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Sample records for fourth-order dispersion mediated

  1. On the Schrodinger equations with isotropic and anisotropic fourth-order dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder J. Villamizar-Roa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the Cauchy problem associated with the nonlinear fourth-order Schrodinger equation with isotropic and anisotropic mixed dispersion. This model is given by the equation $$ i\\partial_tu+\\epsilon \\Delta u+\\delta A u+\\lambda|u|^\\alpha u=0,\\quad x\\in\\mathbb{R}^{n},\\; t\\in \\mathbb{R}, $$ where A is either the operator $\\Delta^2$ (isotropic dispersion or $\\sum_{i=1}^d\\partial_{x_ix_ix_ix_i}$, $1\\leq ddispersion, and $\\alpha, \\epsilon, \\lambda$ are real parameters. We obtain local and global well-posedness results in spaces of initial data with low regularity, based on weak-$L^p$ spaces. Our analysis also includes the biharmonic and anisotropic biharmonic equation $(\\epsilon=0$; in this case, we obtain the existence of self-similar solutions because of their scaling invariance property. In a second part, we analyze the convergence of solutions for the nonlinear fourth-order Schrodinger equation $$ i\\partial_tu+\\epsilon \\Delta u+\\delta \\Delta^2 u+\\lambda|u|^\\alpha u=0, \\quad x\\in\\mathbb{R}^{n},\\; t\\in \\mathbb{R}, $$ as $\\epsilon$ approaches zero, in the $H^2$-norm, to the solutions of the corresponding biharmonic equation $i\\partial_tu+\\delta \\Delta^2 u+\\lambda|u|^\\alpha u=0$.

  2. Bilinear forms, N-soliton solutions and soliton interactions for a fourth-order dispersive nonlinear Schrödinger equation in condensed-matter physics and biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rong-Xiang; Tian, Bo; Liu, Li-Cai; Qin, Bo; Lü, Xing

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a fourth-order dispersive nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which governs the dynamics of a one-dimensional anisotropic Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin chain with the octuple–dipole interaction in condensed-matter physics as well as the alpha helical proteins with higher-order excitations and interactions in biophysics. Beyond the existing constraint, upon the introduction of an auxiliary function, bilinear forms and N-soliton solutions are constructed with the Hirota method. Asymptotic analysis on the two-soliton solutions indicates that the soliton interactions are elastic. Soliton velocity varies linearly with the coefficient of discreteness and higher-order magnetic interactions. Bound-state solitons can also exist under certain conditions. Period of a bound-state soliton is inversely correlated to the coefficient of discreteness and higher-order magnetic interactions. Interactions among the three solitons are all pairwise elastic

  3. Elliptic function and solitary wave solutions of the higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger dynamical equation with fourth-order dispersion and cubic-quintic nonlinearity and its stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, M.; Seadawy, Aly R.; Lu, Dianchen

    2017-08-01

    The higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) with fourth-order dispersion, cubic-quintic terms, self-steepening and nonlinear dispersive terms describes the propagation of extremely short pulses in optical fibers. In this paper, the elliptic function, bright and dark solitons and solitary wave solutions of higher-order NLSE are constructed by employing a modified extended direct algebraic method, which has important applications in applied mathematics and physics. Furthermore, we also present the formation conditions of the bright and dark solitons for this equation. The modulation instability is utilized to discuss the stability of these solutions, which shows that all solutions are exact and stable. Many other higher-order nonlinear evolution equations arising in applied sciences can also be solved by this powerful, effective and reliable method.

  4. SELF-ADJOINT FOURTH ORDER DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Click on the link to view the abstract. Keywords: Fourth order differential equation, eigenvalue dependent boundary conditions, quadratic operator pencil, self-adjoint operator. Quaestiones Mathematicae 34(2011), 393–406 ...

  5. Horizon thermodynamics in fourth-order gravity

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    Meng-Sen Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of horizon thermodynamics, the field equations of Einstein gravity and some other second-order gravities can be rewritten as the thermodynamic identity: dE=TdS−PdV. However, in order to construct the horizon thermodynamics in higher-order gravity, we have to simplify the field equations firstly. In this paper, we study the fourth-order gravity and convert it to second-order gravity via a so-called “Legendre transformation” at the cost of introducing two other fields besides the metric field. With this simplified theory, we implement the conventional procedure in the construction of the horizon thermodynamics in 3 and 4 dimensional spacetime. We find that the field equations in the fourth-order gravity can also be written as the thermodynamic identity. Moreover, we can use this approach to derive the same black hole mass as that by other methods.

  6. On a fourth order superlinear elliptic problem

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    M. Ramos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of a nonzero solution for the fourth order elliptic equation $$Delta^2u= mu u +a(xg(u$$ with boundary conditions $u=Delta u=0$. Here, $mu$ is a real parameter, $g$ is superlinear both at zero and infinity and $a(x$ changes sign in $Omega$. The proof uses a variational argument based on the argument by Bahri-Lions cite{BL}.

  7. New singularities in nonrelativistic coupled channel scattering. II. Fourth order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuri, N.N.; Tsun Wu, T.

    1997-01-01

    We consider a two-channel nonrelativistic potential scattering problem, and study perturbation theory in fourth order for the forward amplitude. The main result is that the new singularity demonstrated in second order in the preceding paper I also occurs at the same point in fourth order. Its strength is again that of a pole. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Quasipotential in the fourth order of perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojkova, N.A.; Dvoeglazov, V.V.; Tyukhtyaev, Yu.N.; Faustov, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    The quasipotential in the fourth order of perturbation theory is calculated in the Coulomb gauge for the unequal mass particles. It could be used for the future calculations of energy spectra in two-body systems. 15 refs.; 1 fig

  9. On a class of fourth order linear recurrence equations

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    Sui-Sun Cheng

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with sequences that satisfy a class of fourth order linear recurrence equations. Basic properties of such sequences are derived. In addition, we discuss the oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior of such sequences.

  10. Oscillation criteria for fourth-order nonlinear delay dynamic equations

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    Yunsong Qi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We obtain criteria for the oscillation of all solutions to a fourth-order nonlinear delay dynamic equation on a time scale that is unbounded from above. The results obtained are illustrated with examples

  11. Solving Variable Coefficient Fourth-Order Parabolic Equation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a Modified initial guess Variational Iteration Method (MigVIM) is used to solve a non-homogeneous variable coefficient fourth order parabolic partial differential equations. The new method shows rapid convergence to the exact solution.

  12. Multiway Filtering Based on Fourth-Order Cumulants

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    Salah Bourennane

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new multiway filtering based on fourth-order cumulants for the denoising of noisy data tensor with correlated Gaussian noise. The classical multiway filtering is based on the TUCKALS3 algorithm that computes a lower-rank tensor approximation. The presented method relies on the statistics of the analyzed multicomponent signal. We first recall how the well-known lower rank-(K1,…,KN tensor approximation processed by TUCKALS3 alternating least square algorithm exploits second-order statistics. Then, we propose to introduce the fourth-order statistics in the TUCKALS3-based method. Indeed, the use of fourth-order cumulants enables to remove the Gaussian components of an additive noise. In the presented method the estimation of the n-mode projector on the n-mode signal subspace are built from the eigenvectors associated with the largest eigenvalues of a fourth-order cumulant slice matrix instead of a covariance matrix. Each projector is applied by means of the n-mode product operator on the n-mode of the data tensor. The qualitative results of the improved multiway TUCKALS3-based filterings are shown for the case of noise reduction in a color image and multicomponent seismic data.

  13. A fourth order exponentially-fitted multiderivative method for Stiff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fourth order exponentially-fitted multiderivative method for Stiff initial value problems. ... Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... implemented and preliminary numerical results indicate that the approach compares favourably with other existing methods that have solved the same set of stiff problems.

  14. Benthic macroinvertebrate community of a fourth order stream in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cinthia

    Full Length Research Paper. Benthic macroinvertebrate community of a fourth order stream in Kashmir Himalaya, India. Shazia Habib1* and A.R. Yousuf2. 1Department of Environmental Science, University of Kashmir, Srinagar, India. 2National Green Tribunal, Government of India, India. Received 31 December, 2013; ...

  15. Fourth-order discrete anisotropic boundary-value problems

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    Maciej Leszczynski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the fourth-order discrete anisotropic boundary value problem with both advance and retardation. We apply the direct method of the calculus of variations and the mountain pass technique to prove the existence of at least one and at least two solutions. Non-existence of non-trivial solutions is also undertaken.

  16. Fourth Order Nonlinear Intensity and the corresponding Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonlinear effects occur whenever the optical fields associated with one or more intense light such as from laser beams propagating in a crystal are large enough to produce polarization fields. This paper describes how the fourth order nonlinear intensity and the corresponding effective refractive index that is intensity ...

  17. Electroencephalography in ellipsoidal geometry with fourth-order harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-Sosa, M; Gutierrez, D

    2016-08-01

    We present a solution to the electroencephalographs (EEG) forward problem of computing the scalp electric potentials for the case when the head's geometry is modeled using a four-shell ellipsoidal geometry and the brain sources with an equivalent current dipole (ECD). The proposed solution includes terms up to the fourth-order ellipsoidal harmonics and we compare this new approximation against those that only considered up to second- and third-order harmonics. Our comparisons use as reference a solution in which a tessellated volume approximates the head and the forward problem is solved through the boundary element method (BEM). We also assess the solution to the inverse problem of estimating the magnitude of an ECD through different harmonic approximations. Our results show that the fourth-order solution provides a better estimate of the ECD in comparison to lesser order ones.

  18. Dirac quantization of the Pais-Uhlenbeck fourth order oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.; Davidson, Aharon

    2005-01-01

    As a model, the Pais-Uhlenbeck fourth order oscillator with equation of motion: (d 4 q/dt 4 )+(ω 1 2 +ω 2 2 )(d 2 q/dt 2 )+ω 1 2 ω 2 2 q=0 is a quantum-mechanical prototype of a field theory containing both second and fourth order derivative terms. With its dynamical degrees of freedom obeying constraints due to the presence of higher order time derivatives, the model cannot be quantized canonically. We thus quantize it using the method of Dirac constraints to construct the correct quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for the system, and find that the Hamiltonian diagonalizes in the positive and negative norm states that are characteristic of higher derivative field theories. However, we also find that the oscillator commutation relations become singular in the ω 1 →ω 2 limit, a limit which corresponds to a prototype of a pure fourth order theory. Thus the particle content of the ω 1 =ω 2 theory cannot be inferred from that of the ω 1 ≠ω 2 theory; and in fact in the ω 1 →ω 2 limit we find that all of the ω 1 ≠ω 2 negative norm states move off shell, with the spectrum of asymptotic in and out states of the equal frequency theory being found to be completely devoid of states with either negative energy or negative norm. As a byproduct of our work we find a Pais-Uhlenbeck analog of the zero energy theorem of Boulware, Horowitz, and Strominger, and show how in the equal frequency Pais-Uhlenbeck theory the theorem can be transformed into a positive energy theorem instead

  19. Nest-mediated seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Warren; Jason P. Love; Mark A. Bradford

    2017-01-01

    Many plant seeds travel on the wind and through animal ingestion or adhesion; however, an overlooked dispersal mode may lurk within those dispersal modes. Viable seeds may remain attached or embedded within materials birds gather for nest building. Our objective was to determine if birds inadvertently transport seeds when they forage for plant materials to...

  20. Stable patterns for fourth-order parabolic equations

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, J. B.; Vandervorst, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    We consider fourth-order parabolic equations of gradient type. For the sake of simplicity, the analysis is carried out for the specific equation $u\\sb t=-\\gamma\\ u\\sb {xxxx}+\\beta u\\sb {xx}-F\\sp \\prime(u)$ with $(t,x)\\in (0,\\infty)\\times(0, L)$ and $\\gamma,\\beta>0$ and where $F(u)$ is a bistable potential. We study its stable equilibria as a function of the ratio $\\gamma/beta\\sp 2$. As the ratio $\\gamma/beta\\sp 2$ crosses an explicit threshold value, the number of stable ...

  1. Brain source localization using a fourth-order deflation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albera, Laurent; Ferréol, Anne; Cosandier-Rimélé, Delphine; Merlet, Isabel; Wendling, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    A high resolution method for solving potentially ill-posed inverse problems is proposed. This method named FO-D-MUSIC allows for localization of brain current sources with unconstrained orientations from surface electro- or magnetoencephalographic data using spherical or realistic head geometries. The FO-D-MUSIC method is based on i) the separability of the data transfer matrix as a function of location and orientation parameters, ii) the Fourth Order (FO) virtual array theory, and iii) the deflation concept extended to FO statistics accounting for the presence of potentially but not completely statistically dependent sources. Computer results display the superiority of the FO-D-MUSIC approach in different situations (very closed sources, small number of electrodes, additive Gaussian noise with unknown spatial covariance, …) compared to classical algorithms. PMID:18269984

  2. On a Fourth-Order Boundary Value Problem at Resonance

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    Man Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spectrum structure of the eigenvalue problem u4x=λux,  x∈0,1;  u0=u1=u′0=u′1=0. As for the application of the spectrum structure, we show the existence of solutions of the fourth-order boundary value problem at resonance -u4x+λ1ux+gx,ux=hx,  x∈0,1;  u0=u1=u′0=u′1=0, which models a statically elastic beam with both end-points being cantilevered or fixed, where λ1 is the first eigenvalue of the corresponding eigenvalue problem and nonlinearity g may be unbounded.

  3. PPN-limit of Fourth Order Gravity inspired by Scalar-Tensor Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; Troisi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the {\\it dynamical} equivalence between higher order gravity and scalar-tensor gravity the PPN-limit of fourth order gravity is discussed. We exploit this analogy developing a fourth order gravity version of the Eddington PPN-parameters. As a result, Solar System experiments can be reconciled with higher order gravity, if physical constraints descending from experiments are fulfilled.

  4. Stability and square integrability of solutions of nonlinear fourth order differential equations

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    Moussadek Remili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to establish a new result, which guarantees the asymptotic stability of zero solution and square integrability of solutions and their derivatives to nonlinear differential equations of fourth order.

  5. Thermodynamic and classical instability of AdS black holes in fourth-order gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon

    2014-01-01

    We study thermodynamic and classical instability of AdS black holes in fourth-order gravity. These include the BTZ black hole in new massive gravity, Schwarzschild-AdS black hole, and higher-dimensional AdS black holes in fourth-order gravity. All thermodynamic quantities which are computed using the Abbot-Deser-Tekin method are used to study thermodynamic instability of AdS black holes. On the other hand, we investigate the s-mode Gregory-Laflamme instability of the massive graviton propagating around the AdS black holes. We establish the connection between the thermodynamic instability and the GL instability of AdS black holes in fourth-order gravity. This shows that the Gubser-Mitra conjecture holds for AdS black holes found from fourth-order gravity

  6. Infinitely Many Homoclinic Solutions for Nonperiodic Fourth Order Differential Equations with General Potentials

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    Liu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a class of nonperiodic fourth order differential equations with general potentials. By using variational methods and genus properties in critical point theory, we obtain that such equations possess infinitely homoclinic solutions.

  7. A fourth order spline collocation approach for a business cycle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayfy, A.; Khoury, S.; Ibdah, H.

    2013-10-01

    A collocation approach, based on a fourth order cubic B-splines is presented for the numerical solution of a Kaleckian business cycle model formulated by a nonlinear delay differential equation. The equation is approximated and the nonlinearity is handled by employing an iterative scheme arising from Newton's method. It is shown that the model exhibits a conditionally dynamical stable cycle. The fourth-order rate of convergence of the scheme is verified numerically for different special cases.

  8. Fourth-Order Conservative Vlasov-Maxwell Solver for Cartesian and Cylindrical Phase Space Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogman, Genia

    coordinates present a new development in the field of computational plasma physics. A fourth-order finite-volume method for solving the Vlasov-Maxwell equation system is presented first for Cartesian and then for cylindrical phase space coordinates. Special attention is given to the treatment of the discrete primary variables and to the quadrature rule for evaluating the surface and line integrals that appear in the governing equations. The finite-volume treatment of conducting wall and axis boundaries is particularly nuanced when it comes to phase space coordinates, and is described in detail. In addition to the mechanics of each part of the finite-volume discretization in the two different coordinate systems, the complete algorithm is also presented. The Cartesian coordinate discretization is applied to several well-known test problems. Since even linear analysis of kinetic theory governing equations is complicated on account of velocity being an independent coordinate, few analytic or semi-analytic predictions exist. Benchmarks are particularly scarce for configurations that have magnetic fields and involve more than two phase space dimensions. Ensuring that simulations are true to the physics thus presents a difficulty in the development of robust numerical methods. The research described in this dissertation addresses this challenge through the development of more complete physics-based benchmarks based on the Dory-Guest-Harris instability. The instability is a special case of perpendicularly-propagating kinetic electrostatic waves in a warm uniformly magnetized plasma. A complete derivation of the closed-form linear theory dispersion relation for the instability is presented. The electric field growth rates and oscillation frequencies specified by the dispersion relation provide concrete measures against which simulation results can be quantitatively compared. Furthermore, a specialized form of perturbation is shown to strongly excite the fastest growing mode. The

  9. Seeley-Gilkey coefficients for the fourth-order operators on a Riemannian manifold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusynin, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    A new covariant method for computing the coefficients in the heat kernel expansion is suggested. It allows one to calculate Seeley-Gilkey coefficients for both minimal and nonminimal differential operators acting on a vector bundle over a Riemannian manifold. The coefficients for the fourth-order minimal operators in arbitrary dimension of the space are calculated. In contrast to the second-order operators the coefficients for the fourth-order (and higher) operators turn out to be essentially dependent on the space dimension. The algorithmic character of the method suggested allows one to calculate coefficients by computer using the analytical calculation system. 19 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Existence of solutions for a fourth order eigenvalue problem ] {Existence of solutions for a fourth order eigenvalue problem with variable exponent under Neumann boundary conditions

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    Khalil Ben Haddouch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will study the eigenvalues for a fourth order elliptic equation with $p(x$-growth conditions $\\Delta^2_{p(x} u=\\lambda |u|^{p(x-2} u$, under Neumann boundary conditions, where $p(x$ is a continuous function defined on the bounded domain with $p(x>1$. Through the Ljusternik-Schnireleman theory on $C^1$-manifold, we prove the existence of infinitely many eigenvalue sequences and $\\sup \\Lambda =+\\infty$, where $\\Lambda$ is the set of all eigenvalues.

  11. Singularity-free static centrally symmetric solutions of some fourth order gravitational field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, B.; Schimming, R.

    1983-01-01

    The fourth order field equations proposed by TREDER with a linear combination of BACH's tensor and EINSTEIN's tensor on the left-hand side admit static centrally symmetric solutions which are analytical and non-flat in some neighborhood of the centre of symmetry. (author)

  12. Existence of Infinitely Many Periodic Solutions for Perturbed Semilinear Fourth-Order Impulsive Differential Inclusions

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    Massimiliano Ferrara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the existence of infinitely many periodic solutions for a semilinear fourth-order impulsive differential inclusion with a perturbed nonlinearity and two parameters. The approach is based on a critical point theorem for nonsmooth functionals.

  13. On the Existence of Positive Solutions for a Fourth-Order Boundary Value Problem

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    Yumei Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the method of order reduction and the fixed point index, the existence of positive solutions for a fourth-order boundary value problem is studied. We provide conditions under which the existence results hold. Such conditions are related to the first eigenvalue corresponding to the relevant linear differential equation with dependence on the derivatives of unknown function.

  14. Singularity-free static centrally symmetric solutions of some fourth order gravitational field equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, B.; Schimming, R.

    1983-01-01

    The fourth order field equations proposed by TREDER with a linear combination of BACH's tensor and EINSTEIN's tensor on the left-hand side admit static centrally symmetric solutions which are analytical and non-flat in some neighborhood of the centre of symmetry.

  15. Stability and square integrability of derivatives of solutions of nonlinear fourth order differential equations with delay

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    Erdal Korkmaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we give sufficient conditions for the boundedness, uniform asymptotic stability and square integrability of the solutions to a certain fourth order non-autonomous differential equations with delay by using Lyapunov’s second method. The results obtained essentially improve, include and complement the results in the literature.

  16. Stability and square integrability of derivatives of solutions of nonlinear fourth order differential equations with delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Erdal

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we give sufficient conditions for the boundedness, uniform asymptotic stability and square integrability of the solutions to a certain fourth order non-autonomous differential equations with delay by using Lyapunov's second method. The results obtained essentially improve, include and complement the results in the literature.

  17. Fourth-order stable central difference method for self-adjoint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, fourth order stable central difference method is presented for solving self-adjoint singular perturbation problems for small values of perturbation parameter, ε . First, the given differential equation was reduced to its conventional form and then it was transformed into linear system of algebraic equations in the ...

  18. Fourth-Order Four-Point Boundary Value Problem: A Solutions Funnel Approach

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    Panos K. Palamides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence of positive or a negative solution of several classes of four-point boundary-value problems for fourth-order ordinary differential equations. Although these problems do not always admit a (positive Green's function, the obtained solution is still of definite sign. Furthermore, we prove the existence of an entire continuum of solutions. Our technique relies on the continuum property (connectedness and compactness of the solutions funnel (Kneser's Theorem, combined with the corresponding vector field.

  19. On one two-point BVP for the fourth order linear ordinary differential equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhigulashvili, Sulkhan; Manjikashvili, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 265-275 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : fourth order linear ordinary differential equations * two-point boundary value problems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2016-0077/gmj-2016-0077. xml

  20. Multiplicity of Solutions for a Class of Fourth-Order Elliptic Problems with Asymptotically Linear Term

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    Qiong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the following fourth-order elliptic equations: Δ2+Δ=(,,∈Ω,=Δ=0,∈Ω, where Ω⊂ℝ is a bounded domain with smooth boundary Ω and (, is asymptotically linear with respect to at infinity. Using an equivalent version of Cerami's condition and the symmetric mountain pass lemma, we obtain the existence of multiple solutions for the equations.

  1. Singularity-free static centrally symmetric solutions of some fourth order gravitational field equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, B.; Schimming, R.

    A formal power series ansatz is used to obtain a convergence proof that the fourth-order gravitational field equations proposed by Treder (1977) with a linear combination of Bach's (1921) tensor and Einstein's tensor on the left-hand side admit static centrally symmetric solutions which are analytical and nonflat in some neighborhood of the center of symmetry. Conformal invariance is attained by means of a scalar gauge field.

  2. Solutions to fourth-order random differential equations with periodic boundary conditions

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    Xiaoling Han

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Existence of solutions and of extremal random solutions are proved for periodic boundary-value problems of fourth-order ordinary random differential equations. Our investigation is done in the space of continuous real-valued functions defined on closed and bounded intervals. Also we study the applications of the random version of a nonlinear alternative of Leray-Schauder type and an algebraic random fixed point theorem by Dhage.

  3. On one two-point BVP for the fourth order linear ordinary differential equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mukhigulashvili, Sulkhan; Manjikashvili, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 265-275 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : fourth order linear ordinary differential equations * two-point boundary value problems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2016-0077/gmj-2016-0077. xml

  4. Asymptotic integration of a linear fourth order differential equation of Poincaré type

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    Anibal Coronel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the asymptotic behavior of nonoscillatory solutions of fourth order linear differential equation where the coefficients are perturbations of constants. We define a change of variable and deduce that the new variable satisfies a third order nonlinear differential equation. We assume three hypotheses. The first hypothesis is related to the constant coefficients and set up that the characteristic polynomial associated with the fourth order linear equation has simple and real roots. The other two hypotheses are related to the behavior of the perturbation functions and establish asymptotic integral smallness conditions of the perturbations. Under these general hypotheses, we obtain four main results. The first two results are related to the application of a fixed point argument to prove that the nonlinear third order equation has a unique solution. The next result concerns with the asymptotic behavior of the solutions of the nonlinear third order equation. The fourth main theorem is introduced to establish the existence of a fundamental system of solutions and to precise the formulas for the asymptotic behavior of the linear fourth order differential equation. In addition, we present an example to show that the results introduced in this paper can be applied in situations where the assumptions of some classical theorems are not satisfied.

  5. Symmetry Reduction and Cauchy Problems for a Class of Fourth-Order Evolution Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jina; Zhang Shunli

    2008-01-01

    We exploit higher-order conditional symmetry to reduce initial-value problems for evolution equations to Cauchy problems for systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). We classify a class of fourth-order evolution equations which admit certain higher-order generalized conditional symmetries (GCSs) and give some examples to show the main reduction procedure. These reductions cannot be derived within the framework of the standard Lie approach, which hints that the technique presented here is something essential for the dimensional reduction of evolution equations

  6. Fourth order scheme for wavelet based solution of Black-Scholes equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finěk, Václav

    2017-12-01

    The present paper is devoted to the numerical solution of the Black-Scholes equation for pricing European options. We apply the Crank-Nicolson scheme with Richardson extrapolation for time discretization and Hermite cubic spline wavelets with four vanishing moments for space discretization. This scheme is the fourth order accurate both in time and in space. Computational results indicate that the Crank-Nicolson scheme with Richardson extrapolation significantly decreases the amount of computational work. We also numerically show that optimal convergence rate for the used scheme is obtained without using startup procedure despite the data irregularities in the model.

  7. Lie symmetry analysis and conservation laws for the time fractional fourth-order evolution equation

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    Wang Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study Lie symmetry analysis and conservation laws for the time fractional nonlinear fourth-order evolution equation. Using the method of Lie point symmetry, we provide the associated vector fields, and derive the similarity reductions of the equation, respectively. The method can be applied wisely and efficiently to get the reduced fractional ordinary differential equations based on the similarity reductions. Finally, by using the nonlinear self-adjointness method and Riemann-Liouville time-fractional derivative operator as well as Euler-Lagrange operator, the conservation laws of the equation are obtained.

  8. Nuclear axial current operators to fourth order in chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, H., E-mail: hermann.krebs@rub.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Epelbaum, E., E-mail: evgeny.epelbaum@rub.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93016 (United States); Meißner, U.-G., E-mail: meissner@hiskp.uni-bonn.de [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut für Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); JARA - High Performance Computing, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    We present the complete derivation of the nuclear axial charge and current operators as well as the pseudoscalar operators to fourth order in the chiral expansion relative to the dominant one-body contribution using the method of unitary transformation. We demonstrate that the unitary ambiguity in the resulting operators can be eliminated by the requirement of renormalizability and by matching of the pion-pole contributions to the nuclear forces. We give expressions for the renormalized single-, two- and three-nucleon contributions to the charge and current operators and pseudoscalar operators including the relevant relativistic corrections. We also verify explicitly the validity of the continuity equation.

  9. MONOMIAL (1, 0,-1 MATRIX OF THE FOURTH ORDER, ISOMORPHIC TO THE GROUP OF QUATERNIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kravets

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A set of direct and inverse elements are examined and compared with a four-dimensional orthonormal basis. The aggregate of even substitutions of fourth power as a product of two transpositions are formed on this finite set. The finite set of substitutions is represented by monomial (1, 0, –1-matrices of fourth order. An isomorphism of quaternion group and two noncommutative subgroups of eighth order is determined. Properties of four aggregates of basic matrices, corresponding to quaternion matrices, are examined.

  10. Determination of hydrochlorothiazide and irbesartan in pharmaceuticals by fourth-order UV derivative spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetuschi, C; Giannandrea, A; Carlucci, G; Mazzeo, P

    2005-08-01

    The fourth-order derivative spectrum from the alcoholic sample is used. HCT can be determined by a specific peak-trough, of low intensity, at 330-340 nm. For IST evaluation, a peak-trough around 250-310 nm is available, common to both products, whose amplitude increases linearly only for low concentration values, while it decreases at higher values. The most difficult aspect of the analysis lies in how to find the optimal concentration range, so that both signals can be evaluated simultaneously. The best results were achieved by using a linear regression for HCT and a regression plane for IST.

  11. ADI splitting schemes for a fourth-order nonlinear partial differential equation from image processing

    KAUST Repository

    Calatroni, Luca

    2013-08-01

    We present directional operator splitting schemes for the numerical solution of a fourth-order, nonlinear partial differential evolution equation which arises in image processing. This equation constitutes the H -1-gradient flow of the total variation and represents a prototype of higher-order equations of similar type which are popular in imaging for denoising, deblurring and inpainting problems. The efficient numerical solution of this equation is very challenging due to the stiffness of most numerical schemes. We show that the combination of directional splitting schemes with implicit time-stepping provides a stable and computationally cheap numerical realisation of the equation.

  12. No-ghost theorem for the fourth-order derivative Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M; Mannheim, Philip D

    2008-03-21

    A new realization of the fourth-order derivative Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator is constructed. This realization possesses no states of negative norm and has a real energy spectrum that is bounded below. The key to this construction is the recognition that in this realization the Hamiltonian is not Dirac Hermitian. However, the Hamiltonian is symmetric under combined space reflection P and time reversal T. The Hilbert space that is appropriate for this PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is identified and it is found to have a positive-definite inner product. Furthermore, the time-evolution operator is unitary.

  13. Quality assessment of remote sensing image fusion using feature-based fourth-order correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Chen, Kai; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-04-01

    In remote sensing fusion, the spatial details of a panchromatic (PAN) image and the spectrum information of multispectral (MS) images will be transferred into fused images according to the characteristics of the human visual system. Thus, a remote sensing image fusion quality assessment called feature-based fourth-order correlation coefficient (FFOCC) is proposed. FFOCC is based on the feature-based coefficient concept. Spatial features related to spatial details of the PAN image and spectral features related to the spectrum information of MS images are first extracted from the fused image. Then, the fourth-order correlation coefficient between the spatial and spectral features is calculated and treated as the assessment result. FFOCC was then compared with existing widely used indices, such as Erreur Relative Globale Adimensionnelle de Synthese, and quality assessed with no reference. Results of the fusion and distortion experiments indicate that the FFOCC is consistent with subjective evaluation. FFOCC significantly outperforms the other indices in evaluating fusion images that are produced by different fusion methods and that are distorted in spatial and spectral features by blurring, adding noise, and changing intensity. All the findings indicate that the proposed method is an objective and effective quality assessment for remote sensing image fusion.

  14. Fourth-order Perturbed Eigenvalue Equation for Stepwise Damage Detection of Aeroplane Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Chun Nam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perturbed eigenvalue equations up to fourth-order are established to detect structural damage in aeroplane wing. Complete set of perturbation terms including orthogonal and non-orthogonal coefficients are computed using perturbed eigenvalue and orthonormal equations. Then the perturbed eigenparameters are optimized using BFGS approach. Finite element model with small to large stepwise damage is used to represent actual aeroplane wing. In small damaged level, termination number is the same for both approaches, while rms errors and termination d-norms are very close. For medium damaged level, termination number is larger for third-order perturbation with lower d-norm and smaller rms error. In large damaged level, termination number is much larger for third-order perturbation with same d-norm and larger rms error. These trends are more significant as the damaged level increases. As the stepwise damage effect increases with damage level, the increase in stepwise effect leads to the increase in model order. Hence, fourth-order perturbation is more accurate to estimate the model solution.

  15. Empirical information on nuclear matter fourth-order symmetry energy from an extended nuclear mass formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We establish a relation between the equation of state of nuclear matter and the fourth-order symmetry energy asym,4(A of finite nuclei in a semi-empirical nuclear mass formula by self-consistently considering the bulk, surface and Coulomb contributions to the nuclear mass. Such a relation allows us to extract information on nuclear matter fourth-order symmetry energy Esym,4(ρ0 at normal nuclear density ρ0 from analyzing nuclear mass data. Based on the recent precise extraction of asym,4(A via the double difference of the “experimental” symmetry energy extracted from nuclear masses, for the first time, we estimate a value of Esym,4(ρ0=20.0±4.6 MeV. Such a value of Esym,4(ρ0 is significantly larger than the predictions from mean-field models and thus suggests the importance of considering the effects of beyond the mean-field approximation in nuclear matter calculations.

  16. Patch Similarity Modulus and Difference Curvature Based Fourth-Order Partial Differential Equation for Image Denoising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjiao Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional fourth-order nonlinear diffusion denoising model suffers the isolated speckles and the loss of fine details in the processed image. For this reason, a new fourth-order partial differential equation based on the patch similarity modulus and the difference curvature is proposed for image denoising. First, based on the intensity similarity of neighbor pixels, this paper presents a new edge indicator called patch similarity modulus, which is strongly robust to noise. Furthermore, the difference curvature which can effectively distinguish between edges and noise is incorporated into the denoising algorithm to determine the diffusion process by adaptively adjusting the size of the diffusion coefficient. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can not only preserve edges and texture details, but also avoid isolated speckles and staircase effect while filtering out noise. And the proposed algorithm has a better performance for the images with abundant details. Additionally, the subjective visual quality and objective evaluation index of the denoised image obtained by the proposed algorithm are higher than the ones from the related methods.

  17. A Fourth Order Accurate Discretization for the Laplace and Heat Equations on Arbitrary Domains, with Applications to the Stefan Problem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibou, Frederic; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the authors first describe a fourth order accurate finite difference discretization for both the Laplace equation and the heat equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on irregular domains...

  18. Short-time fourth-order squeezing effects in spontaneous and stimulated four- and six-wave mixing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, P S

    2003-01-01

    The concept of fourth-order squeezing of the electromagnetic field is investigated in the fundamental mode in spontaneous and stimulated four- and six-wave mixing processes under the short-time approximation based on a fully quantum mechanical approach. The coupled Heisenberg equations of motion involving real and imaginary parts of the quadrature operators are established. The possibility of obtaining fourth-order squeezing is studied. The dependence of fourth-order squeezing on the number of photons is also investigated. It is shown that fourth-order squeezing, which is a higher-order squeezing, allows a much larger fractional noise reduction than lower-order squeezing. It is shown that squeezing is greater in a stimulated process than the corresponding squeezing in spontaneous interaction. The conditions for obtaining maximum and minimum squeezing are obtained. We have also established the non-classical nature of squeezed radiation using the Glauber-Sudarshan representation

  19. Existence of solutions for a fourth-order boundary value problem on the half-line via critical point theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabrouk Briki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fourth-order boundary value problem on the half-line is considered and existence of solutions is proved using a minimization principle and the mountain pass theorem.

  20. The de Sitter spacetime as an attractor solution in fourth-order gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.-J.

    1988-01-01

    We investigate the general vacuum solution of fourth-order gravity, and include the Bach tensor. For L 2 = 1.3μR 2 + 1/2αC 2 the expanding de Sitter spacetime is an attractor in the set of axially symmetric Bianchi type-I models if and only if αμ ≤ 0 or α > 4μ holds. It will be argued that this result holds true for a large class of inhomogeneous models. As a byproduct, a new closed-form cosmological solution, is obtained. It is also shown that the de Sitter spacetime is an attractor for the Bach-Einstein gravity with a minimally coupled scalar field φ. Specialised to Einstein gravity (i.e. α = 0 above) this conformal equivalence remains a non-trivial one. (author)

  1. Mixed qualocation method for fourth order two-point boundary value problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, L. Jones Tarcius; Nandini, A. P.; Devaraj, P.

    2017-04-01

    A quadrature based mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is applied to a fourth order linear non-homogeneous ordinary differential equation with variable coefficients. After employing a splitting technique, a cubic spline trial space and a piecewise linear test space are considered in the method. The integrals are then replaced by Gauss quadrature rule in the formulation itself. Optimal order apriori error estimates in W k,p-norms for k = 0, 1, 2 and 1 ≤ p ≤ ∞ are obtained without any restriction on the mesh, not only for the approximation of the exact solution also for its second derivative. These error estimates are validated by a suitable numerical example.

  2. Conservative fourth-order time integration of non-linear dynamic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2015-01-01

    the resulting time integrals of the inertia and stiffness terms via integration by parts. This process introduces the time derivatives of the state space variables, and these are then substituted from the original state-space differential equations. The resulting discrete form of the state-space equations......An energy conserving time integration algorithm with fourth-order accuracy is developed for dynamic systems with nonlinear stiffness. The discrete formulation is derived by integrating the differential state-space equations of motion over the integration time increment, and then evaluating...... integration of oscillatory systems with only a few integration points per period. Three numerical examples demonstrate the high accuracy of the algorithm. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  3. Fourth-Order Method for Numerical Integration of Age- and Size-Structured Population Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannelli, M; Kostova, T; Milner, F A

    2008-01-08

    In many applications of age- and size-structured population models, there is an interest in obtaining good approximations of total population numbers rather than of their densities. Therefore, it is reasonable in such cases to solve numerically not the PDE model equations themselves, but rather their integral equivalents. For this purpose quadrature formulae are used in place of the integrals. Because quadratures can be designed with any order of accuracy, one can obtain numerical approximations of the solutions with very fast convergence. In this article, we present a general framework and a specific example of a fourth-order method based on composite Newton-Cotes quadratures for a size-structured population model.

  4. Fourth-order terms in the diagrammatic perturbation expansion for the electronic energy of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, S.; Silver, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    Third-order diagrammatic perturbation theory provides a simple and accurate description of the electronic structure of atoms and molecules beyond that afforded by independent electron models. The largest corrections to such treatments, the fourth-order terms, are presented and discussed. All of the diagrams, which arise when the closed-shell Hartree--Fock function is utilized as a reference function, are given through fourth order. 18 references

  5. Fourth-order wave equation in Bhabha-Madhavarao spin-3 2 theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Yu. A.; Markova, M. A.; Bondarenko, A. I.

    2017-09-01

    Within the framework of the Bhabha-Madhavarao formalism, a consistent approach to the derivation of a system of the fourth-order wave equations for the description of a spin-3 2 particle is suggested. For this purpose an additional algebraic object, the so-called q-commutator (q is a primitive fourth root of unity) and a new set of matrices ημ, instead of the original matrices βμ of the Bhabha-Madhavarao algebra, are introduced. It is shown that in terms of the ημ matrices we have succeeded in reducing a procedure of the construction of fourth root of the fourth-order wave operator to a few simple algebraic transformations and to some operation of the passage to the limit z → q, where z is some (complex) deformation parameter entering into the definition of the η-matrices. In addition, a set of the matrices 𝒫1/2 and 𝒫3/2(±)(q) possessing the properties of projectors is introduced. These operators project the matrices ημ onto the spins 1/2- and 3/2-sectors in the theory under consideration. A corresponding generalization of the obtained results to the case of the interaction with an external electromagnetic field introduced through the minimal coupling scheme is carried out. The application to the problem of construction of the path integral representation in para-superspace for the propagator of a massive spin-3 2 particle in a background gauge field within the Bhabha-Madhavarao approach is discussed.

  6. Symmetries and integrability of a fourth-order Euler-Bernoulli beam equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Zaman, F. D.; Mahomed, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The complete symmetry group classification of the fourth-order Euler-Bernoulli ordinary differential equation, where the elastic modulus and the area moment of inertia are constants and the applied load is a function of the normal displacement, is obtained. We perform the Lie and Noether symmetry analysis of this problem. In the Lie analysis, the principal Lie algebra which is one dimensional extends in four cases, viz. the linear, exponential, general power law, and a negative fractional power law. It is further shown that two cases arise in the Noether classification with respect to the standard Lagrangian. That is, the linear case for which the Noether algebra dimension is one less than the Lie algebra dimension as well as the negative fractional power law. In the latter case the Noether algebra is three dimensional and is isomorphic to the Lie algebra which is sl(2,R). This exceptional case, although admitting the nonsolvable algebra sl(2,R), remarkably allows for a two-parameter family of exact solutions via the Noether integrals. The Lie reduction gives a second-order ordinary differential equation which has nonlocal symmetry.

  7. Numerical Simulation of 1D Unsteady Heat Conduction-Convection in Spherical and Cylindrical Coordinates by Fourth-Order FDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Romao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to apply the Fourth Order Finite Difference Method (FDM to solve the one-dimensional unsteady conduction-convection equation with energy generation (or sink in cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Two applications were compared through exact solutions to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed formulation.

  8. Discrete Mixed Petrov-Galerkin Finite Element Method for a Fourth-Order Two-Point Boundary Value Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jones Tarcius Doss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A quadrature-based mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is applied to a fourth-order linear ordinary differential equation. After employing a splitting technique, a cubic spline trial space and a piecewise linear test space are considered in the method. The integrals are then replaced by the Gauss quadrature rule in the formulation itself. Optimal order a priori error estimates are obtained without any restriction on the mesh.

  9. Nuclear fourth-order symmetry energy and its effects on neutron star properties in the relativistic Hartree-Fock theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi Wei; Qian, Zhuang; Xing, Ruo Yu; Niu, Jia Rui; Sun, Bao Yuan

    2018-02-01

    Adopting the density dependent relativistic mean-field (RMF) and relativistic Hartree-Fock (RHF) approaches, the properties of the nuclear fourth-order symmetry energy S4 are studied within the covariant density functional (CDF) theory. It is found that the fourth-order symmetry energies are suppressed in RHF at both saturation and supranuclear densities, where the extra contribution from the Fock terms is demonstrated, specifically via the isoscalar meson-nucleon coupling channels. The reservation of S4 and higher-order symmetry energies in the nuclear equation of state then affects essentially the prediction of neutron star properties, which is illustrated in quantities such as the proton fraction, the core-crust transition density, as well as the fraction of crustal moment of inertia. Since the Fock terms enhance the density dependence of the thermodynamical potential, the RHF calculations predict systematically smaller values of density, proton fraction, and pressure at the core-crust transition boundary of neutron stars than density dependent RMF ones. In addition, a linear anticorrelation between the core-crust transition density ρt and the density slope of symmetry energy L is found which is then utilized to constrain the core-crust transition density as ρt˜[0.069 ,0.098 ] fm-3 with the recent empirical information on L . The study clarifies the important role of the fourth-order symmetry energy in determining the properties of nuclear matter at extreme isospin or density conditions.

  10. Analysis and development of fourth order LCLC resonant based capacitor charging power supply for pulse power applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, P; Hitesh, C; Patel, A; Kolge, T; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K C

    2013-08-01

    A fourth order (LCLC) resonant converter based capacitor charging power supply (CCPS) is designed and developed for pulse power applications. Resonant converters are preferred t utilize soft switching techniques such as zero current switching (ZCS) and zero voltage switching (ZVS). An attempt has been made to overcome the disadvantages in 2nd and 3rd resonant converter topologies; hence a fourth order resonant topology is used in this paper for CCPS application. In this paper a novel fourth order LCLC based resonant converter has been explored and mathematical analysis carried out to calculate load independent constant current. This topology provides load independent constant current at switching frequency (fs) equal to resonant frequency (fr). By changing switching condition (on time and dead time) this topology has both soft switching techniques such as ZCS and ZVS for better switching action to improve the converter efficiency. This novel technique has special features such as low peak current through switches, DC blocking for transformer, utilizing transformer leakage inductance as resonant component. A prototype has been developed and tested successfully to charge a 100 μF capacitor to 200 V.

  11. Characteristics of singularity-free static centrally symmetrical solutions of certain fourth-order gravitational-field equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, B.; Guenther, M.

    Fiedler and Schimming (1983) proved that the fourth order gravitational field equations with a linear combination of Bach's and Einstein's tensors on the left-hand side, which were proposed by Treder, admit static centrally symmetric solutions which are analytical and non-flat in some neighbourhood of the centre of symmetry. The existence of these solutions, known at first only in a small neighbourhood of r = 0 (r radius), can now be extended to intervals 0 ≤ r ≤ α with arbitrarily large α.

  12. Element-Free Galerkin Method Based on Block-Pulse Wavelets Integration for Solving Fourth-Order Obstacle Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Azam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce improved element-free Galerkin method based on block pulse wavelet integration for numerical approximations to the solution of a system of fourth-order boundary-value problems associated with obstacle, unilateral, and contact problems. Moving least squares (MLS approach is used to construct shape functions with optimized weight functions and basis. Numerical results for test problems are presented in this article to elaborate the pertinent features for the proposed technique. Comparison with existing techniques shows that our proposed method based on integration technique provides better approximation at reduced computational cost.

  13. Dispersive shock mediated resonant radiations in defocused nonlinear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Rik; Bhadra, Shyamal Kumar

    2018-04-01

    We report the evolution of resonant radiation (RR) in a self-defocused nonlinear medium with two zero dispersion wavelengths. RR is generated from dispersive shock wave (DSW) front when the pump pulse is in non-solitonic regime close to first zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW). DSW is responsible for pulse splitting resulting in the generation of blue solitons when leading edge of the pump pulse hits the first ZDW. DSW also generates a red shifted dispersive wave (DW) in the presence of higher order dispersion coefficients. Further, DSW through cross-phase modulation with red shifted dispersive wave (DW) excites a localized radiation. The presence of zero nonlinearity point in the system restricts red-shift of RR and enhances the red shifting of DW. It also helps in the formation of DSW at shorter distance and squeezes the solitonic region beyond second zero dispersion point. Predicted results indicate that the spectral evolution depends on the product of Kerr nonlinearity and group velocity dispersion.

  14. Parasite dispersal risk tolerance is mediated by its reproductive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Maxcy P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2017-10-01

    Parasite dispersal theory draws heavily upon epidemiological SIR models in which host status (susceptible (S), infected (I), or recovered (R)) is used to study parasite dispersal evolution. In contrast to these extrinsically host-centric drivers, in this study we focus on an intrinsic driver, the parasite's reproductive value (predicted future offspring) as a regulator of the extent to which the individual will engage in risky dispersal behaviour. As a model system we use the honeybee Apis mellifera and its ectoparasite, the mite Varroa destructor . Mite reproduction happens exclusively inside cells of bee brood, and newly emerged fecund mites may parasitize either a homocolonial brood cell (low risk dispersal) or emigrate to a new bee colony via phoretic attachment to mature forager bees (high risk dispersal). In an empirical bioassay, prepartum mites (high reproductive value) and postpartum mites (low reproductive value) were offered a choice of newly emerged homocolonial worker bees (low risk), homocolonial pollen forager bees (high risk), or heterocolonial pollen foragers (high risk). A preference for newly emerged bees was earlier and more strongly sustained among prepartum mites. This suggests comparatively greater dispersal risk tolerance among postpartum mites with lower reproductive value. A dangerous bid for dispersal may be adaptive if the individual has already successfully reproduced and the rewards for successful dispersal are sufficiently large.

  15. Human-mediated dispersal of seeds by the airflow of vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Lippe, Moritz; Bullock, James M; Kowarik, Ingo; Knopp, Tatjana; Wichmann, Matthias C; Wichmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Human-mediated dispersal is known as an important driver of long-distance dispersal for plants but underlying mechanisms have rarely been assessed. Road corridors function as routes of secondary dispersal for many plant species but the extent to which vehicles support this process remains unclear. In this paper we quantify dispersal distances and seed deposition of plant species moved over the ground by the slipstream of passing cars. We exposed marked seeds of four species on a section of road and drove a car along the road at a speed of 48 km/h. By tracking seeds we quantified movement parallel as well as lateral to the road, resulting dispersal kernels, and the effect of repeated vehicle passes. Median distances travelled by seeds along the road were about eight meters for species with wind dispersal morphologies and one meter for species without such adaptations. Airflow created by the car lifted seeds and resulted in longitudinal dispersal. Single seeds reached our maximum measuring distance of 45 m and for some species exceeded distances under primary dispersal. Mathematical models were fit to dispersal kernels. The incremental effect of passing vehicles on longitudinal dispersal decreased with increasing number of passes as seeds accumulated at road verges. We conclude that dispersal by vehicle airflow facilitates seed movement along roads and accumulation of seeds in roadside habitats. Dispersal by vehicle airflow can aid the spread of plant species and thus has wide implications for roadside ecology, invasion biology and nature conservation.

  16. Optimization of QCD perturbation theory: Results for R{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}} at fourth order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, P.M., E-mail: stevenson@physics.rice.edu [T.W. Bonner Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Physical quantities in QCD are independent of renormalization scheme (RS), but that exact invariance is spoiled by truncations of the perturbation series. 'Optimization' corresponds to making the perturbative approximant, at any given order, locally invariant under small RS changes. A solution of the resulting optimization equations is presented. It allows an efficient algorithm for finding the optimized result. Example results for R{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}=3 N-Ary-Summation q{sub i}{sup 2}(1+R) to fourth order (NNNLO) are given that show nice convergence, even down to arbitrarily low energies. The Q=0 'freezing' behavior, R=0.3{+-}0.3, found at third order is confirmed and made more precise; R=0.2{+-}0.1. Low-energy results in the MS{sup Macron} scheme, by contrast, show the typical pathologies of a non-convergent asymptotic series.

  17. A Class of Numerical Methods for the Solution of Fourth-Order Ordinary Differential Equations in Polar Coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Talwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this piece of work using only three grid points, we propose two sets of numerical methods in a coupled manner for the solution of fourth-order ordinary differential equation uiv(x=f(x,u(x,u′(x,u′′(x,u′′′(x, a

  18. Engineering applications and analysis of vibratory motion fourth order fluid film over the time dependent heated flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmand, Muhammad Ismail; Mamat, Mustafa Bin; Shah, Qayyum

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with the time dependent analysis of thermally conducting and Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) liquid film flow of a fourth order fluid past a vertical and vibratory plate. In this article have been developed for higher order complex nature fluids. The governing-equations have been modeled in the terms of nonlinear partial differential equations with the help of physical boundary circumstances. Two different analytical approaches i.e. Adomian decomposition method (ADM) and the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), have been used for discoveryof the series clarification of the problems. Solutions obtained via two diversemethods have been compared using the graphs, tables and found an excellent contract. Variants of the embedded flow parameters in the solution have been analysed through the graphical diagrams.

  19. Solitary wave solutions of the fourth order Boussinesq equation through the exp(-Ф(η))-expansion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, M Ali; Hj Mohd Ali, Norhashidah

    2014-01-01

    The exp(-Ф(η))-expansion method is an ascending method for obtaining exact and solitary wave solutions for nonlinear evolution equations. In this article, we implement the exp(-Ф(η))-expansion method to build solitary wave solutions to the fourth order Boussinesq equation. The procedure is simple, direct and useful with the help of computer algebra. By using this method, we obtain solitary wave solutions in terms of the hyperbolic functions, the trigonometric functions and elementary functions. The results show that the exp(-Ф(η))-expansion method is straightforward and effective mathematical tool for the treatment of nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics and engineering. 35C07; 35C08; 35P99.

  20. Fourth-order derivative spectrophotometric method for simultaneous determination of pseudoephedrine and naproxen in pharmaceutical dosage forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souri, Effat; Mosafer, Amir; Tehrani, Maliheh Barazandeh

    2016-01-01

    Combination dosage forms of naproxen sodium and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride are used for symptomatic treatment of cold and sinus disorders. In this study, fourth-order derivative spectrophotometric method was used for simultaneous determination of naproxen sodium and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride. The method was linear over the range of 2-28 μg/ml for pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and 4-200 μg/ml for naproxen sodium. The within-day and between-day coefficient of variation values were less than 5.8% and 2.5% for pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and naproxen sodium, respectively. The application of the proposed method for simultaneous determination of naproxen and pseudoephedrine in dosage forms was demonstrated without any special pretreatment. PMID:27168748

  1. Decoupling refractive index and geometric thickness from interferometric measurements of a quartz sample using a fourth-order polynomial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ince, R.; Hueseyinoglu, E.

    2007-01-01

    A Michelson interferometer setup was used to determine refractive index and thickness of afused-quartz sample with no knowledge of either parameter. At small angles,<10 deg. , theinterferometer equation follows a fourth-order polynomial in the sample refractive index alone,effectively decoupling the sample thickness from the equation. The incident angle of the He-Ne laserbeam versus fringe shift was fitted to the polynomial, and its coefficients obtained. These wereused to determine refractive index to within6x10-4 of the known value with an accuracy of ± 1.3%. Sample thickness was determined to an accuracy of ± 2.5%. Reproducibility of therotating table was determined to be ± 2x10-3 degrees

  2. Carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium requires Ca2+ and calcineurin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Dana M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inside bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus retinal pigment epithelial cells, pigment granules move in response to extracellular signals. During the process of aggregation, pigment motility is directed toward the cell nucleus; in dispersion, pigment is directed away from the nucleus and into long apical processes. A number of different chemicals have been found to initiate dispersion, and carbachol (an acetylcholine analog is one example. Previous research indicates that the carbachol-receptor interaction activates a Gq-mediated pathway which is commonly linked to Ca2+ mobilization. The purpose of the present study was to test for involvement of calcium and to probe calcium-dependent mediators to reveal their role in carbachol-mediated dispersion. Results Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion was blocked by the calcium chelator BAPTA. In contrast, the calcium channel antagonist verapamil, and incubation in Ca2+-free medium failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion. The calcineurin inhibitor cypermethrin blocked carbachol-induced dispersion; whereas, two protein kinase C inhibitors (staurosporine and bisindolylmaleimide II failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusion A rise in intracellular calcium is necessary for carbachol-induced dispersion; however, the Ca2+ requirement is not dependent on extracellular sources, implying that intracellular stores are sufficient to enable pigment granule dispersion to occur. Calcineurin is a likely Ca2+-dependent mediator involved in the signal cascade. Although the pathway leads to the generation of diacylglycerol and calcium (both required for the activation of certain PKC isoforms, our evidence does not support a significant role for PKC.

  3. A new fourth-order Fourier-Bessel split-step method for the extended nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, Patrick L.

    2008-01-01

    Fourier split-step techniques are often used to compute soliton-like numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Here, a new fourth-order implementation of the Fourier split-step algorithm is described for problems possessing azimuthal symmetry in 3 + 1-dimensions. This implementation is based, in part, on a finite difference approximation Δ perpendicular FDA of 1/r (∂)/(∂r) r(∂)/(∂r) that possesses an associated exact unitary representation of e i/2λΔ perpendicular FDA . The matrix elements of this unitary matrix are given by special functions known as the associated Bessel functions. Hence the attribute Fourier-Bessel for the method. The Fourier-Bessel algorithm is shown to be unitary and unconditionally stable. The Fourier-Bessel algorithm is employed to simulate the propagation of a periodic series of short laser pulses through a nonlinear medium. This numerical simulation calculates waveform intensity profiles in a sequence of planes that are transverse to the general propagation direction, and labeled by the cylindrical coordinate z. These profiles exhibit a series of isolated pulses that are offset from the time origin by characteristic times, and provide evidence for a physical effect that may be loosely termed normal mode condensation. Normal mode condensation is consistent with experimentally observed pulse filamentation into a packet of short bursts, which may occur as a result of short, intense irradiation of a medium

  4. Dispersion and rheology of surfactant-mediated silver nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Nan; Huang, Chih-Ta; Tseng, Wenjea J.; Wei, Ming-Hsiung

    2010-11-01

    Polycrystalline silver (Ag) nanoparticles were dispersed in solvent mixtures consisting of 2-butoxyethyl acetate (BCA) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate (CA) in a BCA:CA weight ratio of 5:1. Three commercially available polymeric surfactants were used, and the gravitational sedimentation, agglomerate-size distribution, isothermal adsorption, and rheological behavior of the nanoparticle suspensions were examined. One of the surfactants (hereafter termed 9250) was found effective in stabilizing the Ag nanoparticle suspensions. Both the adsorption isotherm and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential adsorption of the 9250 surfactant molecules on the nanoparticle surface, forming a Langmuir-type monolayer adsorption in the given solvents so that a steric stabilization was rendered. An optimal surfactant concentration of 5 wt.% (in terms of the solids weight) was determined experimentally. In addition, the Ag suspensions with a broad range of solids concentration (ϕ = 1-16 vol.%) showed a shear-thinning flow character over a shear-rate range from 1 to 4000 s-1, revealing that an attractive interparticle interaction was operative. Relative viscosity (ηr) of the nanoparticle suspensions deviated from the linearity when ϕ was greater than ˜10 vol.%; at which, the attractive potential began to dominate the interparticle interactions. This ηr-ϕ dependence was compared with various existing models and the (viscosity) predictive capability of the models was discussed.

  5. Rare-Earth Fourth-Order Multipole Moment in Cubic ErCo2 Probed by Linear Dichroism in Core-Level Photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abozeed, Amina A.; Kadono, Toshiharu; Sekiyama, Akira; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Higashiya, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Kanai, Yuina; Yamagami, Kohei; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Andreev, Alexander V.; Wada, Hirofumi; Imada, Shin

    2018-03-01

    We developed a method to experimentally quantify the fourth-order multipole moment of the rare-earth 4f orbital. Linear dichroism (LD) in the Er 3d5/2 core-level photoemission spectra of cubic ErCo2 was measured using bulk-sensitive hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Theoretical calculation reproduced the observed LD, and the result showed that the observed result does not contradict the suggested Γ 83 ground state. Theoretical calculation further showed a linear relationship between the LD size and the size of the fourth-order multipole moment of the Er3+ ion, which is proportional to the expectation value , where Onm are the Stevens operators. These analyses indicate that the LD in 3d photoemission spectra can be used to quantify the average fourth-order multipole moment of rare-earth atoms in a cubic crystal electric field.

  6. Size dispersion and colloid mediated radionuclide transport in a synthetic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delos, A; Walther, C; Schäfer, T; Büchner, S

    2008-08-01

    Size dispersion effects during the migration of natural submicron bentonite colloids (model predictions and earlier findings with carboxylated polystyrene spheres. By addition of trace amounts of americium(III) and plutonium(IV), colloid mediated transport of these radionuclides is studied. The peak arrival times of Pu-244 and Am-241, as measured by ICP-MS, match the bentonite colloid breakthrough and occur significantly prior to the conservative tracer (HTO) indicating the colloid-borne migration of tri- and tetravalent radionuclides.

  7. A histone deacetylase complex mediates biofilm dispersal and drug resistance in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Clarissa J; Fox, Emily P; Hartooni, Nairi; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Hnisz, Denes; Andes, David R; Kuchler, Karl; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-06-10

    Biofilms are resilient, surface-associated communities of cells with specialized properties (e.g., resistance to drugs and mechanical forces) that are distinct from those of suspension (planktonic) cultures. Biofilm formation by the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is medically relevant because C. albicans infections are highly correlated with implanted medical devices, which provide efficient substrates for biofilm formation; moreover, biofilms are inherently resistant to antifungal drugs. Biofilms are also important for C. albicans to colonize diverse niches of the human host. Here, we describe four core members of a conserved histone deacetylase complex in C. albicans (Set3, Hos2, Snt1, and Sif2) and explore the effects of their mutation on biofilm formation. We find that these histone deacetylase complex members are needed for proper biofilm formation, including dispersal of cells from biofilms and multifactorial drug resistance. Our results underscore the importance of the physical properties of biofilms in contributing to drug resistance and dispersal and lay a foundation for new strategies to target biofilm dispersal as a potential antifungal intervention. Through the formation of biofilms--surface-associated communities of cells--microorganisms can establish infections, become drug resistant, and evade the host immune system. Here we investigate how four core members of a conserved histone deacetylase complex mediate biofilm formation by Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans. We show that this histone deacetylase complex is required for biofilm dispersal, a process through which cells leave the biofilm to establish new infections. We also show that the deacetylase complex mediates biofilm drug resistance. This work provides new insight into how the physical properties of biofilms affect dispersal and drug resistance and suggests new potential antifungal strategies that could be effective against biofilms. Copyright

  8. Role of human-mediated dispersal in the spread of the pinewood nematode in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinet, Christelle; Roques, Alain; Pan, Hongyang; Fang, Guofei; Ye, Jianren; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Sun, Jianghua

    2009-01-01

    Intensification of world trade is responsible for an increase in the number of alien species introductions. Human-mediated dispersal promotes not only introductions but also expansion of the species distribution via long-distance dispersal. Thus, understanding the role of anthropogenic pathways in the spread of invading species has become one of the most important challenges nowadays. We analysed the invasion pattern of the pinewood nematode in China based on invasion data from 1982 to 2005 and monitoring data on 7 locations over 15 years. Short distance spread mediated by long-horned beetles was estimated at 7.5 km per year. Infested sites located further away represented more than 90% of observations and the mean long distance spread was estimated at 111-339 km. Railways, river ports, and lakes had significant effects on the spread pattern. Human population density levels explained 87% of the variation in the invasion probability (Pclimate scenarios (stable climate or moderate warming), projections of the invasion probability suggest that this pest could expand its distribution 40-55% by 2025. This study provides evidence that human-induced dispersal plays a fundamental role in the spread of the pinewood nematode, and appropriate control measures should be taken to stop or slow its expansion. This model can be applied to Europe, where the nematode had been introduced later, and is currently expanding its distribution. Similar models could also be derived for other species that could be accidentally transported by humans.

  9. Dispersal and selection mediate hybridization between a native and invasive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ryan P.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Boyer, Matthew C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Allendorf, Fred W.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between native and non-native species has serious biological consequences, but our understanding of how dispersal and selection interact to influence invasive hybridization is limited. Here, we document the spread of genetic introgression between a native (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and invasive (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout, and identify the mechanisms influencing genetic admixture. In two populations inhabiting contrasting environments, non-native admixture increased rapidly from 1984 to 2007 and was driven by surprisingly consistent processes. Individual admixture was related to two phenotypic traits associated with fitness: size at spawning and age of juvenile emigration. Fish with higher non-native admixture were larger and tended to emigrate at a younger age—relationships that are expected to confer fitness advantages to hybrid individuals. However, strong selection against non-native admixture was evident across streams and cohorts (mean selection coefficient against genotypes with non-native alleles (s) ¼ 0.60; s.e. ¼ 0.10). Nevertheless, hybridization was promoted in both streams by the continuous immigration of individuals with high levels of non-native admixture from other hybrid source populations. Thus, antagonistic relationships between dispersal and selection are mediating invasive hybridization between these fish, emphasizing that data on dispersal and natural selection are needed to fully understand the dynamics of introgression between native and non-native species. .

  10. Bird-mediated seed dispersal: reduced digestive efficiency in active birds modulates dispersal capacity of plant seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleyheeg, Erik; Van Leeuwen, C.H.A.; Morison, M.A.; Nolet, Bart; Soons, Merel

    2015-01-01

    Plant populations in fragmented ecosystems rely largely on internal dispersal by animals. To unravel the mechanisms underlying this mode of dispersal, an increasing number of experimental feeding studies is carried out. However, while physical activity is known to affect vertebrate digestive

  11. Role of human-mediated dispersal in the spread of the pinewood nematode in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Robinet

    Full Text Available Intensification of world trade is responsible for an increase in the number of alien species introductions. Human-mediated dispersal promotes not only introductions but also expansion of the species distribution via long-distance dispersal. Thus, understanding the role of anthropogenic pathways in the spread of invading species has become one of the most important challenges nowadays.We analysed the invasion pattern of the pinewood nematode in China based on invasion data from 1982 to 2005 and monitoring data on 7 locations over 15 years. Short distance spread mediated by long-horned beetles was estimated at 7.5 km per year. Infested sites located further away represented more than 90% of observations and the mean long distance spread was estimated at 111-339 km. Railways, river ports, and lakes had significant effects on the spread pattern. Human population density levels explained 87% of the variation in the invasion probability (P<0.05. Since 2001, the number of new records of the nematode was multiplied by a factor of 5 and the spread distance by a factor of 2. We combined a diffusion model to describe the short distance spread with a stochastic, individual based model to describe the long distance jumps. This combined model generated an error of only 13% when used to predict the presence of the nematode. Under two climate scenarios (stable climate or moderate warming, projections of the invasion probability suggest that this pest could expand its distribution 40-55% by 2025.This study provides evidence that human-induced dispersal plays a fundamental role in the spread of the pinewood nematode, and appropriate control measures should be taken to stop or slow its expansion. This model can be applied to Europe, where the nematode had been introduced later, and is currently expanding its distribution. Similar models could also be derived for other species that could be accidentally transported by humans.

  12. Native fruit traits may mediate dispersal competition between native and non-native plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Aslan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Seed disperser preferences may mediate the impact of invasive, non-native plant species on their new ecological communities. Significant seed disperser preference for invasives over native species could facilitate the spread of the invasives while impeding native plant dispersal. Such competition for dispersers could negatively impact the fitness of some native plants. Here, we review published literature to identify circumstances under which preference for non-native fruits occurs. The importance of fruit attraction is underscored by several studies demonstrating that invasive, fleshy-fruited plant species are particularly attractive to regional frugivores. A small set of studies directly compare frugivore preference for native vs. invasive species, and we find that different designs and goals within such studies frequently yield contrasting results. When similar native and non-native plant species have been compared, frugivores have tended to show preference for the non-natives. This preference appears to stem from enhanced feeding efficiency or accessibility associated with the non-native fruits. On the other hand, studies examining preference within existing suites of co-occurring species, with no attempt to maximize fruit similarity, show mixed results, with frugivores in most cases acting opportunistically or preferring native species. A simple, exploratory meta-analysis finds significant preference for native species when these studies are examined as a group. We illustrate the contrasting findings typical of these two approaches with results from two small-scale aviary experiments we conducted to determine preference by frugivorous bird species in northern California. In these case studies, native birds preferred the native fruit species as long as it was dissimilar from non-native fruits, while non-native European starlings preferred non-native fruit. However, native birds showed slight, non-significant preference for non-native fruit

  13. Eastward from Africa: palaeocurrent-mediated chameleon dispersal to the Seychelles islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ted M; Tolley, Krystal A; Glaw, Frank; Böhme, Wolfgang; Vences, Miguel

    2011-04-23

    Madagascar and the Seychelles are Gondwanan remnants currently isolated in the Indian Ocean. In the Late Cretaceous, these islands were joined with India to form the Indigascar landmass, which itself then split into its three component parts around the start of the Tertiary. This history is reflected in the biota of the Seychelles, which appears to contain examples of both vicariance- and dispersal-mediated divergence from Malagasy or Indian sister taxa. One lineage for which this has been assumed but never thoroughly tested is the Seychellean tiger chameleon, a species assigned to the otherwise Madagascar-endemic genus Calumma. We present a multi-locus phylogenetic study of chameleons, and find that the Seychellean species is actually the sister taxon of a southern African clade and requires accomodation in its own genus as Archaius tigris. Divergence dating and biogeographic analyses indicate an origin by transoceanic dispersal from Africa to the Seychelles in the Eocene-Oligocene, providing, to our knowledge, the first such well-documented example and supporting novel palaeocurrent reconstructions.

  14. Parametrization of the cumulant lattice Boltzmann method for fourth order accurate diffusion part II: Application to flow around a sphere at drag crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Martin; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The optimized cumulant lattice Boltzmann method with fourth order accurate diffusion is used to simulate the flow around a sphere up to Reynolds number 106. The drag crisis is well captured by the method. We demonstrate with our results that the drag crisis corresponds to an almost discrete jump in the flow conditions. The intermediate values of drag in a small range of Reynolds numbers around the drag crisis observed in averaged data sets are found to originate from the flow switching between the high and the low drag conditions. Around the critical Reynolds number, the time spent in the low drag condition increases with the Reynolds number such that the average drag curve has a finite steepness.

  15. Well-posedness and exact controllability of a fourth order Schrodinger equation with variable coefficients and Neumann boundary control and collocated observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Wen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider an open-loop system of a fourth order Schrodinger equation with variable coefficients and Neumann boundary control and collocated observation. Using the multiplier method on Riemannian manifold we show that that the system is well-posed in the sense of Salamon. This implies that the exponential stability of the closed-loop system under the direct proportional output feedback control and the exact controllability of open-loop system are equivalent. So in order to conclude feedback stabilization from well-posedness, we study the exact controllability under a uniqueness assumption by presenting the observability inequality for the dual system. In addition, we show that the system is regular in the sense of Weiss, and that the feedthrough operator is zero.

  16. Hybrid grating-prism dispersion eraser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Shuai; Liu, Yanqi; Liu, Xingyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2018-03-01

    A hybrid grating-prism dispersion eraser is proposed to achieve broadband dispersion compensation. A ray-tracing model is built up for its phase spectrum and derivatives. The numerical calculation shows that the eraser can compensate dispersion up to fourth-order. When it is used in chirped-pulse amplifiers, it can obtain aberration-free phase with above 120 nm bandwidth at 0 . 8 μm central wavelength and support near-Fourier-transform-limited femtosecond pulses output.

  17. The influence of dispersion slope to the higher-order dispersion coefficients for highly-nonlinear fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Shah, N. S. M.; Tay, K. G.; Pakarzadeh, H.; Cholan, N. A.; Talib, R.

    2017-09-01

    The highly-nonlinear fiber is the ideal gain medium for many applications particularly because its dispersion can be easily engineered. However, the modification of the fiber dispersion will affect the higher-order dispersion coefficients. Hence, this paper investigates the effect of highly-nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber dispersion profile on the higher-order dispersion coefficients which are the fourth-order and sixth-order dispersion coefficients. The dispersion profile was modified by varying the slope at zero-dispersion wavelength. The fourth-order dispersion coefficient exhibits changes from positive to negative value as the slope at zero-dispersion wavelength is getting higher. Meanwhile, sixth-order dispersion coefficient remains with the positive value even though it shows the reduction as the slope is increased, however it will eventually become negative when the dispersion is high enough. In short, the values of both fourth-order and sixth-order dispersion coefficients at zero-dispersion wavelength decrease when the slope increases. At the request of all authors of the paper, an updated version of this article was published on 13 October 2017. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing had an incorrect affiliation for R. Talib. The affiliation for R. Talib was changed from 3Shiraz University of Technology to 1Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. This has been corrected in the updated and re-published version.

  18. Breather solutions of a fourth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the degenerate, soliton, and rogue wave limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdury, Amdad; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Akhmediev, N

    2017-10-01

    We present one- and two-breather solutions of the fourth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With several parameters to play with, the solution may take a variety of forms. We consider most of these cases including the general form and limiting cases when the modulation frequencies are 0 or coincide. The zero-frequency limit produces a combination of breather-soliton structures on a constant background. The case of equal modulation frequencies produces a degenerate solution that requires a special technique for deriving. A zero-frequency limit of this degenerate solution produces a rational second-order rogue wave solution with a stretching factor involved. Taking, in addition, the zero limit of the stretching factor transforms the second-order rogue waves into a soliton. Adding a differential shift in the degenerate solution results in structural changes in the wave profile. Moreover, the zero-frequency limit of the degenerate solution with differential shift results in a rogue wave triplet. The zero limit of the stretching factor in this solution, in turn, transforms the triplet into a singlet plus a low-amplitude soliton on the background. A large value of the differential shift parameter converts the triplet into a pure singlet.

  19. Integrability and soliton solutions for an inhomogeneous generalized fourth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the inhomogeneous alpha helical proteins and Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pan; Tian, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    For describing the dynamics of alpha helical proteins with internal molecular excitations, nonlinear couplings between lattice vibrations and molecular excitations, and spin excitations in one-dimensional isotropic biquadratic Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin with the octupole–dipole interactions, we consider an inhomogeneous generalized fourth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Based on the Ablowitz–Kaup–Newell–Segur system, infinitely many conservation laws for the equation are derived. Through the auxiliary function, bilinear forms and N-soliton solutions for the equation are obtained. Interactions of solitons are discussed by means of the asymptotic analysis. Effects of linear inhomogeneity on the interactions of solitons are also investigated graphically and analytically. Since the inhomogeneous coefficient of the equation h=α x+β, the soliton takes on the parabolic profile during the evolution. Soliton velocity is related to the parameter α, distance scale coefficient and biquadratic exchange coefficient, but has no relation with the parameter β. Soliton amplitude and width are only related to α. Soliton position is related to β

  20. A fourth order PDE based fuzzy c- means approach for segmentation of microscopic biopsy images in presence of Poisson noise for cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2017-07-01

    For cancer detection from microscopic biopsy images, image segmentation step used for segmentation of cells and nuclei play an important role. Accuracy of segmentation approach dominate the final results. Also the microscopic biopsy images have intrinsic Poisson noise and if it is present in the image the segmentation results may not be accurate. The objective is to propose an efficient fuzzy c-means based segmentation approach which can also handle the noise present in the image during the segmentation process itself i.e. noise removal and segmentation is combined in one step. To address the above issues, in this paper a fourth order partial differential equation (FPDE) based nonlinear filter adapted to Poisson noise with fuzzy c-means segmentation method is proposed. This approach is capable of effectively handling the segmentation problem of blocky artifacts while achieving good tradeoff between Poisson noise removals and edge preservation of the microscopic biopsy images during segmentation process for cancer detection from cells. The proposed approach is tested on breast cancer microscopic biopsy data set with region of interest (ROI) segmented ground truth images. The microscopic biopsy data set contains 31 benign and 27 malignant images of size 896 × 768. The region of interest selected ground truth of all 58 images are also available for this data set. Finally, the result obtained from proposed approach is compared with the results of popular segmentation algorithms; fuzzy c-means, color k-means, texture based segmentation, and total variation fuzzy c-means approaches. The experimental results shows that proposed approach is providing better results in terms of various performance measures such as Jaccard coefficient, dice index, Tanimoto coefficient, area under curve, accuracy, true positive rate, true negative rate, false positive rate, false negative rate, random index, global consistency error, and variance of information as compared to other

  1. Srv mediated dispersal of streptococcal biofilms through SpeB is observed in CovRS+ strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristie L Connolly

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human specific pathogen capable of causing both mild infections and severe invasive disease. We and others have shown that GAS is able to form biofilms during infection. That is to say, they form a three-dimensional, surface attached structure consisting of bacteria and a multi-component extracellular matrix. The mechanisms involved in regulation and dispersal of these GAS structures are still unclear. Recently we have reported that in the absence of the transcriptional regulator Srv in the MGAS5005 background, the cysteine protease SpeB is constitutively produced, leading to increased tissue damage and decreased biofilm formation during a subcutaneous infection in a mouse model. This was interesting because MGAS5005 has a naturally occurring mutation that inactivates the sensor kinase domain of the two component regulatory system CovRS. Others have previously shown that strains lacking covS are associated with decreased SpeB production due to CovR repression of speB expression. Thus, our results suggest the inactivation of srv can bypass CovR repression and lead to constitutive SpeB production. We hypothesized that Srv control of SpeB production may be a mechanism to regulate biofilm dispersal and provide a mechanism by which mild infection can transition to severe disease through biofilm dispersal. The question remained however, is this mechanism conserved among GAS strains or restricted to the unique genetic makeup of MGAS5005. Here we show that Srv mediated control of SpeB and biofilm dispersal is conserved in the invasive clinical isolates RGAS053 (serotype M1 and MGAS315 (serotype M3, both of which have covS intact. This work provides additional evidence that Srv regulated control of SpeB may mediate biofilm formation and dispersal in diverse strain backgrounds.

  2. Mediation of cholino-piperine like receptors by extracts of Piper nigrum induces melanin dispersion in Rana tigerina tadpole melanophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Mohammed; Ali, Sharique A

    2011-08-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the effects of lyophilized dried fruit extracts of Piper nigrum and pure piperine on the tadpole melanophores of frog Rana tigerina which offer excellent in vitro opportunities for studying the effects of pharmacological and pharmaceutical agents. The nature of specific cellular receptors present on the neuro-melanophore junction and their involvement in pigmentary responses has been explored. Effects of lyophilized extracts of P. nigrum and pure piperine were studied on the isolated tail melanophores of tadpoles of the frog R. tigerina as per the modified method. The extract of P. nigrum and its active ingredient piperine caused significant melanin dispersal responses leading to darkening of the tail melanophores, which were completely antagonized by atropine and hyoscine. These per se melanin dispersal effects were also found to be markedly potentiated by neostigmine an anticholinesterase agent. It appears that the melanin dispersal effects of the extracts of P. nigrum and pure piperine leading to skin darkening are mediated by cholinergic muscarinic or piperine-like receptors having similar properties.

  3. Does animal-mediated seed dispersal facilitate the formation of Pinus armandii-Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Dexiang; Yi, Xianfeng; Shi, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yakun; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhang, XinPing

    2014-01-01

    The Pinus armandii and Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata mixed forest is one of the major forest types in the Qinling Mountains, China. P. armandii is considered to be a pioneer species during succession and it is usually invaded by late successional Q. aliena var. acuteserrata. However, the mechanism that underlies its invasion remains unclear. In the present study, we tracked seed dispersal of P. armandii and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata using coded plastic tags in the western, middle and eastern Qinling Mountains to elucidate the invasion process in the mixed forests. Our results indicated that the seeds of both P. armandii and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata were removed rapidly in the Qinling Mountains, and there were no differences in the seed removal rates between the two species. There were significant differences in rodent seed-eating and caching strategies between the two tree species. For P. armandii, seeds were more likely to be eaten in situ than those of Q. aliena var. acuteserrata in all plots. By contrast, the acorns of Q. aliena var. acuteserrata were less frequently eaten in situ, but more likely to be removed and cached. Q. aliena var. acuteserrata acorns had significantly longer dispersal distances than P. armandii seeds in all plots. Although P. armandii seeds were less likely to be dispersed into the Q. aliena var. acuteserrata stands, over 30% of the released acorns were transported into the P. armandii stands where they established five seedlings. Based on the coupled recruitment patterns of P. armandii and Q. aliena var. acuteserrata, we suggest that the animal-mediated seed dispersal contributes to the formation of Pinus armandii-Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata forests.

  4. Chance long-distance or human-mediated dispersal? How Acacia s.l. farnesiana attained its pan-tropical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Haripriya; Fernandes, Manuel M.; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Acacia s.l. farnesiana, which originates from Mesoamerica, is the most widely distributed Acacia s.l. species across the tropics. It is assumed that the plant was transferred across the Atlantic to southern Europe by Spanish explorers, and then spread across the Old World tropics through a combination of chance long-distance and human-mediated dispersal. Our study uses genetic analysis and information from historical sources to test the relative roles of chance and human-mediated dispersal in its distribution. The results confirm the Mesoamerican origins of the plant and show three patterns of human-mediated dispersal. Samples from Spain showed greater genetic diversity than those from other Old World tropics, suggesting more instances of transatlantic introductions from the Americas to that country than to other parts of Africa and Asia. Individuals from the Philippines matched a population from South Central Mexico and were likely to have been direct, trans-Pacific introductions. Australian samples were genetically unique, indicating that the arrival of the species in the continent was independent of these European colonial activities. This suggests the possibility of pre-European human-mediated dispersal across the Pacific Ocean. These significant findings raise new questions for biogeographic studies that assume chance or transoceanic dispersal for disjunct plant distributions. PMID:28484637

  5. Impacts of biological globalization in the Mediterranean: Unveiling the deep history of human-mediated gamebird dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcina, Giovanni; Guerrini, Monica; van Grouw, Hein; Gupta, Brij K.; Panayides, Panicos; Hadjigerou, Pantelis; Al-Sheikhly, Omar F.; Awan, Muhammad N.; Khan, Aleem A.; Zeder, Melinda A.; Barbanera, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Humans have a long history of moving wildlife that over time has resulted in unprecedented biotic homogenization. It is, as a result, often unclear whether certain taxa are native to a region or naturalized, and how the history of human involvement in species dispersal has shaped present-day biodiversity. Although currently an eastern Palaearctic galliform, the black francolin (Francolinus francolinus) was known to occur in the western Mediterranean from at least the time of Pliny the Elder, if not earlier. During Medieval times and the Renaissance, the black francolin was a courtly gamebird prized not only for its flavor, but also its curative, and even aphrodisiac qualities. There is uncertainty, however, whether this important gamebird was native or introduced to the region and, if the latter, what the source of introduction into the western Mediterranean was. Here we combine historical documentation with a DNA investigation of modern birds and archival (13th–20th century) specimens from across the species’ current and historically documented range. Our study proves the black francolin was nonnative to the western Mediterranean, and we document its introduction from the east via several trade routes, some reaching as far as South Asia. This finding provides insight into the reach and scope of long-distance trade routes that serviced the demand of European aristocracy for exotic species as symbols of wealth and prestige, and helps to demonstrate the lasting impact of human-mediated long-distance species dispersal on current day biodiversity. PMID:25733899

  6. Impacts of biological globalization in the Mediterranean: unveiling the deep history of human-mediated gamebird dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcina, Giovanni; Guerrini, Monica; van Grouw, Hein; Gupta, Brij K; Panayides, Panicos; Hadjigerou, Pantelis; Al-Sheikhly, Omar F; Awan, Muhammad N; Khan, Aleem A; Zeder, Melinda A; Barbanera, Filippo

    2015-03-17

    Humans have a long history of moving wildlife that over time has resulted in unprecedented biotic homogenization. It is, as a result, often unclear whether certain taxa are native to a region or naturalized, and how the history of human involvement in species dispersal has shaped present-day biodiversity. Although currently an eastern Palaearctic galliform, the black francolin (Francolinus francolinus) was known to occur in the western Mediterranean from at least the time of Pliny the Elder, if not earlier. During Medieval times and the Renaissance, the black francolin was a courtly gamebird prized not only for its flavor, but also its curative, and even aphrodisiac qualities. There is uncertainty, however, whether this important gamebird was native or introduced to the region and, if the latter, what the source of introduction into the western Mediterranean was. Here we combine historical documentation with a DNA investigation of modern birds and archival (13th-20th century) specimens from across the species' current and historically documented range. Our study proves the black francolin was nonnative to the western Mediterranean, and we document its introduction from the east via several trade routes, some reaching as far as South Asia. This finding provides insight into the reach and scope of long-distance trade routes that serviced the demand of European aristocracy for exotic species as symbols of wealth and prestige, and helps to demonstrate the lasting impact of human-mediated long-distance species dispersal on current day biodiversity.

  7. Investigation of surfactant mediated acid-base charging of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek, Matthew M; Berg, John C

    2012-12-21

    The current work examines the role of acid-base properties on particle charging in apolar media. Manipulating the polarity and magnitude of charge in such systems is of growing interest to a number of applications. A major hurdle to the implementation of this technology is that the mechanism(s) of particle charging remain a subject of debate. The authors previously conducted a study of the charging of a series of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems that contained the surfactant AOT. It was observed that there was a correlation between the particle electrophoretic mobility and the acid-base nature of the particle, as characterized by aqueous point of zero charge (PZC) or the isoelectric point (IEP). The current study investigates whether or not a similar correlation is observed with other surfactants, namely, the acidic Span 80 and the basic OLOA 11000. This is accomplished by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of a series of mineral oxides that are dispersed in Isopar-L containing various concentrations of either Span 80 or OLOA 11000. The mineral oxides used have PZC values that cover a wide range of pH, providing a systematic study of how particle and surfactant acid-base properties impact particle charge. It was found that the magnitude and polarity of particle surface charge varied linearly with the particle PZC for both surfactants used. In addition, the point at which the polarity of charge reversed for the basic surfactant OLOA 11000 was shifted to a pH of approximately 8.5, compared to the previous result of about 5 for AOT. This proves that both surfactant and particle acid-base properties are important, and provides support for the theory of acid-base charging in apolar media.

  8. Facile route of biopolymer mediated ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd., E-mail: noorhaida@usm.my [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Penang, Malaysia and Centre for Organized Matter Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, BS8 1TS, Bristol (United Kingdom); Collins, A. M.; Mann, S. [Centre for Organized Matter Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Cantock' s Close, BS8 1TS, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, we present a facile method for production stable aqueous dispersion of ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles. Ferrocene compounds were employed to achieve stable nanodispersions, stabilized with three different biopolymers namely, alginate, CM-dextran and chitosan. The nanoparticles produce are spherical, less than 10 nm in mean diameter and highly stable without any sedimentation. Fourier infrared transform (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the purity of ferrocene nanoparticles there is no modifications occur during the preparation route. FTIR spectra results were consistent with the presence of absorption band of cyclopentadienyl ring (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}{sup −} ion) which assigned to ν(C-C) vibrations (1409 cm-1), δ(C-H) stretching at 1001 cm{sup −1} and π(C-H) vibrations at 812 cm{sup −1}. Furthermore, all functional group for biopolymers such as CO from carboxyl group of CM-dextran and sodium alginate appears at 1712 cm{sup −1} and 1709 cm{sup −1} respectively, indicating there are steric repulsion interactions for particles stabilization. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of sedimented samples of the biopolymers-stabilized ferrocene (FO) showed all reflections which were indexed respectively to the (−110), (001), (−201), (−111), (200), (−211), (210), (120) and (111) according to the monoclinic phase ferrocene. This confirmed that the products obtained were of high purity of Fe and EDAX analysis also suggests that the presence of the Fe element in the colloidal dispersion.

  9. Thyroxine 5'-deiodination mediates norepinephrine-induced lipogenesis in dispersed brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, A C; Carvalho, S D; Carvalho, C R; Rabelo, R; Moriscot, A S

    1998-02-01

    presence of T4, confirming the mediation of 5'-DII in this process. In conclusion, lipogenesis in brown adipose tissue is under complex hormonal control, with key roles played by NE, thyroid hormones, and local 5'-DII. As in other tissues, NE-generated signals acutely (12 h) inhibited lipogenesis. However, the presence of the 5'-DII generated enough T3 to stimulate lipogenesis and gradually reverse the short-lived NE-induced inhibition, leading to the 2- to 3-fold response observed at later time points.

  10. Colonization of abandoned land by Juniperus thurifera is mediated by the interaction of a diverse dispersal assemblage and environmental heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Escribano-Avila

    Full Text Available Land abandonment is one of the most powerful global change drivers in developed countries where recent rural exodus has been the norm. Abandonment of traditional land use practices has permitted the colonization of these areas by shrub and tree species. For fleshy fruited species the colonization of new areas is determined by the dispersal assemblage composition and abundance. In this study we showed how the relative contribution to the dispersal process by each animal species is modulated by the environmental heterogeneity and ecosystem structure. This complex interaction caused differential patterns on the seed dispersal in both, landscape patches in which the process of colonization is acting nowadays and mature woodlands of Juniperus thurifera, a relict tree distributed in the western Mediterranean Basin. Thrushes (Turdus spp and carnivores (red fox and stone marten dispersed a high amount of seeds while rabbits and sheeps only a tiny fraction. Thrushes dispersed a significant amount of seeds in new colonization areas, however they were limited by the presence of high perches with big crop size. While carnivores dispersed seeds to all studied habitats, even in those patches where no trees of J. thurifera were present, turning out to be critical for primary colonization. The presence of Pinus and Quercus was related to a reduced consumption of J. thurifera seeds while the presence of fleshy fruited shrubs was related with higher content of J. thurifera seeds in dispersers' faeces. Therefore environmental heterogeneity and ecosystem structure had a great influence on dispersers feeding behaviour, and should be considered in order to accurately describe the role of seed dispersal in ecological process, such as regeneration and colonization. J. thurifera expansion is not seed limited thanks to its diverse dispersal community, hence the conservation of all dispersers in an ecosystem enhance ecosystems services and resilience.

  11. Optimized Runge-Kutta methods with minimal dispersion and dissipation for problems arising from computational acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselios, Kostas; Simos, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter a new explicit fourth-order seven-stage Runge-Kutta method with a combination of minimal dispersion and dissipation error and maximal accuracy and stability limit along the imaginary axes, is developed. This method was produced by a general function that was constructed to satisfy all the above requirements and, from which, all the existing fourth-order six-stage RK methods can be produced. The new method is more efficient than the other optimized methods, for acoustic computations

  12. Template-Mediated Ni(II) Dispersion in Mesoporous SiO2for Preparation of Highly Dispersed Ni Catalysts: Influence of Template Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xin; Lu, Yiyuan; Fu, Heyun; Wan, Haiqin; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong

    2017-06-07

    Supported Ni catalysts on three mesoporous SiO 2 supports (i.e., SBA-15, MCM-41, and HMS) were prepared using a solid-state reaction between Ni(NO 3 ) 2 and organic template-occluded mesoporous SiO 2 . For comparison, supported Ni catalysts on mesoporous SiO 2 synthesized by the conventional impregnation method were also included. The catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, H 2 temperature-programmed reduction, transmission electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray. The catalytic properties of the catalysts were evaluated using gas-phase catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane. The results showed that upon grinding Ni(NO 3 ) 2 with template-occluded mesoporous SiO 2 , strong coordination between Ni 2+ and dodecylamine was identified in the Ni(NO 3 ) 2 -HMS system. Additionally, the results of H 2 temperature-programmed reduction revealed that NiO in calcined NiO/HMS was reduced at higher temperature than those in calcined NiO/SBA-15 and NiO/MCM-41, reflecting the presence of a strong interaction between NiO and mesoporous SiO 2 in NiO/HMS. Consistently, the average particle sizes of metallic Ni were found to be 2.7, 3.4, and 9.6 nm in H 2 -reduced Ni/HMS, Ni/SBA-15, and Ni/MCM-41, respectively, indicative of a much higher Ni dispersion in Ni/HMS. For the catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane, Ni/MCM-41 synthesized by the solid-state reaction method exhibited a catalytic activity similar to that prepared by the impregnation method, while higher catalytic activities were observed on Ni/HMS and Ni/SBA-15 than on their counterparts prepared by the impregnation method. Furthermore, a higher conversion was identified on Ni/HMS than on Ni/SBA-15 and Ni/MCM-41, highlighting the importance of template type for the preparation of highly dispersed metal catalysts on mesoporous Si

  13. One-step template-free synthesis of monoporous polymer microspheres with uniform sizes via microwave-mediated dispersion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Chen, Gan-Chao; Li, Yun-Mei; Fan, Jun-Bing; Zhu, Ming-Feng; Tang, Zhiyong

    2011-11-01

    One-step facile synthesis of monoporous polymer microspheres via microwave-controlled dispersion polymerization is introduced. This template-free method employing the dispersion polymerization of styrene under microwave irradiation induces directly the formation of uniform monoporous polymer microspheres, with controllable morphologies and sizes, which can be tuned by simply adjusting parameters for the synthesis. A comparison to conventional heating indicates that microwave irradiation plays a vital role in the formation of this novel morphology.

  14. Spatial solitons and stability in the one-dimensional and the two-dimensional generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with fourth-order diffraction and parity-time-symmetric potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiofack, C. G. L.; Ndzana, F., II; Mohamadou, A.; Kofane, T. C.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of solitons in parity-time (PT )-symmetric optical media characterized by a generic complex hyperbolic refractive index distribution and fourth-order diffraction (FOD). For the linear case, we demonstrate numerically that the FOD parameter can alter the PT -breaking points. For nonlinear cases, the exact analytical expressions of the localized modes are obtained both in one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations with self-focusing and self-defocusing Kerr nonlinearity. The effect of FOD on the stability structure of these localized modes is discussed with the help of linear stability analysis followed by the direct numerical simulation of the governing equation. Examples of stable and unstable solutions are given. The transverse power flow density associated with these localized modes is also discussed. It is found that the relative strength of the FOD coefficient can utterly change the direction of the power flow, which may be used to control the energy exchange among gain or loss regions.

  15. Phage-mediated dispersal of biofilm and distribution of bacterial virulence genes is induced by quorum sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome and the phage meta-genome within the human gut are influenced by antibiotic treatments. Identifying a novel mechanism, here we demonstrate that bacteria use the universal communication molecule AI-2 to induce virulence genes and transfer them via phage release. High concentrations (i.e. 100 μM of AI-2 promote dispersal of bacteria from already established biofilms, and is associated with release of phages capable of infecting other bacteria. Enterococcus faecalis V583ΔABC harbours 7 prophages in its genome, and a mutant deficient in one of these prophages (i.e. prophage 5 showed a greatly reduced dispersal of biofilm. Infection of a probiotic E. faecalis strain without lytic prophages with prophage 5 resulted in increased biofilm formation and also in biofilm dispersal upon induction with AI-2. Infection of the probiotic E. faecalis strain with phage-containing supernatants released through AI-2 from E. faecalis V583ΔABC resulted in a strong increase in pathogenicity of this strain. The polylysogenic probiotic strain was also more virulent in a mouse sepsis model and a rat endocarditis model. Both AI-2 and ciprofloxacin lead to phage release, indicating that conditions in the gastrointestinal tract of hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics might lead to distribution of virulence genes to apathogenic enterococci and possibly also to other commensals or even to beneficial probiotic strains.

  16. A perturbative formulation of nonlinear dispersion for particle motion in storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, H; Soutome, K; Hama, H; Hosaka, M

    1999-01-01

    We provide a perturbative formulation of nonlinear dispersion for particle motion in storage rings without linearizing the kinematic term and give recursion expressions for higher-order terms up to the fourth order. As an example, the nonlinear dispersion function of the SPring-8 storage ring is numerically calculated. The numerical calculation shows that the higher-order terms up to third order are not significantly modulated by magnetic error if the dispersion of the linear optics is sufficiently small. An experimental study of the nonlinear dispersion was also carried out and it was found that the agreement between the theory and the measurement was fairly good up to second order. (author)

  17. Pollen-mediated gene flow from glyphosate-resistant common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Sauer): consequences for the dispersal of resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Debalin; Tyre, Andrew J; Patterson, Eric L; Gaines, Todd A; Irmak, Suat; Knezevic, Stevan Z; Lindquist, John L; Jhala, Amit J

    2017-03-22

    Gene flow is an important component in evolutionary biology; however, the role of gene flow in dispersal of herbicide-resistant alleles among weed populations is poorly understood. Field experiments were conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) from glyphosate-resistant (GR) to -susceptible (GS) common waterhemp using a concentric donor-receptor design. More than 130,000 common waterhemp plants were screened and 26,199 plants were confirmed resistant to glyphosate. Frequency of gene flow from all distances, directions, and years was estimated with a double exponential decay model using Generalized Nonlinear Model (package gnm) in R. PMGF declined by 50% at <3 m distance from the pollen source, whereas 90% reduction was found at 88 m (maximum) depending on the direction of the pollen-receptor blocks. Amplification of the target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), was identified as the mechanism of glyphosate resistance in parent biotype. The EPSPS gene amplification was heritable in common waterhemp and can be transferred via PMGF, and also correlated with glyphosate resistance in pseudo-F 2 progeny. This is the first report of PMGF in GR common waterhemp and the results are critical in explaining the rapid dispersal of GR common waterhemp in Midwestern United States.

  18. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  19. Range expansion of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Kenya: evidence of genetic admixture and human-mediated dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aaron W; Liebl, Andrea L; Richards, Christina L; Martin, Lynn B

    2014-01-01

    Introduced species offer an opportunity to study the ecological process of range expansions. Recently, 3 mechanisms have been identified that may resolve the genetic paradox (the seemingly unlikely success of introduced species given the expected reduction in genetic diversity through bottlenecks or founder effects): multiple introductions, high propagule pressure, and epigenetics. These mechanisms are probably also important in range expansions (either natural or anthropogenic), yet this possibility remains untested in vertebrates. We used microsatellite variation (7 loci) in house sparrows (Passer domesticus), an introduced species that has been spreading across Kenya for ~60 years, to determine if patterns of variation could explain how this human commensal overcame the genetic paradox and expresses such considerable phenotypic differentiation across this new range. We note that in some cases, polygenic traits and epistasis among genes, for example, may not have negative effects on populations. House sparrows arrived in Kenya by a single introduction event (to Mombasa, ~1950) and have lower genetic diversity than native European and introduced North American populations. We used Bayesian clustering of individuals (n = 233) to detect that at least 2 types of range expansion occurred in Kenya: one with genetic admixture and one with little to no admixture. We also found that genetic diversity increased toward a range edge, and the range expansion was consistent with long-distance dispersal. Based on these data, we expect that the Kenyan range expansion was anthropogenically influenced, as the expansions of other introduced human commensals may also be.

  20. Spectral phase shift and residual angular dispersion of an accousto-optic programme dispersive filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerzsoenyi, A.; Meroe, M.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There is an increasing demand for active and precise dispersion control of ultrashort laser pulses. In chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems, the dispersion of the optical elements of the laser has to be compensated at least to the fourth order to obtain high temporal contrast compressed pulses. Nowadays the most convenient device for active and programmable control of spectral phase and amplitude of broadband laser pulses is the acousto-optic programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF), claimed to be able to adjust the spectral phase up to the fourth order. Although it has been widely used, surprisingly enough there has been only a single, low resolution measurement reported on the accuracy of the induced spectral phase shift of the device. In our paper we report on the first systematic experiment aiming at the precise characterization of an AOPDF device. In the experiment the spectral phase shift of the AOPDF device was measured by spectrally and spatially resolved interferometry, which is especially powerful tool to determine small dispersion values with high accuracy. Besides the spectral phase dispersion, we measured both the propagation direction angular dispersion (PDAD) and the phase front angular dispersion (PhFAD). Although the two quantities are equal for plane waves, there may be noticeable difference for Gaussian pulses. PDAD was determined simply by focusing the beam on the slit of an imaging spectrograph, while PhFAD was measured by the use of an inverted Mach-Zehnder interferometer and an imaging spectrograph. In the measurements, the spectral phase shift and both types of angular dispersion have been recorded upon the systematic change of all the accessible functions of the acousto-optic programmable dispersive filter. The measured values of group delay dispersion (GDD) and third order dispersion (TOD) have been found to agree with the preset values within the error of the measurement (1 fs 2 and 10 fs 3

  1. Global phylogeography with mixed-marker analysis reveals male-mediated dispersal in the endangered scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby S Daly-Engel

    Full Text Available The scalloped hammerhead shark, Sphyrna lewini, is a large endangered predator with a circumglobal distribution, observed in the open ocean but linked ontogenetically to coastal embayments for parturition and juvenile development. A previous survey of maternal (mtDNA markers demonstrated strong genetic partitioning overall (global Φ(ST = 0.749 and significant population separations across oceans and between discontinuous continental coastlines.We surveyed the same global range with increased sample coverage (N = 403 and 13 microsatellite loci to assess the male contribution to dispersal and population structure. Biparentally inherited microsatellites reveal low or absent genetic structure across ocean basins and global genetic differentiation (F(ST = 0.035 over an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding measures for maternal mtDNA lineages (Φ(ST = 0.749. Nuclear allelic richness and heterozygosity are high throughout the Indo-Pacific, while genetic structure is low. In contrast, allelic diversity is low while population structure is higher for populations at the ends of the range in the West Atlantic and East Pacific.These data are consistent with the proposed Indo-Pacific center of origin for S. lewini, and indicate that females are philopatric or adhere to coastal habitats while males facilitate gene flow across oceanic expanses. This study includes the largest sampling effort and the most molecular loci ever used to survey the complete range of a large oceanic predator, and findings emphasize the importance of incorporating mixed-marker analysis into stock assessments of threatened and endangered shark species.

  2. Nest suitability, fine-scale population structure and male-mediated dispersal of a solitary ground nesting bee in an urban landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita M López-Uribe

    Full Text Available Bees are the primary pollinators of flowering plants in almost all ecosystems. Worldwide declines in bee populations have raised awareness about the importance of their ecological role in maintaining ecosystem functioning. The naturally strong philopatric behavior that some bee species show can be detrimental to population viability through increased probability of inbreeding. Furthermore, bee populations found in human-altered landscapes, such as urban areas, can experience lower levels of gene flow and effective population sizes, increasing potential for inbreeding depression in wild bee populations. In this study, we investigated the fine-scale population structure of the solitary bee Colletes inaequalis in an urbanized landscape. First, we developed a predictive spatial model to detect suitable nesting habitat for this ground nesting bee and to inform our field search for nests. We genotyped 18 microsatellites in 548 female individuals collected from nest aggregations throughout the study area. Genetic relatedness estimates revealed that genetic similarity among individuals was slightly greater within nest aggregations than among randomly chosen individuals. However, genetic structure among nest aggregations was low (Nei's GST = 0.011. Reconstruction of parental genotypes revealed greater genetic relatedness among females than among males within nest aggregations, suggesting male-mediated dispersal as a potentially important mechanism of population connectivity and inbreeding avoidance. Size of nesting patch was positively correlated with effective population size, but not with other estimators of genetic diversity. We detected a positive trend between geographic distance and genetic differentiation between nest aggregations. Our landscape genetic models suggest that increased urbanization is likely associated with higher levels of inbreeding. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of density and distribution of suitable nesting

  3. Nest suitability, fine-scale population structure and male-mediated dispersal of a solitary ground nesting bee in an urban landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uribe, Margarita M; Morreale, Stephen J; Santiago, Christine K; Danforth, Bryan N

    2015-01-01

    Bees are the primary pollinators of flowering plants in almost all ecosystems. Worldwide declines in bee populations have raised awareness about the importance of their ecological role in maintaining ecosystem functioning. The naturally strong philopatric behavior that some bee species show can be detrimental to population viability through increased probability of inbreeding. Furthermore, bee populations found in human-altered landscapes, such as urban areas, can experience lower levels of gene flow and effective population sizes, increasing potential for inbreeding depression in wild bee populations. In this study, we investigated the fine-scale population structure of the solitary bee Colletes inaequalis in an urbanized landscape. First, we developed a predictive spatial model to detect suitable nesting habitat for this ground nesting bee and to inform our field search for nests. We genotyped 18 microsatellites in 548 female individuals collected from nest aggregations throughout the study area. Genetic relatedness estimates revealed that genetic similarity among individuals was slightly greater within nest aggregations than among randomly chosen individuals. However, genetic structure among nest aggregations was low (Nei's GST = 0.011). Reconstruction of parental genotypes revealed greater genetic relatedness among females than among males within nest aggregations, suggesting male-mediated dispersal as a potentially important mechanism of population connectivity and inbreeding avoidance. Size of nesting patch was positively correlated with effective population size, but not with other estimators of genetic diversity. We detected a positive trend between geographic distance and genetic differentiation between nest aggregations. Our landscape genetic models suggest that increased urbanization is likely associated with higher levels of inbreeding. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of density and distribution of suitable nesting patches for enhancing

  4. Hydrodynamic disperser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, A.I.; Chernov, V.S.; Prokopov, L.I.; Proselkov, Yu.M.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1980-01-15

    A hydrodynamic disperser is suggested which contains a housing, slit nozzles installed on a circular base arranged opposite from each other, resonators secured opposite the nozzle and outlet sleeve. In order to improve the effectiveness of dispersion by throttling the flow, each resonator is made in the form of a crimped plate with crimpings that decrease in height in a direction towards the nozzle.

  5. Positive solutions for a fourth order boundary value problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a boundary value problem for the beam equation, in which the boundary conditions mean that the beam is embedded at one end and free at the other end. Some new estimates to the positive solutions to the boundary value problem are obtained. Some sufficient conditions for the existence of at least one positive solution for the boundary value problem are established. An example is given at the end of the paper to illustrate the main results.

  6. Fourth order compact finite difference method for solving singularly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A numerical method based on finite difference scheme with uniform mesh is presented for solving singularly perturbed two-point boundary value problems of 1D reaction-diffusion equations. First, the derivatives of the given differential equation is replaced by the finite difference approximations and then, solved by using ...

  7. Fourth-Order Vibrational Transition State Theory and Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John F.; Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.

    2015-06-01

    Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) is an enormously successful and well-established theory for treating anharmonic effects on the vibrational levels of semi-rigid molecules. Partially as a consequence of the fact that the theory is exact for the Morse potential (which provides an appropriate qualitative model for stretching anharmonicity), VPT2 calculations for such systems with appropriate ab initio potential functions tend to give fundamental and overtone levels that fall within a handful of wavenumbers of experimentally measured positions. As a consequence, the next non-vanishing level of perturbation theory -- VPT4 -- offers only slight improvements over VPT2 and is not practical for most calculations since it requires information about force constants up through sextic. However, VPT4 (as well as VPT2) can be used for other applications such as the next vibrational correction to rotational constants (the ``gammas'') and other spectroscopic parameters. In addition, the marriage of VPT with the semi-classical transition state theory of Miller (SCTST) has recently proven to be a powerful and accurate treatment for chemical kinetics. In this talk, VPT4-based SCTST tunneling probabilities and cumulative reaction probabilities are give for the first time for selected low-dimensional model systems. The prospects for VPT4, both practical and intrinsic, will also be discussed.

  8. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  9. Histone deacetylases 1 and 3 but not 2 mediate cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 cells and dispersed primary islets from rats and are differentially regulated in the islets of type 1 diabetic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Damgaard Nielsen, M

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising pharmacological targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases. All 11 classical HDACs (HDAC1-11) are found in the pancreatic beta cell, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) protect beta cells from inflammatory insults. We investigated which HDACs...... mediate inflammatory beta cell damage and how the islet content of these HDACs is regulated in recent-onset type 1 diabetes. METHODS: The rat beta cell line INS-1 and dispersed primary islets from rats, either wild type or HDAC1-3 deficient, were exposed to cytokines and HDACi. Molecular mechanisms were...... of HDAC1, -2 and -3 rescued INS-1 cells from inflammatory damage. Small hairpin RNAs against HDAC1 and -3, but not HDAC2, reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 and primary rat islets. The protective properties of specific HDAC knock-down correlated with attenuated cytokine...

  10. Refining the biogeographical scenario of the land snail Cornu aspersum aspersum: Natural spatial expansion and human-mediated dispersal in the Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherpa, Stéphanie; Ansart, Armelle; Madec, Luc; Martin, Marie-Claire; Dréano, Stéphane; Guiller, Annie

    2018-03-01

    The land snail Cornu aspersum aspersum, native to the Mediterranean region, has been the subject of several anatomical and molecular studies leading to recognize two divergent lineages, named "East" and "West" according to their geographical distribution in North Africa. The first biogeographical scenario proposed the role of Oligocene paleogeographic events and Quaternary glacial refugia to explain spatial patterns of genetic variation. The aim of this study was to refine this scenario using molecular and morphometric data from 169 populations sampled across Mediterranean islands and continents. The two previously described lineages no longer correspond to distinct biogeographical entities. Phylogenetic relationships reveal the existence of seven clades, do not support the Tyrrhenian vicariance hypothesis, and suggest that C. a. aspersum most likely originates from North Africa. We found two contrasted patterns with the seven clades defining spatially well-structured populations in the southern Mediterranean whereas one clade is distributed across the basin. High genetic diversities and rates of endemism in North Africa support the role of this region for the diversification of C. a. aspersum. In referring to divergence times previously estimated, we suggest allopatric differentiation due to geological changes of the Atlas system and multiple refugial areas during Pleistocene glaciations. The new biogeographical scenario implies an initial range expansion from North Africa to the Iberian Peninsula and the peri-Tyrrhenian regions through land bridges connections during the Messinian Salinity Crisis and Pleistocene glaciations. Historical events appear to have also structured morphometric variation but recent dispersal events favored the emergence of secondary contacts between clades. Southern Mediterranean clades are limited to their initial distribution and populations of the recent clade would have rapidly recolonized the whole Mediterranean in the Holocene due

  11. Hydrodynamic dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryce, M.H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A dominant mechanism contributing to hydrodynamic dispersion in fluid flow through rocks is variation of travel speeds within the channels carrying the fluid, whether these be interstices between grains, in granular rocks, or cracks in fractured crystalline rocks. The complex interconnections of the channels ensure a mixing of those parts of the fluid which travel more slowly and those which travel faster. On a macroscopic scale this can be treated statistically in terms of the distribution of times taken by a particle of fluid to move from one surface of constant hydraulic potential to another, lower, potential. The distributions in the individual channels are such that very long travel times make a very important contribution. Indeed, while the mean travel time is related to distance by a well-defined transport speed, the mean square is effectively infinite. This results in an asymmetrical plume which differs markedly from a gaussian shape. The distribution of microscopic travel times is related to the distribution of apertures in the interstices, or in the microcracks, which in turn are affected in a complex way by the stresses acting on the rock matrix

  12. Difference in [corrected] adaptive dispersal ability can promote species coexistence in fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Miki, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Theories and empirical evidence suggest that random dispersal of organisms promotes species coexistence in spatially structured environments. However, directed dispersal, where movement is adjusted with fitness-related cues, is less explored in studies of dispersal-mediated coexistence. Here, we present a metacommunity model of two consumers exhibiting directed dispersal and competing for a single resource. Our results indicated that directed dispersal promotes coexistence through two distinct mechanisms, depending on the adaptiveness of dispersal. Maladaptive directed dispersal may promote coexistence similar to random dispersal. More importantly, directed dispersal is adaptive when dispersers track patches of increased resources in fluctuating environments. Coexistence is promoted under increased adaptive dispersal ability of the inferior competitor relative to the superior competitor. This newly described dispersal-mediated coexistence mechanism is likely favored by natural selection under the trade-off between competitive and adaptive dispersal abilities.

  13. Difference Inadaptive Dispersal Ability Can Promote Species Coexistence in Fluctuating Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Miki, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Theories and empirical evidence suggest that random dispersal of organisms promotes species coexistence in spatially structured environments. However, directed dispersal, where movement is adjusted with fitness-related cues, is less explored in studies of dispersal-mediated coexistence. Here, we present a metacommunity model of two consumers exhibiting directed dispersal and competing for a single resource. Our results indicated that directed dispersal promotes coexistence through two distinct mechanisms, depending on the adaptiveness of dispersal. Maladaptive directed dispersal may promote coexistence similar to random dispersal. More importantly, directed dispersal is adaptive when dispersers track patches of increased resources in fluctuating environments. Coexistence is promoted under increased adaptive dispersal ability of the inferior competitor relative to the superior competitor. This newly described dispersal-mediated coexistence mechanism is likely favored by natural selection under the trade-off between competitive and adaptive dispersal abilities. PMID:23383314

  14. Gastroprotective effect of taurine zinc solid dispersions against absolute ethanol-induced gastric lesions is mediated by enhancement of antioxidant activity and endogenous PGE2 production and attenuation of NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan; Mei, Xue-Ting; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Xu, Dong-Hui

    2014-10-05

    Zinc plays a key role in maintaining gastric mucosal integrity, while alcohol dependency can lead to low zinc status. Complexes containing zinc have been reported to have better ability to protect gastric mucosa than the compounds alone. In this study, taurine zinc [Zn(NH3CH2CH2SO3)2] solid dispersions (SDs) were synthesized and investigated in an ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. Gastric ulcer index; gastric mucosa malondialdehyde (MDA) level, glutathione (GSH) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production; and serum nitric oxide (NO) were assessed and histological analysis of the gastric mucosa tissue was performed. Taurine zinc (100, 200 mg/kg) SDs protected rat gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced injury. Moreover, the gastroprotective effect of taurine zinc SDs was accompanied by a decrease in serum NO and significant increase in gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). When indomethacin, a non-selective COX inhibitor was administered before the last dose of taurine zinc, the gastroprotective effect of taurine zinc was weakened. Furthermore, taurine zinc (200 mg/kg) SDs protected against ulceration more significantly than the same dose of taurine alone, suggesting a synergistic effect between taurine and zinc. These results indicate taurine zinc protects the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced damage by elevating antioxidants, decreasing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting the production of nitric oxide. The gastroprotective effect of taurine zinc was also partially mediated by endogenous PGE2 production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. On light propagation in premetric electrodynamics: the covariant dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itin, Yakov

    2009-01-01

    The premetric approach to electrodynamics provides a unified description of a wide class of electromagnetic phenomena. In particular, it involves axion, dilaton and skewon modifications of the classical electrodynamics. This formalism also emerges when the non-minimal coupling between the electromagnetic tensor and the torsion of Einstein-Cartan gravity is considered. Moreover, the premetric formalism can serve as a general covariant background of the electromagnetic properties of anisotropic media. In the current paper, we study wave propagation in the premetric electrodynamics. We derive a system of characteristic equations corresponded to premetric generalization of the Maxwell equation. This singular system is characterized by the adjoint matrix which turns to be of a very special form-proportional to a scalar quartic factor. We prove that a necessary condition for the existence of a non-trivial solution of the characteristic system is expressed by a unique scalar dispersion relation. In the tangential (momentum) space, it determines a fourth-order light hypersurface which replaces the ordinary light cone of the standard Maxwell theory. We derive an explicit form of the covariant dispersion relation and establish its algebraic and physical origin.

  16. Solute dispersion in open channel flow with bed absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Chen, G. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Reactive solute dispersion is of essential significance in various ecological and environmental applications. It is only qualitatively known that boundary absorption depletes pollutant around the boundary and reduces the concentration nearby. All the existing studies on this topic have been focused on the longitudinally distributed mean concentration, far from enough to fully characterize the transport process with tremendous cross-sectional concentration nonuniformity. This work presents an analytical study of the evolution of two-dimensional concentration distribution for solute dispersion in a laminar open channel flow with bed absorption. The fourth order Aris-Gill expansion proposed in our previous study (Wang and Chen, 2016b) is further extended for the case with bed absorption to cover the transitional effects of skewness and kurtosis. Results reveal the extremely nonuniform cross-sectional concentration distribution, and demonstrate that concentration at the bed instead of the mean should be used for reliable quantification of the absorption flux. The accurate two-dimensional concentration distribution presented in this study brings important environmental implications such as risk assessment associated with peak concentration position and duration of toxic pollutant cloud in open channel waters.

  17. Internal and external dispersal of plants by animals: an aquatic perspective on alien interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Casper

    2018-01-01

    Many alien plants use animal vectors for dispersal of their diaspores (zoochory). If alien plants interact with native disperser animals, this can interfere with animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores. Interference by alien species is known for frugivorous animals dispersing fruits of

  18. Genetics of dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocedi, Greta; Cote, Julien; Legrand, Delphine; Guillaume, Frédéric; Wheat, Christopher W.; Fronhofer, Emanuel A.; Garcia, Cristina; Henry, Roslyn; Husby, Arild; Baguette, Michel; Bonte, Dries; Coulon, Aurélie; Kokko, Hanna; Matthysen, Erik; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Nonaka, Etsuko; Stevens, Virginie M.; Travis, Justin M. J.; Donohue, Kathleen; Bullock, James M.; del Mar Delgado, Maria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) review the empirical literature on the genetic basis of dispersal, (ii) explore how theoretical investigations of the evolution of dispersal have represented the genetics of dispersal, and (iii) discuss how the genetic basis of dispersal influences theoretical predictions of the evolution of dispersal and potential consequences. Dispersal has a detectable genetic basis in many organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals. Generally, there is evidence for significant genetic variation for dispersal or dispersal‐related phenotypes or evidence for the micro‐evolution of dispersal in natural populations. Dispersal is typically the outcome of several interacting traits, and this complexity is reflected in its genetic architecture: while some genes of moderate to large effect can influence certain aspects of dispersal, dispersal traits are typically polygenic. Correlations among dispersal traits as well as between dispersal traits and other traits under selection are common, and the genetic basis of dispersal can be highly environment‐dependent. By contrast, models have historically considered a highly simplified genetic architecture of dispersal. It is only recently that models have started to consider multiple loci influencing dispersal, as well as non‐additive effects such as dominance and epistasis, showing that the genetic basis of dispersal can influence evolutionary rates and outcomes, especially under non‐equilibrium conditions. For example, the number of loci controlling dispersal can influence projected rates of dispersal evolution during range shifts and corresponding demographic impacts

  19. Gain and bandwidth investigation in a near-zero ultra-flat dispersion PCF for optical parametric amplification around the communication wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Partha Sona; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy

    2015-04-10

    In this work, we explore the fiber optical parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) gain and bandwidth spectra of near-zero ultra-flattened photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) around the communication wavelength. The parametric gain and spectral bandwidth have been explored for all the three zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) of the near-zero ultra-flat fiber. Our numerical analysis establishes a dispersion profile with D=0±0.35  ps/nm/km for a bandwidth of 440 nm around the communication wavelength to fully exploit the four-wave mixing effect with three ZDWs for broadband applications. It has been observed that the broader gain spectrum of FOPAs can be achieved with the near-zero and ultra-flattened dispersion curve with proper tuning of the pumping condition. A broader bandwidth with sufficient peak gain value has been achieved with small negative anomalous dispersion (β2≤0) and positive value of fourth-order dispersion parameter (+ve  β4) around the pumping wavelength. Wider bandwidth of the parametric amplifier has been observed around the second ZDW with a negative slope of the dispersion curve. A total bandwidth ≈520  nm could be achieved with the ultra-flat dispersion nature of the optimized PCF. The design methodology of achieving wider gain by tuning the pumping wavelength for favorable higher-order dispersion parameters would be very useful for future dispersion engineered devices.

  20. Long-Distance Dispersal of Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Jacob J; Pringle, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Dispersal is a fundamental biological process, operating at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Despite an increasing understanding of fungal biodiversity, most research on fungal dispersal focuses on only a small fraction of species. Thus, any discussion of the dispersal dynamics of fungi as a whole is problematic. While abundant morphological and biogeographic data are available for hundreds of species, researchers have yet to integrate this information into a unifying paradigm of fungal dispersal, especially in the context of long-distance dispersal (LDD). Fungal LDD is mediated by multiple vectors, including meteorological phenomena (e.g., wind and precipitation), plants (e.g., seeds and senesced leaves), animals (e.g., fur, feathers, and gut microbiomes), and in many cases humans. In addition, fungal LDD is shaped by both physical constraints on travel and the ability of spores to survive harsh environments. Finally, fungal LDD is commonly measured in different ways, including by direct capture of spores, genetic comparisons of disconnected populations, and statistical modeling and simulations of dispersal data. To unify perspectives on fungal LDD, we propose a synthetic three-part definition that includes (i) an identification of the source population and a measure of the concentration of source inoculum and (ii) a measured and/or modeled dispersal kernel. With this information, LDD is defined as (iii) the distance found within the dispersal kernel beyond which only 1% of spores travel.

  1. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  2. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  3. Dispersion management with metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-03-07

    An apparatus, system, and method to counteract group velocity dispersion in fibers, or any other propagation of electromagnetic signals at any wavelength (microwave, terahertz, optical, etc.) in any other medium. A dispersion compensation step or device based on dispersion-engineered metamaterials is included and avoids the need of a long section of specialty fiber or the need for Bragg gratings (which have insertion loss).

  4. Dispersant field monitoring procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillman, S. O.; Hood, S. D.; Bronson, M. T.; Shufelt, G.

    1997-01-01

    Alyeska Pipeline Service Company's (APSC) dispersant response capability in the Port of Valdez, Prince William Sound, and in the Gulf of Alaska was described. APSC provides dispersal equipment, aerial spray delivery systems, helibucket delivery systems, vessel delivery systems, along with a minimum of 600,000 gallon stockpile of the dispersant Corexit 9527. Effectiveness and effects are monitored by visual observation. In addition, fluorometer and water sample analysis are also used to provide field analytical data indicative of the environmental effects of dispersant applications. The field monitoring plan was field tested in December 1996. Details of the monitoring procedures are outlined in this paper. 18 refs., 5 tabs

  5. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  6. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  7. Dispersion and space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  8. Dispersion and space charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M. [Department of Electrical Engeneering and Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Dispersion and space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring

  10. Consistent individual differences in seed disperser quality in a seed-eating fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, Bart J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Animal-mediated seed dispersal (zoochory) is considered to be an important mechanism regulating biological processes at larger spatial scales. To date, intra-specific variation in seed disperser quality within seed-dispersing animals has not been studied. Here, I employed seed feeding trials to

  11. The role of waterbirds in the dispersal of freshwater cladocera and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has long been presumed that waterbirds disperse the propagules of aquatic organisms. However, it is only in recent years that this claim has been empirically explored and little is still known about waterbird-mediated dispersal in southern Africa. Aquatic invertebrates are thought to be well adapted to dispersal by ...

  12. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability.

  13. Reactimeter dispersion equation

    OpenAIRE

    A.G. Yuferov

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to derive and analyze a reactimeter metrological model in the form of the dispersion equation which connects reactimeter input/output signal dispersions with superimposed random noise at the inlet. It is proposed to standardize the reactimeter equation form, presenting the main reactimeter computing unit by a convolution equation. Hence, the reactimeter metrological characteristics are completely determined by this unit hardware function which represents a transient re...

  14. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  15. Humans as long-distance dispersers of rural plant communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair G Auffret

    Full Text Available Humans are known for their capacity to disperse organisms long distances. Long-distance dispersal can be important for species threatened by habitat destruction, but research into human-mediated dispersal is often focused upon few and/or invasive species. Here we use citizen science to identify the capacity for humans to disperse seeds on their clothes and footwear from a known species pool in a valuable habitat, allowing for an assessment of the fraction and types of species dispersed by humans in an alternative context. We collected material from volunteers cutting 48 species-rich meadows throughout Sweden. We counted 24,354 seeds of 197 species, representing 34% of the available species pool, including several rare and protected species. However, 71 species (36% are considered invasive elsewhere in the world. Trait analysis showed that seeds with hooks or other appendages were more likely to be dispersed by humans, as well as those with a persistent seed bank. More activity in a meadow resulted in more dispersal, both in terms of species and representation of the source communities. Average potential dispersal distances were measured at 13 km. We consider humans capable seed dispersers, transporting a significant proportion of the plant communities in which they are active, just like more traditional vectors such as livestock. When rural populations were larger, people might have been regular and effective seed dispersers, and the net rural-urban migration resulting in a reduction in humans in the landscape may have exacerbated the dispersal failure evident in declining plant populations today. With the fragmentation of habitat and changes in land use resulting from agricultural change, and the increased mobility of humans worldwide, the dispersal role of humans may have shifted from providers of regular local and landscape dispersal to providers of much rarer long-distance and regional dispersal, and international invasion.

  16. Physically Inspired Models for the Synthesis of Stiff Strings with Dispersive Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testa I

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the derivation and design of digital waveguides from physical models of stiff systems, useful for the synthesis of sounds from strings, rods, and similar objects. A transform method approach is proposed to solve the classic fourth-order equations of stiff systems in order to reduce it to two second-order equations. By introducing scattering boundary matrices, the eigenfrequencies are determined and their dependency is discussed for the clamped, hinged, and intermediate cases. On the basis of the frequency-domain physical model, the numerical discretization is carried out, showing how the insertion of an all-pass delay line generalizes the Karplus-Strong algorithm for the synthesis of ideally flexible vibrating strings. Knowing the physical parameters, the synthesis can proceed using the generalized structure. Another point of view is offered by Laguerre expansions and frequency warping, which are introduced in order to show that a stiff system can be treated as a nonstiff one, provided that the solutions are warped. A method to compute the all-pass chain coefficients and the optimum warping curves from sound samples is discussed. Once the optimum warping characteristic is found, the length of the dispersive delay line to be employed in the simulation is simply determined from the requirement of matching the desired fundamental frequency. The regularization of the dispersion curves by means of optimum unwarping is experimentally evaluated.

  17. Seed dispersal anachronisms: rethinking the fruits extinct megafauna ate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Paulo R; Galetti, Mauro; Jordano, Pedro

    2008-03-05

    Some neotropical, fleshy-fruited plants have fruits structurally similar to paleotropical fruits dispersed by megafauna (mammals > 10(3) kg), yet these dispersers were extinct in South America 10-15 Kyr BP. Anachronic dispersal systems are best explained by interactions with extinct animals and show impaired dispersal resulting in altered seed dispersal dynamics. We introduce an operational definition of megafaunal fruits and perform a comparative analysis of 103 Neotropical fruit species fitting this dispersal mode. We define two megafaunal fruit types based on previous analyses of elephant fruits: fruits 4-10 cm in diameter with up to five large seeds, and fruits > 10 cm diameter with numerous small seeds. Megafaunal fruits are well represented in unrelated families such as Sapotaceae, Fabaceae, Solanaceae, Apocynaceae, Malvaceae, Caryocaraceae, and Arecaceae and combine an overbuilt design (large fruit mass and size) with either a single or few ( 100 seeds). Within-family and within-genus contrasts between megafaunal and non-megafaunal groups of species indicate a marked difference in fruit diameter and fruit mass but less so for individual seed mass, with a significant trend for megafaunal fruits to have larger seeds and seediness. Megafaunal fruits allow plants to circumvent the trade-off between seed size and dispersal by relying on frugivores able to disperse enormous seed loads over long-distances. Present-day seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents, introduced livestock, runoff, flooding, gravity, and human-mediated dispersal allowed survival of megafauna-dependent fruit species after extinction of the major seed dispersers. Megafauna extinction had several potential consequences, such as a scale shift reducing the seed dispersal distances, increasingly clumped spatial patterns, reduced geographic ranges and limited genetic variation and increased among-population structuring. These effects could be extended to other plant species dispersed by large

  18. Seed dispersal anachronisms: rethinking the fruits extinct megafauna ate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R Guimarães

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some neotropical, fleshy-fruited plants have fruits structurally similar to paleotropical fruits dispersed by megafauna (mammals > 10(3 kg, yet these dispersers were extinct in South America 10-15 Kyr BP. Anachronic dispersal systems are best explained by interactions with extinct animals and show impaired dispersal resulting in altered seed dispersal dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce an operational definition of megafaunal fruits and perform a comparative analysis of 103 Neotropical fruit species fitting this dispersal mode. We define two megafaunal fruit types based on previous analyses of elephant fruits: fruits 4-10 cm in diameter with up to five large seeds, and fruits > 10 cm diameter with numerous small seeds. Megafaunal fruits are well represented in unrelated families such as Sapotaceae, Fabaceae, Solanaceae, Apocynaceae, Malvaceae, Caryocaraceae, and Arecaceae and combine an overbuilt design (large fruit mass and size with either a single or few ( 100 seeds. Within-family and within-genus contrasts between megafaunal and non-megafaunal groups of species indicate a marked difference in fruit diameter and fruit mass but less so for individual seed mass, with a significant trend for megafaunal fruits to have larger seeds and seediness. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Megafaunal fruits allow plants to circumvent the trade-off between seed size and dispersal by relying on frugivores able to disperse enormous seed loads over long-distances. Present-day seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents, introduced livestock, runoff, flooding, gravity, and human-mediated dispersal allowed survival of megafauna-dependent fruit species after extinction of the major seed dispersers. Megafauna extinction had several potential consequences, such as a scale shift reducing the seed dispersal distances, increasingly clumped spatial patterns, reduced geographic ranges and limited genetic variation and increased among

  19. Role of high-order dispersion on strong-field laser-molecule interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos; Nairat, Muath

    2016-05-01

    Strong-field (1012- 1016 W/ cm2) laser-matter interactions are characterized by the extent of fragmentation and charge of the resulting ions as a function of peak intensity and pulse duration. Interactions are influenced by high-order dispersion, which is difficult to characterize and compress. Fourth-order dispersion (FOD) causes a time-symmetric pedestal, while third-order dispersion (TOD) causes a leading (negative) or following (positive) pedestal. Here, we report on strong-field interactions with pentane and toluene molecules, tracking the molecular ion and the doubly charged carbon ion C2+ yields as a function of TOD and FOD for otherwise transform-limited (TL) 35fs pulses. We find TL pulses enhance molecular ion yield and suppress C2+ yield, while FOD reverses this trend. Interestingly, the leading pedestal in negative TOD enhances C2+ yield compared to positive TOD. Pulse pedestals are of particular importance in strong-field science because target ionization or alignment can be induced well before the main pulse arrives. A pedestal following an intense laser pulse can cause sequential ionization or accelerate electrons causing cascaded ionization. Control of high-order dispersion allows us to provide strong-field measurements that can help address the mechanisms responsible for different product ions in the presence and absence of pedestals. Financial support of this work comes from the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, DOE SISGR (DE-SC0002325)

  20. Chiral anomalous dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadofyev, Andrey; Sen, Srimoyee

    2018-02-01

    The linearized Einstein equation describing graviton propagation through a chiral medium appears to be helicity dependent. We analyze features of the corresponding spectrum in a collision-less regime above a flat background. In the long wave-length limit, circularly polarized metric perturbations travel with a helicity dependent group velocity that can turn negative giving rise to a new type of an anomalous dispersion. We further show that this chiral anomalous dispersion is a general feature of polarized modes propagating through chiral plasmas extending our result to the electromagnetic sector.

  1. PEP-X: An Ultimate Storage Ring Based on Fourth-Order Geometric Achromats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; Bane, Karl; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    We have designed an 'ultimate' storage ring for the PEP-X light source that achieves the diffraction limited emittances (at 1.5 {angstrom}) of 12 pm-rad in both horizontal and vertical planes with a 4.5-GeV beam. These emittances include the contribution of intrabeam scattering at a nominal current of 200 mA in 3300 bunches. This quality beam in conjunction with a conventional 4-m undulator in a straight section can generate synchrotron radiation having a spectral brightness above 10{sup 22} [photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW] at a 10 keV photon energy. The high coherence at the diffraction limit makes PEP-X competitive with 4th generation light sources based on an energy recovery linac. In addition, the beam lifetime is several hours and the dynamic aperture is large enough to allow off-axis injection. The alignment and stability tolerances, though challenging, are achievable. A ring with all these properties is only possible because of several major advances in mitigating the effects of nonlinear resonances.

  2. Effect of third- and fourth-order moments on the modeling of unresolved transition arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, J.-Ch.; Gilleron, F.; Bauche, J.; Bauche-Arnoult, C.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of the third (skewness) and fourth (kurtosis) reduced centered moments on the statistical modeling of E1 lines in complex atomic spectra is investigated through the use of Gram-Charlier, Normal Inverse Gaussian and Generalized Gaussian distributions. It is shown that the modeling of unresolved transition arrays with non-Gaussian distributions may reveal more detailed structures, due essentially to the large value of the kurtosis. In the present work, focus is put essentially on the Generalized Gaussian, the power of the argument in the exponential being constrained by the kurtosis value. The relevance of the new statistical line distribution is checked by comparisons with smoothed detailed line-by-line calculations and through the analysis of 2 p → 3 d transitions of recent laser or Z-pinch absorption measurements. The issue of calculating high-order moments is also discussed (Racah algebra, Jucys graphical method, semi-empirical approach…).

  3. Explicit fourth-order stiffness representation in non-linear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    global form of the effective internal force is presented, in which it is represented by its algebraic mean value plus a higher order term in the form of the product of the increment of the tangent stiffness matrix at the interval end-points and the corresponding displacement increment. This explicit...

  4. Vibratory motion of fourth order fluid film over a unsteady heated flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmand, Muhammad Ismail; Mamat, Mustafa Bin; Shah, Qayyum; Gul, Taza

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of heat transfer is studied in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thin layer flow of an unsteady fourth grade fluid past a moving and oscillating vertical plate for lift and drainage problem. The governing equations are modelled in terms of nonlinear partial differential equations with some physical boundary conditions. Two different analytical methods, namely Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM) and the Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) are used for finding the series solution of the problem. The solutions obtained through two different techniques are compared using graphs and tables and found an excellent agreement. The variants of embedded flow parameters in the solution are analyzed through graphical illustrations.

  5. A 3D Unstructured Mesh Euler Solver Based on the Fourth-Order CESE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    hyperplane in every BCE associated with the current cell (j, n) and then take the sum of all integrations . For a tetrahedral mesh each cell has four...conservation in space and time without using a one-dimensional Riemann solver, (ii) genuinely multi-dimensional treatment without dimensional splitting (iii...of the original second-order CESE method, including: (i) flux conservation in space and time without using a one-dimensional Riemann solver, (ii

  6. Time-periodic solution of a 2D fourth-order nonlinear parabolic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the classical existence theorem of global attractors, the authors proved that the equation possesses a global attractor in Hk (0 ≤ k < 5) space, which attracts any bounded subset of Hk( ) in the Hk. -norm. On the other hand, by using spectral method, Xu and Tang [16] studied eq. (1.1) with periodic boundary condition. In their ...

  7. Time-periodic solution of a 2D fourth-order nonlinear parabolic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    per( )), M1 = sup0≤t≤ω f (·,t) H1 . Then, there exists a solution (uNj (t))N j=1 ∈ C1 ω[0,ω] for problem (2.2), where. C1 ω[0,ω]={r(t)|r(t + ω) = r(t), ∀t ∈ R, r(t) ∈ C1[0,ω]}. In the meantime, the approximate solution uN (x,t) has the estimation sup. 0≤t≤ω. uN (·,t) 2. H1 ≤ c0(M1), where c0 is a positive constant independent of N ...

  8. Nonexistence of bounded energy solutions for a fourth order equation on thin annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ayed, Mohamed; Hammami, Mokhless; El Mehdi, Khalil

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study the problem P ε : Δ 2 u ε u ε (n+4)/(n-4) , u ε > in 0 in A ε ; u ε = Δu ε = 0 on ∂A ε , where {A ε is contained in R n , ε > 0} is a family of bounded annulus shaped domains such that A ε becomes 'thin' as ε → 0. Our main result is the following: Assume n ≥ 6 and let C > 0 be a constant. Then there exists ε 0 > 0 such that for any ε 0 , the problem P ε has no solution u ε , whose energy, ∫ A ε vertical barΔu ε vertical bar 2 is less than C. Our proof involves a rather delicate analysis of asymptotic profiles of solutions u ε when ε → 0. (author)

  9. Numerical analysis of fourth-order boundary value problems in fluid mechanics and mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Barari, Amin; Fouladi, Fama

    2010-01-01

    In this paper He's variational iteration method is used to solve some examples of linear and non-linear forth-order boundary value problems. The first problem compared with homotopy analysis method solution and the other ones with the exact solution. The results show the high accuracy and speed...

  10. Astrophysical Tests of Kinematical Conformal Cosmology in Fourth-Order Conformal Weyl Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele U. Varieschi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze kinematical conformal cosmology (KCC, an alternative cosmological model based on conformal Weyl gravity (CG, and test it against current type Ia supernova (SNIa luminosity data and other astrophysical observations. Expanding upon previous work on the subject, we revise the analysis of SNIa data, confirming that KCC can explain the evidence for an accelerating expansion of the Universe without using dark energy or other exotic components. We obtain an independent evaluation of the Hubble constant, H0 = 67:53 kms-1 Mpc-1, very close to the current best estimates. The main KCC and CG parameters are re-evaluated and their revised values are found to be close to previous estimates. We also show that available data for the Hubble parameter as a function of redshift can be fitted using KCC and that this model does not suffer from any apparent age problem. Overall,

  11. Existence results for a fourth order partial differential equation arising in condensed matter physics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Escudero, C.; Gazzola, F.; Hakl, Robert; Torres, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 4 (2015), s. 385-393 ISSN 0862-7959 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : higher order parabolic equation * existence of solution * blow-up in finite time Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://hdl.handle.net/10338.dmlcz/144457

  12. Nonexistence and existence of solutions for a fourth-order discrete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Modern Business and Management Department, Guangdong Construction Vocational. Technology ... which is used to describe the bending of an elastic beam (see, for example, [1, 2, 6, 21, 23,. 26, 40] and ...... [28] Matsunaga H, Hara T and Sakata S, Global attractivity for a nonlinear difference equation with variable delay ...

  13. Nonexistence and existence of solutions for a fourth-order discrete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Oriental Science and Technology College, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha. 410128, China. 2Science ... the nonexistence and existence of solutions for mixed boundary value problem and give some new results. ... point theory, topological degree theory, coincidence degree theory, a series of existence results of ...

  14. Psychorheology of food dispersions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štern, Petr; Panovská, Z.; Pokorný, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2010), s. 29-35 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : psychorheology * food dispersions * tomato ketchup * rheology * sensory analysis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.553, year: 2010

  15. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    personnel achieve service recovery. Employee recovery within service research often focuses on front-line employees that work in a fixed location, however a contribution to the field is made by investigating the recovery of spatially dispersed personnel, such as operational personnel in the transport sector...

  16. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  17. Coping with power dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    how the actors involved cope with the new configurations. In this introduction, we discuss the conceptualization of power dispersion and highlight the ways in which the contributions add to this research agenda. We then outline some general conclusions and end by indicating future avenues of research...

  18. A dispersion control chart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    The study proposes a Shewhart-type control chart, namely Q chart, based on inter-quartile range, for monitoring changes (especially of moderate and large amounts which is major concern of Shewhart-type control charts) in process dispersion assuming normality of quality characteristic to be

  19. Turbulence and Dispersion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phenomenon and this is the topic of the present article. Dispersion. Watch smoke flowing out of a chimney2. On a quiet day, it is seen that after rising for a small distance, the smoke stream bends and flows along with the wind. This is to be expected since the smoke particles are carried, or in technical terminology, convected ...

  20. Higher-order Cn dispersion coefficients for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The complete set of second-, third-, and fourth-order van der Waals coefficients C n up to n=32 for the H(1s)-H(1s) dimer have been determined. They are computed by diagonalizing the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian for hydrogen to obtain a set of pseudostates that are used to evaluate the appropriate sum rules. A study of the convergence pattern for n≤16 indicates that all the C n/16 coefficients are accurate to 13 significant digits. The relative size of the fourth-order C n (4) to the second-order C n (2) coefficients is seen to increase as n increases and at n=32 the fourth-order term is actually larger

  1. Dispersed flow film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, M.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1989-12-01

    Dispersed flow film boiling is the heat transfer regime that occurs at high void fractions in a heated channel. The way this transfer mode is modelled in the NRC computer codes (RELAP5 and TRAC) and the validity of the assumption and empirical correlations used is discussed. An extensive review of the theoretical and experimental work related with heat transfer to highly dispersed mixtures reveals the basic deficiencies of these models: the investigation refers mostly to the typical conditions of low rate bottom reflooding, since the simulation of this physical situation by the computer codes has often showed poor results. The alternative models that are available in the literature are reviewed, and their merits and limits are highlighted. The modification that could improve the physics of the models implemented in the codes are identified. (author) 13 figs., 123 refs

  2. Working document dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dop, H. van

    1988-01-01

    This report is a summary of the most important results from June 1985 of the collaboration of the RIVM (Dutch National Institute for Public Health and Environment Hygiene) and KNMI (Royal Dutch Meteorologic Institute) on the domain of dispersion models. It contains a short description of the actual SO x /NO x -model. Furthermore it contains recommendations for modifications of some numerical-mathematical aspects and an impulse to a more complete description of chemical processes in the atmosphere and the (wet) deposition process. A separate chapter is devoted to the preparation of meteorologic data which are relevant for dispersion as well as atmospheric chemistry and deposition. This report serves as working document for the final formulation of a acidifying- and oxidant-model. (H.W.). 69 refs.; 51 figs.; 13 tabs.; 3 schemes

  3. Phonon dispersion in Be

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.P.; Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, S.; Sinha, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    In a study of the lattice dynamics of Be a simple scheme has been developed in which the pairwise and long range forces are accounted on the lines of nonlocal theory and the short range three-body forces are included. This procedure of calculations has been applied to compute the phonon dispersion in Be and the results of investigation have been compared with the experimental data. (author)

  4. Taylor dispersion of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Sandor; Urban, Dominic A.; Milosevic, Ana M.; Crippa, Federica; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect and accurately characterize particles is required by many fields of nanotechnology, including materials science, nanotoxicology, and nanomedicine. Among the most relevant physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, size and the related surface-to-volume ratio are fundamental ones. Taylor dispersion combines three independent phenomena to determine particle size: optical extinction, translational diffusion, and sheer-enhanced dispersion of nanoparticles subjected to a steady laminar flow. The interplay of these defines the apparent size. Considering that particles in fact are never truly uniform nor monodisperse, we rigorously address particle polydispersity and calculate the apparent particle size measured by Taylor dispersion analysis. We conducted case studies addressing aqueous suspensions of model particles and large-scale-produced "industrial" particles of both academic and commercial interest of various core materials and sizes, ranging from 15 to 100 nm. A comparison with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy confirms that our approach is model-independent, non-parametric, and of general validity that provides an accurate account of size polydispersity—independently on the shape of the size distribution and without any assumption required a priori.

  5. An efficient Lagrangian stochastic model of vertical dispersion in the convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, Pasquale; Luhar, Ashok K.; Borgas, Michael S.

    We consider the one-dimensional case of vertical dispersion in the convective boundary layer (CBL) assuming that the turbulence field is stationary and horizontally homogeneous. The dispersion process is simulated by following Lagrangian trajectories of many independent tracer particles in the turbulent flow field, leading to a prediction of the mean concentration. The particle acceleration is determined using a stochastic differential equation, assuming that the joint evolution of the particle velocity and position is a Markov process. The equation consists of a deterministic term and a random term. While the formulation is standard, attention has been focused in recent years on various ways of calculating the deterministic term using the well-mixed condition incorporating the Fokker-Planck equation. Here we propose a simple parameterisation for the deterministic acceleration term by approximating it as a quadratic function of velocity. Such a function is shown to represent well the acceleration under moderate velocity skewness conditions observed in the CBL. The coefficients in the quadratic form are determined in terms of given turbulence statistics by directly integrating the Fokker-Planck equation. An advantage of this approach is that, unlike in existing Lagrangian stochastic models for the CBL, the use of the turbulence statistics up to the fourth order can be made without assuming any predefined form for the probability distribution function (PDF) of the velocity. The main strength of the model, however, lies in its simplicity and computational efficiency. The dispersion results obtained from the new model are compared with existing laboratory data as well as with those obtained from a more complex Lagrangian model in which the deterministic acceleration term is based on a bi-Gaussian velocity PDF. The comparison shows that the new model performs well.

  6. What Causes Animals to Disperse?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Also, Zubiri [3] study in 1995 on Ethiopian wolves showed that in cases where dispersal became far more risky, because of harsh environment and high wolf pack densities, the females (who are the predominant dispersers) often did not disperse, and eventu- ally some became the dominant females of the pack. This would.

  7. Factors Affecting Training Effectiveness in Synchronous, Dispersed Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Educational Psychology Mediating Processes Cognitive Attitude Bagozzi & Burnkrant, 1985; Yang & Yoo, 2004 Social Psychology, Information...Systems Cognitive Engagement Davis, 2012 Educational Psychology Table 1. Factors contributing to learning in synchronous, dispersed VLE with...effects of performance goals on self-regulatory strategy use? Educational Psychology , 24(2), 231–247. Brett, J. F., & VandeWalle, D. (1999). Goal

  8. Fungal networks shape dynamics of bacterial dispersal and community assembly in cheese rind microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanchen; Kastman, Erik K; Guasto, Jeffrey S; Wolfe, Benjamin E

    2018-01-23

    Most studies of bacterial motility have examined small-scale (micrometer-centimeter) cell dispersal in monocultures. However, bacteria live in multispecies communities, where interactions with other microbes may inhibit or facilitate dispersal. Here, we demonstrate that motile bacteria in cheese rind microbiomes use physical networks created by filamentous fungi for dispersal, and that these interactions can shape microbial community structure. Serratia proteamaculans and other motile cheese rind bacteria disperse on fungal networks by swimming in the liquid layers formed on fungal hyphae. RNA-sequencing, transposon mutagenesis, and comparative genomics identify potential genetic mechanisms, including flagella-mediated motility, that control bacterial dispersal on hyphae. By manipulating fungal networks in experimental communities, we demonstrate that fungal-mediated bacterial dispersal can shift cheese rind microbiome composition by promoting the growth of motile over non-motile community members. Our single-cell to whole-community systems approach highlights the interactive dynamics of bacterial motility in multispecies microbiomes.

  9. Amphiphilic heteroarm star polymer synthesized by RAFT dispersion polymerization in water/ethanol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaofang; Zhou, Wei; Qiu, Qian; An, Zesheng

    2012-07-28

    Well-defined amphiphilic heteroarm core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer was efficiently synthesized by RAFT-mediated arm-first strategy in dispersion polymerization, and its direct self-assembly in water was demonstrated.

  10. Tracer dispersion - experiment and CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitny, R.

    2004-01-01

    Description of tracer distribution by means of dispersion models is a method successfully used in process engineering for fifty years. Application of dispersion models in reactor engineering for characterization of flows in column apparatus, heat exchangers, etc. is summarized and experimental tracer techniques as well as CFD methods for dispersion coefficients evaluation are discussed. Possible extensions of thermal axial dispersion model (ADM) and a core-wall ADM model suitable for description of tracer dispersion in laminar flows are suggested as well as CFD implementation as 1D finite elements. (author)

  11. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant application program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.

  12. Spurious dispersion effects at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat, Eduard

    2009-07-01

    The performance of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) process imposes stringent demands on the transverse trajectory and size of the electron beam. Since transverse dispersion changes off-energy particle trajectories and increases the effective beam size, dispersion must be controlled. This thesis treats the concept of dispersion in linacs, and analyses the impact of dispersion on the electron beam and on the FEL process. It presents generation mechanisms for spurious dispersion, quantifying its importance for FLASH (Free-electron Laser in Hamburg) and the XFEL (European X-ray Free-Electron Laser). A method for measuring and correcting dispersion and its implementation in FLASH is described. Experiments of dispersion e ects on the transverse beam quality and on the FEL performance are presented. (orig.)

  13. Spurious dispersion effects at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, Eduard

    2009-07-15

    The performance of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) process imposes stringent demands on the transverse trajectory and size of the electron beam. Since transverse dispersion changes off-energy particle trajectories and increases the effective beam size, dispersion must be controlled. This thesis treats the concept of dispersion in linacs, and analyses the impact of dispersion on the electron beam and on the FEL process. It presents generation mechanisms for spurious dispersion, quantifying its importance for FLASH (Free-electron Laser in Hamburg) and the XFEL (European X-ray Free-Electron Laser). A method for measuring and correcting dispersion and its implementation in FLASH is described. Experiments of dispersion e ects on the transverse beam quality and on the FEL performance are presented. (orig.)

  14. Dispersion stability of thermal nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal nanofluids, the engineered fluids with dispersed functional nanoparticles, have exhibited extraordinary thermophysical properties and added functionalities, and thus have enabled a broad range of important applications. The poor dispersion stability of thermal nanofluids, however, has been considered as a long-existing issue that limits their further development and practical application. This review overviews the recent efforts and progresses in improving the dispersion stability of thermal nanofluids such as mechanistic understanding of dispersion behavior of nanofluids, examples of both water-based and oil-based nanofluids, strategies to stabilize nanofluids, and characterization techniques for dispersion behavior of nanofluids. Finally, on-going research needs, and possible solutions to research challenges and future research directions in exploring stably dispersed thermal nanofluids are discussed. Keywords: Thermal nanofluids, Dispersion, Aggregation, Electrostatic stabilization, Steric stabilization

  15. Modelling of Dispersed Gas-Liquid Flow using LBGK and LPT Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Alankar; Prakash, Akshay; Ravindra, B.

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of gas bubbles play a significant, if not crucial, role in a large variety of industrial process that involves using reactors. Many of these processes are still not well understood in terms of optimal scale-up strategies.An accurate modeling of bubbles and bubble swarms become important for high fidelity bioreactor simulations. This study is a part of the development of robust bubble fluid interaction modules for simulation of industrial-scale reactors. The work presents the simulation of a single bubble rising in a quiescent water tank using current models presented in the literature for bubble-fluid interaction. In this multiphase benchmark problem, the continuous phase (water) is discretized using the Lattice Bhatnagar-Gross and Krook (LBGK) model of Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), while the dispersed gas phase (i.e. air-bubble) modeled with the Lagrangian particle tracking (LPT) approach. The cheap clipped fourth order polynomial function is used to model the interaction between two phases. The model is validated by comparing the simulation results for terminal velocity of a bubble at varying bubble diameter and the influence of bubble motion in liquid velocity with the theoretical and previously available experimental data. This work is supported by the ``Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), Pune'' by providing the advanced computational facility in PARAM Yuva-II.

  16. Phonon dispersion in vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.S.; Rumiantsev, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Phonon dispersion curves in Vanadium metal are investigated by neutron inelastic scattering using three-axis spectrometers. Due to extremely low coherent scattering amplitude of neutrons in natural isotope mixture of vanadium the phonon frequencies could be determined in the energy range below about 15 meV. Several phonon groups were measured with the polarised neutron scattering set-up. It is demonstrated that the intensity of coherent inelastic scattering observed in the non-spin-flip channel vanishes in the spin-flip channel. The phonon density of states is measured on a single crystal keeping the momentum transfer equal to a vector of reciprocal lattice where the coherent inelastic scattering is suppressed. Phonon dispersion curves in vanadium, as measured by neutron and earlier by X-ray scattering, are described in frames of a charge-fluctuation model involving monopolar and dipolar degrees of freedom. The model parameters are compared for different transition metals with body-centred cubic-structure. (author)

  17. Dispersion and current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelskifte, S.

    1986-04-01

    A model for the simulation of particle movements in water should incorporate the mutual distance dependent correlation. As long as reliable data are given accessible a model can be created of the dispersion in a given area from a statistical description of turbulence. Current measurements have been performed in an area north of the Swedish nuclear power plant Barsebaeck, and statistical time series analysis have made it possible to estimate multivariate autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) models for these data using the Box-Jenkins method. The correlation structure for the area has been investigated in detail. Transport and dispersion models for the marine environment are used in estimating doses to the population from the aquatic food chain. Some of these models are described with special emphasis on the time and length scales they cover. Furthermore, to illustrate the background of the simulation model, short introductuions are given to health physics, time series analysis, and turbulence theory. Analysis of the simulation model shows the relative importance of the different parameters. The model can be expanded to conditional simulation, where the current measurements are used directly to simulate the movement of one of the particles. Results from the model are also compared to results from a sampling of bioindicators (Fucus vesiculosus) along the Danish coast. The reliability of bioindicators in this kind of experiment is discussed. (author)

  18. Cross-phase modulation instability in optical fibres with exponential saturable nonlinearity and high-order dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian-Qiong, Zhong; An-Ping, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing the linear-stability analysis, this paper analytically investigates and calculates the condition and gain spectra of cross-phase modulation instability in optical fibres in the case of exponential saturable nonlinearity and high-order dispersion. The results show that, the modulation instability characteristics here are similar to those of conventional saturable nonlinearity and Kerr nonlinearity. That is to say, when the fourth-order dispersion has the same sign as that of the second-order one, a new gain spectral region called the second one which is far away from the zero point may appear. The existence of the exponential saturable nonlinearity will make the spectral width as well as the peak gain of every spectral region increase with the input powers before decrease. Namely, for every spectral regime, this may lead to a unique value of peak gain and spectral width for two different input powers. In comparison with the case of conventional saturable nonlinearity, however, when the other parameters are the same, the variations of the spectral width and the peak gain with the input powers will be faster in case of exponential saturable nonlinearity. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  19. Internal and External Dispersal of Plants by Animals: An Aquatic Perspective on Alien Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Casper H. A.

    2018-01-01

    Many alien plants use animal vectors for dispersal of their diaspores (zoochory). If alien plants interact with native disperser animals, this can interfere with animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores. Interference by alien species is known for frugivorous animals dispersing fruits of terrestrial plants by ingestion, transport and egestion (endozoochory). However, less attention has been paid to possible interference of alien plants with dispersal of diaspores via external attachment (ectozoochory, epizoochory or exozoochory), interference in aquatic ecosystems, or positive effects of alien plants on dispersal of native plants. This literature study addresses the following hypotheses: (1) alien plants may interfere with both internal and external animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores; (2) interference also occurs in aquatic ecosystems; (3) interference of alien plants can have both negative and positive effects on native plants. The studied literature revealed that alien species can comprise large proportions of both internally and externally transported diaspores. Because animals have limited space for ingested and adhering diaspores, alien species affect both internal and external transport of native diaspores. Alien plant species also form large proportions of all dispersed diaspores in aquatic systems and interfere with dispersal of native aquatic plants. Alien interference can be either negative (e.g., through competition with native plants) or positive (e.g., increased abundance of native dispersers, changed disperser behavior or attracting additional disperser species). I propose many future research directions, because understanding whether alien plant species disrupt or facilitate animal-mediated dispersal of native plants is crucial for targeted conservation of invaded (aquatic) plant communities. PMID:29487609

  20. Internal and External Dispersal of Plants by Animals: An Aquatic Perspective on Alien Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper H. A. van Leeuwen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Many alien plants use animal vectors for dispersal of their diaspores (zoochory. If alien plants interact with native disperser animals, this can interfere with animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores. Interference by alien species is known for frugivorous animals dispersing fruits of terrestrial plants by ingestion, transport and egestion (endozoochory. However, less attention has been paid to possible interference of alien plants with dispersal of diaspores via external attachment (ectozoochory, epizoochory or exozoochory, interference in aquatic ecosystems, or positive effects of alien plants on dispersal of native plants. This literature study addresses the following hypotheses: (1 alien plants may interfere with both internal and external animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores; (2 interference also occurs in aquatic ecosystems; (3 interference of alien plants can have both negative and positive effects on native plants. The studied literature revealed that alien species can comprise large proportions of both internally and externally transported diaspores. Because animals have limited space for ingested and adhering diaspores, alien species affect both internal and external transport of native diaspores. Alien plant species also form large proportions of all dispersed diaspores in aquatic systems and interfere with dispersal of native aquatic plants. Alien interference can be either negative (e.g., through competition with native plants or positive (e.g., increased abundance of native dispersers, changed disperser behavior or attracting additional disperser species. I propose many future research directions, because understanding whether alien plant species disrupt or facilitate animal-mediated dispersal of native plants is crucial for targeted conservation of invaded (aquatic plant communities.

  1. Overseas seed dispersal by migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Duarte S; Gangoso, Laura; Bouten, Willem; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-01-13

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) promotes the colonization of isolated and remote habitats, and thus it has been proposed as a mechanism for explaining the distributions of many species. Birds are key LDD vectors for many sessile organisms such as plants, yet LDD beyond local and regional scales has never been directly observed nor quantified. By sampling birds caught while in migratory flight by GPS-tracked wild falcons, we show that migratory birds transport seeds over hundreds of kilometres and mediate dispersal from mainland to oceanic islands. Up to 1.2% of birds that reached a small island of the Canary Archipelago (Alegranza) during their migration from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa carried seeds in their guts. The billions of birds making seasonal migrations each year may then transport millions of seeds. None of the plant species transported by the birds occurs in Alegranza and most do not occur on nearby Canary Islands, providing a direct example of the importance of environmental filters in hampering successful colonization by immigrant species. The constant propagule pressure generated by these LDD events might, nevertheless, explain the colonization of some islands. Hence, migratory birds can mediate rapid range expansion or shifts of many plant taxa and determine their distribution. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  3. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  4. Effects of different dispersal patterns on the presence-absence of multiple species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Mohd Hafiz; Murray, Rua; Plank, Michael J.; Godsoe, William

    2018-03-01

    the profound delicacy in the mediation of priority effects by dispersal processes: ;big steps; can have more influence than many ;small steps;.

  5. Progress in urban dispersion studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The present Study addresses recent achievements in better representation Of the urban area structure in meteorology and dispersion parameterisations. The setup and Main Outcome of several recent dispersion experiments in Urban areas and their use in model validation are discussed. The maximum...... BUBBLE Tracer Experiment) the horizontal spread of the plume corresponds to a Lagrangian time scale bigger than the value for ground Sources. Turbulence measurements LIP to 3-5 times the building height Lire needed for direct use in dispersion Calculations....

  6. Geometry of physical dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzel, Dennis; Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-01-01

    To serve as a dispersion relation, a cotangent bundle function must satisfy three simple algebraic properties. These conditions are derived from the inescapable physical requirements that local matter field dynamics must be predictive and allow for an observer-independent notion of positive energy. Possible modifications of the standard relativistic dispersion relation are thereby severely restricted. For instance, the dispersion relations associated with popular deformations of Maxwell theory by Gambini-Pullin or Myers-Pospelov are not admissible. Dispersion relations passing the simple algebraic checks derived here correspond to physically admissible Finslerian refinements of Lorentzian geometry.

  7. Statistical Thermodynamics of Disperse Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    Principles of statistical physics are applied for the description of thermodynamic equilibrium in disperse systems. The cells of disperse systems are shown to possess a number of non-standard thermodynamic parameters. A random distribution of these parameters in the system is determined....... On the basis of this distribution, it is established that the disperse system has an additional degree of freedom called the macro-entropy. A large set of bounded ideal disperse systems allows exact evaluation of thermodynamic characteristics. The theory developed is applied to the description of equilibrium...

  8. Turbulent dispersion of many particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Busse, A.; Muller, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the utility of the convex hull to analyze dispersion of groups of many Lagrangian tracer particles in turbulence. We examine dispersion in turbulent flows driven by convection, relevant to geophysical flows and the spread of contaminants in the atmosphere, and in turbulent flows affected by magnetic fields, relevant to stellar winds and stellar interiors. Convex hull analysis can provide new information about local dispersion, in the form of the surface area and volume for a cluster of particles. We use dispersive information to examine the local anisotropy that occurs in these turbulent settings, and to understand fundamental characteristics of heat transfer and the small-scale dynamo.

  9. Dispersion bias, dispersion effect, and the aerosol-cloud conundrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yangang; Daum, Peter H; Guo Huan; Peng Yiran

    2008-01-01

    This work examines the influences of relative dispersion (the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) on cloud albedo and cloud radiative forcing, derives an analytical formulation that accounts explicitly for the contribution from droplet concentration and relative dispersion, and presents a new approach to parameterize relative dispersion in climate models. It is shown that inadequate representation of relative dispersion in climate models leads to an overestimation of cloud albedo, resulting in a negative bias of global mean shortwave cloud radiative forcing that can be comparable to the warming caused by doubling CO 2 in magnitude, and that this dispersion bias is likely near its maximum for ambient clouds. Relative dispersion is empirically expressed as a function of the quotient between cloud liquid water content and droplet concentration (i.e., water per droplet), yielding an analytical formulation for the first aerosol indirect effect. Further analysis of the new expression reveals that the dispersion effect not only offsets the cooling from the Twomey effect, but is also proportional to the Twomey effect in magnitude. These results suggest that unrealistic representation of relative dispersion in cloud parameterization in general, and evaluation of aerosol indirect effects in particular, is at least in part responsible for several outstanding puzzles of the aerosol-cloud conundrum: for example, overestimation of cloud radiative cooling by climate models compared to satellite observations; large uncertainty and discrepancy in estimates of the aerosol indirect effect; and the lack of interhemispheric difference in cloud albedo.

  10. mc1r Pathway regulation of zebrafish melanosome dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Jennifer; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Reynolds, Natalie L

    2008-01-01

    upon stimulation by alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) or reduce with melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). In mammals and birds, the melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R) responds to MSH, and stimulates the synthesis of black eumelanin. While MSH-cAMP signaling stimulates melanogenesis...... in mammals, and melanosome dispersal in cold-blood vertebrates, the pathway components are highly conserved. However, it has only been assumed that mc1r mediates melanosome dispersal in fish. Here, using morpholino oligonucleotides designed to knockdown mc1r expression, we find that mc1r morphants are unable...

  11. Independent control of arbitrary orders of dispersion at the high power end of CPA lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerbe, M.; Jojart, P.; Szeged University, Szeged; Kovacs, M.; Osvay, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. One of the most crucial issues in chirped pulse amplification (CPA) systems is the precise temporal recompression of the pulses hitting the target. In case of few cycle high intensity lasers, the stabilization of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the pulses is also required. An acousto-optical programmable dispersion filter can satisfy both aims, providing dispersion (pre)compensation up to the fourth order of dispersion and make the CEP shift stable. Its use is, however, limited to a pulse intensity of 100 MW/cm 2 , hence its application is restricted to the front end of the (OP)CPA laser systems. A simple optical arrangement consisting of wedges with different materials and different apex angles was proposed recently for isochronic control of CEP of a pulse train. In this paper we show that assembly of wedges can be specifically designed to tune only one of the dispersion coefficients, while all the others, including CEP, remain practically unchanged. Wedge pairs changing solely the zeroth (CEP) and second order (group delay) dispersion (GDD) are experimentally presented along with a triplet of wedges tuning the third order dispersion (TOD) only. The experiment was carried out with the use of spectrally resolved interferometry (SRI). A Michelson-interferometer was illuminated by 100 nm bandwidth laser pulses of a Ti:Sapphire oscillator. The sample arm of the interferometer contained the wedge assembly, set to near Brewster-angle incidence at each surfaces, designed for tuning the required order of dispersion. At the output of the interferometer the spectral interference between the pulses from the sample and reference arms was resolved with a spectrograph. The dispersion was tuned by perpendicular shift of the entire wedge assembly to the laser beam. In the measurements spectral interferograms were recorded and evaluated at each spatial position of the assembly. Three different wedge combinations, two doublets and a triplet

  12. Definition of global dispersion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    For estimation of a global longitudinal dispersivity at the Gorleben site, data available primarily consist of suites of geophysical logs from wells penetrating the Quaternary aquifer. A length scale for the principle aquifer at Gorleben is to be found. Samples are to be taken separately to estimate the variance in hydraulic conductivity (Taylor Analysis, Fickian dispersion process). (DG)

  13. Cardiovascular research: data dispersion issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Atiqi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological processes are full of variations and so are responses to therapy as measured in clinical research. Estimators of clinical efficacy are, therefore, usually reported with a measure of uncertainty, otherwise called dispersion. This study aimed to review both the flaws of data reports without measure of dispersion and those with over-dispersion. Examples of estimators commonly reported without a measure of dispersion include: 1 number needed to treat; 2 reproducibility of quantitative diagnostic tests; 3 sensitivity / specificity; 4 Markov predictors; 5 risk profiles predicted from multiple logistic models. Data with large differences between response magnitudes can be assessed for over-dispersion by goodness of fit tests. The c2 goodness of fit test allows adjustment for over-dispersion. For most clinical estimators, the calculation of standard errors or confidence intervals is possible. Sometimes, the choice is deliberately made not to use the data fully, but to skip the standard errors and to use the summary measures only. The problem with this approach is that it may suggest inflated results. We recommend that analytical methods in clinical research should always attempt to include a measure of dispersion in the data. When large differences exist in the data, the presence of over-dispersion should be assessed and appropriate adjustments made.

  14. Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

    2010-01-01

    Several recent advances in coexistence theory emphasize the importance of space and dispersal, but focus on average dispersal rates and require spatial heterogeneity, spatio-temporal variability or dispersal-competition tradeoffs to allow coexistence. We analyse a model with stochastic juvenile dispersal (driven by turbulent flow in the coastal ocean) and show that a low-productivity species can coexist with a high-productivity species by having dispersal patterns sufficiently uncorrelated from those of its competitor, even though, on average, dispersal statistics are identical and subsequent demography and competition is spatially homogeneous. This produces a spatial storage effect, with an ephemeral partitioning of a ‘spatial niche’, and is the first demonstration of a physical mechanism for a pure spatiotemporal environmental response. ‘Turbulent coexistence’ is widely applicable to marine species with pelagic larval dispersal and relatively sessile adult life stages (and perhaps some wind-dispersed species) and complements other spatial and temporal storage effects previously documented for such species. PMID:20455921

  15. Dispersal and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ringing of birds unveiled many aspects of avian migration and dispersal movements. However, there is even much more to be explored by the use of ringing and other marks. Dispersal is crucial in understanding the initial phase of migration in migrating birds as it is to understand patterns and processes of distribution and gene flow. So far, the analysis of migration was largely based on analysing spatial and temporal patters of recoveries of ringed birds. However, there are considerable biases and pitfalls in using recoveries due to spatial and temporal variation in reporting probabilities. Novel methods are required for future studies separating the confounding effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of recovery data and heterogeneity of the landscape as well. These novel approaches should aim a more intensive and novel use of the existing recovery data by taking advantage of, for instance, dynamic and multistate modeling, should elaborate schemes for future studies, and should also include other marks that allow a more rapid data collection, like telemetry, geolocation and global positioning systems, and chemical and molecular markers. The latter appear to be very useful in the delineating origin of birds and connectivity between breeding and non–breeding grounds. Many studies of migration are purely descriptive. However, King and Brooks (King & Brooks, 2004 examine if movement patterns of dolphins change after the introduction of a gillnet ban. Bayesian methods are an interesting approach to this problem as they provide a meaningful measure of the probability that such a change occurred rather than simple yes/no response that is often the result of classical statistical methods. However, the key difficulty of a general implementation of Bayesian methods is the complexity of the modelling —there is no general userfriendly package that is easily accessible to most scientists. Drake and Alisauskas (Drake & Alisauskas, 2004 examine the

  16. Polarization modulational instability in a birefringent optical fiber ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    odinger equation modelling fourth order dispersion effects when the linearly polarized pump is oriented at arbitrary angles with respect to the slow and fast axes of the birefringent fiber. Keywords. Birefringent optical fiber; fourth order dispersion; ...

  17. Pollen dispersal in sugar beet production fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmency, Henri; Klein, Etienne K; De Garanbé, Thierry Gestat; Gouyon, Pierre-Henri; Richard-Molard, Marc; Muchembled, Claude

    2009-04-01

    Pollen-mediated gene flow has important implications for biodiversity conservation and for breeders and farmers' activities. In sugar beet production fields, a few sugar beet bolters can produce pollen as well as be fertilized by wild and weed beet. Since the crop, the wild beets, and the weed beets are the same species and intercross freely, the question of pollen flow is an important issue to determine the potential dispersal of transgenes from field to field and to wild habitats. We report here an experiment to describe pollen dispersal from a small herbicide-resistant sugar beet source towards male sterile target plants located along radiating lines up to 1,200 m away. Individual dispersal functions were inferred from statistical analyses and compared. Pollen limitation, as expected in root-production fields, was confirmed at all the distances from the pollen source. The number of resistant seeds produced by bait plants best fitted a fat-tailed probability distribution curve of pollen grains (power-law) dependent on the distance from the pollen source. A literature survey confirmed that power-law function could fit in most cases. The b coefficient was lower than 2. The number of fertilized flowers by background (herbicide-susceptible) pollen grains was uniform across the whole field. Airborne pollen had a fertilization impact equivalent to that of one adjacent bolter. The individual dispersal function from different pollen sources can be integrated to provide the pollen cloud composition for a given target plant, thus allowing modeling of gene flow in a field, inter-fields in a small region, and also in seed-production area. Long-distance pollen flow is not negligible and could play an important role in rapid transgene dispersal from crop to wild and weed beets in the landscape. The removing of any bolting, herbicide-resistant sugar beet should be compulsory to prevent the occurrence of herbicide-resistant weed beet, thus preventing gene flow to wild

  18. Mediatized Humanitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts to legiti......The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts...... legitimation by accountancy, legitimation by institutionalization, and legitimation by compensation. The analysis relates these changes to a problem of trust associated with mediatization through processes of mediation....

  19. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  20. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  1. Polylactic acid promotes healing of photodegraded disperse orange 11 molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Najee; Bridgewater, Mauricio; Stubbs, Micheala; Kabir, Amin; Crescimanno, Michael; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Dawson, Nathan J.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the recovery of a photodegraded organic molecule mediated by a biopolymer. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from disperse orange 11 (DO11) dye-doped polylactic acid (PLA) was used to monitor photodegradation while the material was being damaged by a strong pump laser. The ASE signal fully recovers over two hours time when the pump beam is blocked. The fluorescence spectra was also observed to recover after partial photobleaching the dye-doped polymer. PLA is the first biopolymer known to mediate the recovery of a photodegraded organic dye molecule.

  2. Dispersion properties of photonic bandgap guiding fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    We investigate low-index core photonic crystal fibers. Dispersion properties very different from standard fibers are found. Both Zero dispersion are very large dispersion is shown possible at 1550 nm wavelength....

  3. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  4. ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF N-BUTYL METHACRYLATE IN AQUEOUS DISPERSED SYSTEMS: A MINIEMULSION APPROACH. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasonication was applied in combination with a hydrophobe for the copper-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate in an aqueous dispersed system. A controlled polymerization was successfully achieved, as demonstrated by a linear correlation between...

  5. Dispersion engineering for integrated nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbésien, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book shows how dispersion engineering in two dimensional dielectric photonic crystals can provide new effects for the precise control of light propagation for integrated nanophotonics.Dispersion engineering in regular and graded photonic crystals to promote anomalous refraction effects is studied from the concepts to experimental demonstration via nanofabrication considerations. Self collimation, ultra and negative refraction, second harmonic generation, mirage and invisibility effects which lead to an unprecedented control of light propagation at the (sub-)wavelength scale for the

  6. Seed dispersal distributions resulting from landscape-dependent daily movement behavior of a key vector species, Anas platyrhynchos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleyheeg, Erik; Treep, J.; de Jager, M.; Nolet, B.A.; Soons, M.B.

    2017-01-01

    Dispersal via animals (zoochory) is a primary mechanism for seed exchange between habitat patches. Recent studies have established that many plant species can survive waterbird gut passage. To quantify the patterns and consequences of waterbird-mediated dispersal, information on ingestion and gut

  7. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...

  8. Dispersal pathways, seed rains, and the dynamics of larval behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Richard K; Fingerut, Jonathan T; Zimmer, Cheryl Ann

    2009-07-01

    Dispersing propagules (larvae, seeds, and spores) establish and maintain populations, which serve as templates for subsequent species interactions. Connectivity among demes derives, in large part, from connectivity between consecutive steps, release, transport, and settlement, in dispersal pathways. Concurrent measurements of individuals in each step are a necessary precursor to identifying governing mechanisms. Here we directly and definitively resolved the roles of physics and behavior in mediating dispersal pathways of an estuarine parasite between its intermediate hosts. Planktonic cercariae of Himasthla rhigedana, a parasitic flatworm, are functionally similar to lecithotrophic larvae of many free-living marine invertebrates. The combination of parasite life cycle characteristics and the relatively simple tidal flows in their habitat renders this system an effective model for dispersal studies. Simultaneous field measurements of larval release, transport, settlement, and the flow regime, together with mechanistic experiments, led to empirical understanding of host colonization. All dispersal steps were highly and significantly correlated over time and in space. This tight coupling resulted, unequivocally, from a suite of larval behaviors. Cercariae emerged from first intermediate host snails only during daytime flood tides, enhancing larval retention in the marsh. Daylight triggered downward swimming, and within seconds, cercariae overpowered turbulent mixing, landing in benthic habitat of second intermediate host snails and crabs. Larvae settled (encysted) on external regions of snails/crabs that, presumably, were most vulnerable to ingestion by definitive host shorebirds. In total, cercarial behaviors greatly foreshortened dispersal distances, magnified local parasite prevalence, and increased the likelihood of large-scale transmission by definitive hosts. Cracking open the black box of dispersal thus revealed mechanisms, connectivity, and ecological

  9. Motivational effects of pay dispersion in pay for performance programs implemented in Romanian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urieşi Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the motivational effects in a sample of Romanian employees in private companies that implement pay for performance programs of one of the characteristics of these programs, namely pay dispersion, and on the potential mediating role of organizational justice in these effects. To this aim, we examined the relationships between the amounts of pay dispersion introduced by the respective financial incentive system, employee perceptions of distributive and procedural justice, work motivation, and base salary, respectively. The results of the data analysis, performed through structural equation modeling, support our hypotheses concerning the positive effect of performance – related pay dispersion on motivation and the mediating role of the two dimensions of organizational justice in this effect. Larger financial rewards allocated by the financial incentive system for high performers increase employee perceptions of distributive and procedural justice, which, in turn, foster work motivation. Base salary was also found to influence pay dispersion, as well as perceived distributive justice.

  10. Predicting dispersal of auto-gyrating fruit in tropical trees: a case study from the Dipterocarpaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James R; Bagchi, Robert; Ellens, Judith; Kettle, Chris J; Burslem, David F R P; Maycock, Colin R; Khoo, Eyen; Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2015-05-01

    Seed dispersal governs the distribution of plant propagules in the landscape and hence forms the template on which density-dependent processes act. Dispersal is therefore a vital component of many species coexistence and forest dynamics models and is of applied value in understanding forest regeneration. Research on the processes that facilitate forest regeneration and restoration is given further weight in the context of widespread loss and degradation of tropical forests, and provides impetus to improve estimates of seed dispersal for tropical forest trees. South-East Asian lowland rainforests, which have been subject to severe degradation, are dominated by trees of the Dipterocarpaceae family which constitute over 40% of forest biomass. Dipterocarp dispersal is generally considered to be poor given their large, gyration-dispersed fruits. However, there is wide variability in fruit size and morphology which we hypothesize mechanistically underpins dispersal potential through the lift provided to seeds mediated by the wings. We explored experimentally how the ratio of fruit wing area to mass ("inverse wing loading," IWL) explains variation in seed dispersal kernels among 13 dipterocarp species by releasing fruit from a canopy tower. Horizontal seed dispersal distances increased with IWL, especially at high wind speeds. Seed dispersal of all species was predominantly local, with 90% of seed dispersing <10 m, although maximum dispersal distances varied widely among species. We present a generic seed dispersal model for dipterocarps based on attributes of seed morphology and provide modeled seed dispersal kernels for all dipterocarp species with IWLs of 1-50, representing 75% of species in Borneo.

  11. Motivational effects of pay dispersion in pay for performance programs implemented in Romanian companies

    OpenAIRE

    Urieşi Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the motivational effects in a sample of Romanian employees in private companies that implement pay for performance programs of one of the characteristics of these programs, namely pay dispersion, and on the potential mediating role of organizational justice in these effects. To this aim, we examined the relationships between the amounts of pay dispersion introduced by the respective financial incentive system, employee perceptions of distributive and procedural ...

  12. Micromixer based on Taylor dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H; Nguyen, N-T; Huang, X

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports an analytical model, the fabrication and the characterization of a polymeric micromixer based on Taylor dispersion. Due to the distributed velocity field over the channel cross section, the effective dispersion in axial direction in a microchannel is much stronger than the pure molecular diffusion. In our work, squential segmentation was used in the micromixer for improving mixing in a microchannel. The micromixer was designed and fabricated based on lamination of five 100-μm-thick polymer sheets. Rubber valve seats were embedded between the forth and the fifth layers. The polymer layers were machined using a CO 2 laser. The lamination of the five layers was carried out by a commercial hot laminator (Aurora LM-450HC). External solenoid actuators are used for closing the valves at the mixer inlets. The experimental results confirm the effect of Taylor dispersion. Mixing ratio can be adjusted by pulse width modulation of the control signal of the solenoids

  13. Dispersal in Mastomys natalensis mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hooft, Pim; Cosson, J F; Vibe-Petersen, Solveig

    2008-01-01

    genotyped. Genetic diversity was high, with no isolation by distance and little differentiation between field plots far apart, indicating a large effective population size and high dispersal rates in agreement with ecological observations. On the other hand, genetic differentiation between nearby field...... plots, isolation by distance within a single field plot and kin clustering were also observed. This apparent contradiction may be explained by yearly founder effects of a small number of breeding individuals per square area, which is consistent with the presence of linkage disequilibrium. An alternative......, not mutually exclusive explanation is that there are both dispersing and sedentary animals in the population. The low-density field plots were characterized by low relatedness and small genetic distances to other field plots, indicating a high turnover rate and negative density-dependent dispersal. In one...

  14. STELLAR MASS DEPENDENT DISK DISPERSAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    We use published optical spectral and infrared (IR) excess data from nine young clusters and associations to study the stellar mass dependent dispersal of circumstellar disks. All clusters older than ∼3 Myr show a decrease in disk fraction with increasing stellar mass for solar to higher mass stars. This result is significant at about the 1σ level in each cluster. For the complete set of clusters we reject the null hypothesis-that solar and intermediate-mass stars lose their disks at the same rate-with 95%-99.9% confidence. To interpret this behavior, we investigate the impact of grain growth, binary companions, and photoevaporation on the evolution of disk signatures. Changes in grain growth timescales at fixed disk temperature may explain why early-type stars with IR excesses appear to evolve faster than their later-type counterparts. Little evidence that binary companions affect disk evolution suggests that photoevaporation is the more likely mechanism for disk dispersal. A simple photoevaporation model provides a good fit to the observed disk fractions for solar and intermediate-mass stars. Although the current mass-dependent disk dispersal signal is not strong, larger and more complete samples of clusters with ages of 3-5 Myr can improve the significance and provide better tests of theoretical models. In addition, the orbits of extra-solar planets can constrain models of disk dispersal and migration. We suggest that the signature of stellar mass dependent disk dispersal due to photoevaporation may be present in the orbits of observed extra-solar planets. Planets orbiting hosts more massive than ∼1.6 M sun may have larger orbits because the disks in which they formed were dispersed before they could migrate.

  15. Mechanical dispersion of clay from soil into water: readily-dispersed and spontaneously-dispersed clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Ewa A.; Dexter, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the experimental determination of the amount of clay dispersed from soil into water is described. The method was evaluated using soil samples from agricultural fields in 18 locations in Poland. Soil particle size distributions, contents of organic matter and exchangeable cations were measured by standard methods. Sub-samples were placed in distilled water and were subjected to four different energy inputs obtained by different numbers of inversions (end-over-end movements). The amounts of clay that dispersed into suspension were measured by light scattering (turbidimetry). An empirical equation was developed that provided an approximate fit to the experimental data for turbidity as a function of number of inversions. It is suggested that extrapolation of the fitted equation to zero inversions enables the amount of spontaneously-dispersed clay to be estimated. This method introduces the possibility of replacing the existing subjective, qualitative method of determining spontaneously-dispersed clay with a quantitative, objective method. Even though the dispersed clay is measured under saturated conditions, soil samples retain a `memory' of the water contents at which they have been stored.

  16. Effects of biotic interactions and dispersal on the presence-absence of multiple species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, Mohd Hafiz; Murray, Rua; Plank, Michael J.; Godsoe, William

    2017-01-01

    One of the important issues in ecology is to predict which species will be present (or absent) across a geographical region. Dispersal is thought to have an important influence on the range limits of species, and understanding this problem in a multi-species community with priority effects (i.e. initial abundances determine species presence-absence) is a challenging task because dispersal also interacts with biotic and abiotic factors. Here, we propose a simple multi-species model to investigate the joint effects of biotic interactions and dispersal on species presence-absence. Our results show that dispersal can substantially expand species ranges when biotic and abiotic forces are present; consequently, coexistence of multiple species is possible. The model also exhibits ecologically interesting priority effects, mediated by intense biotic interactions. In the absence of dispersal, competitive exclusion of all but one species occurs. We find that dispersal reduces competitive exclusion effects that occur in no-dispersal case and promotes coexistence of multiple species. These results also show that priority effects are still prevalent in multi-species communities in the presence of dispersal process. We also illustrate the existence of threshold values of competitive strength (i.e. transcritical bifurcations), which results in different species presence-absence in multi-species communities with and without dispersal.

  17. Can dispersal investment explain why tall plant species achieve longer dispersal distances than short plant species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Fiona J; Letten, Andrew D; Tamme, Riin; Edwards, Will; Moles, Angela T

    2018-01-01

    Tall plant species disperse further distances than do short species, within and across dispersal syndromes, yet the driver underpinning this relationship is unclear. The ability of taller plants to invest more in dispersal structures may explain the positive relationship between plant height and dispersal distance. Here, we quantify the cross-species relationships between presence of dispersal structures, dispersal investment plant height and dispersal distance. Plant height, dispersal syndrome and dispersal investment data were collated for 1613 species from the literature, with dispersal distance data collated for 114 species. We find that species with high dispersal investment disperse further than do species with low dispersal investment. Tall species have a greater probability of having dispersal structures on their seeds compared with short species. For species with dispersal structures on their seeds, plant height is very weakly related to dispersal investment. Our results provide the first global confirmation of the dispersal investment-distance hypothesis, and show dispersal investment can be used for predicting species dispersal distances. However, our results and those of previous studies indicate plant height is still the best proxy for estimating species dispersal distances due to it being such a readily available plant trait. © 2017 Landcare Research. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Evaluation of the impact of higher-order energy enhancement characteristics of solitons in strongly dispersion-managed optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Otero, Francisco J.; Guillán-Lorenzo, Omar; Pedrosa-Rodríguez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Empirical model describing the pulse energy enhancement required to obtain stable pulses to higher-order polynomial equations • An improvement in the accuracy is obtained through the addition of a new quartic addend dependent on the map strength. • This conclusion is validated through a comparison in a commercial DM soliton submarine network. • The error in the interaction distance for two adjacent pulses in the same channel is of the same order as the energy error - Abstract: We study the propagation properties of nonlinear pulses with periodic evolution in a dispersion-managed transmission link by means of a variational approach. We fit the energy enhancement required for stable propagation of a single soliton in a prototypical commercial link to a polynomial approximation that describes the dependence of the energy on the map strength of the normalized unit cell. We present an improvement of a relatively old and essential result, namely, the dependence of the energy-enhancement factor of dispersion-management solitons with the square of the map strength of the fiber link. We find that adding additional corrections to the conventional quadratic formula up to the fourth order results in an improvement in the accuracy of the description of the numerical results obtained with the variational approximation. Even a small error in the energy is found to introduce large deviations in the pulse parameters during its evolution. The error in the evaluation of the interaction distance between two adjacent time division multiplexed pulses propagating in the same channel in a prototypical submarine link is of the same order as the error in the energy.

  19. What Causes Animals to Disperse?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of individual organisms or their propagules in which they leave their home area, sometimes establishing a new home area. This does not include short -term exploratory movements, or changes in the bound- aries of a home range, such that the new range includes at least part of the former. Dispersal thus produces ...

  20. Magnetic exciton dispersion in praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainford, B. D.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the dispersion of magnetic excitons have been made in a single crystal of praseodymium metal using inelastic neutron scattering. A preliminary analysis of the data yields the first detailed information about the exchange interactions and the crystal field splittings in the light...

  1. On Dispersion in Visual Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Barneveld, H.H. van

    1975-01-01

    An idealized visual pigment absorbance spectrum is used together with a Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation to calculate the contribution of the visual pigment to the refractive index of the fly photoreceptor. It appears that an absorption coefficient of 0.010 µm-1 results in a refractive index

  2. A generalized advection dispersion equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper examines a possible effect of uncertainties, variability or heterogeneity of any dynamic system when being included in its evolution rule; the notion is illustrated with the advection dispersion equation, which describes the groundwater pollution model. An uncertain derivative is defined; some properties of.

  3. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  4. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Y; Byrne, H; Osborne, J; Pitt-Francis, J; Gavaghan, D; Quintard, M

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport.

  5. Liquid fuels containing polyamine dispersants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, D.I.

    1983-08-23

    Certain polyamines are useful carburetor dispersants for liquid fuel compositions. Among the suitable polyamines are diamines which may be prepared by the Mannich reaction of certain primary or second amines with an aldehyde such as formaldehyde and an aliphatic nitro compound such as 2-nitropropan followed by reduction of the nitro group.

  6. Mediatized play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    Children’s play must nowadays be understood as a mediatized field in society and culture. Media – understood in a very broad sense - holds severe explanatory power in describing and understanding the practice of play, since play happens both with, through and inspired by media of different sorts....... In this presentation the case of ‘playing soccer’ will be outlined through its different mediated manifestations, including soccer games and programs on TV, computer games, magazines, books, YouTube videos and soccer trading cards....

  7. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    "Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally...... and globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines...... the organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  8. Assessing ecological specialization of an ant-seed dispersal mutualism through a wide geographic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzaneda, Antonio J; Rey, Pedro J

    2009-11-01

    Specialization in species interactions is of central importance for understanding the ecological structure and evolution of plant-animal mutualisms. Most plant-animal mutualisms are facultative and strongly asymmetric. In particular, myrmecochory (seed dispersal by ants) has been regarded as a very generalized interaction. Although some recent studies have suggested that only a few ant species are really important for dispersal, no rigorous measurement of the specialization in ant-seed dispersal mutualisms has been performed. Here, we use individual plants as basic units for replication to investigate the generalization-specialization of the herb Helleborus foetidus on its ant dispersers over a considerable part of its geographical range. We define generalization in terms of diversity components (species richness and evenness) of the ant visitor that realizes dispersal by removing diaspores. We obtain truly comparable values of ant visitor diversity, distinguishing among different functional groups of visitors and identifying incidental visitors and real ant dispersers. Using null model approaches, we test the null hypothesis that ant-mediated dispersal is a generalized mutualism. At least two premises should be confirmed to validate the hypothesis: (1) diaspores are dispersed by multiple ant-visitor species, and (2) diaspore dispersal is significantly equitable. Though up to 37 ant species visited diaspores across 10 populations, only two large formicines, Camponotus cruentatus and Formica lugubris, were responsible for the vast majority of visits resulting in dispersal in most populations and years, which strongly suggests that ant seed dispersal in H. foetidus is ecologically specialized. Interestingly, specialization degree was unrelated to dispersal success across populations. Our study offers new insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of myrmecochory. We propose the existence of an alternative scenario to extensive generalization. In this new scenario

  9. Realistic dispersion kernels applied to cohabitation reaction dispersion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isern, Neus; Fort, Joaquim; Pérez-Losada, Joaquim

    2008-10-01

    We develop front spreading models for several jump distance probability distributions (dispersion kernels). We derive expressions for a cohabitation model (cohabitation of parents and children) and a non-cohabitation model, and apply them to the Neolithic using data from real human populations. The speeds that we obtain are consistent with observations of the Neolithic transition. The correction due to the cohabitation effect is up to 38%.

  10. UV curable aqueous dispersions for wood coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, S.; Bleus, J.P.; Wang, Z.J.; Arceneaux, J. A.; Hall, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the characterisation of aqueous dispersions of UV curable resins is described. Two types of dispersions were used: dispersions that are tacky after water evaporation and tack - free before cure dispersions. The physical and rheological properties of these products have been determined and the performance of these dispersions in various formulations, especially for wood applications has been studied. With these dispersions, it is possible to produce coatings having a good cure speed, good surface hardness and good solvent -, chemical - and water resistance

  11. Nanocomposites from Stable Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymeric Matrices Using Dispersion Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymeric matrices include CNTs dispersed in a host polymer or copolymer whose monomers have delocalized electron orbitals, so that a dispersion interaction results between the host polymer or copolymer and the CNTs dispersed therein. Nanocomposite products, which are presented in bulk, or when fabricated as a film, fiber, foam, coating, adhesive, paste, or molding, are prepared by standard means from the present stable dispersions of CNTs in polymeric matrices, employing dispersion interactions, as presented hereinabove.

  12. A Coupling Method of New EMFE and FE for Fourth-Order Partial Differential Equation of Parabolic Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2013-01-01

    discrete schemes, we introduce a new expanded mixed projection and some important lemmas. We derive the optimal a priori error estimates in L2 and H1-norm for both the scalar unknown u and the diffusion term γ and a priori error estimates in (L22-norm for its gradient λ and its flux σ (the coefficients times the negative gradient. Finally, we provide some numerical results to illustrate the efficiency of our method.

  13. Procedure for preparation of dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Procedure for the preparation of a water based dispersion of cerium oxide, characterised in that a suspension of cerium (IV) hydroxide is formed with an acid, where the acid is in the state of a disaggregation of aggregated crystalline cerium hydroxide, the suspension being preheated for a specified time and to a specified temperature, so that the pH value becomes constant, and whereby the quantity of acid in the suspension is such that the constant pH value is lower than 5.4, so that a conditioned suspension may be obtained, and water may be mixed with the conditioned suspension for making a water based dispersion of cerium oxide. (G.C.)

  14. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub- teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over......What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 (student) teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We...... ensured exogenous variation in otherwise random team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities. Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...

  15. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blume, M.

    1992-01-01

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ''forward scattering'' properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism

  16. Prediction of the moments in advection-diffusion lattice Boltzmann method. I. Truncation dispersion, skewness, and kurtosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the heterogeneity in the soil structure or the nonuniformity of the velocity field on the modeled resident time distribution (RTD) and breakthrough curves is quantified by their moments. While the first moment provides the effective velocity, the second moment is related to the longitudinal dispersion coefficient (kT) in the developed Taylor regime; the third and fourth moments are characterized by their normalized values skewness (Sk) and kurtosis (Ku), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the role of the truncation corrections of the numerical scheme in kT, Sk, and Ku because of their interference with the second moment, in the form of the numerical dispersion, and in the higher-order moments, by their definition. Our symbolic procedure is based on the recently proposed extended method of moments (EMM). Originally, the EMM restores any-order physical moments of the RTD or averaged distributions assuming that the solute concentration obeys the advection-diffusion equation in multidimensional steady-state velocity field, in streamwise-periodic heterogeneous structure. In our work, the EMM is generalized to the fourth-order-accurate apparent mass-conservation equation in two- and three-dimensional duct flows. The method looks for the solution of the transport equation as the product of a long harmonic wave and a spatially periodic oscillating component; the moments of the given numerical scheme are derived from a chain of the steady-state fourth-order equations at a single cell. This mathematical technique is exemplified for the truncation terms of the two-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme, using plug and parabolic flow in straight channel and cylindrical capillary with the d2Q9 and d3Q15 discrete velocity sets as simple but illustrative examples. The derived symbolic dependencies can be readily extended for advection by another, Newtonian or non-Newtonian, flow profile in any-shape open-tabular conduits. It is

  17. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  18. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The average of the moments for event shapes in e+e− → hadrons within the con- text of next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD prediction in dispersive model is studied. Moments used in this article are 〈1 − T〉, 〈ρ〉, 〈BT〉 and 〈BW〉. We extract αs, the coupling con- stant in perturbative theory and α0 in the ...

  19. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  20. Dispersant application by fire monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, R.A.; Chen, A.C.T.

    1995-01-01

    Several years ago, Exxon Company, International, found itself with a need for a rugged system for open ocean use in applying dispersant which could be quickly installed on supply boats and would use readily available parts at remote offshore drilling sites. Fire monitors appeared promising, since they had been used effectively to disperse some minor spills in the past, and visually they appeared to produce a relatively-uniform spray pattern. Calculations also showed that fire monitors could potentially cover three to four times the area covered by a conventional boom because of a wide swatch and the potential for greater boat speed due to a lesser effect of pitching and rolling on monitors than on booms. There were questions, however, about the uniformity of the dosage, the difference in the droplet size produced, and their effect on dispersant performance. Exxon conducted several test programs to more thoroughly evaluate fire monitors for dispersant application, and these programs are the subject of this paper. The first test program involved the testing of numerous nozzles with modifications and monitor elevation angles to determine what combination would give the most uniform dosage in the likely offshore wind conditions. Once a nozzle was selected, the droplet pattern from the monitoring nozzle and from a conventional dilute spray boom were analyzed using high speed video. These tests were followed by application tests of COREXIT 9527 by fire monitor, dilute boom, and neat boom to spilled oil at the Imperial Oil Limited Wave Basin in Calgary. The major content of this paper deals with the results of those tests. Finally, at-sea tests were successfully conducted in the North Sea

  1. Dispersant application by fire monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, R.A.; Chen, A.C.T. [Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States). Production Operations Div.

    1995-06-01

    Several years ago, Exxon Company, International, found itself with a need for a rugged system for open ocean use in applying dispersant which could be quickly installed on supply boats and would use readily available parts at remote offshore drilling sites. Fire monitors appeared promising, since they had been used effectively to disperse some minor spills in the past, and visually they appeared to produce a relatively-uniform spray pattern. Calculations also showed that fire monitors could potentially cover three to four times the area covered by a conventional boom because of a wide swatch and the potential for greater boat speed due to a lesser effect of pitching and rolling on monitors than on booms. There were questions, however, about the uniformity of the dosage, the difference in the droplet size produced, and their effect on dispersant performance. Exxon conducted several test programs to more thoroughly evaluate fire monitors for dispersant application, and these programs are the subject of this paper. The first test program involved the testing of numerous nozzles with modifications and monitor elevation angles to determine what combination would give the most uniform dosage in the likely offshore wind conditions. Once a nozzle was selected, the droplet pattern from the monitoring nozzle and from a conventional dilute spray boom were analyzed using high speed video. These tests were followed by application tests of COREXIT 9527 by fire monitor, dilute boom, and neat boom to spilled oil at the Imperial Oil Limited Wave Basin in Calgary. The major content of this paper deals with the results of those tests. Finally, at-sea tests were successfully conducted in the North Sea.

  2. Accurate dispersion calculations: AUSTAL2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicke, U.

    2005-01-01

    Until the 2002 amendment of the Clean Air Technical Code of 1968, Annex C of this regulation required standard pollutant emission forecasts to be based on the Gaussian flag model. It was clear even at the time of the Code's initial promulgation that this model is only valid in a very narrow application range and in particular not in cases of sources close to ground level, low ground surface roughness and complex dispersion situations. In German licensing procedures there has been for this reason an increasing use of more complex models over the past 10 years, the most frequently used of which today is a Lagrangian dispersion model. This model type was standardised in VDI (Association of German Engineers) Guideline 3945 Sheet 3 in the year 2000. In the course of amending the Clean Air Technical Code in accordance with the new EU Framework Directive the decision was taken at the Environmental Protection Office to replace the Gaussian model with the Lagrangian model as described in VDI 3945 Sheet 3. Using the LASAT dispersion model as a basis the AUSTAL2000 program system has now been developed, providing an example of how the algorithms of Annex 3 of the Clean Air Technical Code can be used in practice. AUSTAL2000 has been available on the Internet since the year 2002 along with source text, documentation and example calculations

  3. Improving practical atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.C.R.; Hudson, B.; Thomson, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The new generation of practical atmospheric dispersion model (for short range ≤ 30 km) are based on dispersion science and boundary layer meteorology which have widespread international acceptance. In addition, recent improvements in computer skills and the widespread availability of small powerful computers make it possible to have new regulatory models which are more complex than the previous generation which were based on charts and simple formulae. This paper describes the basis of these models and how they have developed. Such models are needed to satisfy the urgent public demand for sound, justifiable and consistent environmental decisions. For example, it is preferable that the same models are used to simulate dispersion in different industries; in many countries at present different models are used for emissions from nuclear and fossil fuel power stations. The models should not be so simple as to be suspect but neither should they be too complex for widespread use; for example, at public inquiries in Germany, where simple models are mandatory, it is becoming usual to cite the results from highly complex computational models because the simple models are not credible. This paper is written in a schematic style with an emphasis on tables and diagrams. (au) (22 refs.)

  4. Evolved dispersal strategies at range margins

    OpenAIRE

    Dytham, Calvin

    2009-01-01

    Dispersal is a key component of a species's ecology and will be under different selection pressures in different parts of the range. For example, a long-distance dispersal strategy suitable for continuous habitat at the range core might not be favoured at the margin, where the habitat is sparse. Using a spatially explicit, individual-based, evolutionary simulation model, the dispersal strategies of an organism that has only one dispersal event in its lifetime, such as a plant or sessile anima...

  5. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  6. Rheology of Polyaniline Dispersions in Acrylic Resin

    OpenAIRE

    PLESU, Nicoleta; LIESCU, Smaranda; ILIA, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Acrylic dispersions based on polyaniline were obtained and characterised. The polyaniline was obtained by chemical polymerisation of aniline in different organic acid containing phosphorous, in the presence of ammonium-peroxidisulphate as oxidant agent. The blends were obtained by mechanical dispersion of polyaniline in commercially available acrylic resin. The flow behaviour of these dispersions at different shear rates was studied. Furthermore, the resulting acrylic dispersions w...

  7. Statistical Physics of Colloidal Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the equilibrium statistical mechanics of colloidal dispersions which represent useful model systems for the study of condensed matter physics; namely, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions and polymer stabilized colloidal dispersions. A one-component macroparticle approach is adopted in order to treat the macroscopic and microscopic properties of these systems in a simple and comprehensive manner. The thesis opens with the description of the nature of the colloidal state before reviewing some basic definitions and theory in Chapter II. In Chapter III a variational theory of phase equilibria based on the Gibbs-Bogolyobov inequality is applied to sterically stabilized colloidal dispersions. Hard spheres are chosen as the reference system for the disordered phases while an Einstein model is used for the ordered phases. The new choice of pair potential, taken for mathematical convenience, is a superposition of two Yukawa functions. By matching a double Yukawa potential to the van der Waals attractive potential at different temperatures and introducing a purely temperature dependent coefficient to the repulsive part, a rich variety of observed phase separation phenomena is qualitatively described. The behaviour of the potential is found to be consistent with a small decrease of the polymer layer thickness with increasing temperature. Using the same concept of a collapse transition the non-monotonic second virial coefficient is also explained and quantified. It is shown that a reduction of the effective macroparticle diameter with increasing temperature can only be partially examined from the point of view of a (binary-) polymer solution theory. This chapter concludes with the description of the observed, reversible, depletion flocculation behaviour. This is accomplished by using the variational formalism and by invoking the double Yukawa potential to allow

  8. Dispersion properties of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Dridi, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Approximate dispersion and bending properties of all-silica two-dimensional photonic crystal fibres are characterised by the combination of an effective-index model and classical analysis tools for optical fibres. We believe for the first time to have predicted the dispersion properties of photonic...... crystal fibres. The results strongly indicate that these fibres have potential applications as dispersion managing components...

  9. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  10. Dispersion climatology in a coastal zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1986-01-01

    system should be used to describe the dispersion. This dispersion classification scheme is used to organize 3 years of data from two meteorological masts, one placed directly at a shoreline and the other roughly 1 km inland. Differences in the dispersion climatology over land and water are studied...

  11. Characterization of finite spaces having dispersion points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bsoul, A. T

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we shall characterize the finite spaces having dispersion points. Also, we prove that the dispersion point of a finite space with a dispersion points fixed under all non constant continuous functions which answers the question raised by J. C obb and W. Voxman in 1980 affirmatively for finite space. Some open problems are given. (author). 16 refs

  12. Dispersal distance of rice ( Oryza Sativa L.) pollen at the Tana River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rice is a staple food in Kenya and its production needs to be increased. Genetically modified (GM) rice may be a solution, but before it can be introduced, potential ecological impacts, such as pollen mediated gene flow from GM rice to non-GM rice or to its wild indigenous relatives, need to be understood. Pollen dispersal in ...

  13. Intraspecific variation of seed floating ability in Sparganium emersum suggests a bimodal dispersal strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Verbruggen, E.; Van Groenendael, J.M.; Ouborg, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water-mediated spread of seeds (hydrochory) plays an important role in the dispersal of aquatic plants. In this study we investigate intraspecific variation in floating ability and germination capacity of Sparganium emersum seeds in relation to seed mass, within three natural populations along the

  14. Modeling 137CS dispersion from a radiological dispersion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetin, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    This analysis reveals that, if terrorists detonate a RDD containing a relatively small amount of 137 Cs (approximately 12-35g), the resulting dispersion can contaminate a relatively large area. The actual magnitude of a terrorist incident involving the release of radioactive material by a dirty bomb depends on the dimensions of the contaminated area and the accompanying contamination density (i.e., radioactivity) distributed within that area. Applying a semiempirical model indicates that the spatial extent of the contaminated area and the level of activity within that area are dependent primarily on local scale meteorological conditions, especially whether rainfall occurs, as well particle size and effective release height. As a result, the magnitude of the consequences of terrorists acquiring non-weapons grade nuclear materials and releasing those materials with a dirty bomb is contingent on a number of factors beyond the scope of active countermeasures, especially the RDD's design elements and local-scale meteorological conditions. Modeling the dispersion of radioactive aerosols throughout an urban landscape, especially with accurate 3-D representation of its complex geometry and meteorology, is indispensable for assessing the potential consequences of a terrorist incident and implementing effective emergency response, health services, and decontamination decisions. (orig.)

  15. Normal-dispersion microresonator Kerr frequency combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiaoxiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical microresonator-based Kerr frequency comb generation has developed into a hot research area in the past decade. Microresonator combs are promising for portable applications due to their potential for chip-level integration and low power consumption. According to the group velocity dispersion of the microresonator employed, research in this field may be classified into two categories: the anomalous dispersion regime and the normal dispersion regime. In this paper, we discuss the physics of Kerr comb generation in the normal dispersion regime and review recent experimental advances. The potential advantages and future directions of normal dispersion combs are also discussed.

  16. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 (student) teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We...... ensured exogenous variation in otherwise random team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities. Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...

  17. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances. We ensured exogenous...... variation in - otherwise random - team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities (Raven test). Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...

  18. The influence of larval migration and dispersal depth on potential larval trajectories of a deep-sea bivalve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Doreen M.; Eggleston, David B.; Todd, Austin C.; Young, Craig M.; He, Ruoying

    2017-09-01

    Many fundamental questions in marine ecology require an understanding of larval dispersal and connectivity, yet direct observations of larval trajectories are difficult or impossible to obtain. Although biophysical models provide an alternative approach, in the deep sea, essential biological parameters for these models have seldom been measured empirically. In this study, we used a biophysical model to explore the role of behaviorally mediated migration from two methane seep sites in the Gulf of Mexico on potential larval dispersal patterns and population connectivity of the deep-sea mussel ;Bathymodiolus; childressi, a species for which some biological information is available. Three possible larval dispersal strategies were evaluated for larvae with a Planktonic Larval Duration (PLD) of 395 days: (1) demersal drift, (2) dispersal near the surface early in larval life followed by an extended demersal period before settlement, and (3) dispersal near the surface until just before settlement. Upward swimming speeds varied in the model based on the best data available. Average dispersal distances for simulated larvae varied between 16 km and 1488 km. Dispersal in the upper water column resulted in the greatest dispersal distance (1173 km ± 2.00), followed by mixed dispersal depth (921 km ± 2.00). Larvae originating in the Gulf of Mexico can potentially seed most known seep metapopulations on the Atlantic continental margin, whereas larvae drifting demersally cannot (237 km ± 1.43). Depth of dispersal is therefore shown to be a critical parameter for models of deep-sea connectivity.

  19. Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Chains To Promote the Dispersion of Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Zhiyu; Shen, Jianxiang; Chen, Yulong; Zheng, Zijian; Zhang, Liqun; Lyulin, Alexey V

    2017-10-05

    In this paper we adopt molecular dynamics simulations to study the amphiphilic AB block copolymer (BCP) mediated nanoparticle (NP) dispersion in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs), with the A-block being compatible with the NPs and the B-block being miscible with the polymer matrix. The effects of the number and components of BCP, as well as the interaction strength between A-block and NPs on the spatial organization of NPs, are explored. We find that the increase of the fraction of the A-block brings different dispersion effect to NPs than that of B-block. We also find that the best dispersion state of the NPs occurs in the case of a moderate interaction strength between the A-block and the NPs. Meanwhile, the stress-strain behavior is probed. Our simulation results verify that adopting BCP is an effective way to adjust the dispersion of NPs in the polymer matrix, further to manipulate the mechanical properties.

  20. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  1. Nonlinear rheology of colloidal dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brader, J M

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions are commonly encountered in everyday life and represent an important class of complex fluid. Of particular significance for many commercial products and industrial processes is the ability to control and manipulate the macroscopic flow response of a dispersion by tuning the microscopic interactions between the constituents. An important step towards attaining this goal is the development of robust theoretical methods for predicting from first-principles the rheology and nonequilibrium microstructure of well defined model systems subject to external flow. In this review we give an overview of some promising theoretical approaches and the phenomena they seek to describe, focusing, for simplicity, on systems for which the colloidal particles interact via strongly repulsive, spherically symmetric interactions. In presenting the various theories, we will consider first low volume fraction systems, for which a number of exact results may be derived, before moving on to consider the intermediate and high volume fraction states which present both the most interesting physics and the most demanding technical challenges. In the high volume fraction regime particular emphasis will be given to the rheology of dynamically arrested states. (topical review)

  2. Introduction to nonlinear dispersive equations

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    This textbook introduces the well-posedness theory for initial-value problems of nonlinear, dispersive partial differential equations, with special focus on two key models, the Korteweg–de Vries equation and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. A concise and self-contained treatment of background material (the Fourier transform, interpolation theory, Sobolev spaces, and the linear Schrödinger equation) prepares the reader to understand the main topics covered: the initial-value problem for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the generalized Korteweg–de Vries equation, properties of their solutions, and a survey of general classes of nonlinear dispersive equations of physical and mathematical significance. Each chapter ends with an expert account of recent developments and open problems, as well as exercises. The final chapter gives a detailed exposition of local well-posedness for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, taking the reader to the forefront of recent research. The second edition of Introdu...

  3. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage (typically 80%) of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. Alternatively, for continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the classical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  4. Challenges in Virtual Collaboration. Videoconferencing, Audioconferencing, and Computer-Mediated Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wainfan, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    ...) on group processes and outcomes. Virtual collaborations are collaborations in which the people working together are interdependent in their tasks, share responsibility for outcomes, are geographically dispersed, and rely on mediated...

  5. Dispersion and suburbanisation. New ethnoscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Serra del Pozo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many deviations from the simple scheme of ethnic enclaves or ethnic centralities today, even in contemporary Little Havana in Miami. This scheme tends to be diluted by three processes: 1 the decentralization of some immigrant residents towards the suburbs or urban periphery; these suburban immigrants may be more settled or affluent than recent immigrants living in inner-city communities; 2 the dispersal of entrepreneurs of a particular ethnic minority in a large metropolitan area; and 3 the emergence and coexistence of multiple ethnic groups in the same zone or area. The three processes gradually cause the loss of the unity of the residententrepreneur coethnic tandem in the same neighbourhood.

  6. Positron-atom dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.; Martinis, M.

    1983-01-01

    The singularity structure of the forward positron-atom scattering amplitude is studied within the framework of perturbation theory with the use of the Landau rules. The unphysical and anomalous regions in the positron-atom forward dispersion relations are discussed. It is shown that the unphysical region starts at E 0 = -Vertical BarE(Ps)Vertical Bar+Vertical BarE 1 Vertical Bar and the anomalous region at E/sub a/ = -(√2Vertical BarE(Ps)Vertical Bar - √Vertical BarE 1 Vertical Bar ) 2 , where E(Ps) and E 1 are correspondingly the positronium and the atomic-electron binding energies. The anomalous region is on the physical sheet if Vertical BarE(Ps)Vertical Bar/2>Vertical BarE 1 Vertical Bar

  7. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  8. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... positions close to the boundaries. Different rules have been suggested in the literature with justifications based on simulation studies. Herein the relevant stochastic differential equation model is formulated in a particular way. The formulation is based on the marginal transformation of the position...... dependent particle velocity into a position independent Gaussian velocity. Boundary conditions are obtained from Itos rule of stochastic differentiation. The model directly point at a canonical rule of reflection for the approximating random walk with finite time step. This reflection rule is different from...

  9. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  10. Dispersed publication of editorial research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There seems to be no dedicated journals available for publication of editorial research in the biomedical sciences; that is research into editorial or publication process issues involving the scientific approach to writing, reviewing, editing and publishing. It is unknown where papers...... concerning these issues are typically published. We therefore set out to study the distribution of such papers in the biomedical literature. METHODS: In this pilot study, we conducted a MEDLINE search for papers on editorial research published in the year 2012. RESULTS: We found 445 articles published in 311...... journals with a median of one article per journal (range: 1-17). CONCLUSION: The publication of papers on editorial research seems to be dispersed. In order to increase the visibility of this research field, it may be reasonable to establish well-defined platforms such as dedicated journals or journal...

  11. Dispersed publication of editorial research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri

    2015-01-01

    concerning these issues are typically published. We therefore set out to study the distribution of such papers in the biomedical literature. METHODS: In this pilot study, we conducted a MEDLINE search for papers on editorial research published in the year 2012. RESULTS: We found 445 articles published in 311......INTRODUCTION: There seems to be no dedicated journals available for publication of editorial research in the biomedical sciences; that is research into editorial or publication process issues involving the scientific approach to writing, reviewing, editing and publishing. It is unknown where papers...... journals with a median of one article per journal (range: 1-17). CONCLUSION: The publication of papers on editorial research seems to be dispersed. In order to increase the visibility of this research field, it may be reasonable to establish well-defined platforms such as dedicated journals or journal...

  12. Determination of dispersity of crushed granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dejun; Fan Xianhua; Zhang Yingjie; Yao Jun; Zhou Duo; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    The experimental crushed granite column breakthrough curves, using 99 Tc as spike tracer and 3 H as invariant tracer, are analyzed by different linear regression techniques. Dispersity of crushed granite and retardation factor of 99 TcO 4 - on the crushed granite are determined simultaneously by one linear regression technique. Dispersity of crushed granite is also obtained with 3 H as invariant tracer by the other linear regression technique. The dispersities found by spike source and invariant source methods are compared. The experimental results show that the dispersity found by spike source method is close to that found by invariant source method. It indicates that dispersity is only the characteristic of dispersion medium

  13. Determination of dispersity of crushed granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental crushed granite column breakthrough curves, using 99 Tc as spike tracer and 3 H as invariant tracer, were analyzed by different linear regression techniques. Dispersity of crushed granite and the retardation factor of 99 TcO 4 - on the crushed granite were determined simultaneously by one linear regression. Dispersity of crushed granite was also obtained with 3 H as invariant tracer by the other linear regression. The dispersities found by spike source and invariant source methods are compared. Experimental results show that the dispersity found by the spike source method is close to that found by the invariant source method. This indicates that dispersity is only a characteristic of the dispersion medium. (author)

  14. Dispersion Polymerizations in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, J. M.; Maury, E. E.; Menceloglu, Y. Z.; McClain, J. B.; Romack, T. J.; Combes, J. R.

    1994-07-01

    Conventional heterogeneous dispersion polymerizations of unsaturated monomers are performed in either aqueous or organic dispersing media with the addition of interfacially active agents to stabilize the colloidal dispersion that forms. Successful stabilization of the polymer colloid during polymerization results in the formation of high molar mass polymers with high rates of polymerization. An environmentally responsible alternative to aqueous and organic dispersing media for heterogeneous dispersion polymerizations is described in which supercritical carbon dioxide (CO_2) is used in conjunction with molecularly engineered free radical initiators and amphipathic molecules that are specifically designed to be interfacially active in CO_2. Conventional lipophilic monomers, exemplified by methyl methacrylate, can be quantitatively (>90 percent) polymerized heterogeneously to very high degrees of polymerization (>3000) in supercritical CO_2 in the presence of an added stabilizer to form kinetically stable dispersions that result in micrometer-sized particles with a narrow size distribution.

  15. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  16. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  17. Key factors for UV curable pigment dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magny, B.; Pezron, E.; Ciceron, P.H.; Askienazy, A.

    1999-01-01

    UV oligomers with good pigment dispersion are needed to allow good formulation flexibility and possibility to apply thinner films. Pigment dispersion mainly depends on three phenomena: the wetting of agglomerates, the breakage of agglomerates by mechanical stress and the stabilization of smaller agglomerates and primary particles against flocculation. It has been shown that oligomers with low viscosity and low surface tension induce a good pigment wetting. Examples of monomers and oligomers for good pigment dispersion are given

  18. Formulation of disperse systems science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tadros, Tharwat F

    2014-01-01

    This book presents comprehensively the science and technology behind the formulation of disperse systems like emulsions, suspensions, foams and others. Starting with a general introduction, the book covers a broad range of topics like the role of different classes of surfactants, stability of disperse systems, formulation of different dispersions, evaluation of formulations and many more. Many examples are included, too. Written by the experienced author and editor Tharwart Tadros, this book is indispensable for every scientist working in the field.

  19. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2012-01-01

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed–dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology. PMID:22566677

  20. Uncoupling the effects of seed predation and seed dispersal by granivorous ants on plant population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Arnan

    Full Text Available Secondary seed dispersal is an important plant-animal interaction, which is central to understanding plant population and community dynamics. Very little information is still available on the effects of dispersal on plant demography and, particularly, for ant-seed dispersal interactions. As many other interactions, seed dispersal by animals involves costs (seed predation and benefits (seed dispersal, the balance of which determines the outcome of the interaction. Separate quantification of each of them is essential in order to understand the effects of this interaction. To address this issue, we have successfully separated and analyzed the costs and benefits of seed dispersal by seed-harvesting ants on the plant population dynamics of three shrub species with different traits. To that aim a stochastic, spatially-explicit individually-based simulation model has been implemented based on actual data sets. The results from our simulation model agree with theoretical models of plant response dependent on seed dispersal, for one plant species, and ant-mediated seed predation, for another one. In these cases, model predictions were close to the observed values at field. Nonetheless, these ecological processes did not affect in anyway a third species, for which the model predictions were far from the observed values. This indicates that the balance between costs and benefits associated to secondary seed dispersal is clearly related to specific traits. This study is one of the first works that analyze tradeoffs of secondary seed dispersal on plant population dynamics, by disentangling the effects of related costs and benefits. We suggest analyzing the effects of interactions on population dynamics as opposed to merely analyzing the partners and their interaction strength.

  1. Habitat type and dispersal mode underlie the capacity for plant migration across an intermittent seaway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, J R P; Holland, B R; Beeton, N J; Schönfeld, B; Rossetto, M; Vaillancourt, R E; Jordan, G J

    2017-10-17

    Investigating species distributions across geographic barriers is a commonly utilized method in biogeography to help understand the functional traits that allow plants to disperse successfully. Here the biogeographic pattern analysis approach is extended by using chloroplast DNA whole-genome 'mining' to examine the functional traits that have impacted the dispersal of widespread temperate forest species across an intermittent seaway, the 200 km wide Bass Strait of south-eastern Australia. Multiple, co-distributed species of both dry and wet forests were sampled from five regions on either side of the Strait to obtain insights into past dispersal of these biomes via seed. Using a next-generation sequencing-based pool-seq method, the sharing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was estimated between all five regions in the chloroplast genome. A total of 3335 SNPs were detected in 20 species. SNP sharing patterns between regions provided evidence for significant seed-mediated gene flow across the study area, including across Bass Strait. A higher proportion of shared SNPs in dry forest species, especially those dispersed by birds, compared with wet forest species suggests that dry forest species have undergone greater seed-mediated gene flow across the study region during past climatic oscillations and sea level changes associated with the interglacial/glacial cycles. This finding is consistent with a greater propensity for long-distance dispersal for species of open habitats and proxy evidence that expansive areas of dry vegetation occurred during times of exposure of Bass Strait during glacials. Overall, this study provides novel genetic evidence that habitat type and its interaction with dispersal traits are major influences on dispersal of plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Modeling of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklouti, Nada

    2010-01-01

    This work is a prediction of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide from a chronic rejection of the nuclear power generating plant that can be located in one of the Tunisian sites: Skhira or Bizerte. Also it contains a study of acute rejection 'Chernobyl accident' which was the reference for the validation of GENII the code of modeling of atmospheric dispersion.

  3. Dispersers shape fruit diversity in Ficus (Moraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed dispersal by vertebrates is one of the most common and important plant-animal mutualisms, involving an enormous diversity of fruiting plants and frugivorous vertebrates. Even though plant reproduction largely depends on seed dispersal, evolutionary ecologists have been unable to link co-occurr...

  4. Dispersion-induced nonlinearities in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Mecozzi, A.

    2002-01-01

    A dispersive and saturable medium is shown, under very general conditions, to possess ultrafast dynamic behaviour due to non-adiabatic polarisation dynamics. Simple analytical expressions relating the effect to the refractive index dispersion of a semiconductor ire derived and the magnitude...... of the equivalent Kerr coefficient is shown to be in qualitative agreement with measurements on active semiconductor waveguides....

  5. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than...

  6. Membranes as separators of dispersed emulsion phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefferts, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reuse or discharge of industrial waste waters, containing small fractions of dispersed oil, requires a purification treatment for which membranes can be used. If only little oil is present, removal of the dispersed phase might be preferable to the more commonly applied removal of the

  7. Discrete dispersion models and their Tweedie asymptotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bent; Kokonendji, Célestin C.

    2016-01-01

    The paper introduce a class of two-parameter discrete dispersion models, obtained by combining convolution with a factorial tilting operation, similar to exponential dispersion models which combine convolution and exponential tilting. The equidispersed Poisson model has a special place in this ap......The paper introduce a class of two-parameter discrete dispersion models, obtained by combining convolution with a factorial tilting operation, similar to exponential dispersion models which combine convolution and exponential tilting. The equidispersed Poisson model has a special place...... in this approach, whereas several overdispersed discrete distributions, such as the Neyman Type A, Pólya-Aeppli, negative binomial and Poisson-inverse Gaussian, turn out to be Poisson-Tweedie factorial dispersion models with power dispersion functions, analogous to ordinary Tweedie exponential dispersion models...... with power variance functions. Using the factorial cumulant generating function as tool, we introduce a dilation operation as a discrete analogue of scaling, generalizing binomial thinning. The Poisson-Tweedie factorial dispersion models are closed under dilation, which in turn leads to a Poisson...

  8. Dispersal distance as a benefit of myrmecochory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A N

    1988-05-01

    Nutrient-enrichment and predator avoidance are generally considered the major benefits of myrmecochory, but this is apparently not so in Australia where some of the greatest known concentrations of myrmecochorus plants occur. Here I demonstrate that distance dispersal is a potential benefit of myrmecochory in the Australian environment. Although mean dispersal distance at a site in southeastern Australia was only 2.1 m, the dispersal curve was characterised by a narrow peak and long tail. A dispersal curve of this shape has been shown by Green (1983) to be optimal when safe sites for seedling establishment are rare, as is typically the case for Australian myrmecochores in the absence of fire. Both mean disperal distance and shape of the dispersal curve are influenced strongly by nest density and dispersion, population size, and territoriality of seed-dispersing ants. I argue that distance dispersal is likely to be a benefit of myrmecochory throughout Australia, independent of any targeting of seeds to ant nests.

  9. Operational mesoscale atmospheric dispersion prediction using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An operational atmospheric dispersion prediction system is implemented on a cluster supercomputer for Online Emergency Response at the Kalpakkam nuclear site.This numerical system constitutes a parallel version of a nested grid meso-scale meteorological model MM5 coupled to a random walk particle dispersion ...

  10. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food...

  11. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  12. A synthesis of empirical plant dispersal kernels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bullock, J. M.; González, L. M.; Tamme, R.; Götzenberger, Lars; White, S. M.; Pärtel, M.; Hooftman, D. A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 1 (2017), s. 6-19 ISSN 0022-0477 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : dispersal kernel * dispersal mode * probability density function Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 5.813, year: 2016

  13. Dispersive and erodible soils - fundamental differences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersive, erodible and slaking soils are prevalent over wide areas of South Africa. Each of these materials increases the cost of construction, but dispersive soils are likely to lead to far more serious problems, particularly in dam construction...

  14. Dispersed and decentralised settlement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Černe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the process of reintegration of the urban system new settlements are emerging on the urban rim, transitional zones are reurbanised, derelict areas within the cities are being deve-loped and degraded urban areas of derelict industrial complexes are being renaturalised. In the periphery combined research and production parks are being set up, in the open land-scape integrated business, trade and recreational centres are springing up. Decentralisation and recentralisation of focal points of development accompany the contemporary processes of reurbanisation and suburbanisation – they are simultaneous and move in two-direction i. e. to and from the city. We understand them as manifestation of a dynamic balance among contradiction existing between the centre and the rim. Deindustrialisation and relocation of production and distribution from the centres of gravity to the periphery generate extensive degraded urban areas within cities and between the city and suburbs. The periphery is being urbanised with the creation of new, dispersed and nonhierachical poles of development, and the city and inner city is undergoing reurbanization. The general environmental conditions in the city and in the countryside are being equalised, the potentials of development are being sought in the comparative advantages of local conditions: be it attractive urban dis-tricts, be it suburban entities or countryside areas.

  15. Databases of surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Boschi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of seismic surface waves provide the most important constraint on the elastic properties of the Earth’s lithosphere and upper mantle. Two databases of fundamental mode surface wave dispersion were recently compiled and published by groups at Harvard (Ekström et al., 1997 and Utrecht/Oxford (Trampert and Woodhouse, 1995, 2001, and later employed in 3-d global tomographic studies. Although based on similar sets of seismic records, the two databases show some significant discrepancies. We derive phase velocity maps from both, and compare them to quantify the discrepancies and assess the relative quality of the data; in this endeavour, we take careful account of the effects of regularization and parametrization. At short periods, where Love waves are mostly sensitive to crustal structure and thickness, we refer our comparison to a map of the Earth’s crust derived from independent data. On the assumption that second-order effects like seismic anisotropy and scattering can be neglected, we find the measurements of Ekström et al. (1997 of better quality; those of Trampert and Woodhouse (2001 result in phase velocity maps of much higher spatial frequency and, accordingly, more difficult to explain and justify geophysically. The discrepancy is partly explained by the more conservative a priori selection of data implemented by Ekström et al. (1997. Nevertheless, it becomes more significant with decreasing period, which indicates that it could also be traced to the different measurement techniques employed by the authors.

  16. Dispersed and decentralised settlement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Černe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of reintegration of the urban system new settlements are emerging on theurban rim, transitional zones are reurbanised, derelict areas within the cities are being developedand degraded urban areas of derelict industrial complexes are being renaturalised. Inthe periphery combined research and production parks are being set up, in the open landscapeintegrated business, trade and recreational centres are springing up. Decentralisationand recentralisation of focal points of development accompany the contemporary processesof reurbanisation and suburbanisation – they are simultaneous and move in two-direction i.e. to and from the city. We understand them as manifestation of a dynamic balance amongcontradiction existing between the centre and the rim. Deindustrialisation and relocation ofproduction and distribution from the centres of gravity to the periphery generate extensivedegraded urban areas within cities and between the city and suburbs. The periphery is beingurbanised with the creation of new, dispersed and nonhierachical poles of development, andthe city and inner city is undergoing reurbanization. The general environmental conditionsin the city and in the countryside are being equalised, the potentials of development arebeing sought in the comparative advantages of local conditions: be it attractive urban districts,be it suburban entities or countryside areas.

  17. A Nuclease from Streptococcus mutans Facilitates Biofilm Dispersal and Escape from Killing by Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Sun, Luping; Liu, Wei; Guo, Lihong; Liu, Zhaohui; Wei, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiologic agent of dental caries and occasionally infective endocarditis, with the ability to form biofilms and disperse cells into distal sites to exacerbate and spread infection. In this study, we identified a nuclease (DeoC) as a S. mutans biofilm dispersal modulating factor through microarray analysis. In vitro assays revealed a dispersal defect of a deoC deletion mutant, and functional studies with purified protein were indicative of the biofilm dispersal activity of DeoC. Neutrophils are a key host response factor restraining bacterial spreading through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, we hypothesized that the dispersed S. mutans might utilize DeoC to degrade NETs and escape killing by the immune system. It was found that S. mutans induced NET formation upon contact with neutrophils, while the presence of NETs in turn enhanced the deoC expression of S. mutans . Fluorescence microscopy inspection showed that deoC deletion resulted in a decreased NET degradation ability of S. mutans and enhanced susceptibility to neutrophil killing. Data obtained from this study assigned two important roles for DeoC in S. mutans : contributing to the spread of infection through mediating biofilm dispersal, and facilitating the escape of S. mutans from neutrophil killing through NET degradation.

  18. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J.; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a “team”. This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  19. Analysis of site-specific dispersion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paesler-Sauer, J.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents an analysis of atmospheric dispersion conditions in the environs of nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic of Germany. The analysis is based on meteorological data measured on the power station sites (KFUe = nuclear reactor remote control records) and by neighbouring stations operated by the German Weather Service. The data are series of hourly mean values of wind and temperature gradient or stability class over the period of one or more years. The aim of the data analysis is to find types of dispersion conditions characterized by the flow field and stratification, and to assess the feasibility of calculating these quantities in the case of an emergency. Influences of terrain structures in the environs of the site are considered. The annual frequencies of types of dispersion situations are assessed, the capability to recognize the dispersion situation from meteorological data measured on the site and the applicability of dispersion models are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. UFOMOD - atmospheric dispersion and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitz, H.J.; Matzerath, C.; Paesler-Sauer, J.

    1989-10-01

    The report gives an introduction into the modelling of atmospheric dispersion and deposition which has been implemented in the new program system UFOMOD for assessing the consequences after nuclear accidents. According to the new structure of UFOMOD, different trajectory models with ranges of validity near to the site and at far distances are applied. Emphasis is laid on the description of the segmented plume model MUSEMET and its affilated submodels, being the removal of activity from the cloud by dry and wet deposition, and special effects like plume rise and the behaviour of plumes released into building wakes. In addition, the evaluation of γ-dose correction factors to take account of the finite extent of the radioactive plume in the near range (up to about 20 km) are described. Only brief introductions are given into the principles of the other models available: the puff model RIMPUFF, the long-range puff model MESOS, and the special straight-line Gaussian model ISOLA which are used if low-level long-duration releases are considered. To define starting times of weather sequences and the probabilities of occurrence of these sequences, it is convenient to perform stratified sampling. Therefore, the preprocessing program package METSAM has been developed to perform for generic ACAs a random sampling of weather sequences out off a population of classified weather conditions. The sampling procedure and a detailed input/output (I/O) description is presented and an additional appendix, respectively. A general overview on the I/O structure of MUSEMET as well as a brief user guide to run the KfK version of the MESOS code are also given in the appendix. (orig.) [de

  1. Internal seed dispersal by parrots: an overview of a neglected mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Guillermo; Bravo, Carolina; Pacifico, Erica C; Chamorro, Daniel; Speziale, Karina L; Lambertucci, Sergio A; Hiraldo, Fernando; Tella, José L

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that parrots (Psitacifformes) are generalist apex frugivores, they have largely been considered plant antagonists and thus neglected as seed dispersers of their food plants. Internal dispersal was investigated by searching for seeds in faeces opportunistically collected at communal roosts, foraging sites and nests of eleven parrot species in different habitats and biomes in the Neotropics. Multiple intact seeds of seven plant species of five families were found in a variable proportion of faeces from four parrot species. The mean number of seeds of each plant species per dropping ranged between one and about sixty, with a maximum of almost five hundred seeds from the cacti Pilosocereus pachycladus in a single dropping of Lear's Macaw (Anodorhynchus leari). All seeds retrieved were small (<3 mm) and corresponded to herbs and relatively large, multiple-seeded fleshy berries and infrutescences from shrubs, trees and columnar cacti, often also dispersed by stomatochory. An overview of the potential constraints driving seed dispersal suggest that, despite the obvious size difference between seeds dispersed by endozoochory and stomatochory, there is no clear difference in fruit size depending on the dispersal mode. Regardless of the enhanced or limited germination capability after gut transit, a relatively large proportion of cacti seeds frequently found in the faeces of two parrot species were viable according to the tetrazolium test and germination experiments. The conservative results of our exploratory sampling and a literature review clearly indicate that the importance of parrots as endozoochorous dispersers has been largely under-appreciated due to the lack of research systematically searching for seeds in their faeces. We encourage the evaluation of seed dispersal and other mutualistic interactions mediated by parrots before their generalized population declines contribute to the collapse of key ecosystem processes.

  2. Internal seed dispersal by parrots: an overview of a neglected mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Blanco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that parrots (Psitacifformes are generalist apex frugivores, they have largely been considered plant antagonists and thus neglected as seed dispersers of their food plants. Internal dispersal was investigated by searching for seeds in faeces opportunistically collected at communal roosts, foraging sites and nests of eleven parrot species in different habitats and biomes in the Neotropics. Multiple intact seeds of seven plant species of five families were found in a variable proportion of faeces from four parrot species. The mean number of seeds of each plant species per dropping ranged between one and about sixty, with a maximum of almost five hundred seeds from the cacti Pilosocereus pachycladus in a single dropping of Lear’s Macaw (Anodorhynchus leari. All seeds retrieved were small (<3 mm and corresponded to herbs and relatively large, multiple-seeded fleshy berries and infrutescences from shrubs, trees and columnar cacti, often also dispersed by stomatochory. An overview of the potential constraints driving seed dispersal suggest that, despite the obvious size difference between seeds dispersed by endozoochory and stomatochory, there is no clear difference in fruit size depending on the dispersal mode. Regardless of the enhanced or limited germination capability after gut transit, a relatively large proportion of cacti seeds frequently found in the faeces of two parrot species were viable according to the tetrazolium test and germination experiments. The conservative results of our exploratory sampling and a literature review clearly indicate that the importance of parrots as endozoochorous dispersers has been largely under-appreciated due to the lack of research systematically searching for seeds in their faeces. We encourage the evaluation of seed dispersal and other mutualistic interactions mediated by parrots before their generalized population declines contribute to the collapse of key ecosystem processes.

  3. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  4. Dispersion cancellation in a triple Laue interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    The concept of dispersion cancellation has been established in light optics to improve the resolution of interferometric measurements on dispersive media. Odd order dispersion cancellation allows to measure phase shifts without defocusing the interferometer due to wave packet displacements, while even order dispersion cancellation allows to measure time lags without losing resolution due to wave packet spreading. We report that either type of dispersion cancellation can be realized very easily in a triple Laue interferometer. Such interferometers are Mach–Zehnder interferometers based on Bragg diffraction, and are commonly used for neutrons and x-rays. Although the first x-ray interferometer was built nearly five decades ago, the feature of dispersion cancellation hasn't been recognized so far because the concept was hardly known in the neutron and x-ray community. However, it explains right away the surprising decoupling of phase shift and spatial displacement that we have discovered recently in neutron interferometry (Lemmel and Wagh 2010 Phys. Rev. A 82 033626). Furthermore, this article might inspire the light optics community to consider whether a triple Laue interferometer for laser light would be useful and feasible. We explain how dispersion cancellation works in neutron interferometry, and we describe the setup rigorously by solving the Schrödinger equation and by calculating the path integral. We point out, that the latter has to be evaluated with special care since in our setup the beam trajectory moves with respect to the crystal lattice of the interferometer. (paper)

  5. Molecular analysis of dispersal in giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X J; Zhang, Z J; Wu, H; Goossens, B; Li, M; Jiang, S W; Bruford, M W; Wei, F W

    2007-09-01

    Although dispersal in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a demographic mechanism which can potentially counteract the negative effect of habitat fragmentation, little is known about dispersal in this species because of difficulties in observing individuals. Using data from faecal microsatellite genotyping, we compared the spatial distribution of giant pandas in two populations and the proximity of relatives in one key population to infer their dispersal pattern. We conclude that giant pandas exhibit female-biased dispersal because: (i) vAIc (variance of assignment index) for females was significantly larger than for males, suggesting that females comprise both 'local' and 'foreign' genotypes; (ii) the average spatial distance of related female dyads was significantly larger than that of males; (iii) larger r (relatedness), F(ST) (genetic variance among populations) and mAIc (mean of assignment index) values were found in males using the software FSTAT, although the differences were not significant; (iv) males set up territories neighbouring to their birth place; (v) significant population structure using microsatellites with a concomitant lack of mitochondrial structure was found in a previous study, possibly indicating more extensive female dispersal; and (vi) female-biased dispersal was strongly supported by evidence from concomitant ecological studies. Considering previous ecological data and life-history characteristics of the giant panda, female-biased dispersal is most likely to be due to competition for birth dens among females, inbreeding avoidance and enhancing inclusive fitness among related males.

  6. Radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability in oxide dispersion strengthened materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribis, J., E-mail: joel.ribis@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Bordas, E.; Trocellier, P.; Serruys, Y. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Carlan, Y. de [CEA, DEN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Legris, A. [UMET, CNRS/UMR 8207, Bât. C6, Univ. Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2015-12-15

    ODS materials constitute a new promising class of structural materials for advanced fission and fusion energy application. These Fe–Cr based ferritic steels contain ultra-high density of dispersion-strengthening nanoclusters conferring excellent mechanical properties to the alloy. Hence, guarantee the nanocluster stability under irradiation remain a critical issue. Nanoclusters are non-equilibrium multicomponent compounds (YTiCrO) forming through a complex nucleation pathway during the elaboration process. In this paper, it is proposed to observe the response of these nanoclusters when the system is placed far from equilibrium by means of ion beam. The results indicate that the Y, Ti, O and Cr atoms self-organized so that nanoclusters coarsened but maintain their non-equilibrium chemical composition. It is discussed that the radiation-sustained nanocluster metastability emerges from cooperative effects: radiation-induced Ostwald ripening, permanent creation of vacancies in the clusters, and fast Cr diffusion mediated by interstitials.

  7. An expert system for dispersion model interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyllingstad, E.D.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-10-01

    A prototype expert system designed to diagnose dispersion model uncertainty is described in this paper with application to a puff transport model. The system obtains qualitative information from the model user and through an expert-derived knowledge base, performs a rating of the current simulation. These results can then be used in combination with dispersion model output for deciding appropriate evacuation measures. Ultimately, the goal of this work is to develop an expert system that may be operated accurately by an individual uneducated in meteorology or dispersion modeling. 5 refs., 3 figs

  8. Anomalous dispersion enhanced Cerenkov phase-matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Cahill, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The authors report on a scheme for phase-matching second harmonic generation in polymer waveguides based on the use of anomalous dispersion to optimize Cerenkov phase matching. They have used the theoretical results of Hashizume et al. and Onda and Ito to design an optimum structure for phase-matched conversion. They have found that the use of anomalous dispersion in the design results in a 100-fold enhancement in the calculated conversion efficiency. This technique also overcomes the limitation of anomalous dispersion phase-matching which results from absorption at the second harmonic. Experiments are in progress to demonstrate these results.

  9. Phase noise of dispersion-managed solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, Elaine T.; Biondini, Gino

    2009-01-01

    We quantify noise-induced phase deviations of dispersion-managed solitons (DMS) in optical fiber communications and femtosecond lasers. We first develop a perturbation theory for the dispersion-managed nonlinear Schroedinger equation (DMNLSE) in order to compute the noise-induced mean and variance of the soliton parameters. We then use the analytical results to guide importance-sampled Monte Carlo simulations of the noise-driven DMNLSE. Comparison of these results with those from the original unaveraged governing equations confirms the validity of the DMNLSE as a model for many dispersion-managed systems and quantify the increased robustness of DMS with respect to noise-induced phase jitter.

  10. Characterizing SWCNT Dispersion in Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke; Park, Cheol

    2007-01-01

    The new wave of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) infused composites will yield structurally sound multifunctional nanomaterials. The SWCNT network requires thorough dispersion within the polymer matrix in order to maximize the benefits of the nanomaterial. However, before any nanomaterials can be used in aerospace applications a means of quality assurance and quality control must be certified. Quality control certification requires a means of quantification, however, the measurement protocol mandates a method of seeing the dispersion first. We describe here the new tools that we have developed and implemented to first be able to see carbon nanotubes in polymers and second to measure or quantify the dispersion of the nanotubes.

  11. Removal of Disperse Blue 56 and Disperse Red 135 dyes from aqueous dispersions by modified montmorillonite nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadishoar Javad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study modified montmorillonite was used as an adsorbent for the removal of two selected disperse dyes i.e., Disperse Blue 56 (DB and Disperse Red 135 (DR from dye dispersions. The adsorption equilibrium data of dyes adsorption were investigated by using Nernst, Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The adsorption kinetics was analyzed by using different models including pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and Intraparticle diffusion model. The Freundlich isotherm was found to be the most appropriate model for describing the sorption of the dyes on modified nanoclay. The best fit to the experimental results was obtained by using the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, which satisfactorily described the process of dye adsorption. Although different kinetic models may control the rate of the adsorption process, the results indicated that the main rate limiting step was the intraparticle diffusion. The results showed that the proposed modified montmorillonite could be used as an effective adsorbent for the removal of disperse dyes even from highly concentrated dispersions.

  12. Optical Rotatory Dispersion: New Twists on AN Old Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    environmental provenance of observed behavior. In addition to unraveling basic processes that mediate chiroptical response in condensed media, the vapor-phase ORD benchmarks resulting from these studies afford a critical assessment for computational predictions of dispersive optical activity and for their burgeoning ability to assist in the assignment of absolute stereochemical configuration.

  13. Dispersal Timing: Emigration of Insects Living in Patchy Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Lakovic

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a life-history trait affecting dynamics and persistence of populations; it evolves under various known selective pressures. Theoretical studies on dispersal typically assume 'natal dispersal', where individuals emigrate right after birth. But emigration may also occur during a later moment within a reproductive season ('breeding dispersal'. For example, some female butterflies first deposit eggs in their natal patch before migrating to other site(s to continue egg-laying there. How breeding compared to natal dispersal influences the evolution of dispersal has not been explored. To close this gap we used an individual-based simulation approach to analyze (i the evolution of timing of breeding dispersal in annual organisms, (ii its influence on dispersal (compared to natal dispersal. Furthermore, we tested (iii its performance in direct evolutionary contest with individuals following a natal dispersal strategy. Our results show that evolution should typically result in lower dispersal under breeding dispersal, especially when costs of dispersal are low and population size is small. By distributing offspring evenly across two patches, breeding dispersal allows reducing direct sibling competition in the next generation whereas natal dispersal can only reduce trans-generational kin competition by producing highly dispersive offspring in each generation. The added benefit of breeding dispersal is most prominent in patches with small population sizes. Finally, the evolutionary contests show that a breeding dispersal strategy would universally out-compete natal dispersal.

  14. Dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in dispersant-seawater-sediment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Fu, Jie; Cai, Zhengqing; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-08-15

    This work examined effects of model oil dispersants on dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in simulated marine systems. Three dispersants (Corexit 9500A, Corexit 9527A and SPC 1000) were used to prepare dispersed water accommodated oil (DWAO). While higher doses of dispersants dispersed more n-alkanes and PAHs, Corexit 9500A preferentially dispersed C11-C20 n-alkanes, whereas Corexit 9527A was more favorable for smaller alkanes (C10-C16), and SPC 1000 for C12-C28 n-alkanes. Sorption of petroleum hydrocarbons on sediment was proportional to TPH types/fractions in the DWAOs. Addition of 18mg/L of Corexit 9500A increased sediment uptake of 2-3 ring PAHs, while higher dispersant doses reduced the uptake, due to micelle-enhanced solubilization effects. Both dispersed n-alkanes and PAHs were susceptible to photodegradation under simulated sunlight. For PAHs, both photodegradation and photo-facilitated alkylation were concurrently taking place. The information can facilitate sounder assessment of fate and distribution of dispersed oil hydrocarbons in marine systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dispersion-based short-time Fourier transform applied to dispersive wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Chul; Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Yoon Young

    2005-05-01

    Although time-frequency analysis is effective for characterizing dispersive wave signals, the time-frequency tilings of most conventional analysis methods do not take into account dispersion phenomena. An adaptive time-frequency analysis method is introduced whose time-frequency tiling is determined with respect to the wave dispersion characteristics. In the dispersion-based time-frequency tiling, each time-frequency atom is adaptively rotated in the time-frequency plane, depending on the local wave dispersion. Although this idea can be useful in various problems, its application to the analysis of dispersive wave signals has not been made. In this work, the adaptive time-frequency method was applied to the analysis of dispersive elastic waves measured in waveguide experiments and a theoretical investigation on its time-frequency resolution was presented. The time-frequency resolution of the proposed transform was then compared with that of the standard short-time Fourier transform to show its effectiveness in dealing with dispersive wave signals. In addition, to facilitate the adaptive time-frequency analysis of experimentally measured signals whose dispersion relations are not known, an iterative scheme for determining the relationships was developed. The validity of the present approach in dealing with dispersive waves was verified experimentally. .

  16. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil physical properties and dispersion. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.P.; Brown, C.E.; Pjontek, D.

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory and field testing have shown that the dispersion of oil spilled in water is influenced by chemical dispersants via the modification of the interfacial properties of the oil, such as oil-brine interfacial tension (IFT). This study focused on new laboratory experiments that measured the effects on the physical properties and dispersion of oil, with particular reference to the effects of chemical dispersants on IFT and oil viscosity and the subsequent effects on oil droplet formation. Experiments were conducted at 15 degrees C using Arabian Medium, Alaska North Slope and South Louisiana crude and Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 chemical dispersants. The dispersants were denser than the 3 oils. The effect of IFT reduction on oil dispersion was measured and showed substantial reduction in the size and enhancement of the concentration of oil droplets in the water column. It was shown that the brine-oil IFT associated with the 3 crudes reduced to less than 3.6 mN/m with the application of the chemical dispersants, even at a low dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR) value of 1:200. The use of chemical dispersants increased the viscosity of the dispersant-oil mixture up to 40 per cent over the neat crude oil. It was shown that for each mixing condition, an optimum value of DOR exists that provides for maximal dispersant effectiveness. The IFT reaches maximum reduction at optimum DOR. It was suggested that oil spill modelling can be improved with further study of IFT reduction with DOR and variations of critical micelle concentration with the type and solubility of chemical dispersant, oil type and oil to water ratio. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  17. Post-epizootic salamander persistence in a disease-free refugium suggests poor dispersal ability of Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Stegen, Gwij; Bogaerts, Sergé; Canessa, Stefano; Steinfartz, Sebastian; Janssen, Nico; Bosman, Wilbert; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An

    2018-02-28

    Lack of disease spill-over between adjacent populations has been associated with habitat fragmentation and the absence of population connectivity. We here present a case which describes the absence of the spill-over of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) between two connected subpopulations of fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra). Based on neutrally evolving microsatellite loci, both subpopulations were shown to form a single genetic cluster, suggesting a shared origin and/or recent gene flow. Alpine newts (Ichthyosaura alpestris) and fire salamanders were found in the landscape matrix between the two sites, which are also connected by a stream and separated by no obvious physical barriers. Performing a laboratory trial using alpine newts, we confirmed that Bsal is unable to disperse autonomously. Vector-mediated dispersal may have been impeded by a combination of sub-optimal connectivity, limited dispersal ability of infected hosts and a lack of suitable dispersers following the rapid, Bsal-driven collapse of susceptible hosts at the source site. Although the exact cause remains unclear, the aggregate evidence suggests that Bsal may be a poorer disperser than previously hypothesized. The lack of Bsal dispersal between neighbouring salamander populations opens perspectives for disease management and stresses the necessity of implementing biosecurity measures preventing human-mediated spread.

  18. Experimentally induced helper dispersal in colonially breeding cooperative cichlids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heg, D.; Heg-Bachar, Z.; Brouwer, L.; Taborsky, M.

    2008-01-01

    The 'benefits of philopatry' hypothesis states that helpers in cooperatively breeding species derive higher benefits from remaining home, instead of dispersing and attempting to breed independently. We tested experimentally whether dispersal options influence dispersal propensity in the

  19. Modeling electrical dispersion phenomena in Earth materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Patella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is illustrated that IP phenomena in rocks can be described using conductivity dispersion models deduced as solutions to a 2nd-order linear differential equation describing the motion of a charged particle immersed in an external electrical field. Five dispersion laws are discussed, namely: the non-resonant positive IP model, which leads to the classical Debye-type dispersion law and by extension to the Cole-Cole model, largely used in current practice; the non-resonant negative IP model, which allows negative chargeability values, known in metals at high frequencies, to be explained as an intrinsic physical property of earth materials in specific field cases; the resonant flat, positive or negative IP models, which can explain the presence of peak effects at specific frequencies superimposed on flat, positive or negative dispersion spectra.

  20. Dispersion forces between noble gas atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Luyckx, R.; Coulon, P.

    1978-01-01

    The coefficients of the R-6, R -8, and R-10 terms in the series representation of the dispersion interaction between helium, neon, and argon at distance R are calculated using an elementary variation method.

  1. Dispersion (van der Waals) Forces and TDDFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, John F.

    A semi-pedagogic discussion is given of the use of response theory and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory to describe van der Waals (dispersion) energies, within the context of Adiabatic Connection and the Fluctuation-Dissipation theorem.

  2. Analytic properties of the whistler dispersion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniell, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    The analytic properties of the dispersion function of a whistler are investigated in the complex frequency plane. It possesses a pole and a branch point at a frequency equal to the minimum value of the electron gyrofrequency along the path of propagation. An integral equation relates the dispersion function to the distribution of magnetospheric electrons along the path and the solution of this equation is obtained. It is found that the electron density in the equatorial plane is very simply related to the dispersion function. A discussion of approximate formulae to represent the dispersion shows how particular terms can be related to attributes of the electron density distribution, and a new approximate formula is proposed. (author)

  3. Theoretical Considerations in Developing Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Surwase, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    to their glass-forming ability and glass stability. In the main parts of this chapter, we review theoretical approaches to determine amorphous drug polymer miscibility and crystalline drug polymer solubility, as a prerequisite to develop amorphous solid dispersions (glass solutions).......Before pursuing the laborious route of amorphous solid dispersion formulation and development, which is the topic of many of the subsequent chapters in this book, the formulation scientist would benefit from a priori knowledge whether the amorphous route is a viable one for a given drug and how...... much solubility improvement, and hence increase in bioavailability, can be expected, and what forms of solid dispersion have been developed in the past. In this chapter, we therefore initially define the various forms of solid dispersions, and then go on to discuss properties of pure drugs with respect...

  4. The Dangers of Dispersal of Responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Schiopoiu Burlea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that it is in the nature of the modern corporation that risks are distributed over several agents, we discuss in this paper the organisational behaviour as it results from such dispersal of responsibilities for both the principal and the agent. We explore the hypothesis that dispersal of responsibilities could be the result or a cause of a lack of consensus between the principal and the agent. Our findings suggest that a dispersal of responsibilities has a negative impact on the principal-agent relationship and that it represents a foundation for theoretical and empirical approaches to organisational behaviour. We find that agent perceptions of a dispersal of responsibilities are linked to his/her resistance to the principal’s interests, but this relationship is deeper than was suggested by previous research. However, if the sharing of responsibilities does not run parallel to that, we may have as a result what we call an agency problem.

  5. Adsorption of an anionic dispersant on lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2001-12-01

    Since coal is not a homogeneous substance but a mixture of carbonaceous materials and mineral matter, it has a variety of surface properties. Therefore, it is not easy to control the properties of coal suspensions by simply adjusting variables, such as pH and/or electrolyte. A chemical agent needs to be added to control the properties of the coal suspensions. The adsorption behavior of an anionic dispersant in the presence of a wetting agent using some Turkish lignite samples was investigated. The effects of dispersant concentration, temperature and pH on the dispersant adsorption were studied systematically, and the experimental results are presented. Pellupur B69 as a dispersant, commercial mixture of formaldehyde condensate sodium salt of naphthalene sulphonic acid, and Texapon N{sub 2}5 as a wetting agent, a sodium lauryl ether sulfate, have been used.

  6. Carbon nanotubes dispersed polymer nanocomposites: mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Carbon nanotubes; nanocomposite; Young's modulus; breakdown strength; dielectric constant; thermal conductivity. 1. Introduction. The polymer composite has material characteristics use- ful for diverse applications such as capacitors and acoustic emission sensors. The nanoscaled fillers are dispersed in po-.

  7. Dispersion engineering in metamaterials and metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Ma, Xiaoliang; Guo, Yinghui; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2018-02-01

    Dispersion engineering is essential for spectral utilization in electromagnetic systems. However, it is difficult to manage the dispersions in both natural materials and traditional electromagnetic waveguides since they are tightly related to fine structures of atoms, molecules and causality. The emergence of metamaterials and metasurfaces, which are made of subwavelength inclusions offers tremendous freedom to manipulate the electromagnetic parameters of materials and modes. Here, we review the basic principles, practical applications and recent advancements of the dispersion engineering in metadevices. The contributions of dispersion management in metadevice-based super-resolution imaging/nanolithography systems, planar functional devices, as well as the broadband perfect absorbers/polarization converters are discussed in depth. The challenges faced by this field as well as future developing trends are also presented in the conclusions.

  8. Microstrain in dispersion-hardened steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokuchava, G.D.; Papushkin, I.V.; Sumin, V.V.; Aznabaev, D.; Mukhametuly, B.; Balagurov, A.M.; Sheptyakov, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    Using high-resolution neutron diffraction, microstrain was investigated in three series of samples of stainless austenitic dispersion-hardened steels, which are used as various structural reactor components. The effect of temperature and duration of heat treatment on the precipitation of dispersion-hardened phase particles, as well as on lattice parameter changes and microstrain, was studied. In all studied steels an increase in microstrain at coherence failure was observed

  9. Modelling of pollution dispersion in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borysiewicz, M.; Stankiewicz, R.

    1994-01-01

    The paper contains the review of the mathematical foundation of atmospheric dispersion models. The atmospheric phenomena relevant to atmospheric dispersion model are discussed. In particular the parametrization of processes with time and space scales smaller than numerical grid size, limited by available computer power, is presented. The special attention was devoted to similarity theory and parametrization of boundary layer. The numerical methods are analysed and the drawbacks of the method are presented. (author). 99 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  10. SANS observations on weakly flocculated dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischenko, N.; Ourieva, G.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    Structural changes occurring in colloidal dispersions of poly-(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) particles, sterically stabilized with poly-(12-hydroxystearic acid) (PHSA), while varying the solvent quality, temperature and shear rate, are investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS......). For a moderately concentrated dispersion in a marginal solvent the transition on cooling from the effective stability to a weak attraction is monitored, The degree of attraction is determined in the framework of the sticky spheres model (SSM), SANS and rheological results are correlated....

  11. Phonon dispersion relations for caesium thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irving, M.A.; Smith, T.F.; Elcombe, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Room temperature phonon dispersion relations for frequencies below 2 THz have been measured, along the three orthorhombic axes and selected diagonal directions by neutron inelastic scattering, for caesium thiocyanate. These curves, which represent 13 acoustic modes and 11 optic modes of vibration, do not agree with the dispersion behaviour calculated from the rigid-ion model developed by Ti and Ra to describe their Raman scattering observations

  12. Optimization of Artificial Dispersion in Salvo Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    414. ?ITLg’ndsulitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED optimization of Artificial Dispersion Ph.D. Thesis; in Salvo Firing December 1983 6...are able to offer efficient methods for the computation or approximation of 0OF0" 143 EDO -nom or I Nov so is O@SOLETE 102 0/ @? .F.-6601 1 UNCLASSIFIED...Dispersion in Salvo Firing by Takasi Kisi Gkushi, Osaka University, Japan , 1950 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

  13. Microstrain in dispersion-hardened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokuchava, G. D.; Papushkin, I. V.; Sumin, V. V.; Aznabayev, D.; Mukhametuly, B.; Balagurov, A. M.; Sheptyakov, D. V.

    2013-03-01

    Using high-resolution neutron diffraction, microstrain was investigated in three series of samples of stainless austenitic dispersion-hardened steels, which are used as various structural reactor components. The effect of temperature and duration of heat treatment on the precipitation of dispersion-hardened phase particles, as well as on lattice parameter changes and microstrain, was studied. An increase in microstrain upon coherence failure was observed in all the steels.

  14. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  15. Models of oil spill dispersion stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarized the theory of oil-in-water emulsion stability resulting in the resurfacing of oil spill dispersion. Since most emulsions are unstable, they will break down into their constituent parts because of the many forces and processes that act on them. These include gravitational forces; surfactant interchange with water and the subsequent surfactant loss to the water column; creaming; coalescence; flocculation; Ostwald ripening; and sedimentation. Gravitational separation is the most important force that contributes to the resurfacing of oil droplets from an oil-in-water emulsion. The paper presented a newly developed model that used 4 basic processes. Initial dispersion was an input, then the dispersion was distributed over the mixing depth, as predicted by the wave height. The droplets then rise to the surface according to Stokes' law. Oil on the surface from the rising oil and undispersed oil is redispersed. The droplets in the water column are subject to coalescence as governed by the Smoluchowski equation. The dispersion in the water column therefore decreases at an exponential rate with dispersion half-lives ranging from 120 to 250 minutes. Over 200 runs were performed using variations of the models. The study showed that the most important factor is the effectiveness of the initial dispersion and the the redispersion. Increased sea energy was found to increase the amount of coalescence that occurs, resulting in an increase in resurfacing. However, increased turbulence also caused redispersion, offsetting the effect of the recoalescence slightly. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs.

  16. Dispersion-managed electrical transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koon, K. Tse Ve [Institut Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 5209 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, B.P. 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)], E-mail: kevin@u-bourgogne.fr; Dinda, P. Tchofo [Institut Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 5209 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, B.P. 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)], E-mail: tchofo@u-bourgogne.fr; Marquie, P. [Laboratoire LEII, UMR CNRS No. 5158, Universite de Bourgogne, Aile de l' Ingenieur, B.P. 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)], E-mail: patrick.marquie@u-bourgogne.fr

    2009-05-30

    We examine the ability of electrical pulses to execute a highly stable propagation in a special electrical network made of concatenated pieces of discrete electrical lines with alternately positive and negative signs of the second-order dispersion. We show that such networks, called dispersion-managed electrical lines, induce a pulse breathing phenomenon, that is a dynamical behaviour with alternate regimes of pulse broadening and compression. This breathing phenomenon, which prevents the pulse from broadening without bounds during propagation in the network is the most appealing feature of the technique of dispersion management developed in the last decade in the area of optical communications. Meanwhile, we show that the benefit of using dispersion management in ETLs is strongly mitigated by the third-order dispersion and the losses at the junction points between adjacent pieces of line. These come into play as major factors of impairment for the pulse robustness with a much stronger impact than in dispersion-managed optical transmission lines.

  17. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of applications. For example, such models can be useful for evaluating the mitigation potential of roadside barriers in reducing near-road exposures and their associated adverse health effects. Two databases, a tracer field study and a wind tunnel study, provide measurements used in the development and/or validation of algorithms to simulate dispersion in the presence of noise barriers. The tracer field study was performed in Idaho Falls, ID, USA with a 6-m noise barrier and a finite line source in a variety of atmospheric conditions. The second study was performed in the meteorological wind tunnel at the US EPA and simulated line sources at different distances from a model noise barrier to capture the effect on emissions from individual lanes of traffic. In both cases, velocity and concentration measurements characterized the effect of the barrier on dispersion.This paper presents comparisons with the two datasets of the barrier algorithms implemented in two different dispersion models: US EPA’s R-LINE (a research dispersion modelling tool under development by the US EPA’s Office of Research and Development) and CERC’s ADMS model (ADMS-Urban). In R-LINE the physical features reveal

  18. Dispersed-phase catalysis in coal liquefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utz, B.R.; Cugini, A.V.; Frommell, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the specific reaction (activation) conditions for the conversion of catalyst precursors to unsupported catalyst have a direct effect on the catalytic activity and dispersion. The importance of reaction intermediates in decomposition of ammonium heptamolybdate and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and the sensitivity of these intermediates to reaction conditions, were studied in coal liquefaction systems. Recent results indicate that optimization of activation conditions facilitates the formation of a highly dispersed and active form of molybdenum disulfide for coal liquefaction. The use of the catalyst precursors ammonium heptamolybdate, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum trisulfide for the conversion of coal to soluble products will be discussed. The use of an unsupported dispersed-phase catalyst for direct coal liquefaction is not a novel concept and has been employed in may studies with varying success. Dispersed-phase catalysts soluble and oil-soluble salts, and as finely divided powders. While some methods of catalyst introduction give higher dispersion of the catalyst and greater activity for the liquefaction of coal, all of the techniques allow the formation of a finely dispersed inorganic phase

  19. Rheological Behavior of Bentonite-Polyester Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Omari, Salah Addin

    2013-07-01

    The rheological behavior of a bentonite clay dispersed in unsaturated polyester was investigated. The effects of the solid content and particle size on the steady and transient rheological properties of the dispersions were studied. In addition, two types of bentonite with different Na+/Ca+2 ratio were used in this study. The Herschel-Bulkley and the Weltman models were used to describe the apparent viscosity of the bentonite-polyester composite in relation to the shear rate and shearing time. The bentonite-polyester dispersions were found to exhibit both Newtonian and non-Newtonian behavior. The transition from a Newtonian to a Bingham plastic and then to a shear-thinning material with a yield stress was found to depend on the solid concentration, the particle size, and the type of bentonite. At a low solid content, the apparent viscosity of the bentonite dispersion increased linearly with solid concentration. But a dramatic increase in the apparent viscosity beyond a solid content of 20 wt.% was observed. On the other hand, a thixotropic behavior was detected in bentonite-polyester dispersions with a high solid content and a low particle size. However, this behavior was more pronounced in dispersions with a high Na+/Ca+2 ratio.

  20. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  1. Cefuroxime axetil solid dispersions prepared using solution enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Seoung Wook; Kim, Min-Soo; Jo, Guk Hyun; Lee, Sibeum; Woo, Jong Soo; Park, Jeong-Sook; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2005-12-01

    Cefuroxime axetil (CA) solid dispersions with HPMC 2910/PVP K-30 were prepared using solution enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids (SEDS) in an effort to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. Their physicochemical properties in solid state were characterized by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy. No endothermic and characteristic diffraction peaks corresponding to CA were observed for the solid dispersions in DSC and PXRD. FTIR analysis demonstrated the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between CA and HPMC 2910/PVP K-30 in solid dispersions, resulting in the formation of amorphous or non-crystalline CA. Dissolution studies indicated that the dissolution rates were remarkably increased in solid dispersions compared with those in the physical mixture and drug alone. In conclusion, an amorphous or non-crystalline CA solid dispersion prepared using SEDS could be very useful for the formulation of solid dosage forms.

  2. Proximate influences on female dispersal in white-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Clayton L.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Rosenberry, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Ultimate causes of animal dispersal have been hypothesized to benefit the dispersing individual because dispersal reduces competition for local resources, potential for inbreeding, and competition for breeding partners. However, proximate cues influence important features of dispersal behavior, including when dispersal occurs, how long it lasts, and direction, straightness, and distance of the dispersal path. Therefore, proximate cues that affect dispersal influence ecological processes (e.g., population dynamics, disease transmission, gene flow). We captured and radio-marked 277 juvenile female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), of which 27 dispersed, to evaluate dispersal behavior and to determine proximate cues that may influence dispersal behavior. Female dispersal largely occurred at 1 year of age and coincided with the fawning season. Dispersal paths varied but generally were non-linear and prolonged. Physical landscape features (i.e., roadways, rivers, residential areas) influenced dispersal path direction and where dispersal terminated. Additionally, forays outside of the natal range that did not result in dispersal occurred among 52% of global positioning system (GPS)-collared deer (n = 25) during the dispersal period. Our results suggest intra-specific social interactions and physical landscape features influence dispersal behavior in female deer. Female dispersal behavior, particularly the lack of directionality, the semi-permeable nature of physical barriers, and the frequency of forays outside of the natal range, should be considered in regard to population management and controlling the spread of disease.

  3. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  4. The dispersion of SWCNTs treated by coupling and dispersing agents in fiber reinforced polymer composities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuexin; Yuan, Lu; Zhao, Yan; Guan, Fengxia

    2007-07-01

    It is an obstacle issue for Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applied in fiber reinforced polymer composites that CNTs is dispersed in nano-level, particularly for single-wall Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this paper, SWCNTs were treated by the coupling agent like volan and dispersing agent as BYK to improve the dispersion in the Glass Fiber/Epoxy composites. The result of dispersion of SWCNTs in composites was observed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) of these kinds of composites with treated and untreated SWCNTs were obtained by Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA). Moreover, the bending properties of these composites were tested.

  5. Temporal dynamics of seed excretion by wild ungulates: implications for plant dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Mélanie; Papaïx, Julien; Gosselin, Frédéric; Picot, Denis; Bideau, Eric; Baltzinger, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Dispersal is a key process in metapopulation dynamics as it conditions species' spatial responses to gradients of abiotic and biotic conditions and triggers individual and gene flows. In the numerous plants that are dispersed through seed consumption by herbivores (endozoochory), the distance and effectiveness of dispersal is determined by the combined effects of seed retention time in the vector's digestive system, the spatial extent of its movements, and the ability of the seeds to germinate once released. Estimating these three parameters from experimental data is therefore crucial to calibrate mechanistic metacommunity models of plant-herbivore interactions. In this study, we jointly estimated the retention time and germination probability of six herbaceous plants transported by roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) through feeding experiments and a Bayesian dynamic model. Retention time was longer in the nonruminant wild boar (>36 h) than in the two ruminant species (roe deer: 18-36 h, red deer: 3-36 h). In the two ruminants, but not in wild boar, small and round seeds were excreted faster than large ones. Low germination probabilities of the excreted seeds reflected the high cost imposed by endozoochory on plant survival. Trait-mediated variations in retention time and germination probability among animal and plant species may impact plant dispersal distances and interact with biotic and abiotic conditions at the release site to shape the spatial patterns of dispersed plant species.

  6. Berberine-induced pigment dispersion in Bufo melanostictus melanophores by stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sharique A; Naaz, Ishrat; Choudhary, Ram Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Reduced production of melanin by decreased or the absence of melanocytes leads to various hypopigmentation disorders, and the development of melanogenetic agents for photoprotection and hypopigmentation disorders is one of the top priority areas of research. Hence, the present study was carried out to elucidate the ability of berberine, a principal active ingredient present in the roots of the herb Berberis vulgaris to stimulate pigment dispersion in the isolated skin melanophores of the toad Bufo melanostictus. In the present study, mean melanophore size index of the isolated skin melanophores of B. melanostictus was assayed after treating with various concentrations of berberine. A marked melanin dispersion response leading to skin darkening was observed in the isolated melanophores of toad in response to berberine, which was found to be mediated through beta-2 adrenergic receptors. The physiologically significant dose-related melanin dispersion effects of berberine per se were found to be completely abolished by propranolol, which is a specific beta-2 adrenergic receptor blocker. These per se melanin dispersal effects were also found to be markedly potentiated by isoprenaline, which is a specific beta-adrenoceptor agonist. The results indicate that berberine causes a tremendous, dose-dependent, physiologically significant pigment dispersing in the isolated skin melanophores of B. melanostictus.

  7. Estimation of Release History of Pollutant Source and Dispersion Coefficient of Aquifer Using Trained ANN Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R.; Ayaz, M.; Jain, A.

    2013-12-01

    ANN model was developed to estimate the longitudinal and transverse dispersion coefficients following a philosophy similar to the one used earlier. Performance of the trained ANN model is evaluated for a 3-Dimensional case, first with perfect data and then with erroneous data with an error level up to 10 percent. Since the solution is highly sensitive to the errors in the input data, instead of using the raw data, we smoothen the upper half of the erroneous breakthrough curve by approximating it with a fourth order polynomial which is used as the input pattern for the ANN model. The main advantage of the proposed model is that it requires only the upper half of the breakthrough curve and, in addition to minimizing the effect of uncertainties in the tail ends of the breakthrough curve, is capable of estimating both the release history and aquifer parameters reasonably well. Results for the case with erroneous data having different error levels demonstrate the practical applicability and robustness of the ANN models. It is observed that with increase in the error level, the correlation coefficient of the training, testing and validation regressions tends to decrease, although the value stays within acceptable limits even for reasonably large error levels.

  8. Epizoochorous dispersal by ungulates depends on fur, grooming and social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehrmann, Océane; Jégoux, Flore; Guilbert, Marie-Alice; Isselin-Nondedeu, Francis; Saïd, Sonia; Locatelli, Yann; Baltzinger, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    The transport phase of the animal-mediated plant dispersal process is critical to dispersal effectiveness as it determines the spatial distribution of the diaspores released and their chance for further recruitment. Assessing this specific phase of the dispersal process generally requires combining diaspore retention times with the associated distances covered. Here, we specifically tested the effect of grooming behavior, interindividual contacts and ungulate fur on diaspore retention times and associated dispersal distances for the hooked diaspores of Xanthium strumarium L. experimentally attached to tamed individuals of three ungulate species. We used a comparative approach based on differing fur quality on different body zones of these three ungulates. During 6-hr sessions, we monitored for grooming and social interactions that may induce intended or inadvertent diaspore detachment. Additionally, we proposed innovative approaches to directly assessing diaspore dispersal distances by red deer in situ. Fat-tailed functions fitted diaspore retention time, highlighting the potential for long-distance dispersal events. The longer the hair, the higher the retention capacity of diaspores in the animal's fur. As predicted, donkey retained diaspores longer than red deer and dwarf goat; and we also confirmed that diaspores attached to the short hair of the head fell off more quickly than did those on the other body zones. Dwarf goat groomed more often than both red deer and donkey, but also when it carried diaspores. Up to 14% of the diaspores detached from animal fur after specific grooming behavior. We observed, in controlled conditions, for the first time and for each ungulate species, interindividual transfers of diaspores, representing 5% of the diaspores attached to animals' fur. Our results militate for incorporating animal behavior into plant dispersal modeling approaches.

  9. Nanoparticle dispersion and aggregation in polymer nanocomposites: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Gao, Yangyang; Cao, Dapeng; Zhang, Liqun; Guo, Zhanhu

    2011-06-21

    It is a great challenge to fully understand the microscopic dispersion and aggregation of nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) through experimental techniques. Here, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is adopted to study the dispersion and aggregation mechanisms of spherical NPs in polymer melts. By tuning the polymer-filler interaction in a wide range at both low and high filler loadings, we qualitatively sketch the phase behavior of the PNCs and structural spatial organization of the fillers mediated by the polymers, which emphasize that a homogeneous filler dispersion exists just at the intermediate interfacial interaction, in contrast with traditional viewpoints. The conclusion is in good agreement with the theoretically predicted results from Schweizer et al. Besides, to mimick the experimental coarsening process of NPs in polymer matrixes (ACS Nano 2008, 2, 1305), by grafting polymer chains on the filler surface, we obtain a good filler dispersion with a large interparticle distance. Considering the PNC system without the presence of chemical bonding between the NPs and the grafted polymer chains, the resulting good dispersion state is further used to investigate the effects of the temperature, polymer-filler interaction, and filler size on the filler aggregation process. It is found that the coarsening or aggregation process of the NPs is sensitive to the temperature, and the aggregation extent reaches the minimum in the case of moderate polymer-filler interaction, because in this case a good dispersion is obtained. That is to say, once the filler achieves a good dispersion in a polymer matrix, the properties of the PNCs will be improved significantly, because the coarsening process of the NPs will be delayed and the aging of the PNCs will be slowed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Anomalous, extreme weather disrupts obligate seed dispersal mutualism: snow in a subtropical forest ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youbing; Newman, Chris; Chen, Jin; Xie, Zongqiang; Macdonald, David W

    2013-09-01

    Ongoing global climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events, impacting population dynamics and community structure. There is, however, a critical lack of case studies considering how climatic perturbations affect biotic interactions. Here, we document how an obligate seed dispersal mutualism was disrupted by a temporally anomalous and meteorologically extreme interlude of unseasonably frigid weather, with accompanying snowstorms, in subtropical China, during January-February 2008. Based on the analysis of 5892 fecal samples (representing six mammalian seed dispersers), this event caused a substantial disruption to the relative seed dispersal function for the raisin tree Hovenia dulcis from prestorm 6.29 (2006) and 11.47 (2007), down to 0.35 during the storm (2008). Crucially, this was due to impacts on mammalian seed dispersers and not due to a paucity of fruit, where 4.63 fruit per branch were available in January 2008, vs. 3.73 in 2006 and 3.58 in 2007. An induced dietary shift occurred among omnivorous carnivores during this event, from the consumption fruit to small mammals and birds, reducing their role in seed dispersal substantially. Induced range shift extinguished the functionality of herbivorous mammals completely, however, seed dispersal function was compensated in part by three omnivorous carnivores during poststorm years, and thus while the mutualism remained intact it was enacted by a narrower assemblage of species, rendering the system more vulnerable to extrinsic perturbations. The storm's extended effects also had anthropogenic corollaries - migrating ungulates becoming exposed to heightened levels of illegal hunting - causing long-term modification to the seed dispersal community and mutualism dynamics. Furthermore, degraded forests proved especially vulnerable to the storm's effects. Considering increasing climate variability and anthropogenic disturbance, the impacts of such massive, aberrant

  11. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  12. Nordic Mediation Reseach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A presentation of 12 studies on mediation from researchers from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.......A presentation of 12 studies on mediation from researchers from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden....

  13. Does Environmental Knowledge Inhibit Hominin Dispersal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Colin D; Costopoulos, Andre

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the dispersal potential of a hominin population, its local-scale foraging strategies, and the characteristics of the resource environment using an agent-based modeling approach. In previous work we demonstrated that natural selection can favor a relatively low capacity for assessing and predicting the quality of the resource environment, especially when the distribution of resources is highly clustered. That work also suggested that the more knowledge foraging populations had about their environment, the less likely they were to abandon the landscape they know and disperse into novel territory. The present study gives agents new individual and social strategies for learning about their environment. For both individual and social learning, natural selection favors decreased levels of environmental knowledge, particularly in low-heterogeneity environments. Social acquisition of detailed environmental knowledge results in crowding of agents, which reduces available reproductive space and relative fitness. Agents with less environmental knowledge move away from resource clusters and into areas with more space available for reproduction. These results suggest that, rather than being a requirement for successful dispersal, environmental knowledge strengthens the ties to particular locations and significantly reduces the dispersal potential as a result. The evolved level of environmental knowledge in a population depends on the characteristics of the resource environment and affects the dispersal capacity of the population.

  14. Atmospheric dispersion models of radioactivity releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oza, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    In view of the rapid industrialization in recent time, atmospheric dispersion models have become indispensible 'tools' to ensure that the effects of releases are well within the acceptable limits set by the regulatory authority. In the case of radioactive releases from the nuclear facility, though negligible in quantity and many a times not even measurable, it is required to demonstrate the compliance of these releases to the regulatory limits set by the regulatory authority by carrying out radiological impact assessment. During routine operations of nuclear facility, the releases are so low that environmental impact is usually assessed with the help of atmospheric dispersion models as it is difficult to distinguish negligible contribution of nuclear facility to relatively high natural background radiation. The accidental releases from nuclear facility, though with negligible probability of occurrence, cannot be ruled out. In such cases, the atmospheric dispersion models are of great help to emergency planners for deciding the intervention actions to minimize the consequences in public domain and also to workout strategies for the management of situation. In case of accidental conditions, the atmospheric dispersion models are also utilized for the estimation of probable quantities of radionuclides which might have got released to the atmosphere. Thus, atmospheric dispersion models are an essential tool for nuclear facility during routine operation as well as in the case of accidental conditions

  15. mediation: R Package for Causal Mediation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Tingley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the R package mediation for conducting causal mediation analysis in applied empirical research. In many scientific disciplines, the goal of researchers is not only estimating causal effects of a treatment but also understanding the process in which the treatment causally affects the outcome. Causal mediation analysis is frequently used to assess potential causal mechanisms. The mediation package implements a comprehensive suite of statistical tools for conducting such an analysis. The package is organized into two distinct approaches. Using the model-based approach, researchers can estimate causal mediation effects and conduct sensitivity analysis under the standard research design. Furthermore, the design-based approach provides several analysis tools that are applicable under different experimental designs. This approach requires weaker assumptions than the model-based approach. We also implement a statistical method for dealing with multiple (causally dependent mediators, which are often encountered in practice. Finally, the package also offers a methodology for assessing causal mediation in the presence of treatment noncompliance, a common problem in randomized trials.

  16. Bayesian Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we propose Bayesian analysis of mediation effects. Compared with conventional frequentist mediation analysis, the Bayesian approach has several advantages. First, it allows researchers to incorporate prior information into the mediation analysis, thus potentially improving the efficiency of estimates. Second, under the Bayesian…

  17. Animal Dispersal in Fragmented Habitat: Measuring Habitat Connectivity, Corridor Use, and Dispersal Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Brooker

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available We used a spatially explicit dispersal simulation to generate movement frequencies and distances for comparison with real dispersal frequencies collected in the field from two habitat-specific, sedentary bird species. The relationship between these two data sets allowed us to (1 test the hypothesis that the study species used corridor routes during dispersal; (2 measure the degree of reliance on corridor continuity; (3 estimate the rate of dispersal mortality with respect to distance traveled, and (4 give examples of how the model can be used to assess habitat connectivity with respect to similarly behaved species. We found that Blue-breasted Fairy-wrens and White-browed Babblers both used corridor routes during dispersal. Blue-breasted Fairy-wrens were inhibited by gaps greater than about 60 m, whereas White-browed Babblers crossed gaps of at least 270 m wide. For each species, the rate of dispersal mortality per unit distance traveled was about the same. Because we have effectively partitioned the risk of dispersal mortality from the chance of outside dispersal, and because our mortality estimates are model dependent but landscape independent, they can be transported to other landscapes on which simulations have been run and, therefore, can be used in population viability assessment of unstudied or hypothetical animal populations.

  18. Dispersal ability of island endemic plants: What can we learn using multiple dispersal traits?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vazačová, Kristýna; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 209, č. 9 (2014), s. 530-539 ISSN 0367-2530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/10/0593 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : dispersal mode * long-distance dispersal * Macaronesia Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2014

  19. Oak Dispersal Syndromes: Do Red and White Oaks Exhibit Different Dispersal Srategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Steele; Peter Smallwood; William B. Terzaghi; John E. Carlson; Thomas conteras; Amy McEuen

    2004-01-01

    We provide an overview of the ecological and evolutionary interactions between oaks and several of their dispersal agents, and review a series of studies that demonstrate how various acorn characteristics affect feeding and caching decisions of these animals, which in turn may influence oak dispersal and establishment. We demonstrate that acorns of red oak species show...

  20. Dispersion effect and auto-reconditioning performance of nanometer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ash were used in this work. 2.2 Dispersion experiment. A combinative method of ultrasonic dispersion, mechani- cal agitation and surface modification was adopted to disperse nanometer WS2 particles in green lubricant in this study. And to realize this method, we designed a dispersing equipment and figure 2 gives the ...

  1. Natal dispersal and personalities in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemanse, NJ; Both, C; van Noordwijk, AJ; Rutten, AL; Drent, PJ; Noordwijk, Arie J. van; Drent, Piet J.

    2003-01-01

    Dispersal is a major determinant of the dynamics and genetic structure of populations, and its consequences depend not only on average dispersal rates and distances, but also on the characteristics of dispersing and philopatric individuals. We investigated whether natal dispersal correlated with a

  2. A photonic crystal fiber with zero dispersion at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Andreas

    2002-01-01

    We report on the dispersion properties of a single mode, large core photonic crystal fiber. Using white light interferometry the fiber is found to have zero dispersion at 1064 nm......We report on the dispersion properties of a single mode, large core photonic crystal fiber. Using white light interferometry the fiber is found to have zero dispersion at 1064 nm...

  3. Sphagnum moss disperses spores with vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight L; Edwards, Joan

    2010-07-23

    Sphagnum spores, which have low terminal velocities, are carried by turbulent wind currents to establish colonies many kilometers away. However, spores that are easily kept aloft are also rapidly decelerated in still air; thus, dispersal range depends strongly on release height. Vascular plants grow tall to lift spores into sufficient wind currents for dispersal, but nonvascular plants such as Sphagnum cannot grow sufficiently high. High-speed videos show that exploding capsules of Sphagnum generate vortex rings to efficiently carry spores high enough to be dispersed by turbulent air currents. Spores launched ballistically at similar speeds through still air would travel a few millimeters and not easily reach turbulent air. Vortex rings are used by animals; here, we report vortex rings generated by plants.

  4. Magnetospatial dispersion of semiconductor quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, L. V.; Kats, V. N.; Platonov, A. V.; Kochereshko, V. P.; André, R.; Golub, L. E.

    2018-03-01

    Polarization conversion of light reflected from quantum wells governed by both magnetic field and light propagation direction is observed. We demonstrate that the polarization conversion is caused by the magnetospatial dispersion in quantum wells which manifests itself in the reflection coefficient contribution bilinear in the in-plane components of the magnetic field and the light wave vector. The magnetospatial dispersion is shown to arise due to structure inversion asymmetry of the quantum wells. The effect is resonantly enhanced in the vicinity of the heavy-hole exciton. We show that microscopically the magnetospatial dispersion is caused by the mixing of heavy- and light-hole states in the quantum well due to both orbital effect of the magnetic field and the in-plane hole motion. The degree of the structure inversion asymmetry is determined for GaAs/AlGaAs and CdTe quantum wells.

  5. Eliminating time dispersion from seismic wave modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koene, Erik F. M.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Broggini, Filippo; Andersson, Fredrik

    2018-04-01

    We derive an expression for the error introduced by the second-order accurate temporal finite-difference (FD) operator, as present in the FD, pseudospectral and spectral element methods for seismic wave modeling applied to time-invariant media. The `time-dispersion' error speeds up the signal as a function of frequency and time step only. Time dispersion is thus independent of the propagation path, medium or spatial modeling error. We derive two transforms to either add or remove time dispersion from synthetic seismograms after a simulation. The transforms are compared to previous related work and demonstrated on wave modeling in acoustic as well as elastic media. In addition, an application to imaging is shown. The transforms enable accurate computation of synthetic seismograms at reduced cost, benefitting modeling applications in both exploration and global seismology.

  6. Training for Internationalization through Domestic Geographical Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santangelo, Grazia D.; Stucchi, Tamara

    Traditionally created to deal with the unfriendly domestic environment, business groups (BGs) are increasingly internationalizing. However, how BGs can reconcile their strictly domestic orientation with an international dimension still remains an open question. Drawing on arguments from...... organizational learning, we seek to solve this puzzle in relation to the internationalization of Indian BGs. In particular, we argue that in heterogeneous domestic emerging markets BG’s geographical dispersion across sub-national states provides training for internationalization. To internationalize successfully......, BGs need to develop the capability of managing geographically dispersed units in institutional heterogeneous contexts. Domestic geographical dispersion would indeed help the BG dealing with different regulations, customers and infrastructures. However, there is less scope for such training as BGs...

  7. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m

  8. Rheology of Aqueous Dispersions of Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamana, Hurmiz; Dutcher, John

    Phytoglycogen is a natural, highly branched polysaccharide nanoparticle extracted and purified from sweet corn. The nanoparticles possess many unusual properties that suggest a broad range of applications in cosmetics, food and nutrition, and biomedicine. These applications stem from a strong interaction between the nanoparticles and water, which has motivated our studies of aqueous phytoglycogen dispersions. We have measured the rheology of the dispersions as a function of phytoglycogen concentration C. Unlike other polysaccharides such as starch, we find that the zero-shear viscosity of phytoglycogen dispersions remains very low over an extended range of C, increasing significantly only for C >20% w/w. These results imply that the particles do not interact significantly until they are forced into contact at very high concentrations. This is consistent with our small angle neutron scattering measurements that show that the particle spacing becomes equal to the particle diameter for C 25 % w/w.

  9. Employment effects of spatial dispersal of refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refugees subjected to a spatial dispersal tend to be assigned to a location outside the immigrant-dense cities. We argue that such locations are associated with low place utility. Our partial equilibrium search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts that the reservat......Refugees subjected to a spatial dispersal tend to be assigned to a location outside the immigrant-dense cities. We argue that such locations are associated with low place utility. Our partial equilibrium search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts...... that the reservation wage for local jobs decreases with place utility. We test the theoretical prediction by estimating the effects of characteristics of the location of assignment on the transition rate into the first job. Our sample is male refugees aged 30-59 who were subjected to the Danish spatial dispersal...

  10. Electromagnetic energy momentum in dispersive media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    The standard derivations of electromagnetic energy and momentum in media take Maxwell's equations as the starting point. It is well known that for dispersive media this approach does not directly yield exact expressions for the energy and momentum densities. Although Maxwell's equations fully describe electromagnetic fields, the general approach to conserved quantities in field theory is not based on the field equations, but rather on the action. Here an action principle for macroscopic electromagnetism in dispersive, lossless media is used to derive the exact conserved energy-momentum tensor. The time-averaged energy density reduces to Brillouin's simple formula when the fields are monochromatic. The time-averaged momentum density for monochromatic fields corresponds to the familiar Minkowski expression DxB, but for general fields in dispersive media the momentum density does not have the Minkowski value. The results are unaffected by the debate over momentum balance in light-matter interactions.

  11. Glass transition in soft-sphere dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RamIrez-Gonzalez, P E; Medina-Noyola, M

    2009-01-01

    The concept of dynamic equivalence among mono-disperse soft-sphere fluids is employed in the framework of the self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of colloid dynamics to calculate the ideal glass transition phase diagram of model soft-sphere colloidal dispersions in the softness-concentration state space. The slow dynamics predicted by this theory near the glass transition is compared with available experimental data for the decay of the intermediate scattering function of colloidal dispersions of soft-microgel particles. Increasing deviations from this simple scheme occur for increasingly softer potentials, and this is studied here using the Rogers-Young static structure factor of the soft-sphere systems as the input of the SCGLE theory, without assuming a priori the validity of the equivalence principle above.

  12. Dispersion analysis of arbitrarily cut orthorhombic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Sonja; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Uecker, Reinhard; Kwasniewski, Albert; Popp, Jürgen; Mayerhöfer, Thomas G

    2017-06-05

    We developed a measurement and evaluation scheme to perform dispersion analysis on arbitrarily cut orthorhombic crystals based on the schemes developed for triclinic and uniaxial crystals. As byproduct of dispersion analysis the orientations of the crystal axes are found. In contrast to the spectra of arbitrarily cut uniaxial crystals, where the fit routine has to separate two independent principal spectra, the spectra of arbitrarily cut orthorhombic crystals are a combination of three independent spectra and the evaluation scheme gets more complex. Dispersion analysis is exemplary performed on two different crystals, which show different spectral features and different levels of difficulties to evaluate. Neodymium gallate (NdGaO 3 ) has broad overlapping reflections bands while topaz (Al 2 SiO 4 [F, OH] 2 ) has a quite high total number of infrared active bands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Seed dispersal potential of Asian elephants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harich, Franziska K.; Treydte, Anna C.; Ogutu, Joseph O.; Roberts, John E.; Savini, Chution; Bauer, Jan M.; Savini, Tommaso

    2016-11-01

    Elephants, the largest terrestrial mega-herbivores, play an important ecological role in maintaining forest ecosystem diversity. While several plant species strongly rely on African elephants (Loxodonta africana; L. cyclotis) as seed dispersers, little is known about the dispersal potential of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). We examined the effects of elephant fruit consumption on potential seed dispersal using the example of a tree species with mega-faunal characteristics, Dillenia indica L., in Thailand. We conducted feeding trials with Asian elephants to quantify seed survival and gut passage times (GPT). In total, 1200 ingested and non-ingested control seeds were planted in soil and in elephant dung to quantify differences in germination rates in terms of GPT and dung treatment. We used survival analysis as a novel approach to account for the right-censored nature of the data obtained from germination experiments. The average seed survival rate was 79% and the mean GPT was 35 h. The minimum and maximum GPT were 20 h and 72 h, respectively. Ingested seeds were significantly more likely to germinate and to do so earlier than non-ingested control seeds (P = 0.0002). Seeds with the longest GPT displayed the highest germination success over time. Unexpectedly, seeds planted with dung had longer germination times than those planted without. We conclude that D. indica does not solely depend on but benefits from dispersal by elephants. The declining numbers of these mega-faunal seed dispersers might, therefore, have long-term negative consequences for the recruitment and dispersal dynamics of populations of certain tree species.

  14. Dispersal behavior of yellowjacket (Vespula germanica) queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciocchi, Maité; Martinez, Andrés S; Pereira, Ana J; Villacide, José M; Corley, Juan C

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the factors that affect animal dispersal behavior is important from both fundamental and applied perspectives. Dispersal can have clear evolutionary and ecological consequences, but for nonnative insect pests, dispersal capacity can also help to explain invasion success. Vespula germanica is a social wasp that, in the last century, has successfully invaded several regions of the world, showing one of the highest spread rates reported for a nonnative insect. In contrast with nonsocial wasps, in social species, queens are responsible for population redistribution and spread, as workers are sterile. For V. germanica, it has been observed that queen flight is limited to 2 distinct periods: early autumn, when new queens leave the nest to mate and find sheltered places in which to hibernate, and spring when new colonies are founded. Our aim was to study the flight behavior of V. germanica queens by focusing on the different periods in which dispersal occurs, characterizing as well the potential contribution of queen flight (i.e., distance) to the observed geographical spread. Our results suggest that the distances flown by nonoverwintered queens is greater than that flown by overwintered individuals, suggesting that the main queen dispersal events would occur before queens enter hibernation. This could relate to a behavioral trait of the queens to avoid the inbreeding with related drones. Additionally, given the short distances flown and remarkable geographical spread observed, we provide evidence showing that queen dispersal by flight is likely to contribute proportionately less to population spread than human-aided factors. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. General gauge mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, Patrick; Seiberg, Nathan; Shih, David

    2009-01-01

    We give a general definition of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking which encompasses all the known gauge mediation models. In particular, it includes both models with messengers as well as direct mediation models. A formalism for computing the soft terms in the generic model is presented. Such a formalism is necessary in strongly-coupled direct mediation models where perturbation theory cannot be used. It allows us to identify features of the entire class of gauge mediation models and to distinguish them from specific signatures of various subclasses. (author)

  16. Bed-Load Dispersion: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    ER D C/ CH L SR -1 6- 5 Coastal Inlets Research Program Bed-Load Dispersion: A Literature Review Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo...ERDC/CHL SR-16-5 December 2016 Bed-Load Dispersion: A Literature Review James W. Lewis, Alejandro Sanchez, Travis Dahl, and Ian Floyd Coastal and...calculated at all nodes of each cross-section. 1.2 Objective The objective of this literature review is to prepare the conceptual founda- tion for the

  17. Slinky-whistler dispersion relation from ``scaling''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1990-10-01

    Slinkies come in two sizes, ``regular'' and ``junior.'' Using 61% of the total length of the regular slinky, a whistler is obtained that sounds to the ear exactly like that obtained using the total length of the junior. That agrees with the proposed (approximate) dispersion relation ω=ck2r. If n is taken to be unknown in an assumed dispersion relation ω=ck(kr)n, then, by ear, with no equipment, it is found out n=0.83±0.17, in reasonable agreement with the proposed n=1.0.

  18. Phonon dispersion curves for CsCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, N.K.; Singh, Preeti; Rini, E.G.; Galgale, Jyostna; Singh, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for the present work was gained from the recent publication on phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) of CsCN from the neutron scattering technique. We have applied the extended three-body force shell model (ETSM) by incorporating the effect of coupling between the translation modes and the orientation of cyanide molecules for the description of phonon dispersion curves of CsCN between the temperatures 195 and 295 K. Our results on PDCs in symmetric direction are in good agreement with the experimental data measured with inelastic neutron scattering technique. (author)

  19. Chromatic Dispersion Estimation in Digital Coherent Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, Ruben Andres; Hauske, Fabian N.; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Polarization-diverse coherent demodulation allows to compensate large values of accumulated linear distortion by digital signal processing. In particular, in uncompensated links without optical dispersion compensation, the parameter of the residual chromatic dispersion (CD) is vital to set...... the according digital filtering function. We present different non-data-aided (blind) CD estimation methods for single-carrier transmission under implementation constraint conditions such as bandwidth limitation and sampling rate. The estimation performance for various modulation formats is compared...... with respect to precision and robustness for a wide range of combined channel impairments....

  20. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...... velocity c/n, where n is the complex index of refraction. The angle-resolved energy-loss spectrum of a Drude conductor is analyzed in detail and it is shown that the low-energy peak due to Ohmic losses is enhanced compared to the classical approximation....

  1. Improvements in or relating to dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A process is described for the preparation of an aqueous dispersion of ceria which comprises forming a slurry of cerium IV hydroxide with water and an acid, the acid being capable of causing deaggregation of aggregated crystallites in the cerium IV hydroxide, heating the slurry for such a time and at such a temperature that the pH reaches a steady value, the quantity of acid in the slurry being such that the steady value of pH is below 5.4, thereby to produce a conditioned slurry, and admixing water with the conditioned slurry to produce an aqueous dispersion of ceria. (author)

  2. Employment Effects of Spatial Dispersal of Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    We argue that spatial dispersal influences labour market assimilation of refugees through two mechanisms: first, the local job offer arrival rate and, second, place utility. Our partial search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts that the reservation wage for local...... jobs decreases with place utility. We argue that spatial dispersal decreases average place utility of refugees which decreases the transition rate into first job due to large local reservation wages. We investigate both mechanisms empirically and test the predictions of the theoretical model...

  3. Employment Effects of Spatial Dispersal of Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    Spatial dispersal policies may influence labour market integration of refugees through two mechanisms. First, it may affect the local job offer arrival rate, and second, it may affect place utility. We investigate the second mechanism theoretically by formulating a partial search model in which...... an individual searches simultaneously for a job and for a new residential location. The model predicts that the reservation wage for local jobs is decreasing in place utility. We argue that spatial dispersal policies decrease average place utility of refugees which decrease the transition rate into first job...

  4. Dispersion and transport of atmospheric pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslik, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the physical mechanisms that govern the dispersion and transport of air pollutant; the influence of the state of the 'carrying fluid', i.e. the role of meteorology; and finally, outlines the different techniques of assessing the process. Aspects of physical mechanisms and meteorology covered include: fate of an air pollutant; turbulence and dispersion; transport; wind speed and direction; atmospheric stability; and the role of atmospheric water. Assessment techniques covered are: concentrations measurements; modelling meteorological observations; and tracer releases. It is concluded that the only way to reduce air pollution is to pollute less. 10 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Saturable absorption in detonation nanodiamond dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyukov, Viatcheslav; Mikheev, Gennady; Mogileva, Tatyana; Puzyr, Alexey; Bondar, Vladimir; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Chuvilin, Andrey

    2017-07-01

    We report on a saturable absorption in aqueous dispersions of nanodiamonds with femtosecond laser pulse excitation at a wavelength of 795 nm. The open aperture Z-scan experiments reveal that in a wide range of nanodiamond particle sizes and concentrations, a light-induced increase of transmittance occurs. The transmittance increase originates from the saturation of light absorption and is associated with a light absorption at 1.5 eV by graphite and dimer chains (Pandey dimer chains). The obtained key nonlinear parameters of nanodiamond dispersions are compared with those of graphene and carbon nanotubes, which are widely used for the mode-locking.

  6. Fine scale spatial genetic structure in Pouteria reticulata (Engl. Eyma (Sapotaceae, a dioecious, vertebrate dispersed tropical rain forest tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Schroeder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dioecious tropical tree species often have small flowers and fleshy fruits indicative of small-insect pollination and vertebrate seed dispersal. We hypothesize that seed mediated gene flow should be exceed pollen-mediated gene flow in such species, leading to weak patterns of fine scale spatial genetic structure (SGS. In the present study, we characterize novel microsatellite DNA markers and test for SGS in sapling (N=100 and adult trees (N=99 of the dioecious canopy tree Pouteria reticulata (Sapotaceae in a 50 ha forest dynamics plot on Barro Colorado Island (BCI, Panama. The five genetic markers contained between five and 15 alleles per locus, totaling 51 alleles in the sample population. Significant SGS at local spatial scales (<100m was detected in the sapling (dbh≈1cm and adult (dbh≥20cm size classes, but was stronger in the former (sapling Sp=0.010±0.004, adult Sp=0.006±0.002, suggesting demographic thinning. The degree of SGS was lower than the value expected for non-vertebrate dispersed tropical trees (Sp=0.029, but similar to the average value for vertebrate dispersed tropical trees (Sp=0.009 affirming the dispersal potential of vertebrate dispersed tropical trees in faunally intact forests.

  7. Seed Dispersal Anachronisms: Rethinking the Fruits Extinct Megafauna Ate

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, Paulo R.; Galetti, Mauro; Jordano, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Background: Some neotropical, fleshy-fruited plants have fruits structurally similar to paleotropical fruits dispersed by megafauna (mammals .103 kg), yet these dispersers were extinct in South America 10–15 Kyr BP. Anachronic dispersal systems are best explained by interactions with extinct animals and show impaired dispersal resulting in altered seed dispersal dynamics. Methodology/Principal Findings: We introduce an operational definition of megafaunal fruits and perform a comparativ...

  8. Effects of Earthworms on the Dispersal of Steinernema spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, D. I.; Tylka, G. L.; Berry, E. C.; Lewis, L. C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that dispersal of S. carpocapsae may be enhanced in soil with earthworms. The objective of this research was to determine and compare the effects of earthworms on dispersal of other Steinernema spp. Vertical dispersal of Steinernema carpocapsae, S. feltiae, and S. glaseri was tested in soil columns in the presence and absence of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Dispersal was evaluated by a bioassay and by direct extraction of nematodes from soil. Upward dispersal ...

  9. Chemical countermeasures: Dispersants overview of dispersant use (including application) and research issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    I will attempt in twenty minutes to summarize the state of research on oil spill dispersants as I perceive it. The expertise I bring to this task includes 20 years of experience with the fate and effects of petroleum in the marine environment, including participation in the 1973 and 1981 NRC studies and three years as chairman of the NRC committee on oil spill dispersants. I More recently I served on a committee of the International Maritime Organization which reviewed the open-quotes Impact of oil and related chemicals and wastes on the marine environment.close quotes That report will be published this year. However, my statements in this paper are not made as a representative of either NRC or IMO. They are my own interpretation of scientific literature cited in the above reviews. Dispersants are chemical formulations, which include surface active agents, designed to decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water. Because the first attempts to disperse oil on a large scale, at the Torrey Canyon spill of 1967, used highly toxic degreasing agents, dispersants have an undeserved reputation for toxicity. In fact, for twenty years dispersant formulations have been developed with an emphasis on reducing their toxicity to marine life. The dispersal of oil in water has been documented in the laboratory by dozens of papers (see references in NRC 1989, pp 70-79), and in the field by dozens of studies (NRC 1989, pp 165- 193). The toxicity of commercial dispersant formulations (NRC 1989, pp 81-123) and dispersed oil (NRC 1989, pp 123-147) has been tested on a wide variety of marine organisms ranging from algae to salmonid fishes. The NRC review has been updated by the IMO/GESAMP (1992) study, but the conclusions remain unchanged

  10. Phonon dispersion curves of CsCN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The motivation for the present work was gained from the recent publication on phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) of CsCN from the neutron scattering technique. We have applied the extended three-body force shell model (ETSM) by incorporating the effect of coupling between the translation modes and the ...

  11. Wage Dispersion and Decentralization of Wage Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian Møller; le Maire, Christian Daniel; Munch, Jakob R.

    2013-01-01

    This article studies how decentralization of wage bargaining from sector to firm level influences wage levels and wage dispersion. We use detailed panel data covering a period of decentralization in the Danish labor market. The decentralization process provides variation in the individual worker...

  12. Uncertainty modelling of atmospheric dispersion by stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Uncertainty; polynomial chaos expansion; fuzzy set theory; cumulative distribution function; uniform distribution; membership function. Abstract. The parameters associated to a environmental dispersion model may include different kinds of variability, imprecision and uncertainty. More often, it is seen that ...

  13. Analytical simulation of two dimensional advection dispersion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to investigate the analytical simulation of two dimensional advection dispersion equation of contaminant transport. The steady state flow condition of the contaminant transport where inorganic contaminants in aqueous waste solutions are disposed of at the land surface where it would migrate ...

  14. Analytical Simulation of Two Dimensional Advection Dispersion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The study was designed to investigate the analytical simulation of two dimensional advection dispersion equation of contaminant transport. The steady state flow condition of the contaminant transport where inorganic contaminants in aqueous waste solutions are disposed of at the land surface where it would ...

  15. Problems with Discontinuous Diffusion/Dispersion Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ferraris

    2012-01-01

    accurate on smooth solutions and based on a special numerical treatment of the diffusion/dispersion coefficients that makes its application possible also when such coefficients are discontinuous. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence of the numerical approximation and show a good behavior on a set of benchmark problems in two space dimensions.

  16. Prediction of longitudinal dispersion coefficient using multivariate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. River water quality; artificial neural network; longitudinal dispersion coefficient; pollution transmission ... Error indices showed that MARS model has suitable performanceand is more accurate compared to multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. Results ofthe Gamma test and MARS model ...

  17. Uncertainty modelling of atmospheric dispersion by stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sensitivity and uncertainty of atmospheric dispersion using fuzzy set theory can be found in. Chutia et al (2013). ..... tainties have been presented, will facilitate the decision makers in the said field to take a decision on the quality of the air if ..... Annals of Fuzzy Mathematics and Informatics 5(1): 213–22. Chutia R, Mahanta S ...

  18. Seed Dispersal Potential of Asian Elephants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harich, Franziska K.; Treydte, Anna Christina; Ogutu, Joseph Ochieng

    2016-01-01

    of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). We examined the effects of elephant fruit consumption on potential seed dispersal using the example of a tree species with mega-faunal characteristics, Dillenia indica L., in Thailand. We conducted feeding trials with Asian elephants to quantify seed survival and gut...

  19. Structure factors and phonon dispersion in liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Electronics Department, Narmada College of Science and Commerce, Bharuch 392 011,. India. E-mail: apratapmsu@yahoo.com. Abstract. The phonon spectra for .... Structure factors and phonon dispersion in liquid Li0.61Na0.39 alloy. [5] U Balucani and M Zoppi, Dynamics of the liquid state (Clarendon, Oxford, 1994).

  20. Microwave dispersion of some polar liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poley, J.P.

    1955-01-01

    The chief purpose of the present investigation is the measurement and analysis of the microwave dispersion of some polar liquids. An outline of the problem and a historical survey of experimental work on the dielectric behaviour of polar liquids are given in Chapter I. A number of theoretical

  1. Overseas seed dispersal by migratory birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viana, D.S.; Gangoso, L.; Bouten, W.; Figuerola, J.

    2016-01-01

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) promotes the colonization of isolated and remote habitats, and thus it has been proposed as a mechanism for explaining the distributions of many species. Birds are key LDD vectors for many sessile organisms such as plants, yet LDD beyond local and regional scales has

  2. Phonon dispersion relation of liquid metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The phonon dispersion curves of some liquid metals, viz. Na (Z = 1), Mg. (Z = 2), Al (Z = 3) and Pb (Z = 4), have been computed using our model potential. The charged hard sphere (CHS) reference system is applied to describe the structural information. Our model potential along with CHS reference system is ...

  3. Characterising refractive index dispersion in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Y.; Sojka, L.; Jayasuriya, D.

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of glasses that contain the chalcogen elements (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) for photonics' applications out to MIR wavelengths. In this paper we describe some techniques for determining the refractive index dispersion characteristics of these glasses...

  4. Dispersion of breakdown voltage of liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Itaru; Noguchi, Takuya

    1978-01-01

    As for the electrical insulation characteristics of liquid helium, the discrepancy among the measured values by each person is very large even in the fundamental DC breakdown voltage in uniform electric field. The dispersion of experimental values obtained in the experiments by the same person is also large. Hereafter, the difference among the mean values obtained by each experimenter will be referred to as ''deviation of mean values'', and the dispersion of measured values around the mean value obtained by the same person as ''deviation around the man value''. The authors have mainly investigated on the latter experimentally. The cryostat was made of stainless steel, and the innermost helium chamber was of 500 mm I.D. and approximately 1200 mm deep. The high voltage electrode was of brass sphere of 25 mm diameter, and the low voltage electrode was of brass plate. The experiment was conducted for liquid helium boiling at 4.2 K and 1 atm, and the breakdown voltage and time lag were measured by applying the approximately square wave impulses of fast rise and long tail, ramp and DC voltages. The cause of the deviation of mean values may be the presence of impurity particles or the effect of electrode shape. As for the deviation around the mean value, the dispersion is large, and its standard deviation may amount to 10 to 20% of the man value. The dispersion is not due to the statistical time lag, but is due to parameters that vary with breakdown. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Proton compton scattering in dispersion relation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, Olgierd.

    1978-01-01

    Inserting a logarithmically rising total photon-proton cross section into dispersion relation we update our theoretical knowledge about the forward real part. Taking into account analytic properties of the amplitude in the cosTHETA-variable we find that at low energies our experimental knowledge about this quantity should be modified. (author)

  6. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Correlation between temperature-dependent permittivity dispersion and depolarization behaviours in Zr4+-modified BiFeO3–BaTiO3 piezoelectric ceramics. Weidong Zeng Changrong Zhou Jianrong Xiao Jiafeng Ma. Volume 38 Issue 7 December 2015 pp ...

  7. Dispersion of Chernobyl radioactive plume over Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albergel, A.

    1988-01-01

    A long-range pollutant transport and removal model, is used to analyse the Chernobyl radioactive plume dispersion over the Europe Continent. Model predictions are compared to field measurements of Cs-137 activity in the air from April 26th, to May 5th 1986 [fr

  8. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric properties of nanocrystalline dimer complex (PEPyr–diCd) thin films as novel organic semiconductor. Ahmed Farouk Al-Hossainy. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 209-222 ...

  9. Dipolar structures in colloidal magnetite dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klokkenburg, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Dipolar structures in liquid colloidal dispersions comprising well-defined magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment are analyzed on a single-particle level by in situ cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (2D). Compared to conventional ferrofluids, these

  10. Fused deposition modelling of sodium caseinate dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutyser, M.A.I.; Houlder, S.; Wit, de Martin; Buijsse, C.A.P.; Alting, A.C.

    2018-01-01

    Only recently, researchers have started experimenting with 3D printing of foods. The aim of this study was to investigate 3D printed objects from sodium caseinate dispersions, exhibiting reversible gelation behaviour. Gelation and dispensing behaviour were explored and structures of different

  11. Polyaniline. Thin films and colloidal dispersions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Sapurina, I.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2005), s. 815-826 ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 539; GA AV ČR IAA4050313 Grant - others:IUPAC project 2002-019-1-400 Keywords : polyaniline * thin films * dispersions Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2005

  12. FEATURES OF RESTORATION OF DISPERSE POROUS MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research recycling of dispersed materials in rotary furnaces. Has been received new data on the of heat and mass transfer processes and carry out intensive and continuous process of solid- liquid-phase reduction of oxides in a single unit.

  13. Theoretical Magnon Dispersion Curves for Gd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Harmon, B. N.; Freeman, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The magnon dispersion curve of Gd metal has been determined from first principles by use of augmented-plane-wave energy bands and wave functions. The exchange matrix elements I(k⃗, k⃗′) between the 4f electrons and the conduction electrons from the first six energy bands were calculated under...

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of Transient Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M.; Valdes-Parada, F.; Wood, B.

    2008-12-01

    Transient dispersion is important in many engineering applications, including transport in porous media. A common theoretical approach involves upscaling the micro-scale mass balance equations for convection- diffusion to macro-scale equations that contain effective medium quantities. However, there are a number of assumptions implicit in the various upscaling methods. For example, results obtained from volume averaging are often dependent on a given set of length and time scale constraints. Additionally, a number of the classical models for dispersion do not fully capture the early-time dispersive behavior of the solute for a general set of initial conditions. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of micro-scale transient mass balance equations for convection-diffusion in both capillary tubes and porous media. Special attention is paid to analysis of the influence of a new time- decaying coefficient that filters the effects of the initial conditions. The direct numerical simulations were compared to results obtained from solving the closure problem associated with volume averaging. These comparisons provide a quantitative measure of the significance of (1) the assumptions implicit in the volume averaging method and (2) the importance of the early-time dispersive behavior of the solute due to various initial conditions.

  15. Dispersion relation analysis of proton Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.

    1979-01-01

    Inserting a logarithmically rising total photon-proton cross section into the dispersion relation, theoretical knowledge about the forward real part is updated. Taking into account analytic properties of the amplitude in the cos theta variable it is found that at low energies, experimental knowledge about this quantity should be reassessed. (Auth.)

  16. Laterally and longitudinally dispersive recoil mass separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollnik, H.

    1987-01-01

    Principles of laterally dispersive and time-of-flight mass separators are outlined. Special emphasis is given to separators for very energetic recoils for which electrostatic fields would be technologically impossible. The principle of energy isochronous time-of-flight mass separators is shown to be applicable to storage rings. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear acoustic resonance absorption and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, V.

    1977-01-01

    A generalized form of the 'Kubo susceptibility' is presented correlating NAR absorption and NAR dispersion with the sound induced perturbation Hamiltonian h(t). To illustrate the advantage of NAR susceptibility, the first quantum theoretical treatment is given of dipole NAR in metals whose results are in agreement with experiment. (Auth.)

  18. Heavy ion storage ring without linear dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A possible method to realize a dispersion-free storage ring is described. The simultaneous use of a magnetic field B and an electric field E in bending regions, where the two fields are set perpendicular to each other, enables us to control the effect of momentum dispersion. When the relation (1+1/γ_{0}^{2}E(ρ=-v_{0}×B is satisfied for a beam with the velocity v_{0}, the linear dispersion can be completely eliminated all around the ring. It is shown that the acceleration and deceleration induced by the electrostatic deflector counteracts the heating mechanism due to the shearing force from dipole magnets. The dispersion-free system is thus beneficial to producing ultracold beams. It looks probable that the technique will allow one to achieve three-dimensional crystalline beams. At ICR Kyoto University, an ion cooler storage ring S-LSR oriented for various beam physics purposes is now under construction. The application of the present idea to S-LSR is discussed and the actual design of the dispersionless bend is given.

  19. Dispersion analysis of spaced antenna scintillation measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grzesiak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a dispersion analysis of the phase of GPS signals received at high latitude. Basic theoretical aspects for spectral analysis of two-point measurement are given. To account for nonstationarity and statistical robustness a power distribution of the windowed Fourier transform cross-spectra as a function of frequency and phase is analysed using the Radon transform.

  20. Computing modal dispersion characteristics of radially Asymmetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We developed a matrix theory that applies to with non-circular/circular but concentric layers fibers. And we compute the dispersion characteristics of radially unconventional fiber, known as Asymmetric Bragg fiber. An attempt has been made to determine how the modal characteristics change as circular Bragg fiber is ...

  1. Dispersion relations in heavily-doped nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the dispersion relation in heavily doped nano-structures. The materials considered are III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, GaP, Ge, Platinum Antimonide, stressed, GaSb, Te, II-V, HgTe/CdTe superlattices and Bismuth Telluride semiconductors. The dispersion relation is discussed under magnetic quantization and on the basis of carrier energy spectra. The influences of magnetic field, magneto inversion, and magneto nipi structures on nano-structures is analyzed. The band structure of optoelectronic materials changes with photo-excitation in a fundamental way according to newly formulated electron dispersion laws. They control the quantum effect in optoelectronic devices in the presence of light. The measurement of band gaps in optoelectronic materials in the presence of external photo-excitation is displayed. The influences of magnetic quantization, crossed electric and quantizing fields, intense electric fields on the on the dispersion relation in heavily doped semiconductors and super-lattices are also disc...

  2. Dispersion patterns of pollutant from smokestacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tigor Nauli

    2002-01-01

    Air quality in industrial area depends on the nature of particles emitted from the plume. The particles are transported by the atmosphere away from the source and deposits at surroundings. Coverage area and pollutant concentration at contaminated areas will vary based on emission rate, plume stack, weather profile, and terrain. Forecasting of an area contaminated by industrial waste could help many parties in anticipating the effects, in improving the production process, and in imposing the policy by the authority. Such information can be created by prediction techniques. One of the models for illustrating the air pollution from a single point source is Gaussian dispersion curve. It assumed that pollutant concentration will distributed normally in vertical and downwind direction. The highest concentration of pollutants would be in centerline and lower values as the distance further away from the source. A computer application has been developed to assist modeling the pollutant dispersion. The program collects the atmospheric stability classification, computes dispersion coefficients, and maintains the corresponding mathematical equations. When data of emission rate, plume stack, average wind speed, and atmospheric condition are available, then the program will inform the concentration of pollutants in any distance from the source. By varying in inputs, the computer application produces numerous air pollution predictions as dispersion patterns. The dispersion patterns form the elliptical contour with segments of pollutant concentrations. The central segment represents the highest concentration and the outer segments in concentric manner illustrate the lower concentration. The patterns exhibit the highest contaminated point, the longest distance in a specific weather condition, the moving of the highest contaminated point as weather changing, and the variety of pollutant concentration by the effective stack height. (author)

  3. The First Modern Human Dispersals across Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rito, Teresa; Richards, Martin B.; Fernandes, Verónica; Alshamali, Farida; Cerny, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of more refined chronologies for climate change and archaeology in prehistoric Africa, and for the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), now make it feasible to test more sophisticated models of early modern human dispersals suggested by mtDNA distributions. Here we have generated 42 novel whole-mtDNA genomes belonging to haplogroup L0, the most divergent clade in the maternal line of descent, and analysed them alongside the growing database of African lineages belonging to L0’s sister clade, L1’6. We propose that the last common ancestor of modern human mtDNAs (carried by “mitochondrial Eve”) possibly arose in central Africa ~180 ka, at a time of low population size. By ~130 ka two distinct groups of anatomically modern humans co-existed in Africa: broadly, the ancestors of many modern-day Khoe and San populations in the south and a second central/eastern African group that includes the ancestors of most extant worldwide populations. Early modern human dispersals correlate with climate changes, particularly the tropical African “megadroughts” of MIS 5 (marine isotope stage 5, 135–75 ka) which paradoxically may have facilitated expansions in central and eastern Africa, ultimately triggering the dispersal out of Africa of people carrying haplogroup L3 ~60 ka. Two south to east migrations are discernible within haplogroup LO. One, between 120 and 75 ka, represents the first unambiguous long-range modern human dispersal detected by mtDNA and might have allowed the dispersal of several markers of modernity. A second one, within the last 20 ka signalled by L0d, may have been responsible for the spread of southern click-consonant languages to eastern Africa, contrary to the view that these eastern examples constitute relicts of an ancient, much wider distribution. PMID:24236171

  4. Reliability benefits of dispersed wind resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, M.; Artig, R.

    1998-05-01

    Generating capacity that is available during the utility peak period is worth more than off-peak capacity. Wind power from a single location might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility's peak load than a single site. There are other issues that arise when considering disperse wind plant development. Singular development can result in economies of scale and might reduce the costs of obtaining multiple permits and multiple interconnections. However, disperse development can result in cost efficiencies if interconnection can be accomplished at lower voltages or at locations closer to load centers. Several wind plants are in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming, Iowa and Texas. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically disperse sites on the reliability of the overall wind plant.This paper uses a production-cost/reliability model to analyze the reliability of several wind sites in the state of Minnesota. The analysis finds that the use of a model with traditional reliability measures does not produce consistent, robust results. An approach based on fuzzy set theory is applied in this paper, with improved results. Using such a model, the authors find that system reliability can be optimized with a mix of disperse wind sites

  5. The first modern human dispersals across Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rito, Teresa; Richards, Martin B; Fernandes, Verónica; Alshamali, Farida; Cerny, Viktor; Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of more refined chronologies for climate change and archaeology in prehistoric Africa, and for the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), now make it feasible to test more sophisticated models of early modern human dispersals suggested by mtDNA distributions. Here we have generated 42 novel whole-mtDNA genomes belonging to haplogroup L0, the most divergent clade in the maternal line of descent, and analysed them alongside the growing database of African lineages belonging to L0's sister clade, L1'6. We propose that the last common ancestor of modern human mtDNAs (carried by "mitochondrial Eve") possibly arose in central Africa ~180 ka, at a time of low population size. By ~130 ka two distinct groups of anatomically modern humans co-existed in Africa: broadly, the ancestors of many modern-day Khoe and San populations in the south and a second central/eastern African group that includes the ancestors of most extant worldwide populations. Early modern human dispersals correlate with climate changes, particularly the tropical African "megadroughts" of MIS 5 (marine isotope stage 5, 135-75 ka) which paradoxically may have facilitated expansions in central and eastern Africa, ultimately triggering the dispersal out of Africa of people carrying haplogroup L3 ~60 ka. Two south to east migrations are discernible within haplogroup LO. One, between 120 and 75 ka, represents the first unambiguous long-range modern human dispersal detected by mtDNA and might have allowed the dispersal of several markers of modernity. A second one, within the last 20 ka signalled by L0d, may have been responsible for the spread of southern click-consonant languages to eastern Africa, contrary to the view that these eastern examples constitute relicts of an ancient, much wider distribution.

  6. Flexible Mediation Analysis With Multiple Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Johan; Loeys, Tom; Moerkerke, Beatrijs; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2017-07-15

    The advent of counterfactual-based mediation analysis has triggered enormous progress on how, and under what assumptions, one may disentangle path-specific effects upon combining arbitrary (possibly nonlinear) models for mediator and outcome. However, current developments have largely focused on single mediators because required identification assumptions prohibit simple extensions to settings with multiple mediators that may depend on one another. In this article, we propose a procedure for obtaining fine-grained decompositions that may still be recovered from observed data in such complex settings. We first show that existing analytical approaches target specific instances of a more general set of decompositions and may therefore fail to provide a comprehensive assessment of the processes that underpin cause-effect relationships between exposure and outcome. We then outline conditions for obtaining the remaining set of decompositions. Because the number of targeted decompositions increases rapidly with the number of mediators, we introduce natural effects models along with estimation methods that allow for flexible and parsimonious modeling. Our procedure can easily be implemented using off-the-shelf software and is illustrated using a reanalysis of the World Health Organization's Large Analysis and Review of European Housing and Health Status (WHO-LARES) study on the effect of mold exposure on mental health (2002-2003). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Stability and the competition-dispersal trade-off as drivers of speciation and biodiversity gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc ePellissier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The geography of speciation is one of the most contentious topics at the frontier between ecology and evolution. Here, building on previous hypotheses, I propose that ecological constraints on species co-existence mediate the likelihood of speciation, via a trade-off between competitive and dispersal abilities. Habitat stability, as found in the tropics, selects for the evolution of stronger competitive abilities. Since resource investment in competitive and dispersal abilities should trade off, high competition in stable habitats reduces species dispersal ability, decreasing effective population sizes. In smaller local populations, higher fixation rates of molecular substitutions increases the likelihood of speciation. Higher species diversity triggers more speciation by further increasing the spatial structuring of populations and decreasing effective population sizes. Higher resource specialization also trades-off with dispersal ability and could account for speciation at higher trophic levels. Biotic interactions would therefore promote parapatric speciation and generate spatial patterns in diversity such as the latitudinal diversity gradient. I discuss the main evidence for this mechanism and emphasize the need for studies coupling ecology and speciation theory within landscapes.

  8. Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Chains To Promote the Dispersion of Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we adopt molecular dynamics simulations to study the amphiphilic AB block copolymer (BCP) mediated nanoparticle (NP) dispersion in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs), with the A-block being compatible with the NPs and the B-block being miscible with the polymer matrix. The effects of the number and components of BCP, as well as the interaction strength between A-block and NPs on the spatial organization of NPs, are explored. We find that the increase of the fraction of the A-block brings different dispersion effect to NPs than that of B-block. We also find that the best dispersion state of the NPs occurs in the case of a moderate interaction strength between the A-block and the NPs. Meanwhile, the stress–strain behavior is probed. Our simulation results verify that adopting BCP is an effective way to adjust the dispersion of NPs in the polymer matrix, further to manipulate the mechanical properties. PMID:28892620

  9. The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Don A; Banks, Sam C; Barton, Philip S; Ikin, Karen; Lentini, Pia; Lindenmayer, David B; Smith, Annabel L; Berry, Laurence E; Burns, Emma L; Edworthy, Amanda; Evans, Maldwyn J; Gibson, Rebecca; Heinsohn, Rob; Howland, Brett; Kay, Geoff; Munro, Nicola; Scheele, Ben C; Stirnemann, Ingrid; Stojanovic, Dejan; Sweaney, Nici; Villaseñor, Nélida R; Westgate, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning) and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i) questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii) methods used to study dispersal; (iii) the quality of dispersal data; (iv) extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v) likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i) improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii) understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii) define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting management

  10. The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don A Driscoll

    Full Text Available Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii methods used to study dispersal; (iii the quality of dispersal data; (iv extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting

  11. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  12. Applied mediation analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Theis; Hansen, Kim Wadt; Sørensen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, mediation analysis has emerged as a powerful tool to disentangle causal pathways from an exposure/treatment to clinically relevant outcomes. Mediation analysis has been applied in scientific fields as diverse as labour market relations and randomized clinical trials of heart...... disease treatments. In parallel to these applications, the underlying mathematical theory and computer tools have been refined. This combined review and tutorial will introduce the reader to modern mediation analysis including: the mathematical framework; required assumptions; and software implementation...

  13. Carbon chloride-core fibers for soliton mediated supercontinuum generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemnitz, Mario; Gaida, Christian; Gebhardt, Martin; Stutzki, Fabian; Kobelke, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas; Limpert, Jens; Schmidt, Markus A

    2018-02-05

    We report on soliton-fission mediated infrared supercontinuum generation in liquid-core step-index fibers using highly transparent carbon chlorides (CCl 4 , C 2 Cl 4 ). By developing models for the refractive index dispersions and nonlinear response functions, dispersion engineering and pumping with an ultrafast thulium fiber laser (300 fs) at 1.92 μm, distinct soliton fission and dispersive wave generation was observed, particularly in the case of tetrachloroethylene (C 2 Cl 4 ). The measured results match simulations of both the generalized and a hybrid nonlinear Schrödinger equation, with the latter resembling the characteristics of non-instantaneous medium via a static potential term and representing a simulation tool with substantially reduced complexity. We show that C 2 Cl 4 has the potential for observing non-instantaneous soliton dynamics along meters of liquid-core fiber opening a feasible route for directly observing hybrid soliton dynamics.

  14. Temporal dispersion of Dyakonov modes induced by spatial dispersion in dielectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushkov, Andrey A.; Shcherbakov, Alexey A.

    2017-09-01

    The article focuses on investigation of nonlocal effects in 3D periodic dielectric composites operating in the effective medium regime. Ab-initio simulations using the modified Plane-Wave method provide reliable quantitative description of spatial-dispersion effects, including unusual birefringence, dispersion of optical axes and noticeable isofrequency surface deformations. Additionally, such simulation allows one to derive numerical coefficients for the effective medium approximation and to estimate its accuracy. In our work we consider plane interfaces between isotropic media and dielectric composites, and demonstrate a theoretical possibility to excite surface Dyakonov waves with strong temporal dispersion, which appears to be induced by the mentioned spatial dispersion, and does not exist in case of natural anisotropic dielectrics.

  15. Implementing general gauge mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Dine, Michael; Festuccia, Guido; Mason, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Recently there has been much progress in building models of gauge mediation, often with predictions different than those of minimal gauge mediation. Meade, Seiberg, and Shih have characterized the most general spectrum which can arise in gauge-mediated models. We discuss some of the challenges of building models of general gauge mediation, especially the problem of messenger parity and issues connected with R symmetry breaking and CP violation. We build a variety of viable, weakly coupled models which exhibit some or all of the possible low energy parameters.

  16. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mediator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturi, Michela

    , Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian Mediator. In our study, we have taken the S. pombe Mediator into consideration and characterized genetically and biochemically two subunits already know in S. cerevisiae, Med9 and Med11, but still not identified in the S. pombe Mediator. Genetic analysis has shown that med9...... complex, but our results did not exclude it completely either. Our attempts to demonstrate the presence of these two subunits in the Mediator complex remain inconclusive primarily due to the lack of proper expression of the tagged versions of the proteins. However, we have paved a way to further...

  17. Stable dispersions of polymer-coated graphitic nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Nguyen, Sonbinh T. (Inventor); Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of making a dispersion of reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets involves providing a dispersion of graphite oxide nanoplatelets and reducing the graphite oxide nanoplatelets in the dispersion in the presence of a reducing agent and a polymer. The reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets are reduced to an extent to provide a higher C/O ratio than graphite oxide. A stable dispersion having polymer-treated reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets dispersed in a dispersing medium, such as water or organic liquid is provided. The polymer-treated, reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets can be distributed in a polymer matrix to provide a composite material.

  18. Tracer Dispersion Within an Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.; Shallcross, D.; Price, C.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P.

    2003-12-01

    The transport and dispersion of pollutants has extremely important implications for the environment on urban, regional and global scales. At the urban level localised emissions of both biogenic and anthropogenic pollutants can directly impact the health of the inhabitants. The DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollutants and their Penetration into the Local Environment) project is a consortium of six universities, which involves a multidisciplinary approach to characterise relatively small-scale urban atmospheric dispersion including wind tunnel modelling, computer simulations, fieldwork and analysis. This work describes the tracer technology used to characterise atmospheric dispersion as well as preliminary results from the first tracer release experiment in Central London. A steady state finite duration release of both perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) was performed as part of the first DAPPLE campaign. These compounds were released over a fifteen-minute integrated time period with the SF6 release staggered one and a half minutes behind the PMCH. The low background concentrations of PMCH (~ 5 x 10-3 pptv) and SF6 (~5pptv) along with non-depositing and non-reactive characteristics allow for the implementation of near ideal fluid dynamic experiments. Sampling consists of a multiport ladder fitting with solenoid valves onto which a succession of sampling bags is attached. These are electrically actuated in sequential order with an integrated sampling time of three minutes. The samplers are placed at various receptor positions in the DAPPLE zone in predefined positions designed to best validate these model simulated meteorological dispersion processes. Analysis of PMCH is carried out using sample enrichment on carbon based adsorbents, separation by capillary Gas Chromatography and Negative Ion Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry detection (GC-MS-NICI). SF6 concentrations are determined using fixed volume loop injections with Gas

  19. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M.; Doe, K.; Jackman, P.

    2007-01-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  20. Dispersion Free Steering for YASP and dispersion correction for TI8

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, J

    2009-01-01

    The LHC injection tests performed in August 2008 revealed a horizontal dispersion mismatch for both the TI2 and the TI8 transfer lines. While the error for TI2 is acceptable and most likely due to an error of the initial conditions at the entrance of the line, the TI8 dispersion error is rather severe. No unambiguous source of the dispersion mismatch could be identified, even tough large strength errors on some quadrupoles could explain part of the problem [1]. Steering and energy matching of both TI2 and TI8 are tricky due to the limited sampling of the trajectories by the beam position monitors. The possibility that the dispersion error may be due to the kicks from misaligned quadrupoles and from orbit correctors was pointed by E. Gianfelice and first tests yielded encouraging results [2]. The SPS and LHC steering program YASP was therefore upgraded to be able to perform combined orbit (or trajectory) and dispersion corrections, so called Dispersion Free Steering (DFS) that was already used at LEP [3]. This...

  1. Inferring long-distance dispersal modes in American amphitropically disjunct species through adaptive dispersal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, John J; Saunders, Kelsey

    2017-11-22

    A repeated pattern of American amphitropical disjunct species or sister species distributed on either side of the equator has long-fascinated botanists, but the modes of these disjunctions remain untested. We evaluated diaspore morphology to generate hypotheses on probable dispersal mechanisms. The sizes and structures of diaspores, habit, habitat, distribution, and dispersal units were collected for 108 species from literature searches and herbarium specimens. Variation was evaluated with summary statistics, χ 2 tests with Monte Carlo simulations, ANOVAs, and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Seeds were the dispersing diaspore in 38.0% of the species, 45.4 were dispersed as fruits, and the remaining were dispersed as infructescences or spores. Diaspores were epizoochorous (52.8%), anemochorous (20.4%), achorous (15.7%), endozoochorous (8.3%), and hydrochorous (2.8%). Epizoochory was significantly greater than expected. Zoochory occurred more frequently than expected when considering achorous diaspores as animal-dispersed. Most species were associated with wetland, woodland, and grassland habitats. An ANOVA revealed that diaspores associated with hydrochory were larger and anemochory was smaller; all other syndromes were not significantly different. Botanists have long-held the assumption that bird migrations are responsible for amphitropical disjunctions. Our results support this hypothesis, with the majority of these events occurring by external attachment of small fruits. However, our results also indicate that anemochory might play a greater role in producing amphitropical distributions than previously thought and at a greater rate than endozoochory or hydrochory. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  2. Oceanic barnacles act as foundation species on plastic debris: implications for marine dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Michael A; Pfaller, Joseph B

    2016-01-27

    Plastic has emerged as an abundant, stable substratum for oceanic dispersal of organisms via rafting. However, the ecological mechanisms underlying community diversity on plastic debris remain poorly understood. On a cruise from California to Hawai'i, we surveyed plastic debris, some likely originating from the 2011 Tōhoku tsunami, to examine the relationship between rafting community diversity and both habitat area and stalked barnacle (Lepas spp.) abundance. For sessile taxa richness, we observed an interaction in which the positive effect of debris area weakened the negative effect of barnacle cover. In contrast, for mobile taxa richness, including cohabiting species from opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean, barnacle abundance had a positive effect that was strongest at smaller debris sizes. These findings suggest that barnacles, through interactions with habitat area, have trait-dependent effects on other species, serving as both foundation species and competitors, mediating the diversity and dispersal potential of marine organisms on plastic debris.

  3. Dispersion management of the SULF front end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Xu, Yi; Liu, Zhengzheng; Lu, Jun; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Xingyan; Li, Zhaoyang; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2017-04-01

    To manage dispersion of the front end in the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility (SULF), which is a large-scale project aimed at delivering 10 PW laser pulses, a stretcher based on a combination of a grating and a prism (grism) pair is inserted between an Öffner-triplet-type stretcher and a regenerative amplifier to reduce high-order dispersion introduced by optical materials at the amplification stage. The alignment of the grism pair is implemented by controlling the far-field pattern of the output beam of the grism pair. The energy of the front end reaches up to 7 J at a 1-Hz repetition rate. Experimental results show that the pulse duration can be compressed to 22.4 fs and the spectral distortion over the spectrum is less than 2.25 rad.

  4. Solvent characterization using the dispersion number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    When developing new solvent extraction processes, one often has to evaluate new solvents, new aqueous phases, or both for their ability to work in plant-scale equipment. To facilitate solvent characterization, a simple test is proposed based on the dimensionless dispersion number (N Di ). It allows one to characterize the ability of the solvent to separate from a two-phase dispersion and allows one to estimate process throughput for equipment of a given size. Several ways to carry out the N Di test are given, including a standard test procedure. The N Di test was applied to the performance of solvent extraction equipment with discrete process stages, the leaching of plasticizers from plastic tubing, and the development of a new solvent for the combined extraction of strontium and transuranic elements

  5. Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, Alain; Hardeman, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and economic costs. The nature of such a radiological attack would anyway be different compared to conventional radiological accidents, basically because it can happen anywhere at any time. Part of the response resides in a general preparedness scheme incorporating attacks with Radiological Dispersion Devices. Training of different potential intervention teams is essential. The response would consist of a prioritised list of actions adapted to the circumstances. As the psychosocial dimension of the crisis could be worse than the purely radiological one, an adapted communication strategy with the public aspect would be a key issue

  6. Aerated concrete with mineral dispersed reinforcing additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdov, G. I.; Ilina, L. V.; Mukhina, I. N.; Rakov, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    To guarantee the production of aerated concrete with the lowest average density while ensuring the required strength it is necessary to use a silica component with a surface area of 250-300 m2 / kg. The article presents experimental data on grinding the silica component together with clinker to the optimum dispersion. This allows increasing the strength of non-autoclaved aerated concrete up to 33%. Furthermore, the addition to aerated concrete the mixture of dispersed reinforcing agents (wollastonite, diopside) and electrolytes with multiply charged cations and anions (1% Fe2 (SO4)3; Al2 (SO4)3) provides the growth of aerated concrete strength at 30 - 75%. As a cohesive the clinker, crushed together with silica and mineral supplements should be used. This increases the strength of aerated concrete at 65% in comparing with Portland cement.

  7. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  8. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  9. LAGRANGIAN PARTICLE DISPERSION MODEL (LPDM) TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K

    2006-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) uses the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) in conjunction with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System as an operational tool for emergency response consequence assessments for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The LPDM is an advanced stochastic atmospheric transport model used to transport and disperse passive tracers subject to the meteorological field generated by RAMS from sources of varying number and shape. The Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) of the SRNL is undertaking the task of reviewing documentation and code for LPDM Quality Assurance (QA). The LPDM QA task will include a model technical description, computer coding descriptions, model applications, and configuration control. This report provides a comprehensive technical description of the LPDM model

  10. Atmospheric tracer experiments for regional dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffter, J.L.; Ferber, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Tracer experiments are being conducted to verify atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations at distances from tens to hundreds of km from pollutant sources. In one study, a 2 1/2 year sampling program has been carried out at 13 sites located 30 to 140 km from a source of 85 Kr at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. Average weekly concentrations as well as twice-daily concentrations were obtained. Sampling data and meteorological data, including surface, tower, and rawinsonde observations are available on magnetic tape for model verification studies. Some verification results for the Air Resources Laboratories Atmospheric Transort and Dispersion Model (ARL-ATAD) are shown for averaging periods from one week to two years

  11. Dispersion and stabilization of cochleate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozó, Tamás; Wacha, András; Mihály, Judith; Bóta, Attila; Kellermayer, Miklós S Z

    2017-08-01

    Cochleates, calcium-stabilized membrane rolls of nanoscale diameter, promise a unique and efficient way of delivering lipid-soluble drugs, proteins or nucleic acids into biological systems because they protect the encapsulated material against enzymatic or chemical degradation. Self-aggregation, which typically arises during production and storage is a major obstacle that has so far precluded the development of an efficient cochleate-based drug-delivery system. Here we show that citric acid, added transiently in a narrow concentration range, effectively disperses cochleate aggregates, stabilizes the disperse state for long-term storage and preserves the canonical ultrastructure and topological characteristics of cochleate nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  13. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  14. Modified dispersion relations, inflation, and scale invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Stefano; Friedhoff, Victor Nicolai; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2018-02-01

    For a certain type of modified dispersion relations, the vacuum quantum state for very short wavelength cosmological perturbations is scale-invariant and it has been suggested that this may be the source of the scale-invariance observed in the temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. We point out that for this scenario to be possible, it is necessary to redshift these short wavelength modes to cosmological scales in such a way that the scale-invariance is not lost. This requires nontrivial background dynamics before the onset of standard radiation-dominated cosmology; we demonstrate that one possible solution is inflation with a sufficiently large Hubble rate, for this slow roll is not necessary. In addition, we also show that if the slow-roll condition is added to inflation with a large Hubble rate, then for any power law modified dispersion relation quantum vacuum fluctuations become nearly scale-invariant when they exit the Hubble radius.

  15. Phylogeography of a successful aerial disperser: the golden orb spider Nephila on Indian Ocean islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuntner Matjaž

    2011-05-01

    subsequent to colonization, a scenario that might be referred to as speciation in progress. However, due to relatively small sample sizes, we cannot rule out that we simply failed to collect Mascarene haplotypes on Madagascar, a scenario that might imply human mediated dispersal. Nonetheless, the former interpretation better fits the available data and results in a pattern similar to the related Nephilengys. Nephilengys, however, shows higher genetic divergences with diversification on more remote islands. That the better disperser of the two lineages, Nephila, has colonized more islands but failed to diversify, demonstrates how dispersal ability can shape both the patterns of colonization and formation of species across archipelagos.

  16. Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Wendy D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doherty, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Mark T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, Ryan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    This report documents the results of the development and the manufacturing experience gained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) while working with the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) materials MA 956, 14YWT, and 9YWT. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. ODS materials have the potential to provide improved performance for the U-Mo concept.

  17. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    sound sources deployed in the SW06 experiment. The signal ranges were ~5 and ~7 km, and the data were received on the MPL vertical array moored at...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments N. Ross...our understanding of the interaction of sound with the ocean bottom is the frequency dependence of sound speed and attenuation in marine sediments

  18. Photon Dispersion in a Supernova Core

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, A.; Raffelt, G.

    1997-01-01

    While the photon forward-scattering amplitude on free magnetic dipoles (e.g. free neutrons) vanishes, the nucleon magnetic moments still contribute significantly to the photon dispersion relation in a supernova (SN) core where the nucleon spins are not free due to their interaction. We study the frequency dependence of the relevant spin susceptibility in a toy model with only neutrons which interact by one-pion exchange. Our approach amounts to calculating the photon absorption rate from the ...

  19. Dispersion of contaminants in saturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moltyaner, G.L.; Poisson, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The main objective of this paper is to outline the experimental and theoretical investigations performed in an attempt to validate the applicability of finite element based numerical models for the prediction of the behaviour of a conservative tracer at the Twin Lake aquifer, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario. The essential point is that the 3/4 of a million data points obtained at the Twin Lake site from a 40 m natural gradient tracer test provide a unique opportunity for quantifying the system variability and for testing finite element models of the dispersion process. The subject of this discussion is the advection-dispersion model of contaminant transport - its equation and solution by the Galerkin finite element method. The report gives a brief description of the experimental data and the methods for the estimation of transport parameters. Scales of averaging associated with the conceptual formulation of the dispersion process, measurement of process variables, parameter estimation and the numerical models are discussed. The compatibility between the scales is emphasized as a major requirement for predictive modelling. The developed finite element model of the radioiodine transport describes the overall behaviour of the tracer plume but lacks the capability to simulate the fingerlike spreading of the plume due to the fact that the grid does not have an adequately fine space discretization. Unfortunately, a refinement of the grid spacing is limited by the size of the site computer memory. For the advection-dominated transport, as that encountered at the Twin Lake aquifer, the failure to satisfy fine mesh requirement causes numerical dispersion. In general, it was concluded that the conventional finite element model may produce accurate simulation of the tracer cloud provided that the adequately fine space discretization of the grid compatible with the support scale of measurements and the adequately fine time discretization are made. This

  20. Evaluation of hovercraft for dispersant application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, D.; Belore, R.; Buist, I.; Humphrey, B.

    1988-01-01

    A series of field trials were carried out in Vancouver, Canada in July and August 1986 to determine whether or not hovercraft should be considered for dispersant application. Questions are: the ability of the hovercraft to ''fly'' over an oil slick at high speed without displacing the oil out of the path, the potential for using the hovercraft to impart vertical mixing energy into the water column to aid in the dispersant process and, the ability to mount a suitable spray boom and obtain a uniform spray pattern across the swath width. The field trials and subsequent interpretation of results provide positive answers to the first and second question. The question of mixing energy requires some qualification. The hovercraft contributes considerable mixing energy to the immediate water surface through air entrainment but this effect is short lived and there does not appear to be significant long term vertical mixing in the hovercraft wake. Recommendations are made for operating procedures and boom mounting which should ensure a uniform drop size and dose rate across a swath up to 18 m. The cushion air escaping from around the craft perimeter is not an important factor in adversly affecting the dispersant spray pattern. Depending on the type of machine available, hovcercraft have the capability of treating up to a 1km/sup 2/ slick between loads, at average speeds in the 15 to 25 knot range. The inherent advantages of high transit speed to the site (up to 45 Knots), amphibious operation (i.e. not draft limited) and lack of ceiling or visibility restrictions provide hovercarft with unique capabilities in the dispersant application role. Two patents relating to the process have been abstracted. Appendix B gives the sprecifications of two different models of hovercrafts. 14 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  2. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  3. Plasma Dispersion Functions for Complex Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, S. S.; Castejon, F.

    2005-07-01

    Plasma dispersion functions for complex wave propagation frequency in the weak relativistic regime for arbitrary longitudinal refractive index are estimated and presented in this work. These functions, that are know as Shkarofsky functions in the case of real frequency, are estimated using a new method that avoids the singularities that appear in previous calculations shown in the preceding literature. These results can be used to obtain the properties of plasma instabilities in the weakly relativistic regime. (Author) 14 refs.

  4. [Disperse endocrine system and APUD concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil'to, I V; Sukhodolo, I V; Gereng, E A; Shamardina, L A

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the problems of disperse endocrine system and APUD-system morphology, summarizes some debatable issues of single endocrine cell biology. The data presented refer to the history of both systems discovery, morphological methods of their study, developmental sources, their structural organization and physiological roles of their cells. The significance of single endocrine cells in the regulation of the organism functions is discussed.

  5. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, M.; Richter, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 045603. ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : volume gratings * holography * dispersion * refractive index modulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/2040-8986/aa6092/meta

  6. Plasma Dispersion Functions for Complex Frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S. S.; Castejon, F.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma dispersion functions for complex wave propagation frequency in the weak relativistic regime for arbitrary longitudinal refractive index are estimated and presented in this work. These functions, that are know as Shkarofsky functions in the case of real frequency, are estimated using a new method that avoids the singularities that appear in previous calculations shown in the preceding literature. These results can be used to obtain the properties of plasma instabilities in the weakly relativistic regime. (Author) 14 refs

  7. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  8. Longitudinal ultrasonic waves dispersion in bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2001-01-01

    The exhibition intends to review some aspects of the propagation of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulses shortly in bars of traverse section uniform.Aspects they are part of the denominated geometric dispersion of the pulses.This phenomenon It can present like an additional complication in the ultrasonic essay of low frequency of thin pieces in structures and machines but takes place former ex professed in some applications of the wave guides been accustomed to in the prosecution of signs

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Polypropylene / MWCNT Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Saswati; Burghardt, Wesley; Ramanathan, Thillaiyan; Brinson, L. Catherine; Kasimatis, Kosmas; Torkelson, John

    2008-03-01

    Dispersions of multiwall carbon nanotubes in polypropylene are prepared via melt batch mixing and solid-state shear pulverization, and characterized via linear viscoelastic measurements, SEM, polypropylene crystallization kinetics, electrical conductivity and dynamic mechanical analysis. Increasing the intensity or duration of the melt mixing leads to higher dispersion, evidenced by increases in a low-frequency elastic plateau and accelerated PP crystallization kinetics attributed to more effective heterogeneous nucleation. The sample prepared by pulverization exhibits faster crystallization kinetics than any of the melt blended samples, but in contrast shows no measurable low frequency elastic plateau. Electrical conductivity measurements similarly show higher conductivity in melt blended samples. This may be attributable to scission of the nanotubes during pulverization, such that even well dispersed tubes cannot form an entangled network at a given concentration. At the same time, pulverized composites show marked increase in stiffness at low loadings, indicating that tube scission due to pulverization is not catastrophic. Conversely, long mixing times required in melt blending cause substantial thermal degradation of the polymer matrix with a corresponding loss of mechanical properties.

  10. Atmospheric dispersion in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The atmosphere is an important pathway for the transport of radioactive releases from a nuclear power plant to the environment and thereby to man. It is necessary therefore to have adequate information about this pathway in order to estimate the dispersion of radioactive releases to the population in the region and thus be able to assess the radiological impact on man. The present Guide describes the meteorological phenomena and mechanisms involved in the dispersion of the released effluents in the atmosphere, discusses the methods which may be used to calculate the concentration and deposition in the region, specifies the data needed for input to these models, states the characteristics of the requisite instrumentation and data analysis systems and discusses certain related topics. Methods are presented for estimating concentration for short and long periods of emission over a wide range of types of radioactive releases. The evaluation of dose to individuals and population, given the concentration, is dealt with in national and international publications. It has been customary in the safety analysis of nuclear power plants to prepare dispersion estimates with different degrees of emphasis and various accuracy requirements at the stages of (a) site survey, (b) site evaluation, and (c) operation of the plant, and for accident contingency planning. Recommendations given in the present Guide generally apply to a distance of up to about 10 km depending upon the complexity of the terrain. The extension to longer distances may be made with caution and to the satisfaction of the regulatory authority

  11. Optical measurements in evolving dispersed pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgaropoulos, Victor; Angeli, Panagiota

    2017-12-01

    Optical laser-based techniques and an extensive data analysis methodology have been developed to acquire flow and separation characteristics of concentrated liquid-liquid dispersions. A helical static mixer was used at the inlet of an acrylic 4 m long horizontal pipe to actuate the dispersed flows at low mixture velocities. The organic (913 kg m^{-3}, 0.0046 Pa s) and aqueous phases (1146 kg m^{-3}, 0.0084 Pa s) were chosen to have matched refractive indices. Measurements were conducted at 15 and 135 equivalent pipe diameters downstream the inlet. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements illustrated the flow structures and provided the local in-situ holdup profiles. It was found that along the pipe the drops segregate and in some cases coalesce either with other drops or with the corresponding continuous phase. A multi-level threshold algorithm was developed to measure the drop sizes from the PLIF images. The velocity profiles in the aqueous phase were measured with particle image velocimetry (PIV), while the settling velocities of the organic dispersed drops were acquired with particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). It was also possible to capture coalescence events of a drop with an interface over time and to acquire the instantaneous velocity and vorticity fields in the coalescing drop.

  12. On arterial fiber dispersion and auxetic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokh, K Y

    2017-08-16

    There are two polar contemporary approaches to the constitutive modeling of arterial wall with anisotropy induced by collagen fibers. The first one is based on the angular integration (AI) of the strain energy on a unit sphere for the analytically defined fiber dispersion. The second one is based on the introduction of the generalized structure tensors (GST). AI approach is very involved computationally while GST approach requires somewhat complicated procedure for the exclusion of compressed fibers. We present some middle ground models, which are based on the use of 16 and 8 structure tensors. These models are moderately involved computationally and they allow excluding compressed fibers easily. We use the proposed models to study the role of the fiber dispersion in the constitutive modeling of the arterial wall. Particularly, we study the auxetic effect which can appear in anisotropic materials. The effect means thickening of the tissue in the direction perpendicular to its stretching. Such an effect was not observed in experiments while some simple anisotropic models do predict it. We show that more accurate account of the fiber dispersion suppresses the auxetic effect in a qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atmospheric dispersion modeling of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, Sorin; Oprea, Ion; Margeanu, Cristina; Angelescu, Tatiana

    1999-01-01

    In case of a nuclear accident, which could lead to release of radioactive contaminants, fastest countermeasures are needed, relating to sheltering, iodine distribution, evacuation and interdiction of food and water consumption. All these decisions should be based either on estimation of inhaled dose and the dose due to external exposure for public or on the estimation of radioactive concentration in food (which will depend on the radioactive concentration in air and ground deposition). In order to perform any of these calculations of consequences in case of nuclear accident, which leads to release of radioactive contaminants in the atmosphere, we must start with atmospheric dispersion calculations. In the last few years, considerable efforts have been devoted in order to improve computer codes for dispersion in the atmosphere of the radioactive contaminants released in a nuclear accident. The paper presents the model used in computer codes for assessment of nuclear accident consequences and a special attention was paid to the dispersion model used in the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti. The values for the used parameters and the results for air and ground concentration are also presented. (authors)

  14. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  15. Dispersion characteristics of a nonlinear elastic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Khajehtourian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We study wave dispersion in a one-dimensional nonlinear elastic metamaterial consisting of a thin rod with periodically attached local resonators. Our model is based on an exact finite-strain dispersion relation for a homogeneous solid, utilized in conjunction with the standard transfer matrix method for a periodic medium. The nonlinearity considered stems from large elastic deformation in the thin rod, whereas the metamaterial behavior is associated with the dynamics of the local resonators. We derive an approximate dispersion relation for this system and provide an analytical prediction of band-gap characteristics. The results demonstrate the effect of the nonlinearity on the characteristics of the band structure, including the size, location, and character of the band gaps. For example, large deformation alone may cause a pair of isolated Bragg-scattering and local-resonance band gaps to coalesce. We show that for a wave amplitude on the order of one-eighth of the unit cell size, the effect of the nonlinearity in the structure considered is no longer negligible when the unit-cell size is one-fourteenth of the wavelength or larger.

  16. Sputtered Layered Synthetic Microstruture (LSM) Dispersion Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Troy W.

    1981-10-01

    The opportunities offered by engineered synthetic multilayer dispersion elements for x-rays have been recognized since the earliest days of x-ray diffraction analysis. In this paper, application of sputter deposition tehnology to the synthesis of Layered Synthetic Microstructure (LSM's) of sufficient quality or use as x-ray dispersion elements is discussed. It will be shown that high efficiency, controllble bandwidth dispersion elements, with d spacings varying from 15 Å to 180 Å, may be synthesized onto both mechanically stiff and flexible substrtes. Multilayer component materials include tungten, niobium, molybdenum, titanium, vanadium, and silicon layers separated by carbon layers. Experimental observations of peak reflectivity in first order, integrated reflectivity in first order, and diffraction performance at selected photon energies in the range, 100 to 15000 eV, will be reported and compared to theory. Emphasis is placed on results giving information concerning limiting structural characteristics of these LSM's. It will be shown that the observed behavior is in accord with theory, both kinematic and dynamic regimes being clearly observed. In addition, the mosaic spread of these LSM's is not detectable, indicatig that they are perfect structures. A consistent explanation of these experimental results indicates that roughness at the interfaces between constituent layers is the structural characteristic currently limiting diffracting behavior.

  17. Laccase/Mediator Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, Roelant; Vincken, Jean Paul; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A.

    2018-01-01

    Laccase-mediator systems (LMS) have been widely studied for their capacity to oxidize the nonphenolic subunits of lignin (70-90% of the polymer). The phenolic subunits (10-30% of the polymer), which can also be oxidized without mediators, have received considerably less attention. Consequently, it

  18. Generation of dispersion in nondispersive nonlinear waves in thermal equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonjung; Kovačič, Gregor; Cai, David

    2013-02-26

    In this work, we examine the important theoretical question of whether dispersion relations can arise from purely nonlinear interactions among waves that possess no linear dispersive characteristics. Using two prototypical examples of nondispersive waves, we demonstrate how nonlinear interactions can indeed give rise to effective dispersive-wave-like characteristics in thermal equilibrium. Physically, these example systems correspond to the strong nonlinear coupling limit in the theory of wave turbulence. We derive the form of the corresponding dispersion relation, which describes the effective dispersive structures, using the generalized Langevin equations obtained in the Zwanzig-Mori projection framework. We confirm the validity of this effective dispersion relation in our numerical study using the wavenumber-frequency spectral analysis. Our work may provide insight into an important connection between highly nonlinear turbulent wave systems, possibly with no discernible dispersive properties, and the dispersive nature of the corresponding renormalized waves.

  19. Dispersant effectiveness in the field on fresh oils and emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunel, T.; Davies, L.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed data set on the effectiveness of dispersants on fresh oils and emulsions, was presented. The data set could be used to calibrate laboratory dispersant tests and dispersion models so that oil spill response teams would have accurate information to make decisions regarding remediation processes. AEA Technology developed steady state continuous release experiments to provide a data set with quantitative measures of dispersant effectiveness in the field. The Sea Empress incident was closely monitored in order to compare the quantification obtained through field trials. It was noted that the prediction of the percentage of oil dispersed chemically is not the only indication of whether or not to use a dispersant. The important determinant to consider should be the extent to which the natural dispersion process would be enhanced by dispersant application. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs

  20. Chemotaxis and flow disorder shape microbial dispersion in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Anna, Pietro; Yawata, Yutaka; Stocker, Roman; Juanes, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria drive a plethora of natural processes in the subsurface, consuming organic matter and catalysing chemical reactions that are key to global elemental cycles. These macro-scale consequences result from the collective action of individual bacteria at the micro-scale, which are modulated by the highly heterogeneous subsurface environment, dominated by flow disorder and strong chemical gradients. Yet, despite the generally recognized importance of these microscale processes, microbe-host medium interaction at the pore scale remain poorly characterized and understood. Here, we introduce a microfluidic model system to directly image and quantify the role of cell motility on bacterial dispersion and residence time in confined, porous, media. Using the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus subtilis and the common amino acid serine as a resource, we observe that chemotaxis in highly disordered and confined physico-chemical environment affords bacteria an increase in their ability to persistently occupy the host medium. Our findings illustrate that the interplay between bacterial behaviour and pore-scale disorder in fluid velocity and nutrient concentration directly impacts the residence time, transport and bio-geo-chemical transformation rates of biota in the subsurface, and thus likely the processes they mediate.