are investigated in detail. It concludes that a more than 3 Å/ purging cycle deposition rate and the good quality of ALD Al2O3 were achieved in this plasma source even without extra heating. The ultra-thin films were characterized by including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The high deposition rates obtained at ambient temperatures were analyzed after in-situ the diagnostic of plasmas by Langmuir probe.

  9. Ion Current Density Calculation of the Inductive Radio Frequency Ion Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Voznyi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A radio-frequency (RF inductive ion source at 27.12 MHz is investigated. With a global model of the argon discharge, plasma density, electron temperature and ion current density of the ion source is calculated in relation to absorbed RF power and gas pressure as a discharge chamber size changes. It is found that ion beam current density grows as the discharge chamber size decreases. Calculations show that in the RF source with a discharge chamber 30 mm in diameter and 35 mm long the ion current density is 40 mA/cm2 at 100 W of absorbed RF power and 7 mTorr of pressure, and agrees well with experimentally measured value of 43 mA/cm2. With decreasing discharge chamber diameter to 15 mm ion current density can reach 85 mA/cm2 at absorbed RF power of 100 W.

  10. Chandra View of the Ultra-Steep Spectrum Radio Source in Abell 2443: Merger Shock-Induced Compression of Fossil Radio Plasma?

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E; Sarazin, C L; Blanton, E L; Giacintucci, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a new Chandra X-ray observation of the intracluster medium in the galaxy cluster Abell 2443, hosting an ultra-steep spectrum radio source. The data reveal that the intracluster medium is highly disturbed. The thermal gas in the core is elongated along a northwest to southeast axis and there is a cool tail to the north. We also detect two X-ray surface brightness edges near the cluster core. The edges appear to be consistent with an inner cold front to the northeast of the core and an outer shock front to the southeast of the core. The southeastern edge is coincident with the location of the radio relic as expected for shock (re)acceleration or adiabatic compression of fossil relativistic electrons.

  11. GMRT 610-MHz observations of the faint radio source population - and what these tell us about the higher-radio-frequency sky

    CERN Document Server

    Whittam, I H; Jarvis, M J; Riley, J M

    2016-01-01

    We present 610-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of 0.84 deg$^2$ of the AMI001 field (centred on $00^{\\rm h} 23^{\\rm m} 10^{\\rm s}$, $+31^{\\circ} 53'$) with an r.m.s. noise of 18 $\\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in the centre of the field. 955 sources are detected, and 814 are included in the source count analysis. The source counts from these observations are consistent with previous work. We have used these data to study the spectral index distribution of a sample of sources selected at 15.7 GHz from the recent deep extension to the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey. The median spectral index, $\\alpha$, (where $S \\propto \

  12. Radio identification of decameter-wave sources. II: The 30deg

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhodanov, O V; Andernach, H; 10.1134/S1990341309010052

    2009-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the identification of decameter-wave sources of the UTR catalog within declination interval 30degsources are cross-identified with CATS database catalogs within 40'x40' error boxes. The sources are deblended using the data on the coordinates of the objects and the behavior of their continuum radio spectra. The spectra of 876 sources are derived and fitted by standard analytical functions. Of these sources, 221 objects have straight-line spectra with spectral indices alpha<-1.0. All objects are catalogued and stored in the CATS database.

  13. A robust derivation of the tight relationship of radio core dominance to inclination angle in high redshift 3CRR sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that, in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), the core radio flux density can be normalized to the flux density of the extended lobe emission to infer the orientation of a radio source. However very little is known about the reliability and precision of this method, and we are unaware of any robust conversion recipe to infer the inclination from the core dominance. Investigating whether or not the radio core dominance parameter R separates the quasars from the radio-galaxies in the $z \\ge$~1 3CRR catalog, we found excellent agreement of R with optical type, infrared flux ratios and optical polarization. This indicates that probably both R and optical classification are very good orientation indicators, and the unified model is strongly predictive for these objects. The relative number densities indicate half-opening angles close to 60$^\\circ$, as expected from large surveys. The separations of optical types according to radio core dominance as well as NIR/MIR ratios, which are essentially p...

  14. Studies of an inductively coupled negative hydrogen ion radio frequency source through simulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2004-08-24

    In the frame work of a development project for ITER neutral beam injection system a radio frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen (H-/D-) ion source, (BATMAN ion source) is developed which is designed to produce several 10s of ampere of H-/D- beam current. This PhD work has been carried out to understand and optimize BATMAN ion source. The study has been done with the help of computer simulations, modeling and experiments. The complete three dimensional Monte-Carlo computer simulation codes have been developed under the scope of this PhD work. A comprehensive description about the volume production and the surface production of H- ions is presented in the thesis along with the study results obtained from the simulations, modeling and the experiments. One of the simulations is based on the volume production of H- ions, where it calculates the density profile of the vibrationally excited H2 molecules, the density profile of H- ions and the transport probability of those H- ions along the source axis towards the grid. The other simulation studies the transport of those H- ions which are produced on the surface of the plasma grid. It is expected that if there is a plasma flow in the source, the transport of plasma components (molecules and ions) would be influenced. Experimentally it is observed that there is a convective plasma flow exists in the ion source. A transverse magnetic filter field which is present near the grid inside the ion source reduces the flow velocity. Negative ions and electrons have the same sign of charge; therefore the electrons are co-extracted with the negative ions through the grid system, which is not desirable. It is observed that a magnetic field near the grid, magnetized the electrons and therefore reduce the co-extracted electron current. It is also observed experimentally that if the plasma grid is biased positively with respect to the source body, the electron density near the plasma grid is reduced and therefore the co

  15. Five new millisecond pulsars from a radio survey of 14 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kerr; F. Camilo; T.J. Johnson; E.C. Ferrara; L. Guillemot; A.K. Harding; J. Hessels; S. Johnston; M. Keith; M. Kramer; S.M. Ransom; P.S. Ray; J.E. Reynolds; J. Sarkissian; K.S. Wood

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephem

  16. Scatter broadening of compact radio sources by the ionized intergalactic medium: Prospects for detection with Space VLBI and the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Koay, J Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting and probing various components of the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) and their turbulent properties at radio frequencies through observations of scatter broadening of compact sources. There is a strong case for conducting targeted observations to resolve scatter broadening (where the angular size scales as $\\sim \

  17. Obscured flat spectrum radio AGN as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Maggi, G; Correa, P; de Vries, K D; Gentile, G; Tavares, J Leon; Scholten, O; van Eijndhoven, N; Vereecken, M; Winchen, T

    2016-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no significance. Therefore, in this article we consider a specific sub-class of AGN for which an increased neutrino production is expected. This sub-class contains AGN for which their high-energy jet is pointing toward Earth. Furthermore, we impose the condition that the jet is obscured by gas or dust surrounding the AGN. A method is presented to determine the total column density of the obscuring medium, which is probed by determining the relative X-ray attenuation with respect to the radio flux as obtained from the AGN spectrum. The total column density allows us to probe the interaction of the jet with the surrounding matter which leads to additional neutrino production. Finally, starting from two different source cat...

  18. The Nuclear Region of Low Luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum Sources. II. Emission-Line Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, A C

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marcha's et al. (1996) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. T...

  19. Faraday Rotation from Magnesium II Absorbers towards Polarized Background Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Farnes, J S; Corrigan, M E; Gaensler, B M

    2014-01-01

    Strong magnesium II (MgII) absorption lines in quasar spectra typically serve as a proxy for an intervening galaxy along the line of sight. Previous studies have found a correlation between the number of these MgII absorbers and the rotation measure (RM) at $\\approx5$ GHz. We cross-match a sample of 35,752 optically-identified non-intrinsic MgII absorption systems with 25,649 polarized background radio sources for which we have measurements of both the spectral index and RM at 1.4 GHz. We use the spectral index to split the resulting sample of 599 sources into flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum subsamples. We find that our flat-spectrum sample shows significant ($\\sim3.5\\sigma$) evidence for a correlation between MgII absorption and RM at 1.4 GHz, while our steep-spectrum sample shows no such correlation. We argue that such an effect cannot be explained by either luminosity or other observational effects, by evolution in another confounding variable, by wavelength-dependent polarization structure in an active g...

  20. Observations of IntraDay Variable sources with the Effelsberg and Urumqi Radio Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Marchili, N; Liu, X; Song, H G; Gabányi, K É; Fuhrmann, L; Müller, P; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A; Han, J L

    2008-01-01

    A sample of classical IntraDay Variable (IDV) and IDV candidate sources has been monitored with the Urumqi 25m telescope and the Effelsberg 100m telescope. Aim of the project is to investigate the origin of IntraDay Variability, a phenomenon which has been observed in about 30% of flat spectrum radio quasars. Simultaneous Effelsberg-Urumqi observations demonstrated that the Urumqi antenna, although relatively small in diameter, is well suitable for IDV experiments. A few Urumqi datasets, however, turned out to be affected by a spurious $\\sim 24$ hours modulation, an effect which has been removed by means of a new procedure for data reduction. In about 14 months, 12 epochs of observation have been collected, for a total observing time of more than 45 days. The epochs are regularly distributed over the whole year, in order to check for the presence of systematic annual changes in the variability time scales - a crucial test for verifying the consistency of source-extrinsic models of the variability. Preliminary...

  1. Monitoring the $\\gamma$-Ray Source 2CG 135+1 and the Radio Star LSI+61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M; Van Dijk, R; Strickman, M S; Zhang, S N; Foster, R S; Ray, P; Mattox, J R; Ulmer, M P; Purcell, W; Coe, M J

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of a CGRO multi-instrument series of observations of the unidentified gamma-ray source 2CG 135+1 and of its possible counterpart, the peculiar radio source GT 0236+610 coincident with the Be star LSI+61 303. We monitored the time variable radio source GT 0236+610 during the CGRO observations. OSSE and COMPTEL data were obtained during the period May-June 1994, and BATSE data for the period April 1994-January 1995. We discuss the time variability of the gamma-ray emission and spectral properties of 2CG~135+1. Understanding the nature of 2CG 135+1 may be of crucial importance for the interpretation of a class of unidentified time variable gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy.

  2. The compact, time-variable radio source projected inside W3(OH): Evidence for a Photoevaporated Disk?

    CERN Document Server

    Dzib, Sergio A; Rodriguez, Luis F; Kurtz, Stan E; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A; Lizano, Susana

    2013-01-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the compact (~ 0.05"), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact HII region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of \\alpha = 1.3 +- 0.3 (S_\

  3. Ulysses Observations of Nonlinear Wave-wave Interactions in the Source Regions of Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Thejappa; R. J. MacDowall

    2000-09-01

    The Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) has observed Langmuir, ion-acoustic and associated solar type III radio emissions in the interplanetary medium. Bursts of 50-300 Hz (in the spacecraft frame) electric field signals, corresponding to long-wavelength ion-acoustic waves are often observed coincident in time with the most intense Langmuir wave spikes, providing evidence for the electrostatic decay instability. Langmuir waves often occur as envelope solitons, suggesting that strong turbulence processes, such as modulational instability and soliton formation, often coexist with weak turbulence processes, such as electrostatic decay, in a few type III burst source regions.

  4. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-Frequency Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Megan B; Marriage, Tobias A; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E; Asboth, V; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J Richard; Devlin, Mark J; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renee A; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, John P; Ivison, R J; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Morales, Gustavo; Niemack, Michael D; Oliver, Seb; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Reese, Erik D; Rojas, Felipe; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Sifon, Cristobal; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Switzer, Eric R; Viero, Marco P; Wollack, Edward J; Zemcov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with the halos that host them. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) has conducted a survey at 148 GHz, 218 GHz and 277 GHz along the celestial equator. Using samples of radio sources selected at 1.4 GHz from FIRST and NVSS, we measure the stacked 148, 218 and 277 GHz flux densities for sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities ranging from 5 to 200 mJy. At these flux densities, the radio source population is dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN), with both steep and flat spectrum populations, which have combined radio-to-millimeter spectral indices ranging from 0.5 to 0.95, reflecting the prevalence of steep spectrum sources at high flux densities and the presence of flat spectrum sources at lower flux densities. The thermal SZ effect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5$\\sigma$ level through its spectral signature. Wh...

  5. J1649+26: A Grand-Design Spiral with a Large Double-Lobed Radio Source

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie Y; Duffin, Ryan; Keel, Bill; Lacy, Mark; Momjian, Emmanuel; Morrison, Glenn; Mroczkowski, Tony; Neff, Susan; Norris, Ray P; Schmitt, Henrique; Toy, Vicki; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a grand-design spiral galaxy associated with a double-lobed radio source. J1649+2635 (z = 0.0545) is a red spiral galaxy with a prominent bulge that it is associated with a L$_{1.4{\\rm GHz}}\\sim$10$^{24}$WHz$^{-1}$ double-lobed radio source that spans almost 100kpc. J1649+2635 has a black hole mass of M$_{\\rm BH} \\sim$ 3--7 $\\times$ 10$^8$M$_{\\odot}$ and SFR$\\sim$ 0.26 -- 2.6M$_{\\odot}$year$^{-1}$. The galaxy hosts a $\\sim$96kpc diffuse optical halo, which is unprecedented for spiral galaxies. We find that J1649+2635 resides in an overdense environment with a mass of M$_{dyn} = 7.7^{+7.9}_{-4.3} \\times 10^{13}$M$_{\\odot}$, likely a galaxy group below the detection threshold of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We suggest one possible scenario for the association of double-lobed radio emission from J1649+2635 is that the source may be similar to a Seyfert galaxy, located in a denser-than-normal environment. The study of spiral galaxies that host large-scale radio emission is important becaus...

  6. Origin of X-shaped radio-sources: further insights from the properties of their host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillone, M.; Capetti, A.; Rossi, P.

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of X-shaped radio-sources (XRSs). These objects show, in addition to the main lobes, a pair of wings that produce their peculiar radio morphology. We obtain our sample by selecting from the initial list of Cheung (2007, AJ, 133, 2097) the 53 galaxies with the better defined wings and with available SDSS images. We identify the host galaxies and measure their optical position angle, obtaining a positive result in 22 cases. The orientation of the secondary radio structures shows a strong connection with the optical axis, with all (but one) wing forming an angle larger than 40° with the host major axis. The probability that this is compatible with a uniform distribution is P = 0.9 × 10-4. For all but three sources of the sample, spectroscopic or photometric redshifts are avaliable. The radio luminosity distribution of XRSs has a high power cut-off at L ˜ 1034 erg s-1 Hz-1 at 1.4 GHz. Spectra are available from the SDSS for 28 XRSs. We modeled them to extract information on their emission lines and stellar population properties. The sample is formed by approximately the same number of high and low excitation galaxies (HEGs and LEGs); this classification is essential for a proper comparison with non-winged radio-galaxies. XRSs follow the same relations between radio and line luminosity defined by radio-galaxies in the 3C sample. While in HEGs a young stellar population is often present, this is not detected in the 13 LEGs, which is, again, in agreement with the properties of non-XRSs. The lack of young stars in LEGs supports the idea that they have not experienced a recent gas-rich merger. The connection between the optical axis and the wing orientation, as well as the stellar population and emission-line properties, provide further support for a hydro-dynamic origin of the radio-wings (for example, associated with the expansion of the radio cocoon in an asymmetric external medium) rather than with a change of orientation of the

  7. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Health and safety professionals, and the public, are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in Central New Jersey and Jersey Shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47 % vs 13 %), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs 6 days), and longer periods without internet (29 vs 6 days). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends and web/email. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio, and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas. PMID:24279815

  8. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety professionals and the public are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in central New Jersey and Jersey shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47% vs. 13%), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs. 6 d), and longer periods without Internet (29 vs. 6 d). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends, and Web/e-mail. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the Web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the Web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered Web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas.

  9. Emission line outflows in PKS1549-79 the effects of the early stages of radio source evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Tadhunter, C N; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A; Dickson, R

    2001-01-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of the southern radio galaxy PKS1549-79 (z =0.152).Despite the flat spectrum character of the radio emission from this source, our optical spectra show no sign of the broad permitted lines and non-stellar continuum characteristic of quasar nuclei and broad line radio galaxies. However, the high ionization forbidden lines, including [OIII]5007,4959, are unusually broad for a narrow line radio galaxy (FWHM 1350 km/s), and are blueshifted by 600 km/s relative to the low ionization lines such as[OII]3726,3729. The [OII] lines are also considerably narrower (FWHM 650 km/s) than the [OIII] lines, and have a redshift consistent with that of the recently-detected HI 21cm absorption line system. Whereas the kinematics of the [OIII] emission lines are consistent with outflow in an inner narrow line region, the properties of the [OII] emission lines suggest that they are emitted by a more extended and quiescent gaseous component. We argue that, given the radio properties of the ...

  10. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, I; Marcaide, J M; Guirado, J C; Perez-Torres, M A; Ros, E

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of 10 years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of micro-as per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time)....

  11. Source Localization in a Cognitive Radio Environment Consisting of Frequency and Spatial Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Cognitive Radio,” Proc. IEEE Military Communications Conference, pp. 1–6, 2007. [7] S. Haykin, “Cognitive radio: brain -empowered wireless...26] N. Patwari, J. N. Ash, S. Kyperountas, A. O. Hero, R. L. Moses , and N. S. Correal, “Locating the nodes: cooperative localization in

  12. On the source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, José L; Agudo, Iván; Marscher, Alan P; Jorstad, Svetlana G

    2011-01-01

    The source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120 is analyzed through Very Long Baseline Array observations carried out between 1999 and 2007 at 86, 43, 22, 15, 12, 8, 5, 2, and 1.7 GHz. Comparison of observations from 1999 to 2001 reveals uncorrelated changes in the linear polarization of the underlying jet emission and the Faraday rotation screen: while the rotation measure (RM) remains constant between approximately 2 and 5 mas from the core, the RM-corrected electric vector position angles (EVPAs) of two superluminal components are rotated by almost 90 degrees when compared to other components moving through similar jet locations. On the other hand, the innermost 2 mas experiences a significant change in RM -- including a sign reversal -- but without variations in the RM-corrected EVPAs. Similarly, observations in 2007 reveal a double sign reversal in RM along the jet, while the RM-corrected EVPAs remain perpendicular to the jet axis. Although the observed coherent structure and gradient...

  13. A Magnetically-Switched, Rotating Black Hole Model For the Production of Extragalactic Radio Jets and the Fanaroff and Riley Class Division

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D L

    1998-01-01

    A model is presented in which both Fanaroff and Riley class I and II extragalactic jets are produced by magnetized accretion disk coronae in the ergospheres of rotating black holes. While the jets are produced in the accretion disk itself, the output power still is an increasing function of the black hole angular momentum. For high enough spin, the black hole triggers the magnetic switch, producing highly-relativistic, kinetic-energy-dominated jets instead of Poynting-flux-dominated ones for lower spin. The coronal mass densities needed to trigger the switch at the observed FR break power are quite small ($\\sim 10^{-15} g cm^{-3}$), implying that the source of the jet material may be either a pair plasma or very tenuous electron-proton corona, not the main accretion disk itself. The model explains the differences in morphology and Mach number between FR I and II sources and the observed trend for massive galaxies to undergo the FR I/II transition at higher radio power. It also is consistent with the energy co...

  14. Deep radio images of the HEGRA and Whipple TeV sources in the Cygnus OB2 region

    CERN Document Server

    Marti, Josep; Ishwara Chandra C H; Bosch-Ramon, Valenti

    2007-01-01

    Context. The modern generation of Cherenkov telescopes has revealed a new population of gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy. Some of them have been identified with previously known X-ray binary systems while other remain without clear counterparts a lower energies. Our initial goal here was reporting on extensive radio observations of the first extended and yet unidentified source, namely TeV J2032+4130. This object was originally detected by the HEGRA telescope in the direction of the Cygnus OB2 region and its nature has been a matter of debate during the latest years. Aims. We aim to pursue our radio exploration of the TeV J2032+4130 position that we initiated in a previous paper but taking now into account the latest results from new Whipple and MILAGRO TeV telescopes. Methods. Our investigation is mostly based on interferometric radio observations with the Giant Metre Wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) close to Pune (India) and the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico (USA). We also conducted near infrared observati...

  15. A Measurement of the Millimeter Emission and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Low-Frequency Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Crichton, Devin; Marriage, Tobias; Mo, Wenli; Aguirre, Paula; Addison, Graeme E.; Asboth, V.; Battaglia, Nick; Bock, James; Bond, J. Richard; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the millimeter-wavelength properties of 1.4 GHz-selected sources and a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect associated with the halos that host them. We stack data at 148, 218 and 277 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at the positions of a large sample of radio AGN selected at 1.4 GHz. The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect associated with the halos that host the AGN is detected at the 5 sigma level through its spectral signature, representing a statistical detection of the SZ effect in some of the lowest mass halos (average M(sub 200) approximately equals 10(sup 13) solar mass h(sub 70)(exp -1) ) studied to date. The relation between the SZ effect and mass (based on weak lensing measurements of radio galaxies) is consistent with that measured by Planck for local bright galaxies. In the context of galaxy evolution models, this study confirms that galaxies with radio AGN also typically support hot gaseous halos. Adding Herschel observations allows us to show that the SZ signal is not significantly contaminated by dust emission. Finally, we analyze the contribution of radio sources to the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  16. Modelling The Effects of Density Gradients and Fluctuations on the Apparent Sizes and Positions of Low Frequency Solar Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Benjamin Thomas; Kontar, Eduard; Jeffrey, Natasha

    2017-08-01

    Recent high spatial and temporal resolution imaging of fast growth of the Type-III source and movement of the source centroid. In this work, we use a Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation to model the passage of low frequency (5-240 MHz) radio waves through the solar corona from a point source, considering both isotropic and dipole emission. We model the effects of random density fluctuations and an isotropic density gradient on the transport of the rays, varying the strength of the scattering to observe the effects on images of the source from an observer at 1 AU. Absorption of photons is included, and the effects on the reproduced images and flux curves are observed. The apparent source size and centroid position are tracked through the simulation, and we find a general increase in source size with time, and a variation of centroid position in both directions throughout the simulation. We find that the size of the variation is strongly dependant upon frequency, with lower frequency sources appearing to move further on the disk than higher frequency sources. We also observe the strength of the effects at different viewing angles, finding that the greatest variation occurs closer to the solar limb. Further observational work is required to limit the scattering parameters, in order to allow for comparison with current radio images.

  17. The elusive radio loud Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2110

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The AGN NGC 2110 presents a peculiar case among the Seyfert 2 galaxies, as it displays also features of radio-loud objects and is classified as FR-I radio galaxy. Here we analyse simultaneous INTEGRAL and Swift data taken in 2008 and 2009. We reconstruct the spectral energy distribution in order to provide further insight. The combined X-ray spectrum is well represented by an absorbed cut-off power law model plus soft excess. Combining all available data, the spectrum appears flat (photon index 1.25 \\pm 0.04) with the high-energy cut-off being at 82 \\pm 9 keV. The intrinsic absorption is moderate (NH = 4E22 1/cm**2), the iron K-alpha line is weak (EW = 114 eV), and no reflection component is detected in the INTEGRAL spectrum. The data indicate that the X-ray spectrum is moderately variable both in flux and spectral shape. The 2008 spectrum is slightly steeper (photon index 1.5, Ec = 90 keV) with the source being brighter, and flatter in 2009 (photon index 1.4, Ec = 120 keV) in the lower flux state. The spectr...

  18. THE COMPACT, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO SOURCE PROJECTED INSIDE W3(OH): EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOEVAPORATED DISK?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodriguez-Garza, Carolina B.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A.; Lizano, Susana, E-mail: s.dzib@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico)

    2013-08-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the compact ({approx}0.''05), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact H II region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 (S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). This spectral index and the brightness temperature of the source ({approx}6500 K) suggest that we are most likely detecting partially optically thick free-free radiation. The radio source is probably associated with the ionizing star of W3(OH), but an interpretation in terms of an ionized stellar wind fails because the detected flux densities are orders of magnitude larger than expected. We discuss several scenarios and tentatively propose that the radio emission could arise in a static ionized atmosphere around a fossil photoevaporated disk.

  19. From the Blazar Sequence to the Blazar Envelope: Revisiting the Relativistic Jet Dichotomy in Radio-Loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanini; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the concept of a blazar sequence that relates the synchrotron peak frequency (Vpeak) in blazars with synchrotron peak luminosity (Lpeak, in vLv) using a large sample of radio-loud AGN. We present observational evidence that the blazar sequence is formed from two populations in the synchrotron Vpeak - Lpeak plane, each forming an upper edge to an envelope of progressively misaligned blazars, and connecting to an adjacent group of radio galaxies having jets viewed at much larger angles to the line of sight. When binned by jet kinetic power (Lkin; as measured through a scaling relationship with extended radio power), we find that radio core dominance decreases with decreasing synchrotron Lpeak, revealing that sources in the envelope are generally more misaligned. We find population-based evidence of velocity gradients in jets at low kinetic powers (approximately 10(exp 42) - 10(exp 44.5) erg s(exp -1)), corresponding to FR I radio galaxies and most BL Lacs. These low jet power 'weak jet' sources, thought to exhibit radiatively inefficient accretion, are distinguished from the population of non-decelerating, low synchrotron-peaking (LSP) blazars and FR II radio galaxies ('strong' jets) which are thought to exhibit radiatively efficient accretion. The two-population interpretation explains the apparent contradiction of the existence of highly core-dominated, low-power blazars at both low and high synchrotron peak frequencies, and further implies that most intermediate synchrotron peak (ISP) sources are not intermediate in intrinsic jet power between LSP and high synchrotron-peaking (HSP) sources, but are more misaligned versions of HSP sources with similar jet powers.

  20. DYNAMICS INSIDE THE RADIO AND X-RAY CLUSTER CAVITIES OF CYGNUS A AND SIMILAR FRII SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai, E-mail: mathews@ucolick.org [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    We describe approximate axisymmetric computations of the dynamical evolution of material inside radio lobes and X-ray cluster gas cavities in Fanaroff-Riley II (FRII) sources such as Cygnus A. All energy is delivered by a jet to the lobe/cavity via a moving hotspot where jet energy dissipates in a reverse shock. Our calculations describe the evolution of hot plasma, cosmic rays (CRs), and toroidal magnetic fields flowing from the hotspot into the cavity. Many important observational features are explained. Gas, CRs, and field flow back along the cavity surface in a 'boundary backflow' consistent with detailed FRII observations. Computed ages of backflowing CRs are consistent with observed radio-synchrotron age variations only if shear instabilities in the boundary backflow are damped and we assume this is done with viscosity of unknown origin. We compute a faint thermal jet along the symmetry axis and suggest that it is responsible for redirecting the Cygnus A nonthermal jet. Magnetic fields estimated from synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) X-radiation observed near the hotspot evolve into radio lobe fields. Computed profiles of radio-synchrotron lobe emission perpendicular to the jet reveal dramatically limb-brightened emission in excellent agreement with FRII observation, although computed lobe fields exceed those observed. Strong winds flowing from hotspots naturally create kiloparsec-sized spatial offsets between hotspot nonthermal X-ray inverse Compton (IC-CMB) emission and radio-synchrotron emission that peaks 1-2 kpc ahead where the field increases due to wind compression. In our computed version of Cygnus A, nonthermal X-ray emission increases from the hotspot (some IC-CMB, mostly SSC) toward the offset radio-synchrotron peak (mostly SSC).

  1. Measurements of distributed polarized radio sources from spinning spacecraft - Effect of a tilted axial antenna ISEE-3 application and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainberg, J.; Hoang, S.; Manning, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the system response of a satellite receiver-antenna system to locate a radio source when the satellite is tilted on its axis. The satellite is spin stabilized but experiences a tilt due to either a mechanical misalignment or a shift in the electrical axis caused by parasitic currents in other spacecraft structures. The shorter the antenna, the more significant the effects. Numerical techniques are developed for obtaining the Stokes parameters and the angular parameters of a uniform conical source sensed by a linear antenna in order to derive the average power response of a synthesized dipole to a point on a distributed polarized source. Relative gains are calculated along the antenna at different angles to the source. The techniques are applied to sample ISEE-3 satellite data for Type III solar radio bursts which were sensed by an axial and an equatorial antenna. The two antennas permit localization of the source and quantification of the polarization and angular extent of the source. The resulting high precision in calculations of all three source parameters commends use of the model in analyses of data from the planned ULYSSES mission.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray and radio sources in binaries (Malkov+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, O. Y.; Tessema, S. B.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We have also compiled a general list of 239 radio pulsars in binary systems. The list is supplied with indication of photometric, spectroscopic or X-ray binarity, and with cross-identification data. (4 data files).

  3. High Resolution Rapid Response observations of compact radio sources with the Ceduna Hobart Interferometer (CHI)

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchard, Jay M; Ojha, Roopesh; Kadler, Matthias; Dickey, John M; Edwards, Philip G

    2012-01-01

    Context. Frequent, simultaneous observations across the electromagnetic spectrum are essential to the study of a range of astrophysical phenomena including Active Galactic Nuclei. A key tool of such studies is the ability to observe an object when it flares i.e. exhibits a rapid and significant increase in its flux density. Aims. We describe the specific observational procedures and the calibration techniques that have been developed and tested to create a single baseline radio interferometer that can rapidly observe a flaring object. This is the only facility that is dedicated to rapid high resolution radio observations of an object south of -30 degrees declination. An immediate application is to provide rapid contemporaneous radio coverage of AGN flaring at {\\gamma}-ray frequencies detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods. A single baseline interferometer was formed with radio telescopes in Hobart, Tasmania and Ceduna, South Australia. A software correlator was set up at the University of Ta...

  4. A Compact X-Ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source that we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column {N}H=6.7(4.0,9.7)× {10}21 cm-2 and photon index {{Γ }}=1.8(1.4,2.2). For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is {1.7}-0.3+0.4× {10}32 erg s-1 (90% confidence intervals). Both LX and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative 3σ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be 3× {10}-17 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter 13\\prime\\prime , the flux limit is 6% of the flux of the point source. The steep radio spectrum of the PWN (α ˜ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts {L}{{X}} {{(nebula)}}˜ 1× {10}33 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  5. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of ten years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of μas per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time). For one of our sources, 0615+820, the morphological and spectral properties in year 2010, as well as the relative astrometry between years 2000 and 2010, suggest the possibility of either a strong parsec-scale interaction of the AGN jet with the ISM, a gravitational lens with 1 mas diameter, or a resolved massive binary black hole. Reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A27

  6. Deep radio imaging of 47 Tuc identifies the peculiar X-ray source X9 as a new black hole candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Miller-Jones, J C A; Heinke, C O; Maccarone, T J; Berg, M van den; Knigge, C; Chomiuk, L; Noyola, E; Russell, T D; Seth, A C; Sivakoff, G R

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of steady radio emission from the known X-ray source X9 in the globular cluster 47 Tuc. With a double-peaked C IV emission line in its ultraviolet spectrum providing a clear signature of accretion, this source had been previously classified as a cataclysmic variable. In deep ATCA imaging from 2010 and 2013, we identified a steady radio source at both 5.5 and 9.0 GHz, with a radio spectral index (defined as $S_{\

  7. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wolk, G; Peletier, R F; Pel, J W

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and determine the presence of dust tori among radio galaxies of various types. Actively accreting supermassive black holes in the centres of radio galaxies may be uncovered through their dust tori reradiating the optical and ultraviolet continuum in mid-infrared bands. Using VISIR on the VLT, we have obtained sub-arcsecond (~0.40") resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 micron, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio galaxies of four types in the redshift range z=0.006-0.156. The sample consists of 8 edge-darkened, low-power Fanaroff-Riley class I (FR-I) radio galaxies, 6 edge-brightened, class II (FR-II) radio galaxies displaying low-excitation optical emission, 7 FR-IIs displaying high-excitation optical emission, and 6 FR-II broad emission line radio galaxies. Out of the sample of 27 objects, 10 nuclei are detected and several have constraining non-detections at 10 sigma sensitivities of 7 mJy. On the basis of the core ...

  8. Dynamics Inside the Radio and X-ray Cluster Cavities of Cygnus A and Similar FRII Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, William G

    2012-01-01

    We describe approximate axisymmetric computations of the dynamical evolution of material inside radio lobes and X-ray cluster gas cavities in Fanaroff-Riley II sources such as Cygnus A. All energy is delivered by a jet to the lobe/cavity via a moving hotspot where jet energy dissipates in a reverse shock. Our calculations describe the evolution of hot plasma, cosmic rays (CRs) and toroidal magnetic fields flowing from the hotspot into the cavity. Many observed features are explained. Gas, CRs and field flow back along the cavity surface in a "boundary backflow" consistent with detailed FRII observations. Computed ages of backflowing CRs are consistent with observed radio-synchrotron age variations only if shear instabilities in the boundary backflow are damped and we assume this is done with viscosity of unknown origin. Magnetic fields estimated from synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) X-radiation observed near the hotspot evolve into radio lobe fields. Computed profiles of radio synchrotron lobe emission perpendi...

  9. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Andreas; Middelberg, Enno; Spitler, Lee R; Leipski, Christian; Parker, Quentin A

    2015-01-01

    Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts >=2. This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS and on the potential link between IFRS and high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 um and 500 um. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared ...

  10. A Chandra study of X-ray sources in the field of the z=2.16 radio galaxy MRC 1138-262

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Carilli, C L; Harris, D E; Miley, G K; Röttgering, H J A

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra X-ray Observatory study of the field X-ray source population in the vicinity of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262. Many serendipitous X-ray sources are detected in an area of 8'x8' around the radio source and 90% are identified in our deep VLT images. The space density of such sources is higher than expected on the basis of the statistics of ROSAT and Chandra deep surveys. The most likely explanation is in terms of a concentration of AGN associated with the protocluster at z=2.16 which was found around the radio galaxy in previous studies. Two sources have a confirmed spectroscopic redshift close to that of the radio galaxy, and for three more sources other observations suggest that they are associated with the protocluster. Four of these five X-ray sources form, together with the radio galaxy, a filament in the plane of the sky. The direction of the filament is similar to that of the radio source axis, the large scale distribution of the other protocluster members, the 150 kpc-s...

  11. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  12. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  13. The GHz-Peaked Spectrum radio galaxy 2021+614 Detection of slow motion in a compact symmetric object

    CERN Document Server

    Tschager, W; Röttgering, H J A; Snellen, I; Miley, G K; Tschager, Wolfgang; Schilizzi, Richard T.; R"ottgering, Huub J. A.; Snellen, Ignas A. G.; Miley, George K.

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed VSOP (VLBI Space Observatory Programme) data at 5 GHz and ground-based VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) data at 15 GHz for the GHz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxy 2021+614. Its morphology is consistent with it being a compact symmetric source extending over 30 h^-1 pc (H_0 = 100 h km s^-1 Mpc^-1, q_0 = 0.5). From a comparison with earlier observations we have detected an increase in the separation and a decrease in the size of the two most prominent components. We determine the projected speed with which these two components recede from each other to be 0.12+/-0.02 h^-1 c. Given the projected separation of the two components of 16.1 h^-1 pc, the infered kinematic age is 440+/-80 years, measured in the source reference frame. These results provide additional support for the contention that compact symmetric radio objects are young and the precursors of the classical FR I or FR II radio sources. The sizes of individual components appear to contract with time which is not consistent w...

  14. Neutrinos from active black holes, sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Julia K

    2008-01-01

    A correlation between the highest energy Cosmic Rays (above ~60 EeV) and the distribution of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) gives rise to a prediction of neutrino production in the same sources. In this paper, we present a detailed AGN model, predicting neutrino production near the foot of the jet, where the photon field from the disk creates a high optical depth for proton-photon interactions. The protons escape from later shocks where the emission region is optically thin for proton-photon interactions. Consequently, Cosmic Rays are predicted to come from FR-I galaxies, independent of the orientation of the source. Neutrinos, on the other hand, are only observable from sources directing their jet towards Earth, i.e. flat spectrum radio quasars, due to the strongly beamed neutrino emission.

  15. Lightning as a possible source of the radio emission on HAT-P-11b

    CERN Document Server

    Hodosán, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Lightning induced radio emission has been observed on Solar System planets. There have been many attempts to observe exoplanets in the radio wavelength, however, no unequivocal detection has been reported. Lecavelier des Etangs et al. (2013, A&A, 552, A65) carried out radio transit observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b, and suggested that a small part of the radio flux can be attributed to the planet. In the current letter, we assume that this signal is real, and study if this radio emission could be caused by lightning in the atmosphere of the planet. We find that a lightning storm with 530 times larger flash densities than the Earth-storms with the largest lightning activity is needed to produce the observed signal from HAT-P-11b. The optical counterpart would nevertheless be undetectable with current technology. We show that HCN produced by lightning chemistry of such thunderstorms is observable 2-3 years after the storm, which produces signatures in the L ($3.0 \\mu{\\rm m}-4.0 \\mu$m) and N ($7.5 \\mu{...

  16. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of magnetic fields in Fanaroff-Riley class II radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martin; Alexander, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Radio observations of Fanaroff-Riley class II sources often show correlations between the synchrotron emission and the linear-polarimetric distributions. Magnetic position vectors seem to align with the projected emission of both the radio jets and the sources' edges. Using statistics we study such relation as well as its unknown time evolution via synthetic polarisation maps of model FR II sources formed in 3D-MHD numerical simulations of bipolar, hypersonic and weakly magnetised jets. The magnetic field is initially random with a Kolmogorov power spectrum, everywhere. We investigate the structure and evolution of magnetic fields in the sources as a function of the power of jets and the observational viewing angle. Our synthetic polarisation maps agree with observations, showing B-field vectors which are predominantly aligned with the jet axis, and show that magnetic fields inside sources are shaped by the jets' backflow. Polarimetry is found to correlate with time, the viewing angle and the jet-to-ambient d...

  17. The jet-disc connection: evidence for a reinterpretation in radio loud and radio quiet active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Garofalo, David

    2013-01-01

    To constrain models of the jet-disc connection, we explore Eddington ratios reported in Foschini (2011) and interpret them in relation to the values in Sikora et al. across the active galactic nuclei population from radio loud quasars, their flat spectrum radio quasar subclass, the recently discovered gamma-ray loud narrow-line type 1 Seyfert galaxies, Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies and radio quiet quasars of the Palomar Green survey. While appeal to disc truncation in radiatively inefficient flow appears to explain the observed inverse relation between radio loudness and Eddington ratio in radio loud and radio quiet quasars, FR I objects, scale invariance and recent data on powerful jets in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies offer compelling arguments in favour of a reinterpretaion of the jet-disc connection.

  18. The Co-ordinated Radio and Infrared Survey for High-Mass Star Formation - II. Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, C R; Cotton, W D; Lumsden, S L; Urquhart, J S; Chandler, C; Churchwell, E B; Diamond, P; Dougherty, S M; Fender, R P; Fuller, G; Garrington, S T; Gledhill, T M; Goldsmith, P F; Hindson, L; Jackson, J M; Kurtz, S E; Marti, J; Moore, T J T; Mundy, L G; Muxlow, T W B; Oudmaijer, R D; Pandian, J D; Paredes, J M; Shepherd, D S; Smethurst, S; Spencer, R E; Thompson, M A; Umana, G; Zijlstra, A A

    2012-01-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 deg < l < 65 deg), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.5" resolution Stokes I map with a root-mean-squared noise level better than 0.4 mJy/beam. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalogue of compact radio-emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimised to detect emission on size scales up to 14" and for unresolved sources the catalogue is more than 90 percent complete ...

  19. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Jupiter-like exoplanets with internal plasma sources: implications for detectability of auroral radio emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, J D

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide the first consideration of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Jupiter-like exoplanets with internal plasma sources such as volcanic moons. We estimate the radio power emitted by such systems under the condition of near-rigid corotation throughout the closed magnetosphere, in order to examine the behaviour of the best candidates for detection with next generation radio telescopes. We thus estimate for different stellar X-ray-UV (XUV) luminosity cases the orbital distances within which the ionospheric Pedersen conductance would be high enough to maintain near-rigid corotation, and we then consider the magnitudes of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere currents flowing within the systems, and the resulting radio powers, at such distances. We also examine the effects of two key system parameters, i.e. the planetary angular velocity and the plasma mass outflow rate from sources internal to the magnetosphere. In all XUV luminosity cases studied, a significant number of parameter combi...

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio fluxes of 195 ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources (Le Bail+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bail, K.; Gipson, J. M.; Gordon, D.; MacMillan, D. S.; Behrend, D.; Thomas, C. C.; Bolotin, S.; Himwich, W. E.; Baver, K. D.; Corey, B. E.; Titus, M.; Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.; Collioud, A.

    2016-07-01

    The second realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) is based on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data at radio frequencies in X band and S band. The European Space Agency's Gaia mission, launched on 2013 December 19, started routine scientific operations in 2014 July. By scanning the whole sky, it is expected to observe ~500000 Quasi Stellar Objects in the optical domain. This means that, in the future, two extragalactic celestial reference frames, at two different frequency domains, will coexist. It will thus be important to align them very accurately. In 2012, the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) selected 195 sources from ICRF2 that will be observed by Gaia and should be suitable for aligning the radio and optical frames: they are called ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources. The LAB submitted a proposal to the International VLBI Service (IVS) to regularly observe these ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources at the same rate as Gaia observes them in the optical realm, e.g., roughly once a month. Of the 195 sources, all but one have been successfully observed in the 12 months prior to 2015 September 01. Table1 lists the 195 ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources. Beginning in 2003 June, the Goddard VLBI group developed a program to purposefully monitor when sources were observed and to increase the observations of "under-observed" sources. In 2013 March, we added all 195 ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources to the IVS source monitoring program with an observation target of 12 successful sessions per year. (1 data file).

  1. The texox cluster survey: using radio sources as galaxy cluster signposts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L. Gay

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available La b usqueda de C umulos TexOx (CTO ha revelado m as de 10 c umulos de galaxias y candidatos a estos, previamente desconocidos, en los primeros cuatro campos de dicha b usqueda. Estos c umulos forman una muestra de c umulos \\radio- activos", que son aquellos ricos en fuentes potentes de radio. La fotometr a pre- liminar de un subconjunto de campos con datos en varios colores muestran que estos c umulos tienen una alta fracci on de galaxias azules, y que tanto las galaxias azules como las fuentes de radio tienden a estar menos concentradas al centro que las galaxias rojas de los c umulos. Estas propiedades son t picas de los c umulos con efecto Butcher-Oemler.

  2. A sharper view of the outer Galaxy at 1420 and 408 MHz from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey II: The catalogue of extended radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kerton, C R; Patterson, J

    2007-01-01

    A new catalogue of extended radio sources has been prepared based on arcminute-resolution 1420 MHz images from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). The new catalogue provides both 1420 MHz and 408 MHz flux density measurements on sources found near the Galactic plane in the second quadrant of our Galaxy. In addition cross-identifications are made with other major radio catalogues and information is provided to facilitate the recovery of CGPS image data associated with each catalogued source. Numerous new radio sources are identified and the catalogue provides a comprehensive summary of both newly discovered and previously known HII regions and supernova remnants in the outer Galaxy. The catalogue should be of use both for synoptic studies of Galactic structure and for placing higher resolution observations, at radio and other wavelengths, in context.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Sub-mJy radio sources SF properties (Bonzini+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzini, M.; Mainieri, V.; Padovani, P.; Andreani, P.; Berta, S.; Bethermin, M.; Lutz, D.; Rodighiero, G.; Rosario, D.; Tozzi, P.; Vattakunnel, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated the SF properties of the faint radio population as detected by one of the deepest 1.4 GHz survey up-to-date conducted with the VLA in the E-CDFS. This study builds upon the results presented in Bonzini et al. (2012, Cat. J/ApJS/203/15 and 2013, Cat. J/MNRAS/436/3759) where we have exploited the wealth of multiwavelength data available in this field to identify the AGNs, further divide them into RL and RQ, and characterize the properties of the radio selected galaxies (e.g. redshift, stellar mass). (1 data file).

  4. A study of broadband Faraday rotation and polarization behaviour over 1.3--10 GHz in 36 discrete radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C S; Feain, I J

    2016-01-01

    We present a broadband polarization analysis of 36 discrete polarized radio sources over a very broad, densely-sampled frequency band. Our sample was selected on the basis of polarization behaviour apparent in narrowband archival data at 1.4 GHz: half the sample show complicated frequency-dependent polarization behaviour (i.e. Faraday complexity) at these frequencies, while half show comparatively simple behaviour (i.e. they appear Faraday simple). We re-observed the sample using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in full polarization, with 6 GHz of densely sampled frequency coverage spanning 1.3 to 10 GHz. We have devised a general polarization modelling technique that allows us to identify multiple polarized emission components in a source, and to characterize their properties. We detect Faraday complex behaviour in almost every source in our sample. Several sources exhibit particularly remarkable polarization behaviour. By comparing our new and archival data, we have identified temporal variabili...

  5. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources VI: gamma-ray blazar candidates in the WISH survey and their radio properties

    CERN Document Server

    Nori, M; Massaro, F; D'Abrusco, R; Paggi, A; Tosti, G; Funk, S

    2015-01-01

    According to the second Fermi LAT Catalog (2FGL), about one third of the gamma-ray sources listed have no assigned counterparts at lower energies. Many statistical methods have been developed to find proper counterparts for these sources. We explore the sky area covered at low radio frequency by Westerbork in the Southern Hemisphere (WISH) survey to search for blazar-like associations among the unidentified gamma-ray sources listed in the 2FGL (UGSs). Searching the WISH and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) radio surveys within the positional uncertainty regions of the 2FGL UGSs, we select as gamma-ray blazar candidates the radio sources characterized by flat radio spectra between 352 MHz and 1400 MHz. We propose new gamma-ray blazar associations for eight UGSs and we also discuss their spectral properties at low radio frequencies. We compare the radio flux density distribution of the low radio frequency gamma-ray blazar candidates with that of gamma-ray blazars associated with other methods. We find significant dif...

  6. Characterizing Open Source Routing Radio-to-Router Information in an Airborne Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    different combination of heterogeneous radio systems (see Figures 3 and 4) to bridge network connectivity ’" E’-<:lfcnk St.. rOod B.um Rod!o sr.’ .... (ES8...actual RF and signal coding techniques ; 2) The link layer which describes the characteristics of a I-hop link; 3) The network layer that uses

  7. A diffuse bubble-like radio-halo source MRC 0116+111: imprint of AGN feedback in a low-mass cluster of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Gopal-Krishna,; Werner, Norbert; Wadnerkar, Nitin; Belapure, Jaydeep; Kumbharkhane, A C

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed observations of MRC 0116+111, revealing a luminous, mini radio-halo of ~240 kpc diameter located at the centre of a cluster of galaxies at redshift z = 0.131. Our optical and multi-wavelength GMRT and VLA radio observations reveal a highly unusual radio source: showing a pair of giant (~100 kpc diameter) bubble-like diffuse structures, that are about three times larger than the analogous extended radio emission observed in M87 - the dominant central radio galaxy in the Virgo Cluster. However, in MRC 0116+111 we do not detect any ongoing Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) activity, such as a compact core or active radio jets feeding the plasma bubbles. The radio emitting relativistic particles and magnetic fields were probably seeded in the past by a pair of radio-jets originating in the AGN of the central cD galaxy. The extremely steep high-frequency radio spectrum of the north-western bubble, located ~100 kpc from cluster centre, indicates radiation losses, possibly because having detached, it...

  8. A multi-wavelength study of the radio source G296.7-0.9: confirmation as a Galactic supernova remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, W J; Murphy, T; Reeves, S; Green, A J

    2011-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the radio source G296.7-0.9. This source has a bilateral radio morphology, a radio spectral index of -0.5 +/- 0.1, sparse patches of linear polarisation, and thermal X-rays with a bright arc near the radio boundary. Considering these characteristics, we conclude that G296.7-0.9 is a supernova remnant (SNR). The age and morphology of the SNR in the context of its environment suggest that the source is co-located with an HII region, and that portions of the shock front have broken out into a lower density medium. We see no evidence for a neutron star or pulsar wind nebula associated with SNR G296.7-0.9.

  9. Minifilament Eruption as the Source of a Blowout Jet, C-class Flare, and Type-III Radio Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Li, Haidong; Xu, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    We report a strong minifilament eruption associated with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite C1.6 flare and WIND type-III radio burst. The minifilament, which lies at the periphery of active region 12259, is detected by Hα images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope. The minifilament undergoes a partial and then a full eruption. Simultaneously, two co-spatial jets are successively observed in extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The first jet exhibits a typical fan-spine geometry, suggesting that the co-spatial minifilament is possibly embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine structure. However, the second jet displays blowout morphology when the entire minifilament erupts upward, leaving behind a hard X-ray emission source in the base. Differential emission measure analyses show that the eruptive region is heated up to about 4 MK during the fan-spine jet, while up to about 7 MK during the blowout jet. In particular, the blowout jet is accompanied by an interplanetary type-III radio burst observed by WIND/WAVES in the frequency range from above 10 to 0.1 MHz. Hence, the minifilament eruption is correlated with the interplanetary type-III radio burst for the first time. These results not only suggest that coronal jets can result from magnetic reconnection initiated by erupting minifilaments with open fields, but also shed light on the potential influence of minifilament eruption on interplanetary space.

  10. Origin of X-shaped radio-sources: further insights from the properties of their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gillone, Melissa; Rossi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of X-shaped radio-sources (XRSs). These objects show, in addition to the main lobes, a pair of wings producing their peculiar radio morphology. We obtain our sample by selecting from the initial list of Cheung (2007, AJ, 133, 2097) the 53 galaxies with the better defined wings and with available SDSS images. We identified the host galaxies and measured their optical position angle, obtaining a positive result in 22 cases. The orientation of the secondary radio structures shows a strong connection with the optical axis, with all (but one) wing forming a angle larger than 40 degrees with the host major axis. The probability that this is compatible with a uniform distribution is P = 0.9 10E-4. Spectra are available from the SDSS for 28 XRSs. We modeled them to extract information on their emission lines and stellar population properties. The sample is formed by approximately the same number of high and low excitation galaxies (HEG and LEG); this classification is essential f...

  11. Self-consistent evolution of gas and cosmic rays in Cygnus A and similar FR II classic double radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, William G

    2010-01-01

    In Cygnus A and other classical FR II double radio sources, powerful opposing jets from the cores of halo-centered galaxies drive out into the surrounding cluster gas, forming hotspots of shocked and compressed cluster gas at the jet extremities. The moving hotspots are sandwiched between two shocks. An inner-facing shock receives momentum and cosmic rays from the jet and creates additional cosmic rays that form a radio lobe elongated along the jet axis. An outer-facing bow shock moves directly into the undisturbed group or cluster gas, creating a cocoon of shocked gas enclosing the radio lobe. We describe computations that follow the self-consistent dynamical evolution of the shocked cluster gas and the relativistic synchrotron-emitting gas inside the lobes. Relativistic and non-relativistic components exchange momentum by interacting with small magnetic fields having dynamically negligible energy densities. The evolution of Cygnus A is governed almost entirely by cosmic ray energy flowing from the hotspots....

  12. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources: A Cosmological View - AGN Number Counts, the Cosmic X-Ray Background and SMBH Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn, Peter-Christian; Ibar, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Context. Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5 sigma sensitivities as low as 1 uJy. Aims. Recent SED-modelling and analysis of their radio properties shows that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3

  13. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina, E-mail: sinajahanbakhsh@gmail.com; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bogazici University, Istanbul 34342 (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  14. Medicina array demonstrator: calibration and radiation pattern characterization using a UAV-mounted radio-frequency source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, G.; Naldi, G.; Bianchi, G.; Mattana, A.; Monari, J.; Perini, F.; Poloni, M.; Schiaffino, M.; Bolli, P.; Lingua, A.; Aicardi, I.; Bendea, H.; Maschio, P.; Piras, M.; Virone, G.; Paonessa, F.; Farooqui, Z.; Tibaldi, A.; Addamo, G.; Peverini, O. A.; Tascone, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of the new-generation Low-Frequency Aperture Array (LFAA) radio telescopes is instrument calibration. The operational LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) instrument and the future LFAA element of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) require advanced calibration techniques to reach the expected outstanding performance. In this framework, a small array, called Medicina Array Demonstrator (MAD), has been designed and installed in Italy to provide a test bench for antenna characterization and calibration techniques based on a flying artificial test source. A radio-frequency tone is transmitted through a dipole antenna mounted on a micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) (hexacopter) and received by each element of the array. A modern digital FPGA-based back-end is responsible for both data-acquisition and data-reduction. A simple amplitude and phase equalization algorithm is exploited for array calibration owing to the high stability and accuracy of the developed artificial test source. Both the measured embedded element patterns and calibrated array patterns are found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. The successful measurement campaign has demonstrated that a UAV-mounted test source provides a means to accurately validate and calibrate the full-polarized response of an antenna/array in operating conditions, including consequently effects like mutual coupling between the array elements and contribution of the environment to the antenna patterns. A similar system can therefore find a future application in the SKA-LFAA context.

  15. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-Wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source which we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column $N_H = 6.7 (4.0, 9.7) \\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and photon index $\\Gamma = 1.8 (1.4, 2.2)$. For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is $ 1.7^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \\times 10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (90\\% confidence intervals). Both $L_X$ and $\\Gamma$ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative $3 \\sigma$ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter $13"$, the flux limit is 6\\% of the f...

  16. The Broad Line Radio Galaxy J2114+820

    CERN Document Server

    Lara, L; Cotton, W D; Feretti, L; Giovannini, G; Marcaide, J M; Venturi, T

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the study of a new sample of large angular size radio galaxies selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, we have made radio observations of J2114+820, a low power radio galaxy with an angular size of 6'. Its radio structure basically consists of a prominent core, a jet directed in north-west direction and two extended S-shaped lobes. We have also observed the optical counterpart of J2114+820, a bright elliptical galaxy with a strong unresolved central component. The optical spectrum shows broad emission lines. This fact, together with its low radio power and FR-I type morphology, renders J2114+820 a non-trivial object from the point of view of the current unification schemes of radio loud active galactic nuclei.

  17. The discovery of lensed radio and X-ray sources behind the Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 with the JVLA and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Jones, C; Forman, W R; Andrade-Santos, F; Bonafede, A; Brüggen, M; Bulbul, E; Clarke, T E; Churazov, E; David, L; Dawson, W A; Donahue, M; Goulding, A; Kraft, R P; Mason, B; Merten, J; Mroczkowski, T; Murray, S S; Nulsen, P E J; Rosati, P; Roediger, E; Randall, S W; Sayers, J; Umetsu, K; Vikhlinin, A; Zitrin, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on high-resolution JVLA and Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. MACS J0717.5+3745 offers the largest contiguous magnified area of any known cluster, making it a promising target to search for lensed radio and X-ray sources. With the high-resolution 1.0-6.5 GHz JVLA imaging in A and B configuration, we detect a total of 51 compact radio sources within the area covered by the HST imaging. Within this sample we find 7 lensed sources with amplification factors larger than $2$. None of these sources are identified as multiply-lensed. Based on the radio luminosities, the majority of these sources are likely star forming galaxies with star formation rates of 10-50 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ located at $1 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 2$. Two of the lensed radio sources are also detected in the Chandra image of the cluster. These two sources are likely AGN, given their $2-10$ keV X-ray luminosities of $\\sim 10^{43-44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. From the derived radio luminosity function, we find evidence...

  18. IRAS F02044+0957 radio source in interacting system of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhodanov, O V; Mujica, R; Valdés, J R; Trushkin, S A

    2001-01-01

    The steep spectrum of IRAS F02044+0957 was obtained with the RATAN-600 radio telescope at four frequencies. Optical spectroscopy of the system components, was carried out with the 2.1m telescope of the Guillermo Haro Observatory. Observational data allow us to conclude that this object is a pair of interacting galaxies, a LINER and a HII galaxy, at $z=0.093$.

  19. Discovery of an unusual new radio source in the star-forming galaxy M82: Faint supernova, supermassive blackhole, or an extra-galactic microquasar?

    CERN Document Server

    Muxlow, T W B; Garrington, S T; Pedlar, A; Fenech, D M; Argo, M K; van Eymeren, J; Ward, M; Zezas, A; Brunthaler, A

    2010-01-01

    A faint new radio source has been detected in the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy M82 using MERLIN radio observations designed to monitor the flux density evolution of the recent bright supernova SN2008iz. This new source was initially identified in observations made between 1-5th May 2009 but had not been present in observations made one week earlier, or in any previous observations of M82. In this paper we report the discovery of this new source and monitoring of its evolution over its first 9 months of existence. The true nature of this new source remains unclear, and we discuss whether this source may be an unusual and faint supernova, a supermassive blackhole associated with the nucleus of M82, or intriguingly the first detection of radio emission from an extragalactic microquasar.

  20. Hydrodynamic Models of Radio Galaxy Morphology: Winged and X-shaped Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J

    2011-01-01

    We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic models of radio galaxies interacting with initially relaxed hot atmospheres and explore the significant off-axis radio lobe structures which result under certain conditions. With a focus on the "winged" and "X-shaped" radio galaxy population, we confirm the importance of observed trends such as the connection of wing formation with jets co-aligned with the major axis of the surrounding atmosphere. These wings are formed substantially by the deflection of lobe plasma flowing back from the hot spots (backflow) and develop in two stages: supersonic expansion of an overpressured cocoon at early times followed by buoyant expansion at later times. We explore a limited parameter space of jet and atmosphere properties and find that the most prominent wings are produced when a decaying jet is injected into a small, dense, highly elliptical atmosphere. On the basis of this search, we argue that the deflection of backflow by gradients in the hot atmosphere is a strong candidate ...

  1. Bent-Tailed Radio Sources in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey of the Chandra Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Dehghan, Siamak; Franzen, Thomas M O; Norris, Ray P; Miller, Neal A

    2015-01-01

    Using the 1.4 GHz Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS), supplemented with the 1.4 GHz Very Large Array images, we undertook a search for bent-tailed (BT) radio galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Here we present a catalog of 56 detections, which include 45 bent-tailed sources, four diffuse low-surface-brightness objects (one relic, two halos, and one unclassified object), and a further seven complex, multi-component sources. We report BT sources with rest-frame powers in the range $10^{22} \\leq$ $\\textrm{P}_{1.4 \\textrm{ GHz}} \\leq 10^{26}$ W Hz$^{-1}$, redshifts up to 2 and linear extents from tens of kpc up to about one Mpc. This is the first systematic study of such sources down to such low powers and high redshifts and demonstrates the complementary nature of searches in deep, limited area surveys as compared to shallower, large surveys. Of the sources presented here one is the most distant bent-tailed source yet detected at a redshift of 2.1688. Two of the sources are found to be as...

  2. Deep imaging of Fanaroff-Riley Class I radio galaxies with lobes

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, R A; Bridle, A H; Parma, P; Bondi, M

    2011-01-01

    We present deep, high-resolution imaging of the nearby Fanaroff-Riley Class I (FR I) radio galaxies NGC 193, B2 0206+35, B2 0755+37 and M 84 at frequencies of 4.9 and 1.4 GHz using new and archival multi-configuration observations from the Very Large Array. In addition, we describe lower-resolution observations of B2 0326+39 and a reanalysis of our published images of 3C 296. All of these radio galaxies show twin jets and well-defined lobes or bridges of emission, and we examine the common properties of this class of source. We show detailed images of total intensity, brightness gradient, spectral index, degree of polarization and projected magnetic-field direction. The jet bases are very similar to those in tailed twin-jet sources and show the characteristics of decelerating, relativistic flows. Except on one side of M 84, we find that the jets can be traced at least as far as the ends of the lobes, where they often form structures which we call "caps" with sharp outer brightness gradients. Continuing, but l...

  3. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nori, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  4. Planck intermediate results. VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jagemann, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurinsky, N.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschènes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sajina, A.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Sudiwala, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2013-02-01

    We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources - infrared and radio sources - from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately homogeneous coverage are used to permit a clean and controlled correction for incompleteness, which was explicitly not done for the ERCSC, as it was aimed at providing lists of sources to be followed up. Our sample, prior to the 80% completeness cut, contains between 217 sources at 100 GHz and 1058 sources at 857 GHz over about 12 800 to 16 550 deg2 (31 to 40% of the sky). After the 80% completeness cut, between 122 and 452 and sources remain, with flux densities above 0.3 and 1.9 Jy at 100 and 857 GHz. The sample so defined can be used for statistical analysis. Using the multi-frequency coverage of the Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between the two populations. We find an approximately equal number of synchrotron and dusty sources between 217 and 353 GHz; at 353 GHz or higher (or 217 GHz and lower) frequencies, the number is dominated by dusty (synchrotron) sources, as expected. For most of the sources, the spectral indices are also derived. We provide for the first time counts of bright sources from 353 to 857 GHz and the contributions from dusty and synchrotron sources at all HFI frequencies in the key spectral range where these spectra are crossing. The observed counts are in the Euclidean regime. The number counts are compared to previously published data (from earlier Planck results, Herschel, BLAST, SCUBA, LABOCA, SPT, and ACT) and models taking into account both radio or infrared galaxies, and covering a

  5. A revisit to self-excited push pull vacuum tube radio frequency oscillator for ion sources and power measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlondo, L R; Lalremruata, B; Punte, L R M; Rebecca, L; Lalnunthari, J; Thanga, H H

    2016-04-01

    Self-excited push-pull vacuum tube oscillator is one of the most commonly used oscillators in radio frequency (RF)-ion plasma sources for generation of ions using radio frequency. However, in spite of its fundamental role in the process of plasma formation, the working and operational characteristics are the most frequently skip part in the descriptions of RF ion sources in literatures. A more detailed treatment is given in the present work on the RF oscillator alone using twin beam power tetrodes 829B and GI30. The circuit operates at 102 MHz, and the oscillation conditions, stability in frequency, and RF output power are studied and analyzed. A modified form of photometric method and RF peak voltage detection method are employed to study the variation of the oscillator output power with plate voltage. The power curves obtained from these measurements are quadratic in nature and increase with increase in plate voltage. However, the RF output power as measured by photometric methods is always less than the value calculated from peak voltage measurements. This difference is due to the fact that the filament coil of the ordinary light bulb used as load/detector in photometric method is not a perfect inductor. The effect of inductive reactance on power transfer to load was further investigated and a technique is developed to estimate the amount of power correction needed in the photometric measurement result.

  6. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  7. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, T. J. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia)

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  8. Discovery of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a Fermi Source with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Desvignes, G.; Camilo, F.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a search of a Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source with no known associations, with the Nancay Radio Telescope. The new pulsar, confirmed with the Green Bank Telescope, has a spin period of 2.38 ms, is relatively nearby (d approx. system have made PSR J2043+1711 one of the first new Fermi-selected millisecond pulsars to be added to pulsar gravitational wave timing arrays. It has also allowed a significant measurement of relativistic delays in the times of arrival of the pulses due to the curvature of space-time near the companion, but not yet with enough precision to derive useful masses for the pulsar and the companion. Nevertheless, a mass for the pulsar between 1.7 and 2.0 solar Mass can be derived if a standard millisecond pulsar formation model is assumed. In this paper, we also present a comprehensive summary of pulsar searches in Fermi LAT sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope to date.

  9. Confirmation of a conspiracy - Dual-band VLBI maps of the flat-spectrum radio source 2021 + 614

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittels, J. J.; Shapiro, I. I.; Cotton, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    VLBI observations at 3.6 and 13 cm wavelengths of the flat-spectrum radio source 2021 + 614 reveal two components, separated by about 6.5 + or - 0.6 milli-arcseconds along a position angle of 36 deg + or - 6 deg. The dual-band observations show that the two components have spectral indices of opposite signs, indicating that, as for 0735 + 178 (Cotton et al. 1980), the flat spectrum of 2021 + 614 is a result of the superposition of spectra from individual components, each having a peaked spectrum, presumably due to incoherent electron synchrotron radiation. If this situation is typical, then there is too large a percentage of flat-spectrum sources for the individual components in each to have independent characteristics.

  10. Multiepoch Radio Observations of the Exciting Sources of HH 212 and HH 119

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Galván Madrid

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos observaciones de alta resolución angular (- 0.``3 hechas con el Very Large Array a 3.5 cm hacia las regiones de las fuentes excitadoras de dos sistemas Herbig-Haro: HH 212 en Orión y HH 119 en B335. Las observaciones fueron hechas durante tres épocas diferentes con el objetivo de medir posibles variaciones temporales rápidas (en la escala de una semana a un mes en las fuentes. En HH 212 detectamos, promediando las observaciones de las tres épocas, una fuente muy débil justo en la posición esperada para la fuente excitadora del sistema HH. La comparación con otras observaciones de radio de esta fuente indica variación temporal considerable en escala de años. En B335 detectamos en cada época al objeto previamente reportado por otros autores y nuestros resultados sugieren que esta fuente, un chorro térmico de radio, es variable en escalas de tiempo de un mes. Discutimos posibles explicaciones para esta rápida variabilidad.

  11. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project: analysis of radio source properties between 5 and 217 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Massardi, Marcella; Bonavera, Laura; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Galluzzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project has yielded observations of 464 sources with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) between 4.5 and 40 GHz. The main purpose of the project was to investigate the spectral properties of mm-selected radio sources at frequencies below and overlapping with the ESA's Planck satellite frequency bands, minimizing the variability effects by observing almost simultaneously with the first two Planck all-sky surveys. In this paper we present the whole catalogue of observations in total intensity. By comparing PACO with the various measures of Planck Catalog of Compact Sources (PCCS) flux densities we found the best consistency with the PCCS "detection pipeline" photometry (DETFLUX) that we used to investigate the spectral properties of sources from 5 to 217 GHz. Of our sources, 91% have remarkably smooth spectrum, well described by a double power law over the full range. This suggests a single emitting region, at variance with the notion that "flat" spectra resu...

  12. PSR J2021+3651 A Young Radio Pulsar Coincident with an Unidentified EGRET Gamma-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Ransom, S M; Kaspi, V M; Freire, P C C; Crawford, F; Lorimer, D R; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Crawford, Fronefield; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2002-01-01

    We report on a deep search for radio pulsations toward five unidentified ASCA X-ray sources coincident with EGRET gamma-ray sources. This search has led to the discovery of a young and energetic pulsar using data obtained with the new Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor. PSR J2021+3651 is likely associated with the X-ray source AX J2021.1+3651, which in turn is likely associated with the COS B high energy gamma-ray source 2CG 075+00, also known as GeV J2020+3658 or 3EG J2021+3716. PSR J2021+3651 has a rotation period P = 104 ms and P_dot = 9.6x10^{-14}, implying a characteristic age ~17 kyr and a spin-down luminosity E_dot ~ 3.4x10^{36}ergs/s. The dispersion measure DM ~ 371 pc cm^{-3} is by far the highest of any observed pulsar in the Galactic longitude range 55 10 kpc, and a high gamma-ray efficiency of \\~15%, but the true distance may be closer if there is a significant contribution to the DM from excess gas in the Cygnus region. The implied luminosity of the associated X-ray source suggests the X-ray emis...

  13. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  14. Ways to improve the efficiency and reliability of radio frequency driven negative ion sources for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, W., E-mail: kraus@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Briefi, S.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); AG Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Universität Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Gutmann, P.; Doerfler, J. [AG Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Universität Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources are being developed at IPP Garching for the future neutral beam injection system of ITER. The overall power efficiency of these sources is low, because for the RF power supply self-excited generators are utilized and the plasma is generated in small cylindrical sources (“drivers”) and expands into the source main volume. At IPP experiments to reduce the primary power and the RF power required for the plasma production are performed in two ways: The oscillator generator of the prototype source has been replaced by a transistorized RF transmitter and two alternative driver concepts, a spiral coil, in which the field is concentrated by ferrites, which omits the losses by plasma expansion and a helicon source are being tested.

  15. A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong Huang; Jun-Hui Fan; Jing Pan

    2011-03-01

    Variability is one of the extremely observational properties. In the radio bands, variability is caused by the shock in the jet. In this case, emissions increase rapidly following an exponential curve, and then decrease rapidly also in an exponential curve. The variability time scale is important with regard to the physics carrying on in the jet. However, it is not easy to fit the light curve. In this paper, we proposed a method of light curve fitting on a PC machine, in which the theoretical exponential light curve is adopted to the observations using the least regression method. Using this method, anybody can fit the light curve and get the time scale by moving and clicking themouse.We also used this method to some light curves obtained from the archive and compared our results with those in the literature.

  16. Simplified radio-over-fiber transport systems with a low-cost multiband light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Hung; Peng, Peng-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Shih, Chine-Liang; Chen, Hwan-Wen

    2010-12-01

    In this Letter, low-cost radio-over-fiber (ROF) transport systems are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By utilizing a laser diode (LD) and a local oscillator (LO) to generate coherent multiband optical carriers, as well as a self-composed wavelength selector to separate every two carriers for different ROF transport systems, no any other dedicated LD or electrical frequency upconverting circuit/process is needed in the central station (CS). Compared with current ROF systems, the required numbers of LDs, LOs, and mixers in a CS are significantly reduced. Reducing the number of components not only can simplify the network structure but can also reduce the volume and complexity of the relative logistics. To demonstrate the practice of the proposed ROF transport systems, clear eye diagrams and error-free transmission performance are experimentally presented.

  17. Interpretation of the Global Anisotropy in the Radio Polarizations of Cosmologically Distant Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj Jain; S. Sarala

    2006-12-01

    We present a detailed statistical study of the observed anisotropy in radio polarizations from distant extragalactic objects. This anisotropy was earlier found by Birch (1982) and reconfirmed by Jain and Ralston (1999) in a larger data set. A very strong signal was seen after imposing the cut $|RM-\\overline{RM}| \\gt 6$ rad/m2, where RM is the rotation measure and $\\overline{RM}$ its mean value. In this paper, we show that there are several indications that this anisotropy cannot be attributed to bias in the data. We also find that a generalized statistic shows a very strong signal in the entire data without imposing the RM dependent cut. Finally we argue that an anisotropic background pseudoscalar field can explain the observations.

  18. Neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of the radio source Sagittarius B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alferova, Z.A.; Venger, A.P.; Gosachinskii, I.V.; Grachev, V.G.; Mogileva, V.G.; Ryzhkov, N.F.; Yudaeva, N.A.

    1980-11-01

    The H 1 cloud around the Sgr B2 gas--dust complex at +60 km/sec radial velocity has been observed with the RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 21-cm line with 2'.6 x 55' x 6.3 km/sec resolution. The cloud measures roughly-equal40 pc across; its H 1 mass is roughly-equal1.5 x 10/sup 3/ M/sub sun/ and it has a low kinetic temperature, <20 /sup 0/K. It is rotating as a unit with roughly-equal20 km/sec velocity at its edge, but radial motions of 5 km/sec or more are absent.

  19. GPS Radio Occultation: A Potential New Data Source for Improvement of Antarctic Pressure Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Sheng-jie; C. K. Shum; J. Wickert; Ch. Reigber

    2003-01-01

    Radio occultation technique, first demonstrated by the GPS/MET experiment in 1995[1], has the potential to provide improved spatial and temporal resolution in the probing of the Earth's neutral atmosphere, including pressure,temperature and water vapor profiles, in addition to traditional measurements (e.g.,radiosonde, spaceborne radiometers) and ground-based GPS networks for precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements. This paper provides an overview of the radio occultation concept and retrieval procedure and current technical limitations including lower troposphere inhomogeneities, signal penetration, multipath, and water vapor ambiguity. The current limitations using atmospheric model pressure fields (ECMWF and NCEP) for the modeling of atmospheric mass load over Antarctica, for its separation from climate sensitive signals observed by gravity mapping satellite,GRACE, are quantified. Atmospheric pressure fields over Antarctica are poorly known and higher temporal variability of pressure causes an "aliasing" error in GRACE-observed climate-sensitive signals such as hydrology, mass balance and oceanic mass variations. In particular, comparison of ECMWF 6-hour data with the Automatic Weather Station (AWS) in Antarctica indicates mean differences of 5 hPa,and rms of 1.7 hPa, exceeding the accuracy requirement for GRACE. Aliasing effec tmanifests as high-frequency errors in GRACE-observed gravity signals and are more pronounced over Antarctica. The possibility of using current operating satellite(SAC-C, CHAMP and GRACE) occultation data to improve Antarctic surface pressure fields is proposed. Preliminary results indicate that in the absence of water vapor over Antarctica, retrieved CHAMP pressure profile agrees well with radiosonde data from Neumayer station, and that occultation signals reach near the surface.

  20. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources III: gamma-ray blazar-like counterparts at low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Giroletti, M; Paggi, A; Masetti, N; Tosti, G; Nori, M; Funk, S

    2013-01-01

    About one third of the gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi LAT catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies so being classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the northern hemisphere. First we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of gamma-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the gamma-ray blazar candidates selected with the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the ...

  1. Radio observations of the TeV source HESS J1943+213: a new case of a pulsar wind nebula?

    CERN Document Server

    Gabanyi, K E; Giacani, E; Paragi, Z; Pidopryhora, Y; Frey, S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the H.E.S.S. Collaboration discovered a very high energy gamma-ray point source close to the Galactic plane. They offered three possible explanations for the nature of the source: a gamma-ray binary, a pulsar wind nebula, or a BL Lac object. They concluded that the observations favoured an extreme BL Lac object interpretation. We investigated the nature of the radio source reported as the counterpart of the very high energy gamma-ray source. We performed high-resolution radio interferometric observations with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network at a frequency of 1.6 GHz on 2011 May 18. We also reanalysed archival 1.4-GHz radio continuum and HI spectral line data taken with the Very Large Array. The accurate position of the radio source, as observed with EVN, is ~ 4" off from the one obtained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. The new position is in excellent agreement with that of the proposed X-ray counterpart of the TeV source. From HI absorption data, a distance of about 11.5 +/- 1.5 ...

  2. Small radio frequency driven multicusp ion source for positive hydrogen ion beam production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L.T.; Herz, P.R.; Leung, K.N.; Pickard, D.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1994-04-01

    A compact, 2.5 cm diam rf-driven multicusp ion source has been developed and tested for H[sup +] ion production in pulse mode operation. The source is optimized for atomic hydrogen ion species and extractable current. It is found that hydrogen ion beam current densities in excess of 650 mA/cm[sup 2] can be achieved with H[sup +] species above 80%. The geometry and position of the porcelain-coated copper antenna were found to be of great significance in relation to the efficiency of the ion source.

  3. Enhancing GNU Radio for Hardware Accelerated Radio Design

    OpenAIRE

    Irick, Charles Robert

    2010-01-01

    As technology evolves and new methods for designing radios arise, it becomes necessary to continue the search for fast and flexible development environments. Some of these new technologies include software defined radio (SDR), Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and the open source project GNU Radio. Software defined radio is a concept that GNU Radio has harnessed to allow developers to quickly create flexible radio designs. In terms of hardware, the maturity of FPGAs give ...

  4. VLA observations of the wide-angle tailed radio source 1313+073

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patnaik, A.R.; Banhatti, D.G.; Subrahmanya, C.R. (Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bangalore (India). Radio Astronomy Centre)

    1984-12-15

    VLA observations at 20 and 6 cm of the wide-angle tailed source 1313+073 are presented. It has an asymmetric structure with a sharp bend in the eastern tail and a gradual bend in the western. Both tails become diffuse after the bends. Several models are explored to explain this structure and it is concluded that the tails bend because of the motion of the parent cD galaxy through the ICM, which is possible if the cluster containing the source is dynamically young. Examination of the optical fields of 26 similar sources shows that in 20 of them the parent galaxies have a fainter companion (by approx. 2 mag), or are D, cD or db. This indicates that cannibalism may be important in the formation and powering of such sources.

  5. Modeling of plasma transport and negative ion extraction in a magnetized radio-frequency plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G.; Kohen, N.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Negative ion sources for fusion are high densities plasma sources in large discharge volumes. There are many challenges in the modeling of these sources, due to numerical constraints associated with the high plasma density, to the coupling between plasma and neutral transport and chemistry, the presence of a magnetic filter, and the extraction of negative ions. In this paper we present recent results concerning these different aspects. Emphasis is put on the modeling approach and on the methods and approximations. The models are not fully predictive and not complete as would be engineering codes but they are used to identify the basic principles and to better understand the physics of the negative ion sources.

  6. GNSS Radio Occultation Observations as a data source for Ionospheric Assimilation: COSMIC-1 & COSMIC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.; Kuo, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    Since the pioneer GPS/MET mission, low Earth orbit (LEO) based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique has been a powerful technique in ionosphere monitoring. After that, many LEO satellites were launched with RO payload, include: CHAMP , GRACE, SAC-C/D, COSMIC, C/NOFS, Metop-A/B, TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X, and etc. COSMIC was the first constellation of satellites dedicated primarily to RO and delivering RO data in near real time. Currently in UCAR CDAAC, we process most of these missions' RO data for the community. Due to the success of COSMIC mission, a follow on mission called COSMIC-2 will be launched in 2016 and 2018, respectively. The COSMIC-2 RO data will be 4-6 times of COSMIC due to the doubled satellite and GNSS signals. In this paper we will describe: (1) Data process and quality in UCAR/CDAAC; (2) Ionospheric data assimilation results based on COSMIC data; (3) OSSE study for COSMIC-2.

  7. Spectral Indices of Core and Extended Components of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Shui Zhang; Jun-Hui Fan

    2003-01-01

    We use observed peak and total flux densities at 6cm and 20 cm to determine the spectral indices separately for the core and extended components of QSOs and galaxies, as well as their core-dominance parameters. Our results indicate that 1) Nine QSOs show both greater than 1.0 core-dominance parameters (those objects should be blazars) and greater than 0.5 spectral indices. The average core spectral index is αCore = 0.85±0.21 for the nine blazars, which implies that it is not reliable to use αradio = 0.0 for blazars. For the different subclasses, the core and extended spectral indices are as follows: for the blazars, αCore = 0.22±0.06 and αExt =0.77±0.12; the galaxies, αCore = 1.01±0.13 and αExt =0.83±0.21, and for the QSOs, αCore = 0.28±0.10 and αExt =0.68±0.08. 2) The core spectral index and core dominance parameter (R) show an anti-correlation, αC = (-1.28±0.26) log R+(0.65 ± 0.11); 3) R is approximately linearly correlated with redshift (z).

  8. Broadband Spectral Modeling of the Extreme Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum Radio Source PKS B0008-421

    CERN Document Server

    Callingham, J R; Ekers, R D; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Morgan, J; Bernardi, G; Bell, M E; Bhat, R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Jacobs, D C; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kudrayavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Shankar, N Udaya; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    We present broadband observations and spectral modeling of PKS B0008-421, and identify it as an extreme gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) source. PKS B0008-421 is characterized by the steepest known spectral slope below the turnover, close to the theoretical limit of synchrotron self-absorption, and the smallest known spectral width of any GPS source. Spectral coverage of the source spans from 0.118 to 22 GHz, which includes data from the Murchison Widefield Array and the wide bandpass receivers on the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have implemented a Bayesian inference model fitting routine to fit the data with various absorption models. We find that without the inclusion of a high-frequency exponential break the absorption models can not accurately fit the data, with significant deviations above and below the peak in the radio spectrum. The addition of a high-frequency break provides acceptable spectral fits for the inhomogeneous free-free absorption and double-component synchrotron self-absorption mod...

  9. 20 cm VLA radio-continuum study of M31-images and point source catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvin T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at λ=20 cm (v=1.4 GHz from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004 at λ=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73% of these sources exhibit a spectral index of α<-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs. Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these objects in our images within a 500 search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogues were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNRs and SNR candidates common to multi frequency domains.

  10. 20 cm VLA Radio-Continuum Study of M31 - Images and Point Source Catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    CERN Document Server

    Galvin, T J

    2014-01-01

    We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at lambda=20 cm (nu=1.4 GHz) from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004) at lambda=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73%) of these sources exhibit a spectral index of alpha <-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs). Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these object in our images within a 5 arcsec search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogs were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNR and SNR candidates common to multi-frequency domains.

  11. Radio polarimetry of compact steep spectrum sources at sub-arcsecond resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, F; Junor, W; Saikia, D J; Salter, C J

    2013-01-01

    Aims - We report new Very Large Array polarimetric observations of Compact Steep-Spectrum (CSS) sources at 8.4, 15, and 23GHz. Methods - Using multi-frequency VLA observations we have derived sub-arcsecond resolution images of the total intensity, polarisation, and rotation measure (RM) distributions. Results heading - We present multi-frequency VLA polarisation observations of CSS sources. About half of the sources are point-like even at the resolution of about 0.1x0.1 arcseconds. The remaining sources have double or triple structure. Low values for the percentage of polarised emission in CSS sources is confirmed. On the average, quasars are more polarised than galaxies. A wide range of RM values have been measured. There are clear indications of very large RMs up to 5\\,585 rad m**(-2). CSS galaxies are characterized by RM values that are larger than CSS quasars. The majority of the objects show very large values of RM. Conclusions - The available data on sub-arcsecond-scale rest-frame RM estimates for CSS s...

  12. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. V. ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO CANDIDATES WITH THE KERNEL DENSITY ESTIMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G., E-mail: fmassaro@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Nearly one-third of the γ-ray sources detected by Fermi are still unidentified, despite significant recent progress in this area. However, all of the γ-ray extragalactic sources associated in the second Fermi-LAT catalog have a radio counterpart. Motivated by this observational evidence, we investigate all the radio sources of the major radio surveys that lie within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs) at a 95% level of confidence. First, we search for their infrared counterparts in the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and then we analyze their IR colors in comparison with those of the known γ-ray blazars. We propose a new approach, on the basis of a two-dimensional kernel density estimation technique in the single [3.4] – [4.6] – [12] μm WISE color-color plot, replacing the constraint imposed in our previous investigations on the detection at 22 μm of each potential IR counterpart of the UGSs with associated radio emission. The main goal of this analysis is to find distant γ-ray blazar candidates that, being too faint at 22 μm, are not detected by WISE and thus are not selected by our purely IR-based methods. We find 55 UGSs that likely correspond to radio sources with blazar-like IR signatures. An additional 11 UGSs that have blazar-like IR colors have been found within the sample of sources found with deep recent Australia Telescope Compact Array observations.

  13. Extended X-ray emission from non-thermal sources in the COSMOS field: A detailed study of a large radio galaxy at z=1.168

    CERN Document Server

    Jelic, Vibor; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Civano, Francesca; Schinnerer, Eva; Cappelluti, Nico; Koekemoer, Anton

    2012-01-01

    X-ray selected galaxy group samples are usually generated by searching for extended X- ray sources that reflect the thermal radiation of the intragroup medium. On the other hand, large radio galaxies that regularly occupy galaxy groups also emit in the X-ray window, and their contribution to X-ray selected group samples is still not well understood. In order to investigate their relative importance, we have carried out a systematic search for non-thermal extended X-ray sources in the COSMOS field. Based on the morphological coincidence of X-ray and radio extensions, out of 60 radio galaxies, and \\sim 300 extended X-ray sources, we find only one candidate where the observed extended X-ray emission arises from non- thermal processes related to radio galaxies. We present a detailed analysis of this source, and its environment. Our results yield that external Inverse Compton emission of the lobes is the dominant process that generates the observed X-ray emission of our extended X-ray candidate, with a minor contr...

  14. Negative chlorine ions from multicusp radio frequency ion source for heavy ion fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahto, S. K.; Hahto, S. T.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.; Grisham, L. R.

    2003-06-01

    Use of high mass atomic neutral beams produced from negative ions as drivers for inertial confinement fusion has been suggested recently. Best candidates for the negative ions would be bromine and iodine with sufficiently high mass and electron affinity. These materials require a heated vapor ion source. Chlorine was selected for initial testing because it has similar electron affinity to those of bromine and iodine, and is available in gaseous form. An experiment was set up by the Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to measure achievable current densities and other beam parameters by using a rf driven multicusp ion source [K. N. Leung, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 65, 1165 (1994); Q. Ji et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 822 (2002)]. Current density of 45 mA/cm2 was achieved with 99.5% of the beam as atomic negative chlorine at 2.2 kW of rf power. An electron to negative ion ratio as low as 7 to 1 was observed, while the ratio of positive and negative chlorine ion currents was 1.3. This in addition to the fact that the front plate biasing had almost no effect to the negative chlorine ion and electron currents indicates that a very high percentage of the negative charge in the extraction area of the ion source was in form of Cl- ions. A comparison of positive and negative chlorine ion temperatures was conducted with the pepper pot emittance measurement technique and very similar transverse temperature values were obtained for positive and negative chlorine ions.

  15. Could the Compact Radio Sources in M82 be Cluster Wind Driven Bubbles?

    CERN Document Server

    Seaquist, E R

    2006-01-01

    The compact non-thermal sources in M82 and other starburst galaxies are generally thought to be supernova remnants (SNRs). We consider an alternative hypothesis that most are wind driven bubbles (WDBs) associated with very young super star clusters (SSCs). In this scenario, the synchrotron emitting particles are produced at the site of the shock transition between the cluster wind and the hot bubble gas. The particles radiate in the strong magnetic field produced in the expanding shell of shocked ambient interstellar gas. One of the motivations for this hypothesis is the lack of observed time variability in most of the sources, implying ages greater than expected for SNRs, but comfortably within the range for WDBs. In addition, as SNRs, these sources are not effective in driving the starburst mass outflow associated with the nuclear region of M82, thus requiring a separate mechanism for coupling SN energy to this outflow. The WDB hypothesis is found to be feasible for underlying clusters in the mass range ~2x...

  16. Radio-loud high-redshift protogalaxy canidates in Bootes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S; van Breugel, W; Brown, M J; de Vries, W; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Jannuzi, B; Rottgering, H; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Willner, S P

    2007-07-20

    We used the Near Infrared Camera (NIRC) on Keck I to obtain K{sub s}-band images of four candidate high-redshift radio galaxies selected using optical and radio data in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey in Bootes. Our targets have 1.4 GHz radio flux densities greater than 1 mJy, but are undetected in the optical. Spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that three of these objects are at z > 3, with radio luminosities near the FR-I/FR-II break. The other has photometric redshift z{sub phot} = 1.2, but may in fact be at higher redshift. Two of the four objects exhibit diffuse morphologies in K{sub s}-band, suggesting that they are still in the process of forming.

  17. Radio-frequency ion source generating beams with an increased proton content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Podyminogin, A. A.; Shikhovtsev, I. V.

    2007-01-01

    The results of experiments with an rf ion source generating a beam with an improved mass composition are reported. The proton content in the beam is increased by raising the rf power density in the discharge under the antenna and installing a magnetic filter near the plasma grid. Additional steps are taken to prevent the earlier observed degradation of the beam composition because of aluminum reduction on the inner surface of the ceramic discharge chamber and water release. Specifically, the chamber is lined with pyrolytic boron nitride sheets.

  18. Radio frequency-driven proton source with a back-streaming electron dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Q; Sy, A; Kwan, J W

    2010-02-01

    This article describes an rf ion source with a back-streaming electron dump. A quartz tube, brazed to a metal plug at one end, is fused in the center of a flat quartz plate. rf power (at 13.6 MHz) is coupled to generate hydrogen plasma using a planar external antenna bonded to the window. Bonding the water-cooled rf antenna to the quartz window significantly lowers its temperature. The water-cooled metal plug serves as the back-streaming electron dump. At 1800 W, the current density of extracted hydrogen ions reaches approximately 125 mA/cm(2).

  19. Star formation rates in Lyman break galaxies: radio stacking of LBGs in the COSMOS field and the sub-$\\mu$Jy radio source population

    CERN Document Server

    Carilli, C L; Capak, P; Schinnerer, E; Lee, K -S; McCraken, H; Yun, M S; Scoville, N; Smolcic, V; Giavalisco, M; Datta, A; Taniguchi, Y; Urry, C Megan

    2008-01-01

    We present an analysis of the radio properties of large samples of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at $z \\sim 3$, 4, and 5 from the COSMOS field. The median stacking analysis yields a statistical detection of the $z \\sim 3$ LBGs (U-band drop-outs), with a 1.4 GHz flux density of $0.90 \\pm 0.21 \\mu$Jy. The stacked emission is unresolved, with a size $< 1"$, or a physical size $< 8$kpc. The total star formation rate implied by this radio luminosity is $31\\pm 7$ $M_\\odot$ year$^{-1}$, based on the radio-FIR correlation in low redshift star forming galaxies. The star formation rate derived from a similar analysis of the UV luminosities is 17 $M_\\odot$ year$^{-1}$, without any correction for UV dust attenuation. The simplest conclusion is that the dust attenuation factor is 1.8 at UV wavelengths. However, this factor is considerably smaller than the standard attenuation factor $\\sim 5$, normally assumed for LBGs. We discuss potential reasons for this discrepancy, including the possibility that the dust attenuati...

  20. Understanding Radio-Selected Thermal Sources in M 33: Ultraviolet, Optical, Near-Infrared, Spitzer Mid-Infrared, and Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Buckalew, B A; Darnel, J M; Polomski, E; Gehrz, R D; Humphreys, R M; Woodward, C E; Hinz, J L; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Misselt, K; Pérez-González, P G; Rieke, G H; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Barmby, P; Pahre, M A; Roellig, T L; Devereux, N; Van Loon, J T; Brandl, B; Buckalew, Brent A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Darnel, Jonathan M.; Polomski, Elisha; Gehrz, Robert D.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Woodward, Charles E.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Rieke, George H.; Devereux, Nick; Loon, Jacco Th. Van

    2005-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared, Spitzer mid-infrared, and radio images of 14 radio-selected objects in M 33. These objects are thought to represent the youngest phase of star cluster formation. We have detected the majority of cluster candidates in M 33 at all wavelengths. From the near-IR images, we derived ages 2-10 Myr, K_S-band extinctions (A_K_S) of 0-1 mag, and stellar masses of 10^3-10^4 M_solar. We have generated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each cluster from 0.1 micron to 160 microns. From these SEDs, we have modeled the dust emission around these star clusters to determine the dust masses (1-10^3 M_solar) and temperatures (40-90 K) of the clusters' local interstellar medium. Extinctions derived from the JHK_S, Halpha, and UV images are similar to within a factor of 2 or 3. These results suggest that eleven of the fourteen radio-selected objects are optically-visible young star clusters with a surrounding H II region, that two are background objects, possibly AGN, and that ...