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Sample records for four-dimensional ultrafast electron

  1. Four-Dimensional Ultrafast Electron Microscopy: Insights into an Emerging Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Adhikari, Aniruddha; Eliason, Jeffrey K.; Sun, Jingya; Bose, Riya; Flannigan, David J.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D-UEM) is a novel analytical technique that aims to fulfill the long-held dream of researchers to investigate materials at extremely short spatial and temporal resolutions by integrating the excellent

  2. Four-Dimensional Ultrafast Electron Microscopy: Insights into an Emerging Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Adhikari, Aniruddha

    2016-12-15

    Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D-UEM) is a novel analytical technique that aims to fulfill the long-held dream of researchers to investigate materials at extremely short spatial and temporal resolutions by integrating the excellent spatial resolution of electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of ultrafast femtosecond laser-based spectroscopy. The ingenious use of pulsed photoelectrons to probe surfaces and volumes of materials enables time-resolved snapshots of the dynamics to be captured in a way hitherto impossible by other conventional techniques. The flexibility of 4D-UEM lies in the fact that it can be used in both the scanning (S-UEM) and transmission (UEM) modes depending upon the type of electron microscope involved. While UEM can be employed to monitor elementary structural changes and phase transitions in samples using real-space mapping, diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and tomography, S-UEM is well suited to map ultrafast dynamical events on materials surfaces in space and time. This review provides an overview of the unique features that distinguish these techniques and also illustrates the applications of both S-UEM and UEM to a multitude of problems relevant to materials science and chemistry.

  3. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Melnikov, Vasily; Khan, Jafar Iqbal; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    , we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions

  4. Real-Space Imaging of Carrier Dynamics of Materials Surfaces by Second-Generation Four-Dimensional Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2015-09-14

    In the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaics, ultrafast dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination on material surfaces, are among the key factors that determine the overall energy conversion efficiency. A precise knowledge of these dynamical events on the nanometer (nm) and femtosecond (fs) scales was not accessible until recently. The only way to access such fundamental processes fully is to map the surface dynamics selectively in real space and time. In this study, we establish a second generation of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) and demonstrate the ability to record time-resolved images (snapshots) of material surfaces with 650 fs and ∼5 nm temporal and spatial resolutions, respectively. In this method, the surface of a specimen is excited by a clocking optical pulse and imaged using a pulsed primary electron beam as a probe pulse, generating secondary electrons (SEs), which are emitted from the surface of the specimen in a manner that is sensitive to the local electron/hole density. This method provides direct and controllable information regarding surface dynamics. We clearly demonstrate how the surface morphology, grains, defects, and nanostructured features can significantly impact the overall dynamical processes on the surface of photoactive-materials. In addition, the ability to access two regimes of dynamical probing in a single experiment and the energy loss of SEs in semiconductor-nanoscale materials will also be discussed.

  5. Estimation of four-dimensional dose distribution using electronic portal imaging device in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Asumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a method to evaluate four-dimensional radiation dose distribution in a patient body based upon the animated image of EPID (electronic portal imaging device) which is an image of beam-direction at the irradiation. In the first place, we have obtained the image of the dose which is emitted from patient body at therapy planning using therapy planning CT image and dose evaluation algorism. In the second place, we have estimated the emission dose image at the irradiation using EPID animated image which is obtained at the irradiation. In the third place, we have got an affine transformation matrix including respiratory movement in the body by performing linear registration on the emission dose image at therapy planning to get the one at the irradiation. In the fourth place, we have applied the affine transformation matrix on the therapy planning CT image and estimated the CT image 'at irradiation'. Finally we have evaluated four-dimensional dose distribution by calculating dose distribution in the CT image 'at irradiation' which has been estimated for each frame of the EPID animated-image. This scheme may be useful for evaluating therapy results and risk management. (author)

  6. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  7. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T c 4 superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the suppression of momentum

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-07-09

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T{sub c}4 superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the

  9. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  10. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  11. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won, E-mail: jungj@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Yeo, Inhwan [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as “reference” images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the

  12. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  14. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  15. Four Dimensional Trace Space Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, M.

    2005-02-10

    Future high energy colliders and FELs (Free Electron Lasers) such as the proposed LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC require high brightness electron beams. In general a high brightness electron beam will contain a large number of electrons that occupy a short longitudinal duration, can be focused to a small transverse area while having small transverse divergences. Therefore the beam must have a high peak current and occupy small areas in transverse phase space and so have small transverse emittances. Additionally the beam should propagate at high energy and have a low energy spread to reduce chromatic effects. The requirements of the LCLS for example are pulses which contain 10{sup 10} electrons in a temporal duration of 10 ps FWHM with projected normalized transverse emittances of 1{pi} mm mrad[1]. Currently the most promising method of producing such a beam is the RF photoinjector. The GTF (Gun Test Facility) at SLAC was constructed to produce and characterize laser and electron beams which fulfill the LCLS requirements. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at the GTF contain evidence of strong coupling between the transverse dimensions of the beam. This thesis explores the effects of this coupling on the determination of the projected emittances of the electron beam. In the presence of such a coupling the projected normalized emittance is no longer a conserved quantity. The conserved quantity is the normalized full four dimensional phase space occupied by the beam. A method to determine the presence and evaluate the strength of the coupling in emittance measurements made in the laboratory is developed. A method to calculate the four dimensional volume the beam occupies in phase space using quantities available in the laboratory environment is also developed. Results of measurements made of the electron beam at the GTF that demonstrate these concepts are presented and discussed.

  16. Ultrafast Plasmonic Electron Emission from Ag Nanolayers with Different Roughness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Márton, I.; Ayadi, V.; Rácz, P.; Stefaniuk, T.; Wróbel, Piotr; Földi, P.; Dombi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), s. 811-816 ISSN 1557-1955 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Nanoparticles * Ultrafast phenomena * Electron emission Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2016

  17. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  18. Four-dimensional imaging of the initial stage of fast evolving plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Pengfei; Wang Weimin; Zhang Zhongchao; Chen Long; Zheng Jun; Li Runze; Qian Dong; Li Junjie; Wang Xuan; Cao Jianming; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2010-01-01

    Using an ultrafast electron probe capable of four-dimensional diagnosis, the initial stage of fast evolving plasmas produced by a 10 14 W/cm 2 laser irradiation of a metal target was investigated in real time with picosecond time resolution. The associated strong transient electric field was identified to have two components, which either focus or defocus the probe electron beam. The effects of this field on the probe electron beam can be reproduced by a self-expanding charge cloud containing about 5x10 7 suprathermal electrons with the outermost layer expanding at an average speed of 1.2x10 7 m/s.

  19. On four dimensional mirror symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losev, A.; Nekrasov, N.; Shatashvili, S.

    2000-01-01

    A conjecture relating instanton calculus in four dimensional supersymmetric theories and the deformation theory of Lagrangian submanifolds in C 2r invariant under a (subgroup of) Sp(2r,Z) is formulated. This is a four dimensional counterpart of the mirror symmetry of topological strings (relating Gromov-Witten invariants and generalized variations of Hodge structure). (orig.)

  20. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM, which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time.

  1. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Min; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Ye-Jin; Kwon, Oh-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time.

  2. A Four-Dimensional Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of East Asian Students in English-speaking Countries: A Four-Dimensional ... country's language greatly shapes all aspects of the student's international education ... Taking this ecological approach will help clearly define the role that home ...

  3. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  4. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We then observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  5. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  6. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  7. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  8. Ultrafast transient-absorption of the solvated electron in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Y.; Alfano, J.C.; Walhout, P.K.; Barbara, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafast near infrared (NIR)-pump/variable wavelength probe transient-absorption spectroscopy has been performed on the aqueous solvated electron. The photodynamics of the solvated electron excited to its p-state are qualitatively similar to previous measurements of the dynamics of photoinjected electrons at high energy. This result confirms the previous interpretation of photoinjected electron dynamics as having a rate-limiting bottleneck at low energies presumably involving the p-state

  9. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K., E-mail: lrk@slac.stanford.edu; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  10. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes.

  11. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Wayne E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Frank, Alan; Reed, Bryan; Schmerge, John F.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Stuart, Brent C.; Weber, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  12. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X., E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  13. Ultrafast terahertz electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Liang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on using ultrafast laser pulses to study Terahertz (THz) electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures and microstructures. Ultrafast timeresolved (optical, NIR, MIR, THz) pump-probe spectroscopy setup has been successfully built, which enables me to perform a series of relevant experiments. Firstly, a novel high e ciency and compact THz wave emitter based on split-ring-resonators has been developed and characterized. The emitter can be pumped at any wavelength by tailoring the magnetic resonance and could generate gapless THz waves covering the entire THz band. Secondly, two kinds of new photonic structures for THz wave manipulation have been successfully designed and characterized. One is based on the 1D and 2D photo-imprinted di ractive elements. The other is based on the photoexcited double-split-ring-resonator metamaterials. Both structures are exible and can modulate THz waves with large tunability. Thirdly, the dark excitons in semiconducting singlewalled carbon nanotubes are studied by optical pump and THz probe spectroscopy, which provides the rst insights into the THz responses of nonequilibrium excitonic correlations and dynamics from the dark ground states in carbon nanotubes. Next, several on-going projects are brie y presented such as the study of ultrafast THz dynamics of Dirac fermions in topological insulator Bi2Se3 with Mid-infrared excitation. Finally, the thesis ends with a summary of the completed experiments and an outlook of the future plan.

  14. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  15. New four-dimensional symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    A new picture of nature is proposed in which there are only two fundamental universal constants anti e (identical with e/c) and dirac constant (identical with dirac constant/c). The theory is developed within the framework of a new four-dimensional symmetry which is constructed on the basis of the Poincare--Einstein principle of relativity for the laws of physics and the Newtonian concept of time. One obtains a new space--light transformation law, a velocity-addition law, and so on. In this symmetry scheme, the speed of light is constant and is completely relative. The new theory is logically self-consistent, and it moreover is in agreement with all previously established experimental facts, such as the ''lifetime dilatation'' of unstable particles, the Michelson--Morley experiment, etc. There is a difference relative to the usual theory, though, in that our theory predicts a new law for the Doppler frequency shift, which can be tested experimentally by measuring the second-order frequency shift

  16. Ultrafast dynamics of electrons at interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, Jason Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-03

    Electronic states of a thin layer of material on a surface possess unique physical and chemical properties. Some of these properties arise from the reduced dimensionality of the thin layer with respect to the bulk or the properties of the electric field where two materials of differing dielectric constants meet at an interface. Other properties are related to the nature of the surface chemical bond. Here, the properties of excess electrons in thin layers of Xenon, Krypton, and alkali metals are investigated, and the bound state energies and effective masses of the excess electrons are determined using two-photon photoemission. For Xenon, the dependence of bound state energy, effective mass, and lifetime on layer thickness from one to nine layers is examined. Not all quantities were measured at each coverage. The two photon photoemission spectra of thin layers of Xenon on a Ag(111) substrate exhibit a number of sharp, well-defined peaks. The binding energy of the excess electronic states of Xenon layers exhibited a pronounced dependence on coverage. A discrete energy shift was observed for each additional atomic layer. At low coverage, a series of states resembling a Rydberg series is observed. This series is similar to the image state series observed on clean metal surfaces. Deviations from image state energies can be described in terms of the dielectric constant of the overlayer material and its effect on the image potential. For thicker layers of Xe (beyond the first few atomic layers), the coverage dependence of the features begins to resemble that of quantum well states. Quantum well states are related to bulk band states. However, the finite thickness of the layer restricts the perpendicular wavevector to a discrete set of values. Therefore, the spectrum of quantum well states contains a series of peaks which correspond to the various allowed values of the perpendicular wavevector. Analysis of the quantum well spectrum yields electronic band structure

  17. High peak power THz source for ultrafast electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengguang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz science and technology have already become the research highlight at present. In this paper, we put forward a device setup to carry out ultrafast fundamental research. A photocathode RF gun generates electron bunches with ∼MeV energy, ∼ps bunch width and about 25pC charge. The electron bunches inject the designed wiggler, the coherent radiation at THz spectrum emits from these bunches and increases rapidly until the saturation at ∼MW within a short wiggler. THz pulses can be used as pump to stimulate an ultra-short excitation in some kind of sample. Those electron bunches out of wiggler can be handled into bunches with ∼1pC change, small beam spot and energy spread to be probe. Because the pump and probe comes from the same electron source, synchronization between pump and probe is inherent. The whole facility can be compacted on a tabletop.

  18. Direct observation of the ultrafast electron transfer process in a polymer/fullerene blend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerullo, G.; Lanzani, G.; Silvestri, S. De; Brabec, Ch.J.; Zerza, G.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in organic molecules is an extensively investigated topic both because of fundamental interest in the photophysics and for applications to artificial photosynthesis. Highly efficient ultrafast electron transfer from photoexcited conjugated polymers to C60 has been

  19. Attosecond electron pulse trains and quantum state reconstruction in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Katharina E.; Rathje, Christopher; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Hohage, Thorsten; Feist, Armin; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast electron and X-ray imaging and spectroscopy are the basis for an ongoing revolution in the understanding of dynamical atomic-scale processes in matter. The underlying technology relies heavily on laser science for the generation and characterization of ever shorter pulses. Recent findings suggest that ultrafast electron microscopy with attosecond-structured wavefunctions may be feasible. However, such future technologies call for means to both prepare and fully analyse the corresponding free-electron quantum states. Here, we introduce a framework for the preparation, coherent manipulation and characterization of free-electron quantum states, experimentally demonstrating attosecond electron pulse trains. Phase-locked optical fields coherently control the electron wavefunction along the beam direction. We establish a new variant of quantum state tomography—`SQUIRRELS'—for free-electron ensembles. The ability to tailor and quantitatively map electron quantum states will promote the nanoscale study of electron-matter entanglement and new forms of ultrafast electron microscopy down to the attosecond regime.

  20. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofang; Saleh, Ned; Krishnan, Mohan; Wang Haiwen; Backus, Sterling; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Umstadter, Donald; Wang Quandong; Shen Baifei

    2003-01-01

    Mega-electron-volt (MeV) electron emission from the interaction of an ultrafast (τ∼29 fs), intense (>10 18 W/cm 2 ) laser pulse with underdense plasmas has been studied. A beam of MeV electrons with a divergence angle as small as 1 deg. is observed in the forward direction, which is correlated with relativistic filamentation of the laser pulse in plasmas. A novel net-energy-gain mechanism is proposed for electron acceleration resulting from the relativistic filamentation and beam breakup. These results suggest an approach for generating a beam of femtosecond, MeV electrons at a kilohertz repetition rate with a compact ultrafast intense laser system

  1. Seeing in 4D with electrons: development of ultrafast electron microscopy at Caltech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, J.S.; Zewail, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    The vision to develop 4D electron microscopy, a union of the capabilities of electron microscopy with ultrafast techniques to capture clearly defined images of the nano-scale structure of a material at each step in the course of its chemical or physical transformations, has been pursued at Caltech for the last decade. In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the capabilities of three currently active Caltech 4D microscopy laboratories. Ongoing work is illustrated by a description of the most recent application of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a field made possible only by the development of the 4D ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). An appendix gives the various applications made so far and the historic roots of the development at Caltech. (authors)

  2. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  3. Effect of ballistic electrons on ultrafast thermomechanical responses of a thin metal film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Qi-lin; Tian Xin

    2017-01-01

    The ultrafast thermomechanical coupling problem in a thin gold film irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses with different electron ballistic depths is investigated via the ultrafast thermoelasticity model. The solution of the problem is obtained by solving finite element governing equations. The comparison between the results of ultrafast thermomechanical coupling responses with different electron ballistic depths is made to show the ballistic electron effect. It is found that the ballistic electrons have a significant influence on the ultrafast thermomechanical coupling behaviors of the gold thin film and the best laser micromachining results can be achieved by choosing the specific laser technology (large or small ballistic range). In addition, the influence of simplification of the ultrashort laser pulse source on the results is studied, and it is found that the simplification has a great influence on the thermomechanical responses, which implies that care should be taken when the simplified form of the laser source term is applied as the Gaussian heat source. (paper)

  4. Analytic model of electron pulse propagation in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, A.M.; Sipe, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mean-field analytic model to study the propagation of electron pulses used in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments (UED). We assume a Gaussian form to characterize the electron pulse, and derive a system of ordinary differential equations that are solved quickly and easily to give the pulse dynamics. We compare our model to an N-body numerical simulation and are able to show excellent agreement between the two result sets. This model is a convenient alternative to time consuming and computationally intense N-body simulations in exploring the dynamics of UED electron pulses, and as a tool for refining UED experimental designs

  5. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  6. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. - Highlights: • A detailed characterization of electron

  8. Super integrable four-dimensional autonomous mappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capel, H W; Sahadevan, R; Rajakumar, S

    2007-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the complete integrability of a fourth-order autonomous difference equation of the type w(n + 4) = w(n)F(w(n + 1), w(n + 2), w(n + 3)) is presented. We identify seven distinct families of four-dimensional mappings which are super integrable and have three (independent) integrals via a duality relation as introduced in a recent paper by Quispel, Capel and Roberts (2005 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 3965-80). It is observed that these seven families can be related to the four-dimensional symplectic mappings with two integrals including all the four-dimensional periodic reductions of the integrable double-discrete modified Korteweg-deVries and sine-Gordon equations treated in an earlier paper by two of us (Capel and Sahadevan 2001 Physica A 289 86-106)

  9. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

  10. Ultrafast electron microscopy: Instrument response from the single-electron to high bunch-charge regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemmons, Dayne A.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-09-01

    We determine the instrument response of an ultrafast electron microscope equipped with a conventional thermionic electron gun and absent modifications beyond the optical ports. Using flat, graphite-encircled LaB6 cathodes, we image space-charge effects as a function of photoelectron-packet population and find that an applied Wehnelt bias has a negligible effect on the threshold levels (>103 electrons per pulse) but does appear to suppress blurring at the upper limits (∼105 electrons). Using plasma lensing, we determine the instrument-response time for 700-fs laser pulses and find that single-electron packets are laser limited (1 ps), while broadening occurs well below the space-charge limit.

  11. Ultrafast dynamics of electronically excited molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietard, Aude

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis investigated the ultrafast dynamics of photo-chromic molecules and argon clusters in the gas phase at the femtosecond timescale. Pump-probe experiments are performed in a set-up which associates a versatile pulsed molecular beam coupled to a photoelectron/photoion velocity map imager (VMI) and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Theses pump-probe experiments provides the temporal evolution of the electronic distribution for each system of interest. Besides, a modelization has been performed in order to characterize the density and the velocity distribution in the pulsed beam. Regarding the photo-chromic di-thienyl-ethene molecules, parallel electronic relaxation pathways were observed. This contrasts with the observation of sequential relaxation processes in most molecules studied so far. In the present case, the initial wave packet splits in two parts. One part is driven to the ground state at the femtosecond time scale through a conical intersection, and the second part remains for ps in the excited state and experiences oscillations in a suspended well. This study has shed light into the intrinsic dynamics of the molecules under study and a general relaxation mechanism has been proposed, which applies to the whole family of di-thienyl-ethene molecules whatever the state of matter (gas phase or solution) in which they have been investigated. Concerning argon clusters excited at about 14 eV, two behaviors of different time scale have been observed at different time scales. The first one occurs in the first picoseconds of the dynamics. It corresponds to the electronic relaxation of an excitonic state at a rate of 1 eV.ps -1 . The second phenomenon corresponds to the localization of the exciton on the excimer Ar 2 *. This phenomenon is observed 4-5 ps after the excitation. In this study, we also observed the ejection of excited argon atoms, addressing the lifetime of the delocalized excitonic state. This work provide additional informations

  12. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas studied by two terahertz pulse experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary form only given. Ultrafast electron field emission from gold resonant antennas induced by strong terahertz (THz) transient is investigated using two THz pulse experiments. It is shown that UV emission from nitrogen plasma generated by liberated electrons is a good indication of the local...

  13. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: cropers@gwdg.de [4th Physical Institute - Solids and Nanostructures, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  14. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B12 in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states

  15. Ultrafast electron injection at the cationic porphyrin-graphene interface assisted by molecular flattening

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Parida, Manas R.; Alarousu, Erkki; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-01-01

    The steady-state and femtosecond (fs) time-resolved data clearly demonstrate that the charge transfer (CT) process at the porphyrin-graphene carboxylate (GC) interfaces can be tuned from zero to very sufficient and ultrafast by changing the electronic structure of the meso unit and the redox properties of the porphyrin cavity. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  16. Hot-electrons-induced ultrafast demagnitization in Co/Pt multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergeard, N.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lengaigne, G.; Montaigne, F.; Lalieu, M. L. M.; Koopmans, B.; Malinowski, G.

    2016-01-01

    Using specially engineered structures to tailor the optical absorption in a metallic multilayer, we analyze the magnetization dynamics of a Co/Pt multilayer buried below a thick Cu layer. We demonstrate that hot electrons alone can very efficiently induce ultrafast demagnetization. Simulations based

  17. Real-time observation of ultrafast electron injection at graphene–Zn porphyrin interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2015-02-25

    We report on the ultrafast interfacial electron transfer ( ET) between zinc( II) porphyrin ( ZnTMPyP) and negatively charged graphene carboxylate ( GC) using state- of- the- art femtosecond laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The steady- state interaction between GC and ZnTMPyP results in a red- shifted absorption spectrum, providing a clear indication for the binding affinity between ZnTMPyP and GC via electrostatic and p- p stacking interactions. Ultrafast transient absorption ( TA) spectra in the absence and presence of three different GC concentrations reveal ( i) the ultrafast formation of singlet excited ZnTMPyP*, which partially relaxes into a long- lived triplet state, and ( ii) ET from the singlet excited ZnTMPyP* to GC, forming ZnTMPyP + and GC , as indicated by a spectral feature at 650- 750 nm, which is attributed to a ZnTMPyP radical cation resulting from the ET process.

  18. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: carrier trapping versus electron-hole recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpene, E; Mancini, E; Dallera, C; Schwen, D; Ronning, C; Silvestri, S De

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films by means of femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity. We estimated the electron-phonon relaxation time of a few hundred femtoseconds and we observed that under low optical excitation photo-generated carriers decay according to two distinct mechanisms attributed to trapping by defect states and direct electron-hole recombination. With high excitation, when photo-carrier and trap densities are comparable, a unique temporal evolution develops, as the time dependence of the trapping process becomes degenerate with the electron-hole recombination. This experimental evidence highlights the role of defects in the ultrafast electronic dynamics and is not specific to this particular form of carbon, but has general validity for amorphous and disordered semiconductors

  19. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported....... We addressed this topic by performing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) measurements of aqueous suspensions of uncoated and DCF-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles, and an aqueous iron(iii)–dye complex. Following light absorption, excited state relaxation times of the dye of 115...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...

  20. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Weihong; Li Tanping; Zhang Luyuan; Yang Yi; Kao Yating; Wang Lijuan [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zhong Dongping [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: dongping@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2008-06-23

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications.

  1. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a π-Conjugated Oligomer/Porphyrin Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2014-10-02

    Controlling charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) at the donor-acceptor interface is extremely important to optimize the conversion efficiency in solar cell devices. In general, ultrafast CT and slow CR are desirable for optimal device performance. In this Letter, the ultrafast excited-state CT between platinum oligomer (DPP-Pt(acac)) as a new electron donor and porphyrin as an electron acceptor is monitored for the first time using femtosecond (fs) transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy with broad-band capability and 120 fs temporal resolution. Turning the CT on/off has been shown to be possible either by switching from an organometallic oligomer to a metal-free oligomer or by controlling the charge density on the nitrogen atom of the porphyrin meso unit. Our time-resolved data show that the CT and CS between DPP-Pt(acac) and cationic porphyrin are ultrafast (approximately 1.5 ps), and the CR is slow (ns time scale), as inferred from the formation and the decay of the cationic and anionic species. We also found that the metallic center in the DPP-Pt(acac) oligomer and the positive charge on the porphyrin are the keys to switching on/off the ultrafast CT process.

  2. Concept and design of a beam blanker with integrated photoconductive switch for ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weppelman, I G C; Moerland, R J; Hoogenboom, J P; Kruit, P

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method to create ultrashort electron pulses by integrating a photoconductive switch with an electrostatic deflector. This paper discusses the feasibility of such a system by analytical and numerical calculations. We argue that ultrafast electron pulses can be achieved for micrometer scale dimensions of the blanker, which are feasible with MEMS-based fabrication technology. According to basic models, the design presented in this paper is capable of generating 100 fs electron pulses with spatial resolutions of less than 10 nm. Our concept for an ultrafast beam blanker (UFB) may provide an attractive alternative to perform ultrafast electron microscopy, as it does not require modification of the microscope nor realignment between DC and pulsed mode of operation. Moreover, only low laser pulse energies are required. Due to its small dimensions the UFB can be inserted in the beam line of a commercial microscope via standard entry ports for blankers or variable apertures. The use of a photoconductive switch ensures minimal jitter between laser and electron pulses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  4. Distinctive Spectral Features of Exciton and Excimer States in the Ultrafast Electronic Deactivation of the Adenine Dinucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhldreier, Mayra C.; Röttger, Katharina; Temps, Friedrich

    We report the observation by transient absorption spectroscopy of distinctive spectro-temporal signatures of delocalized exciton versus relaxed, weakly bound excimer states in the ultrafast electronic deactivation after UV photoexcitation of the adenine dinucleotide.

  5. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2016-01-01

    , electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance

  6. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  7. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States); Beaurepaire, B.; Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-02-11

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  8. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  9. Ultra-fast electron capture by electrosterically-stabilized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandi, Khashayar; Findlater, Alexander D; Mahimwalla, Zahid; MacNeil, Connor S; Awoonor-Williams, Ernest; Zahariev, Federico; Gordon, Mark S

    2015-07-21

    Ultra-fast pre-solvated electron capture has been observed for aqueous solutions of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) surface-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs; ∼9 nm). The extraordinarily large inverse temperature dependent rate constants (k(e)∼ 5 × 10(14) M(-1) s(-1)) measured for the capture of electrons in solution suggest electron capture by the AuNP surface that is on the timescale of, and therefore in competition with, electron solvation and electron-cation recombination reactions. The observed electron transfer rates challenge the conventional notion that radiation induced biological damage would be enhanced in the presence of AuNPs. On the contrary, AuNPs stabilized by non-covalently bonded ligands demonstrate the potential to quench radiation-induced electrons, indicating potential applications in fields ranging from radiation therapy to heterogeneous catalysis.

  10. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  11. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xianhai; Du Yingchao; Huang Wenhui; Tang Chuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    transverse ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled. (authors)

  12. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; AbdulHalim, Lina G.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Soldan, Giada; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, T. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Reis, D. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  14. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-10-29

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Ultrafast equilibration of excited electrons in dynamical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhibin; Allen, Roland E

    2009-12-02

    In our density-functional-based simulations of materials responding to femtosecond-scale laser pulses, we have observed a potentially useful phenomenon: the excited electrons automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within ∼100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion. Microscopic simulations like these can then provide the separate electronic and kinetic temperatures, chemical potentials, pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses as input for studies on larger lengths and timescales.

  16. Extended supersymmetry in four-dimensional Euclidean space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeon, D.G.C.; Sherry, T.N.

    2000-01-01

    Since the generators of the two SU(2) groups which comprise SO(4) are not Hermitian conjugates of each other, the simplest supersymmetry algebra in four-dimensional Euclidean space more closely resembles the N=2 than the N=1 supersymmetry algebra in four-dimensional Minkowski space. An extended supersymmetry algebra in four-dimensional Euclidean space is considered in this paper; its structure resembles that of N=4 supersymmetry in four-dimensional Minkowski space. The relationship of this algebra to the algebra found by dimensionally reducing the N=1 supersymmetry algebra in ten-dimensional Euclidean space to four-dimensional Euclidean space is examined. The dimensional reduction of N=1 super Yang-Mills theory in ten-dimensional Minkowski space to four-dimensional Euclidean space is also considered

  17. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaozheng Ji

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening

  18. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shaozheng; Piazza, Luca; Cao, Gaolong; Park, Sang Tae; Reed, Bryan W; Masiel, Daniel J; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2017-09-01

    Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM) that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening shows a close to

  19. First-principles calculations of heat capacities of ultrafast laser-excited electrons in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J.P.; Recoules, V.; Stoian, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser excitation can induce fast increases of the electronic subsystem temperature. The subsequent electronic evolutions in terms of band structure and energy distribution can determine the change of several thermodynamic properties, including one essential for energy deposition; the electronic heat capacity. Using density functional calculations performed at finite electronic temperatures, the electronic heat capacities dependent on electronic temperatures are obtained for a series of metals, including free electron like, transition and noble metals. The effect of exchange and correlation functionals and the presence of semicore electrons on electronic heat capacities are first evaluated and found to be negligible in most cases. Then, we tested the validity of the free electron approaches, varying the number of free electrons per atom. This shows that only simple metals can be correctly fitted with these approaches. For transition metals, the presence of localized d electrons produces a strong deviation toward high energies of the electronic heat capacities, implying that more energy is needed to thermally excite them, compared to free sp electrons. This is attributed to collective excitation effects strengthened by a change of the electronic screening at high temperature

  20. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlis, N.H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G.R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  1. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  2. Ultrafast Hot Electron Induced Phase Transitions in Vanadium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Au/Cr/VO2/Si system was investigated in pump–probe experiments. Hot-electrons generated in the Au were found to penetrate into the underlying VO2 and couple with its lattice inducing a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in ~2 picoseconds.

  3. Test of theoretical models for ultrafast heterogeneous electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    first excited singlet state attached via different bridge–anchor groups to the TiO2 surface, were compared with the ... surface the energy distribution curves for the injected electrons were fitted ... oxygen atoms to one or two Ti atoms on the TiO2.

  4. Design and commissioning of an aberration-corrected ultrafast spin-polarized low energy electron microscope with multiple electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weishi; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Feng, Jun; Kunze, Kai; Schaff, Oliver; Tromp, Ruud; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2017-03-01

    We describe the design and commissioning of a novel aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (AC-LEEM). A third magnetic prism array (MPA) is added to the standard AC-LEEM with two prism arrays, allowing the incorporation of an ultrafast spin-polarized electron source alongside the standard cold field emission electron source, without degrading spatial resolution. The high degree of symmetries of the AC-LEEM are utilized while we design the electron optics of the ultrafast spin-polarized electron source, so as to minimize the deleterious effect of time broadening, while maintaining full control of electron spin. A spatial resolution of 2nm and temporal resolution of 10ps (ps) are expected in the future time resolved aberration-corrected spin-polarized LEEM (TR-AC-SPLEEM). The commissioning of the three-prism AC-LEEM has been successfully finished with the cold field emission source, with a spatial resolution below 2nm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrafast Gap Dynamics and Electronic Interactions in a Photoexcited Cuprate Superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parham

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We perform time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES on optimally doped Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (BSCCO-2212 using sufficient energy resolution (9 meV to resolve the k-dependent near-nodal gap structure on time scales where the concept of an electronic pseudotemperature is a useful quantity, i.e., after electronic thermalization has occurred. We study the ultrafast evolution of this gap structure, uncovering a very rich landscape of decay rates as a function of angle, temperature, and energy. We explicitly focus on the quasiparticle states at the gap edge as well as on the spectral weight inside the gap that “fills” the gap—understood as an interaction, or self-energy effect—and we also make high resolution measurements of the nodal states, enabling a direct and accurate measurement of the electronic temperature (or pseudotemperature of the electrons in the system. Rather than the standard method of interpreting these results using individual quasiparticle scattering rates that vary significantly as a function of angle, temperature, and energy, we show that the entire landscape of relaxations can be understood by modeling the system as following a nonequilibrium, electronic pseudotemperature that controls all electrons in the zone. Furthermore, this model has zero free parameters, as we obtain the crucial information of the SC gap Δ and the gap-filling strength Γ_{TDoS} by connecting to static ARPES measurements. The quantitative and qualitative agreement between data and model suggests that the critical parameters and interactions of the system, including the pairing interactions, follow parametrically from the electronic pseudotemperature. We expect that this concept will be relevant for understanding the ultrafast response of a great variety of electronic materials, even though the electronic pseudotemperature may not be directly measurable.

  6. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  7. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  8. A new coupling mechanism between two graphene electron waveguides for ultrafast switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Liang, Shi-Jun; Kyoseva, Elica; Ang, Lay Kee

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel coupling between two graphene electron waveguides, in analogy the optical waveguides. The design is based on the coherent quantum mechanical tunneling of Rabi oscillation between the two graphene electron waveguides. Based on this coupling mechanism, we propose that it can be used as an ultrafast electronic switching device. Based on a modified coupled mode theory, we construct a theoretical model to analyze the device characteristics, and predict that the switching speed is faster than 1 ps and the on-off ratio exceeds 106. Due to the long mean free path of electrons in graphene at room temperature, the proposed design avoids the limitation of low temperature operation required in the traditional design by using semiconductor quantum-well structure. The layout of our design is similar to that of a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor that should be readily fabricated with current state-of-art nanotechnology.

  9. Communication: Effects of thermionic-gun parameters on operating modes in ultrafast electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Kieft

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron microscopes with thermionic guns and LaB6 sources can be operated in both the nanosecond, single-shot and femtosecond, single-electron modes. This has been demonstrated with conventional Wehnelt electrodes and absent any applied bias. Here, by conducting simulations using the General Particle Tracer code, we define the electron-gun parameter space within which various modes may be optimized. The properties of interest include electron collection efficiency, temporal and energy spreads, and effects of laser-pulse duration incident on the LaB6 source. We find that collection efficiencies can reach 100% for all modes, despite there being no bias applied to the electrode.

  10. Unmanned Aerial System Four-Dimensional Gunnery Training Device Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Aerial System (UAS) Four-Dimensional Gunnery Training Device: Training Effectiveness Assessment (James & Miller, in press). 31 Technical ...Research Product 2018-05 Unmanned Aerial System Four-Dimensional Gunnery Training Device Development David R. James...for the Department of the Army by Northrop Grumman Corporation. Technical review by Thomas Rhett Graves, Ph.D., U.S. Army Research Institute

  11. Inverse Operation of Four-dimensional Vector Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    H J Bao; A J Sang; H X Chen

    2011-01-01

    This is a new series of study to define and prove multidimensional vector matrix mathematics, which includes four-dimensional vector matrix determinant, four-dimensional vector matrix inverse and related properties. There are innovative concepts of multi-dimensional vector matrix mathematics created by authors with numerous applications in engineering, math, video conferencing, 3D TV, and other fields.

  12. Four-dimensional strings: Phenomenology and model building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros, M.

    1989-01-01

    In these lectures we will review some of the last developments in string theories leading to the construction of realistic four-dimensional string models. Special attention will be paid to world-sheet and space-time supersymmetry, modular invariance and model building for supersymmetric and (tachyon-free) nonsupersymmetric ten and four-dimensional models. (orig.)

  13. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-01-01

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY

  14. Novel radio-frequency gun structures for ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Faillace, L; Fukasawa, A; Moody, J T; O'Shea, B; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M

    2009-08-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) photoinjector-based relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising new technique that has the potential to probe structural changes at the atomic scale with sub-100 fs temporal resolution in a single shot. We analyze the limitations on the temporal and spatial resolution of this technique considering the operating parameters of a standard 1.6 cell RF gun (which is the RF photoinjector used for the first experimental tests of relativistic UED at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; University of California, Los Angeles; Brookhaven National Laboratory), and study the possibility of employing novel RF structures to circumvent some of these limits.

  15. The Investigation of New Magnetic Materials and Their Phenomena Using Ultrafast Fresnel Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliep, Karl B.

    State-of-the-art technology drives scientific progress, pushing the boundaries of our current understanding of fundamental processes and mechanisms. Our continual scientific advancement is hindered only by what we can observe and experimentally verify; thus, it is reasonable to assert that instrument development and improvement is the cornerstone for technological and intellectual growth. For example, the invention of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allowed us to observe nanoscale phenomena for the first time in the 1930s and even now it is invaluable in the development of smaller, faster electronics. As we uncover more about the fundamentals of nanoscale phenomena, we have realized that images alone reveal only a snapshot of the story; to continue progressing we need a way to observe the entire scene unfold (e.g. how defects affect the flow of current across a transistor or how thermal energy propagates in nanoscale systems like graphene). Recently, by combining the spatial resolution of a TEM with the temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers, ultrafast electron microscopy ? or microscope ? (UEM) has allowed us to simultaneously observe transient nanoscale phenomena at ultrafast timescales. Ultrafast characterization techniques allow for the investigation of a new realm of previously unseen phenomenon inherent to the transient electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of materials. However, despite the progress made in ultrafast techniques, capturing the nanoscale spatial sub-ns temporal mechanisms and phenomenon at play in magnetic materials (especially during the operation of magnetic devices) has only recently become possible using UEM. With only a handful of instruments available, magnetic characterization using UEM is far from commonplace and any advances made are sparsely reported, and further, specific to the individual instrument. In this dissertation, I outline the development of novel magnetic materials and the establishment of a UEM lab at

  16. Accelerator-based single-shot ultrafast transmission electron microscope with picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-09-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. We anticipate that u-TEMs with a product of temporal and spatial resolution beyond 10-19 ms will open up new opportunities in probing matter at ultrafast temporal and ultrasmall spatial scales.

  17. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200  μm, for two final bunch charges: 10^{5} electrons (16 fC and 10^{6} electrons (160 fC. Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}=0.27  nm/μm was obtained for a final bunch charge of 10^{5} electrons and final bunch length of σ_{t}≈100  fs. For a final charge of 10^{6} electrons the cryogun produces L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.1  nm/μm for σ_{t}≈100–200  fs and σ_{x}≥50  μm. These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  18. Structural dynamics of surfaces by ultrafast electron crystallography: experimental and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sascha; Liang, Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-12-07

    Recent studies in ultrafast electron crystallography (UEC) using a reflection diffraction geometry have enabled the investigation of a wide range of phenomena on the femtosecond and picosecond time scales. In all these studies, the analysis of the diffraction patterns and their temporal change after excitation was performed within the kinematical scattering theory. In this contribution, we address the question, to what extent dynamical scattering effects have to be included in order to obtain quantitative information about structural dynamics. We discuss different scattering regimes and provide diffraction maps that describe all essential features of scatterings and observables. The effects are quantified by dynamical scattering simulations and examined by direct comparison to the results of ultrafast electron diffraction experiments on an in situ prepared Ni(100) surface, for which structural dynamics can be well described by a two-temperature model. We also report calculations for graphite surfaces. The theoretical framework provided here allows for further UEC studies of surfaces especially at larger penetration depths and for those of heavy-atom materials. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. Effect of donor orientation on ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer in coumarin-amine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P. K.; Nath, S.; Bhasikuttan, A. C.; Kumbhakar, M.; Mohanty, J.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mukherjee, T.; Pal, H.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of donor amine orientation on nondiffusive ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in coumarin-amine systems has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion measurements. Intermolecular ET from different aromatic and aliphatic amines used as donor solvents to the excited coumarin-151 (C151) acceptor occurs with ultrafast rates such that the shortest fluorescence lifetime component (τ 1 ) is the measure of the fastest ET rate (τ 1 =τ ET fast =(k ET fast ) -1 ), assigned to the C151-amine contact pairs in which amine donors are properly oriented with respect to C151 to maximize the acceptor-donor electronic coupling (V el ). It is interestingly observed that as the amine solvents are diluted by suitable diluents (either keeping solvent dielectric constant similar or with increasing dielectric constant), the τ 1 remains almost in the similar range as long as the amine dilution does not cross a certain critical limit, which in terms of the amine mole fraction (x A ) is found to be ∼0.4 for aromatic amines and ∼0.8 for aliphatic amines. Beyond these dilutions in the two respective cases of the amine systems, the τ 1 values are seen to increase very sharply. The large difference in the critical x A values involving aromatic and aliphatic amine donors has been rationalized in terms of the largely different orientational restrictions for the ET reactions as imposed by the aliphatic (n-type) and aromatic (π-type) nature of the amine donors [A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008)]. Since the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the n-type aliphatic amines is mostly centralized at the amino nitrogen, only some specific orientations of these amines with respect to the close-contact acceptor dye [also of π-character; A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008) and E. W. Castner et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2869 (2000)] can give suitable V el and thus ultrafast ET reaction. In contrary, the

  20. Mapping momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling and nonequilibrium phonon dynamics with ultrafast electron diffuse scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mark J.; René de Cotret, Laurent P.; Otto, Martin R.; Chatelain, Robert P.; Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Sutton, Mark; Siwick, Bradley J.

    2018-04-01

    Despite their fundamental role in determining material properties, detailed momentum-dependent information on the strength of electron-phonon and phonon-phonon coupling (EPC and PPC, respectively) across the entire Brillouin zone has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that ultrafast electron diffuse scattering (UEDS) directly provides such information. By exploiting symmetry-based selection rules and time resolution, scattering from different phonon branches can be distinguished even without energy resolution. Using graphite as a model system, we show that UEDS patterns map the relative EPC and PPC strength through their profound sensitivity to photoinduced changes in phonon populations. We measure strong EPC to the K -point TO phonon of A1' symmetry (K -A1' ) and along the entire TO branch between Γ -K , not only to the Γ -E2 g phonon. We also determine that the subsequent phonon relaxation of these strongly coupled optical phonons involve three stages: decay via several identifiable channels to TA and LA phonons (1 -2 ps), intraband thermalization of the non-equilibrium TA/LA phonon populations (30 -40 ps) and interband relaxation of the TA/LA modes (115 ps). Combining UEDS with ultrafast angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy will yield a complete picture of the dynamics within and between electron and phonon subsystems, helping to unravel complex phases in which the intertwined nature of these systems has a strong influence on emergent properties.

  1. Short-Range Electron Transfer in Reduced Flavodoxin: Ultrafast Nonequilibrium Dynamics Coupled with Protein Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mainak; He, Ting-Fang; Lu, Yangyi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2018-05-03

    Short-range electron transfer (ET) in proteins is an ultrafast process on the similar timescales as local protein-solvent fluctuations thus the two dynamics are coupled. Here, we use semiquinone flavodoxin and systematically characterized the photoinduced redox cycle with eleven mutations of different aromatic electron donors (tryptophan and tyrosine) and local residues to change redox properties. We observed the forward and backward ET dynamics in a few picoseconds, strongly following a stretched behavior resulting from a coupling between local environment relaxations and these ET processes. We further observed the hot vibrational-state formation through charge recombination and the subsequent cooling dynamics also in a few picoseconds. Combined with the ET studies in oxidized flavodoxin, these results coherently reveal the evolution of the ET dynamics from single to stretched exponential behaviors and thus elucidate critical timescales for the coupling. The observed hot vibration-state formation is robust and should be considered in all photoinduced back ET processes in flavoproteins.

  2. Development of a high brightness ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope based on a laser-driven cold field emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdellier, F; Caruso, G M; Weber, S; Kociak, M; Arbouet, A

    2018-03-01

    We report on the development of an ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope based on a cold field emission source which can operate in either DC or ultrafast mode. Electron emission from a tungsten nanotip is triggered by femtosecond laser pulses which are tightly focused by optical components integrated inside a cold field emission source close to the cathode. The properties of the electron probe (brightness, angular current density, stability) are quantitatively determined. The measured brightness is the largest reported so far for UTEMs. Examples of imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy using ultrashort electron pulses are given. Finally, the potential of this instrument is illustrated by performing electron holography in the off-axis configuration using ultrashort electron pulses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oscillator potential for the four-dimensional Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardoyan, Levon; Nersessian, Armen

    2005-01-01

    We suggest an exactly solvable model of an oscillator on a four-dimensional sphere interacting with an SU(2) Yang monopole. We show that the properties of the model essentially depend on the monopole charge

  4. Commutative curvature operators over four-dimensional generalized symmetric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Haji-Badali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Commutative properties of four-dimensional generalized symmetric pseudo-Riemannian manifolds were considered. Specially, in this paper, we studied Skew-Tsankov and Jacobi-Tsankov conditions in 4-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian generalized symmetric manifolds.

  5. Electronic and structural response of nanomaterials to ultrafast and ultraintense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Zhibin; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li; Allen, Roland E

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of materials with ultrafast and ultraintense laser pulses is a current frontier of science both experimentally and theoretically. In this review, we briefly discuss some recent theoretical studies by the present authors with our method of semiclassical electron-radiation-ion dynamics (SERID). In particular, Zhou et al. and Jiang et al. respectively, determined the optimal duration and optimal timing for a series of femtosecond scale laser pulses to excite a specific vibrational mode in a general chemical system. A set of such modes can be used as a "fingerprint" for characterizing a particular molecule or a complex in a solid. One can therefore envision many applications, ranging from fundamental studies to detection of chemical or biological agents. Allen et al. proved that dimers are preferentially emitted during photofragmentation of C60 under an ultrafast and ultraintense laser pulse. For interactions between laser pulses and semiconductors, e.g., GaAs, Si and InSb, besides experimentally accessible optical properties--epsilon(omega) and chi(2)-Allen et al. offered many other indicators to confirm the nonthermal nature of structural changes driven by electronic excitations and occurring during the first few hundred femtoseconds. Lin et al. found that, after the application of a femtosecond laser pulse, excited electrons in materials automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within roughly 100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion.

  6. Massive supermultiplets in four-dimensional superstring theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Wanzhe; Lüst, Dieter; Schlotterer, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    We extend the discussion of Feng et al. (2011) on massive Regge excitations on the first mass level of four-dimensional superstring theory. For the lightest massive modes of the open string sector, universal supermultiplets common to all four-dimensional compactifications with N=1,2 and N=4 spacetime supersymmetry are constructed respectively - both their vertex operators and their supersymmetry variations. Massive spinor helicity methods shed light on the interplay between individual polarization states.

  7. Ultrafast electron-lattice coupling dynamics in VO2 and V2O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Elsa; Gilbert Corder, Stephanie N.; Yun, Sun Jin; Wang, Siming; Ramírez, Juan Gabriel; West, Kevin; Zhang, Jingdi; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Schuller, Ivan K.; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Liu, Mengkun; Averitt, Richard D.

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast optical pump-optical probe and optical pump-terahertz probe spectroscopy were performed on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3 ) thin films over a wide temperature range. A comparison of the experimental data from these two different techniques and two different vanadium oxides, in particular a comparison of the spectral weight oscillations generated by the photoinduced longitudinal acoustic modulation, reveals the strong electron-phonon coupling that exists in both materials. The low-energy Drude response of V2O3 appears more amenable than VO2 to ultrafast strain control. Additionally, our results provide a measurement of the temperature dependence of the sound velocity in both systems, revealing a four- to fivefold increase in VO2 and a three- to fivefold increase in V2O3 across the insulator-to-metal phase transition. Our data also confirm observations of strong damping and phonon anharmonicity in the metallic phase of VO2, and suggest that a similar phenomenon might be at play in the metallic phase of V2O3 . More generally, our simple table-top approach provides relevant and detailed information about dynamical lattice properties of vanadium oxides, paving the way to similar studies in other complex materials.

  8. Charge dynamics in aluminum oxide thin film studied by ultrafast scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Maurizio; Sala, Vittorio; Irde, Gabriele; Pietralunga, Silvia Maria; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    The excitation dynamics of defects in insulators plays a central role in a variety of fields from Electronics and Photonics to Quantum computing. We report here a time-resolved measurement of electron dynamics in 100 nm film of aluminum oxide on silicon by Ultrafast Scanning Electron Microscopy (USEM). In our pump-probe setup, an UV femtosecond laser excitation pulse and a delayed picosecond electron probe pulse are spatially overlapped on the sample, triggering Secondary Electrons (SE) emission to the detector. The zero of the pump-probe delay and the time resolution were determined by measuring the dynamics of laser-induced SE contrast on silicon. We observed fast dynamics with components ranging from tens of picoseconds to few nanoseconds, that fits within the timescales typical of the UV color center evolution. The surface sensitivity of SE detection gives to the USEM the potential of applying pump-probe investigations to charge dynamics at surfaces and interfaces of current nano-devices. The present work demonstrates this approach on large gap insulator surfaces. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Static and Dynamic Electron Microscopy Investigations at the Atomic and Ultrafast Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Pranav Kumar

    Advancements in the electron microscopy capabilities - aberration-corrected imaging, monochromatic spectroscopy, direct-electron detectors - have enabled routine visualization of atomic-scale processes with millisecond temporal resolutions in this decade. This, combined with progress in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder technology and nanofabrication techniques, allows comprehensive experiments on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. The development of ultrafast (sub-nanosecond) time-resolved TEM with ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has further pushed the envelope of in situ TEM to sub-nanosecond temporal resolution while maintaining sub-nanometer spatial resolution. A plethora of materials phenomena - including electron-phonon coupling, phonon transport, first-order phase transitions, bond rotation, plasmon dynamics, melting, and dopant atoms arrangement - are not yet clearly understood and could be benefitted with the current in situ TEM capabilities having atomic-level and ultrafast precision. Better understanding of these phenomena and intrinsic material dynamics (e.g. how phonons propagate in a material, what time-scales are involved in a first-order phase transition, how fast a material melts, where dopant atoms sit in a crystal) in new-generation and technologically important materials (e.g. two-dimensional layered materials, semiconductor and magnetic devices, rare-earth-element-free permanent magnets, unconventional superconductors) could bring a paradigm shift in their electronic, structural, magnetic, thermal and optical applications. Present research efforts, employing cutting-edge static and dynamic in situ electron microscopy resources at the University of Minnesota, are directed towards understanding the atomic-scale crystallographic structural transition and phonon transport in an iron-pnictide parent compound LaFeAsO, studying the mechanical stability of fast moving hard-drive heads in heat

  10. Accelerator-based Single-shot Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope with Picosecond Temporal Resolution and Nanometer Spatial Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, D.; Fu, F.; Zhang, J.; Huang, X.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Wan, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present feasibility study of an accelerator-based ultrafast transmission electron microscope (u-TEM) capable of producing a full field image in a single-shot with simultaneous picosecond temporal resolution and nanometer spatial resolution. We study key physics related to performance of u-TEMs, and discuss major challenges as well as possible solutions for practical realization of u-TEMs. The feasibility of u-TEMs is confirmed through simulations using realistic electron beam parameters. W...

  11. Ultrafast electron-optical phonon scattering and quasiparticle lifetime in CVD-grown graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingzhi; Yu, Ting; Lin, Jianyi; Gurzadyan, Gagik G

    2011-04-26

    Ultrafast quasiparticle dynamics in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been studied by UV pump/white-light probe spectroscopy. Transient differential transmission spectra of monolayer graphene are observed in the visible probe range (400-650 nm). Kinetics of the quasiparticle (i.e., low-energy single-particle excitation with renormalized energy due to electron-electron Coulomb, electron-optical phonon (e-op), and optical phonon-acoustic phonon (op-ap) interactions) was monitored with 50 fs resolution. Extending the probe range to near-infrared, we find the evolution of quasiparticle relaxation channels from monoexponential e-op scattering to double exponential decay due to e-op and op-ap scattering. Moreover, quasiparticle lifetimes of mono- and randomly stacked graphene films are obtained for the probe photon energies continuously from 1.9 to 2.3 eV. Dependence of quasiparticle decay rate on the probe energy is linear for 10-layer stacked graphene films. This is due to the dominant e-op intervalley scattering and the linear density of states in the probed electronic band. A dimensionless coupling constant W is derived, which characterizes the scattering strength of quasiparticles by lattice points in graphene.

  12. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  13. Four-dimensional hilbert curves for R-trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haverkort, Herman; Walderveen, Freek van

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional R-trees are a class of spatial index structures in which objects are arranged to enable fast window queries: report all objects that intersect a given query window. One of the most successful methods of arranging the objects in the index structure is based on sorting the objects...... according to the positions of their centers along a two-dimensional Hilbert space-filling curve. Alternatively, one may use the coordinates of the objects' bounding boxes to represent each object by a four-dimensional point, and sort these points along a four-dimensional Hilbert-type curve. In experiments...

  14. OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics Series. Volume 13: Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    tomography. Many materials such as plastics, cardboard, wood and rubber have good transparency in the terahertz frequency range. Hence, this new...Ultrafast processes in semiconductors. Introduction Nonlinear Bragg reflector ( NBR ) consists of periodically distributed optical nonlinearity coexisting...with multiple reflection and group-delay dispersion. Recent theoretical analyses showed the potential of NBR in ultrafast optoelectronics such as all

  15. Lattice classification of the four-dimensional heterotic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balog, J.; Forgacs, P.; Vecsernyes, P.; Horvath, Z.

    1987-06-01

    A lattice slicing procedure is proposed which leads to the classification of all four-dimensional chiral heterotic strings based on Conway and Sloane's 22-dimensional self-dual Euclidean lattices. By reversing this procedure it is possible to construct all these theories. (author)

  16. The scalar curvature problem on the four dimensional half sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Ayed, M; El-Mehdi, K

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of prescribing the scalar curvature under minimal boundary conditions on the standard four dimensional half sphere. We provide an Euler-Hopf type criterion for a given function to be a scalar curvature for some metric conformal to the standard one. Our proof involves the study of critical points at infinity of the associated variational problem.

  17. Statistical Entropy of Four-Dimensional Extremal Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldacena, J.M.; Strominger, A.

    1996-01-01

    String theory is used to count microstates of four-dimensional extremal black holes in compactifications with N=4 and N=8 supersymmetry. The result agrees for large charges with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Four-dimensional conversion for spiritual leadership development: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The process of a four-dimensional conversion and/or transformation strives in helping the leadership of an organisation, especially such as the church, with practical ways that may lead to the development of an effective leadership by observing the four important aspects of human spirituality as elaborated on in the article.

  19. Variability of four-dimensional computed tomography patient models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos; van Herk, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the interfractional variability in lung tumor trajectory and mean position during the course of radiation therapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Repeat four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (median, nine scans/patient) routinely acquired during the course of

  20. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  1. Exciplex formation in bimolecular photoinduced electron-transfer investigated by ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marius; Letrun, Romain; Vauthey, Eric

    2014-03-12

    The dynamics of bimolecular photoinduced electron-transfer reactions has been investigated with three donor/acceptor (D/A) pairs in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and acetonitrile (ACN) using a combination of ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, including time-resolved infrared absorption. For the D/A pairs with the highest driving force of electron transfer, all transient spectroscopic features can be unambiguously assigned to the excited reactant and the ionic products. For the pair with the lowest driving force, three additional transient infrared bands, more intense in THF than in ACN, with a time dependence that differs from those of the other bands are observed. From their frequency and solvent dependence, these bands can be assigned to an exciplex. Moreover, polarization-resolved measurements point to a relatively well-defined mutual orientation of the constituents and to a slower reorientational time compared to those of the individual reactants. Thanks to the minimal overlap of the infrared signature of all transient species in THF, a detailed reaction scheme including the relevant kinetic and thermodynamic parameters could be deduced for this pair. This analysis reveals that the formation and recombination of the ion pair occur almost exclusively via the exciplex.

  2. Imaging nanoscale spatial modulation of a relativistic electron beam with a MeV ultrafast electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Liu, Yaqi; Xu, Jun; Yu, Dapeng; Wan, Weishi; Zhu, Yimei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie

    2018-03-01

    An accelerator-based MeV ultrafast electron microscope (MUEM) has been proposed as a promising tool to the study structural dynamics at the nanometer spatial scale and the picosecond temporal scale. Here, we report experimental tests of a prototype MUEM where high quality images with nanoscale fine structures were recorded with a pulsed ˜3 MeV picosecond electron beam. The temporal and spatial resolutions of the MUEM operating in the single-shot mode are about 4 ps (FWHM) and 100 nm (FWHM), corresponding to a temporal-spatial resolution of 4 × 10-19 s m, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than that achieved with state-of-the-art single-shot keV UEM. Using this instrument, we offer the demonstration of visualizing the nanoscale periodic spatial modulation of an electron beam, which may be converted into longitudinal density modulation through emittance exchange to enable production of high-power coherent radiation at short wavelengths. Our results mark a great step towards single-shot nanometer-resolution MUEMs and compact intense x-ray sources that may have widespread applications in many areas of science.

  3. Ultrafast Processes in Atoms and Molecules: Integrated treatment of electronic and nuclear motion in ultrashort XUV pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCurdy, C. William [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of

    2017-12-14

    This project made use of Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock method developed earlier in the McCurdy group in a series of novel applications of the method to ultrafast spectroscopic processes. MCTDHF treats the dynamics of a molecule or atom under the influence of an external field in manner that has all electrons active. That property distinguishes this method from the more popular (and much less computationally demanding) approaches for treating the electron dynamics of atoms and molecules in fields, such as the time-dependent “Configuration Interaction Singles” approximation or approaches that limit the treatment to either one or two-electron models.

  4. Theoretical Study of Ultrafast Electron Injection into a Dye/TiO2 System in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chundan; Xia, Qide; Li, Kuan; Li, Juan; Yang, Zhenqing

    2018-06-01

    The ultrafast injection of excited electrons in dye/TiO2 system plays a critical role, which determines the device's efficiency in large part. In this work, we studied the geometrical structures and electronic properties of a dye/TiO2 composite system for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by using density functional theory, and we analyzed the mechanism of ultrafast electron injection with emphasis on the power conversion efficiency. The results show that the dye SPL103/TiO2 (101) surface is more stable than dye SPL101. The electron injection driving force of SPL103/TiO2 (101) is 3.55 times that of SPL101, indicating that SPL103/TiO2 (101) has a strong ability to transfer electrons. SPL103 and SPL101/TiO2 (101) both have fast electron transfer processes, and especially the electron injection time of SPL103/TiO2 (101) is only 1.875 fs. The results of this work are expected to provide a new understanding of the mechanism of electron injection in dyes/TiO2 systems for use in highly effective DSSCs.

  5. Identification of Architectural Functions in A Four-Dimensional Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firza Utama

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research has explored the possibilities and concept of architectural space in a virtual environment. The virtual environment exists as a different concept, and challenges the constraints of the physical world. One of the possibilities in a virtual environment is that it is able to extend the spatial dimension higher than the physical three-dimension. To take the advantage of this possibility, this research has applied some geometrical four-dimensional (4D methods to define virtual architectural space. The spatial characteristics of 4D space is established by analyzing the four-dimensional structure that can be comprehended by human participant for its spatial quality, and by developing a system to control the fourth axis of movement. Multiple three-dimensional spaces that fluidly change their volume have been defined as one of the possibilities of virtual architecturalspace concept in order to enrich our understanding of virtual spatial experience.

  6. Common time in a four-dimensional symmetry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.P.; Sherry, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Following the ideas of Poincare, Reichenbach, and Grunbaum concerning the convention of setting up clock systems, we analyze clock systems and light propagation within the framework of four-dimensional symmetry. It is possible to construct a new four-dimensional symmetry framework incorporating common time: observers in different inertial frames of reference use one and the same clock system, which is located in any one of the frames. Consequently, simultaneity has a meaning independent of position and independent of frame of reference. A further consequence is that the two-way speeds of light alone are isotropic in any frame. By the choice of clock system there will be one frame in which the one-way speed of light is isotropic. This frame can be arbitrarily chosen. The difference between one-way speeds an two-way speeds of light signals is considered in detail

  7. Ultrafast optical pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy of strongly correlated electron materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averitt, R.D.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Thorsmolle, V.K.; Jia, Quanxi; Lobad, A.I.; Trugman, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    We have used optical-pump far-infrared probe spectroscopy to probe the low energy electron dynamics of high temperature superconductors and colossal magnetoresistance manganites. For the superconductor YBa2Cu3O7, picosecond conductivity measurements probe the interplay between Cooper-pairs and quasiparticles. In optimally doped films, the recovery time for long-range phase-coherent pairing increases from ∼1.5 ps at 4K to ∼3.5 ps near Tc, consistent with the closing of the superconducting gap. For underdoped films, the measured recovery time is temperature independent (3.5 ps) in accordance with the presence of a pseudogap. Ultrafast picosecond measurements of optically induced changes in the absolute conductivity of La0:7M0:3MnO3 thin films (M = Ca, Sr) from 10K to ∼0.9Tc reveal a two-component relaxation. A fast, ∼2 ps, conductivity decrease arises from optically induced modification of the effective phonon temperature. The slower component, related to spin-lattice relaxation, has a lifetime that increases upon approaching Tc from below in accordance with an increasing spin specific heat. Our results indicate that for T<< Tc, the conductivity is determined by incoherent phonons while spin fluctuations dominate near Tc.

  8. Diffraction contrast as a sensitive indicator of femtosecond sub-nanoscale motion in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Schliep, Karl B.; Flannigan, David J.

    2013-09-01

    With ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM), access can be gained to the spatiotemporal scales required to directly visualize rapid, non-equilibrium structural dynamics of materials. This is achieved by operating a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion by photoelectrically generating coherent, well-timed electron packets in the gun region of the TEM. These probe photoelectrons are accelerated down the TEM column where they travel through the specimen before reaching a standard, commercially-available CCD detector. A second laser pulse is used to excite (pump) the specimen in situ. Structural changes are visualized by varying the arrival time of the pump laser pulse relative to the probe electron packet at the specimen. Here, we discuss how ultrafast nanoscale motions of crystalline materials can be visualized and precisely quantified using diffraction contrast in UTEM. Because diffraction contrast sensitively depends upon both crystal lattice orientation as well as incoming electron wavevector, minor spatial/directional variations in either will produce dynamic and often complex patterns in real-space images. This is because sections of the crystalline material that satisfy the Laue conditions may be heterogeneously distributed such that electron scattering vectors vary over nanoscale regions. Thus, minor changes in either crystal grain orientation, as occurs during specimen tilting, warping, or anisotropic expansion, or in the electron wavevector result in dramatic changes in the observed diffraction contrast. In this way, dynamic contrast patterns observed in UTEM images can be used as sensitive indicators of ultrafast specimen motion. Further, these motions can be spatiotemporally mapped such that direction and amplitude can be determined.

  9. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a π-Conjugated Oligomer/Porphyrin Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Goswami, Subhadip; Alsulami, Qana; Schanze, Kirk S.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) at the donor-acceptor interface is extremely important to optimize the conversion efficiency in solar cell devices. In general, ultrafast CT and slow CR

  10. Supergravity duals of supersymmetric four dimensional gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigazzi, F [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Cotrone, A L [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau Cedex (France); [INFN, Rome (Italy); Petrini, M [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Zaffaroni, A [Universita di Milano-Bicocca and INFN, Milan (Italy)

    2002-03-01

    This article contains an overview of some recent attempts of understanding supergravity and string duals of four dimensional gauge theories using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We discuss the general philosophy underlying the various ways to realize Super Yang-Mills theories in terms of systems of branes. We then review some of the existing duals for N=2 and N=1 theories. We also discuss differences and similarities with realistic theories. (author)

  11. Four dimensional sigma model coupled to the metric tensor field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghika, G.; Visinescu, M.

    1980-02-01

    We discuss the four dimensional nonlinear sigma model with an internal O(n) invariance coupled to the metric tensor field satisfying Einstein equations. We derive a bound on the coupling constant between the sigma field and the metric tensor using the theory of harmonic maps. A special attention is paid to Einstein spaces and some new explicit solutions of the model are constructed. (author)

  12. Photoelectron diffraction from single oriented molecules: Towards ultrafast structure determination of molecules using x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Misato; Fujikawa, Takashi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Mizuno, Tomoya; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yagishita, Akira

    2013-06-01

    We provide a molecular structure determination method, based on multiple-scattering x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) calculations. This method is applied to our XPD data on several molecules having different equilibrium geometries. Then it is confirmed that, by our method, bond lengths and bond angles can be determined with a resolution of less than 0.1 Å and 10∘, respectively. Differently from any other scenario of ultrafast structure determination, we measure the two- or three-dimensional XPD of aligned or oriented molecules in the energy range from 100 to 200 eV with a 4π detection velocity map imaging spectrometer. Thanks to the intense and ultrashort pulse properties of x-ray free-electron lasers, our approach exhibits the most probable method for obtaining ultrafast real-time structural information on small to medium-sized molecules consisting of light elements, i.e., a “molecular movie.”

  13. Evidences from electron momentum spectroscopy for ultra-fast charge transfers and structural reorganizations in a floppy molecule: Ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, Michael S; Hajgato, Balazs; Morini, Filippo

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electron momentum distributions employing advanced Dyson orbital theories and statistical thermodynamics beyond the RRHO approximation fail to quantitatively reproduce the outermost momentum profile inferred from experiments on ethanol employing high resolution Electron Momentum Spectroscopy [1]. Study of the influence of nuclear dynamics in the initial ground state and final ionized state indicates that this discrepancy between theory and experiment reflects a charge transfer occurring during an ultra-fast dissociation of the ethanol radical cation into a methyl radical and H 2 C=O-H + .

  14. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  15. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.; Xu, J.; Xu, R. X.; Yan, Y. J.

    2013-01-01

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2 ′ -biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified

  16. Spinors and supersymmetry in four-dimensional Euclidean space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeon, D.G.C.; Sherry, T.N.

    2001-01-01

    Spinors in four-dimensional Euclidean space are treated using the decomposition of the Euclidean space SO(4) symmetry group into SU(2)xSU(2). Both 2- and 4-spinor representations of this SO(4) symmetry group are shown to differ significantly from the corresponding spinor representations of the SO(3, 1) symmetry group in Minkowski space. The simplest self conjugate supersymmetry algebra allowed in four-dimensional Euclidean space is demonstrated to be an N=2 supersymmetry algebra which resembles the N=2 supersymmetry algebra in four-dimensional Minkowski space. The differences between the two supersymmetry algebras gives rise to different representations; in particular an analysis of the Clifford algebra structure shows that the momentum invariant is bounded above by the central charges in 4dE, while in 4dM the central charges bound the momentum invariant from below. Dimensional reduction of the N=1 SUSY algebra in six-dimensional Minkowski space (6dM) to 4dE reproduces our SUSY algebra in 4dE. This dimensional reduction can be used to introduce additional generators into the SUSY algebra in 4dE. Well known interpolating maps are used to relate the N=2 SUSY algebra in 4dE derived in this paper to the N=2 SUSY algebra in 4dM. The nature of the spinors in 4dE allows us to write an axially gauge invariant model which is shown to be both Hermitian and anomaly-free. No equivalent model exists in 4dM. Useful formulae in 4dE are collected together in two appendixes

  17. On 'Common time' in the four-dimensional symmetry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Shobha

    1980-01-01

    Recently Hsu has advanced a 'Four-Dimensional Symmetry Theory' with a 'Common time' for all inertial frames. He believes that such a 'Common time' is physically possible. However, as a consequence of 'Common time', Hsu asserts that the speed of light in some inertial frames is not necessarily invariant and isotropic - a result, quite contrary to Einstein's Principle of the constancy of the velocity of light. In the present paper, taking Hsu's 'Common time' at its face value, the author has demonstrated that his formulation itself leads to physically absurd results. A 'Common time' for all inertial frames is just not possible. (author)

  18. Naked singularities in four-dimensional string backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammedi, N.

    1993-04-01

    It is shown that gauged nonlinear sigma models can be always deformed by terms proportional to the field strength of the gauge fields (nonminimal gauging). These deformations can be interpreted as perturbations, by marginal operators, of conformal coset models. When applied to the SL(2, R)xSU(2)/U(1)xU(1)) WZWN model, a large class of four-dimensional curved spacetime backgrounds are obtained. In particular, a naked singularity may form at a time when the volume of the universe is different from zero. (orig.)

  19. Quantum walk with a four-dimensional coin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Craig S; Gabris, Aurel; Jex, Igor; Barnett, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    We examine the physical implementation of a discrete time quantum walk with a four-dimensional coin. Our quantum walker is a photon moving repeatedly through a time delay loop, with time being our position space. The quantum coin is implemented using the internal states of the photon: the polarization and two of the orbital angular momentum states. We demonstrate how to implement this physically and what components would be needed. We then illustrate some of the results that could be obtained by performing the experiment.

  20. Four-dimensional optical manipulation of colloidal particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, P.J.; Daria, V.R.; Glückstad, J.

    2005-01-01

    We transform a TEM00 laser mode into multiple counterpropagating optical traps to achieve four-dimensional simultaneous manipulation of multiple particles. Efficient synthesis and dynamic control of the counterpropagating-beam traps is carried out via the generalized phase contrast method......, and a spatial polarization-encoding scheme. Our experiments genuinely demonstrate real-time, interactive particle-position control for forming arbitrary volumetric constellations and complex three-dimensional trajectories of multiple particles. This opens up doors for cross-disciplinary cutting-edge research...

  1. Four-dimensional maps of the human somatosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Pietro; Abdollahi, Rouhollah O; Sartori, Ivana; Caruana, Fausto; Pelliccia, Veronica; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Mai, Roberto; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Orban, Guy A

    2016-03-29

    A fine-grained description of the spatiotemporal dynamics of human brain activity is a major goal of neuroscientific research. Limitations in spatial and temporal resolution of available noninvasive recording and imaging techniques have hindered so far the acquisition of precise, comprehensive four-dimensional maps of human neural activity. The present study combines anatomical and functional data from intracerebral recordings of nearly 100 patients, to generate highly resolved four-dimensional maps of human cortical processing of nonpainful somatosensory stimuli. These maps indicate that the human somatosensory system devoted to the hand encompasses a widespread network covering more than 10% of the cortical surface of both hemispheres. This network includes phasic components, centered on primary somatosensory cortex and neighboring motor, premotor, and inferior parietal regions, and tonic components, centered on opercular and insular areas, and involving human parietal rostroventral area and ventral medial-superior-temporal area. The technique described opens new avenues for investigating the neural basis of all levels of cortical processing in humans.

  2. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  3. Ultrafast electron diffraction and electron microscopy: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishchenko, A A; Aseyev, S A; Ryabov, E A; Bagratashvili, V N; Panchenko, V Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acting as complementary research tools, high time-resolved spectroscopy and diffractometry techniques proceeding from various physical principles open up new possibilities for studying matter with necessary integration of the 'structure–dynamics–function' triad in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. Since the 1980s, a new field of research has started at the leading research laboratories, aimed at developing means of filming the coherent dynamics of nuclei in molecules and fast processes in biological objects ('atomic and molecular movies'). The utilization of ultrashort laser pulse sources has significantly modified traditional electron beam approaches to and provided high space–time resolution for the study of materials. Diffraction methods using frame-by-frame filming and the development of the main principles of the study of coherent dynamics of atoms have paved the way to observing wave packet dynamics, the intermediate states of reaction centers, and the dynamics of electrons in molecules, thus allowing a transition from the kinetics to the dynamics of the phase trajectories of molecules in the investigation of chemical reactions. (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Molecular-structure control of ultrafast electron injection at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-03-05

    Charge transfer (CT) at donor (D)/acceptor (A) interfaces is central to the functioning of photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Understanding and controlling this process on the molecular level has been proven to be crucial for optimizing the performance of many energy-challenge relevant devices. Here, we report the experimental observations of controlled on/off ultrafast electron transfer (ET) at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot (QD) interfaces using femto- and nanosecond broad-band transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The time-resolved data demonstrate how one can turn on/off the electron injection from porphyrin to the CdTe QDs. With careful control of the molecular structure, we are able to tune the electron injection at the porphyrin-CdTe QD interface from zero to very efficient and ultrafast. In addition, our data demonstrate that the ET process occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs, which is one of the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  5. Ultrafast chemical interface scattering as an additional decay channel for nascent nonthermal electrons in small metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christophe; Abid, Jean-Pierre; Fermin, David; Girault, Hubert H

    2004-05-15

    The use of 4.2 nm gold nanoparticles wrapped in an adsorbates shell and embedded in a TiO2 metal oxide matrix gives the opportunity to investigate ultrafast electron-electron scattering dynamics in combination with electronic surface phenomena via the surface plasmon lifetimes. These gold nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit a large nonclassical broadening of the surface plasmon band, which is attributed to a chemical interface damping. The acceleration of the loss of surface plasmon phase coherence indicates that the energy and the momentum of the collective electrons can be dissipated into electronic affinity levels of adsorbates. As a result of the preparation process, gold NPs are wrapped in a shell of sulfate compounds that gives rise to a large density of interfacial molecules confined between Au and TiO2, as revealed by Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy. A detailed analysis of the transient absorption spectra obtained by broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy allows separating electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction. Internal thermalization times (electron-electron scattering) are determined by probing the decay of nascent nonthermal electrons (NNEs) and the build-up of the Fermi-Dirac electron distribution, giving time constants of 540 to 760 fs at 0.42 and 0.34 eV from the Fermi level, respectively. Comparison with literature data reveals that lifetimes of NNEs measured for these small gold NPs are more than four times longer than for silver NPs with similar sizes. The surprisingly long internal thermalization time is attributed to an additional decay mechanism (besides the classical e-e scattering) for the energy loss of NNEs, identified as the ultrafast chemical interface scattering process. NNEs experience an inelastic resonant scattering process into unoccupied electronic states of adsorbates, that directly act as an efficient heat bath, via the excitation of molecular vibrational modes. The two-temperature model is no longer

  6. Four-dimensional gravity as an almost-Poisson system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Eyo Eyo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the phase space structure of a noncanonical formulation of four-dimensional gravity referred to as the Instanton representation of Plebanski gravity (IRPG). The typical Hamiltonian (symplectic) approach leads to an obstruction to the definition of a symplectic structure on the full phase space of the IRPG. We circumvent this obstruction, using the Lagrange equations of motion, to find the appropriate generalization of the Poisson bracket. It is shown that the IRPG does not support a Poisson bracket except on the vector constraint surface. Yet there exists a fundamental bilinear operation on its phase space which produces the correct equations of motion and induces the correct transformation properties of the basic fields. This bilinear operation is known as the almost-Poisson bracket, which fails to satisfy the Jacobi identity and in this case also the condition of antisymmetry. We place these results into the overall context of nonsymplectic systems.

  7. Twistors and four-dimensional conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report (with technical details omitted) on work concerned with generalizations to four dimensions of two-dimensional Conformed Field Theory. Accounts of this and related material are contained elsewhere. The Hilbert space of the four-dimensional theory has a natural interpretation in terms of massless spinor fields on real Minkowski space. From the twistor point of view this follows from the boundary CR-manifold P being precisely the space of light rays in real compactified Minkowski space. All the amplitudes can therefore be regarded as defined on Hilbert spaces built from Lorentzian spinor fields. Thus the twistor picture provides a kind of halfway house between the Lorentzian and Euclidean field theories. (author)

  8. Four-dimensional Printing of Liquid Crystal Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambulo, Cedric P; Burroughs, Julia J; Boothby, Jennifer M; Kim, Hyun; Shankar, M Ravi; Ware, Taylor H

    2017-10-25

    Three-dimensional structures capable of reversible changes in shape, i.e., four-dimensional-printed structures, may enable new generations of soft robotics, implantable medical devices, and consumer products. Here, thermally responsive liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are direct-write printed into 3D structures with a controlled molecular order. Molecular order is locally programmed by controlling the print path used to build the 3D object, and this order controls the stimulus response. Each aligned LCE filament undergoes 40% reversible contraction along the print direction on heating. By printing objects with controlled geometry and stimulus response, magnified shape transformations, for example, volumetric contractions or rapid, repetitive snap-through transitions, are realized.

  9. Raman scattering in air: four-dimensional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Kessler, T.J.; Lawrence, G.N.

    1994-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires propagation of high-intensity, pulse-shaped IR and UV laser beams through long air paths. Such beams are subject to energy losses and decreased beam quality as a result by stimulated rotational Raman scattering (SRRS). In this paper we describe how quantum fluctuations, stimulated Raman amplification, diffraction propagation, and optical aberrations interact during the propagation of short, high-power laser pulses using a four-dimensional (4-D) model of the optical beams and the medium. The 4-D model has been incorporated into a general optical-propagation computer program that allows the entire optical system to be modeled and that is implemented on high-end personal computers, workstations, and supercomputers. The numerical model is used to illustrate important phenomena in the evolution of the optical beams. In addition, the OMEGA Upgrade laser system is used as a design case to illustrate the various considerations for inertial confinement fusion laser design

  10. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  11. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2015-06-25

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  12. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana; Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Goswami, Subhadip; Alarousu, Erkki; Usman, Anwar; Schanze, Kirk S.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  13. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  14. Single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction for structure dynamic studies of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z., E-mail: mmo09@slac.stanford.edu; Shen, X.; Chen, Z.; Li, R. K.; Dunning, M.; Zheng, Q.; Weathersby, S. P.; Reid, A. H.; Coffee, R.; Makasyuk, I.; Edstrom, S.; McCormick, D.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Wang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Sokolowski-Tinten, K. [Faculty of Physics and Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a single-shot mega-electronvolt ultrafast-electron-diffraction system to measure the structural dynamics of warm dense matter. The electron probe in this system is featured by a kinetic energy of 3.2 MeV and a total charge of 20 fC, with the FWHM pulse duration and spot size at sample of 350 fs and 120 μm respectively. We demonstrate its unique capability by visualizing the atomic structural changes of warm dense gold formed from a laser-excited 35-nm freestanding single-crystal gold foil. The temporal evolution of the Bragg peak intensity and of the liquid signal during solid-liquid phase transition are quantitatively determined. This experimental capability opens up an exciting opportunity to unravel the atomic dynamics of structural phase transitions in warm dense matter regime.

  15. Coherent phonon excitation and linear thermal expansion in structural dynamics and ultrafast electron diffraction of laser-heated metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jau

    2008-04-28

    In this study, we examine the ultrafast structural dynamics of metals induced by a femtosecond laser-heating pulse as probed by time-resolved electron diffraction. Using the two-temperature model and the Grüneisen relationship we calculate the electron temperature, phonon temperature, and impulsive force at each atomic site in the slab. Together with the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam anharmonic chain model we calculate changes of bond distance and the peak shift of Bragg spots or Laue rings. A laser-heated thin slab is shown to exhibit "breathing" standing-wave behavior, with a period equal to the round-trip time for sound wave and a wavelength twice the slab thickness. The peak delay time first increases linearly with the thickness (linear thermal expansion due to lattice temperature jump are shown to contribute to the overall structural changes. Differences between these two mechanisms and their dependence on film thickness and other factors are discussed.

  16. Delayed electron relaxation in CdTe nanorods studied by spectral analysis of the ultrafast transient absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriegel, I., E-mail: ilka.kriegel@iit.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Scotognella, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); CNST of IIT@POLIMI, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Soavi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Brescia, R. [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Rodríguez-Fernández, J.; Feldmann, J. [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Department of Physics and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstr. 4, 80799 Munich (Germany); Lanzani, G., E-mail: guglielmo.lanzani@iit.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); CNST of IIT@POLIMI, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Tassone, F. [CNST of IIT@POLIMI, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2016-06-01

    Highlights: • We study the photophysics of CdTe nanorods by ultrafast absorption spectroscopy. • We fit photobleaching and photoinduced absorption features at all time delays. • Dynamics are extracted from superpositions of bleaches (Gaussians) and derivatives. • Fast non-radiative recombination and slower hole trapping processes are extracted. • A potential approach to unveil ultrafast non-radiative recombination processes. - Abstract: In transient absorption (TA) spectra, the bleach features originating from state filling are overlapped by their energy-shifted derivatives, arising from excited state energy level shifts. This makes the direct extraction of carrier dynamics from a single-wavelength time-trace misleading. Fitting TA spectra in time, as Gaussian functions and their derivative-like shifted Gaussians, allows to individually extract the real dynamics of both photobleached transitions, and their energy shifts. In CdTe nanorods (NRs) we found a delayed heating of holes due to the release of the large excess energy in the electron relaxation process. The slow hole-trapping process is consistent with a high number of surface trap states in these model NRs. Our results show that only a correct disentanglement of bleaching and energy shift contributions provides a reliable framework to extract the underlying carrier relaxation dynamics, including trapping, non-radiative recombination, and eventually carrier multiplication.

  17. Delayed electron relaxation in CdTe nanorods studied by spectral analysis of the ultrafast transient absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriegel, I.; Scotognella, F.; Soavi, G.; Brescia, R.; Rodríguez-Fernández, J.; Feldmann, J.; Lanzani, G.; Tassone, F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the photophysics of CdTe nanorods by ultrafast absorption spectroscopy. • We fit photobleaching and photoinduced absorption features at all time delays. • Dynamics are extracted from superpositions of bleaches (Gaussians) and derivatives. • Fast non-radiative recombination and slower hole trapping processes are extracted. • A potential approach to unveil ultrafast non-radiative recombination processes. - Abstract: In transient absorption (TA) spectra, the bleach features originating from state filling are overlapped by their energy-shifted derivatives, arising from excited state energy level shifts. This makes the direct extraction of carrier dynamics from a single-wavelength time-trace misleading. Fitting TA spectra in time, as Gaussian functions and their derivative-like shifted Gaussians, allows to individually extract the real dynamics of both photobleached transitions, and their energy shifts. In CdTe nanorods (NRs) we found a delayed heating of holes due to the release of the large excess energy in the electron relaxation process. The slow hole-trapping process is consistent with a high number of surface trap states in these model NRs. Our results show that only a correct disentanglement of bleaching and energy shift contributions provides a reliable framework to extract the underlying carrier relaxation dynamics, including trapping, non-radiative recombination, and eventually carrier multiplication.

  18. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Using the Adjoint Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jian-Wen

    The calculus of variations is used to confirm that variational four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) using the adjoint method can be implemented when the numerical model equations have a finite number of first-order discontinuous points. These points represent the on/off switches associated with physical processes, for which the Jacobian matrix of the model equation does not exist. Numerical evidence suggests that, in some situations when the adjoint method is used for FDDA, the temperature field retrieved using horizontal wind data is numerically not unique. A physical interpretation of this type of non-uniqueness of the retrieval is proposed in terms of energetics. The adjoint equations of a numerical model can also be used for model-parameter estimation. A general computational procedure is developed to determine the size and distribution of any internal model parameter. The procedure is then applied to a one-dimensional shallow -fluid model in the context of analysis-nudging FDDA: the weighting coefficients used by the Newtonian nudging technique are determined. The sensitivity of these nudging coefficients to the optimal objectives and constraints is investigated. Experiments of FDDA using the adjoint method are conducted using the dry version of the hydrostatic Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM4) and its adjoint. The minimization procedure converges and the initialization experiment is successful. Temperature-retrieval experiments involving an assimilation of the horizontal wind are also carried out using the adjoint of MM4.

  19. Probing ultrafast changes of spin and charge density profiles with resonant XUV magnetic reflectivity at the free-electron laser FERMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutt, C; Sant, T; Ksenzov, D; Capotondi, F; Pedersoli, E; Raimondi, L; Nikolov, I P; Kiskinova, M; Jaiswal, S; Jakob, G; Kläui, M; Zabel, H; Pietsch, U

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of resonant magnetic XUV reflectivity experiments performed at the XUV free-electron laser FERMI. Circularly polarized XUV light with the photon energy tuned to the Fe M 2,3 edge is used to measure resonant magnetic reflectivities and the corresponding Q -resolved asymmetry of a Permalloy/Ta/Permalloy trilayer film. The asymmetry exhibits ultrafast changes on 240 fs time scales upon pumping with ultrashort IR laser pulses. Depending on the value of the wavevector transfer Q z , we observe both decreasing and increasing values of the asymmetry parameter, which is attributed to ultrafast changes in the vertical spin and charge density profiles of the trilayer film.

  20. Semiautomated four-dimensional computed tomography segmentation using deformable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, Dustin; Starkschall, George; McNutt, Todd; Kaus, Michael; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a proof of feasibility of the application of a commercial prototype deformable model algorithm to the problem of delineation of anatomic structures on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data sets. We acquired a 4D CT image data set of a patient's thorax that consisted of three-dimensional (3D) image data sets from eight phases in the respiratory cycle. The contours of the right and left lungs, cord, heart, and esophagus were manually delineated on the end inspiration data set. An interactive deformable model algorithm, originally intended for deforming an atlas-based model surface to a 3D CT image data set, was applied in an automated fashion. Triangulations based on the contours generated on each phase were deformed to the CT data set on the succeeding phase to generate the contours on that phase. Deformation was propagated through the eight phases, and the contours obtained on the end inspiration data set were compared with the original manually delineated contours. Structures defined by high-density gradients, such as lungs, cord, and heart, were accurately reproduced, except in regions where other gradient boundaries may have confused the algorithm, such as near bronchi. The algorithm failed to accurately contour the esophagus, a soft-tissue structure completely surrounded by tissue of similar density, without manual interaction. This technique has the potential to facilitate contour delineation in 4D CT image data sets; and future evolution of the software is expected to improve the process

  1. Model-based image reconstruction for four-dimensional PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianfang; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tonography (PET) is useful in diagnosis and radiation treatment planning for a variety of cancers. For patients with cancers in thoracic or upper abdominal region, the respiratory motion produces large distortions in the tumor shape and size, affecting the accuracy in both diagnosis and treatment. Four-dimensional (4D) (gated) PET aims to reduce the motion artifacts and to provide accurate measurement of the tumor volume and the tracer concentration. A major issue in 4D PET is the lack of statistics. Since the collected photons are divided into several frames in the 4D PET scan, the quality of each reconstructed frame degrades as the number of frames increases. The increased noise in each frame heavily degrades the quantitative accuracy of the PET imaging. In this work, we propose a method to enhance the performance of 4D PET by developing a new technique of 4D PET reconstruction with incorporation of an organ motion model derived from 4D-CT images. The method is based on the well-known maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. During the processes of forward- and backward-projection in the ML-EM iterations, all projection data acquired at different phases are combined together to update the emission map with the aid of deformable model, the statistics is therefore greatly improved. The proposed algorithm was first evaluated with computer simulations using a mathematical dynamic phantom. Experiment with a moving physical phantom was then carried out to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method and the increase of signal-to-noise ratio over three-dimensional PET. Finally, the 4D PET reconstruction was applied to a patient case

  2. Probing ultrafast dynamics in electronic structure of epitaxial Gd(0 0 0 1) on W(1 1 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, Nathan [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Malinowski, Gregory [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Bendounan, Azzedine; Silly, Mathieu G.; Chauvet, Christian [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Krizmancic, Damjan [Instituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM)-CNR Laboratorio TASC, in Area Science Park S.S.14, Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Sirotti, Fausto [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •Study of the magnetism of epitaxial Gd(0 0 0 1)/W(1 1 0). •Study of Gd(0 0 0 1) band structure as a function of the temperature. •Study of the Gd magnetism dynamics probing the M5 edge. -- Abstract: The electronic and magnetic properties of Gd have been studied using time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy employing laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe pulses. The static temperature evolution of the valence band and more precisely, the 5d6s exchange splitting is reported. Ultrafast demagnetization is measured using dichroic resonant Auger spectroscopy. Remarkably, a complete demagnetization is observed followed up by a non-monotonic recovery that could be associated to magnetization oscillations.

  3. Triplet exciton dissociation and electron extraction in graphene-templated pentacene observed with ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Thomas J; Zhang, Lushuai; Roy, Susmit Singha; Kearns, Nicholas M; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T; Andrew, Trisha L

    2017-02-08

    We compare the ultrafast dynamics of singlet fission and charge generation in pentacene films grown on glass and graphene. Pentacene grown on graphene is interesting because it forms large crystals with the long axis of the molecules "lying-down" (parallel to the surface). At low excitation fluence, spectra for pentacene on graphene contain triplet absorptions at 507 and 545 nm and no bleaching at 630 nm, which we show is due to the orientation of the pentacene molecules. We perform the first transient absorption anisotropy measurements on pentacene, observing negative anisotropy of the 507 and 545 nm peaks, consistent with triplet absorption. A broad feature at 853 nm, observed on both glass and graphene, is isotropic, suggesting hole absorption. At high fluence, there are additional features, whose kinetics and anisotropies are not explained by heating, that we assign to charge generation; we propose a polaron pair absorption at 614 nm. The lifetimes are shorter at high fluence for both pentacene on glass and graphene, indicative of triplet-triplet annihilation that likely enhances charge generation. The anisotropy decays more slowly for pentacene on graphene than on glass, in keeping with the smaller domain size observed via atomic force microscopy. Coherent acoustic phonons are observed for pentacene on graphene, which is a consequence of more homogeneous domains. Measuring the ultrafast dynamics of pentacene as a function of molecular orientation, fluence, and polarization provides new insight to previous spectral assignments.

  4. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2011-01-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  5. Four-dimensional computed tomography angiographic evaluation of cranial dural arteriovenous fistula before and after embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bing; Xu, Bing; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Qi; Wang, Li; Wang, Minjie

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of four-dimensional CTA before and after embolization treatment with ONYX-18 in eleven patients with cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and to compare the results with those of the reference standard DSA. Eleven patients with cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas detected on DSA underwent transarterial embolization with ONYX-18. Four-dimensional CTA was performed an average of 2 days before and 4 days after DSA. Four-dimensional CTA and DSA images were reviewed by two neuroradiologists for identification of feeding arteries and drainage veins and for determining treatment effects. Interobserver and intermodality agreement between four-dimensional CTA and DSA were assessed. Forty-two feeding arteries were identified for 14 fistulas in the 11 patients. Of these, 36 (85.71%) were detected on four-dimensional CTA. After transarterial embolization, one patient got partly embolized, and the fistulas in the remaining 10 patients were completely occluded. The interobserver agreement for four-dimensional CTA and intermodality agreement between four-dimensional CTA and DSA were excellent (κ=1) for shunt location, identification of drainage veins, and fistula occlusion after treatment. Four-dimensional CTA images are highly accurate when compared with DSA images both before and after transarterial embolization treatment. Four-dimensional CTA can be used for diagnosis as well as follow-up of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 to intense electronic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Torralva, Ben; Ewing, Rodney C.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd2O3 and monoclinic ZrO2 have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd2O3 exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (40$\\bar{2}$), (003), (310), and (112$\\bar{2}$) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four Ag and three Bg Raman modes. ZrO2 underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of Eg and A1g Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  7. Temporal behavior of hydrated electron studied up to 400 deg. C by ultrafast pulse radiolysis and Monte Carlo calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yosuke; Muroya, Yusa; Lin, Mingzhang; Yu, Yan; Mehran, Mostafavi; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2012-09-01

    Pulse radiolysis is a very powerful and unique method to observe the transient species and to determine their yields and has been widely used up to now. Since the radiation-induced reactions at elevated temperatures are accelerated, precise measurement becomes difficult by the conventional pulse radiolysis systems. Then, a higher time resolved pulse radiolysis system is highly expected. Recently, an ultrafast pulse radiolysis system has been developed in the University of Tokyo and applied to water radiolysis at elevated temperatures [1]. Temporal behavior of the hydrated electron at elevated temperatures up to 400 deg C has been detected. The time dependent behavior of hydrated electron at elevated temperatures were detected and the latest version of the Monte Carlo simulation code developed at University of Sherbrooke was applied to reproduce the experimental results. From the simulation, it was made clear that the thermalization distance becomes smaller with increasing temperature. In addition, in supercritical water, the initial yield is significantly dependent on density (pressure), which is consistent with our previous evaluation. (authors)

  8. Bimodal Exciplex Formation in Bimolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer Revealed by Ultrafast Time-Resolved Infrared Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marius; Licari, Giuseppe; Vauthey, Eric

    2015-09-03

    The dynamics of a moderately exergonic photoinduced charge separation has been investigated by ultrafast time-resolved infrared absorption with the dimethylanthracene/phthalonitrile donor/acceptor pair in solvents covering a broad range of polarity. A distinct spectral signature of an exciplex could be identified in the -C≡N stretching region. On the basis of quantum chemistry calculations, the 4-5 times larger width of this band compared to those of the ions and of the locally excited donor bands is explained by a dynamic distribution of exciplex geometry with different mutual orientations and distances of the constituents and, thus, with varying charge-transfer character. Although spectrally similar, two types of exciplexes could be distinguished by their dynamics: short-lived, "tight", exciplexes generated upon static quenching and longer-lived, "loose", exciplexes formed upon dynamic quenching in parallel with ion pairs. Tight exciplexes were observed in all solvents, except in the least polar diethyl ether where quenching is slower than diffusion. The product distribution of the dynamic quenching depends strongly on the solvent polarity: whereas no significant loose exciplex population could be detected in acetonitrile, both exciplex and ion pair are generated in less polar solvents, with the relative population of exciplex increasing with decreasing solvent polarity. These results are compared with those reported previously with donor/acceptor pairs in different driving force regimes to obtain a comprehensive picture of the role of the exciplexes in bimolecular photoinduced charge separation.

  9. A covariant form of the Maxwell's equations in four-dimensional spaces with an arbitrary signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, I.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of duality in the four-dimensional spaces with the arbitrary constant metric is strictly mathematically formulated. A covariant model for covariant and contravariant bivectors in this space based on three four-dimensional vectors is proposed. 14 refs

  10. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured...... on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal...

  11. Nitrogen plasma formation through terahertz-induced ultrafast electron field emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy and electron diffraction techniques rely on electron sources. Those sources require strong electric fields to extract electrons from metals, either by the photoelectric effect, driven by multiphoton absorption of strong laser fields, or in the static field emission regime....... Terahertz (THz) radiation, commonly understood to be nonionizing due to its low photon energy, is here shown to produce electron field emission. We demonstrate that a carrier-envelope phase-stable single-cycle optical field at THz frequencies interacting with a metallic microantenna can generate...... and accelerate ultrashort and ultrabright electron bunches into free space, and we use these electrons to excite and ionize ambient nitrogen molecules near the antenna. The associated UV emission from the gas forms a novel THz wave detector, which, in contrast with conventional photon-counting or heat...

  12. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC. In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10−1/30 (150  mA-50  mA of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A. Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetition rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. Off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.

  13. Ultrafast re-structuring of the electronic landscape of transparent dielectrics: new material states (Die-Met)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaly, E. G.; Rode, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    Swift excitation of transparent dielectrics by ultrashort and highly intense laser pulse leads to ultra-fast re-structuring of the electronic landscape and generates many transient material states, which are continuously reshaped in accord with the changing pulse intensity. These unconventional transient material states, which exhibit simultaneously both dielectric and metallic properties, we termed here as the `Die-Met' states. The excited material is transparent and conductive at the same time. The real part of permittivity of the excited material changes from positive to negative values with the increase of excitation, which affects strongly the interaction process during the laser pulse. When the incident field has a component along the permittivity gradient, the amplitude of the field increases resonantly near the point of zero permittivity, which dramatically changes the interaction mode and increases absorption in a way that is similar to the resonant absorption in plasma. The complex 3D structure of the permittivity makes a transparent part of the excited dielectric (at ɛ 0 > ɛ re > 0) optically active. The electro-magnetic wave gets a twisted trajectory and accrues the geometric phase while passing through such a medium. Both the phase and the rotation of the polarisation plane depend on the 3D permittivity structure. Measuring the transmission, polarisation and the phase of the probe beam allows one to quantitatively identify these new transient states. We discuss the revelations of this effect in different experimental situations and their possible applications.

  14. Probing ultrafast changes of spin and charge density profiles with resonant XUV magnetic reflectivity at the free-electron laser FERMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gutt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of resonant magnetic XUV reflectivity experiments performed at the XUV free-electron laser FERMI. Circularly polarized XUV light with the photon energy tuned to the Fe M2,3 edge is used to measure resonant magnetic reflectivities and the corresponding Q-resolved asymmetry of a Permalloy/Ta/Permalloy trilayer film. The asymmetry exhibits ultrafast changes on 240 fs time scales upon pumping with ultrashort IR laser pulses. Depending on the value of the wavevector transfer Qz, we observe both decreasing and increasing values of the asymmetry parameter, which is attributed to ultrafast changes in the vertical spin and charge density profiles of the trilayer film.

  15. Nonequilibrium Dynamics in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Electron Plasma after Ultrafast Intersubband Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutgen, S.; Kaindl, R.A.; Woerner, M.; Elsaesser, T.; Hase, A.; Kuenzel, H.; Gulia, M.; Meglio, D.; Lugli, P.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum wells is studied after excitation from the n=1 to the n=2 conduction subband. Femtosecond pump-probe experiments demonstrate for the first time athermal distributions of n=1 electrons on a surprisingly long time scale of 2ps. Thermalization involves intersubband scattering of excited electrons via optical phonon emission with a time constant of 1ps and intrasubband Coulomb and phonon scattering. Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations show that the slow electron equilibration results from Pauli blocking and screening of carrier-carrier scattering. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Four-dimensional computed tomography angiographic evaluation of cranial dural arteriovenous fistula before and after embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Bing; Xu, Bing; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Qi; Wang, Li; Wang, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 4D CTA showed excellent agreement with DSA with regard to identification of feeding arteries and drainage veins. • The most important finding was 4D CTA in determining the impact of DAVF treatment with transarterial embolization. • 4D CTA provides images similar to those obtained with DSA both before and after treatment. - Abstract: Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of four-dimensional CTA before and after embolization treatment with ONYX-18 in eleven patients with cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and to compare the results with those of the reference standard DSA. Patients and Methods: Eleven patients with cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas detected on DSA underwent transarterial embolization with ONYX-18. Four-dimensional CTA was performed an average of 2 days before and 4 days after DSA. Four-dimensional CTA and DSA images were reviewed by two neuroradiologists for identification of feeding arteries and drainage veins and for determining treatment effects. Interobserver and intermodality agreement between four-dimensional CTA and DSA were assessed. Results: Forty-two feeding arteries were identified for 14 fistulas in the 11 patients. Of these, 36 (85.71%) were detected on four-dimensional CTA. After transarterial embolization, one patient got partly embolized, and the fistulas in the remaining 10 patients were completely occluded. The interobserver agreement for four-dimensional CTA and intermodality agreement between four-dimensional CTA and DSA were excellent (κ = 1) for shunt location, identification of drainage veins, and fistula occlusion after treatment. Conclusion: Four-dimensional CTA images are highly accurate when compared with DSA images both before and after transarterial embolization treatment. Four-dimensional CTA can be used for diagnosis as well as follow-up of cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas in clinical settings

  17. Ultrafast electron dynamics at alkali/ice structures adsorbed on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study the interaction between excess electrons in water ice structures adsorbed on metal surfaces and other charged or neutral species, like alkali ions, or chemically reactive molecules, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), respectively. The excess electrons in the ice can interact with the ions directly or indirectly via the hydrogen bonded water molecules. In both cases the presence of the alkali influences the population, localization, and lifetime of electronic states of excess electrons in the ice adlayer. These properties are of great relevance when considering the highly reactive character of the excess electrons, which can mediate chemical reactions by dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The influence of alkali adsorption on electron solvation and transfer dynamics in ice structures is investigated for two types of adsorption configurations using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. In the first system alkali atoms are coadsorbed on top of a wetting amorphous ice film adsorbed on Cu(111). At temperatures between 60 and 100 K alkali adsorption leads to the formation of positively charged alkali ions at the ice/vacuum interface. The interaction between the alkali ions at the surface and the dipole moments of the surrounding water molecules results in a reorientation of the water molecules. As a consequence new electron trapping sites, i.e. at local potential minima, are formed. Photoinjection of excess electrons into these alkali-ion covered amorphous ice layers, results in the trapping of a solvated electron at an alkali-ion/water complex. In contrast to solvation in pure amorphous ice films, where the electrons are located in the bulk of the ice layer, solvated electrons at alkali-ion/water complexes are located at the ice/vacuum interface. They exhibit lifetimes of several picoseconds and show a fast energetic stabilization. With ongoing solvation, i.e. pump-probe time delay, the electron transfer is

  18. An ultrafast spectroscopic and quantum mechanical investigation of multiple emissions in push-pull pyridinium derivatives bearing different electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, B; Benassi, E; Cesaretti, A; Fortuna, C G; Spalletti, A; Barone, V; Elisei, F

    2015-08-28

    A joint experimental and theoretical approach, involving state-of-the-art femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion measurements and quantum mechanical computations including vibronic effects, was employed to get a deep insight into the excited state dynamics of two cationic dipolar chromophores (Donor-π-Acceptor(+)) where the electron deficient portion is a N-methyl pyridinium and the electron donor a trimethoxyphenyl or a pyrene, respectively. The ultrafast spectroscopic investigation, and the time resolved area normalised emission spectra in particular, revealed a peculiar multiple emissive behaviour and allowed the distinct emitting states to be remarkably distinguished from solvation dynamics, occurring in water in a similar timescale. The two and three emissions experimentally detected for the trimethoxyphenyl and pyrene derivatives, respectively, were associated with specific local emissive minima in the potential energy surface of S1 on the ground of quantum-mechanical calculations. A low polar and planar Locally Excited (LE) state together with a highly polar and Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) state is identified to be responsible for the dual emission of the trimethoxyphenyl compound. Interestingly, the more complex photobehaviour of the pyrenyl derivative was explained considering the contribution to the fluorescence coming not only from the LE and TICT states but also from a nearly Planar Intramolecular Charge Transfer (PICT) state, with both the TICT and the PICT generated from LE by progressive torsion around the quasi-single bond between the methylpyridinium and the ethene bridge. These findings point to an interconversion between rotamers for the pyrene compound taking place in its excited state against the Non-equilibrated Excited Rotamers (NEER) principle.

  19. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  20. Design and implementation of electronics and data acquisition system for Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    . UBAT is equipped with an X-ray detector, analog and digital signal readout electronics that detects X-rays from GRBs and determines the location. SMT is equipped with a stepping motor and the associated electronics to rotate the slewing mirror targeting the GRBs identified by UBAT. First the slewing...... mirror points to a GRB, then SMT obtains the optical image of the GRB using the intensified CCD and its readout electronics. The UFFO Data Acquisition system (UDAQ) is responsible for the overall function and operation of the observatory and the communication with the satellite main processor....... In this paper we present the design and implementation of the electronics of UBAT and SMT as well as the architecture and implementation of UDAQ....

  1. Micro-channel plate detector for ultra-fast relativistic electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.; Gutierrez, M.S.; Bender, H.A.; Hilko, B.; Kruschwitz, C.A.; Wilcox, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    Using relativistic ultra-short electron beams to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment, such as a university laboratory, at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. One of the main issues in bringing this technique to full maturity is the development of efficient detector systems to record the diffraction pattern using a few MeV electron beams. Low noise, high spatial resolution, and single-electron detection capability are all characteristics of an ideal detector. In this paper, we compare the performances of a traditional fluorescent phosphor screen with a detection system based on the micro-channel plate (MCP). Since MCPs are typically used with lower energy electron beams, these tests constitute one of the few experimental data points available on the use of these devices with MeV energy beams.

  2. Micro-channel plate detector for ultra-fast relativistic electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P., E-mail: musumeci@physics.ucla.edu [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1547 (United States); Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.; Gutierrez, M.S. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1547 (United States); Bender, H.A.; Hilko, B.; Kruschwitz, C.A.; Wilcox, N.S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Using relativistic ultra-short electron beams to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment, such as a university laboratory, at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. One of the main issues in bringing this technique to full maturity is the development of efficient detector systems to record the diffraction pattern using a few MeV electron beams. Low noise, high spatial resolution, and single-electron detection capability are all characteristics of an ideal detector. In this paper, we compare the performances of a traditional fluorescent phosphor screen with a detection system based on the micro-channel plate (MCP). Since MCPs are typically used with lower energy electron beams, these tests constitute one of the few experimental data points available on the use of these devices with MeV energy beams.

  3. Nonadiabatic Response Model of Laser-Induced Ultrafast π-Electron Rotations in Chiral Aromatic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Manabu; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Lin, Sheng H.

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the nonadiabatic couplings between optically induced π-electron rotations and molecular vibrations in a chiral aromatic molecule irradiated by a nonhelical, linearly polarized laser pulse. The results of wave packet dynamics simulation show that the vibrational amplitudes strongly depend on the initial rotation direction, clockwise or counterclockwise, which is controlled by the polarization direction of the incident pulse. This suggests that attosecond π-electron rotations can be observed by spectroscopic detection of femtosecond molecular vibrations.

  4. Ultrafast Phase Transition in Vanadium Dioxide Driven by Hot-Electron Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasankumar R. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel all-optical method of triggering the phase transition in vanadium dioxide by means of ballistic electrons injected across the interface between a mesh of Au nanoparticles coveringd VO2 nanoislands. By performing non-degenerate pump-probe transmission spectroscopy on this hybrid plasmonic/phase-changing nanostructure, structural and electronic dynamics can be retrieved and compared.

  5. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, J.

    2005-11-01

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  6. Room Temperature Deposition Processes Mediated By Ultrafast Photo-Excited Hot Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-30

    mechanical through resonant energy transfer. The average electron temperature (Tel) during τ2 evolves as energy is lost through optical and acoustic ...through ballistic collisions and acoustic phonons. The large difference in heat capacities between electrons and the substrate leads to negligible...temperature pyrometer indicated only a ~30oC temperature gradient between the thermocouple location and the topside of the sample which faced the

  7. Comment on non-renormalization theorem in the four dimensional superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Jiro; Nakazawa, Naohito; Sakai, Kenji; Ojima, Shuichi.

    1987-10-01

    We discuss non-renormalization theorem in the context of the four dimensional superstrings. We explicitly demonstrate that the graviton 3-point one-loop amplitude does not vanish in contrast to the ten dimensional superstring theories. (author)

  8. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} to intense electronic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittman, Dylan R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ewing, Rodney C. [Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (402{sup ¯}), (003), (310), and (112{sup ¯}) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four A{sub g} and three B{sub g} Raman modes. ZrO{sub 2} underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  9. Ultra high speed optical transmission using subcarrier-multiplexed four-dimensional LDPC-coded modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batshon, Hussam G; Djordjevic, Ivan; Schmidt, Ted

    2010-09-13

    We propose a subcarrier-multiplexed four-dimensional LDPC bit-interleaved coded modulation scheme that is capable of achieving beyond 480 Gb/s single-channel transmission rate over optical channels. Subcarrier-multiplexed four-dimensional LDPC coded modulation scheme outperforms the corresponding dual polarization schemes by up to 4.6 dB in OSNR at BER 10(-8).

  10. Four-dimensional Hall mechanics as a particle on CP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, Stefano; Casteill, Pierre-Yves; Nersessian, Armen

    2003-01-01

    In order to establish an explicit connection between four-dimensional Hall effect on S 4 and six-dimensional Hall effect on CP 3 , we perform the Hamiltonian reduction of a particle moving on CP 3 in a constant magnetic field to the four-dimensional Hall mechanics (i.e., a-bar particle on S 4 in a SU(2) instanton field). This reduction corresponds to fixing the isospin of the latter system

  11. Hawking radiation from four-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes in M theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.R.; Mathur, S.D.; Ramadevi, P.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a method has been developed for relating four dimensional Schwarzschild black holes in M theory to near-extremal black holes in string theory with four charges, using suitably defined open-quotes boostsclose quotes and T dualities. We show that this method can be extended to obtain the emission rate of low energy massless scalars for the four dimensional Schwarzschild hole from the microscopic picture of radiation from the near extremal hole. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  12. Ultrafast Interfacial Electron and Hole Transfer from CsPbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaifeng; Liang, Guijie; Shang, Qiongyi; Ren, Yueping; Kong, Degui; Lian, Tianquan

    2015-10-14

    Recently reported colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelengths covering the whole visible spectrum and exceptionally high PL quantum yields (QYs, 50-90%) constitute a new family of functional materials with potential applications in light-harvesting and -emitting devices. By transient absorption spectroscopy, we show that the high PL QYs (∼79%) can be attributed to negligible electron or hole trapping pathways in CsPbBr3 QDs: ∼94% of lowest excitonic states decayed with a single-exponential time constant of 4.5 ± 0.2 ns. Furthermore, excitons in CsPbBr3 QDs can be efficiently dissociated in the presence of electron or hole acceptors. The half-lives of electron transfer (ET) to benzoquinone and subsequent charge recombination are 65 ± 5 ps and 2.6 ± 0.4 ns, respectively. The half-lives for hole transfer (HT) to phenothiazine and the subsequent charge recombination are 49 ± 6 ps and 1.0 ± 0.2 ns, respectively. The lack of electron and hole traps and fast interfacial ET and HT rates are key properties that may enable the development of efficient lead halide perovskite QDs-based light-harvesting and -emitting devices.

  13. Diagnosis of fetal syndromes by three- and four-dimensional ultrasound: is there any improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barišić, Lara Spalldi; Stanojević, Milan; Kurjak, Asim; Porović, Selma; Gaber, Ghalia

    2017-08-28

    With all of our present knowledge, high technology diagnostic equipment, electronic databases and other available supporting resources, detection of fetal syndromes is still a challenge for healthcare providers in prenatal as well as in the postnatal period. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal syndromes is not straightforward, and it is a difficult puzzle that needs to be assembled and solved. Detection of one anomaly should always raise a suspicion of the existence of more anomalies, and can be a trigger to investigate further and raise awareness of possible syndromes. Highly specialized software systems for three- and four-dimensional ultrasound (3D/4D US) enabled detailed depiction of fetal anatomy and assessment of the dynamics of fetal structural and functional development in real time. With recent advances in 3D/4D US technology, antenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies and syndromes shifted from the 2nd to the 1st trimester of pregnancy. It is questionable what can and should be done after the prenatal diagnosis of fetal syndrome. The 3D and 4D US techniques improved detection accuracy of fetal abnormalities and syndromes from early pregnancy onwards. It is not easy to make prenatal diagnosis of fetal syndromes, so tools which help like online integrated databases are needed to increase diagnostic precision. The aim of this paper is to present the possibilities of different US techniques in the detection of some fetal syndromes prenatally.

  14. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.

    2015-01-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  15. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do-Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  16. Conservation of vibrational coherence in ultrafast electronic relaxation: The case of diplatinum complexes in solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monni, R.; Auböck, G.; Kinschel, D.; Aziz-Lange, K. M.; Gray, H. B.; Vlček, Antonín; Chergui, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 683, SEP 2017 (2017), s. 112-120 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14129; GA ČR GA17-01137S Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1201 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : vibrational energy * electronic energy * diplatinum complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2016

  17. Computational Benchmarking for Ultrafast Electron Dynamics: Wave Function Methods vs Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Micael J T; Mignolet, Benoit; Kus, Tomasz; Papadopoulos, Theodoros A; Remacle, F; Verstraete, Matthieu J

    2015-05-12

    Attosecond electron dynamics in small- and medium-sized molecules, induced by an ultrashort strong optical pulse, is studied computationally for a frozen nuclear geometry. The importance of exchange and correlation effects on the nonequilibrium electron dynamics induced by the interaction of the molecule with the strong optical pulse is analyzed by comparing the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation based on the correlated field-free stationary electronic states computed with the equationof-motion coupled cluster singles and doubles and the complete active space multi-configurational self-consistent field methodologies on one hand, and various functionals in real-time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on the other. We aim to evaluate the performance of the latter approach, which is very widely used for nonlinear absorption processes and whose computational cost has a more favorable scaling with the system size. We focus on LiH as a toy model for a nontrivial molecule and show that our conclusions carry over to larger molecules, exemplified by ABCU (C10H19N). The molecules are probed with IR and UV pulses whose intensities are not strong enough to significantly ionize the system. By comparing the evolution of the time-dependent field-free electronic dipole moment, as well as its Fourier power spectrum, we show that TD-DFT performs qualitatively well in most cases. Contrary to previous studies, we find almost no changes in the TD-DFT excitation energies when excited states are populated. Transitions between states of different symmetries are induced using pulses polarized in different directions. We observe that the performance of TD-DFT does not depend on the symmetry of the states involved in the transition.

  18. Ultrafast carrier thermalization in lead iodide perovskite probed with two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Johannes M; Branchi, Federico; Valduga de Almeida Camargo, Franco; Zhao, Baodan; Friend, Richard H; Cerullo, Giulio; Deschler, Felix

    2017-08-29

    In band-like semiconductors, charge carriers form a thermal energy distribution rapidly after optical excitation. In hybrid perovskites, the cooling of such thermal carrier distributions occurs on timescales of about 300 fs via carrier-phonon scattering. However, the initial build-up of the thermal distribution proved difficult to resolve with pump-probe techniques due to the requirement of high resolution, both in time and pump energy. Here, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with sub-10 fs resolution to directly observe the carrier interactions that lead to a thermal carrier distribution. We find that thermalization occurs dominantly via carrier-carrier scattering under the investigated fluences and report the dependence of carrier scattering rates on excess energy and carrier density. We extract characteristic carrier thermalization times from below 10 to 85 fs. These values allow for mobilities of 500 cm 2  V -1  s -1 at carrier densities lower than 2 × 10 19  cm -3 and limit the time for carrier extraction in hot carrier solar cells.Carrier-carrier scattering rates determine the fundamental limits of carrier transport and electronic coherence. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with sub-10 fs resolution, Richter and Branchi et al. extract carrier thermalization times of 10 to 85 fs in hybrid perovskites.

  19. Breaking the Attosecond, Angstrom and TV/m Field Barriers with Ultrafast Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Fukasawa, A.; Hemsing, E.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Musumeci, P.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Pellegrini, C.; Schiller, D.; Travish, G.; Bucksbaum, P.; Hogan, M.; Krejcik, Patrick; Ferrario, M.; Muggli, Patric

    2010-01-01

    Recent initiatives at UCLA concerning ultra-short, GeV electron beam generation have been aimed at achieving sub-fs pulses capable of driving X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in single-spike mode. This scheme uses very low charge beams, which may allow existing FEL injectors to produce few-100 attosecond pulses, with very high brightness. Towards this end, recent experiments at the Stanford X-ray FEL (LCLS, first of its kind, built with essential UCLA leadership) have produced ∼2 fs, 20 pC electron pulses. We discuss here extensions of this work, in which we seek to exploit the beam brightness in FELs, in tandem with new developments at UCLA in cryogenic undulator technology, to create compact accelerator/undulator systems that can lase below 0.15 Angst , or be used to permit 1.5 Angst operation at 4.5 GeV. In addition, we are now developing experiments which use the present LCLS fs pulses to excite plasma wakefields exceeding 1 TV/m, permitting a table-top TeV accelerator for frontier high energy physics applications. We discuss the experimental issues associated with this initiative.

  20. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of electrons in Au clusters capped with dodecanethiol molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamanaka, Y.; Fukagawa, K.; Tai, Y.; Murakami, J.; Nakamura, A.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated electron relaxation dynamics of size-selected Au clusters capped by dodecanethiol molecules in the cluster sizes of 28-142 atoms using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Absorption spectra of 28-71-atom clusters show discrete peaks due to the optical transitions between quantized states, while an absorption band due to the surface plasmon is observed in 142-atom clusters. In the differential absorption spectra measured by the pump-probe experiments, a large redshift of 140 meV lasting over 10 ps and absorption bleaching decaying within 2 ps are observed at the absorption peaks of 28-atom clusters. The redshift is ascribed to a charge transfer between Au clusters and dodecanethiol molecules adsorbed on the cluster surface, and the bleaching is due to blocking of the optical transitions between the ground state and the occupied electronic states due to the Pauli's-exclusion principle. Such behavior is in contrast to the 142-atom clusters, where the cooling of hot electrons generated by photo-excitation determines the relaxation dynamics. These results indicate molecular properties of the 28-atom Au cluster-dodecanethiol system

  1. Ultrafast optical snapshots of hybrid perovskites reveal the origin of multiband electronic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Even, Jacky; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2017-11-01

    Connecting the complex electronic excitations of hybrid perovskites to their intricate organic-inorganic lattice structure has critical implications for energy conversion and optoelectronic technologies. Here we detail the multiband, multivalley electronic structure of a halide hybrid perovskite by measuring the absorption transients of a millimeter-scale-grain thin film as it undergoes a thermally controlled reversible tetragonal-to-orthogonal phase transition. Probing nearly single grains of this hybrid perovskite, we observe an unreported energy splitting (degeneracy lifting) of the high-energy 2.6 eV band in the tetragonal phase that further splits as the rotational degrees of freedom of the disordered C H3N H3 + molecules are reduced when the sample is cooled. This energy splitting drastically increases during an extended phase-transition coexistence region that persists from 160 to 120 K, becoming more pronounced in the orthorhombic phase. By tracking the temperature-dependent optical transition energies and using symmetry analysis that describes the evolution of electronic states from the tetragonal phase to the orthorhombic phase, we assign this energy splitting to the nearly degenerate transitions in the tetragonal phase from both the R - and M -point-derived states. Importantly, these assignments explain how momentum conservation effects lead to long hot-carrier lifetimes in the room-temperature tetragonal phase, with faster hot-carrier relaxation when the hybrid perovskite structurally transitions to the orthorhombic phase due to enhanced scattering at the Γ point.

  2. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pennacchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect. Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons.

  3. Ultrafast exciton decay in PbS quantum dots through simultaneous electron and hole recombination with a surface-localized ion pair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edme, Kedy; Bettis Homan, Stephanie; Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Weiss, Emily A., E-mail: e-weiss@northwestern.edu

    2016-06-01

    Highlights: • We synthesize complexes of PbS quantum dots (QDs) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). Each PbS QD spontaneously reduces up to 17 TCNQ molecules. • The photoluminescence of the PbS QDs is quenched in the presence of the reduced TCNQ species through ultrafast non-radiative, simultaneous decay of the electron and hole. • We assign this decay to a four-carrier, concerted charge recombination mechanism with the surface localized sulfur–TCNQ{sup x−} ion pair. - Abstract: This paper describes the ultrafast decay of the band-edge exciton in PbS quantum dots (QDs) through simultaneous recombination of the excitonic hole and electron with the surface localized ion pair formed upon adsorption of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). Each PbS QD (R = 1.8 nm) spontaneously reduces up to 17 TCNQ molecules upon adsorption of the TCNQ molecule to a sulfur on the QD surface. The photoluminescence of the PbS QDs is quenched in the presence of the reduced TCNQ species through ultrafast (⩽15-ps) non-radiative decay of the exciton; the rate constant for the decay process increases approximately linearly with the number of adsorbed, reduced TCNQ molecules. Near-infrared and mid-infrared transient absorption show that this decay occurs through simultaneous transfer of the excitonic electron and hole, and is assigned to a four-carrier, concerted charge recombination mechanism based on the observations that (i) the PL of the QDs recovers when spontaneously reduced TCNQ{sup 1−} desorbs from the QD surface upon addition of salt, and (ii) the PL of the QDs is preserved when another spontaneous oxidant, ferrocinium, which cannot participate in charge transfer in its reduced state, is substituted for TCNQ.

  4. Ultrafast electron crystallography of the cooperative reaction path in vanadium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Shyue Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved electron diffraction with atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolution was used to unravel the transformation pathway in the photoinduced structural phase transition of vanadium dioxide. Results from bulk crystals and single-crystalline thin-films reveal a common, stepwise mechanism: First, there is a femtosecond V−V bond dilation within 300 fs, second, an intracell adjustment in picoseconds and, third, a nanoscale shear motion within tens of picoseconds. Experiments at different ambient temperatures and pump laser fluences reveal a temperature-dependent excitation threshold required to trigger the transitional reaction path of the atomic motions.

  5. Spot profile analysis and lifetime mapping in ultrafast electron diffraction: Lattice excitation of self-organized Ge nanostructures on Si(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frigge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast high energy electron diffraction in reflection geometry is employed to study the structural dynamics of self-organized Germanium hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters on Si(001 upon femtosecond laser excitation. Utilizing the difference in size and strain state the response of hut- and dome clusters can be distinguished by a transient spot profile analysis. Surface diffraction from {105}-type facets provide exclusive information on hut clusters. A pixel-by-pixel analysis of the dynamics of the entire diffraction pattern gives time constants of 40, 160, and 390 ps, which are assigned to the cooling time constants for hut-, dome-, and relaxed clusters.

  6. Ultrafast optical control of the electronic properties of ZrTe5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crepaldi, Alberto; Cilento, Federico [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste (Italy); Manzoni, Giulia; Sterzi, Andrea; Diego, Michele [Universita degli Studi di Trieste (Italy); Kuhn, Timo; Gragnaniello, Luca; Fonin, Mikhail [University of Konstanz (Germany); Autes, Gabriel; Bugnon, Philippe; Magrez, Arnaud; Berger, Helmuth; Yazyev, Oleg; Grioni, Marco [EPFL (Switzerland); Zacchigna, Michele [C.N.R.-I.O.M. (Italy); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2016-07-01

    ZrTe5 has recently attracted considerable interest owing to some unique, albeit only partially understood, properties. The electrical resistivity exhibits a peak at a temperature where the nature of the charge carriers changes from holes to electrons. The observed negative magneto-resistance has been attributed to the presence of Dirac particles, either three-dimensional or two-dimensional and spin-polarized. Our time and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) study has addressed the origin of the anomalous transport behavior of ZrTe5, while showing the possibility to control the electronic properties of this material via sub-ps IR laser pulses. These observations open the way to the exploitation of ZrTe5 as a platform for magnetoelectric optical and thermoelectric transport applications. Finally, by combining ab initio calculations, ARPES and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) we are contributing to shed light on the topological nature of ZrTe5, which is shown to be close to transition between strong and weak topological insulator phases.

  7. Electron phonon couplings in 2D perovskite probed by ultrafast photoinduced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Uyen; Ni, Limeng; Rao, Akshay

    We use the time-resolved photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy with 20fs time resolution to investigate the electron phonon coupling in the self-assembled hybrid organic layered perovskite, the hexyl ammonium lead iodide compound (C6H13NH3)2 (PbI4) . The coupling results in the broadening and asymmetry of its temperature-dependence photoluminescence spectra. The exact time scale of this coupling, however, wasn't reported experimentally. Here we show that using an ultrashort excitation pulse allows us to resolve from PIA kinetics the oscillation of coherent longitudinal optical phonons that relaxes and self-traps electrons to lower energy states within 200 fs. The 200fs relaxation time is equivalent to a coupling strength of 40meV. Two coupled phonon modes are also identified as about 100 cm-1 and 300 cm-1 from the FFT spectrum of the PIA kinetics. The lower energy mode is consistent with previous reports and Raman spectrum but the higher energy one hasn't been observed before.

  8. Ultra-fast pump-probe determination of electron-phonon coupling in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Dragan

    2010-03-01

    Fresh femtosecond spectroscopy experiments show the electron-phonon interaction strength λ to be 0.7 and 1.4 for YBCO and LSCO respectively and not around 0.2 as previously reported [1]. The revised estimates arise primarily from improved time-resolution, and also partly from improved modeling. Comparison with classical superconductors and pnictides shows non-monotonic correlation of λ with Tc. Systematic new measurements of the condensate vaporization energy (Uv) in cuprates [2] and pnictides reveals a power-law dependence on Tc with exponent 2. However, Uc is 16-18 times greater than the BCS condensation energy Uc, implying that a significant heat capacity of the ``bosonic glue.'' In contrast, charge-density wave systems with electronically driven ordering transitions have Uv˜Uc. The data suggest BCS and Eliashberg-based models to be inappropriate for describing the physics of high-temperature superconductors, and point towards polaron models which consider strong or intermediate λ.[4pt] [1] C.Gadermeier et al., arXiv:0902.1636[0pt] [2] P.Kusar et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 227001 (2008)

  9. Ultrafast electron, lattice and spin dynamics on rare earth metal surfaces. Investigated with linear and nonlinear optical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, I.E.

    2006-03-15

    This thesis presents the femtosecond laser-induced electron, lattice and spin dynamics on two representative rare-earth systems: The ferromagnetic gadolinium Gd(0001) and the paramagnetic yttrium Y(0001) metals. The employed investigation tools are the time-resolved linear reflectivity and second-harmonic generation, which provide complementary information about the bulk and surface/interface dynamics, respectively. The femtosecond laser excitation of the exchange-split surface state of Gd(0001) triggers simultaneously the coherent vibrational dynamics of the lattice and spin subsystems in the surface region at a frequency of 3 THz. The coherent optical phonon corresponds to the vibration of the topmost atomic layer against the underlying bulk along the normal direction to the surface. The coupling mechanism between phonons and magnons is attributed to the modulation of the exchange interaction J between neighbour atoms due to the coherent lattice vibration. This leads to an oscillatory motion of the magnetic moments having the same frequency as the lattice vibration. Thus these results reveal a new type of phonon-magnon coupling mediated by the modulation of the exchange interaction and not by the conventional spin-orbit interaction. Moreover, we show that coherent spin dynamics in the THz frequency domain is achievable, which is at least one order of magnitude faster than previously reported. The laser-induced (de)magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic Gd(0001) thin films have been studied. Upon photo-excitation, the nonlinear magneto-optics measurements performed in this work show a sudden drop in the spin polarization of the surface state by more than 50% in a <100 fs time interval. Under comparable experimental conditions, the time-resolved photoemission studies reveal a constant exchange splitting of the surface state. The ultrafast decrease of spin polarization can be explained by the quasi-elastic spin-flip scattering of the hot electrons among spin

  10. Ultrafast triggered transient energy storage by atomic layer deposition into porous silicon for integrated transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Anna; Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Share, Keith; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics.Here we demonstrate the first on-chip silicon-integrated rechargeable transient power source based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating of vanadium oxide (VOx) into porous silicon. A stable specific capacitance above 20 F g-1 is achieved until the device is triggered with alkaline solutions. Due to the rational design of the active VOx coating enabled by ALD, transience occurs through a rapid disabling step that occurs within seconds, followed by full dissolution of all active materials within 30 minutes of the initial trigger. This work demonstrates how engineered materials for energy storage can provide a basis for next-generation transient systems and highlights porous silicon as a versatile scaffold to integrate transient energy storage into transient electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental details for ALD and material fabrication, ellipsometry film thickness, preparation of gel electrolyte and separator, details for electrochemical measurements, HRTEM image of VOx coated porous silicon, Raman spectroscopy for VOx as-deposited as well as annealed in air for 1 hour at 450 °C, SEM and transient behavior dissolution tests of uniformly coated VOx on

  11. Femtosecond excitations in metallic nanostructures. From ultrafast light confinement to a local electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropers, C.

    2007-07-11

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of optical excitations in metallic nanostructures. In experiments on selected model structures, the dynamics of these excitations and their electromagnetic spatial modes are investigated with femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution, respectively. Angle- and time-resolved transmission experiments on metallic thin film gratings demonstrate the dominant role resonant surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) play in the optical properties of such structures. The lifetimes of these excitations are determined, and it is shown that coherent couplings among SPP-resonances result in drastic lifetime modifications. Near the visible part of the spectrum, subradiant SPP lifetimes of up to 200 femtoseconds are observed, which is considerably longer than previously expected for these structures. The spatial SPP mode profiles are imaged using a custom-built near-field optical microscope. The experiments reveal a direct correlation between the spatial mode structure and the dynamics of different SPP resonances. Coupling-induced SPP band gaps are identified as splittings into symmetric and antisymmetric surface modes. These findings allow for an interpretation of the near-field optical image contrast in terms of the contributions of different vectorial components of the electromagnetic near-field. A selective imaging of different electric and magnetic field components is demonstrated for various types of near-field probes. Furthermore, the excitation of SPPs in periodic structures is employed in a novel type of near-field tip. The resonant excitation of SPPs in a nanofabricated grating on the shaft of a sharp metallic tip results in their concentration at the tip apex. The final part of the thesis highlights the importance of optical field enhancements for the local generation of nonlinear optical signals at the apex of sharp metallic tips. Specifically, the observation of intense multiphoton electron emission after femtosecond

  12. Ultrafast responses of dipolar and octupolar compounds with dipicolinate as an electron acceptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaochuan, E-mail: ycwang@dlmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Siyuan; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Guiqiu [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China); Xiao, Haibo [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Two dipolar compounds with dipicolinate as electron acceptor group named trans-dimethyl-4-[4’-(N,N-dimethylamino)-styry1]-pyridin-2,6-dicarboxylate (M-1), trans-dimethyl-4-[4'-(N,N-diphenylamino)-styry1]-pyridin-2,6-dicarboxylate (P-1) as well as a P-1 based multi-branched octupolar compound {4-[(E)-2-(2,6-dimethoxycarbonylpyridin-4-yl) vinyl]}-N,N-bis{4-[(E)-2-(2,6-dimethoxycarbonylpyridin-4-yl)vinylphenyl]} aniline (P-3) with intense two-photon fluorescence emission properties are systematically investigated by using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, Z-scan, and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF) method. The two-photon absorption cross section of octupolar compound P-3 in THF solution is determined to be 376 GM, which is approximately 12 times greater than that of dipolar counterpart P-1 (32 GM). Transient absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the excited state dynamics of the dipolar and octupolar compounds. The formation and relaxation lifetimes of the intra-molecular charge transfer (ICT) state are determined to be in the ranges of several picoseconds and several-hundreds of picoseconds, respectively, for all the three compounds in THF solutions. An extended π-conjugated system and increased intra-molecular cooperative effect are responsible for the observed large two-photon absorption character. - Highlights: • Octupolar compound gain 12-fold enhancement of two photon absorption. • Dynamic properties of intra-molecular charge transfer state are determined. • Cooperative effect is responsible for great increase of two photon character.

  13. Ultrafast laser induced electronic and structural modifications in bulk fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchik, K.; D' Amico, C.; Velpula, P. K.; Mauclair, C.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Stoian, R. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR 5516 CNRS, Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 Saint Etienne (France)

    2013-10-07

    Ultrashort laser pulses can modify the inner structure of fused silica, generating refractive index changes varying from soft positive (type I) light guiding forms to negative (type II) values with void presence and anisotropic sub-wavelength modulation. We investigate electronic and structural material changes in the type I to type II transition via coherent and incoherent secondary light emission reflecting free carrier behavior and post-irradiation material relaxation in the index change patterns. Using phase contrast microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy, we determine in a space-resolved manner defect formation, redistribution and spatial segregation, and glass network reorganization paths in conditions marking the changeover between type I and type II photoinscription regimes. We first show characteristic patterns of second harmonic generation in type I and type II traces, indicating the collective involvement of free carriers and polarization memory. Second, incoherent photoemission from resonantly and non-resonantly excited defect states reveals accumulation of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) in positive index domains and oxygen deficiency centers (ODCs) with O{sub 2}{sup −} ions segregation in void-like regions and in the nanostructured domains, reflecting the interaction strength. Complementary Raman investigations put into evidence signatures of the different environments where photo-chemical densification (bond rearrangements) and mechanical effects can be indicated. NBOHCs setting in before visible index changes serve as precursors for subsequent compaction build-up, indicating a scenario of cold, defect-assisted densification for the soft type I irradiation regime. Additionally, we observe hydrodynamic effects and severe bond-breaking in type II zones with indications of phase transition. These observations illuminate densification paths in fused silica in low power irradiation regimes, and equally in energetic ranges

  14. Response to 'Comment on 'Ultrafast electron optics: Propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets'' [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 803 (2003)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwick, Bradley J.; Dwyer, Jason R.; Jordan, Robert E.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-01-01

    In this reply, we address the main issues raised by Qian et al. regarding our recent article [J. Appl. Phys. 92, 1643 (2002)]. In particular, we reiterate the approximations used in the development of the mean-field model and demonstrate how the form used for the on-axis potential is applicable to the study of femtosecond electron packet propagation and is not in need of correction. We also repeat our assertion that the one-dimensional (1-D) fluid model developed by Qian et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 91, 462 (2002)] overestimates space-charge-induced pulse broadening and is in qualitative disagreement with femtosecond electron packet propagation dynamics. The key differences between the mean-field and 1-D fluid model are discussed and their range of applicability is clarified

  15. Renormalization of period doubling in symmetric four-dimensional volume-preserving maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, J.; Greene, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have determined three maps (truncated at quadratic terms) that are fixed under the renormalization operator of pitchfork period doubling in symmetric four-dimensional volume-preserving maps. Each of these contains the previously known two-dimensional area-preserving map that is fixed under the period-doubling operator. One of these three fixed maps consists of two uncoupled two-dimensional (nonlinear) area-preserving fixed maps. The other two contain also the two-dimensional area-preserving fixed map coupled (in general) with a linear two-dimensional map. The renormalization calculation recovers all numerical results for the pitchfork period doubling in the symmetric four-dimensional volume-preserving maps, reported by Mao and Helleman [Phys. Rev. A 35, 1847 (1987)]. For a large class of nonsymmetric four-dimensional volume-preserving maps, we found that the fixed maps are the same as those for the symmetric maps

  16. A validation study of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) in insurance medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, W.; Langeland, W.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Draisma, S.; Terluin, B.; Draijer, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the criterion validity and the diagnostic accuracy of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) regarding the identification of depressive and anxiety disorders in an insurance medicine setting. Participants: Our sample consisted of 230 individuals who

  17. Bosonisation of four dimensional real fermionic string models and asymmetric orbifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailin, D.; Dunbar, D.C.; Love, A.

    1990-01-01

    Models of four dimensional strings based on internal world-sheet fermions are bosonised and the partition functions are compared with the partition functions of asymmetric Z 2 M orbifold models. Selection rules and couplings are also compared between the two formations. (orig.)

  18. Energy and angular-momentum non-conservation in four-dimensional gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, A.

    1985-01-01

    We study energy and angular-momentum non-conservation on four-dimensional chiral gauge theories using Landau levels. These effects are physical manifestations of the usual gauge anomaly, and enable us to understand in a semi-classical approximation why anomaly cancellation is required for a consistent field theory. (orig.)

  19. Quantum theory of string in the four-dimensional space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pron'ko, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The Lorentz invariant quantum theory of string is constructed in four-dimensional space-time. Unlike the traditional approach whose result was breaking of Lorentz invariance, our method is based on the usage of other variables for description of string configurations. The method of an auxiliary spectral problem for periodic potentials is the main tool in construction of these new variables

  20. Four-dimensional computed tomographic analysis of esophageal mobility during normal respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, Edith M. T.; Senan, Suresh; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Slotman, Ben J.; van Sörnsen de Koste, John R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemo-radiotherapy for thoracic tumors can result in high-grade radiation esophagitis. Treatment planning to reduce esophageal irradiation requires organ motion to be accounted for. In this study, esophageal mobility was assessed using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). METHODS

  1. Registration-based Reconstruction of Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for reconstruction of four-dimensional (4D) cone beam computed tomography from an undersampled set of X-ray projections. The novelty of the proposed method lies in utilizing optical flow based registration to facilitate that each temporal phase is reconstructed from the full...

  2. Spontaneous transition to a stochastic state in a four-dimensional Yang-Mills quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semikhatov, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    The quantum expectation values in a four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory are represented in each topological sector as expectation values over the diffusion which develops in the ''fourth'' Euclidean time. The Langevin equations of this diffusion are stochastic duality equations in the A 4 = 0 gauge

  3. Adding Four- Dimensional Data Assimilation (a.k.a. grid nudging) to MPAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding four-dimensional data assimilation (a.k.a. grid nudging) to MPAS.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is investigating the use of MPAS as the meteorological driver for its next-generation air quality model. To function as such, MPAS needs to operate in a diagnostic mod...

  4. Nonrenormalizable quantum field models in four-dimensional space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczka, R.

    1978-01-01

    The construction of no-cutoff Euclidean Green's functions for nonrenormalizable interactions L/sub I/(phi) = lambda∫ddelta (epsilon): expepsilonphi: in four-dimensional space-time is carried out. It is shown that all axioms for the generating functional of the Euclidean Green's function are satisfied except perhaps SO(4) invariance

  5. Four-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of total liquid ventilated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Lars; Schnabel, Christian; Gaertner, Maria; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be utilized for the spatially and temporally resolved visualization of alveolar tissue and its dynamics in rodent models, which allows the investigation of lung dynamics on the microscopic scale of single alveoli. The findings could provide experimental input data for numerical simulations of lung tissue mechanics and could support the development of protective ventilation strategies. Real four-dimensional OCT imaging permits the acquisition of several OCT stacks within one single ventilation cycle. Thus, the entire four-dimensional information is directly obtained. Compared to conventional virtual four-dimensional OCT imaging, where the image acquisition is extended over many ventilation cycles and is triggered on pressure levels, real four-dimensional OCT is less vulnerable against motion artifacts and non-reproducible movement of the lung tissue over subsequent ventilation cycles, which widely reduces image artifacts. However, OCT imaging of alveolar tissue is affected by refraction and total internal reflection at air-tissue interfaces. Thus, only the first alveolar layer beneath the pleura is visible. To circumvent this effect, total liquid ventilation can be carried out to match the refractive indices of lung tissue and the breathing medium, which improves the visibility of the alveolar structure, the image quality and the penetration depth and provides the real structure of the alveolar tissue. In this study, a combination of four-dimensional OCT imaging with total liquid ventilation allowed the visualization of the alveolar structure in rat lung tissue benefiting from the improved depth range beneath the pleura and from the high spatial and temporal resolution.

  6. Ultrafast biophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vasa, P

    2016-01-01

    This book presents emerging contemporary optical techniques of ultrafast science which have opened entirely new vistas for probing biological entities and processes. The spectrum reaches from time-resolved imaging and multiphoton microscopy to cancer therapy and studies of DNA damage. The book displays interdisciplinary research at the interface of physics and biology. Emerging topics on the horizon are also discussed, like the use of squeezed light, frequency combs and terahertz imaging as the possibility of mimicking biological systems. The book is written in a manner to make it readily accessible to researchers, postgraduate biologists, chemists, engineers, and physicists and students of optics, biomedical optics, photonics and biotechnology.

  7. Electron-mediated relaxation following ultrafast pumping of strongly correlated materials: model evidence of a correlation-tuned crossover between thermal and nonthermal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, B; Kemper, A F; Sentef, M; Devereaux, T P; Freericks, J K

    2013-08-16

    We examine electron-electron mediated relaxation following ultrafast electric field pump excitation of the fermionic degrees of freedom in the Falicov-Kimball model for correlated electrons. The results reveal a dichotomy in the temporal evolution of the system as one tunes through the Mott metal-to-insulator transition: in the metallic regime relaxation can be characterized by evolution toward a steady state well described by Fermi-Dirac statistics with an increased effective temperature; however, in the insulating regime this quasithermal paradigm breaks down with relaxation toward a nonthermal state with a complicated electronic distribution as a function of momentum. We characterize the behavior by studying changes in the energy, photoemission response, and electronic distribution as functions of time. This relaxation may be observable qualitatively on short enough time scales that the electrons behave like an isolated system not in contact with additional degrees of freedom which would act as a thermal bath, especially when using strong driving fields and studying materials whose physics may manifest the effects of correlations.

  8. PREFACE: Ultrafast biophotonics Ultrafast biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Reid, Derryck; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2010-08-01

    The use of light to explore biology can be traced to the first observations of tissue made with early microscopes in the mid-seventeenth century, and has today evolved into the discipline which we now know as biophotonics. This field encompasses a diverse range of activities, each of which shares the common theme of exploiting the interaction of light with biological material. With the rapid advancement of ultrafast optical technologies over the last few decades, ultrafast lasers have increasingly found applications in biophotonics, to the extent that the distinctive new field of ultrafast biophotonics has now emerged, where robust turnkey ultrafast laser systems are facilitating cutting-edge studies in the life sciences to take place in everyday laboratories. The broad spectral bandwidths, precision timing resolution, low coherence and high peak powers of ultrafast optical pulses provide unique opportunities for imaging and manipulating biological systems. Time-resolved studies of bio-molecular dynamics exploit the short pulse durations from such lasers, while other applications such as optical coherence tomography benefit from the broad optical bandwidths possible by using super-continuum generation and additionally allowing for high speed imaging with speeds as high as 47 000 scans per second. Continuing progress in laser-system technology is accelerating the adoption of ultrafast techniques across the life sciences, both in research laboratories and in clinical applications, such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery. Revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy, two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has enabled higher spatial resolution with improved depth penetration into biological specimens. Advantages of this nonlinear optical process include: reduced photo-interactions, allowing for extensive imaging time periods; simultaneously exciting multiple fluorescent molecules with only one excitation wavelength; and

  9. Ultrafast spectroscopy of biological photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Groot, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent new insights on reaction dynamics of photoreceptors proteins gained from ultrafast spectroscopy. In Blue Light sensing Using FAD (BLUF) domains, a hydrogen-bond rearrangement around the flavin chromophore proceeds through a radical-pair mechanism, by which light-induced electron and

  10. Ultrafast THz Saturable Absorption in Doped Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors by nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy. This effect is caused by the semiconductor conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite-valley scattering in strong THz fields.......We demonstrate ultrafast THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors by nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy. This effect is caused by the semiconductor conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite-valley scattering in strong THz fields....

  11. A general method for baseline-removal in ultrafast electron powder diffraction data using the dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent P. René de Cotret

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The general problem of background subtraction in ultrafast electron powder diffraction (UEPD is presented with a focus on the diffraction patterns obtained from materials of moderately complex structure which contain many overlapping peaks and effectively no scattering vector regions that can be considered exclusively background. We compare the performance of background subtraction algorithms based on discrete and dual-tree complex (DTCWT wavelet transforms when applied to simulated UEPD data on the M1–R phase transition in VO2 with a time-varying background. We find that the DTCWT approach is capable of extracting intensities that are accurate to better than 2% across the whole range of scattering vector simulated, effectively independent of delay time. A Python package is available.

  12. A layer-by-layer ZnO nanoparticle-PbS quantum dot self-assembly platform for ultrafast interfacial electron injection

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed Samir

    2014-08-28

    Absorbent layers of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now used as material platforms for low-cost, high-performance solar cells. The semiconductor metal oxide nanoparticles as an acceptor layer have become an integral part of the next generation solar cell. To achieve sufficient electron transfer and subsequently high conversion efficiency in these solar cells, however, energy-level alignment and interfacial contact between the donor and the acceptor units are needed. Here, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique is used to assemble ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), providing adequate PbS QD uptake to achieve greater interfacial contact compared with traditional sputtering methods. Electron injection at the PbS QD and ZnO NP interface is investigated using broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 120 femtosecond temporal resolution. The results indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to ZnO NPs occurs on a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This observation is supported by the interfacial electronic-energy alignment between the donor and acceptor moieties. Finally, due to the combination of large interfacial contact and ultrafast electron injection, this proposed platform of assembled thin films holds promise for a variety of solar cell architectures and other settings that principally rely on interfacial contact, such as photocatalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms and its application in medical imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chongguo; Wu Dake

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging simulation is a powerful tool for characterizing,evaluating,and optimizing medical imaging devices and techniques. A vital aspect of simulation is to have a realistic phantom or model of the subject's anatomy. Four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms provide realistic models of the mouse anatomy and physiology for imaging studies. When combined with accurate models for the imaging process,are capable of providing a wealth of realistic imaging data from subjects with various anatomies and motions (cardiac and respiratory) in health and disease. With this ability, the four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms have enormous potential to study the effects of anatomical, physiological and physical factors on medical and small animal imaging and to research new instrumentation, image acquisition strategies, image processing, reconstruction methods, image visualization and interpretation techniques. (authors)

  14. String propagation in an exact four-dimensional black hole background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, S.

    1997-01-01

    We study string propagation in an exact, stringy, four-dimensional dyonic black hole background. The exact solutions in terms of elliptic functions describing string configurations in the J=0 limit are obtained by solving the string equations of motion and constraints. By using the covariant formalism, we also investigate the propagation of physical perturbations along the string in the given curved background. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Statistical Entropy of Nonextremal Four-Dimensional Black Holes and U-Duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, G.T.; Lowe, D.A.; Maldacena, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We identify the states in string theory which are responsible for the entropy of near-extremal rotating four-dimensional black holes in N=8 supergravity. For black holes far from extremality (with no rotation), the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is exactly matched by a mysterious duality invariant extension of the formulas derived for near-extremal black holes states. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Four-dimensional Microscope-Integrated Optical Coherence Tomography to Visualize Suture Depth in Strabismus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Neel D; Bhullar, Paramjit K; Shieh, Christine; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A; Freedman, Sharon F; Kuo, Anthony N

    2017-02-14

    The authors report the use of swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (SS-MIOCT), capable of live four-dimensional (three-dimensional across time) intraoperative imaging, to directly visualize suture depth during lateral rectus resection. Key surgical steps visualized in this report included needle depth during partial and full-thickness muscle passes along with scleral passes. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54:e1-e5.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Haunted Kaluza universe with four-dimensional Lorentzian flat, Kerr, and Taub-NUT slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Rossen I.; Prodanov, Emil M.

    2005-01-01

    The duality between the original Kaluza's theory and Klein's subsequent modification is duality between slicing and threading decomposition of the five-dimensional spacetime. The field equations of the original Kaluza's theory lead to the interpretation of the four-dimensional Lorentzian Kerr and Taub-NUT solutions as resulting from static electric and magnetic charges and dipoles in the presence of ghost matter and constant dilaton, which models Newton's constant

  18. Feasibility of four-dimensional preoperative simulation for elbow debridement arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Michiro; Murakami, Yukimi; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-04-02

    Recent advances in imaging modalities have enabled three-dimensional preoperative simulation. A four-dimensional preoperative simulation system would be useful for debridement arthroplasty of primary degenerative elbow osteoarthritis because it would be able to detect the impingement lesions. We developed a four-dimensional simulation system by adding the anatomical axis to the three-dimensional computed tomography scan data of the affected arm in one position. Eleven patients with primary degenerative elbow osteoarthritis were included. A "two rings" method was used to calculate the flexion-extension axis of the elbow by converting the surface of the trochlea and capitellum into two rings. A four-dimensional simulation movie was created and showed the optimal range of motion and the impingement area requiring excision. To evaluate the reliability of the flexion-extension axis, interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities regarding the assessment of bony overlap volumes were calculated twice for each patient by two authors. Patients were treated by open or arthroscopic debridement arthroplasties. Pre- and postoperative examinations included elbow range of motion measurement, and completion of the patient-rated questionnaire Hand20, Japanese Orthopaedic Association-Japan Elbow Society Elbow Function Score, and the Mayo Elbow Performance Score. Measurement of the bony overlap volume showed an intraobserver intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.93 and 0.90, and an interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.94. The mean elbow flexion-extension arc significantly improved from 101° to 125°. The mean Hand20 score significantly improved from 52 to 22. The mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association-Japan Elbow Society Elbow Function Score significantly improved from 67 to 88. The mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score significantly improved from 71 to 91 at the final follow-up evaluation. We showed that four-dimensional, preoperative simulation can be generated by

  19. Nonperturbative construction of nonrenormalizable models of quantum field theory in four-dimensional space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczka, R.

    1979-01-01

    Construction of non-cutoff Euclidean Green's functions for nonrenormalizable interactions Lsub(I)(phi)=lambda∫dσ(epsilon):expepsilonphi: in four-dimensional space-time is presented. It is shown that all axioms for the generating functional of E.G.F. are satisfied except perhaps the SO(4) invariance. It is shown that the singularities of E.G.F. for coinciding points are not worse than those of the free theory. (author)

  20. Higher-order gravity in higher dimensions: geometrical origins of four-dimensional cosmology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troisi, Antonio [Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' E.R. Caianiello' ' , Salerno (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Determining the cosmological field equations is still very much debated and led to a wide discussion around different theoretical proposals. A suitable conceptual scheme could be represented by gravity models that naturally generalize Einstein theory like higher-order gravity theories and higher-dimensional ones. Both of these two different approaches allow one to define, at the effective level, Einstein field equations equipped with source-like energy-momentum tensors of geometrical origin. In this paper, the possibility is discussed to develop a five-dimensional fourth-order gravity model whose lower-dimensional reduction could provide an interpretation of cosmological four-dimensional matter-energy components. We describe the basic concepts of the model, the complete field equations formalism and the 5-D to 4-D reduction procedure. Five-dimensional f(R) field equations turn out to be equivalent, on the four-dimensional hypersurfaces orthogonal to the extra coordinate, to an Einstein-like cosmological model with three matter-energy tensors related with higher derivative and higher-dimensional counter-terms. By considering the gravity model with f(R) = f{sub 0}R{sup n} the possibility is investigated to obtain five-dimensional power law solutions. The effective four-dimensional picture and the behaviour of the geometrically induced sources are finally outlined in correspondence to simple cases of such higher-dimensional solutions. (orig.)

  1. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  2. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Scoby

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV<10  pC electron bunch on the spatial profile of the laser pulse. The electric field lines inside the dielectric bend at an angle due to a relatively large (n∼3 index of refraction of the ZnTe crystal. We found theoretically and experimentally that the EOS signal can be maximized with a proper choice of incoming laser polarization angle. We achieved single-shot nondestructive measurement of the relative time of arrival between the pump and the probe beams thus improving the temporal resolution of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction experiments.

  3. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  5. Effect of Novel Amplitude/Phase Binning Algorithm on Commercial Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Lu Wei; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; Klahr, Paul; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a significant source of anatomic uncertainty in radiotherapy planning and can result in errors of portal size and the subsequent radiation dose. Although four-dimensional computed tomography allows for more accurate analysis of the respiratory cycle, breathing irregularities during data acquisition can cause considerable image distortions. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of respiratory irregularities on four-dimensional computed tomography, and to evaluate a novel image reconstruction algorithm using percentile-based tagging of the respiratory cycle. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated helical computed tomography scans were acquired for 11 consecutive patients. The inspiration and expiration data sets were reconstructed using the default phase-based method, as well as a novel respiration percentile-based method with patient-specific metrics to define the ranges of the reconstruction. The image output was analyzed in a blinded fashion for the phase- and percentile-based reconstructions to determine the prevalence and severity of the image artifacts. Results: The percentile-based algorithm resulted in a significant reduction in artifact severity compared with the phase-based algorithm, although the overall artifact prevalence did not differ between the two algorithms. The magnitude of differences in respiratory tag placement between the phase- and percentile-based algorithms correlated with the presence of image artifacts. Conclusion: The results of our study have indicated that our novel four-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction method could be useful in detecting clinically relevant image distortions that might otherwise go unnoticed and to reduce the image distortion associated with some respiratory irregularities. Additional work is necessary to assess the clinical impact on areas of possible irregular breathing

  6. A four-dimensional variational chemistry data assimilation scheme for Eulerian chemistry transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibern, Hendrik; Schmidt, Hauke

    1999-08-01

    The inverse problem of data assimilation of tropospheric trace gas observations into an Eulerian chemistry transport model has been solved by the four-dimensional variational technique including chemical reactions, transport, and diffusion. The University of Cologne European Air Pollution Dispersion Chemistry Transport Model 2 with the Regional Acid Deposition Model 2 gas phase mechanism is taken as the basis for developing a full four-dimensional variational data assimilation package, on the basis of the adjoint model version, which includes the adjoint operators of horizontal and vertical advection, implicit vertical diffusion, and the adjoint gas phase mechanism. To assess the potential and limitations of the technique without degrading the impact of nonperfect meteorological analyses and statistically not established error covariance estimates, artificial meteorological data and observations are used. The results are presented on the basis of a suite of experiments, where reduced records of artificial "observations" are provided to the assimilation procedure, while other "data" is retained for performance control of the analysis. The paper demonstrates that the four-dimensional variational technique is applicable for a comprehensive chemistry transport model in terms of computational and storage requirements on advanced parallel platforms. It is further shown that observed species can generally be analyzed, even if the "measurements" have unbiased random errors. More challenging experiments are presented, aiming to tax the skill of the method (1) by restricting available observations mostly to surface ozone observations for a limited assimilation interval of 6 hours and (2) by starting with poorly chosen first guess values. In this first such application to a three-dimensional chemistry transport model, success was also achieved in analyzing not only observed but also chemically closely related unobserved constituents.

  7. Acquiring a four-dimensional computed tomography dataset using an external respiratory signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedam, S S; Keall, P J; Kini, V R; Mostafavi, H; Shukla, H P; Mohan, R

    2003-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) methods strive to achieve highly conformal radiotherapy, particularly for lung and breast tumours, in the presence of respiratory-induced motion of tumours and normal tissues. Four-dimensional radiotherapy accounts for respiratory motion during imaging, planning and radiation delivery, and requires a 4D CT image in which the internal anatomy motion as a function of the respiratory cycle can be quantified. The aims of our research were (a) to develop a method to acquire 4D CT images from a spiral CT scan using an external respiratory signal and (b) to examine the potential utility of 4D CT imaging. A commercially available respiratory motion monitoring system provided an 'external' tracking signal of the patient's breathing. Simultaneous recording of a TTL 'X-Ray ON' signal from the CT scanner indicated the start time of CT image acquisition, thus facilitating time stamping of all subsequent images. An over-sampled spiral CT scan was acquired using a pitch of 0.5 and scanner rotation time of 1.5 s. Each image from such a scan was sorted into an image bin that corresponded with the phase of the respiratory cycle in which the image was acquired. The complete set of such image bins accumulated over a respiratory cycle constitutes a 4D CT dataset. Four-dimensional CT datasets of a mechanical oscillator phantom and a patient undergoing lung radiotherapy were acquired. Motion artefacts were significantly reduced in the images in the 4D CT dataset compared to the three-dimensional (3D) images, for which respiratory motion was not accounted. Accounting for respiratory motion using 4D CT imaging is feasible and yields images with less distortion than 3D images. 4D images also contain respiratory motion information not available in a 3D CT image

  8. Non-critical string duals of four-dimensional CFTs with fundamental matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigazzi, F.; Casero, R.; Paredes, A.; Cotrone, A.L.

    2006-01-01

    The two-derivative approximation to non-critical strings is used as a qualitative tool to find solutions dual to four dimensional CFTs with matter in the fundamental. Two solutions are discussed: an AdS 5 x S 3 , which is dual to an N=1 SCFT only for a ratio of N f /N c and an AdS 5 which is proposed to be dual to N=0 QCD in the conformal window. All solutions have curvatures of the order of the string scale. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Post-Newtonian approximation of the maximum four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have calculated the post-Newtonian approximation of the maximum four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory proposed by Hsu. The theory contains torsion; however, torsion is not active at the level of the post-Newtonian approximation of the metric. Depending on the nature of the approximation, we obtain the general-relativistic values for the classical Robertson parameters (γ = β = 1), but deviations for the Nordtvedt effect and violations of post-Newtonian conservation laws. We conclude that in its present form the theory is not a viable theory of gravitation

  10. Bifurcation structures and transient chaos in a four-dimensional Chua model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, Anderson, E-mail: hoffande@gmail.com; Silva, Denilson T. da; Manchein, Cesar, E-mail: cesar.manchein@udesc.br; Albuquerque, Holokx A., E-mail: holokx.albuquerque@udesc.br

    2014-01-10

    A four-dimensional four-parameter Chua model with cubic nonlinearity is studied applying numerical continuation and numerical solutions methods. Regarding numerical solution methods, its dynamics is characterized on Lyapunov and isoperiodic diagrams and regarding numerical continuation method, the bifurcation curves are obtained. Combining both methods the bifurcation structures of the model were obtained with the possibility to describe the shrimp-shaped domains and their endoskeletons. We study the effect of a parameter that controls the dimension of the system leading the model to present transient chaos with its corresponding basin of attraction being riddled.

  11. Four-dimensional (4D) tracking of high-temperature microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Liu, Q.; Waganaar, W.; Fontanese, J.; James, D.; Munsat, T.

    2016-01-01

    High-speed tracking of hot and molten microparticles in motion provides rich information about burning plasmas in magnetic fusion. An exploding-wire apparatus is used to produce moving high-temperature metallic microparticles and to develop four-dimensional (4D) or time-resolved 3D particle tracking techniques. The pinhole camera model and algorithms developed for computer vision are used for scene calibration and 4D reconstructions. 3D positions and velocities are then derived for different microparticles. Velocity resolution approaches 0.1 m/s by using the local constant velocity approximation.

  12. Quasinormal modes of four-dimensional topological nonlinear charged Lifshitz black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becar, Ramon [Universidad Cato lica de Temuco, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas y Fisicas, Temuco (Chile); Gonzalez, P.A. [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2016-02-15

    We study scalar perturbations of four- dimensional topological nonlinear charged Lifshitz black holes with spherical and plane transverse sections, and we find numerically the quasinormal modes for scalar fields. Then we study the stability of these black holes under massive and massless scalar field perturbations. We focus our study on the dependence of the dynamical exponent, the nonlinear exponent, the angular momentum, and the mass of the scalar field in the modes. It is found that the modes are overdamped, depending strongly on the dynamical exponent and the angular momentum of the scalar field for a spherical transverse section. In contrast, for plane transverse sections the modes are always overdamped. (orig.)

  13. Finite-temperature symmetry restoration in the four-dimensional Φ4 model with four components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The finite-temperature symmetry restoration in the four-dimensional φ 4 theory with four components and with an infinite self-coupling is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations on lattices with time extensions L t =4,5,6 and space extensions 12 3 -28 3 . The numerical calculations are done by means of the Wolff cluster algorithm which is very efficient for simulations near a phase transition. The numerical results are in good agreement with an improved one-loop expansion and with the 1/N-expansion, indicating that in the electroweak theory the symmetry restoration temperature T sr is about 350 GeV. (orig.)

  14. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  15. An accessible four-dimensional treatment of Maxwell's equations in terms of differential forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Lucas

    2017-03-01

    Maxwell’s equations are derived in terms of differential forms in the four-dimensional Minkowski representation, starting from the three-dimensional vector calculus differential version of these equations. Introducing all the mathematical and physical concepts needed (including the tool of differential forms), using only knowledge of elementary vector calculus and the local vector version of Maxwell’s equations, the equations are reduced to a simple and elegant set of two equations for a unified quantity, the electromagnetic field. The treatment should be accessible for students taking a first course on electromagnetism.

  16. Analysis of interfractional variations in pancreatic position based on four-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Itoh, Akio; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Akira; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess inter-fractional variations in pancreatic position using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) and to find the suitable phase of respiration for breath-holding. The variations in respiratory motion range during treatment course and inter-fractional variations in pancreatic positions were not negligible; however, our study suggested that breath-holding at end-exhalation with some coaching techniques might be considerable one of the non-invasive approaches to get higher positional reproducibility of pancreatic tumors. (author)

  17. Four-dimensional Hooke's law can encompass linear elasticity and inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoci, S.; Mihich, L.

    1999-01-01

    The question is examined whether the formally straightforward extension of Hooke's time-honoured stress-strain relation to the four dimensions of special and of general relativity can make physical sense. The four-dimensional Hooke law is found able to account for the inertia of matter; in the flat-space, slow-motion approximation the field equations for the displacement four-vector field ξ i can encompass both linear elasticity and inertia. In this limit one just recovers the equations of motion of the classical theory of elasticity

  18. One-way quantum computation with four-dimensional photonic qudits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Jaewoo; Knight, Peter L.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Rudolph, Terry

    2007-01-01

    We consider the possibility of performing linear optical quantum computations making use of extra photonic degrees of freedom. In particular, we focus on the case where we use photons as quadbits, four-dimensional photonic qudits. The basic 2-quadbit cluster state is a hyperentangled state across polarization and two spatial mode degrees of freedom. We examine the nondeterministic methods whereby such states can be created from single photons and/or Bell pairs and then give some mechanisms for performing higher-dimensional fusion gates

  19. Gravitational matter-antimatter asymmetry and four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A formulation of gravity based on the maximum four-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge symmetry is studied. The theory predicts that the gravitational force inside matter (fermions) is different from that inside antimatter. This difference could lead to the cosmic separation of matter and antimatter in the evolution of the universe. Moreover, a new gravitational long-range spin-force between two fermions is predicted, in addition to the usual Newtonian force. The geometrical foundation of such a gravitational theory is the Riemann-Cartan geometry, in which there is a torsion. The results of the theory for weak fields are consistent with previous experiments.

  20. Impact of metal ions in porphyrin-based applied materials for visible-light photocatalysis: Key information from ultrafast electronic spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Kar, Prasenjit; Sardar, Samim; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Seddigi, Zaki Shakir Abdullah; Ahmed, Saleh Abdel Mgeed; Danish, Ekram Yousif; Mohammed, Omar F.; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-01-01

    ProtoporphyrinIX-zinc oxide (PP-ZnO) nanohybrids have been synthesized for applications in photocatalytic devices. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and steady-state infrared, absorption, and emission spectroscopies have been used to analyze the structural details and optical properties of these nanohybrids. Time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption techniques have been applied to study the ultrafast dynamic events that are key to photocatalytic activities. The photocatalytic efficiency under visible-light irradiation in the presence of naturally abundant iron(III) and copper(II) ions has been found to be significantly retarded in the former case, but enhanced in the latter case. More importantly, femtosecond (fs) transient absorption data have clearly demonstrated that the residence of photoexcited electrons from the sensitizer PP in the centrally located iron moiety hinders ground-state bleach recovery of the sensitizer, affecting the overall photocatalytic rate of the nanohybrid. The presence of copper(II) ions, on the other hand, offers additional stability against photobleaching and eventually enhances the efficiency of photocatalysis. In addition, we have also explored the role of UV light in the efficiency of photocatalysis and have rationalized our observations from femtosecond- to picosecond-resolved studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Excited state electron and energy relays in supramolecular dinuclear complexes revealed by ultrafast optical and X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Dugan; Kohler, Lars; Hadt, Ryan G; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Cunming; Mulfort, Karen L; Chen, Lin X

    2018-01-28

    The kinetics of photoinduced electron and energy transfer in a family of tetrapyridophenazine-bridged heteroleptic homo- and heterodinuclear copper(i) bis(phenanthroline)/ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes were studied using ultrafast optical and multi-edge X-ray transient absorption spectroscopies. This work combines the synthesis of heterodinuclear Cu(i)-Ru(ii) analogs of the homodinuclear Cu(i)-Cu(i) targets with spectroscopic analysis and electronic structure calculations to first disentangle the dynamics at individual metal sites by taking advantage of the element and site specificity of X-ray absorption and theoretical methods. The excited state dynamical models developed for the heterodinuclear complexes are then applied to model the more challenging homodinuclear complexes. These results suggest that both intermetallic charge and energy transfer can be observed in an asymmetric dinuclear copper complex in which the ground state redox potentials of the copper sites are offset by only 310 meV. We also demonstrate the ability of several of these complexes to effectively and unidirectionally shuttle energy between different metal centers, a property that could be of great use in the design of broadly absorbing and multifunctional multimetallic photocatalysts. This work provides an important step toward developing both a fundamental conceptual picture and a practical experimental handle with which synthetic chemists, spectroscopists, and theoreticians may collaborate to engineer cheap and efficient photocatalytic materials capable of performing coulombically demanding chemical transformations.

  2. Impact of metal ions in porphyrin-based applied materials for visible-light photocatalysis: Key information from ultrafast electronic spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Kar, Prasenjit

    2014-07-10

    ProtoporphyrinIX-zinc oxide (PP-ZnO) nanohybrids have been synthesized for applications in photocatalytic devices. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and steady-state infrared, absorption, and emission spectroscopies have been used to analyze the structural details and optical properties of these nanohybrids. Time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption techniques have been applied to study the ultrafast dynamic events that are key to photocatalytic activities. The photocatalytic efficiency under visible-light irradiation in the presence of naturally abundant iron(III) and copper(II) ions has been found to be significantly retarded in the former case, but enhanced in the latter case. More importantly, femtosecond (fs) transient absorption data have clearly demonstrated that the residence of photoexcited electrons from the sensitizer PP in the centrally located iron moiety hinders ground-state bleach recovery of the sensitizer, affecting the overall photocatalytic rate of the nanohybrid. The presence of copper(II) ions, on the other hand, offers additional stability against photobleaching and eventually enhances the efficiency of photocatalysis. In addition, we have also explored the role of UV light in the efficiency of photocatalysis and have rationalized our observations from femtosecond- to picosecond-resolved studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Remarkably High Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: From Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy to Device Fabrication and Optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2016-04-10

    In organic donor-acceptor systems, ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) are key determinants of the overall performance of photovoltaic devices. However, a profound understanding of these photophysical processes at device interfaces remains superficial, creating a major bottleneck that circumvents advancements and the optimization of these solar cells. Here, results from time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy are examined to provide the fundamental information necessary to fabricate and optimize organic solar cell devices. In real time, CT and CS are monitored at the interface between three fullerene acceptors (FAs) (PC71BM, PC61BM, and IC60BA) and the PTB7-Th donor polymer. Femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) data demonstrates that photoinduced electron transfer from the PTB7-Th polymer to each FA occurs on the sub-picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of long-lived radical ions. It is also found that the power conversion efficiency improves from 2% in IC60BA-based solar cells to >9% in PC71BM-based devices, in support of our time-resolved results. The insights reported in this manuscript provide a clear understanding of the key variables involved at the device interface, paving the way for the exploitation of efficient CS and subsequently improving the photoconversion efficiency. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A novel four-dimensional analytical approach for analysis of complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Susanne; Jakob, Cornelia; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2016-05-01

    A two-dimensional LC (2D-LC) method, based on the work of Erni and Frei in 1978, was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high-resolution mass spectrometer (IM-MS), which enabled the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-LC, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and mass spectrometry (MS)). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting LC system, using a long modulation time of 4 min, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first - dimension peaks to the second - dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography. Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Ginkgo biloba shows the separation power of this four-dimensional separation method with a calculated total peak capacity of more than 8700. Furthermore, the advantage of ion mobility for characterizing unknown compounds by their collision cross section (CCS) and accurate mass in a non-target approach is shown for different matrices like plant extracts and coffee. Graphical abstract Principle of the four-dimensional separation.

  5. On the four-dimensional character of micro-physical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietdijk, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    It is proved that retroactive effects exist in Nature. This emphasizes the fact that micro-processes constitute integrated wholes so much that it is no longer far-fetched to posit the hypothesis that events, that is, action, rather than objects, constitute the proper stuff of the (four-dimensional) Universe. Mind here, too, that retroactivity implies that the future and future parts of events 'exist already'. Then, distances between (e.g., alternative) events A and B have to be measured by the quantity of 'occurring' or action that is needed in order to transform event A into event B. The action metric so introduced appears to be in a position to solve the nonlocality paradoxes of quantum mechanics such as wave-particle 'duality' and the EPR paradox. In this connection, the Minkowski metric corresponds to a macro scheme which cannot be 'interpolated' to within a micro-process, i.e., to within action quanta, without producing serious metrical distortions. Generally, metric is considered to be a property of events, it having no existence independent of them as a 'pre-existing scheme'. Planck's elementary quantities of action h are seen as real entities in the four-dimensional world, i.e., as the 'atoms of occurring'. By intersecting (dilated) series of them with a now-hyperplane we in an imaginable way get the wave patterns satisfying the relevant wave equation. (Auth.)

  6. Decision-making for supplying energy projects: A four-dimensional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith Stegen, Karen; Palovic, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Extant pipeline evaluation models offer insufficient supplier analysis tools. • We offer a four-dimensional decision-making tool to augment extant models. • Model employs four filters to help decision makers eliminate unsuitable suppliers. • Aids in prioritization of best courses of action for overcoming obstacles. • Case study of Nabucco pipeline shows Azerbaijan would have been best supply option. - Abstract: Importing states and regions employ myriad strategies to enhance energy security, from stockpiling to diversification to efficiency programs. As has occurred in recent years, importers can seek diversification by initiating pipeline and liquefied natural gas projects, meaning they may also have to select suppliers. However, most extant pipeline evaluation models erroneously assume suppliers are known and thus neglect supplier selection. We propose a decision-making tool to augment these older models: a systematic and replicable four-dimensional model to help policymakers and managers identify suitable suppliers and prioritize the best courses of action for overcoming obstacles. The first three dimensions—timeframe, supply availability and infrastructure constraints—filter out unsuitable suppliers. The fourth dimension then assesses the political, geopolitical and commercial stability of the remaining candidates. To demonstrate the model in practice, we assess the original Nabucco pipeline proposal, which was designed to transport gas from the Caspian and Middle East regions to Europe

  7. Cardiac imaging using 256-detector row four-dimensional CT. Preliminary clinical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Higashino, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Along with the increase of detector rows on the z-axis and a faster gantry rotation speed, the spatial and temporal resolutions of the multislice computed tomography (CT) have been improved for noninvasive coronary artery imaging. We investigated the feasibility of the second specification prototype 256-detector row four-dimensional CT for assessing coronary artery and cardiac function. The subjects were five patients with coronary artery disease. Contrast medium (40-60 ml) was intravenously administered at the rate of 3-4 ml/s. The patient's whole heart was scanned for 1.5 s to cover at least one cardiac cycle during breathholding without electrocardiographic gating. Parameters used were 0.5 mm slice thickness, 0.5 s/rotation, 120 Kv, and 350 mA, with a half-scan reconstruction algorithm (temporal resolution 250 ms). Twenty-six transaxial datasets were reconstructed at intervals of 50 ms. The assessability of the coronary arteries in American Heart Association (AHA) segments 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 11 was visually evaluated, resulting in 29 of 32 (90.9%) segments being assessable. Functional assessment was also performed using animated movies without banding artifacts in all cases. The 256-detector row four-dimensional CT can assess the coronary artery and cardiac function using data during 1.5 s without banding artifacts. (author)

  8. Four-dimensional conversion for spiritual leadership development: A missiological approach for African churches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalemba Mwambazambi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The process of a four-dimensional conversion and/or transformation strives in helping the leadership of an organisation, especially such as the church, with practical ways that may lead to the development of an effective leadership by observing the four important aspects of human spirituality as elaborated on in the article. The spiritual, intellectual, moral and socio-political dimensions of the transformation can be catered for so that the complete inner being of humans, as well as their social and political attitudes and behaviours, can equally be transformed to maximum spiritual, personal and socio-political profitability. Mutombo-Mukendi demonstrates that the need for a spiritual leadership that can contribute to an effective transformation of Africa is dire, both for the church and the larger community. The real challenge is how to develop such leadership. This article provides intentional and practical ways that may lead to the development of the needed leadership. Four-dimensional transformation of people can be planned and carried out both in the church arena and in the surrounding communities. Skills development and transfer can also take place when skilled people from the church work with unskilled people from the community.

  9. Four dimensional chaos and intermittency in a mesoscopic model of the electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafilis, Mathew P; Frascoli, Federico; Cadusch, Peter J; Liley, David T J

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of so-called four dimensional chaos in dynamical systems represented by coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations is rarely reported in the literature. In this paper, we present evidence that Liley's mesoscopic theory of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which has been used to describe brain activity in a variety of clinically relevant contexts, possesses a chaotic attractor with a Kaplan-Yorke dimension significantly larger than three. This accounts for simple, high order chaos for a physiologically admissible parameter set. Whilst the Lyapunov spectrum of the attractor has only one positive exponent, the contracting dimensions are such that the integer part of the Kaplan-Yorke dimension is three, thus giving rise to four dimensional chaos. A one-parameter bifurcation analysis with respect to the parameter corresponding to extracortical input is conducted, with results indicating that the origin of chaos is due to an inverse period doubling cascade. Hence, in the vicinity of the high order, strange attractor, the model is shown to display intermittent behavior, with random alternations between oscillatory and chaotic regimes. This phenomenon represents a possible dynamical justification of some of the typical features of clinically established EEG traces, which can arise in the case of burst suppression in anesthesia and epileptic encephalopathies in early infancy.

  10. Charged rotating black holes in four-dimensional gauged and ungauged supergravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Z.-W.; Cvetic, M.; Lue, H.; Pope, C.N.

    2005-01-01

    We study four-dimensional non-extremal charged rotating black holes in ungauged and gauged supergravity. In the ungauged case, we obtain rotating black holes with four independent charges, as solutions of N=2 supergravity coupled to three Abelian vector multiplets. This is done by reducing the theory along the time direction to three dimensions, where it has an O(4,4) global symmetry. Applied to the reduction of the uncharged Kerr metric, O(1,1) 4 is a subject of O(4,4) transformations generate new solutions that correspond, after lifting back to four dimensions, to the introduction of four independent electromagnetic charges. In the case where these charges are set pairwise equal, we then generalise the four-dimensional rotating black holes to solutions of gauged N=4 supergravity, with mass, angular momentum and two independent electromagnetic charges. The dilaton and axion fields are non-constant. We also find generalisations of the gauged and ungauged solutions to include the NUT parameter, and for the ungauged solutions, the acceleration parameter too. The solutions in gauged supergravity provide new gravitational backgrounds for a further study of the AdS 4 /CFT 3 correspondence at non-zero temperature

  11. Mass, angular momentum and thermodynamics in four-dimensional Kerr-AdS black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Rodrigo [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, the connection between the Lorentz-covariant counterterms that regularize the four-dimensional AdS gravity action and topological invariants is explored. It is shown that demanding the spacetime to have a negative constant curvature in the asymptotic region permits the explicit construction of such series of boundary terms. The orthonormal frame is adapted to appropriately describe the boundary geometry and, as a result, the boundary term can be expressed as a functional of the boundary metric, extrinsic curvature and intrinsic curvature. This choice also allows to write down the background-independent Noether charges associated to asymptotic symmetries in standard tensorial formalism. The absence of the Gibbons-Hawking term is a consequence of an action principle based on a boundary condition different than Dirichlet on the metric. This argument makes plausible the idea of regarding this approach as an alternative regularization scheme for AdS gravity in all even dimensions, different than the standard counterterms prescription. As an illustration of the finiteness of the charges and the euclidean action in this framework, the conserved quantities and black hole entropy for four-dimensional Kerr-AdS are computed.

  12. Comparison of an Electronic Nose Based on Ultrafast Gas Chromatography, Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography, and Sensory Evaluation for an Analysis of Type of Whisky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Wiśniewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whisky is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages. There are many types of whisky, for example, Scotch, Irish, and American whisky (called bourbon. The whisky market is highly diversified, and, because of this, it is important to have a method which would enable rapid quality evaluation and authentication of the type of whisky. The aim of this work was to compare 3 methods: an electronic nose based on the technology of ultrafast gas chromatography (Fast-GC, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC, and sensory evaluation. The selected whisky brands included 6 blended whiskies from Scotland, 4 blended whiskies from Ireland, and 4 bourbons produced in the USA. For data analysis, peak heights of chromatograms were used. The panelists who took part in sensory evaluations included 4 women and 4 men. The obtained data were analyzed by 2 chemometric methods: partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA and discrimination function analysis (DFA. E-nose and GC × GC allowed for differentiation between whiskies by type. Sensory analysis did not allow for differentiation between whiskies by type, but it allowed giving consumer preferences.

  13. Reply to “Comment on ‘Ultrafast Demagnetization Measurements Using Extreme Ultraviolet Light: Comparison of Electronic and Magnetic Contributions’ ”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Turgut

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the following, we show that the conclusions of our article titled “Ultrafast Demagnetization Measurements Using Extreme Ultraviolet Light: Comparison of Electronic and Magnetic Contributions” are correct. The Comment of Vodungbo et al. argues that a unique determination of the refractive index variation over time is not possible using the data set presented in our paper. Furthermore, it was suggested that the lack of uniqueness allows for the possibility of a very specific time-dependent trajectory of the refractive index in the complex plane that could give rise to a large nonmagnetic modulation of the measured asymmetry, in spite of a negligible change in the s-polarized reflectivity. In this Reply, we conclusively show that any nonmagnetic contribution to the measured asymmetry is indeed negligible (<2%, below the noise level of the magnetic-asymmetry measurements. First, we use a few additional measurements to unambiguously rule out the presence of any nonmagnetic contributions to the signal. Second, we show that the scenario proposed by Vodungbo et al. would require both exotic time and energy dependences of the refractive index near the M edge that are extremely unlikely (virtually impossible in real materials. Thus, the conclusions of our original article are preserved.

  14. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-01-01

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved

  15. Galactic Cosmic-ray Transport in the Global Heliosphere: A Four-Dimensional Stochastic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinski, V.

    2009-04-01

    We study galactic cosmic-ray transport in the outer heliosphere and heliosheath using a newly developed transport model based on stochastic integration of the phase-space trajectories of Parker's equation. The model employs backward integration of the diffusion-convection transport equation using Ito calculus and is four-dimensional in space+momentum. We apply the model to the problem of galactic proton transport in the heliosphere during a negative solar minimum. Model results are compared with the Voyager measurements of galactic proton radial gradients and spectra in the heliosheath. We show that the heliosheath is not as efficient in diverting cosmic rays during solar minima as predicted by earlier two-dimensional models.

  16. Quantum theory of spinor field in four-dimensional Riemannian space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavokhina, N.S.

    1996-01-01

    The review deals with the spinor field in the four-dimensional Riemannian space-time. The field beys the Dirac-Fock-Ivanenko equation. Principles of quantization of the spinor field in the Riemannian space-time are formulated which in a particular case of the plane space-time are equivalent to the canonical rules of quantization. The formulated principles are exemplified by the De Sitter space-time. The study of quantum field theory in the De Sitter space-time is interesting because it itself leads to a method of an invariant well for plane space-time. However, the study of the quantum spinor field theory in an arbitrary Riemannian space-time allows one to take into account the influence of the external gravitational field on the quantized spinor field. 60 refs

  17. Euler numbers of four-dimensional rotating black holes with the Euclidean signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhengze

    2003-01-01

    For a black hole's spacetime manifold in the Euclidean signature, its metric is positive definite and therefore a Riemannian manifold. It can be regarded as a gravitational instanton and a topological characteristic which is the Euler number to which it is associated. In this paper we derive a formula for the Euler numbers of four-dimensional rotating black holes by the integral of the Euler density on the spacetime manifolds of black holes. Using this formula, we obtain that the Euler numbers of Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes are 2. We also obtain that the Euler number of the Kerr-Sen metric in the heterotic string theory with one boost angle nonzero is 2, which is in accordance with its topology

  18. Four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, gauge invariant mass and fluctuating three-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, Antti J; Slizovskiy, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in a gauge invariant coupling between four-dimensional Yang-Mills field and a three-brane that can fluctuate into higher dimensions. For this we interpret the Yang-Mills theory as a higher dimensional bulk gravity theory with dynamics that is governed by the Einstein action, and with a metric tensor constructed from the gauge field in a manner that displays the original gauge symmetry as an isometry. The brane moves in this higher dimensional spacetime under the influence of its bulk gravity, with dynamics determined by the Nambu action. This introduces the desired interaction between the brane and the gauge field in a way that preserves the original gauge invariance as an isometry of the induced metric. After a prudent change of variables the result can be interpreted as a gauge invariant and massive vector field that propagates in the original spacetime R 4 . The presence of the brane becomes entirely invisible, expect for the mass.

  19. New classes of bi-axially symmetric solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundell, Per; Yin, Yihao [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2017-01-11

    We present new infinite-dimensional spaces of bi-axially symmetric asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity, obtained by modifications of the Ansatz used in https://arxiv.org/abs/1107.1217, which gave rise to a Type-D solution space. The current Ansatz is based on internal semigroup algebras (without identity) generated by exponentials formed out of the bi-axial symmetry generators. After having switched on the vacuum gauge function, the resulting generalized Weyl tensor is given by a sum of generalized Petrov type-D tensors that are Kerr-like or 2-brane-like in the asymptotic AdS{sub 4} region, and the twistor space connection is smooth in twistor space over finite regions of spacetime. We provide evidence for that the linearized twistor space connection can be brought to Vasiliev gauge.

  20. All the Four-Dimensional Static, Spherically Symmetric Solutions of Abelian Kaluza-Klein Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, M.; Youm, D.

    1995-01-01

    We present the explicit form for all the four-dimensional, static, spherically symmetric solutions in (4+n)-d Abelian Kaluza-Klein theory by performing a subset of SO(2,n) transformations corresponding to four SO(1,1) boosts on the Schwarzschild solution, supplemented by SO(n)/SO(n-2) transformations. The solutions are parametrized by the mass M, Taub-NUT charge a, and n electric rvec Q and n magnetic rvec P charges. Nonextreme black holes (with zero Taub-NUT charge) have either the Reissner-Nordstroem or Schwarzschild global space-time. Supersymmetric extreme black holes have a null or naked singularity, while nonsupersymmetric extreme ones have a global space-time of extreme Reissner-Nordstroem black holes. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  1. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  2. No-go theorems for R symmetries in four-dimensional GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Fallbacher, Maximilian; Vaudrevange, Patrick K S

    2011-01-01

    We prove that it is impossible to construct a grand unified model, based on a simple gauge group, in four dimensions that leads to the exact MSSM, nor to a singlet extension, and possesses an unbroken R symmetry. This implies that no MSSM model with either a Z_{M>=3}^R or U(1)_R symmetry can be completed by a four-dimensional GUT in the ultraviolet. However, our no-go theorem does not apply to GUT models with extra dimensions. We also show that it is impossible to construct a 4D GUT that leads to the MSSM plus an additional anomaly-free symmetry that forbids the mu term.

  3. Automated four-dimensional Monte Carlo workflow using log files and real-time motion monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibolt, P; Andersen, C E; Cronholm, R O; Heath, E; Behrens, C F

    2017-01-01

    With emerging techniques for tracking and gating methods in radiotherapy of lung cancer patients, there is an increasing need for efficient four-dimensional Monte Carlo (4DMC) based quality assurance (QA). An automated and flexible workflow for 4DMC QA, based on the 4DdefDOSXYZnrc user code, has been developed in python. The workflow has been tested and verified using an in-house developed dosimetry system comprised of a dynamic thorax phantom constructed for plastic scintillator dosimetry. The workflow is directly compatible with any treatment planning system and can also be triggered by the appearance of linac log files. It has minimum user interaction and, with the use of linac log files, it provides a method for verification of the actually delivered dose in the patient geometry. (paper)

  4. Universal time versus relativistic time in four-dimensional symmetry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.B.; Hsu, J.P.; Sherry, T.N.

    1976-12-01

    A new four-dimensional symmetry framework with a universal time is investigated which can be realized by a radioactive clock--the measured survival fraction of unstable particles gives the elapsed time. The world picture turns out to be quite different from that in special relativity. The general space-light transformation and the nonuniversal speed of light in this framework are discussed. The difference between the one-way speed and the two-way speed of a light signal is considered in detail. Moreover, the discussion sheds light on the connection between the universality of the light speed and the clock which does not read universal time. The relation with special relativity theory is examined in a few cases

  5. Four-dimensional optoacoustic temperature mapping in laser-induced thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaga Landa, Francisco Javier; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís.; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Photoablative laser therapy is in common use for selective destruction of malignant masses, vascular and brain abnormalities. Tissue ablation and coagulation are irreversible processes occurring shortly after crossing a certain thermal exposure threshold. As a result, accurate mapping of the temperature field is essential for optimizing the outcome of these clinical interventions. Here we demonstrate four-dimensional optoacoustic temperature mapping of the entire photoablated region. Accuracy of the method is investigated in tissue-mimicking phantom experiments. Deviations of the volumetric optoacoustic temperature readings provided at 40ms intervals remained below 10% for temperature elevations above 3°C, as validated by simultaneous thermocouple measurements. The excellent spatio-temporal resolution of the new temperature monitoring approach aims at improving safety and efficacy of laser-based photothermal procedures.

  6. Power Doppler flow mapping and four-dimensional ultrasound for evaluating tubal patency compared with laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Amr A; Shaalan, Waleed; Abdel-Dayem, Tamer; Awad, Elsayed Elbadawy; Elkassar, Yasser; Lüdders, Dörte; Malik, Eduard; Sallam, Hassan N

    2015-12-01

    To study the accuracy of four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound and power Doppler flow mapping in detecting tubal patency in women with sub-/infertility, and compare it with laparoscopy and chromopertubation. A prospective study. The study was performed in the outpatient clinic and infertility unit of a university hospital. The sonographic team and laparoscopic team were blinded to the results of each other. Women aged younger than 43 years seeking medical advice due to primary or secondary infertility and who planned to have a diagnostic laparoscopy performed, were recruited to the study after signing an informed consent. All of the recruited patients had power Doppler flow mapping and 4D hysterosalpingo-sonography by injecting sterile saline into the fallopian tubes 1 day before surgery. Registering Doppler signals, while using power Doppler, both at the tubal ostia and fimbrial end and the ability to demonstrate the course of the tube especially the isthmus and fimbrial end, while using 4D mode, was considered a patent tube. Out of 50 recruited patients, 33 women had bilateral patent tubes and five had unilateral patent tubes as shown by chromopertubation during diagnostic laparoscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for two-dimensional power Doppler hysterosalpingography were 94.4%, 100%, 100%, 89.2%, and 96.2%, respectively and for 4D ultrasound were 70.4%, 100%, 100%, 70.4%, and 82.6%, respectively. Four-dimensional saline hysterosalpingography has acceptable accuracy in detecting tubal patency, but is surpassed by power Doppler saline hysterosalpingography. Power Doppler saline hysterosalpingography could be incorporated into the routine sub-/infertility workup. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Four-Dimensional CT of the Diaphragm in Children: Initial Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the technical feasibility of four-dimensional (4D) CT for the functional evaluation of the pediatric diaphragm. Materials and Methods In 22 consecutive children (median age 3.5 months, age range 3 days–3 years), 4D CT was performed to assess diaphragm motion. Diaphragm abnormalities were qualitatively evaluated and diaphragm motion was quantitatively measured on 4D CT. Lung density changes between peak inspiration and expiration were measured in the basal lung parenchyma. The diaphragm motions and lung density changes measured on 4D CT were compared between various diaphragm conditions. In 11 of the 22 children, chest sonography was available for comparison. Results Four-dimensional CT demonstrated normal diaphragm (n = 8), paralysis (n = 10), eventration (n = 3), and diffusely decreased motion (n = 1). Chest sonography demonstrated normal diaphragm (n = 2), paralysis (n = 6), eventration (n = 2), and right pleural effusion (n = 1). The sonographic findings were concordant with the 4D CT findings in 90.9% (10/11) of the patients. In diaphragm paralysis, the affected diaphragm motion was significantly decreased compared with the contralateral normal diaphragm motion (−1.1 ± 2.2 mm vs. 7.6 ± 3.8 mm, p = 0.005). The normal diaphragms showed significantly greater motion than the paralyzed diaphragms (4.5 ± 2.1 mm vs. −1.1 ± 2.2 mm, p Hounsfield units [HU] vs. 180 ± 71 HU, p = 0.03), while no significant differences were found between the normal diaphragms and the paralyzed diaphragms (136 ± 66 HU vs. 89 ± 73 HU, p = 0.1) or between the normal diaphragms and the contralateral normal diaphragms in paralysis (136 ± 66 HU vs. 180 ± 71 HU, p = 0.1). Conclusion The functional evaluation of the pediatric diaphragm is feasible with 4D CT in select children. PMID:29354007

  8. Semiconductors Under Ion Radiation: Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Perfect Crystals and the Effect of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Stability and safety issues have been challenging difficulties for materials and devices under radiation such as solar panels in outer space. On the other hand, radiation can be utilized to modify materials and increase their performance via focused-ion beam patterning at nano-scale. In order to grasp the underlying processes, further understanding of the radiation-material and radiation-defect interactions is required and inevitably involves the electron-ion dynamics that was traditionally hard to capture. By applying Ehrenfest dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory, we have been able to perform real-time simulation of electron-ion dynamics in MgO and InP/GaP. By simulating a high-energy proton penetrating the material, the energy gain of electronic system can be interpreted as electronic stopping power and the result is compared to existing data. We also study electronic stopping in the vicinity of defects: for both oxygen vacancy in MgO and interface of InP/GaP superlattice, electronic stopping shows strong dependence on the velocity of the proton. To study the energy transfer from electronic system to lattice, simulations of about 100 femto-seconds are performed and we analyze the difference between Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  9. Development of a high repetition rate laser-plasma accelerator for ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic microscopy and electron diffraction allowed the understanding of the organization of atoms in matter. Using a temporally short source, one can measure atomic displacements or modifications of the electronic distribution in matter. To date, the best temporal resolution for time resolved diffraction experiments is of the order of a hundred femto-seconds (fs). Laser accelerators are good candidates to reach the femtosecond temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments. Such accelerators used to work at a low repetition rate, so that it was necessary to develop a new one operating at a high repetition rate in order to accumulate a large amount of data. In this thesis, a laser-plasma accelerator operating at the kHz repetition rate was developed and built. This source generates electron bunches at 100 keV from 3 mJ and 25 fs laser pulses. The physics of the acceleration has been studied, and the effect of the laser wavefront on the electron transverse distribution has been demonstrated. (author)

  10. Four-dimensional reconstruction of cultural heritage sites based on photogrammetry and clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulodimos, Athanasios; Doulamis, Nikolaos; Fritsch, Dieter; Makantasis, Konstantinos; Doulamis, Anastasios; Klein, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A system designed and developed for the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of cultural heritage (CH) assets is presented. Two basic approaches are presented. The first one, resulting in an "approximate" 3-D model, uses images retrieved in online multimedia collections; it employs a clustering-based technique to perform content-based filtering and eliminate outliers that significantly reduce the performance of 3-D reconstruction frameworks. The second one is based on input image data acquired through terrestrial laser scanning, as well as close range and airborne photogrammetry; it follows a sophisticated multistep strategy, which leads to a "precise" 3-D model. Furthermore, the concept of change history maps is proposed to address the computational limitations involved in four-dimensional (4-D) modeling, i.e., capturing 3-D models of a CH landmark or site at different time instances. The system also comprises a presentation viewer, which manages the display of the multifaceted CH content collected and created. The described methods have been successfully applied and evaluated in challenging real-world scenarios, including the 4-D reconstruction of the historic Market Square of the German city of Calw in the context of the 4-D-CH-World EU project.

  11. Quantum Mechanics and Black Holes in Four-Dimensional String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V

    1992-01-01

    In previous papers we have shown how strings in a two-dimensional target space reconcile quantum mechanics with general relativity, thanks to an infinite set of conserved quantum numbers, ``W-hair'', associated with topological soliton-like states. In this paper we extend these arguments to four dimensions, by considering explicitly the case of string black holes with radial symmetry. The key infinite-dimensional W-symmetry is associated with the $\\frac{SU(1,1)}{U(1)}$ coset structure of the dilaton-graviton sector that is a model-independent feature of spherically symmetric four-dimensional strings. Arguments are also given that the enormous number of string {\\it discrete (topological)} states account for the maintenance of quantum coherence during the (non-thermal) stringy evaporation process, as well as quenching the large Hawking-Bekenstein entropy associated with the black hole. Defining the latter as the measure of the loss of information for an observer at infinity, who - ignoring the higher string qua...

  12. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain-machine interface using active dimension selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Adam G

    2016-06-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s(-1) for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  13. Quantification of Artifact Reduction With Real-Time Cine Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Acquisition Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, Ulrich W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the magnitude and frequency of artifacts in simulated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images using three real-time acquisition methods- direction-dependent displacement acquisition, simultaneous displacement and phase acquisition, and simultaneous displacement and velocity acquisition- and to compare these methods with commonly used retrospective phase sorting. Methods and Materials: Image acquisition for the four 4D CT methods was simulated with different displacement and velocity tolerances for spheres with radii of 0.5 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.5 cm, using 58 patient-measured tumors and respiratory motion traces. The magnitude and frequency of artifacts, CT doses, and acquisition times were computed for each method. Results: The mean artifact magnitude was 50% smaller for the three real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. The dose was ∼50% lower, but the acquisition time was 20% to 100% longer for the real-time methods than for retrospective phase sorting. Conclusions: Real-time acquisition methods can reduce the frequency and magnitude of artifacts in 4D CT images, as well as the imaging dose, but they increase the image acquisition time. The results suggest that direction-dependent displacement acquisition is the preferred real-time 4D CT acquisition method, because on average, the lowest dose is delivered to the patient and the acquisition time is the shortest for the resulting number and magnitude of artifacts.

  14. N = 1 supersymmetric indices and the four-dimensional A-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closset, Cyril; Kim, Heeyeon; Willett, Brian

    2017-08-01

    We compute the supersymmetric partition function of N = 1 supersymmetric gauge theories with an R-symmetry on M_4\\cong M_{g,p}× {S}^1 , a principal elliptic fiber bundle of degree p over a genus- g Riemann surface, Σ g . Equivalently, we compute the generalized supersymmetric index I_{M}{_{g,p}, with the supersymmetric three-manifold M_{g,p} as the spatial slice. The ordinary N = 1 supersymmetric index on the round three-sphere is recovered as a special case. We approach this computation from the point of view of a topological A-model for the abelianized gauge fields on the base Σ g . This A-model — or A-twisted two-dimensional N = (2 , 2) gauge theory — encodes all the information about the generalized indices, which are viewed as expectations values of some canonically-defined surface defects wrapped on T 2 inside Σ g × T 2. Being defined by compactification on the torus, the A-model also enjoys natural modular properties, governed by the four-dimensional 't Hooft anomalies. As an application of our results, we provide new tests of Seiberg duality. We also present a new evaluation formula for the three-sphere index as a sum over two-dimensional vacua.

  15. N=12 supersymmetric four-dimensional nonlinear σ-models from nonanticommutative superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatanaka, Tomoya; Ketov, Sergei V.; Kobayashi, Yoshishige; Sasaki, Shin

    2005-01-01

    The component structure of a generic N=1/2 supersymmetric nonlinear sigma-model (NLSM) defined in the four-dimensional (Euclidean) nonanticommutative (NAC) superspace is investigated in detail. The most general NLSM is described in terms of arbitrary Kahler potential, and chiral and antichiral superpotentials. The case of a single chiral superfield gives rise to splitting of the NLSM potentials, whereas the case of several chiral superfields results in smearing (or fuzziness) of the NLSM potentials, while both effects are controlled by the auxiliary fields. We eliminate the auxiliary fields by solving their algebraic equations of motion, and demonstrate that the results are dependent upon whether the auxiliary integrations responsible for the fuzziness are performed before or after elimination of the auxiliary fields. There is no ambiguity in the case of splitting, i.e., for a single chiral superfield. Fully explicit results are derived in the case of the N=1/2 supersymmetric NAC-deformed CP n NLSM in four dimensions. Here we find another surprise that our results differ from the N=1/2 supersymmetric CP n NLSM derived by the quotient construction from the N=1/2 supersymmetric NAC-deformed gauge theory. We conclude that an N=1/2 supersymmetric deformation of a generic NLSM from the NAC superspace is not unique

  16. Simulations of four-dimensional simplicial quantum gravity as dynamical triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agishtein, M.E.; Migdal, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Four-Dimensional Simplicial Quantum Gravity is simulated using the dynamical triangulation approach. The authors studied simplicial manifolds of spherical topology and found the critical line for the cosmological constant as a function of the gravitational one, separating the phases of opened and closed Universe. When the bare cosmological constant approaches this line from above, the four-volume grows: the authors reached about 5 x 10 4 simplexes, which proved to be sufficient for the statistical limit of infinite volume. However, for the genuine continuum theory of gravity, the parameters of the lattice model should be further adjusted to reach the second order phase transition point, where the correlation length grows to infinity. The authors varied the gravitational constant, and they found the first order phase transition, similar to the one found in three-dimensional model, except in 4D the fluctuations are rather large at the transition point, so that this is close to the second order phase transition. The average curvature in cutoff units is large and positive in one phase (gravity), and small negative in another (antigravity). The authors studied the fractal geometry of both phases, using the heavy particle propagator to define the geodesic map, as well as with the old approach using the shortest lattice paths

  17. Assessment of turbulent flow effects on the vessel wall using four-dimensional flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Magnus; Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Dyverfeldt, Petter

    2017-06-01

    To explore the use of MR-estimated turbulence quantities for the assessment of turbulent flow effects on the vessel wall. Numerical velocity data for two patient-derived models was obtained using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for two physiological flow rates. The four-dimensional (4D) Flow MRI measurements were simulated at three different spatial resolutions and used to investigate the estimation of turbulent wall shear stress (tWSS) using the intravoxel standard deviation (IVSD) of velocity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) estimated near the vessel wall. Accurate estimation of tWSS using the IVSD is limited by the spatial resolution achievable with 4D Flow MRI. TKE, estimated near the wall, has a strong linear relationship to the tWSS (mean R 2  = 0.84). Near-wall TKE estimates from MR simulations have good agreement to CFD-derived ground truth (mean R 2  = 0.90). Maps of near-wall TKE have strong visual correspondence to tWSS. Near-wall estimation of TKE permits assessment of relative maps of tWSS, but direct estimation of tWSS is challenging due to limitations in spatial resolution. Assessment of tWSS and near-wall TKE may open new avenues for analysis of different pathologies. Magn Reson Med 77:2310-2319, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Four-dimensional parameter estimation of plane waves using swarming intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman Fawad; Munir Fahad; Khan Zafar Ullah; Qureshi Ijaz Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an efficient approach for four-dimensional (4D) parameter estimation of plane waves impinging on a 2-L shape array. The 4D parameters include amplitude, frequency and the two-dimensional (2D) direction of arrival, namely, azimuth and elevation angles. The proposed approach is based on memetic computation, in which the global optimizer, particle swarm optimization is hybridized with a rapid local search technique, pattern search. For this purpose, a new multi-objective fitness function is used. This fitness function is the combination of mean square error and the correlation between the normalized desired and estimated vectors. The proposed hybrid scheme is not only compared with individual performances of particle swarm optimization and pattern search, but also with the performance of the hybrid genetic algorithm and that of the traditional approach. A large number of Monte—Carlo simulations are carried out to validate the performance of the proposed scheme. It gives promising results in terms of estimation accuracy, convergence rate, proximity effect and robustness against noise. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Four-dimensional microscope- integrated optical coherence tomography to enhance visualization in glaucoma surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Neel Dave; Bhullar, Paramjit Kaur; Shieh, Christine; Viehland, Christian; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar Mijail; Keller, Brenton; Izatt, Joseph Adam; Toth, Cynthia Ann; Challa, Pratap; Kuo, Anthony Nanlin

    2017-01-01

    We report the first use of swept-source microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (SS-MIOCT) capable of live four-dimensional (4D) (three-dimensional across time) imaging intraoperatively to directly visualize tube shunt placement and trabeculectomy surgeries in two patients with severe open-angle glaucoma and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that was not adequately managed by medical intervention or prior surgery. We performed tube shunt placement and trabeculectomy surgery and used SS-MIOCT to visualize and record surgical steps that benefitted from the enhanced visualization. In the case of tube shunt placement, SS-MIOCT successfully visualized the scleral tunneling, tube shunt positioning in the anterior chamber, and tube shunt suturing. For the trabeculectomy, SS-MIOCT successfully visualized the scleral flap creation, sclerotomy, and iridectomy. Postoperatively, both patients did well, with IOPs decreasing to the target goal. We found the benefit of SS-MIOCT was greatest in surgical steps requiring depth-based assessments. This technology has the potential to improve clinical outcomes.

  20. False vacuum decay in quantum mechanics and four dimensional scalar field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuglov, Maxim

    2018-04-01

    When the Higgs boson was discovered in 2012 it was realized that electroweak vacuum may suffer a possible metastability on the Planck scale and can eventually decay. To understand this problem it is important to have reliable predictions for the vacuum decay rate within the framework of quantum field theory. For now, it can only be done at one loop level, which is apparently is not enough. The aim of this work is to develop a technique for the calculation of two and higher order radiative corrections to the false vacuum decay rate in the framework of four dimensional scalar quantum field theory and then apply it to the case of the Standard Model. To achieve this goal, we first start from the case of d=1 dimensional QFT i.e. quantum mechanics. We show that for some potentials two and three loop corrections can be very important and must be taken into account. Next, we use quantum mechanical example as a template for the general d=4 dimensional theory. In it we are concentrating on the calculations of bounce solution and corresponding Green function in so called thin wall approximation. The obtained Green function is then used as a main ingredient for the calculation of two loop radiative corrections to the false vacuum decay rate.

  1. Two-dimensional topological field theories coupled to four-dimensional BF theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesinos, Merced; Perez, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional BF theory admits a natural coupling to extended sources supported on two-dimensional surfaces or string world sheets. Solutions of the theory are in one to one correspondence with solutions of Einstein equations with distributional matter (cosmic strings). We study new (topological field) theories that can be constructed by adding extra degrees of freedom to the two-dimensional world sheet. We show how two-dimensional Yang-Mills degrees of freedom can be added on the world sheet, producing in this way, an interactive (topological) theory of Yang-Mills fields with BF fields in four dimensions. We also show how a world sheet tetrad can be naturally added. As in the previous case the set of solutions of these theories are contained in the set of solutions of Einstein's equations if one allows distributional matter supported on two-dimensional surfaces. These theories are argued to be exactly quantizable. In the context of quantum gravity, one important motivation to study these models is to explore the possibility of constructing a background-independent quantum field theory where local degrees of freedom at low energies arise from global topological (world sheet) degrees of freedom at the fundamental level

  2. Outcome of four-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy for centrally located lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Praag, John; Aluwini, Shafak; Klaveren, Rob J. van; Verhoef, Cornelis; Pattynama, Peter M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess local control, overall survival, and toxicity of four-dimensional, risk-adapted stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered while tracking respiratory motion in patients with primary and metastatic lung cancer located in the central chest. Methods: Fifty-eight central lesions of 56 patients (39 with primary, 17 with metastatic tumors) were treated. Fifteen tumors located near the esophagus were treated with 6 fractions of 8 Gy. Other tumors were treated according to the following dose escalation scheme: 5 fractions of 9 Gy (n = 6), then 5 fractions of 10 Gy (n = 15), and finally 5 fractions of 12 Gy (n = 22). Results: Dose constraints for critical structures were generally achieved; in 21 patients the coverage of the PTV was reduced below 95% to protect adjacent organs at risk. At a median follow-up of 23 months, the actuarial 2-years local tumor control was 85% for tumors treated with a BED >100 Gy compared to 60% for tumors treated with a BED ⩽100 Gy. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 1–2 esophagitis was observed in 11% of patients. Conclusion: SBRT of central lung lesions can be safely delivered, with promising early tumor control in patients many of whom have severe comorbid conditions.

  3. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  4. Observation of coherent optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser radiation in Sb films by ultrafast electron diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, B. N.; Kompanets, V. O.; Aseev, S. A., E-mail: isanfemto@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Ischenko, A. A. [Moscow Technological University, Institute of High Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Kochikov, I. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Misochko, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The generation of coherent optical phonons in a polycrystalline antimony film sample has been investigated using femtosecond electron diffraction method. Phonon vibrations have been induced in the Sb sample by the main harmonic of a femtosecond Ti:Sa laser (λ = 800 nm) and probed by a pulsed ultrashort photoelectron beam synchronized with the pump laser. The diffraction patterns recorded at different times relative to the pump laser pulse display oscillations of electron diffraction intensity corresponding to the frequencies of vibrations of optical phonons: totally symmetric (A{sub 1g}) and twofold degenerate (E{sub g}) phonon modes. The frequencies that correspond to combinations of these phonon modes in the Sb sample have also been experimentally observed.

  5. Analysis of transformations of the ultrafast electron transfer photoreaction mechanism in liquid solutions by the rate distribution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Michael G; Soboleva, Irina V

    2014-05-01

    Representation of the experimental reaction kinetics in the form of rate distribution is shown to be an effective method for the analysis of the mechanisms of these reactions and for comparisons of the kinetics with QC calculations, as well as with the experimental data on the medium mobility. The rate constant distribution function P(k) can be obtained directly from the experimental kinetics N(t) by an inverse Laplace transform. The application of this approach to kinetic data for several excited-state electron transfer reactions reveals the transformations of their rate control factors in the time domain of 1-1000 ps. In neat electron donating solvents two components are observed. The fastest component (k > 1 ps(-1)) was found to be controlled by the fluctuations of the overall electronic coupling matrix element, involving all the reactant molecules, located inside the interior of the solvent shell, rather than for specific pairs of reactant molecules. The slower component (1 > k > 0.1 ps(-1)) is controlled by the medium reorganization (longitudinal relaxation times, τL). A substantial contribution from the non-stationary diffusion controlled reaction is observed in diluted solutions ([Q] transformation of the rate control factors in the course of the reactions.

  6. Experimental Study of Electron and Phonon Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials by Ultrafast Laser Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaohan

    With the rapid advances in the development of nanotechnology, nowadays, the sizes of elementary unit, i.e. transistor, of micro- and nanoelectronic devices are well deep into nanoscale. For the pursuit of cheaper and faster nanoscale electronic devices, the size of transistors keeps scaling down. As the miniaturization of the nanoelectronic devices, the electrical resistivity increases dramatically, resulting rapid growth in the heat generation. The heat generation and limited thermal dissipation in nanoscale materials have become a critical problem in the development of the next generation nanoelectronic devices. Copper (Cu) is widely used conducting material in nanoelectronic devices, and the electron-phonon scattering is the dominant contributor to the resistivity in Cu nanowires at room temperature. Meanwhile, phonons are the main carriers of heat in insulators, intrinsic and lightly doped semiconductors. The thermal transport is an ensemble of phonon transport, which strongly depends on the phonon frequency. In addition, the phonon transport in nanoscale materials can behave fundamentally different than in bulk materials, because of the spatial confinement. However, the size effect on electron-phonon scattering and frequency dependent phonon transport in nanoscale materials remain largely unexplored, due to the lack of suitable experimental techniques. This thesis is mainly focusing on the study of carrier dynamics and acoustic phonon transport in nanoscale materials. The weak photothermal interaction in Cu makes thermoreflectance measurement difficult, we rather measured the reflectivity change of Cu induced by absorption variation. We have developed a method to separately measure the processes of electron-electron scattering and electron-phonon scattering in epitaxial Cu films by monitoring the transient reflectivity signal using the resonant probe with particular wavelengths. The enhancement on electron-phonon scattering in epitaxial Cu films with thickness

  7. Cooperative catalysis: electron-rich Fe-H complexes and DMAP, a successful "joint venture" for ultrafast hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Susanne; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A series of defined iron-hydrogen complexes was prepared in a straightforward one-pot approach. The structure and electronic properties of such complexes were investigated by means of quantum-chemical analysis. These new complexes were then applied in the dehydrogenative silylation of methanol. The complex (dppp)(CO)(NO)FeH showed a remarkable activity with a TOF of more than 600 000 h(-1) of pure hydrogen gas within seconds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A priori motion models for four-dimensional reconstruction in gated cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalush, D.S.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Cui, Lin

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the benefit of incorporating a priori assumptions about cardiac motion in a fully four-dimensional (4D) reconstruction algorithm for gated cardiac SPECT. Previous work has shown that non-motion-specific 4D Gibbs priors enforcing smoothing in time and space can control noise while preserving resolution. In this paper, we evaluate methods for incorporating known heart motion in the Gibbs prior model. The new model is derived by assigning motion vectors to each 4D voxel, defining the movement of that volume of activity into the neighboring time frames. Weights for the Gibbs cliques are computed based on these open-quotes most likelyclose quotes motion vectors. To evaluate, we employ the mathematical cardiac-torso (MCAT) phantom with a new dynamic heart model that simulates the beating and twisting motion of the heart. Sixteen realistically-simulated gated datasets were generated, with noise simulated to emulate a real Tl-201 gated SPECT study. Reconstructions were performed using several different reconstruction algorithms, all modeling nonuniform attenuation and three-dimensional detector response. These include ML-EM with 4D filtering, 4D MAP-EM without prior motion assumption, and 4D MAP-EM with prior motion assumptions. The prior motion assumptions included both the correct motion model and incorrect models. Results show that reconstructions using the 4D prior model can smooth noise and preserve time-domain resolution more effectively than 4D linear filters. We conclude that modeling of motion in 4D reconstruction algorithms can be a powerful tool for smoothing noise and preserving temporal resolution in gated cardiac studies

  9. Evaluating four-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography for monitoring DNAPL source zone remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Christopher; Gerhard, Jason I; Karaoulis, Marios; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Giannopoulos, Antonios

    2014-07-01

    Practical, non-invasive tools do not currently exist for mapping the remediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) exhibits significant potential but has not yet become a practitioner's tool due to challenges in interpreting the survey results at real sites. This study explores the effectiveness of recently developed four-dimensional (4D, i.e., 3D space plus time) time-lapse surface ERT to monitor DNAPL source zone remediation. A laboratory experiment demonstrated the approach for mapping a changing NAPL distribution over time. A recently developed DNAPL-ERT numerical model was then employed to independently simulate the experiment, providing confidence that the DNAPL-ERT model is a reliable tool for simulating real systems. The numerical model was then used to evaluate the potential for this approach at the field scale. Four DNAPL source zones, exhibiting a range of complexity, were initially simulated, followed by modeled time-lapse ERT monitoring of complete DNAPL remediation by enhanced dissolution. 4D ERT inversion provided estimates of the regions of the source zone experiencing mass reduction with time. Results show that 4D time-lapse ERT has significant potential to map both the outline and the center of mass of the evolving treated portion of the source zone to within a few meters in each direction. In addition, the technique can provide a reasonable, albeit conservative, estimate of the DNAPL volume remediated with time: 25% underestimation in the upper 2m and up to 50% underestimation at late time between 2 and 4m depth. The technique is less reliable for identifying cleanup of DNAPL stringers outside the main DNAPL body. Overall, this study demonstrates that 4D time-lapse ERT has potential for mapping where and how quickly DNAPL mass changes in real time during site remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of Respiratory Motion for Distal Esophagus Cancer Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaremko, Brian P.; Guerrero, Thomas M.; McAleer, Mary F.; Bucci, M. Kara; Noyola-Martinez, Josue M.S.; Nguyen, Linda T. C.; Balter, Peter A.; Guerra, Rudy; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the motion characteristics of distal esophagus cancer primary tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-one consecutive patients treated for esophagus cancer who received respiratory-gated 4D CT imaging for treatment planning were selected. Deformable image registration was used to map the full expiratory motion gross tumor volume (GTV) to the full-inspiratory CT image, allowing quantitative assessment of each voxel's displacement. These displacements were correlated with patient tumor and respiratory characteristics. Results: The mean (SE) tidal volume was 608 (73) mL. The mean GTV volume was 64.3 (10.7) mL on expiration and 64.1 (10.7) mL on inspiration (no significant difference). The mean tumor motion in the x-direction was 0.13 (0.006) cm (average of absolute values), in the y-direction 0.23 (0.01) cm (anteriorly), and in the z-direction 0.71 (0.02) cm (inferiorly). Tumor motion correlated with tidal volume. Comparison of tumor motion above vs. below the diaphragm was significant for the average net displacement (p = 0.014), motion below the diaphragm was greater than above. From the cumulative distribution 95% of the tumors moved less than 0.80 cm radially and 1.75 cm inferiorly. Conclusions: Primary esophagus tumor motion was evaluated with 4D CT. According to the results of this study, when 4D CT is not available, a radial margin of 0.8 cm and axial margin of ±1.8 cm would provide tumor motion coverage for 95% of the cases in our study population

  11. Stable de Sitter vacua in four-dimensional supergravity originating from five dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oegetbil, O.

    2008-01-01

    The five-dimensional stable de Sitter ground states in N=2 supergravity obtained by gauging SO(1,1) symmetry of the real symmetric scalar manifold (in particular, a generic Jordan family manifold of the vector multiplets) simultaneously with a subgroup R s of the R-symmetry group descend to four-dimensional de Sitter ground states under certain conditions. First, the holomorphic section in four dimensions has to be chosen carefully by using the symplectic freedom in four dimensions; second, a group contraction is necessary to bring the potential into a desired form. Under these conditions, stable de Sitter vacua can be obtained in dimensionally reduced theories (from 5D to 4D) if the semidirect product of SO(1,1) with R (1,1) together with a simultaneous R s is gauged. We review the stable de Sitter vacua in four dimensions found in earlier literature for N=2 Yang-Mills Einstein supergravity with the SO(2,1)xR s gauge group in a symplectic basis that comes naturally after dimensional reduction. Although this particular gauge group does not descend directly from five dimensions, we show that its contraction does. Hence, two different theories overlap in certain limits. Examples of stable de Sitter vacua are given for the cases: (i) R s =U(1) R , (ii) R s =SU(2) R , and (iii) N=2 Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theory coupled to a universal hypermultiplet. We conclude with a discussion regarding the extension of our results to supergravity theories with more general homogeneous scalar manifolds.

  12. Four-dimensional computed tomographic analysis of esophageal mobility during normal respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieleman, Edith; Senan, Suresh; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Slotman, Ben J.; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2007-01-01

    Background: Chemo-radiotherapy for thoracic tumors can result in high-grade radiation esophagitis. Treatment planning to reduce esophageal irradiation requires organ motion to be accounted for. In this study, esophageal mobility was assessed using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: Thoracic 4DCT scans were acquired on a 16-slice CT scanner in 29 patients. The outer esophageal wall was contoured in two extreme phases of respiration in 9 patients with nonesophageal malignancies. The displacement of the center of contour was measured at 2-cm intervals. In 20 additional patients with Stage I lung cancer, the esophagus was contoured in all 10 phases of each 4DCT at five defined anatomic levels. Both approaches were then applied to 4DCT scans of 4 patients who each had two repeat scans performed. A linear mixed effects model was constructed with fixed effects: measurement direction, measurement type, and measurement location along the cranio-caudal axis. Results: Measurement location and direction were significant descriptive parameters (Wald F-tests, p < 0.001), and the interaction term between the two was significant (p = 0.02). Medio-lateral mobility exceeded dorso-ventral mobility in the lower half of the esophagus but was of a similar magnitude in the upper half. Margins that would have incorporated all movement in medio-lateral and dorso-ventral directions were 5 mm proximally, 7 mm and 6 mm respectively in the mid-esophagus, and 9 mm and 8 mm respectively in the distal esophagus. Conclusions: The distal esophagus shows more mobility. Margins for mobility that can encompass all movement were derived for use in treatment planning, particularly for stereotactic radiotherapy

  13. Conceptual formulation on four-dimensional inverse planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Louis; Ma Yunzhi; Xing Lei; Ye Yinyu

    2009-01-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) offers an extra dimension of 'time' on the three-dimensional patient model with which we can incorporate target motion in radiation treatment (RT) planning and delivery in various ways such as in the concept of internal target volume, in gated treatment or in target tracking. However, for all these methodologies, different phases are essentially considered as non-interconnected independent phases for the purpose of optimization, in other words, the 'time' dimension has yet to be incorporated explicitly in the optimization algorithm and fully exploited. In this note, we have formulated a new 4D inverse planning technique that treats all the phases in the 4DCT as one single entity in the optimization. The optimization is formulated as a quadratic problem for disciplined convex programming that enables the problem to be analyzed and solved efficiently. In the proof-of-principle examples illustrated, we show that the temporal information of the spatial relation of the target and organs at risk could be 'exchanged' amongst different phases so that an appropriate weighting of dose deposition could be allocated to each phase, thus enabling a treatment with a tight target margin and a full duty cycle otherwise not achievable by either of the aforementioned methodologies. Yet there are practical issues to be solved in the 4D RT planning and delivery. The 4D concept in the optimization we have formulated here does provide insight on how the 'time' dimension can be exploited in the 4D optimization process. (note)

  14. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H.; Wu, Shengjie; Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2–18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5–9 mm in the ML direction, 4–11 mm in the AP direction, and 12–25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5–16 mm in the ML direction, 6–17 mm in the AP direction, and 21–52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  15. Four-dimensional cone beam CT with adaptive gantry rotation and adaptive data sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jun; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew; Chi, P.-C. M.; Balter, Peter; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Pan Tinsu

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new four-dimensional cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) on a Varian image-guided radiation therapy system, which has radiation therapy treatment and cone beam CT imaging capabilities. We adapted the speed of gantry rotation time of the CBCT to the average breath cycle of the patient to maintain the same level of image quality and adjusted the data sampling frequency to keep a similar level of radiation exposure to the patient. Our design utilized the real-time positioning and monitoring system to record the respiratory signal of the patient during the acquisition of the CBCT data. We used the full-fan bowtie filter during data acquisition, acquired the projection data over 200 deg of gantry rotation, and reconstructed the images with a half-scan cone beam reconstruction. The scan time for a 200-deg gantry rotation per patient ranged from 3.3 to 6.6 min for the average breath cycle of 3-6 s. The radiation dose of the 4D-CBCT was about 1-2 times the radiation dose of the 4D-CT on a multislice CT scanner. We evaluated the 4D-CBCT in scanning, data processing and image quality with phantom studies. We demonstrated the clinical applicability of the 4D-CBCT and compared the 4D-CBCT and the 4D-CT scans in four patient studies. The contrast-to-noise ratio of the 4D-CT was 2.8-3.5 times of the contrast-to-noise ratio of the 4D-CBCT in the four patient studies

  16. Four-Dimensional (4D) Printing: Applying Soft Adaptive Materials to Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zibiao; Loh, Xian Jun

    Four-dimensional (4D) printing is an up-and-coming technology for the creation of dynamic devices which have shape changing capabilities or on-demand capabilities over time. Through the printing of adaptive 3D structures, the concept of 4D printing can be realized. Modern manufacturing primarily utilizes direct assembly techniques, limiting the possibility of error correction or instant modification of a structure. Self-building, programmable physical materials are interesting for the automatic and remote construction of structures. Adaptive materials are programmable physical or biological materials which possess shape changing properties or can be made to have simple logic responses. There is immense potential in having disorganized fragments form an ordered construct through physical interactions. However, these are currently limited to only self-assembly at the smallest scale, typically at the nanoscale. The answer to customizable macro-structures is in additive manufacturing, or 3D printing. 3D printing is a 30 years old technology which is beginning to be widely used by consumers. However, the main gripes about this technology are that it is too inefficient, inaccessible, and slow. Cost is also a significant factor in the adoption of this technology. 3D printing has the potential to transform and disrupt the manufacturing landscape as well as our lives. 4D printing seeks to use multi-functional materials in 3D printing so that the printed structure has multiple response capabilities and able to self-assemble on the macroscale. In this paper, we will analyze the early promise of this technology as well as to highlight potential challenges that adopters could face. The primary focus will be to have a look at the application of materials to 3D printing and to show how these materials can be tailored to create responsive customized 4D structures.

  17. Muon borehole detector development for use in four-dimensional tomographic density monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Joshua

    The increase of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and the correlated temperature rise has initiated research into methods of carbon sequestration. One promising possibility is to store CO2 in subsurface reservoirs of porous rock. After injection, the monitoring of the injected CO2 is of paramount importance because the CO2 plume, if escaped, poses health and environmental risks. Traditionally, seismic reflection methods are the chosen method of determining changes in the reservoir density due to CO2 injection, but this is expensive and not continuous. A potential and promising alternative is to use cosmic muon tomography to determine density changes in the reservoir over a period of time. The work I have completed was the development of a muon detector that will be capable of being deployed in boreholes and perform long-term tomography of the reservoir of interest. The detector has the required dimensions, an angular resolution of approximately 2 degrees, and is robust enough to survive the caustic nature of the fluids in boreholes, as well as temperature and pressure fluctuations. The detector design is based on polystyrene scintillating rods arrayed in alternating layers. The layers, as arranged, can provide four-dimensional (4D) tomographic data to detect small changes in density at depths up to approximately 2 kilometers. Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation code, was used to develop and optimize the detector design. Additionally, I developed a method of determining the muon flux at depth, including CO2 saturation changes in subsurface reservoirs. Preliminary experiments were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This thesis will show the simulations I performed to determine the angular resolution and background discrimination required of the detector, the experiments to determine light transport through the polystyrene scintillating rods and fibers, and the method developed to predict muon flux changes at depth expected after injection.

  18. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S., E-mail: atmaram.pai-panandiker@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2-18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5-9 mm in the ML direction, 4-11 mm in the AP direction, and 12-25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5-16 mm in the ML direction, 6-17 mm in the AP direction, and 21-52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  19. Definition of internal target volume and domestric study for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Zhang Li; Huang Xiaoyan; Cai Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional (4D) CT, and to compare the differences in target volume definition and dose distribution among 3D, 4D and respiratory-gated plans. Methods: 4DCT scanning was obtained for 12 patients with hepatocellular. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and normal tissues were contoured on all 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT images. The 3D, 4D and gated treatment plans were prepared for each patient using three different planning target volumes (PTVs): 1) PTV 3D was derived from a single CTV plus conventional margins; 2) PTV 4D was derived from ITV 4D , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus setup margins (SMs); 3) PT Gating was derived from ITV Gating , which encompassed 3 CTVs within gating-window at end-expiration plus SMs. The PTV volume and dose distribution were compared among different plans. Results: The PTV3D was the largest in all 12 patients, but still missed partial target volume in 5 patients when comparing with PTV4D. Both the 4D plans and the gated plans spared more normal tissues than the 3D plans, especially the liver. Without increasing normal tissue dose, the 4D plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from (50.8 ± 2.0) Gy (3D plans) to (54.7 ± 3.3) Gy, and the gated plans could further increase the dose to (58.0 ± 3.9) Gy. Conclusions: The 4DCT-based plans can ensure optimal target coverage with less irradiation of normal tissues and allow dose escalation when compared with 3D plans. Respiratory gated radiotherapy can further reduce the target volumes to spare more surrounding tissues, especially for patients with large extent of respiratory mobility. (authors)

  20. Defining internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X, Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Zhang Li; Huang Xiaoyan; Liu Hui; Li Qiaoqiao; Hu Yonghong; Cai Ling; Cui Nianji

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Materials and methods: Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and clinical target volumes (CTVs) were contoured on all 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT scans in 10 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The 3D and 4D treatment plans were performed for each patient using two different planning target volumes (PTVs): (1) PTV 3D was derived from a single CTV plus conventional margins; (2) PTV 4D was derived from ITV 4D , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus setup margins (SMs). The volumes of PTVs and dose distribution were compared between the two plans. Results: The average PTV volume of the 4D plans (328.4 ± 152.2 cm 3 ) was less than 3D plans (407.0 ± 165.6 cm 3 ). The 4D plans spared more surrounding normal tissues than 3D plans, especially normal liver. Compared with 3D plans, the mean dose to normal liver (MDTNL) decreased from 22.7 to 20.3 Gy. Without increasing the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the 4D plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from 50.4 ± 1.3 to 54.2 ± 2.6 Gy, an average increase of 7.5% (range 4.0-16.0%). Conclusions: The conventional 3D plans can result in geometric miss and include excess normal tissues. The 4DCT-based plans can reduce the target volumes to spare more normal tissues and allow dose escalation compared with 3D plans

  1. Improving left ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI using intramodality image registration for cardiac blood flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikas; Bustamante, Mariana; Fredriksson, Alexandru; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino

    2018-01-01

    Assessment of blood flow in the left ventricle using four-dimensional flow MRI requires accurate left ventricle segmentation that is often hampered by the low contrast between blood and the myocardium. The purpose of this work is to improve left-ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI for reliable blood flow analysis. The left ventricle segmentations are first obtained using morphological cine-MRI with better in-plane resolution and contrast, and then aligned to four-dimensional flow MRI data. This alignment is, however, not trivial due to inter-slice misalignment errors caused by patient motion and respiratory drift during breath-hold based cine-MRI acquisition. A robust image registration based framework is proposed to mitigate such errors automatically. Data from 20 subjects, including healthy volunteers and patients, was used to evaluate its geometric accuracy and impact on blood flow analysis. High spatial correspondence was observed between manually and automatically aligned segmentations, and the improvements in alignment compared to uncorrected segmentations were significant (P  0.05). Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in improving left-ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI, and its potential for reliable blood flow analysis. Magn Reson Med 79:554-560, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Intensified CCD for ultrafast diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.; Tripp, G.; Coleman, L.

    1978-01-01

    Many of the present laser fusion diagnostics are recorded on either ultrafast streak cameras or on oscilloscopes. For those experiments in which a large volume of data is accumulated, direct computer processing of the information becomes important. We describe an approach which uses a RCA 52501 back-thinned CCD sensor to obtain direct electron readouts for both the streak camera and the CRT. Performance of the 100 GHz streak camera and the 4 GHz CRT are presented. Design parameters and computer interfacing for both systems are described in detail

  3. A method for the reconstruction of four-dimensional synchronized CT scans acquired during free breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Nystrom, Michelle; Kalinin, Eugene; Parikh, Parag; Dempsey, James F.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Mutic, Sasa; Wahab, Sasha H.; Islam, Tareque; Christensen, Gary; Politte, David G.; Whiting, Bruce R.

    2003-01-01

    Breathing motion is a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Accounting for breathing motion has a profound effect on the size of conformal radiation portals employed in these sites. Breathing motion also causes artifacts and distortions in treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans acquired during free breathing and also causes a breakdown of the assumption of the superposition of radiation portals in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, possibly leading to significant dose delivery errors. Proposed voluntary and involuntary breath-hold techniques have the potential for reducing or eliminating the effects of breathing motion, however, they are limited in practice, by the fact that many lung cancer patients cannot tolerate holding their breath. We present an alternative solution to accounting for breathing motion in radiotherapy treatment planning, where multislice CT scans are collected simultaneously with digital spirometry over many free breathing cycles to create a four-dimensional (4-D) image set, where tidal lung volume is the additional dimension. An analysis of this 4-D data leads to methods for digital-spirometry, based elimination or accounting of breathing motion artifacts in radiotherapy treatment planning for free breathing patients. The 4-D image set is generated by sorting free-breathing multislice CT scans according to user-defined tidal-volume bins. A multislice CT scanner is operated in the cine mode, acquiring 15 scans per couch position, while the patient undergoes simultaneous digital-spirometry measurements. The spirometry is used to retrospectively sort the CT scans by their correlated tidal lung volume within the patient's normal breathing cycle. This method has been prototyped using data from three lung cancer patients. The actual tidal lung volumes agreed with the specified bin volumes within standard deviations ranging between 22 and 33 cm 3 . An analysis of sagittal and

  4. Four-dimensional ultrasonography of the fetal heart with spatiotemporal image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luís F; Lee, Wesley; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Espinoza, Jimmy; Schoen, Mary Lou; Falkensammer, Peter; Treadwell, Marjorie; Romero, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    This study was undertaken to describe a new technique for the examination of the fetal heart using four-dimensional ultrasonography with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). Volume data sets of the fetal heart were acquired with a new cardiac gating technique (STIC), which uses automated transverse and longitudinal sweeps of the anterior chest wall. These volumes were obtained from 69 fetuses: 35 normal, 16 with congenital anomalies not affecting the cardiovascular system, and 18 with cardiac abnormalities. Dynamic multiplanar slicing and surface rendering of cardiac structures were performed. To illustrate the STIC technique, two representative volumes from a normal fetus were compared with volumes obtained from fetuses with the following congenital heart anomalies: atrioventricular septal defect, tricuspid stenosis, tricuspid atresia, and interrupted inferior vena cava with abnormal venous drainage. Volume datasets obtained with a transverse sweep were utilized to demonstrate the cardiac chambers, moderator band, interatrial and interventricular septae, atrioventricular valves, pulmonary veins, and outflow tracts. With the use of a reference dot to navigate the four-chamber view, intracardiac structures could be simultaneously studied in three orthogonal planes. The same volume dataset was used for surface rendering of the atrioventricular valves. The aortic and ductal arches were best visualized when the original plane of acquisition was sagittal. Volumes could be interactively manipulated to simultaneously visualize both outflow tracts, in addition to the aortic and ductal arches. Novel views of specific structures were generated. For example, the location and extent of a ventricular septal defect was imaged in a sagittal view of the interventricular septum. Furthermore, surface-rendered images of the atrioventricular valves were employed to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Representative video clips were posted on the Journal's Web

  5. Four dimensional digital tomosynthesis using on-board imager for the verification of respiratory motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin C Park

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate respiratory motion of a patient by generating four-dimensional digital tomosynthesis (4D DTS, extracting respiratory signal from patients' on-board projection data, and ensuring the feasibility of 4D DTS as a localization tool for the targets which have respiratory movement. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Four patients with lung and liver cancer were included to verify the feasibility of 4D-DTS with an on-board imager. CBCT acquisition (650-670 projections was used to reconstruct 4D DTS images and the breath signal of the patients was generated by extracting the motion of diaphragm during data acquisition. Based on the extracted signal, the projection data was divided into four phases: peak-exhale phase, mid-inhale phase, peak-inhale phase, and mid-exhale phase. The binned projection data was then used to generate 4D DTS, where the total scan angle was assigned as ±22.5° from rotation center, centered on 0° and 180° for coronal "half-fan" 4D DTS, and 90° and 270° for sagittal "half-fan" 4D DTS. The result was then compared with 4D CBCT which we have also generated with the same phase distribution. RESULTS: The motion of the diaphragm was evident from the 4D DTS results for peak-exhale, mid-inhale, peak-inhale and mid-exhale phase assignment which was absent in 3D DTS. Compared to the result of 4D CBCT, the view aliasing effect due to arbitrary angle reconstruction was less severe. In addition, the severity of metal artifacts, the image distortion due to presence of metal, was less than that of the 4D CBCT results. CONCLUSION: We have implemented on-board 4D DTS on patients data to visualize the movement of anatomy due to respiratory motion. The results indicate that 4D-DTS could be a promising alternative to 4D CBCT for acquiring the respiratory motion of internal organs just prior to radiotherapy treatment.

  6. Ultrafast Coulomb explosion of a diiodomethane molecule induced by an X-ray free-electron laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kukk, Edwin; Motomura, Koji; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Iablonskyi, Denys; Ito, Yuta; Sakakibara, Yuta; You, Daehyun; Nishiyama, Toshiyuki; Asa, Kazuki; Sato, Yuhiro; Umemoto, Takayuki; Kariyazono, Kango; Ochiai, Kohei; Kanno, Manabu; Yamazaki, Kaoru; Kooser, Kuno; Nicolas, Christophe; Miron, Catalin; Asavei, Theodor; Neagu, Liviu; Schöffler, Markus; Kastirke, Gregor; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Rudenko, Artem; Owada, Shigeki; Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Kono, Hirohiko; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2017-08-02

    Coulomb explosion of diiodomethane CH 2 I 2 molecules irradiated by ultrashort and intense X-ray pulses from SACLA, the Japanese X-ray free electron laser facility, was investigated by multi-ion coincidence measurements and self-consistent charge density-functional-based tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) simulations. The diiodomethane molecule, containing two heavy-atom X-ray absorbing sites, exhibits a rather different charge generation and nuclear motion dynamics compared to iodomethane CH 3 I with only a single heavy atom, as studied earlier. We focus on charge creation and distribution in CH 2 I 2 in comparison to CH 3 I. The release of kinetic energy into atomic ion fragments is also studied by comparing SCC-DFTB simulations with the experiment. Compared to earlier simulations, several key enhancements are made, such as the introduction of a bond axis recoil model, where vibrational energy generated during charge creation processes induces only bond stretching or shrinking. We also propose an analytical Coulomb energy partition model to extract the essential mechanism of Coulomb explosion of molecules from the computed and the experimentally measured kinetic energies of fragment atomic ions by partitioning each pair Coulomb interaction energy into two ions of the pair under the constraint of momentum conservation. Effective internuclear distances assigned to individual fragment ions at the critical moment of the Coulomb explosion are then estimated from the average kinetic energies of the ions. We demonstrate, with good agreement between the experiment and the SCC-DFTB simulation, how the more heavily charged iodine fragments and their interplay define the characteristic features of the Coulomb explosion of CH 2 I 2 . The present study also confirms earlier findings concerning the magnitude of bond elongation in the ultrashort X-ray pulse duration, showing that structural damage to all but C-H bonds does not develop to a noticeable degree in the pulse length of ∼10

  7. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  8. Electron-lattice energy relaxation in laser-excited thin-film Au-insulator heterostructures studied by ultrafast MeV electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Shen, X; Zheng, Q; Chase, T; Coffee, R; Jerman, M; Li, R K; Ligges, M; Makasyuk, I; Mo, M; Reid, A H; Rethfeld, B; Vecchione, T; Weathersby, S P; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2017-09-01

    We apply time-resolved MeV electron diffraction to study the electron-lattice energy relaxation in thin film Au-insulator heterostructures. Through precise measurements of the transient Debye-Waller-factor, the mean-square atomic displacement is directly determined, which allows to quantitatively follow the temporal evolution of the lattice temperature after short pulse laser excitation. Data obtained over an extended range of laser fluences reveal an increased relaxation rate when the film thickness is reduced or the Au-film is capped with an additional insulator top-layer. This behavior is attributed to a cross-interfacial coupling of excited electrons in the Au film to phonons in the adjacent insulator layer(s). Analysis of the data using the two-temperature-model taking explicitly into account the additional energy loss at the interface(s) allows to deduce the relative strength of the two relaxation channels.

  9. T2-weighted four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with result-driven phase sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: T2-weighted MRI provides excellent tumor-to-tissue contrast for target volume delineation in radiation therapy treatment planning. This study aims at developing a novel T2-weighted retrospective four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) phase sorting technique for imaging organ/tumor respiratory motion. Methods: A 2D fast T2-weighted half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo MR sequence was used for image acquisition of 4D-MRI, with a frame rate of 2–3 frames/s. Respiratory motion was measured using an external breathing monitoring device. A phase sorting method was developed to sort the images by their corresponding respiratory phases. Besides, a result-driven strategy was applied to effectively utilize redundant images in the case when multiple images were allocated to a bin. This strategy, selecting the image with minimal amplitude error, will generate the most representative 4D-MRI. Since we are using a different image acquisition mode for 4D imaging (the sequential image acquisition scheme) with the conventionally used cine or helical image acquisition scheme, the 4D dataset sufficient condition was not obviously and directly predictable. An important challenge of the proposed technique was to determine the number of repeated scans (N_R) required to obtain sufficient phase information at each slice position. To tackle this challenge, the authors first conducted computer simulations using real-time position management respiratory signals of the 29 cancer patients under an IRB-approved retrospective study to derive the relationships between N_R and the following factors: number of slices (N_S), number of 4D-MRI respiratory bins (N_B), and starting phase at image acquisition (P_0). To validate the authors’ technique, 4D-MRI acquisition and reconstruction were simulated on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom using simulation derived parameters. Twelve healthy volunteers were involved in an IRB-approved study

  10. Four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with retrospective k-space reordering: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Chen, Nan-kuei; Chu, Mei-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Current four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of a new strategy for 4D-MRI which is based on retrospective k-space reordering. Methods: We simulated a k-space reordered 4D-MRI on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom. A 2D echo planar imaging MRI sequence [frame rate (F) = 0.448 Hz; image resolution (R) = 256 × 256; number of k-space segments (N KS ) = 4] with sequential image acquisition mode was assumed for the simulation. Image quality of the simulated “4D-MRI” acquired from the XCAT phantom was qualitatively evaluated, and tumor motion trajectories were compared to input signals. In particular, mean absolute amplitude differences (D) and cross correlation coefficients (CC) were calculated. Furthermore, to evaluate the data sufficient condition for the new 4D-MRI technique, a comprehensive simulation study was performed using 30 cancer patients’ respiratory profiles to study the relationships between data completeness (C p ) and a number of impacting factors: the number of repeated scans (N R ), number of slices (N S ), number of respiratory phase bins (N P ), N KS , F, R, and initial respiratory phase at image acquisition (P 0 ). As a proof-of-concept, we implemented the proposed k-space reordering 4D-MRI technique on a T2-weighted fast spin echo MR sequence and tested it on a healthy volunteer. Results: The simulated 4D-MRI acquired from the XCAT phantom matched closely to the original XCAT images. Tumor motion trajectories measured from the simulated 4D-MRI matched well with input signals (D = 0.83 and 0.83 mm, and CC = 0.998 and 0.992 in superior–inferior and anterior–posterior directions, respectively). The relationship between C p and N R was found best represented by an exponential function (C P =100(1−e −0.18N R ), when N S

  11. Four-dimensional cone beam CT reconstruction and enhancement using a temporal nonlocal means method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Xun; Tian Zhen; Lou Yifei; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jiang, Steve B. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30318 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy. Conventionally, it is reconstructed by first sorting the x-ray projections into multiple respiratory phase bins according to a breathing signal extracted either from the projection images or some external surrogates, and then reconstructing a 3D CBCT image in each phase bin independently using FDK algorithm. This method requires adequate number of projections for each phase, which can be achieved using a low gantry rotation or multiple gantry rotations. Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. 4D-CBCT images at different breathing phases share a lot of redundant information, because they represent the same anatomy captured at slightly different temporal points. Taking this redundancy along the temporal dimension into account can in principle facilitate the reconstruction in the situation of inadequate number of projection images. In this work, the authors propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. Methods: The authors define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A forward-backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss-Jacobi iteration method are employed to solve the problems. The algorithms implementation on

  12. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy planning strategy from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Cohen, Patrice; Xie, Huchen; Low, Daniel; Li, Diana; Rimner, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) planning from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view (ttBEV) with reliable gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation, realistic normal tissue representation, high planning accuracy and low clinical workload, we propose and validate a novel 4D conformal planning strategy based on a synthesized 3.5D computed tomographic (3.5DCT) image with a motion-compensated tumor. To recreate patient anatomy from a ttBEV in the moving tumor coordinate system for 4DRT planning (or 4D planning), the centers of delineated GTVs in all phase CT images of 4DCT were aligned, and then the aligned CTs were averaged to produce a new 3.5DCT image. This GTV-motion-compensated CT contains a motionless target (with motion artifacts minimized) and motion-blurred normal tissues (with a realistic temporal density average). Semi-automatic threshold-based segmentation of the tumor, lung and body was applied, while manual delineation was used for other organs at risk (OARs). To validate this 3.5DCT-based 4D planning strategy, five patients with peripheral lung lesions of small size (tumor and a minor beam aperture and weighting adjustment to maintain plan conformality. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the 4DCT plan was created with two methods: one is an integrated DVH (iDVH4D), which is defined as the temporal average of all 3D-phase-plan DVHs, and the other (DVH4D) is based on the dose distribution in a reference phase CT image by dose warping from all phase plans using the displacement vector field (DVF) from a free-form deformable image registration (DIR). The DVH3.5D (for the 3.5DCT plan) was compared with both iDVH4D and DVH4D. To quantify the DVH difference between the 3.5DCT plan and the 4DCT plan, two methods were used: relative difference (%) of the areas underneath the DVH curves and the volumes receiving more than 20% (V20) and 50% (V50) of prescribed dose of these 4D plans. The volume of the delineated GTV from different phase

  13. Four-dimensional optical multiband-OFDM for beyond 1.4 Tb/s serial optical transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan; Batshon, Hussam G; Xu, Lei; Wang, Ting

    2011-01-17

    We propose a four-dimensional (4D) coded multiband-OFDM scheme suitable for beyond 1.4 Tb/s serial optical transport. The proposed scheme organizes the N-dimensional (ND) signal constellation points in the form of signal matrix; employs 2D-inverse FFT and 2D-FFT to perform modulation and demodulation, respectively; and exploits both orthogonal polarizations. This scheme can fully exploit advantages of OFDM to deal with chromatic dispersion, PMD and PDL effects; and multidimensional signal constellations to improve OSNR sensitivity of conventional optical OFDM. The improvement of 4D-OFDM over corresponding polarization-multiplexed QAM (with the same number of constellation points) ranges from 1.79 dB for 16 signal constellation point-four-dimensional-OFDM (16-4D-OFDM) up to 4.53 dB for 128-4D-OFDM.

  14. Monte Carlo Study of Four-Dimensional Self-avoiding Walks of up to One Billion Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisby, Nathan

    2018-04-01

    We study self-avoiding walks on the four-dimensional hypercubic lattice via Monte Carlo simulations of walks with up to one billion steps. We study the expected logarithmic corrections to scaling, and find convincing evidence in support the scaling form predicted by the renormalization group, with an estimate for the power of the logarithmic factor of 0.2516(14), which is consistent with the predicted value of 1/4. We also characterize the behaviour of the pivot algorithm for sampling four dimensional self-avoiding walks, and conjecture that the probability of a pivot move being successful for an N-step walk is O([ log N ]^{-1/4}).

  15. On the entropy of four-dimensional near-extremal N = 2 black holes with R2-terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruss, Eyal; Oz, Yaron

    2007-01-01

    We consider the entropy of four-dimensional near-extremal N = 2 black holes. The Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula has the structure of the extremal black holes entropy with a shift of the charges depending on the non-extremality parameter and the moduli at infinity. We construct a class of near-extremal horizon solutions with R 2 -terms, and show that the generalized Wald entropy formula exhibits the same property

  16. A Novel Four-Dimensional Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction System and Its Linear Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minggang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a new four-dimensional energy-saving and emission-reduction chaotic system. The system is obtained in accordance with the complicated relationship between energy saving and emission reduction, carbon emission, economic growth, and new energy development. The dynamics behavior of the system will be analyzed by means of Lyapunov exponents and equilibrium points. Linear feedback control methods are used to suppress chaos to unstable equilibrium. Numerical simulations are presented to show these results.

  17. An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose using CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhiguo; Yang Shuping; Li Zaijun; Sun Xiulan; Wang Guangli; Fang Yinjun; Liu Junkang

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We first reported an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose using CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle. Since promising their electrocatalytic synergy towards glucose was achieved, the biosensor showed high sensitivity (5762.8 nA nM -1 cm -2 ), low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3 x 10 -12 M) and fast response time (0.045 s). - Abstract: The paper reported an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose which was based on CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle. Since efficient electron transfer between glucose oxidase and the electrode was achieved, the biosensor showed high sensitivity (5762.8 nA nM -1 cm -2 ), low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3 x 10 -12 M), fast response time (0.045 s), wide calibration range (from 1 x 10 -11 M to 1 x 10 -8 M) and good long-term stability (26 weeks). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of the glucose oxidase on the medium, 5.24 x 10 -6 mM, indicates excellent bioelectrocatalytic activity of the immobilized enzyme towards glucose oxidation. Moreover, the effects of omitting graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and gold nanoparticle were also investigated. The result showed sensitivity of the biosensor is 7.67-fold better if graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and gold nanoparticle are used. This could be ascribed to improvement of the conductivity between graphene nanosheets due to introduction of gold nanoparticles, ultrafast charge transfer from CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot to graphene nanosheets and gold nanoparticle due to unique electrochemical properties of the CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and good biocompatibility of gold nanoparticle for glucose oxidase. The biosensor is of best sensitivity in all glucose biosensors based on graphene nanomaterials up to

  18. An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose using CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Zhiguo; Yang Shuping [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Li Zaijun, E-mail: zaijunli@263.net [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Sun Xiulan [School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Wang Guangli [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Fang Yinjun [Zhejiang Zanyu Technology Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310009 (China); Liu Junkang [School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2011-10-30

    Graphical abstract: We first reported an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose using CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle. Since promising their electrocatalytic synergy towards glucose was achieved, the biosensor showed high sensitivity (5762.8 nA nM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3 x 10{sup -12} M) and fast response time (0.045 s). - Abstract: The paper reported an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for glucose which was based on CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot as ultrafast electron transfer relay between graphene-gold nanocomposite and gold nanoparticle. Since efficient electron transfer between glucose oxidase and the electrode was achieved, the biosensor showed high sensitivity (5762.8 nA nM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), low detection limit (S/N = 3) (3 x 10{sup -12} M), fast response time (0.045 s), wide calibration range (from 1 x 10{sup -11} M to 1 x 10{sup -8} M) and good long-term stability (26 weeks). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of the glucose oxidase on the medium, 5.24 x 10{sup -6} mM, indicates excellent bioelectrocatalytic activity of the immobilized enzyme towards glucose oxidation. Moreover, the effects of omitting graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and gold nanoparticle were also investigated. The result showed sensitivity of the biosensor is 7.67-fold better if graphene-gold nanocomposite, CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and gold nanoparticle are used. This could be ascribed to improvement of the conductivity between graphene nanosheets due to introduction of gold nanoparticles, ultrafast charge transfer from CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot to graphene nanosheets and gold nanoparticle due to unique electrochemical properties of the CdTe-CdS core-shell quantum dot and good biocompatibility of gold nanoparticle for glucose oxidase. The biosensor is of best sensitivity in all glucose

  19. Ultrafast nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Leburn, Christopher; Reid, Derryck

    2013-01-01

    The field of ultrafast nonlinear optics is broad and multidisciplinary, and encompasses areas concerned with both the generation and measurement of ultrashort pulses of light, as well as those concerned with the applications of such pulses. Ultrashort pulses are extreme events – both in terms of their durations, and also the high peak powers which their short durations can facilitate. These extreme properties make them powerful experiment tools. On one hand, their ultrashort durations facilitate the probing and manipulation of matter on incredibly short timescales. On the other, their ultrashort durations can facilitate high peak powers which can drive highly nonlinear light-matter interaction processes. Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics covers a complete range of topics, both applied and fundamental in nature, within the area of ultrafast nonlinear optics. Chapters 1 to 4 are concerned with the generation and measurement of ultrashort pulses. Chapters 5 to 7 are concerned with fundamental applications of ultrasho...

  20. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-10-14

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  1. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  2. Ultrafast Saturation of Electronic-Resonance-Enhanced Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and Comparison for Pulse Durations in the Nanosecond to Femtosecond Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-05

    near sat- uration limit of the probe intensity [16]. In such spectro - scopic techniques, while it is important to obtain spec- trum of the intended...There are a few literature that exist on the ultrafast UV -laser excitation of NO, e.g., Lopez-Marten et al. have shown that the laser intensi- ties in...observe ac-Stark shift (see Ref. [40]). Though, to the best of our knowledge, no study has been reported for ionization of NO by UV pulse of 236 nm at 10

  3. Quantum modeling of ultrafast photoinduced charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Carlo Andrea; Troiani, Filippo; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2018-01-01

    Phenomena involving electron transfer are ubiquitous in nature, photosynthesis and enzymes or protein activity being prominent examples. Their deep understanding thus represents a mandatory scientific goal. Moreover, controlling the separation of photogenerated charges is a crucial prerequisite in many applicative contexts, including quantum electronics, photo-electrochemical water splitting, photocatalytic dye degradation, and energy conversion. In particular, photoinduced charge separation is the pivotal step driving the storage of sun light into electrical or chemical energy. If properly mastered, these processes may also allow us to achieve a better command of information storage at the nanoscale, as required for the development of molecular electronics, optical switching, or quantum technologies, amongst others. In this Topical Review we survey recent progress in the understanding of ultrafast charge separation from photoexcited states. We report the state-of-the-art of the observation and theoretical description of charge separation phenomena in the ultrafast regime mainly focusing on molecular- and nano-sized solar energy conversion systems. In particular, we examine different proposed mechanisms driving ultrafast charge dynamics, with particular regard to the role of quantum coherence and electron-nuclear coupling, and link experimental observations to theoretical approaches based either on model Hamiltonians or on first principles simulations.

  4. Four-dimensional anti-de Sitter toroidal black holes from a three-dimensional perspective: Full complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanchin, Vilson T.; Kleber, Antares; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensional reduction of black hole solutions in four-dimensional (4D) general relativity is performed and new 3D black hole solutions are obtained. Considering a 4D spacetime with one spacelike Killing vector, it is possible to split the Einstein-Hilbert-Maxwell action with a cosmological term in terms of 3D quantities. Definitions of quasilocal mass and charges in 3D spacetimes are reviewed. The analysis is then particularized to the toroidal charged rotating anti-de Sitter black hole. The reinterpretation of the fields and charges in terms of a three-dimensional point of view is given in each case, and the causal structure analyzed

  5. Hemodynamic measurement using four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI: Quantification of hemodynamic parameters and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ho Jin; Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; KIm, Nam Kug [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  6. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hojin [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae [Asan Institute of Life Science, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Jihoon [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hak [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  7. An accessible four-dimensional treatment of Maxwell's equations in terms of differential forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sá, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Maxwell’s equations are derived in terms of differential forms in the four-dimensional Minkowski representation, starting from the three-dimensional vector calculus differential version of these equations. Introducing all the mathematical and physical concepts needed (including the tool of differential forms), using only knowledge of elementary vector calculus and the local vector version of Maxwell’s equations, the equations are reduced to a simple and elegant set of two equations for a unified quantity, the electromagnetic field. The treatment should be accessible for students taking a first course on electromagnetism. (paper)

  8. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes Khz at > 100 kV/m E field

  9. Motion of particles on a four-dimensional asymptotically AdS black hole with scalar hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P.A.; Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    Motivated by black hole solutions with matter fields outside their horizon, we study the effect of these matter fields on the motion of massless and massive particles. We consider as background a four-dimensional asymptotically AdS black hole with scalar hair. The geodesics are studied numerically and we discuss the differences in the motion of particles between the four-dimensional asymptotically AdS black holes with scalar hair and their no-hair limit, that is, Schwarzschild AdS black holes. Mainly, we found that there are bounded orbits like planetary orbits in this background. However, the periods associated to circular orbits are modified by the presence of the scalar hair. Besides, we found that some classical tests such as perihelion precession, deflection of light, and gravitational time delay have the standard value of general relativity plus a correction term coming from the cosmological constant and the scalar hair. Finally, we found a specific value of the parameter associated to the scalar hair, in order to explain the discrepancy between the theory and the observations, for the perihelion precession of Mercury and light deflection. (orig.)

  10. Quality Assurance Challenges for Motion-Adaptive Radiation Therapy: Gating, Breath Holding, and Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B.; Wolfgang, John; Mageras, Gig S.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, quality assurance (QA) for motion-adaptive radiation therapy involves various challenges because of the added temporal dimension. Here we discuss those challenges for three specific techniques related to motion-adaptive therapy: namely respiratory gating, breath holding, and four-dimensional computed tomography. Similar to the introduction of any other new technologies in clinical practice, typical QA measures should be taken for these techniques also, including initial testing of equipment and clinical procedures, as well as frequent QA examinations during the early stage of implementation. Here, rather than covering every QA aspect in depth, we focus on some major QA challenges. The biggest QA challenge for gating and breath holding is how to ensure treatment accuracy when internal target position is predicted using external surrogates. Recommended QA measures for each component of treatment, including simulation, planning, patient positioning, and treatment delivery and verification, are discussed. For four-dimensional computed tomography, some major QA challenges have also been discussed

  11. Modulated Structures of Homologous Compounds In MO 3(ZnO) m( M=In, Ga; m=Integer) Described by Four-Dimensional Superspace Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfei; Bando, Yoshio; Nakamura, Masaki; Onoda, Mitsuko; Kimizuka, Noboru

    1998-09-01

    The modulated structures appearing in the homologous compounds InMO3(ZnO)m(M=In, Ga;m=integer) were observed by using a high-resoultion transmission electron microscope and are described based on a four-dimensional superspace group. The electron diffraction patterns for compounds withmlarger than 6 reveal extra spots, indicating the formation of a modulated structure. The subcell structures form=odd and even numbers are assigned to be either monoclinic or orthorhombic, respectively. On the other hand, extra spots can be indexed by one-dimensional modulated structure. The possible space groups for the subcell structure areCm,C2, andC2/mform=odd numbers, while those form=even numbers areCcm21andCcmm, respectively. Then, corresponding possible superspace groups are assigned to bePC2s,PCmoverline1, andPC2/msoverline1for oddmnumbers andPCcm211overline1overline1andPCcmm1overline11for evenmnumbers. Based on the superspace group determination, a structure model for a one-dimensional modulated structure is proposed.

  12. Qualitative characteristics and comparison of volatile fraction of vodkas made from different botanical materials by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and the electronic nose based on the technology of ultra-fast gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Śliwińska, Magdalena; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Vodka is a spirit-based beverage made from ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin. At present, increasingly more vodka brands have labels that specify the botanical origin of the product. Until now, the techniques for distinguishing between vodkas of different botanical origin have been costly, time-consuming and insufficient for making a distinction between vodka produced from similar raw materials. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to find a fast and relatively inexpensive technique for conducting such tests. In the present study, we employed comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and an electronic nose based on the technology of ultra-fast GC with chemometric methods such as partial least square discriminant analysis, discriminant function analysis and soft independent modeling of class analogy. Both techniques allow a distinction between the vodkas produced from different raw materials. In the case of GC×GC, the differences between vodkas were more noticeable than in the analysis by electronic nose; however, the electronic nose allowed the significantly faster analysis of vodkas. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Woodford, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses ultrafast magnetization dynamics from a theoretical perspective. The manipulation of magnetization using the inverse Faraday effect has been studied, as well as magnetic relaxation processes in quantum dots. The inverse Faraday effect – the generation of a magnetic field by nonresonant, circularly polarized light – offers the possibility to control and reverse magnetization on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This is important both for the technological advant...

  14. Enhanced Optoelectronic Performance of a Passivated Nanowire-Based Device: Key Information from Real-Space Imaging Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2016-03-03

    Managing trap states and understanding their role in ultrafast charge-carrier dynamics, particularly at surface and interfaces, remains a major bottleneck preventing further advancements and commercial exploitation of nanowire (NW)-based devices. A key challenge is to selectively map such ultrafast dynamical processes on the surfaces of NWs, a capability so far out of reach of time-resolved laser techniques. Selective mapping of surface dynamics in real space and time can only be achieved by applying four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM). Charge carrier dynamics are spatially and temporally visualized on the surface of InGaN NW arrays before and after surface passivation with octadecylthiol (ODT). The time-resolved secondary electron images clearly demonstrate that carrier recombination on the NW surface is significantly slowed down after ODT treatment. This observation is fully supported by enhancement of the performance of the light emitting device. Direct observation of surface dynamics provides a profound understanding of the photophysical mechanisms on materials\\' surfaces and enables the formulation of effective surface trap state management strategies for the next generation of high-performance NW-based optoelectronic devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Sensitivity of the model error parameter specification in weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jeremy A.; Daescu, Dacian N.

    2017-08-01

    This article presents the mathematical framework to evaluate the sensitivity of a forecast error aspect to the input parameters of a weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation system (w4D-Var DAS), extending the established theory from strong-constraint 4D-Var. Emphasis is placed on the derivation of the equations for evaluating the forecast sensitivity to parameters in the DAS representation of the model error statistics, including bias, standard deviation, and correlation structure. A novel adjoint-based procedure for adaptive tuning of the specified model error covariance matrix is introduced. Results from numerical convergence tests establish the validity of the model error sensitivity equations. Preliminary experiments providing a proof-of-concept are performed using the Lorenz multi-scale model to illustrate the theoretical concepts and potential benefits for practical applications.

  16. The Topological Structure of the SU(2) Chern–Simons Topological Current in the Four-Dimensional Quantum Hall Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu-Ming, Zhang; Yi-Shi, Duan

    2010-01-01

    In the light of the decomposition of the SU(2) gauge potential for I = 1/2, we obtain the SU(2) Chern-Simons current over S 4 , i.e. the vortex current in the effective field for the four-dimensional quantum Hall effect. Similar to the vortex excitations in the two-dimensional quantum Hall effect (2D FQH) which are generated from the zero points of the complex scalar field, in the 4D FQH, we show that the SU(2) Chern–Simons vortices are generated from the zero points of the two-component wave functions Ψ, and their topological charges are quantized in terms of the Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees of φ-mapping under the condition that the zero points of field Ψ are regular points. (condensed matter: electronicstructure, electrical, magnetic, and opticalproperties)

  17. Energy analysis of four dimensional extended hyperbolic Scarf I plus three dimensional separable trigonometric noncentral potentials using SUSY QM approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.; Deta, U. A.; Handhika, J.

    2016-01-01

    The non-relativistic energies and wave functions of extended hyperbolic Scarf I plus separable non-central shape invariant potential in four dimensions are investigated using Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) Approach. The three dimensional separable non-central shape invariant angular potential consists of trigonometric Scarf II, Manning Rosen and Poschl-Teller potentials. The four dimensional Schrodinger equation with separable shape invariant non-central potential is reduced into four one dimensional Schrodinger equations through variable separation method. By using SUSY QM, the non-relativistic energies and radial wave functions are obtained from radial Schrodinger equation, the orbital quantum numbers and angular wave functions are obtained from angular Schrodinger equations. The extended potential means there is perturbation terms in potential and cause the decrease in energy spectra of Scarf I potential. (paper)

  18. The study of two, three and four dimensional nonlinear dynamics of nuclear fission reactors and effective parameters on its behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajik, M.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this research, new physical fission reactor parameters which have very sensitive effects on the qualitative behavior of a reactor, are introduced. Therefore, the two, the nonlinear dynamics of two, three and four dimensional, considering almost the effective parameters are formulated for describing nuclear fission reactor systems. Using both analytical and numerical methods, the stability and instability of the given dynamical equations and the conditions of stability are studied in these systems. We have shown that the two parameters of the mean energy residence time in fuel and coolant and also their ratios have the most qualitative effects on the dynamical behaviour of a typical nuclear fission reactor. Increasing or decreasing of these parameters from a captain limit can lead to stability or un stability in a given system

  19. Four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. II Invariant distribution of quantized field oscillators and questions on infinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The foundation of the quantum field theory is changed by introducing a new universal probability principle into field operators: one single inherent and invariant probability distribution P(/k/) is postulated for boson and fermion field oscillators. This can be accomplished only when one treats the four-dimensional symmetry from a broad viewpoint. Special relativity is too restrictive to allow such a universal probability principle. A radical length, R, appears in physics through the probability distribution P(/k/). The force between two point particles vanishes when their relative distance tends to zero. This appears to be a general property for all forces and resembles the property of asymptotic freedom. The usual infinities in vacuum fluctuations and in local interactions, however complicated they may be, are all removed from quantum field theories. In appendix A a simple finite and unitary theory of unified electroweak interactions is discussed without assuming Higgs scalar bosons.

  20. Boson-fermion mass splittings in four-dimensional heterotic string models with anomalous U(1) gauge groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Onogi, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    In four-dimensional heterotic string models with anomalous U(1) gauge groups, space-time supersymmetry (SUSY) breaks down spontaneously at one loop. In this paper, the Ward-Takahashi identity of broken SUSY in one-loop two-point amplitudes is investigated in all generalities. The boson-fermion mass splitting of any supersymmetric pair in an arbitrary model is proportional to the product of the D-term expectation value (the sum of (chirality)x(U(1) charge) of massless fermions in the model) and the U(1) charge of the external particle. In order to give a better understanding of the results, we present some examples of the mass splittings in a simple Z 3 orbifold model. (orig.)

  1. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean ± standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 ± 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 ± 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 ± 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 ± 0.27 cm and 0.77 ± 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  2. Four-dimensional CT-based evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for abdominal lymph node metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Xi Mian; Deng Xiaowu; Li Qiaoqiao; Huang Xiaoyan; Liu Mengzhong

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the potential benefits and limitations of a new volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning system in Monaco, compared with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Four-dimensional CT scans of 13 patients with abdominal lymph node metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma were selected. Internal target volume was defined as the combined volume of clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the multiple four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) phases. Dose prescription was set to 45 Gy for the planning target volume (PTV) in daily 3.0-Gy fractions. The PTV dose coverage, organs at risk (OAR) doses, delivery parameters and treatment accuracy were assessed. Compared with 3DCRT, both VMAT and IMRT provided a systematic improvement in PTV coverage and homogeneity. Planning objectives were not fulfilled for the right kidney, in which the 3DCRT plans exceeded the dose constraints in two patients. Equivalent target coverage and sparing of OARs were achieved with VMAT compared with IMRT. The number of MU/fraction was 462±68 (3DCRT), 564±105 (IMRT) and 601±134 (VMAT), respectively. Effective treatment times were as follows: 1.8±0.2 min (3DCRT), 6.1±1.5 min (IMRT) and 4.8±1.0 min (VMAT). This study suggests that the VMAT plans generated in Monaco improved delivery efficiency for equivalent dosimetric quality to IMRT, and were superior to 3DCRT in target coverage and sparing of most OARs. However, the superiority of VMAT over IMRT in delivery efficiency is limited. (author)

  3. Investigation of four-dimensional computed tomography-based pulmonary ventilation imaging in patients with emphysematous lung regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Loo, Billy W Jr; Keall, Paul J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States); Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Von Berg, Jens; Blaffert, Thomas [Department of Digital Imaging, Philips Research Europe, Roentgenstrasse 24-26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Klinder, Tobias, E-mail: Tokihiro@stanford.edu [Clinical Informatics, Interventional, and Translational Solutions, Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510 (United States)

    2011-04-07

    A pulmonary ventilation imaging technique based on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has advantages over existing techniques. However, physiologically accurate 4D-CT ventilation imaging has not been achieved in patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 4D-CT ventilation imaging by correlating ventilation with emphysema. Emphysematous lung regions are less ventilated and can be used as surrogates for low ventilation. We tested the hypothesis: 4D-CT ventilation in emphysematous lung regions is significantly lower than in non-emphysematous regions. Four-dimensional CT ventilation images were created for 12 patients with emphysematous lung regions as observed on CT, using a total of four combinations of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms: surface-based (DIR{sup sur}) and volumetric (DIR{sup vol}), and two metrics: Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) and Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}), yielding four ventilation image sets per patient. Emphysematous lung regions were detected by density masking. We tested our hypothesis using the one-tailed t-test. Visually, different DIR algorithms and metrics yielded spatially variant 4D-CT ventilation images. The mean ventilation values in emphysematous lung regions were consistently lower than in non-emphysematous regions for all the combinations of DIR algorithms and metrics. V{sub HU} resulted in statistically significant differences for both DIR{sup sur} (0.14 {+-} 0.14 versus 0.29 {+-} 0.16, p = 0.01) and DIR{sup vol} (0.13 {+-} 0.13 versus 0.27 {+-} 0.15, p < 0.01). However, V{sub Jac} resulted in non-significant differences for both DIR{sup sur} (0.15 {+-} 0.07 versus 0.17 {+-} 0.08, p = 0.20) and DIR{sup vol} (0.17 {+-} 0.08 versus 0.19 {+-} 0.09, p = 0.30). This study demonstrated the strong correlation between the HU-based 4D-CT ventilation and emphysema, which indicates the potential for HU-based 4D-CT ventilation imaging to achieve high physiologic accuracy. A

  4. Four-dimensional volume-of-interest reconstruction for cone-beam computed tomography-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moiz; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu

    2011-10-01

    Data sufficiency are a major problem in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) on linear accelerator-integrated scanners for image-guided radiotherapy. Scan times must be in the range of 4-6 min to avoid undersampling artifacts. Various image reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to accommodate undersampled data acquisitions, but these algorithms are computationally expensive, may require long reconstruction times, and may require algorithm parameters to be optimized. The authors present a novel reconstruction method, 4D volume-of-interest (4D-VOI) reconstruction which suppresses undersampling artifacts and resolves lung tumor motion for undersampled 1-min scans. The 4D-VOI reconstruction is much less computationally expensive than other 4D-CBCT algorithms. The 4D-VOI method uses respiration-correlated projection data to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) image inside a VOI containing the moving tumor, and uncorrelated projection data to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) image outside the VOI. Anatomical motion is resolved inside the VOI and blurred outside the VOI. The authors acquired a 1-min. scan of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing a moving water-filled sphere. The authors also used previously acquired 1-min scans for two lung cancer patients who had received CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The same raw data were used to test and compare the 4D-VOI reconstruction with the standard 4D reconstruction and the McKinnon-Bates (MB) reconstruction algorithms. Both the 4D-VOI and the MB reconstructions suppress nearly all the streak artifacts compared with the standard 4D reconstruction, but the 4D-VOI has 3-8 times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than the MB reconstruction. In the dynamic chest phantom study, the 4D-VOI and the standard 4D reconstructions both resolved a moving sphere with an 18 mm displacement. The 4D-VOI reconstruction shows a motion blur of only 3 mm, whereas the MB reconstruction shows a motion blur of 13 mm

  5. Ultrafast Non-thermal Response of Plasmonic Resonance in Gold Nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soavi, Giancarlo; Valle, Giuseppe Della; Biagioni, Paolo; Cattoni, Andrea; Longhi, Stefano; Cerullo, Giulio; Brida, Daniele

    Ultrafast thermalization of electrons in metal nanostructures is studied by means of pump-probe spectroscopy. We track in real-time the plasmon resonance evolution, providing a tool for understanding and controlling gold nanoantennas non-linear optical response.

  6. Curvature invariant characterization of event horizons of four-dimensional black holes conformal to stationary black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, David D.

    2017-11-01

    We introduce three approaches to generate curvature invariants that transform covariantly under a conformal transformation of a four-dimensional spacetime. For any black hole conformally related to a stationary black hole, we show how a set of conformally covariant invariants can be combined to produce a conformally covariant invariant that detects the event horizon of the conformally related black hole. As an application we consider the rotating dynamical black holes conformally related to the Kerr-Newman-Unti-Tamburino-(anti)-de Sitter spacetimes and construct an invariant that detects the conformal Killing horizon along with a second invariant that detects the conformal stationary limit surface. In addition, we present necessary conditions for a dynamical black hole to be conformally related to a stationary black hole and apply these conditions to the ingoing Kerr-Vaidya and Vaidya black hole solutions to determine if they are conformally related to stationary black holes for particular choices of the mass function. While two of the three approaches cannot be generalized to higher dimensions, we discuss the existence of a conformally covariant invariant that will detect the event horizon for any higher dimensional black hole conformally related to a stationary black hole which admits at least two conformally covariant invariants, including all vacuum spacetimes.

  7. Comparison of Volumes between Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images using Dynamic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Eun; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Jung, Woo Hyun; Choi, Byeong Don [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between the volumes acquired with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)images with a reconstruction image-filtering algorithm and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with dynamic phantom. The 4DCT images were obtained from the computerized imaging reference systems (CIRS) phantom using a computed tomography (CT) simulator. We analyzed the volumes for maximum intensity projection (MIP), minimum intensity projection (MinIP) and average intensity projection (AVG) of the images obtained with the 4DCT scanner against those acquired from CBCT images with CT ranger tools. Difference in volume for node of 1, 2 and 3 cm between CBCT and 4DCT was 0.54⁓2.33, 5.16⁓8.06, 9.03⁓20.11 ml in MIP, respectively, 0.00⁓1.48, 0.00⁓8.47, 1.42⁓24.85 ml in MinIP, respectively and 0.00⁓1.17, 0.00⁓2.19, 0.04⁓3.35 ml in AVG, respectively. After a comparative analysis of the volumes for each nodal size, it was apparent that the CBCT images were similar to the AVG images acquired using 4DCT.

  8. Gross tumor volume dependency on phase sorting methods of four-dimensional computed tomography images for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Yong; Lim, Sang Wook; Ma, Sun Young; Yu, Je Sang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To see the gross tumor volume (GTV) dependency according to the phase selection and reconstruction methods, we measured and analyzed the changes of tumor volume and motion at each phase in 20 cases with lung cancer patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images in 20 cases of 19 patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. The 4D-CT images were reconstructed by the maximum intensity projection (MIP) and the minimum intensity projection (Min-IP) method after sorting phase as 40%–60%, 30%–70%, and 0%–90%. We analyzed the relationship between the range of motion and the change of GTV according to the reconstruction method. The motion ranges of GTVs are statistically significant only for the tumor motion in craniocaudal direction. The discrepancies of GTV volume and motion between MIP and Min-IP increased rapidly as the wider ranges of duty cycles are selected. As narrow as possible duty cycle such as 40%–60% and MIP reconstruction was suitable for lung cancer if the respiration was stable. Selecting the reconstruction methods and duty cycle is important for small size and for large motion range tumors.

  9. Differences in abdominal organ movement between supine and prone positions measured using four-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Seok; Park, Sung Ho; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the differences in intrafractional organ movement throughout the breathing cycles between the supine and prone positions using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT). Materials and methods: We performed 4D CT on nine volunteers in the supine and prone positions, with each examinee asked to breathe normally during scanning. The movement of abdominal organs in the cranio-caudal (CC), anterior-posterior (AP) and right-left (RL) directions was quantified by contouring on each phase between inspiration and expiration. Results: The mean intrafractional motions of the hepatic dome, lower tip, pancreatic head and tail, both kidneys, spleen, and celiac axis in the supine/prone position were 17.3/13.0, 14.4/11.0, 12.8/8.9, 13.0/10.0, 14.3/12.1, 12.3/12.6, 11.7/12.6 and 2.2/1.8 mm, respectively. Intrafractional movements of the liver dome and pancreatic head were reduced significantly in the prone position. The CC directional excursions were major determinants of the 3D displacements of the abdominal organs. Alteration from the supine to the prone position did not change the amount of intrafractional movements of kidneys, spleen, and celiac axis. Conclusion: There was a significant reduction in the movements of the liver and pancreas during the prone position, especially in the CC direction, suggesting possible advantage of radiotherapy to these organs in this position

  10. Evaluation of four-dimensional nonbinary LDPC-coded modulation for next-generation long-haul optical transport networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yequn; Arabaci, Murat; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2012-04-09

    Leveraging the advanced coherent optical communication technologies, this paper explores the feasibility of using four-dimensional (4D) nonbinary LDPC-coded modulation (4D-NB-LDPC-CM) schemes for long-haul transmission in future optical transport networks. In contrast to our previous works on 4D-NB-LDPC-CM which considered amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise as the dominant impairment, this paper undertakes transmission in a more realistic optical fiber transmission environment, taking into account impairments due to dispersion effects, nonlinear phase noise, Kerr nonlinearities, and stimulated Raman scattering in addition to ASE noise. We first reveal the advantages of using 4D modulation formats in LDPC-coded modulation instead of conventional two-dimensional (2D) modulation formats used with polarization-division multiplexing (PDM). Then we demonstrate that 4D LDPC-coded modulation schemes with nonbinary LDPC component codes significantly outperform not only their conventional PDM-2D counterparts but also the corresponding 4D bit-interleaved LDPC-coded modulation (4D-BI-LDPC-CM) schemes, which employ binary LDPC codes as component codes. We also show that the transmission reach improvement offered by the 4D-NB-LDPC-CM over 4D-BI-LDPC-CM increases as the underlying constellation size and hence the spectral efficiency of transmission increases. Our results suggest that 4D-NB-LDPC-CM can be an excellent candidate for long-haul transmission in next-generation optical networks.

  11. Tailoring four-dimensional cone-beam CT acquisition settings for fiducial marker-based image guidance in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; van Wieringen, Niek; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2018-04-01

    Use of four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) and fiducial markers for image guidance during radiation therapy (RT) of mobile tumors is challenging due to the trade-off among image quality, imaging dose, and scanning time. This study aimed to investigate different 4D-CBCT acquisition settings for good visibility of fiducial markers in 4D-CBCT. Using these 4D-CBCTs, the feasibility of marker-based 4D registration for RT setup verification and manual respiration-induced motion quantification was investigated. For this, we applied a dynamic phantom with three different breathing motion amplitudes and included two patients with implanted markers. Irrespective of the motion amplitude, for a medium field of view (FOV), marker visibility was improved by reducing the imaging dose per projection and increasing the number of projection images; however, the scanning time was 4 to 8 min. For a small FOV, the total imaging dose and the scanning time were reduced (62.5% of the dose using a medium FOV, 2.5 min) without losing marker visibility. However, the body contour could be missing for a small FOV, which is not preferred in RT. The marker-based 4D setup verification was feasible for both the phantom and patient data. Moreover, manual marker motion quantification can achieve a high accuracy with a mean error of [Formula: see text].

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions.

  13. Inflow hemodynamics evaluated by using four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging and the size ratio of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futami, Kazuya; Nambu, Iku; Kitabayashi, Tomohiro; Sano, Hiroki; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of the rupture risk is critical for the identification of unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs) eligible for invasive treatments. The size ratio (SR) is a strong morphological predictor for rupture. We investigated the relationship between the inflow hemodynamics evaluated on four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and the SR to identify specific characteristics related to UCA rupture. We evaluated the inflow jet patterns and inflow hemodynamic parameters of 70 UCAs on 4D flow MR imaging and compared them among 23 aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1 and 47 aneurysms with an SR ≤2.0. Based on the shape of inflow streamline bundles with a velocity ≥75% of the maximum flow velocity in the parent artery, the inflow jet patterns were classified as concentrated (C), diffuse (D), neck-limited (N), and unvisualized (U). The incidence of patterns C and N was significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1. The rate of pattern U was significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≤2.0. The maximum inflow rate and the inflow rate ratio were significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1. The SR affected the inflow jet pattern, the maximum inflow rate, and the inflow rate ratio of UCAs. In conjunction with the SR, inflow hemodynamic analysis using 4D flow MR imaging may contribute to the risk stratification for aneurysmal rupture. (orig.)

  14. Inflow hemodynamics evaluated by using four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging and the size ratio of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futami, Kazuya [Matto-Ishikawa Central Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Hakusan, Ishikawa (Japan); Nambu, Iku; Kitabayashi, Tomohiro; Sano, Hiroki; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi [Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Prediction of the rupture risk is critical for the identification of unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs) eligible for invasive treatments. The size ratio (SR) is a strong morphological predictor for rupture. We investigated the relationship between the inflow hemodynamics evaluated on four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and the SR to identify specific characteristics related to UCA rupture. We evaluated the inflow jet patterns and inflow hemodynamic parameters of 70 UCAs on 4D flow MR imaging and compared them among 23 aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1 and 47 aneurysms with an SR ≤2.0. Based on the shape of inflow streamline bundles with a velocity ≥75% of the maximum flow velocity in the parent artery, the inflow jet patterns were classified as concentrated (C), diffuse (D), neck-limited (N), and unvisualized (U). The incidence of patterns C and N was significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1. The rate of pattern U was significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≤2.0. The maximum inflow rate and the inflow rate ratio were significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1. The SR affected the inflow jet pattern, the maximum inflow rate, and the inflow rate ratio of UCAs. In conjunction with the SR, inflow hemodynamic analysis using 4D flow MR imaging may contribute to the risk stratification for aneurysmal rupture. (orig.)

  15. Extracting cardiac shapes and motion of the chick embryo heart outflow tract from four-dimensional optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Liu, Aiping; Thornburg, Kent L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the development of image reconstruction algorithms, enabled four-dimensional (4-D) (three-dimensional imaging over time) imaging of the embryonic heart. To further analyze and quantify the dynamics of cardiac beating, segmentation procedures that can extract the shape of the heart and its motion are needed. Most previous studies analyzed cardiac image sequences using manually extracted shapes and measurements. However, this is time consuming and subject to inter-operator variability. Automated or semi-automated analyses of 4-D cardiac OCT images, although very desirable, are also extremely challenging. This work proposes a robust algorithm to semi automatically detect and track cardiac tissue layers from 4-D OCT images of early (tubular) embryonic hearts. Our algorithm uses a two-dimensional (2-D) deformable double-line model (DLM) to detect target cardiac tissues. The detection algorithm uses a maximum-likelihood estimator and was successfully applied to 4-D in vivo OCT images of the heart outflow tract of day three chicken embryos. The extracted shapes captured the dynamics of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract wall, enabling further analysis of cardiac motion.

  16. Four-dimensional variational data assimilation for inverse modelling of atmospheric methane emissions: method and comparison with synthesis inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Meirink

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation system for inverse modelling of atmospheric methane emissions is presented. The system is based on the TM5 atmospheric transport model. It can be used for assimilating large volumes of measurements, in particular satellite observations and quasi-continuous in-situ observations, and at the same time it enables the optimization of a large number of model parameters, specifically grid-scale emission rates. Furthermore, the variational method allows to estimate uncertainties in posterior emissions. Here, the system is applied to optimize monthly methane emissions over a 1-year time window on the basis of surface observations from the NOAA-ESRL network. The results are rigorously compared with an analogous inversion by Bergamaschi et al. (2007, which was based on the traditional synthesis approach. The posterior emissions as well as their uncertainties obtained in both inversions show a high degree of consistency. At the same time we illustrate the advantage of 4D-Var in reducing aggregation errors by optimizing emissions at the grid scale of the transport model. The full potential of the assimilation system is exploited in Meirink et al. (2008, who use satellite observations of column-averaged methane mixing ratios to optimize emissions at high spatial resolution, taking advantage of the zooming capability of the TM5 model.

  17. Ultrafast THz saturable absorption in doped semiconductors at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVII presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultraf...

  18. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  19. Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0032 Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics Kuang-Hsiung Wu National Chiao Tung University Final Report 04/14/2017...DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-13-1-4022 “Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics” Date May 23th, 2016

  20. Tracking the ultrafast XUV optical properties of x-ray free-electron-laser heated matter with high-order harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth O.; Künzel, S.; Daboussi, S.; Iwan, B.; Gonzalez, A. I.; Boutu, W.; Hilbert, V.; Zastrau, U.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Granados, E.; Galtier, E.; Heimann, P.; Barbrel, B.; Dovillaire, G.; Lee, R. W.; Dunn, J.; Recoules, V.; Blancard, C.; Renaudin, P.; de la Varga, A. G.; Velarde, P.; Audebert, P.; Merdji, H.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Fajardo, M.

    2018-02-01

    We present measurements of photon absorption by free electrons as a solid is transformed to plasma. A femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser is used to heat a solid, which separates the electron and ion heating time scales. The changes in absorption are measured with an independent probe pulse created through high-order-harmonic generation. We find an increase in electron temperature to have a relatively small impact on absorption, contrary to several predictions, whereas ion heating increases absorption. We compare the data to current theoretical and numerical approaches and find that a smoother electronic structure yields a better fit to the data, suggestive of a temperature-dependent electronic structure in warm dense matter.

  1. Four-dimensional echocardiography area strain combined with exercise stress echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular regional systolic function in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Peng, Long; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Li-Xue; Li, Chun-Mei; Wang, Yi; Rao, Li

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the diagnosis value of four-dimensional echocardiography area strain (AS) combined with exercise stress echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular regional systolic function in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis. Based on treadmill exercise load status, two-dimensional conventional echocardiography and four-dimensional echocardiography area strain were performed on patients suspected coronary artery disease before coronary angiogram. Thirty patients (case group) with mild left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis (stenosis Four-dimensional echocardiography area strain combined with exercise stress echocardiography could sensitively find left ventricular regional systolic function abnormality in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis, and locate stenosis coronary artery accordingly. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 9th International Symposium on Ultrafast Processes in Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, S; Denardo, G

    1996-01-01

    This volume is a collection of papers presented at the Ninth International Symposium on "Ultrafast Processes in Spectroscopy" (UPS '95) held at the International Centre for Theo­ retical Physics (ICTP), Trieste (Italy), October 30 -November 3, 1995. These meetings have become recognized as the major forum in Europe for discussion of new work in this rapidly moving field. The UPS'95 Conference in Trieste brought together a multidisciplinary group of researchers sharing common interests in the generation of ultrashort optical pulses and their application to studies of ultrafast phenomena in physics, chemistry, material science, electronics, and biology. It was attended by approximately 250 participants from 20 countries and the five-day program comprises more than 200 papers. The progress of both technology and applications in the field of ultrafast processes during these last years is truly remarkable. The advent of all solid state femtosecond lasers and the extension of laser wavelengths by frequency convers...

  3. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump–probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoby, Cheyne M., E-mail: scoby@physics.ucla.edu [UCLA Department of Physics, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Li, R.K.; Musumeci, P. [UCLA Department of Physics, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ∼1ps precision.

  4. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump–probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, Cheyne M.; Li, R.K.; Musumeci, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ∼1ps precision

  5. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  6. Efficient approach for determining four-dimensional computed tomography-based internal target volume in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Gu; Kim, Eun Seog

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate efficient approaches for determining internal target volume (ITV) from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images used in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 4D CT images were analyzed for 15 patients who received SBRT for stage I NSCLC. Three different ITVs were determined as follows: combining clinical target volume (CTV) from all 10 respiratory phases (ITV 10Phases ); combining CTV from four respiratory phases, including two extreme phases (0% and 50%) plus two intermediate phases (20% and 70%) (ITV 4Phases ); and combining CTV from two extreme phases (ITV 2Phases ). The matching index (MI) of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases was defined as the ratio of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases , respectively, to the ITV 10Phases . The tumor motion index (TMI) was defined as the ratio of ITV 10Phases to CTV mean , which was the mean of 10 CTVs delineated on 10 respiratory phases. The ITVs were significantly different in the order of ITV 10Phases , ITV 4Phases , and ITV 2Phases (all p 4Phases was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p 4Phases was inversely related to TMI (r = -0.569, p = 0.034). In a subgroup with low TMI (n = 7), ITV 4Phases was not statistically different from ITV 10Phases (p = 0.192) and its MI was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p = 0.016). The ITV 4Phases may be an efficient approach alternative to optimal ITV 10Phases in SBRT for early-stage NSCLC with less tumor motion.

  7. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  8. Quantification of Mediastinal and Hilar Lymph Node Movement Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scan: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Wolfgang, John A.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Choi, Noah C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively describe mediastinal and hilar lymph node movement in patients with lymph node-positive lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with lung cancer who underwent four-dimensional computed tomography scanning at Massachusetts General Hospital were included in the study. The maximum extent of superior motion of the superior border was measured, as well as the maximum inferior movement of the inferior border. The average of these two values is defined as the peak-to-peak movement. This process was repeated for mediolateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) movement. Linear regression was used to determine lymph node characteristics associated with peak-to-peak movement. Various uniform expansions were investigated to determine the expansion margins necessary to ensure complete internal target volume (ITV) coverage. Results: The mean peak-to-peak displacements of paratracheal lymph nodes were 4 mm (craniocaudal [CC]), 2 mm (ML), and 2 mm (AP). For subcarinal lymph nodes, the mean peak-to-peak movements were 6 mm (CC), 4 mm (ML), and 2 mm (AP). The mean peak-to-peak displacements of hilar lymph nodes were 7 mm (CC), 1 mm (ML), and 4 mm (AP). On multivariate analysis, lymph node station and lymph node size were significantly related to peak-to-peak movement. Expansions of 8 mm for paratracheal nodes and 13 mm for subcarinal and hilar nodes would have been necessary to cover the ITV of 95% of these nodal masses. Conclusions: Subcarinal and hilar lymph nodes may move substantially throughout the respiratory cycle. In the absence of patient-specific information on nodal motion, expansions of at least 8 mm, 13 mm, and 13 mm should be considered to cover the ITV of paratracheal, subcarinal, and hilar lymph nodes, respectively

  9. A four-dimensional motion field atlas of the tongue from tagged and cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L.; Stone, Maureen; Wedeen, Van J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Woo, Jonghye

    2017-02-01

    Representation of human tongue motion using three-dimensional vector fields over time can be used to better understand tongue function during speech, swallowing, and other lingual behaviors. To characterize the inter-subject variability of the tongue's shape and motion of a population carrying out one of these functions it is desirable to build a statistical model of the four-dimensional (4D) tongue. In this paper, we propose a method to construct a spatio-temporal atlas of tongue motion using magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired from fourteen healthy human subjects. First, cine MR images revealing the anatomical features of the tongue are used to construct a 4D intensity image atlas. Second, tagged MR images acquired to capture internal motion are used to compute a dense motion field at each time frame using a phase-based motion tracking method. Third, motion fields from each subject are pulled back to the cine atlas space using the deformation fields computed during the cine atlas construction. Finally, a spatio-temporal motion field atlas is created to show a sequence of mean motion fields and their inter-subject variation. The quality of the atlas was evaluated by deforming cine images in the atlas space. Comparison between deformed and original cine images showed high correspondence. The proposed method provides a quantitative representation to observe the commonality and variability of the tongue motion field for the first time, and shows potential in evaluation of common properties such as strains and other tensors based on motion fields.

  10. Estimation of emission adjustments from the application of four-dimensional data assimilation to photochemical air quality modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Dominguez, A.; Russell, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Four-dimensional data assimilation applied to photochemical air quality modeling is used to suggest adjustments to the emissions inventory of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. In this approach, a three-dimensional air quality model, coupled with direct sensitivity analysis, develops spatially and temporally varying concentration and sensitivity fields that account for chemical and physical processing, and receptor analysis is used to adjust source strengths. Proposed changes to domain-wide NO x , volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO emissions from anthropogenic sources and for VOC emissions from biogenic sources were estimated, as well as modifications to sources based on their spatial location (urban vs. rural areas). In general, domain-wide anthropogenic VOC emissions were increased approximately two times their base case level to best match observations, domain-wide anthropogenic NO x and biogenic VOC emissions (BEIS2 estimates) remained close to their base case value and domain-wide CO emissions were decreased. Adjustments for anthropogenic NO x emissions increased their level of uncertainty when adjustments were computed for mobile and area sources (or urban and rural sources) separately, due in part to the poor spatial resolution of the observation field of nitrogen-containing species. Estimated changes to CO emissions also suffer from poor spatial resolution of the measurements. Results suggest that rural anthropogenic VOC emissions appear to be severely underpredicted. The FDDA approach was also used to investigate the speciation profiles of VOC emissions, and results warrant revision of these profiles. In general, the results obtained here are consistent with what are viewed as the current deficiencies in emissions inventories as derived by other top-down techniques, such as tunnel studies and analysis of ambient measurements. (Author)

  11. Quantification of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; de Jong, Rianne; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is an important geometrical uncertainty in esophageal cancer radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify this motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Twenty esophageal cancer patients underwent endoscopy-guided marker implantation in the tumor volume and 4DCT acquisition. The 4DCT data were sorted into 10 breathing phases and the end-of-inhalation phase was selected as reference. We quantified for each visible marker (n=60) the motion in each phase and derived the peak-to-peak motion magnitude throughout the breathing cycle. The motion was quantified and analyzed for four different regions and in three orthogonal directions. The median(interquartile range) of the peak-to-peak magnitudes of the respiration-induced marker motion (left-right/anterior-posterior/cranial-caudal) was 1.5(0.5)/1.6(0.5)/2.9(1.4) mm for the proximal esophagus (n=6), 1.5(1.4)/1.4(1.3)/3.7(2.6) mm for the middle esophagus (n=12), 2.6(1.3)/3.3(1.8)/5.4(2.9) mm for the distal esophagus (n=25), and 3.7(2.1)/5.3(1.8)/8.2(3.1) mm for the proximal stomach (n=17). The variations in the results between the three directions, four regions, and patients suggest the need of individualized region-dependent anisotropic internal margins. Therefore, we recommend using markers with 4DCT to patient-specifically adapt the internal target volume (ITV). Without 4DCT, 3DCTs at the end-of-inhalation and end-of-exhalation phases could be alternatively applied for ITV individualization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation of primary middle and distal esophageal cancers motion with surrounding tissues using four-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Guo, Bing; Shang, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of gross tumor volume (GTV) motion with the structure of interest (SOI) motion and volume variation for middle and distal esophageal cancers using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Thirty-three patients with middle or distal esophageal carcinoma underwent 4DCT simulation scan during free breathing. All image sets were registered with 0% phase, and the GTV, apex of diaphragm, lung, and heart were delineated on each phase of the 4DCT data. The position of GTV and SOI was identified in all 4DCT phases, and the volume of lung and heart was also achieved. The phase relationship between the GTV and SOI was estimated through Pearson's correlation test. The mean peak-to-peak displacement of all primary tumors in the lateral (LR), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions was 0.13 cm, 0.20 cm, and 0.30 cm, respectively. The SI peak-to-peak motion of the GTV was defined as the greatest magnitude of motion. The displacement of GTV correlated well with heart in three dimensions and significantly associated with bilateral lung in LR and SI directions. A significant correlation was found between the GTV and apex of the diaphragm in SI direction (r left=0.918 and r right=0.928). A significant inverse correlation was found between GTV motion and varying lung volume, but the correlation was not significant with heart (r LR=-0.530, r AP=-0.531, and r SI=-0.588) during respiratory cycle. For middle and distal esophageal cancers, GTV should expand asymmetric internal margins. The primary tumor motion has quite good correlation with diaphragm, heart, and lung.

  13. TH-E-17A-05: Optimizing Four Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography Projection Allocation to Respiratory Bins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) is an emerging image guidance strategy but it can suffer from poor image quality. To avoid repeating scans it is beneficial to make the best use of the imaging data obtained. For conventional 4DCBCT the location and size of respiratory bins is fixed and projections are allocated to the respiratory bin within which it falls. Strictly adhering to this rule is unnecessary and can compromise image quality. In this study we optimize the size and location of respiratory bins and allow projections to be sourced from adjacent phases of the respiratory cycle. Methods: A mathematical optimization framework using mixed integer quadratic programming has been developed that determines when to source projections from adjacent respiratory bins and optimizes the size and location of the bins. The method, which we will call projection sharing, runs in under 2 seconds of CPU time. Five 4DCBCT datasets of stage III-IV lung cancer patients were used to test the algorithm. The standard deviation of the angular separation between projections (SD-A) and the standard deviation in the volume of the reconstructed fiducial gold coil (SD-V) were used as proxies to measure streaking artefacts and motion blur respectively. Results: The SD-A using displacement binning and projection sharing was 30%–50% smaller than conventional phase based binning and 59%–76% smaller than conventional displacement binning indicating more uniformly spaced projections and fewer streaking artefacts. The SD-V was 20–90% smaller when using projection sharing than using conventional phase based binning suggesting more uniform marker segmentation and less motion blur. Conclusion: Image quality was visibly and significantly improved with projection sharing. Projection sharing does not require any modifications to existing hardware and offers a more robust replacement to phase based binning, or, an option if phase based reconstruction is not of a

  14. Dynamic measurement of the optical properties of bovine enamel demineralization models using four-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, Abdirahman; Anthony, Arthi; Brigi, Carel; Merchant, Muhammad Sabih; Siraj, Huda; Tomlins, Peter H.

    2017-07-01

    Dental enamel mineral loss is multifactorial and is consequently explored using a variety of in vitro models. Important factors include the presence of acidic pH and its specific ionic composition, which can both influence lesion characteristics. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been demonstrated as a promising tool for studying dental enamel demineralization. However, OCT-based characterization and comparison of demineralization model dynamics are challenging without a consistent experimental environment. Therefore, an automated four-dimensional OCT system was integrated with a multispecimen flow cell to measure and compare the optical properties of subsurface enamel demineralization in different models. This configuration was entirely automated, thus mitigating any need to disturb the specimens and ensuring spatial registration of OCT image volumes at multiple time points. Twelve bovine enamel disks were divided equally among three model groups. The model demineralization solutions were citric acid (pH 3.8), acetic acid (pH 4.0), and acetic acid with added calcium and phosphate (pH 4.4). Bovine specimens were exposed to the solution continuously for 48 h. Three-dimensional OCT data were obtained automatically from each specimen at a minimum of 1-h intervals from the same location within each specimen. Lesion dynamics were measured in terms of the depth below the surface to which the lesion extended and the attenuation coefficient. The net loss of surface enamel was also measured for comparison. Similarities between the dynamics of each model were observed, although there were also distinct characteristic differences. Notably, the attenuation coefficients showed a systematic offset and temporal shift with respect to the different models. Furthermore, the lesion depth curves displayed a discontinuous increase several hours after the initial acid challenge. This work demonstrated the capability of OCT to distinguish between different enamel demineralization

  15. Dissipation of the tilting degree of freedom in heavy-ion-induced fission from four-dimensional Langevin dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadtochy, P.N. [Omsk State Technical University, Omsk (Russian Federation); Ryabov, E.G.; Cheredov, A.V.; Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    A stochastic approach based on four-dimensional Langevin fission dynamics is applied to the calculation of a wide set of experimental observables of excited compound nuclei from {sup 199}Pb to {sup 248}Cf formed in reactions induced by heavy ions. In the model under investigation, the tilting degree of freedom (K coordinate) representing the projection of the total angular momentum onto the symmetry axis of the nucleus is taken into account in addition to three collective shape coordinates introduced on the basis of {c,h,α} parametrization. The evolution of the K coordinate is described by means of the Langevin equation in the overdamped regime. The friction tensor for the shape collective coordinates is calculated under the assumption of the modified version of the one-body dissipation mechanism, where the reduction coefficient k{sub s} of the contribution from the ''wall'' formula is introduced. The calculations are performed both for the constant values of the coefficient k{sub s} and for the coordinate-dependent reduction coefficient k{sub s}(q) which is found on the basis of the ''chaos-weighted wall formula''. Different possibilities of the deformation-dependent dissipation coefficient (γ{sub K}) for the K coordinate are investigated. The presented results demonstrate that an impact of the k{sub s} and γ{sub K} parameters on the calculated observable fission characteristics can be selectively probed. It was found that it is possible to describe the experimental data consistently with the deformation-dependent γ{sub K}(q) coefficient for shapes featuring a neck, which predicts quite small values of γ{sub K} = 0.0077 (MeV zs){sup -1/2} and constant γ{sub K} = 0.1 -0.4 (MeV zs){sup -1/2} for compact shapes featuring no neck. (orig.)

  16. Airflow and air quality simulations over the western mountainous region with a four-dimensional data assimilation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tetsuji; Kao, Chih-Yue; Bunker, Susan

    We apply a three-dimensional meteorological model with a four-dimensional data assimilation (4-DDA) technique to simulate diurnal variations of wind, temperature, water vapor, and turbulence in a region extending from the west coast to east of the Rockies and from northern Mexico to Wyoming. The wind data taken during the 1985 SCENES ( Subregional Cooperative Electric Utility, Dept. of Defense, National Park Service, and Environmental Protection Agency Study on Visibility) field experiments are successfully assimilated into the model through the 4-DDA technique by 'nudging' the modeled winds toward the observed winds. The modeled winds and turbulence fields are then used in a Lagrangian random-particle statistical model to investigate how pollutants from potential sources are transported and diffused. Finally, we calculate the ground concentrations through a kernel density estimator. Two scenarios in different weather patterns are investigated with simulation periods up to 6 days. One is associated with the evolution of a surface cold front and the other under a high-pressure stagnant condition. In the frontal case, the impact of air-mass movement on the ground concentrations of pollutants released from the Los Angeles area is well depicted by the model. Also, the pollutants produced from Los Angeles can be transported to the Grand Canyon area within 24 h. However, if we use only the data that were obtained from the regular NWS rawinsonde network, whose temporal and spatial resolutions are coarser than those of the special network, the plume goes north-northeast and never reaches the Grand Canyon area. In the stagnant case, the pollutants meander around the source area and can have significant impact on local air quality.

  17. Dosimetric variation due to CT inter-slice spacing in four-dimensional carbon beam lung therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Motoki; Mori, Shinichiro; Kandatsu, Susumu; Baba, Masayuki; Sharp, Gregory C; Asakura, Hiroshi; Endo, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    When CT data with thick slice thickness are used in treatment planning, geometrical uncertainty may induce dosimetric errors. We evaluated carbon ion dose variations due to different CT slice thicknesses using a four-dimensional (4D) carbon ion beam dose calculation, and compared results between ungated and gated respiratory strategies. Seven lung patients were scanned in 4D mode with a 0.5 mm slice thickness using a 256-multi-slice CT scanner. CT images were averaged with various numbers of images to simulate reconstructed images with various slice thicknesses (0.5-5.0 mm). Two scenarios were studied (respiratory-ungated and -gated strategies). Range compensators were designed for each of the CT volumes with coarse inter-slice spacing to cover the internal target volume (ITV), as defined from 4DCT. Carbon ion dose distribution was computed for each resulting ITV on the 0.5 mm slice 4DCT data. The accumulated dose distribution was then calculated using deformable registration for 4D dose assessment. The magnitude of over- and under-dosage was found to be larger with the use of range compensators designed with a coarser inter-slice spacing than those obtained with a 0.5 mm slice thickness. Although no under-dosage was observed within the clinical target volume (CTV) region, D95 remained at over 97% of the prescribed dose for the ungated strategy and 95% for the gated strategy for all slice thicknesses. An inter-slice spacing of less than 3 mm may be able to minimize dose variation between the ungated and gated strategies. Although volumes with increased inter-slice spacing may reduce geometrical accuracy at a certain respiratory phase, this does not significantly affect delivery of the accumulated dose to the target during the treatment course.

  18. Fourteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A; Silvestri, Sandro; Ultrafast Phenomena XIV

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XIV presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including ultrafast laser and measurement technology as well as studies of ultrafast phenomena. Pico-, femto-, and atosecond processes relevant in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering are presented. Ultrafast technology is now having a profound impact within a wide range of applications, among them imaging, material diagnostics, and transformation and high-speed optoelectronics. This book summarizes results presented at the 14th Ultrafast Phenomena Conference and reviews the state of the art in this important and rapidly advancing field.

  19. Sixteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Corkum, Paul; Nelson, Keith A; Riedle, Eberhard; Schoenlein, Robert W; Ultrafast Phenomena XVI

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVI presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, amongst them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, material processing, and ultrahigh speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 16th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  20. Imaging Localized Energy States in Silicon-doped InGaN Nanowires Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2018-01-23

    Introducing dopants into InGaN NWs is known to significantly improve their device performances through a variety of mechanisms. However, to further optimize device operation under the influence of large specific surfaces, a thorough knowledge of ultrafast dynamical processes at the surface and interface of these NWs is imperative. Here, we describe the development of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) as an extremely surface-sensitive method to directly visualize in space and time the enormous impact of silicon doping on the surface-carrier dynamics of InGaN NWs. Two time regime dynamics are identified for the first time in a 4D S-UEM experiment: an early time behavior (within 200 picoseconds) associated with the deferred evolution of secondary electrons due to the presence of localized trap states that decrease the electron escape rate and a longer timescale behavior (several ns) marked by accelerated charge carrier recombination. The results are further corroborated by conductivity studies carried out in dark and under illumination.

  1. Imaging Localized Energy States in Silicon-doped InGaN Nanowires Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Burlakov, Victor M; Liu, Guangyu; Haque, Mohammed; Priante, Davide; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Wehbe, Nimer; Zhao, Chao; Yang, Haoze; Ng, Tien Khee; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman; Wu, Tao; Ooi, Boon S.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2018-01-01

    Introducing dopants into InGaN NWs is known to significantly improve their device performances through a variety of mechanisms. However, to further optimize device operation under the influence of large specific surfaces, a thorough knowledge of ultrafast dynamical processes at the surface and interface of these NWs is imperative. Here, we describe the development of four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM) as an extremely surface-sensitive method to directly visualize in space and time the enormous impact of silicon doping on the surface-carrier dynamics of InGaN NWs. Two time regime dynamics are identified for the first time in a 4D S-UEM experiment: an early time behavior (within 200 picoseconds) associated with the deferred evolution of secondary electrons due to the presence of localized trap states that decrease the electron escape rate and a longer timescale behavior (several ns) marked by accelerated charge carrier recombination. The results are further corroborated by conductivity studies carried out in dark and under illumination.

  2. A layer-by-layer ZnO nanoparticle-PbS quantum dot self-assembly platform for ultrafast interfacial electron injection

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed Samir; Usman, Anwar; El-Ballouli, AlA'A O.; Alarousu, Erkki Antero; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-01-01

    solar cell. To achieve sufficient electron transfer and subsequently high conversion efficiency in these solar cells, however, energy-level alignment and interfacial contact between the donor and the acceptor units are needed. Here, the layer-by

  3. Remarkably High Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: From Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy to Device Fabrication and Optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana; Banavoth, Murali; Alsinan, Yara; Parida, Manas R.; Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    of these photophysical processes at device interfaces remains superficial, creating a major bottleneck that circumvents advancements and the optimization of these solar cells. Here, results from time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy

  4. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump-probe experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoby, Cheyne M; Li, R K; Musumeci, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ~1 ps precision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mid-ventilation CT scan construction from four-dimensional respiration-correlated CT scans for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthaus, Jochem W. H.; Schneider, Christoph; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel; Belderbos, José S. A.; Rossi, Maddalena M. G.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Damen, Eugène M. F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Four-dimensional (4D) respiration-correlated imaging techniques can be used to obtain (respiration) artifact-free computed tomography (CT) images of the thorax. Current radiotherapy planning systems, however, do not accommodate 4D-CT data. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple,

  6. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care? A psychometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Oosterbaan, D.B.; Brouwers, E.P.; Straten, A. van; Ven, P.M. van de; Langerak, W.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety

  7. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Oosterbaan, D.B.; Brouwers, E.P.; van Straten, A.; van de Ven, P.M.; Langerak, W.; van Marwijk, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety

  8. The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ): a validation study of a multidimensional self-report questionnaire to assess distress, depression, anxiety and somatization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Ader, H.J.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Hermens, M.L.M.; van Boeijen, C.A.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is a self-report questionnaire that has been developed in primary care to distinguish non-specific general distress from depression, anxiety and somatization. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate its criterion and construct validity.

  9. The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) in the general population: scale structure, reliability, measurement invariance and normative data : A cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Smits, N.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; De Vet, H.C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is a self-report questionnaire measuring distress, depression, anxiety and somatization with separate scales. The 4DSQ has extensively been validated in clinical samples, especially from primary care settings. Information about measurement

  10. The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) in the general population : scale structure, reliability, measurement invariance and normative data: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Smits, N.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is a self-report questionnaire measuring distress, depression, anxiety and somatization with separate scales. The 4DSQ has extensively been validated in clinical samples, especially from primary care settings. Information about

  11. To what extent does the anxiety scale of the Four Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) detect specific types of anxiety disorder in primary care? : A psychometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, B.; Oosterbaan, D.B.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van Straten, A.H.M.; van de Ven, P.; Langerak, W.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety scales may help primary care physicians to detect specific anxiety disorders among the many emotionally distressed patients presenting in primary care. The anxiety scale of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) consists of an admixture of symptoms of specific anxiety

  12. Ultrafast laser-semiconductor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schile, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the ultrafast (< 100 fs) interactions of infrared, sub-100 fs laser pulses with IR, photosensitive semiconductor materials InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe are reported. Both the carrier dynamics and the associated Terahertz radiation from these materials are discussed. The most recent developments of femtosecond (< 100 fs) Optical Parametric Oscillators (OPO) has extended the wavelength range from the visible to 5.2 μm. The photogenerated semiconductor free carrier dynamics are determined in the 77 to 300 degrees K temperature range using the Transmission Correlation Peak (TCP) method. The electron-phonon scattering times are typically 200 - 600 fs. Depending upon the material composition and substrate on which the IR crystalline materials are deposited, the nonlinear TCP absorption gives recombination rates as fast as 10's of picoseconds. For the HgCdTe, there exists a 400 fs electron-phonon scattering process along with a much longer 3600 fs loss process. Studies of the interactions of these ultrashort laser pulses with semiconductors produce Terahertz (Thz) radiative pulses. With undoped InSb, there is a substantial change in the spectral content of this THz radiation between 80 - 260 degrees K while the spectrum of Te-doped InSb remains nearly unchanged, an effect attributed to its mobility being dominated by impurity scattering. At 80 degrees K, the terahertz radiation from undoped InSb is dependent on wavelength, with both a higher frequency spectrum and much larger amplitudes generated at longer wavelengths. No such effect is observed at 260 degrees K. Finally, new results on the dependence of the emitted THz radiation on the InSb crystal's orientation is presented

  13. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  14. Planning Study Comparison of Real-Time Target Tracking and Four-Dimensional Inverse Planning for Managing Patient Respiratory Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time target tracking (RT-TT) and four-dimensional inverse planning (4D-IP) are two potential methods to manage respiratory target motion. In this study, we evaluated each method using the cumulative dose-volume criteria in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Respiration-correlated computed tomography scans were acquired for 4 patients. Deformable image registration was applied to generate a displacement mapping for each phase image of the respiration-correlated computed tomography images. First, the dose distribution for the organs of interest obtained from an idealized RT-TT technique was evaluated, assuming perfect knowledge of organ motion and beam tracking. Inverse planning was performed on each phase image separately. The treatment dose to the organs of interest was then accumulated from the optimized plans. Second, 4D-IP was performed using the probability density function of respiratory motion. The beam arrangement, prescription dose, and objectives were consistent in both planning methods. The dose-volume and equivalent uniform dose in the target volume, lung, heart, and spinal cord were used for the evaluation. Results: The cumulative dose in the target was similar for both techniques. The equivalent uniform dose of the lung, heart, and spinal cord was 4.6 ± 2.2, 11 ± 4.4, and 11 ± 6.6 Gy for RT-TT with a 0-mm target margin, 5.2 ± 3.1, 12 ± 5.9, and 12 ± 7.8 Gy for RT-TT with a 2-mm target margin, and 5.3 ± 2.3, 11.9 ± 5.0, and 12 ± 5.6 Gy for 4D-IP, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D-IP can achieve plans similar to those achieved by RT-TT. Considering clinical implementation, 4D-IP could be a more reliable and practical method to manage patient respiration-induced motion

  15. Motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR): Application to four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Justin C.; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Sung Ho; Liu, Zhaowei; Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Utilization of respiratory correlated four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has enabled verification of internal target motion and volume immediately prior to treatment. However, with current standard CBCT scan, 4DCBCT poses challenge for reconstruction due to the fact that multiple phase binning leads to insufficient number of projection data to reconstruct and thus cause streaking artifacts. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel 4DCBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR), that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase resolution 4DCBCT images with no more than the imaging dose as well as projections used in a standard free breathing 3DCBCT (FB-3DCBCT) scan.Methods: The unknown 4DCBCT volume at each phase was mathematically modeled as a combination of FB-3DCBCT and phase-specific update vector which has an associated motion-map matrix. The motion-map matrix, which is the key innovation of the MCIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes voxels that are moving from stationary ones. This 4DCBCT model was then reconstructed with compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework such that the voxels with high motion would be aggressively updated by the phase-wise sorted projections and the voxels with less motion would be minimally updated to preserve the FB-3DCBCT. To evaluate the performance of our proposed MCIR algorithm, we evaluated both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The results were then compared with the (1) clinical FB-3DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, (2) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, and (3) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the well-known prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS).Results: Examination of the MCIR algorithm showed that high phase-resolved 4DCBCT with sets of up to 20 phases using a typical FB-3DCBCT scan could be reconstructed without compromising the image quality. Moreover, in comparison with

  16. An analysis of respiratory induced kidney motion on four-dimensional computed tomography and its implications for stereotactic kidney radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Pham, Daniel; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Dang, Kim; Devereux, Thomas; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment modality for primary renal cell carcinoma. To account for respiratory-induced target motion, an internal target volume (ITV) concept is often used in treatment planning of SABR. The purpose of this study is to assess patterns of kidney motion and investigate potential surrogates of kidney displacement with the view of ITV verification during treatment. Datasets from 71 consecutive patients with free breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) planning scans were included in this study. The displacement of the left and right hemi-diaphragm, liver dome and abdominal wall were measured and tested for correlation with the displacement of the both kidneys and patient breathing frequency. Nine patients were excluded due to severe banding artifact. Of 62 evaluable patients, the median age was 68 years, with 41 male patients and 21 female patients. The mean (range) of the maximum, minimum and average breathing frequency throughout the 4DCTs were 20.1 (11–38), 15.1 (9–24) and 17.3 (9–27.5) breaths per minute, respectively. The mean (interquartile range) displacement of the left and right kidneys was 0.74 cm (0.45-0.98 cm) and 0.75 cm (0.49-0.97) respectively. The amplitude of liver-dome motion was correlated with right kidney displacement (r=0.52, p<0.001), but not with left kidney displacement (p=0.796). There was a statistically significant correlation between the magnitude of right kidney displacement and that of abdominal displacement (r=0.36, p=0.004), but not the left kidney (r=0.24, p=0.056). Hemi-diaphragm displacements were correlated with kidney displacements respectively, with a weaker correlation for the left kidney/left diaphragm (r=0.45, [95% CI 0.22 to 0.63], p=<0.001) than for the right kidney/right diaphragm (r=0.57, [95% CI 0.37 to 0.72], p=<0.001). For the majority of patients, maximal left and right kidney displacement is subcentimeter in magnitude. The magnitude of

  17. Correlation of primary middle and distal esophageal cancers motion with surrounding tissues using four-dimensional computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang,1 Jianbin Li,1 Yingjie Zhang,1 Qian Shao,1 Min Xu,1 Bing Guo,1 Dongping Shang2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Big Bore CT Room, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To investigate the correlation of gross tumor volume (GTV motion with the structure of interest (SOI motion and volume variation for middle and distal esophageal cancers using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT.Patients and methods: Thirty-three patients with middle or distal esophageal carcinoma underwent 4DCT simulation scan during free breathing. All image sets were registered with 0% phase, and the GTV, apex of diaphragm, lung, and heart were delineated on each phase of the 4DCT data. The position of GTV and SOI was identified in all 4DCT phases, and the volume of lung and heart was also achieved. The phase relationship between the GTV and SOI was estimated through Pearson’s correlation test.Results: The mean peak-to-peak displacement of all primary tumors in the lateral (LR, anteroposterior (AP, and superoinferior (SI directions was 0.13 cm, 0.20 cm, and 0.30 cm, respectively. The SI peak-to-peak motion of the GTV was defined as the greatest magnitude of motion. The displacement of GTV correlated well with heart in three dimensions and significantly associated with bilateral lung in LR and SI directions. A significant correlation was found between the GTV and apex of the diaphragm in SI direction (rleft=0.918 and rright=0.928. A significant inverse correlation was found between GTV motion and varying lung volume, but the correlation was not significant with heart (rLR=–0.530, rAP=–0.531, and rSI=–0.588 during respiratory cycle.Conclusion: For middle and distal esophageal cancers, GTV should expand asymmetric internal margins. The primary tumor motion has quite good correlation with diaphragm, heart, and lung. Keywords

  18. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Keall, Paul J; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and

  19. Motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR): Application to four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Justin C. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kim, Jin Sung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho [Department of Medical Physics, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Zhaowei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Utilization of respiratory correlated four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has enabled verification of internal target motion and volume immediately prior to treatment. However, with current standard CBCT scan, 4DCBCT poses challenge for reconstruction due to the fact that multiple phase binning leads to insufficient number of projection data to reconstruct and thus cause streaking artifacts. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel 4DCBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR), that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase resolution 4DCBCT images with no more than the imaging dose as well as projections used in a standard free breathing 3DCBCT (FB-3DCBCT) scan.Methods: The unknown 4DCBCT volume at each phase was mathematically modeled as a combination of FB-3DCBCT and phase-specific update vector which has an associated motion-map matrix. The motion-map matrix, which is the key innovation of the MCIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes voxels that are moving from stationary ones. This 4DCBCT model was then reconstructed with compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework such that the voxels with high motion would be aggressively updated by the phase-wise sorted projections and the voxels with less motion would be minimally updated to preserve the FB-3DCBCT. To evaluate the performance of our proposed MCIR algorithm, we evaluated both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The results were then compared with the (1) clinical FB-3DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, (2) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, and (3) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the well-known prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS).Results: Examination of the MCIR algorithm showed that high phase-resolved 4DCBCT with sets of up to 20 phases using a typical FB-3DCBCT scan could be reconstructed without compromising the image quality. Moreover, in comparison with

  20. Quality assurance device for four-dimensional IMRT or SBRT and respiratory gating using patient-specific intrafraction motion kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Benjamin E; Ehler, Eric; Bragg, Henry; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2007-09-17

    Emerging technologies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) and implanted beacons are expected to allow clinicians to accurately model intrafraction motion and to quantitatively estimate internal target volumes (ITVs) for radiation therapy involving moving targets. In the case of intensity-modulated (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivery, clinicians must consider the interplay between the temporal nature of the modulation and the target motion within the ITV. A need exists for a 4D IMRT/SBRT quality assurance (QA) device that can incorporate and analyze customized intrafraction motion as it relates to dose delivery and respiratory gating. We built a 4D IMRT/SBRT prototype device and entered (X, Y, Z)(T) coordinates representing a motion kernel into a software application that 1. transformed the kernel into beam-specific two-dimensional (2D) motion "projections," 2. previewed the motion in real time, and 3. drove a recision X-Y motorized device that had, atop it, a mounted planar IMRT QA measurement device. The detectors that intersected the target in the beam's-eye-view of any single phase of the breathing cycle (a small subset of all the detectors) were defined as "target detectors" to be analyzed for dose uniformity between multiple fractions. Data regarding the use of this device to quantify dose variation fraction-to-fraction resulting from target motion (for several delivery modalities and with and without gating) have been recently published. A combined software and hardware solution for patient-customized 4D IMRT/SBRT QA is an effective tool for assessing IMRT delivery under conditions of intrafraction motion. The 4D IMRT QA device accurately reproduced the projected motion kernels for all beam's-eye-view motion kernels. This device has been proved to, effectively quantify the degradation in dose uniformity resulting from a moving target within a static planning target volume, and, integrate with a commercial

  1. Four-dimensional distribution of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic cloud over Europe observed by EARLINET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pappalardo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April–May 2010 represents a "natural experiment" to study the impact of volcanic emissions on a continental scale. For the first time, quantitative data about the presence, altitude, and layering of the volcanic cloud, in conjunction with optical information, are available for most parts of Europe derived from the observations by the European Aerosol Research Lidar NETwork (EARLINET. Based on multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems, EARLINET is the only instrument worldwide that is able to provide dense time series of high-quality optical data to be used for aerosol typing and for the retrieval of particle microphysical properties as a function of altitude. In this work we show the four-dimensional (4-D distribution of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic cloud in the troposphere over Europe as observed by EARLINET during the entire volcanic event (15 April–26 May 2010. All optical properties directly measured (backscatter, extinction, and particle linear depolarization ratio are stored in the EARLINET database available at http://www.earlinet.org. A specific relational database providing the volcanic mask over Europe, realized ad hoc for this specific event, has been developed and is available on request at http://www.earlinet.org. During the first days after the eruption, volcanic particles were detected over Central Europe within a wide range of altitudes, from the upper troposphere down to the local planetary boundary layer (PBL. After 19 April 2010, volcanic particles were detected over southern and south-eastern Europe. During the first half of May (5–15 May, material emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano was detected over Spain and Portugal and then over the Mediterranean and the Balkans. The last observations of the event were recorded until 25 May in Central Europe and in the Eastern Mediterranean area. The 4-D distribution of volcanic aerosol layering and optical properties on

  2. Effect of tumor volume on the enhancement pattern of parathyroid adenoma on parathyroid four-dimensional CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Sohn, Chul-Ho [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Eun; Kim, Su-jin [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jae-Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of tumor volume on the enhancement pattern of parathyroid adenoma (PTA) on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). We analyzed the enhancement patterns of PTA on four-phase 4D-CT in 44 patients. Dependency of the changes of Hounsfield unit values (ΔHU) on the tumor volumes and clinical characteristics was evaluated using linear regression analyses. In addition, an unpaired t test was used to compare ΔHU of PTAs between PTA volume ≥1 cm{sup 3} and <1 cm{sup 3}, thyroid gland, and lymph node. PTA volume based on CT was the strongest factor on the ΔHU{sub Pre} {sub to} {sub Arterial} and ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Venous} and ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Delayed} (R {sup 2} = 0.34, 0.25, and 0.32, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). PTA ≥1 cm {sup 3} had statistically significant greater enhancement between the unenhanced phase and the arterial phase than PTA <1 cm {sup 3} (mean values ± standard deviations (SDs) of ΔHU{sub Pre} {sub to} {sub Arterial}, 102.7 ± 33.7 and 57.5 ± 28.8, respectively, P < 0.001). PTA ≥1 cm {sup 3} showed an early washout pattern on the venous phase, whereas PTA <1 cm {sup 3} showed a progressive enhancement pattern on the venous phase (mean values ± SDs of ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Venous}, -13.2 ± 31.6 and 14.4 ± 32.7, respectively; P = 0.009). The enhancement pattern of PTA on 4D-CT is variable with respect to PTA volume based on CT. Therefore, the enhancement pattern of PTA on 4D-CT requires careful interpretation concerning the tumor volume, especially in cases of PTA <1 cm {sup 3}. (orig.)

  3. Quantitation of the reconstruction quality of a four-dimensional computed tomography process for lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Parikh, Parag J.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Mutic, Sasa; Singh, Anurag K.; Christensen, Gary E.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) technique for mapping breathing motion in radiotherapy treatment planning. A multislice CT scanner (1.5 mm slices) operated in cine mode was used to acquire 12 contiguous slices in each couch position for 15 consecutive scans (0.5 s rotation, 0.25 s between scans) while the patient underwent simultaneous quantitative spirometry measurements to provide a sorting metric. The spirometry-sorted scans were used to reconstruct a 4D data set. A critical factor for 4D CT is quantifying the reconstructed data set quality which we measure by correlating the metric used relative to internal-object motion. For this study, the internal air content within the lung was used as a surrogate for internal motion measurements. Thresholding and image morphological operations were applied to delineate the air-containing tissues (lungs, trachea) from each CT slice. The Hounsfield values were converted to the internal air content (V). The relationship between the air content and spirometer-measured tidal volume (ν) was found to be quite linear throughout the lungs and was used to estimate the overall accuracy and precision of tidal volume-sorted 4D CT. Inspection of the CT-scan air content as a function of tidal volume showed excellent correlations (typically r>0.99) throughout the lung volume. Because of the discovered linear relationship, the ratio of internal air content to tidal volume was indicative of the fraction of air change in each couch position. Theoretically, due to air density differences within the lung and in room, the sum of these ratios would equal 1.11. For 12 patients, the mean value was 1.08±0.06, indicating the high quality of spirometry-based image sorting. The residual of a first-order fit between ν and V was used to estimate the process precision. For all patients, the precision was better than 8%, with a mean value of 5.1%±1.9%. This quantitative analysis highlights the value of using spirometry

  4. Reliability of pelvic floor measurements on three- and four-dimensional ultrasound during and after first pregnancy: implications for training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veelen, G A; Schweitzer, K J; van der Vaart, C H

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the reliability of measurements of the levator hiatus and levator-urethra gap (LUG) using three/four-dimensional (3D/4D) transperineal ultrasound in women during their first pregnancy and 6 months postpartum, and to assess the learning process for these measurements. An inexperienced observer was taught to perform measurements of the levator hiatus and LUG by an experienced observer. After training, 3D/4D ultrasound volume datasets of 40 women in the first trimester were analyzed by these two observers. Another training session then took place and both observers repeated the analyses of the same volume datasets. Finally, analyses of 40 volume datasets of the women 6 months postpartum were performed by both observers. Intra- and interobserver reliability were determined by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95% CIs. For levator hiatal measurements, in the women during their first pregnancy the interobserver reliability was substantial to almost perfect after both the first and second training session (ICC, 0.62-0.83 and 0.71-0.89, respectively, for anteroposterior diameter, transverse diameter and area at rest, on contraction and on Valsalva) and the intraobserver reliability was substantial to almost perfect for both observers. For these measurements performed once the women had delivered, interobserver reliability was moderate to almost perfect. For LUG measurements performed during pregnancy, interobserver reliability was slight to moderate after the first training session (ICC, 0.14-0.54), but improved after the second training session (ICC, 0.38-0.71), and intraobserver reliability was moderate to substantial for the experienced observer and slight to moderate for the inexperienced observer. For these measurements performed when the women had delivered, interobserver reliability was fair to moderate. The levator hiatus and LUG can be measured reliably using 3D/4D ultrasound in primigravid and primiparous women. The technique to measure

  5. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.; Xiao, Dequan; Batista, Victor S.; Nibbering, Erik Theodorus Johannes

    2014-01-01

    of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ

  6. Ultra-fast computation of electronic spectra for large systems by tight-binding based simplified Tamm-Dancoff approximation (sTDA-xTB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The computational bottleneck of the extremely fast simplified Tamm-Dancoff approximated (sTDA) time-dependent density functional theory procedure [S. Grimme, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244104 (2013)] for the computation of electronic spectra for large systems is the determination of the ground state Kohn-Sham orbitals and eigenvalues. This limits such treatments to single structures with a few hundred atoms and hence, e.g., sampling along molecular dynamics trajectories for flexible systems or the calculation of chromophore aggregates is often not possible. The aim of this work is to solve this problem by a specifically designed semi-empirical tight binding (TB) procedure similar to the well established self-consistent-charge density functional TB scheme. The new special purpose method provides orbitals and orbital energies of hybrid density functional character for a subsequent and basically unmodified sTDA procedure. Compared to many previous semi-empirical excited state methods, an advantage of the ansatz is that a general eigenvalue problem in a non-orthogonal, extended atomic orbital basis is solved and therefore correct occupied/virtual orbital energy splittings as well as Rydberg levels are obtained. A key idea for the success of the new model is that the determination of atomic charges (describing an effective electron-electron interaction) and the one-particle spectrum is decoupled and treated by two differently parametrized Hamiltonians/basis sets. The three-diagonalization-step composite procedure can routinely compute broad range electronic spectra (0-8 eV) within minutes of computation time for systems composed of 500-1000 atoms with an accuracy typical of standard time-dependent density functional theory (0.3-0.5 eV average error). An easily extendable parametrization based on coupled-cluster and density functional computed reference data for the elements H–Zn including transition metals is described. The accuracy of the method termed sTDA-xTB is first

  7. Ultra-fast computation of electronic spectra for large systems by tight-binding based simplified Tamm-Dancoff approximation (sTDA-xTB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimme, Stefan, E-mail: grimme@thch.uni-bonn.de; Bannwarth, Christoph [Mulliken Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Beringstraße 4, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-08-07

    The computational bottleneck of the extremely fast simplified Tamm-Dancoff approximated (sTDA) time-dependent density functional theory procedure [S. Grimme, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244104 (2013)] for the computation of electronic spectra for large systems is the determination of the ground state Kohn-Sham orbitals and eigenvalues. This limits such treatments to single structures with a few hundred atoms and hence, e.g., sampling along molecular dynamics trajectories for flexible systems or the calculation of chromophore aggregates is often not possible. The aim of this work is to solve this problem by a specifically designed semi-empirical tight binding (TB) procedure similar to the well established self-consistent-charge density functional TB scheme. The new special purpose method provides orbitals and orbital energies of hybrid density functional character for a subsequent and basically unmodified sTDA procedure. Compared to many previous semi-empirical excited state methods, an advantage of the ansatz is that a general eigenvalue problem in a non-orthogonal, extended atomic orbital basis is solved and therefore correct occupied/virtual orbital energy splittings as well as Rydberg levels are obtained. A key idea for the success of the new model is that the determination of atomic charges (describing an effective electron-electron interaction) and the one-particle spectrum is decoupled and treated by two differently parametrized Hamiltonians/basis sets. The three-diagonalization-step composite procedure can routinely compute broad range electronic spectra (0-8 eV) within minutes of computation time for systems composed of 500-1000 atoms with an accuracy typical of standard time-dependent density functional theory (0.3-0.5 eV average error). An easily extendable parametrization based on coupled-cluster and density functional computed reference data for the elements H–Zn including transition metals is described. The accuracy of the method termed sTDA-xTB is first

  8. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. Scoby; P. Musumeci; J. T. Moody; M. S. Gutierrez

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS) where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV

  9. Propagation of complex shaped ultrafast pulses in highly optically dense samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J. C.; Fetterman, M. R.; Warren, W. S.; Goswami, D.

    2008-01-01

    We examine the propagation of shaped (amplitude- and frequency-modulated) ultrafast laser pulses through optically dense rubidium vapor. Pulse reshaping, stimulated emission dynamics, and residual electronic excitation all strongly depend on the laser pulse shape. For example, frequency swept pulses, which produce adiabatic passage in the optically thin limit (independent of the sign of the frequency sweep), behave unexpectedly in optically dense samples. Paraxial Maxwell optical Bloch equations can model our ultrafast pulse propagation results well and provide insight

  10. Single-step electron transfer on the nanometer scale: ultra-fast charge shift in strongly coupled zinc porphyrin-gold porphyrin dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortage, Jérôme; Boixel, Julien; Blart, Errol; Hammarström, Leif; Becker, Hans Christian; Odobel, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis, electrochemical properties, and photoinduced electron transfer processes of a series of three novel zinc(II)-gold(III) bisporphyrin dyads (ZnP--S--AuP(+)) are described. The systems studied consist of two trisaryl porphyrins connected directly in the meso position via an alkyne unit to tert-(phenylenethynylene) or penta(phenylenethynylene) spacers. In these dyads, the estimated center to center interporphyrin separation distance varies from 32 to 45 A. The absorption, emission, and electrochemical data indicate that there are strong electronic interactions between the linked elements, thanks to the direct attachment of the spacer on the porphyrin ring through the alkyne unit. At room temperature in toluene, light excitation of the zinc porphyrin results in almost quantitative formation of the charge shifted state (.+)ZnP--S--AuP(.), whose lifetime is in the order of hundreds of picoseconds. In this solvent, the charge-separated state decays to the ground state through the intermediate population of the zinc porphyrin triplet excited state. Excitation of the gold porphyrin leads instead to rapid energy transfer to the triplet ZnP. In dichloromethane the charge shift reactions are even faster, with time constants down to 2 ps, and may be induced also by excitation of the gold porphyrin. In this latter solvent, the longest charge-shifted lifetime (tau=2.3 ns) was obtained with the penta-(phenylenethynylene) spacer. The charge shift reactions are discussed in terms of bridge-mediated super-exchange mechanisms as electron or hole transfer. These new bis-porphyrin arrays, with strong electronic coupling, represent interesting molecular systems in which extremely fast and efficient long-range photoinduced charge shift occurs over a long distance. The rate constants are two to three orders of magnitude larger than for corresponding ZnP--AuP(+) dyads linked via meso-phenyl groups to oligo-phenyleneethynylene spacers. This study demonstrates the critical

  11. Ultrafast quantum control of ionization dynamics in krypton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütten, Konrad; Mittermair, Michael; Stock, Sebastian O; Beerwerth, Randolf; Shirvanyan, Vahe; Riemensberger, Johann; Duensing, Andreas; Heider, Rupert; Wagner, Martin S; Guggenmos, Alexander; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kabachnik, Nikolay M; Kienberger, Reinhard; Bernhardt, Birgitta

    2018-02-19

    Ultrafast spectroscopy with attosecond resolution has enabled the real time observation of ultrafast electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and solids. These experiments employ attosecond pulses or pulse trains and explore dynamical processes in a pump-probe scheme that is selectively sensitive to electronic state of matter via photoelectron or XUV absorption spectroscopy or that includes changes of the ionic state detected via photo-ion mass spectrometry. Here, we demonstrate how the implementation of combined photo-ion and absorption spectroscopy with attosecond resolution enables tracking the complex multidimensional excitation and decay cascade of an Auger auto-ionization process of a few femtoseconds in highly excited krypton. In tandem with theory, our study reveals the role of intermediate electronic states in the formation of multiply charged ions. Amplitude tuning of a dressing laser field addresses different groups of decay channels and allows exerting temporal and quantitative control over the ionization dynamics in rare gas atoms.

  12. Ultrafast Synaptic Events in a Chalcogenide Memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Yingpeng; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjian; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Huajun; Miao, Xiangshui

    2013-04-01

    Compact and power-efficient plastic electronic synapses are of fundamental importance to overcoming the bottlenecks of developing a neuromorphic chip. Memristor is a strong contender among the various electronic synapses in existence today. However, the speeds of synaptic events are relatively slow in most attempts at emulating synapses due to the material-related mechanism. Here we revealed the intrinsic memristance of stoichiometric crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 that originates from the charge trapping and releasing by the defects. The device resistance states, representing synaptic weights, were precisely modulated by 30 ns potentiating/depressing electrical pulses. We demonstrated four spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) forms by applying programmed pre- and postsynaptic spiking pulse pairs in different time windows ranging from 50 ms down to 500 ns, the latter of which is 105 times faster than the speed of STDP in human brain. This study provides new opportunities for building ultrafast neuromorphic computing systems and surpassing Von Neumann architecture.

  13. Ultrafast strain engineering in complex oxide heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Paul; Caviglia, Andrea; Hu, Wanzheng; Bromberger, Hubertus; Singla, Rashmi; Mitrano, Matteo; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Kaiser, Stefan; Foerst, Michael [Max-Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics - Center for Free Electron Laser Science, University of Hamburg (Germany); Scherwitzl, Raoul; Zubko, Pavlo; Gariglio, Sergio; Triscone, Jean-Marc [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneve 4, Geneva (Switzerland); Cavalleri, Andrea [Max-Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics - Center for Free Electron Laser Science, University of Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical coupling between the substrate and the thin film is expected to be effective on the ultrafast timescale, and could be exploited for the dynamic control of materials properties. Here, we demonstrate that a large-amplitude mid-infrared field, made resonant with a stretching mode of the substrate, can switch the electronic properties of a thin film across an interface. Exploiting dynamic strain propagation between different components of a heterostructure, insulating antiferromagnetic NdNiO{sub 3} is driven through a prompt, five-order-of-magnitude increase of the electrical conductivity, with resonant frequency and susceptibility that is controlled by choice of the substrate material. Vibrational phase control, extended here to a wide class of heterostructures and interfaces, may be conductive to new strategies for electronic phase control at THz repetition rates.

  14. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipritidis, John; Keall, Paul J.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r - Inter =0.52±0

  15. Measuring interfraction and intrafraction lung function changes during radiation therapy using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipritidis, John, E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Hugo, Geoffrey; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Adaptive ventilation guided radiation therapy could minimize the irradiation of healthy lung based on repeat lung ventilation imaging (VI) during treatment. However the efficacy of adaptive ventilation guidance requires that interfraction (e.g., week-to-week), ventilation changes are not washed out by intrafraction (e.g., pre- and postfraction) changes, for example, due to patient breathing variability. The authors hypothesize that patients undergoing lung cancer radiation therapy exhibit larger interfraction ventilation changes compared to intrafraction function changes. To test this, the authors perform the first comparison of interfraction and intrafraction lung VI pairs using four-dimensional cone beam CT ventilation imaging (4D-CBCT VI), a novel technique for functional lung imaging. Methods: The authors analyzed a total of 215 4D-CBCT scans acquired for 19 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients over 4–6 weeks of radiation therapy. This set of 215 scans was sorted into 56 interfraction pairs (including first day scans and each of treatment weeks 2, 4, and 6) and 78 intrafraction pairs (including pre/postfraction scans on the same-day), with some scans appearing in both sets. VIs were obtained from the Jacobian determinant of the transform between the 4D-CBCT end-exhale and end-inhale images after deformable image registration. All VIs were deformably registered to their corresponding planning CT and normalized to account for differences in breathing effort, thus facilitating image comparison in terms of (i) voxelwise Spearman correlations, (ii) mean image differences, and (iii) gamma pass rates for all interfraction and intrafraction VI pairs. For the side of the lung ipsilateral to the tumor, we applied two-sided t-tests to determine whether interfraction VI pairs were more different than intrafraction VI pairs. Results: The (mean ± standard deviation) Spearman correlation for interfraction VI pairs was r{sup -}{sub Inter

  16. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang, Jianbin Li, Yingjie Zhang, Qian Shao, Min Xu, Tingyong Fan, Jinzhi Wang Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: To investigate the definition of planning target volumes (PTVs based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT compared with conventional PTV definition and PTV definition using asymmetrical margins for thoracic primary esophageal cancer. Materials and methods: Forty-three patients with esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing. The motions of primary tumors located in the proximal (group A, middle (group B, and distal (group C thoracic esophagus were obtained from the 4DCT scans. PTV3D was defined on 3DCT using the tumor motion measured based on 4DCT, PTV conventional (PTVconv was defined on 3DCT by adding a 1.0 cm margin to the clinical target volume, and PTV4D was defined as the union of the target volumes contoured on the ten phases of the 4DCT images. The centroid positions, volumetric differences, and dice similarity coefficients were evaluated for all PTVs. Results: The median centroid shifts between PTV3D and PTV4D and between PTVconv and PTV4D in all three dimensions were <0.3 cm for the three groups. The median size ratios of PTV4D to PTV3D were 0.80, 0.88, and 0.71, and PTV4D to PTVconv were 0.67, 0.73, and 0.76 (χ2=–3.18, –2.98, and –3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002 for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The dice similarity coefficients were 0.87, 0.90, and 0.81 between PTV4D and PTV3D and 0.80, 0.84, and 0.83 between PTV4D and PTVconv (χ2=–3.18, –2.98, and –3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002 for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The difference between the degree of inclusion of PTV4D in PTV3D and that of PTV4D in PTVconv was <2% for all groups. Compared with PTVconv, the amount of irradiated normal tissue

  17. Quantum corrections to ward identities of chronological AVV- and AAA-current correlators for nondegenerate many-fermion systems in the four-dimensional world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucheryavij, V.Yi.

    1994-01-01

    The explicit form of nontrivial quantum corrections to Ward identities for AVV- and AAA-current correlators in the four-dimensional world for nondegenerate many-fermion systems of general type is obtained. The characteristics of all nontrivial quantum corrections for nondegenerate two-flavour fermion systems are classified and described. In particular, the well-known results follow from ours for the trivial quantum corrections (anomalies) in the case of the degenerate spectrum of fermion masses

  18. Four-dimensional data coupled to alternating weighted residue constraint quadrilinear decomposition model applied to environmental analysis: Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Shutao; Cui, Yaoyao; Wang, Yutian; Liu, Lingfei; Yang, Zhe

    2018-03-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was carried out by three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy combining with Alternating Weighted Residue Constraint Quadrilinear Decomposition (AWRCQLD). The experimental subjects were acenaphthene (ANA) and naphthalene (NAP). Firstly, in order to solve the redundant information of the three-dimensional fluorescence spectral data, the wavelet transform was used to compress data in preprocessing. Then, the four-dimensional data was constructed by using the excitation-emission fluorescence spectra of different concentration PAHs. The sample data was obtained from three solvents that are methanol, ethanol and Ultra-pure water. The four-dimensional spectral data was analyzed by AWRCQLD, then the recovery rate of PAHs was obtained from the three solvents and compared respectively. On one hand, the results showed that PAHs can be measured more accurately by the high-order data, and the recovery rate was higher. On the other hand, the results presented that AWRCQLD can better reflect the superiority of four-dimensional algorithm than the second-order calibration and other third-order calibration algorithms. The recovery rate of ANA was 96.5% 103.3% and the root mean square error of prediction was 0.04 μgL- 1. The recovery rate of NAP was 96.7% 115.7% and the root mean square error of prediction was 0.06 μgL- 1.

  19. Ultrafast characterization of optoelectronic devices and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuemei

    The recent fast growth in high-speed electronics and optoelectronics has placed demanding requirements on testing tools. Electro-optic (EO) sampling is a well-established technique for characterization of high-speed electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits. However, with the progress in device miniaturization, lower power consumption (smaller signal), and higher throughput (higher clock rate), EO sampling also needs to be updated, accordingly, towards better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity, without speed sacrifice. In this thesis, a novel EO sampler with a single-crystal organic 4-dimethylamino-N-methy-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) as the EO sensor is developed. The system exhibits sub-picosecond temporal resolution, sub-millivolt sensitivity, and a 10-fold improvement on SNR, compared with its LiTaO3 counterpart. The success is attributed to the very high EO coefficient, the very low dielectric constant, and the fast response, coming from the major contribution of the pi-electrons in DAST. With the advance of ultrafast laser technology, low-noise and compact femtosecond fiber lasers have come to maturation and become light-source options for ultrafast metrology systems. We have successfully integrated a femtosecond erbium-doped-fiber laser into an EO sampler, making the system compact and very reliable. The fact that EO sampling is essentially an impulse-response measurement process, requires integration of ultrashort (sub-picosecond) impulse generation network with the device under test. We have implemented a reliable lift-off and transfer technique in order to obtain epitaxial-quality freestanding low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) thin-film photo-switches, which can be integrated with many substrates. The photoresponse of our freestanding LT-GaAs devices was thoroughly characterized with the help of our EO sampler. As fast as 360 fs full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and >1 V electrical pulses were obtained, with quantum efficiency

  20. Excited state electron and energy relays in supramolecular dinuclear complexes revealed by ultrafast optical and X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis schemes, experimental methods, NMR spectra, X-ray crystallographic information, emission spectra, cyclic voltammetry, electronic structure calculations, data analysis and numerical methods, and other additional figures. CCDC 1561879. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04055e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Lars; Hadt, Ryan G.; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Cunming

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of photoinduced electron and energy transfer in a family of tetrapyridophenazine-bridged heteroleptic homo- and heterodinuclear copper(i) bis(phenanthroline)/ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes were studied using ultrafast optical and multi-edge X-ray transient absorption spectroscopies. This work combines the synthesis of heterodinuclear Cu(i)–Ru(ii) analogs of the homodinuclear Cu(i)–Cu(i) targets with spectroscopic analysis and electronic structure calculations to first disentangle the dynamics at individual metal sites by taking advantage of the element and site specificity of X-ray absorption and theoretical methods. The excited state dynamical models developed for the heterodinuclear complexes are then applied to model the more challenging homodinuclear complexes. These results suggest that both intermetallic charge and energy transfer can be observed in an asymmetric dinuclear copper complex in which the ground state redox potentials of the copper sites are offset by only 310 meV. We also demonstrate the ability of several of these complexes to effectively and unidirectionally shuttle energy between different metal centers, a property that could be of great use in the design of broadly absorbing and multifunctional multimetallic photocatalysts. This work provides an important step toward developing both a fundamental conceptual picture and a practical experimental handle with which synthetic chemists, spectroscopists, and theoreticians may collaborate to engineer cheap and efficient photocatalytic materials capable of performing coulombically demanding chemical transformations. PMID:29629153

  1. Ultrafast collinear scattering and carrier multiplication in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brida, D; Tomadin, A; Manzoni, C; Kim, Y J; Lombardo, A; Milana, S; Nair, R R; Novoselov, K S; Ferrari, A C; Cerullo, G; Polini, M

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is emerging as a viable alternative to conventional optoelectronic, plasmonic and nanophotonic materials. The interaction of light with charge carriers creates an out-of-equilibrium distribution, which relaxes on an ultrafast timescale to a hot Fermi-Dirac distribution, that subsequently cools emitting phonons. Although the slower relaxation mechanisms have been extensively investigated, the initial stages still pose a challenge. Experimentally, they defy the resolution of most pump-probe setups, due to the extremely fast sub-100 fs carrier dynamics. Theoretically, massless Dirac fermions represent a novel many-body problem, fundamentally different from Schrödinger fermions. Here we combine pump-probe spectroscopy with a microscopic theory to investigate electron-electron interactions during the early stages of relaxation. We identify the mechanisms controlling the ultrafast dynamics, in particular the role of collinear scattering. This gives rise to Auger processes, including charge multiplication, which is key in photovoltage generation and photodetectors.

  2. Ultrafast dissociation: An unexpected tool for probing molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Paul; Miron, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultrafast dissociation has been investigated by means of XPS and mass spectrometry. ► The interplay between electron relaxation and molecular dynamics is evidenced. ► Extension toward polyatomics, clusters, adsorbed molecules is considered. ► Quantum effects (spectral hole, angular effects) evidence the molecular field anisotropy. -- Abstract: Ultrafast dissociation following core–shell excitation into an antibonding orbital led to the early observation in HBr of atomic Auger lines associated to the decay of dissociated excited atoms. The purpose of this article is to review the very large variety of systems where such a situation has been encountered, extending from simple diatomic molecules toward more complex systems like polyatomics, clusters, or adsorbed molecules. Interestingly, this phenomenon has revealed an extremely rich and powerful tool for probing nuclear dynamics and its subtle interplay with electron relaxation occurring on a comparable time scale. Consequently this review covers a surprisingly large period, starting in 1986 and still ongoing.

  3. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We...

  4. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Marcher

    1999-01-01

    In this work we present an experimental technique for investigating ultrafast carrier dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers at room temperature. These dynamics, influenced by carrier heating, spectral hole-burning and two-photon absorption, are very important for device applications in inf...

  5. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We elucid...

  6. Ultrafast optical switching in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurenko, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding research on photonic crystals is driven by potential applications in all-optical switches, optical computers, low-threshold lasers, and holographic data storage. The performance of such devices might surpass the speed of traditional electronics by several orders of magnitude and may result in a true revolution in nanotechnology. The heart of such devices would likely be an optical switching element. This thesis analyzes different regimes of ultrafast all-optical switchin...

  7. Ultrafast photoinduced charge separation in metal-semiconductor nanohybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongin, Denis; Shaviv, Ehud; Maioli, Paolo; Crut, Aurélien; Banin, Uri; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2012-08-28

    Hybrid nano-objects formed by two or more disparate materials are among the most promising and versatile nanosystems. A key parameter in their properties is interaction between their components. In this context we have investigated ultrafast charge separation in semiconductor-metal nanohybrids using a model system of gold-tipped CdS nanorods in a matchstick architecture. Experiments are performed using an optical time-resolved pump-probe technique, exciting either the semiconductor or the metal component of the particles, and probing the light-induced change of their optical response. Electron-hole pairs photoexcited in the semiconductor part of the nanohybrids are shown to undergo rapid charge separation with the electron transferred to the metal part on a sub-20 fs time scale. This ultrafast gold charging leads to a transient red-shift and broadening of the metal surface plasmon resonance, in agreement with results for free clusters but in contrast to observation for static charging of gold nanoparticles in liquid environments. Quantitative comparison with a theoretical model is in excellent agreement with the experimental results, confirming photoexcitation of one electron-hole pair per nanohybrid followed by ultrafast charge separation. The results also point to the utilization of such metal-semiconductor nanohybrids in light-harvesting applications and in photocatalysis.

  8. Ultrafast photoconductor detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davis, B.A.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment in which we used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When we irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped GaAs detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. We are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  9. Ultrafast photoconductive detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.; Davis, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the results of an experiment in which they used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When they irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped Ga/As detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response of was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. They are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  10. Ultrafast and ultrasensitive dielectric liquids/mixtures: Basic measurements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Faidas, H.; McCorkle, D.L.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1989-01-01

    Basic properties of cryogenic and room temperature dielectric liquids/mixtures with high electron yields (under irradiation by ionizing particles) and high excess electron drift velocities are discussed. A number of ultrafast and ultrasensitive liquid media -- appropriate for possible use in liquid-filled radiation detectors and other applications -- are identified. 44 refs., 12 figs

  11. Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezhil, Muthuveni; Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George; Bucci, M. Kara; Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 ± 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 ± 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 ± 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs

  12. Investigation of pancreas tumour movements and of their potential markers by four-dimensional scanography: implication for image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, F.; Yorke, E.; Davidson, M.; Zhang, Z.; Jackson, A.; Mageras, G.; Wu, A.; Goodman, K.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the study which aimed at quantifying pancreas tumour movements induced by breathing by using four-dimensional scanography, and at assessing the reliability of biliary prosthesis, of intra-tumor fiducials, and of an external maker as position markers of the gross tumour volume (GTV). The authors analyzed scanography images acquired during the simulation of 22 patients treated for locally advanced pancreas cancer by intensity-modulated conformational irradiation with respiratory gating. Average movements in different directions have measured. Respiratory gating limits the GTV movement amplitude by 40 to 60 per cent. GTV movements are in good correlation with that of biliary prostheses and intra-tumor fiducials. Short communication

  13. The end point of the first-order phase transition of the SU(2) gauge-Higgs model on a four-dimensional isotropic lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Y.; Csikor, F.; Fodor, Z.; Ukawa, A.

    1999-01-01

    We report results of a study of the end point of the electroweak phase transition of the SU(2) gauge-Higgs model defined on a four-dimensional isotropic lattice with N t = 2. Finite-size scaling study of Lee-Yang zeros yields λ c = 0.00116(16) for the end point. Combined with a zero-temperature measurement of Higgs and W boson masses, this leads to M H,c = 68.2 ± 6.6 GeV for the critical Higgs boson mass. An independent analysis of Binder cumulant gives a consistent value λ c = 0.00102(3) for the end point

  14. The four-dimensional non-uniform rational B-splines-based cardiac-torso phantom and its application in medical imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chongguo; Wu Dake; Lang Jinyi

    2008-01-01

    Simulation skill is playing an increasingly important role in medical imaging research. four-dimensional non-uniform rational B-splines-based cardiac-torso (4D NCAT) phantom is new tool for meoical imaging res catch and when combined with accurate models for the imaging process a wealth of realistic imaging data from subjects of various anatomies. Can be provided 4D NCAT phantoms have bend widely used in medical research such as SPECT, PET, CT and so on. 4D NCAT phantoms have also been used in inverse planning system of intensity modulated radiation therapy. (authors)

  15. Ultrafast MR Imaging in Pediatric Neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Smith, J.T.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic information obtained from ultrafast MR imaging with standard MR imaging techniques in pediatric neuroradiology. The goal was to judge whether ultrafast methods can be used to replace standard methods and reduce the need for sedation or general anesthesia as a result of the considerably shorter scan times. Material and Methods: Our prospective study involved 125 patients. Routine clinical imaging was performed along with two ultrafast methods. Single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) was used to give T2-weighted images and an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence to provide a T1-weighted images. The ultrafast images were presented to an experienced neuro radiologist who was also given the information present on the initial referral card. These reports based on the ultrafast images were then compared with the formal radiologic report made solely on the basis of the standard imaging. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity for ultrafast imaging when compared to the reference standard were 78% and 98% with positive and negative predictive values of 98% and 76%. Pathologies characterized by small areas of subtle T2 prolongation were difficult or impossible to see on the ultrafast images but otherwise they provided reliable information. Conclusions: This paper demonstrates that ultrafast MR imaging can diagnose many pediatric intracranial abnormalities as well as standard methods. Anatomic resolution limits its capacity to define subtle developmental anomalies and contrast resolution limitations of the ultrafast methods reduce the detection of pathology characterized by subtle T2 prolongation

  16. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens, E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.org, E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported.

  17. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported

  18. Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Murphy, Catherine [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Martin, Lane [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Our research program on Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces advanced understanding of the mesoscale science of heat conduction. At the length and time scales of atoms and atomic motions, energy is transported by interactions between single-particle and collective excitations. At macroscopic scales, entropy, temperature, and heat are the governing concepts. Key gaps in fundamental knowledge appear at the transitions between these two regimes. The transport of thermal energy at interfaces plays a pivotal role in these scientific issues. Measurements of heat transport with ultrafast time resolution are needed because picoseconds are the fundamental scales where the lack of equilibrium between various thermal excitations becomes a important factor in the transport physics. A critical aspect of our work has been the development of experimental methods and model systems that enabled more precise and sensitive investigations of nanoscale thermal transport.

  19. Ultrafast comparison of personal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Mauldin, Denise; Hood, Leroy; Robinson, Max; Glusman, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    We present an ultra-fast method for comparing personal genomes. We transform the standard genome representation (lists of variants relative to a reference) into 'genome fingerprints' that can be readily compared across sequencing technologies and reference versions. Because of their reduced size, computation on the genome fingerprints is fast and requires little memory. This enables scaling up a variety of important genome analyses, including quantifying relatedness, recognizing duplicative s...

  20. Study of fission dynamics of the excited nuclei produced in fusion reactions in the framework of the four-dimensional Langevin equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslamizadeh, H. [Persian Gulf University, Department of Physics, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of fission of excited nuclei has been studied by solving four-dimensional Langevin equations with dissipation generated through the chaos-weighted wall and window friction formula. The projection of the total spin of the compound nucleus to the symmetry axis, K, was considered as the fourth dimension in Langevin dynamical calculations. The average pre-scission neutron multiplicities, mean kinetic energy of fission fragments and the variances of the mass and kinetic energy have been calculated in a wide range of fissile parameter for compound nuclei {sup 162}Yb, {sup 172}Yb, {sup 215}Fr, {sup 224}Th, {sup 248}Cf, {sup 260}Rf and results compared with the experimental data. Calculations were performed with a constant dissipation coefficient of K, {sub γK} (MeV zs){sup -1/2}, and with a non-constant dissipation coefficient. Comparison of the theoretical results for the average pre-scission neutron multiplicities, mean kinetic energy of fission fragments and the variances of the mass and kinetic energy with the experimental data showed that the results of four-dimensional Langevin equations with a non-constant dissipation coefficient are in better agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, the difference between the results of two models for compound nuclei with low fissile parameter is low whereas, for heavy compound nuclei, is high. (orig.)

  1. Unified treatment of complete orthonormal sets for wave functions, and Slater orbitals of particles with arbitrary spin in coordinate, momentum and four-dimensional spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseinov, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    The new analytical relations of complete orthonormal sets for the tensor wave functions and the tensor Slater orbitals of particles with arbitrary spin in coordinate, momentum and four-dimensional spaces are derived using the properties of tensor spherical harmonics and complete orthonormal scalar basis sets of ψ α -exponential type orbitals, φ α -momentum space orbitals and z α -hyperspherical harmonics introduced by the author for particles with spin s=0, where the α=1,0,-1,-2,.... All of the tensor wave functions obtained are complete without the inclusion of the continuum and, therefore, their group of transformations is the four-dimensional rotation group O(4). The analytical formulas in coordinate space are also derived for the overlap integrals over tensor Slater orbitals with the same screening constant. We notice that the new idea presented in this work is the combination of tensor spherical harmonics of rank s with complete orthonormal scalar sets for radial parts of ψ α -, φ α - and z α -orbitals, where s=1/2,1,3/2,2,...

  2. Nonlinear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a four-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floberg, J M; Holden, J E

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines four-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established three and four-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications. (paper)

  3. Gauge constructs and immersions of four-dimensional spacetimes in (4 + k)-dimensional flat spaces: algebraic evaluation of gravity fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelen, Dominic G B

    2003-01-01

    Local action of the fundamental group SO(a, 4 + k - a) is used to show that any solution of an algebraically closed differential system, that is generated from matrix Lie algebra valued 1-forms on a four-dimensional parameter space, will generate families of immersions of four-dimensional spacetimes R 4 in flat (4 + k)-dimensional spaces M 4+k with compatible signature. The algorithm is shown to work with local action of SO(a, 4 + k - a) replaced by local action of GL(4 + k). Immersions generated by local action of the Poincare group on the target spacetime are also obtained. Evaluations of the line elements, immersion loci and connection and curvature forms of these immersions are algebraic. Families of immersions that depend on one or more arbitrary functions are calculated for 1 ≤ k ≤ 4. Appropriate sections of graphs of the conformal factor for two and three interacting line singularities immersed in M 6 are given in appendix A. The local immersion theorem given in appendix B shows that all local solutions of the immersion problem are obtained by use of this method and an algebraic extension in exceptional cases

  4. Ultrafast Hierarchical OTDM/WDM Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Sotobayashi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast hierarchical OTDM/WDM network is proposed for the future core-network. We review its enabling technologies: C- and L-wavelength-band generation, OTDM-WDM mutual multiplexing format conversions, and ultrafast OTDM wavelengthband conversions.

  5. Avant-Garde Ultrafast Laser Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazansky P. G.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast laser processing of transparent materials reveals new phenomena. Reviewed, are recent demonstrations of 5D optical memory, vortex polarization and Airy beam converters employing self-assembled nanostructuring, ultrafast laser calligraphy and polarization writing control using pulses with tilted front.

  6. Ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecule organic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Kendall Laine

    As research in the field of ultrafast optics has produced shorter and shorter pulses, at an ever-widening range of frequencies, ultrafast spectroscopy has grown correspondingly. In particular, ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy allows direct observation of electrons in transient or excited states, regardless of the eventual relaxation mechanisms. High-harmonic conversion of 800nm, femtosecond, Ti:sapphire laser pulses allows excite/probe spectroscopy down into atomic core level states. To this end, an ultrafast, X-UV photoelectron spectroscopic system is described, including design considerations for the high-harmonic generation line, the time of flight detector, and the subsequent data collection electronics. Using a similar experimental setup, I have performed several ultrafast, photoelectron excited state decay studies at the IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center. All of the observed materials were electroluminescent thin film organics, which have applications as the emitter layer in organic light emitting devices. The specific materials discussed are: Alq, BAlq, DPVBi, and Alq doped with DCM or DMQA. Alq:DCM is also known to lase at low photoexcitation thresholds. A detailed understanding of the involved relaxation mechanisms is beneficial to both applications. Using 3.14 eV excite, and 26.7 eV probe, 90 fs laser pulses, we have observed the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) decay rate over the first 200 picoseconds. During this time, diffusion is insignificant, and all dynamics occur in the absence of electron transport. With excitation intensities in the range of 100μJ/cm2, we have modeled the Alq, BAlq, and DPVBi decays via bimolecular singlet-singlet annihilation. At similar excitations, we have modeled the Alq:DCM decay via Förster transfer, stimulated emission, and excimeric formation. Furthermore, the Alq:DCM occupied to unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap was seen to shrink as a function of excite-to-probe delay, in accordance with the

  7. Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, Nora [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-10-13

    This grant supported a Single Investigator and Small Group Research (SISGR) application to enable multi-user research in Ultrafast Science using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray free electron laser (FEL) which lased for the first time at 1.5 Å on April 20, 2009. The goal of our proposal was to enable a New Era of Science by requesting funds to purchase and build Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science (AIUS), to utilize the intense, short x-ray pulses produced by the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will allow peer review selected users to probe the ultrasmall and capture the ultrafast. These tools will expand on the investment already made in the construction of the light source and its instrumentation in both the LCLS and LUSI projects. The AIUS will provide researchers in the AMO, Chemical, Biological and Condensed Matter communities with greater flexibility in defining their scientific agenda at the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will complement and significantly augment the present AMO instrument (funded through the LCLS project) through detectors and capabilities not included in the initial suite of instrumentation at the facility. We have built all of the instrumentations and they have been utilized by scientists. Please see report attached.

  8. Four-dimensional (4D) flow of the whole heart and great vessels using real-time respiratory self-gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uribe, Sergio; Beerbaum, Philipp; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2009-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) flow imaging has been used to study flow patterns and pathophysiology, usually focused on specific thoracic vessels and cardiac chambers. Whole-heart 4D flow at high measurement accuracy covering the entire thoracic cardiovascular system would be desirable to simplify...... and improve hemodynamic assessment. This has been a challenge because compensation of respiratory motion is difficult to achieve, but it is paramount to limit artifacts and improve accuracy. In this work we propose a self-gating technique for respiratory motion-compensation integrated into a whole-heart 4D...... flow acquisition that overcomes these challenges. Flow components are measured in all three directions for each pixel over the complete cardiac cycle, and 1D volume projections are obtained at certain time intervals for respiratory gating in real time during the acquisition. The technique was tested...

  9. Compression of Ultrafast Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Copyright 2003, AIP Publishing LLC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1611998.) When designing the pulse shaper, the laser beam must completely fill the...for the design of future versions of this device. The easiest way to align the pulse shaper is to use the laser beam that will be shaped, without...Afterward, an ultrafast thin beam splitter is placed into the system after the diameter of the laser beam is reduced; this is done to monitor the beam

  10. Solitons in four dimensional gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, T.

    1990-01-01

    An alternative method to solve the Chiral equations with SL (2,R) symmetry is developed. One gets the N-soliton solution using the Neugebauer Ansatz. For N = 1 one obtains the Backlund transformation of the Chiral equations. From the application of this transformation for the flat seed solution one finds the Kerr-NUT solution. This method can be applied to generate solutions of the n-dimensional Einstein equations (Author)

  11. Four-Dimensional Golden Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-25

    The Golden search technique is a method to search a multiple-dimension space to find the minimum. It basically subdivides the possible ranges of parameters until it brackets, to within an arbitrarily small distance, the minimum. It has the advantages that (1) the function to be minimized can be non-linear, (2) it does not require derivatives of the function, (3) the convergence criterion does not depend on the magnitude of the function. Thus, if the function is a goodness of fit parameter such as chi-square, the convergence does not depend on the noise being correctly estimated or the function correctly following the chi-square statistic. And, (4) the convergence criterion does not depend on the shape of the function. Thus, long shallow surfaces can be searched without the problem of premature convergence. As with many methods, the Golden search technique can be confused by surfaces with multiple minima.

  12. Four-dimensional superstring models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykken, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    These five lectures give an elementary introduction to perturbative superstring theory, superstring phenomenology, and the fermionic construction of perturbative string models. These lectures assume no prior knowledge of string theory. (author) string theory. (author)

  13. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R and D topics are discussed. -- Highlights: •We are proposing thin pixel silicon sensors with 10's of picoseconds time resolution. •Fast charge collection is coupled with internal charge multiplication. •The truly 4-D sensors will revolutionize imaging and particle counting in many applications.

  14. Low damage electrical modification of 4H-SiC via ultrafast laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minhyung; Cahyadi, Rico; Wendorf, Joseph; Bowen, Willie; Torralva, Ben; Yalisove, Steven; Phillips, Jamie

    2018-04-01

    The electrical properties of 4H-SiC under ultrafast laser irradiation in the low fluence regime (engineering spatially localized structural and electronic modification of wide bandgap materials such as 4H-SiC with relatively low surface damage via low temperature processing.

  15. Ultrafast, 2 min synthesis of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (d < 2 nm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew N.; Li, Dawei; Dass, Amala; Eah, Sang-Kee

    2012-06-01

    An ultrafast synthesis method is presented for hexanethiolate-coated gold nanoclusters (d gold nanoclusters are separated from the reaction byproducts fast and easily without any need for post-synthesis cleaning.An ultrafast synthesis method is presented for hexanethiolate-coated gold nanoclusters (d gold nanoclusters are separated from the reaction byproducts fast and easily without any need for post-synthesis cleaning. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details of gold nanocluster synthesis and mass-spectrometry. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30890h

  16. Linear and ultrafast nonlinear plasmonics of single nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Vallée, Fabrice; Del Fatti, Natalia

    2017-03-01

    Single-particle optical investigations have greatly improved our understanding of the fundamental properties of nano-objects, avoiding the spurious inhomogeneous effects that affect ensemble experiments. Correlation with high-resolution imaging techniques providing morphological information (e.g. electron microscopy) allows a quantitative interpretation of the optical measurements by means of analytical models and numerical simulations. In this topical review, we first briefly recall the principles underlying some of the most commonly used single-particle optical techniques: near-field, dark-field, spatial modulation and photothermal microscopies/spectroscopies. We then focus on the quantitative investigation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of metallic nano-objects using linear and ultrafast optical techniques. While measured SPR positions and spectral areas are found in good agreement with predictions based on Maxwell’s equations, SPR widths are strongly influenced by quantum confinement (or, from a classical standpoint, surface-induced electron scattering) and, for small nano-objects, cannot be reproduced using the dielectric functions of bulk materials. Linear measurements on single nano-objects (silver nanospheres and gold nanorods) allow a quantification of the size and geometry dependences of these effects in confined metals. Addressing the ultrafast response of an individual nano-object is also a powerful tool to elucidate the physical mechanisms at the origin of their optical nonlinearities, and their electronic, vibrational and thermal relaxation processes. Experimental investigations of the dynamical response of gold nanorods are shown to be quantitatively modeled in terms of modifications of the metal dielectric function enhanced by plasmonic effects. Ultrafast spectroscopy can also be exploited to unveil hidden physical properties of more complex nanosystems. In this context, two-color femtosecond pump-probe experiments performed on individual

  17. Quantum Hooke's Law to Classify Pulse Laser Induced Ultrafast Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a ``super pressing'' state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  18. Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy of Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P.; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2018-06-01

    Ongoing developments in ultrafast x-ray sources offer powerful new means of probing the complex nonadiabatically coupled structural and electronic dynamics of photoexcited molecules. These non-Born-Oppenheimer effects are governed by general electronic degeneracies termed conical intersections, which play a key role, analogous to that of a transition state, in the electronic-nuclear dynamics of excited molecules. Using high-level ab initio quantum dynamics simulations, we studied time-resolved x-ray absorption (TRXAS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) of the prototypical unsaturated organic chromophore, ethylene, following excitation to its S2(π π*) state. The TRXAS, in particular, is highly sensitive to all aspects of the ensuing dynamics. These x-ray spectroscopies provide a clear signature of the wave packet dynamics near conical intersections, related to charge localization effects driven by the nuclear dynamics. Given the ubiquity of charge localization in excited state dynamics, we believe that ultrafast x-ray spectroscopies offer a unique and powerful route to the direct observation of dynamics around conical intersections.

  19. Ultrafast dynamics during the photoinduced phase transition in VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegkamp, Daniel; Stähler, Julia

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition of VO2 from a monoclinic insulator to a rutile metal, which occurs thermally at TC = 340 K, can also be driven by strong photoexcitation. The ultrafast dynamics during this photoinduced phase transition (PIPT) have attracted great scientific attention for decades, as this approach promises to answer the question of whether the insulator-to-metal (IMT) transition is caused by electronic or crystallographic processes through disentanglement of the different contributions in the time domain. We review our recent results achieved by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron, optical, and coherent phonon spectroscopy and discuss them within the framework of a selection of latest, complementary studies of the ultrafast PIPT in VO2. We show that the population change of electrons and holes caused by photoexcitation launches a highly non-equilibrium plasma phase characterized by enhanced screening due to quasi-free carriers and followed by two branches of non-equilibrium dynamics: (i) an instantaneous (within the time resolution) collapse of the insulating gap that precedes charge carrier relaxation and significant ionic motion and (ii) an instantaneous lattice potential symmetry change that represents the onset of the crystallographic phase transition through ionic motion on longer timescales. We discuss the interconnection between these two non-thermal pathways with particular focus on the meaning of the critical fluence of the PIPT in different types of experiments. Based on this, we conclude that the PIPT threshold identified in optical experiments is most probably determined by the excitation density required to drive the lattice potential change rather than the IMT. These considerations suggest that the IMT can be driven by weaker excitation, predicting a transiently metallic, monoclinic state of VO2 that is not stabilized by the non-thermal structural transition and, thus, decays on ultrafast timescales.

  20. Nonponderomotive electron acceleration in ultrashort surface-plasmon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, Peter; Dombi, Peter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Konkoly-Thege M. ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the nonponderomotive nature of ultrafast plasmonic electron acceleration in strongly decaying electromagnetic fields generated by few-cycle and single-cycle femtosecond laser pulses. We clearly identify the conditions contributing to nonponderomotive acceleration and establish fundamental scaling laws and carrier-envelope phase effects. These all-optically accelerated compact, femtosecond electron sources can be utilized in contemporary ultrafast methods.

  1. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2016-05-26

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  2. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya; Bera, Ashok; Parida, Manas R.; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Wu, Tao; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  3. A four dimensional separation method based on continuous heart-cutting gas chromatography with ion mobility and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipok, Christian; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2018-02-09

    A two-dimensional GC (2D-GC) method was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high resolution mass spectrometer, which enables the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-GC, ion mobilility spectrometry and mass spectrometry). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting GC-system (GC+GC), using a long modulation time of 20s, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first dimension peaks to the second dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Calendula officinales shows the separation power of this four dimensional separation method. The introduction of ion mobility spectrometry provides an additional separation dimension and allows to determine collision cross sections (CCS) of the analytes as a further physicochemical constant supporting the identification. A CCS database with more than 800 standard substances including drug-like compounds and pesticides was used for CCS data base search in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of four-dimensional echocardiography with high-definition flow imaging and spatiotemporal image correlation in detecting fetal pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Zhang, Ying; Fan, Miao; Wang, Yu; Wang, Meilian; Siddiqui, Faiza Amber; Sun, Wei; Sun, Feifei; Zhang, Dongyu; Lei, Wenjia; Hu, Guyue

    2017-06-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal total anomalous pulmonary vein connection (TAPVC) remains challenging for most screening sonographers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of four-dimensional echocardiography with high-definition flow imaging and spatiotemporal image correlation (4D-HDFI) in identifying pulmonary veins in normal and TAPVC fetuses. We retrospectively reviewed and performed 4D-HDFI in 204 normal and 12 fetuses with confirmed diagnosis of TAPVC. Cardiac volumes were available for postanalysis to obtain 4D-rendered images of the pulmonary veins. For the normal fetuses, two other traditional modalities including color Doppler and HDFI were used to detect the number of pulmonary veins and comparisons were made between each of these traditional methods and 4D-HDFI. For conventional echocardiography, HDFI modality was superior to color Doppler in detecting more pulmonary veins in normal fetuses throughout the gestational period. 4D-HDFI was the best method during the second trimester of pregnancy in identifying normal fetal pulmonary veins. 4D-HDFI images vividly depicted the figure, course, and drainage of pulmonary veins in both normal and TAPVC fetuses. HDFI and the advanced 4D-HDFI technique could facilitate identification of the anatomical features of pulmonary veins in both normal and TAPVC fetuses; 4D-HDFI therefore provides additional and more precise information than conventional echocardiography techniques. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Speed and amplitude of lung tumor motion precisely detected in four-dimensional setup and in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Fujita, Katsuhisa R.T.; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Kato, Norio; Osaka, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Background: To reduce the uncertainty of registration for lung tumors, we have developed a four-dimensional (4D) setup system using a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: During treatment planning and daily setup in the treatment room, the trajectory of the internal fiducial marker was recorded for 1 to 2 min at the rate of 30 times per second by the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. To maximize gating efficiency, the patient's position on the treatment couch was adjusted using the 4D setup system with fine on-line remote control of the treatment couch. Results: The trajectory of the marker detected in the 4D setup system was well visualized and used for daily setup. Various degrees of interfractional and intrafractional changes in the absolute amplitude and speed of the internal marker were detected. Readjustments were necessary during each treatment session, prompted by baseline shifting of the tumor position. Conclusion: The 4D setup system was shown to be useful for reducing the uncertainty of tumor motion and for increasing the efficiency of gated irradiation. Considering the interfractional and intrafractional changes in speed and amplitude detected in this study, intercepting radiotherapy is the safe and cost-effective method for 4D radiotherapy using real-time tracking technology

  6. Dimensional Reduction of N=1, E_8 SYM over SU(3)/U(1) x U(1) x Z_3 and its four-dimensional effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Irges, Nikos; Zoupanos, George

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the Standard Model inspired by the E_8 x E_8 Heterotic String. In order that a reasonable effective Lagrangian is presented we neglect everything else other than the ten-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills sector associated with one of the gauge factors and certain couplings necessary for anomaly cancellation. We consider a compactified space-time M_4 x B_0 / Z_3, where B_0 is the nearly-Kaehler manifold SU(3)/U(1) x U(1) and Z_3 is a freely acting discrete group on B_0. Then we reduce dimensionally the E_8 on this manifold and we employ the Wilson flux mechanism leading in four dimensions to an SU(3)^3 gauge theory with the spectrum of a N=1 supersymmetric theory. We compute the effective four-dimensional Lagrangian and demonstrate that an extension of the Standard Model is obtained with interesting features including a conserved baryon number and fixed tree level Yukawa couplings and scalar potential. The spectrum contains new states such as right handed neutrinos and heavy ...

  7. Four-dimensional real-time sonographically guided cauterization of the umbilical cord in a case of twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timor-Tritsch, Ilan E; Rebarber, Andrei; MacKenzie, Andrew; Caglione, Christopher F; Young, Bruce K

    2003-07-01

    In the past decade, three-dimensional (3D) sonographic technology has matured from a static imaging modality to near-real-time imaging. One of the more notable improvements in this technology has been the speed with which the imaged volume is acquired and displayed. This has enabled the birth of the near-real-time or four-dimensional (4D) sonographic concept. Using the 4D feature of the current 3D sonography machines allows us to follow moving structures, such as fetal motion, in almost real time. Shortly after the emergence of 3D and 4D technology as a clinical imaging tool, its use in guiding needles into structures was explored by other investigators. We present a case in which we used the 4D feature of our sonographic equipment to follow the course and motion of an instrument inserted into the uterus to occlude the umbilical cord of a fetus in a case of twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

  8. Fetal cardiac stroke volume determination by four-dimensional ultrasound with spatio-temporal image correlation compared with two-dimensional and Doppler ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Giuseppe; Capponi, Alessandra; Cavicchioni, Ottavia; Vendola, Marianne; Arduini, Domenico

    2007-12-01

    To assess the agreement of stroke volume (SV) measured with two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography with Doppler capability (vs) four-dimensional (4D) with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) in normal and growth restricted fetuses. 2D Doppler and 4D STIC were used to measure SV of 40 normal fetuses at 20 to 22 and 28 to 32 weeks, and 16 growth-restricted fetuses at 26 to 34 weeks of gestation. Intraclass correlation was used to evaluate the agreement between left and right SV obtained by the two techniques, and proportionate Bland-Altman plots constructed. The time necessary to obtain SV was analyzed. The intraclass correlation coefficient between 2D Doppler and 4D STIC measurements for the left ventricle were 0.977 and 0.980 for the right ventricle. The proportionate limits of agreement between the two methods were 18.7 to 23.9% for the left ventricle and - 20.9 to 21.7% for the right ventricle. The time necessary to measure SV was significantly shorter with 4D STIC (3.1 (vs) 7.9 min p < 0.0001) than with 2D Doppler. There is a good agreement between SV measured either by 2D Doppler or by 4D STIC. The 4D STIC represents a simple and rapid technique to estimate fetal SV and promises to become the method of choice. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) in the evaluation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas: comparison with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and surgical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zebin; Zheng, Yingyan; Li, Jian; Chen, Dehua; Liu, Fang; Cao, Dairong

    2017-12-01

    To explore the value of four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) in the preoperative evaluation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) using 320-row volume CT. 4D-CTA and DSA data of 18 patients with histopathologically proven JNAs were retrospectively reviewed. The location, extent, feeding vessels and stage of JNAs were assessed by two radiologists independently and blindly. The agreements between both reviewers and between 4D-CTA and surgical findings for assessing the above indicators were analysed, respectively. The radiation dose and the number of feeding arteries between 4D-CTA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were also compared. 4D-CTA showed high diagnostic consistency with surgical pathology for JNAs with consistent rates of 96.2 and 100% in both reviewers, respectively. The effective dose of 4D-CTA was significantly less than that of DSA (p 0.05). 4D-CTA can provide a reliable preoperative diagnosis and assessment of JNAs, which is useful for determining the surgical strategy and management of this condition.

  10. Ultrafast magnon generation in an Fe film on Cu(100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A B; Pickel, M; Donath, M; Buczek, P; Ernst, A; Zhukov, V P; Echenique, P M; Sandratskii, L M; Chulkov, E V; Weinelt, M

    2010-11-05

    We report on a combined experimental and theoretical study of the spin-dependent relaxation processes in the electron system of an iron film on Cu(100). Spin-, time-, energy- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission shows a strong characteristic dependence of the lifetime of photoexcited electrons on their spin and energy. Ab initio calculations as well as a many-body treatment corroborate that the observed properties are determined by relaxation processes involving magnon emission. Thereby we demonstrate that magnon emission by hot electrons occurs on the femtosecond time scale and thus provides a significant source of ultrafast spin-flip processes. Furthermore, engineering of the magnon spectrum paves the way for tuning the dynamic properties of magnetic materials.

  11. Ultrafast stimulated Raman spectroscopy in the near-infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    A number of electronic transitions in the near-infrared wavelength region are associated with migration or delocalization of electrons in large molecules or molecular systems. Time-resolved near-infrared Raman spectroscopy will be a powerful tool for investigating the structural dynamic of samples with delocalized electrons. However, the sensitivity of near-infrared spontaneous Raman spectrometers is significantly low due to an extremely small probability of Raman scattering and a low sensitivity of near-infrared detectors. Nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is one of the techniques that can overcome the sensitivity problems and enable us to obtain time-resolved Raman spectra in resonance with near-IR transitions. In this article, the author introduces recent progress of ultrafast time-resolved near-infrared stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Optical setup, spectral and temporal resolution, and applications of the spectrometer are described. (author)

  12. Robust Stacking-Independent Ultrafast Charge Transfer in MoS2/WS2 Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ziheng; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Wei; Cao, Ting; Qiao, Ruixi; Liu, Can; Liang, Jing; Jin, Chuanhong; Jiao, Liying; Shi, Kebin; Meng, Sheng; Liu, Kaihui

    2017-12-26

    Van der Waals-coupled two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures have attracted great attention recently due to their high potential in the next-generation photodetectors and solar cells. The understanding of charge-transfer process between adjacent atomic layers is the key to design optimal devices as it directly determines the fundamental response speed and photon-electron conversion efficiency. However, general belief and theoretical studies have shown that the charge transfer behavior depends sensitively on interlayer configurations, which is difficult to control accurately, bringing great uncertainties in device designing. Here we investigate the ultrafast dynamics of interlayer charge transfer in a prototype heterostructure, the MoS 2 /WS 2 bilayer with various stacking configurations, by optical two-color ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Surprisingly, we found that the charge transfer is robust against varying interlayer twist angles and interlayer coupling strength, in time scale of ∼90 fs. Our observation, together with atomic-resolved transmission electron characterization and time-dependent density functional theory simulations, reveals that the robust ultrafast charge transfer is attributed to the heterogeneous interlayer stretching/sliding, which provides additional channels for efficient charge transfer previously unknown. Our results elucidate the origin of transfer rate robustness against interlayer stacking configurations in optical devices based on 2D heterostructures, facilitating their applications in ultrafast and high-efficient optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices in the near future.

  13. PREFACE: Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials—single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene, in particular—have emerged in the last decade as novel low-dimensional systems with extraordinary properties. Because they are direct-bandgap systems, SWCNTs are one of the leading candidates to unify electronic and optical functions in nanoscale circuitry; their diameter-dependent bandgaps can be utilized for multi-wavelength devices. Graphene's ultrahigh carrier mobilities are promising for high-frequency electronic devices, while, at the same time, it is predicted to have ideal properties for terahertz generation and detection due to its unique zero-gap, zero-mass band structure. There have been a large number of basic optical studies on these materials, but most of them were performed in the weak-excitation, quasi-equilibrium regime. In order to probe and assess their performance characteristics as optoelectronic materials under device-operating conditions, it is crucial to strongly drive them and examine their optical properties in highly non-equilibrium situations and with ultrashot time resolution. In this section, the reader will find the latest results in this rapidly growing field of research. We have assembled contributions from some of the leading experts in ultrafast and nonlinear optical spectroscopy of carbon-based nanomaterials. Specific topics featured include: thermalization, cooling, and recombination dynamics of photo-generated carriers; stimulated emission, gain, and amplification; ultrafast photoluminescence; coherent phonon dynamics; exciton-phonon and exciton-plasmon interactions; exciton-exciton annihilation and Auger processes; spontaneous and stimulated emission of terahertz radiation; four-wave mixing and harmonic generation; ultrafast photocurrents; the AC Stark and Franz-Keldysh effects; and non-perturbative light-mater coupling. We would like to express our sincere thanks to those who contributed their latest results to this special section, and the

  14. Ultrafast demagnetization enhancement in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction driven by spin tunneling current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Yang, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-10-07

    The laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction is exploited by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TRMOKE) for both the parallel state (P state) and the antiparallel state (AP state) of the magnetizations between two magnetic layers. It was observed that the demagnetization time is shorter and the magnitude of demagnetization is larger in the AP state than those in the P state. These behaviors are attributed to the ultrafast spin transfer between two CoFeB layers via the tunneling of hot electrons through the MgO barrier. Our observation indicates that ultrafast demagnetization can be engineered by the hot electrons tunneling current. It opens the door to manipulate the ultrafast spin current in magnetic tunneling junctions.

  15. Unlocking the Constraints of Cyanobacterial Productivity: Acclimations Enabling Ultrafast Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; McClure, Ryan S.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Romine, Margie F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Konopka, Allan E.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-07-26

    ABSTRACT

    Harnessing the metabolic potential of photosynthetic microbes for next-generation biotechnology objectives requires detailed scientific understanding of the physiological constraints and regulatory controls affecting carbon partitioning between biomass, metabolite storage pools, and bioproduct synthesis. We dissected the cellular mechanisms underlying the remarkable physiological robustness of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacteriumSynechococcussp. strain PCC 7002 (Synechococcus7002) and identify key mechanisms that allow cyanobacteria to achieve unprecedented photoautotrophic productivities (~2.5-h doubling time). Ultrafast growth ofSynechococcus7002 was supported by high rates of photosynthetic electron transfer and linked to significantly elevated transcription of precursor biosynthesis and protein translation machinery. Notably, no growth or photosynthesis inhibition signatures were observed under any of the tested experimental conditions. Finally, the ultrafast growth inSynechococcus7002 was also linked to a 300% expansion of average cell volume. We hypothesize that this cellular adaptation is required at high irradiances to support higher cell division rates and reduce deleterious effects, corresponding to high light, through increased carbon and reductant sequestration.

    IMPORTANCEEfficient coupling between photosynthesis and productivity is central to the development of biotechnology based on solar energy. Therefore, understanding the factors constraining maximum rates of carbon processing is necessary to identify regulatory mechanisms and devise strategies to overcome productivity constraints. Here, we interrogate the molecular mechanisms that operate at a systems level to allow cyanobacteria to achieve ultrafast growth. This was done by considering growth and photosynthetic kinetics with global transcription patterns. We have delineated

  16. Comparison of IGRT Registration Strategies for Optimal Coverage of Primary Lung Tumors and Involved Nodes Based on Multiple Four-Dimensional CT Scans Obtained Throughout the Radiotherapy Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Shah, Chirag; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Yan, Di; Ionascu, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of primary tumor and involved lymph node (LN) geometry (centroid, shape, volume) on internal target volume (ITV) throughout treatment for locally advanced non–small cell lung cancer using weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer were treated using image-guided radiotherapy with acquisition of weekly 10-Phase 4DCTs (n = 51). Initial ITV was based on planning 4DCT. Master-ITV incorporated target geometry across the entire treatment (all 4DCTs). Geographic miss was defined as the % Master-ITV positioned outside of the initial planning ITV after registration is complete. Registration strategies considered were bony (B), primary tumor soft tissue alone (T), and registration based on primary tumor and involved LNs (T L N). Results: The % geographic miss for the primary tumor, mediastinal, and hilar lymph nodes based on each registration strategy were (1) B: 30%, 30%, 30%; (2) T: 21%, 40%, 36%; and (3) T L N: 26%, 26%, 27%. Mean geographic expansions to encompass 100% of the primary tumor and involved LNs were 1.2 ± 0.7 cm and 0.8 ± 0.3 cm, respectively, for B and T L N. Primary and involved LN expansions were 0.7 ± 0.5 cm and 1.1 ± 0.5 cm for T. Conclusion: T is best for solitary targets. When treatments include primary tumor and LNs, B and T L N provide more comprehensive geographic coverage. We have identified high % geographic miss when considering multiple registration strategies. The dosimetric implications are the subject of future study.

  17. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  18. Comparison of IGRT Registration Strategies for Optimal Coverage of Primary Lung Tumors and Involved Nodes Based on Multiple Four-Dimensional CT Scans Obtained Throughout the Radiotherapy Course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Shah, Chirag; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Yan, Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ionascu, Dan, E-mail: Dan.ionascu@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of primary tumor and involved lymph node (LN) geometry (centroid, shape, volume) on internal target volume (ITV) throughout treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer using weekly four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer were treated using image-guided radiotherapy with acquisition of weekly 10-Phase 4DCTs (n = 51). Initial ITV was based on planning 4DCT. Master-ITV incorporated target geometry across the entire treatment (all 4DCTs). Geographic miss was defined as the % Master-ITV positioned outside of the initial planning ITV after registration is complete. Registration strategies considered were bony (B), primary tumor soft tissue alone (T), and registration based on primary tumor and involved LNs (T{sub L}N). Results: The % geographic miss for the primary tumor, mediastinal, and hilar lymph nodes based on each registration strategy were (1) B: 30%, 30%, 30%; (2) T: 21%, 40%, 36%; and (3) T{sub L}N: 26%, 26%, 27%. Mean geographic expansions to encompass 100% of the primary tumor and involved LNs were 1.2 {+-} 0.7 cm and 0.8 {+-} 0.3 cm, respectively, for B and T{sub L}N. Primary and involved LN expansions were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 cm and 1.1 {+-} 0.5 cm for T. Conclusion: T is best for solitary targets. When treatments include primary tumor and LNs, B and T{sub L}N provide more comprehensive geographic coverage. We have identified high % geographic miss when considering multiple registration strategies. The dosimetric implications are the subject of future study.

  19. Four-dimensional measurement of the displacement of internal fiducial and skin markers during 320-multislice computed tomography scanning of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Okuma, Kae; Tada, Keiichiro; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Shibata-Mobayashi, Shino; Sakumi, Akira; Saotome, Naoya; Haga, Akihiro; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-10-01

    To study the three-dimensional movement of internal tumor bed fiducial and breast skin markers, using 320-multislice computed tomography (CT); and to analyze intrafractional errors for breast cancer patients undergoing breast irradiation. This study examined 280 markers on the skin of the breast (200 markers) and on the primary tumor bed (80 markers) of 20 patients treated by external-beam photon radiotherapy. Motion assessment was analyzed in 41 respiratory phases during 20 s of cine CT in the radiotherapy position. To assess intrafractional errors resulting from respiratory motion, four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for 20 patients. Motion in the anterior-posterior (A/P) and superior-inferior (S/I) directions showed a strong correlation (|r| > 0.7) with the respiratory curve for most markers (79% and 70%, respectively). The average marker displacements between maximum and minimum value during 20 s for the 200 breast skin metal markers were 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, 2.1 ± 0.6 mm, and 1.6 ± 0.4 mm in the left-right, A/P, and S/I directions, respectively. For the 80 tumor bed clips, displacements were 0.9 ± 0.2 mm in left-right, 1.7 ± 0.5 mm in A/P, and 1.1 ± 0.3 mm in S/I. There was no significant difference in the motion between breast quadrant regions or between the primary site and the other regions. Motion in primary breast tumors was evaluated with 320-multislice CT. Very little change was detected during individual radiation treatment fractions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning Based on Manual and Automatically Generated Contours Using Deformable Image Registration in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography of Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the implications of differences between contours drawn manually and contours generated automatically by deformable image registration for four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning. Methods and Materials: In 12 lung cancer patients intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning was performed for both manual contours and automatically generated ('auto') contours in mid and peak expiration of 4D computed tomography scans, with the manual contours in peak inspiration serving as the reference for the displacement vector fields. Manual and auto plans were analyzed with respect to their coverage of the manual contours, which were assumed to represent the anatomically correct volumes. Results: Auto contours were on average larger than manual contours by up to 9%. Objective scores, D 2% and D 98% of the planning target volume, homogeneity and conformity indices, and coverage of normal tissue structures (lungs, heart, esophagus, spinal cord) at defined dose levels were not significantly different between plans (p = 0.22-0.94). Differences were statistically insignificant for the generalized equivalent uniform dose of the planning target volume (p = 0.19-0.94) and normal tissue complication probabilities for lung and esophagus (p = 0.13-0.47). Dosimetric differences >2% or >1 Gy were more frequent in patients with auto/manual volume differences ≥10% (p = 0.04). Conclusions: The applied deformable image registration algorithm produces clinically plausible auto contours in the majority of structures. At this stage clinical supervision of the auto contouring process is required, and manual interventions may become necessary. Before routine use, further investigations are required, particularly to reduce imaging artifacts