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Sample records for fossil galaxy groups

  1. Radio properties of fossil galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    We study 1.4 GHz radio properties of a sample of fossil galaxy groups using GMRT radio observations and the FIRST survey catalog. Fossil galaxy groups, having no recent major mergers in their dominant galaxies and also group scale mergers, give us the opportunity to investigate the effect of galaxy merger on AGN activity. In this work, we compare the radio properties of a rich sample of fossil groups with a sample of normal galaxy groups and clusters and show that the brightest group galaxies in fossil groups are under luminous at 1.4 GHz, relative to the general population of the brightest group galaxies, indicating that the dynamically relaxed nature of fossil groups has influenced the AGN activity in their dominant galaxy.

  2. The Properties of Fossil Groups of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Eigenthaler, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations as well as optical and X-ray observations over the last few years have shown that poor groups of galaxies can evolve to what is called a fossil group. Dynamical friction as the driving process leads to the coalescence of individual galaxies in ordinary poor groups leaving behind nothing more than a central, massive elliptical galaxy supposed to contain the merger history of the whole group. Due to merging timescales for less-massive galaxies and gas cooling timescales of the X-ray intragroup medium exceeding a Hubble time, a surrounding faint-galaxy population having survived this galactic cannibalism as well as an extended X-ray halo similar to that found in ordinary groups, is expected. Recent studies suggest that fossil groups are very abundant and could be the progenitors of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the centers of rich galaxy clusters. However, only a few objects are known to the literature. This article aims to summarize the results of observational fossil group research...

  3. On The Nature of Fossil Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    La Barbera, F; De la Rosa, I G; Sorrentino, G; Gal, R R; Kohl-Moreira, J L

    2009-01-01

    We present a new sample of 25 fossil groups (FGs) at z < 0.1, along with a control sample of seventeen bright ellipticals located in non-fossil systems. Both the global properties of FGs (e.g. X-ray luminosity) as well as the photometric properties (i.e. isophotal shape parameter, a4) and spectroscopic parameters (e.g. the alpha-enhancement) of their first-ranked ellipticals are consistent with those of the control sample. This result favors a scenario where FGs are not a distinct class of systems, but rather a common phase in the life of galaxy groups. We also find no evidence for an evolutionary sequence explaining the formation of galaxies in fossil systems through the merging of galaxies in compact groups.

  4. Fossil Group Origins VII. Galaxy substructures in fossil systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Aguerri, J A L; Boschin, W; Barrena, R; del Burgo, C; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; D'Onghia, E; Kundert, A; Méndez-Abreu, J; Sánchez-Janssen, R

    2016-01-01

    Fossil groups are expected to be the final product of galaxy merging within galaxy groups. In simulations, they are predicted to assemble their mass at high redshift. This early formation allows for the innermost $M^\\ast$ galaxies to merge into a massive central galaxy. Then, they are expected to maintain their fossil status because of the few interactions with the large-scale structure. In this context, the magnitude gap between the two brightest galaxies of the system is considered a good indicator of its dynamical status. As a consequence, the systems with the largest gaps should be dynamically relaxed. In order to examine the dynamical status of these systems, we systematically analyze, for the first time, the presence of galaxy substructures in a sample of 12 spectroscopically-confirmed fossil systems with redshift $z \\le 0.25$. We apply a number of tests in order to investigate the substructure in fossil systems in the two-dimensional space of projected positions out to $R_{200}$. Moreover, for a subsam...

  5. Satellite Galaxies and Fossil Groups in the Millennium Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, L V; Lambas, D G; White, S D M; Croton, D J

    2007-01-01

    We use a semianalytic galaxy catalogue constructed from the Millennium Simulation to study the satellites of isolated galaxies in the LCDM cosmogony. This sample (~80,000$ bright primaries, surrounded by ~178,000 satellites) allows the characterization, with minimal statistical uncertainty, of the dynamical properties of satellite/primary galaxy systems in a LCDM universe. We find that, overall, the satellite population traces the dark matter rather well: its spatial distribution and kinematics may be approximated by an NFW profile with a mildly anisotropic velocity distribution. Their spatial distribution is also mildly anisotropic, with a well-defined ``anti-Holmberg'' effect that reflects the misalignment between the major axis and angular momentum of the host halo. The isolation criteria for our primaries picks not only galaxies in sparse environments, but also a number of primaries at the centre of ''fossil'' groups. We find that the abundance and luminosity function of these unusual systems are in reaso...

  6. Fossil Group Origins. VI. Global X-ray scaling relations of fossil galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kundert, A; D'Onghia, E; Girardi, M; Aguerri, J A L; Barrena, R; Corsini, E M; De Grandi, S; Jiménez-Bailón, E; Lozada-Muñoz, M; Méndez-Abreu, J; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Wilcots, E; Zarattini, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the first pointed X-ray observations of ten candidate fossil galaxy groups and clusters. With these Suzaku observations, we determine global temperatures and bolometric X-ray luminosities of the intracluster medium (ICM) out to $r_{500}$ for six systems in our sample. The remaining four systems show signs of significant contamination from non-ICM sources. For the six objects with successfully determined $r_{500}$ properties, we measure global temperatures between $2.8 \\ \\mathrm{keV} \\leq T_{\\mathrm{X}} \\leq 5.3 \\ \\mathrm{keV}$, bolometric X-ray luminosities of $0.6 \\times 10^{44} \\ \\mathrm{ergs} \\ \\mathrm{s}^{-1} \\leq L_{\\mathrm{X,bol}} \\leq 7.2\\times 10^{44} \\ \\mathrm{ergs} \\ \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$, and estimate masses, as derived from $T_{\\mathrm{X}}$, of $M_{500} \\gtrsim 10^{14} \\ \\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$. Scaling relations are constructed for an assembled sample of fossil and non-fossil systems using global X-ray luminosities, temperatures, optical luminosities, and velocity dispersions. The fit of the sc...

  7. The Fossil Phase in the Life of a Galaxy Group

    CERN Document Server

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Gottloeber, Stefan; Hoeft, Matthias; Khalatyan, Arman; Klypin, Anatoly; Mueller, Volker

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the origin and evolution of fossil groups in a concordance LCDM cosmological simulation. We consider haloes with masses between $(1-5)\\times10^{13} \\hMsun$ and study the physical mechanisms that lead to the formation of the large gap in magnitude between the brightest and the second most bright group member, which is typical for these fossil systems. Fossil groups are found to have high dark matter concentrations, which we can relate to their early formation time. The large magnitude-gaps arise after the groups have build up half of their final mass, due to merging of massive group members. We show that the existence of fossil systems is primarily driven by the relatively early infall of massive satellites, and that we do not find a strong environmental dependence for these systems. In addition, we find tentative evidence for fossil group satellites falling in on orbits with typically lower angular momentum, which might lead to a more efficient merger onto the host. We find a population of grou...

  8. Evolution of Compact and Fossil Groups of Galaxies from Semi-analytical Models of Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Mamon, Gary A.; Dariush, Ali. A.; Raouf, Mojtaba

    2017-05-01

    We compare the mean mass assembly histories of compact and fossil galaxy groups in the Millennium Dark Matter Simulation and an associated semi-analytic galaxy formation model. Tracing the halo mass of compact groups (CGs) from z = 0 to z = 1 shows that, on average, 55% of the halo mass in CGs is assembled since z˜ 1, compared to 40% of the halo mass in fossil groups (FGs) on the same time interval, indicating that compared to FGs, CGs are relatively younger galaxy systems. At z = 0, for a given halo mass, FGs tend to have a larger concentration than CGs. Investigating the evolution of CG’s parameters reveals that they become more compact with time. CGs at z = 0.5 see their magnitude gaps increase exponentially, but it takes ˜10 Gyr for them to reach a magnitude gap of 2 mag. The slow growth of the magnitude gap leads to only a minority (˜41%) of CGs selected at z = 0.5 turning into a FG by z = 0. Also, while three-quarters of FGs go through a compact phase, most fail to meet the CG isolation criterion, leaving only ˜30% of FGs fully satisfying the CG selection criteria. Therefore, there is no strong link of CGs turning into FGs or FGs originating from CGs. The relation between CGs and FGs is thus more complex, and in most cases, FGs and CGs follow different evolutionary tracks.

  9. Optically selected fossil groups; X-ray observations and galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Khosroshahi, Habib G; Rasmussen, Jesper; Molaeinezhad, Alireza; Ponman, Trevor; Dariush, Ali A; Sanderson, Alastair J R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the X-ray and optical observations of galaxy groups selected from the 2dfGRS group catalog, to explore the possibility that galaxy groups hosting a giant elliptical galaxy and a large optical luminosity gap present between the two brightest group galaxies, can be associated with an extended X-ray emission, similar to that observed in fossil galaxy groups. The X-ray observations of 4 galaxy groups were carried out with Chandra telescope with 10-20 ksec exposure time. Combining the X-ray and the optical observations we find evidences for the presence of a diffuse extended X-ray emission beyond the optical size of the brightest group galaxy. Taking both the X-ray and the optical criteria, one of the groups is identified as a fossil group and one is ruled out because of the contamination in the earlier optical selection. For the two remaining systems, the X-ay luminosity threshold is close to the convention know for fossil groups. In all cases the X-ray luminosity is below the expected value from the...

  10. The Mass Assembly of Fossil Groups of Galaxies in the Millennium Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dariush, Ali; Ponman, Trevor J; Pearce, Frazer; Raychaudhury, Somak; Hartley, Will

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of present-day fossil galaxy groups is studied in the Millennium Simulation. Using the corresponding Millennium gas simulation and semi-analytic galaxy catalogues, we select fossil groups at redshift zero according to the conventional observational criteria, and trace the haloes corresponding to these groups backwards in time, extracting the associated dark matter, gas and galaxy properties. The space density of the fossils from this study is remarkably close to the observed estimates and various possibilities for the remaining discrepancy are discussed. The fraction of X-ray bright systems which are fossils appears to be in reasonable agreement with observation, and the simulations predict that fossil systems will be found in significant numbers (3-4% of the population) even in quite rich clusters. We find that fossils assemble a higher fraction of their mass at high redshift, compared to non-fossil groups, with the ratio of the currently assembled halo mass to final mass, at any epoch, being a...

  11. Fossil groups in the Millennium simulation. From the brightest to the faintest galaxies during the past 8 Gyr

    CERN Document Server

    Kanagusuku, Maria Jose; Zandivarez, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of bright and faint galaxies in fossil and non-fossil groups. We used mock galaxies constructed based on the Millennium run simulation II. We identified fossil groups at redshift zero according to two different selection criteria, and then built reliable control samples of non-fossil groups that reproduce the fossil virial mass and assembly time distributions. The faint galaxies were defined as having r-band absolute magnitudes in the range [-16,-11]. We analysed the properties of the bright and faint galaxies in fossil and non-fossil groups during the past 8 Gyr. We observed that the brightest galaxy in fossil groups is typically brighter and more massive than their counterparts in control groups. Fossil groups developed their large magnitude gap between the brightest galaxies around 3.5 Gyr ago. The brightest galaxy stellar masses of all groups show a notorious increment at that time. By analysing the behaviour of the magnitude gap between the first and the second, third, and fo...

  12. ESO 3060170: A massive fossil galaxy group with a heated gas core?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, M.; Forman, W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2004-01-01

    .85). This is direct evidence of the importance of nongravitational processes in group centers. We derive the mass profiles within 1/3r(vir) and find that the ESO 3060170 group is the most massive fossil group known [(1-2)x10(14) M-circle dot]. The M/L ratio of the system, similar to150 at 0.3r(vir), is normal.......We present a detailed study of the ESO 3060170 galaxy group, combining Chandra, XMM-Newton, and optical observations. The system is found to be a fossil galaxy group. The group X-ray emission is composed of a central, dense, cool core (10 kpc in radius) and an isothermal medium beyond the central...

  13. The First Galaxies and the Likely Discovery of Their Fossils in the Local Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ricotti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower bound for the mass of a galaxy is unknown, as are the typical luminosity of the smallest galaxies and their numbers. The answers depend on the extent to which star formation in the first population of small mass halos may be suppressed by radiative feedback loops. If early populations of dwarf galaxies did form in significant number before reionization, their “fossils” should be found today in the Local Group. This paper reviews our ongoing efforts to simulate and identify fossil dwarfs in the Local Group. It is widely believed that reionization stopped star formation in fossil dwarfs. However, here we dispute this idea and discuss a physical mechanism whereby recent episodes of star formation would be produced in some fossil dwarfs that, hence, may characterized by a bimodal star formation history. The same mechanism could turn dark halos that failed to form stars before reionization into gas-rich “dark galaxies”. We believe that current observational data supports the thesis that a fraction of the new ultra-faint dwarfs discovered in the Local Group are fossil dwarfs and we predict the existence of a population of ultra-faint dwarfs with lower surface brightness than currently observed.

  14. Fossil Galaxy Groups -- Ideal Laboratories for Studying the Effects of AGN Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Jetha, Nazirah N; Raychaudhury, Somak; Sengupta, Chandreyee; Hardcastle, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We present the first of a sample of fossil galaxy groups with pre-existing Chandra and/or XMM-Newton X-ray observations and new or forthcoming low frequency GMRT data -- RXJ1416.4+2315 (z=0.137). Fossil galaxy groups are ideal laboratories for studying feedback mechanisms and how energy injection affects the IGM, since due to the lack of recent merging activity, we expect the IGM to be relatively pristine and affected only by any AGN activity that has occurred in the group. Our Chandra X-ray observations reveal features resembling AGN-inflated bubbles, whilst our GMRT radio data show evidence of extended emission from the central AGN that may be filling the bubble. This has enabled us to estimate the work done by the central AGN, place limits on the rates of energy injection and discuss the nature of the plasma filling the bubble.

  15. ESO 3060170: A massive fossil galaxy group with a heated gas core?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, M.; Forman, W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the ESO 3060170 galaxy group, combining Chandra, XMM-Newton, and optical observations. The system is found to be a fossil galaxy group. The group X-ray emission is composed of a central, dense, cool core (10 kpc in radius) and an isothermal medium beyond the central...... 10 kpc. The region between 10 and 50 kpc (the cooling radius) has the same temperature as the gas from 50 to 400 kpc, although the gas cooling time between 10 and 50 kpc (2-6 Gyr) is shorter than the Hubble time. Thus, the ESO 3060170 group does not have a group-sized cooling core. We suggest...

  16. J0454-0309: Evidence for a strong lensing fossil group falling into a poor galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Schirmer, Mischa; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Halkola, Aleksi; Erben, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have discovered a strong lensing fossil group (J0454) at z=0.26, projected near the well-studied cluster MS0451-0305. Using multicolour Subaru/Suprime-Cam and CFHT/Megaprime imaging together with Keck spectroscopy we identify member galaxies. A VLT/FORS2 spectrum was taken to determine the redshifts of the brightest elliptical and the lensed arc. Using HST/ACS images we determine the group's weak lensing signal and model the strong lens system. This is the first time that a fossil group is analysed with lensing methods. The X-ray luminosity and temperature are derived from XMM-Newton data. We find two filaments extending over 4 Mpc, and within the virial radius we identify 31 members spectroscopically and 33 via the red sequence with i<22 mag. They segregate into spirals and a dynamically cooler central concentration of ellipticals with a velocity dispersion of 480 km/s. Weak lensing and cluster richness relations yield r200 = 830 kpc and M200 = 0.85 x 10^14 Msun. The brightest group galaxy (BGG) is inc...

  17. J0454-0309: evidence of a strong lensing fossil group falling into a poor galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, M.; Suyu, S.; Schrabback, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Erben, T.; Halkola, A.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We have discovered a strong lensing fossil group (J0454) projected near the well-studied cluster MS0451-0305. Using the large amount of available archival data, we compare J0454 to normal groups and clusters. A highly asymmetric image configuration of the strong lens enables us to study the substructure of the system. Methods: We used multicolour Subaru/Suprime-Cam and CFHT/Megaprime imaging, together with Keck spectroscopy to identify member galaxies. A VLT/FORS2 spectrum was taken to determine the redshifts of the brightest elliptical and the lensed arc. Using HST/ACS images, we determined the group's weak lensing signal and modelled the strong lens system. This is the first time that a fossil group is analysed with lensing methods. The X-ray luminosity and temperature were derived from XMM-Newton data. Results: J0454 is located at z = 0.26, with a gap of 2.5 mag between the brightest and second brightest galaxies within half the virial radius. Outside a radius of 1.5 Mpc, we find two filaments extending over 4 Mpc, and within we identify 31 members spectroscopically and 33 via the red sequence with i instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; based on data obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  18. Comparison of the properties of two fossil groups of galaxies with the normal group NGC 6034 based on multiband imaging and optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, C; Guennou, L; LeBrun, V; Durret, F; Clement, B; Clerc, N; Comeron, S; Ilbert, O; lin, Y; Russeil, D; Seemann, U

    2012-01-01

    We collected multiband imaging and spectroscopy for two fossil groups (RX J1119.7+2126 and 1RXS J235814.4+150524) and one normal group (NGC 6034). We computed photometric redshifts in the central zones of each group, combining previous data with the SDSS five-band data. For each group we investigated the red sequence (RS) of the color-magnitude relation and computed the luminosity functions, stellar population ages and distributions of the group members. Spectroscopy allowed us to investigate the large-scale surroundings of these groups and the substructure levels in 1RXS J235814.4+150524 and NGC 6034. The large-scale environment of 1RXS J235814.4+150524 is poor, though its galaxy density map shows a clear signature of the surrounding cosmic web. RX J1119.7+2126 appears to be very isolated, while the cosmic environment of NGC 6034 is very rich. At the group scale, 1RXS J235814.4+150524 shows no substructure. Galaxies with recent stellar populations seem preferentially located in the group outskirts. A RS is d...

  19. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Craig D.; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Richards, Joseph W.; Deadman, Paul-James [Center for Time Domain Informatics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Kathy Romer, A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Liddle, Andrew R. [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Hoyle, Ben [Institute of Sciences of the Cosmos (ICCUB) and IEEC, Physics Department, University of Barcelona, Barcelona 08024 (Spain); Hilton, Matt [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Stott, John P.; Capozzi, Diego; Collins, Chris A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Sahlen, Martin [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford, S. Adam [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-06-10

    This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5 R{sub 200}, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters.

  20. The XMM Cluster Survey: The Stellar Mass Assembly of Fossil Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Craig D; Richards, Joseph W; Lloyd-Davies, E J; Hoyle, Ben; Romer, A Kathy; Mehrtens, Nicola; Hilton, Matt; Stott, John P; Capozzi, Diego; Collins, Chris A; Deadman, Paul-James; Liddle, Andrew R; Sahlén, Martin; Stanford, S Adam; Viana, Pedro T P

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy are positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in fossil systems (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star-formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies. However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal brightest cluster galaxies, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain...

  1. Fossil Groups Origins III. Characterization of the sample and observational properties of fossil systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Girardi, M; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Boschin, W; Aguerri, J A L; Méndez-Abreu, J; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Catalán-Torrecilla, C; Corsini, E M; del Burgo, C; D'Onghia, E; Herrera-Ruiz, N; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Bailon, E Jimenez; Muñoz, M Lozada; Napolitano, N; Vilchez, J M

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Fossil systems are group- or cluster-sized objects whose luminosity is dominated by a very massive central galaxy. In the current cold dark matter scenario, these objects formed hierarchically at an early epoch of the Universe and then slowly evolved until present day. That is the reason why they are called {\\it fossils}. We started an extensive observational program to characterize a sample of 34 fossil group candidates spanning a broad range of physical properties. Deep $r-$band images were taken for each candidate and optical spectroscopic observations were obtained for $\\sim$ 1200 galaxies. This new dataset was completed with SDSS DR7 archival data to obtain robust cluster membership and global properties of each fossil group candidate. For each system, we recomputed the magnitude gaps between the two brightest galaxies ($\\Delta m_{12}$) and the first and fourth ranked galaxies ($\\Delta m_{14}$) within 0.5 $R_{{\\rm 200}}$. We consider fossil systems those with $\\Delta m_{12} \\ge 2$ mag or $\\Del...

  2. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J.T.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Arag´on-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic fila

  3. FINDING FOSSIL GROUPS: OPTICAL IDENTIFICATION AND X-RAY CONFIRMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Eric D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rykoff, Eli S. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dupke, Renato A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Proctor, Robert N. [Departamento de Astronomia, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes de Oliveira, Raimundo [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Garmire, Gordon P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Koester, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); McKay, Timothy A., E-mail: milleric@mit.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We report the discovery of 12 new fossil groups (FGs) of galaxies, systems dominated by a single giant elliptical galaxy and cluster-scale gravitational potential, but lacking the population of bright galaxies typically seen in galaxy clusters. These FGs, selected from the maxBCG optical cluster catalog, were detected in snapshot observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We detail the highly successful selection method, with an 80% success rate in identifying 12 FGs from our target sample of 15 candidates. For 11 of the systems, we determine the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and hydrostatic mass, which do not deviate significantly from expectations for normal systems, spanning a range typical of rich groups and poor clusters of galaxies. A small number of detected FGs are morphologically irregular, possibly due to past mergers, interaction of the intra-group medium with a central active galactic nucleus (AGN), or superposition of multiple massive halos. Two-thirds of the X-ray-detected FGs exhibit X-ray emission associated with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), although we are unable to distinguish between AGN and extended thermal galaxy emission using the current data. This sample representing a large increase in the number of known FGs, will be invaluable for future planned observations to determine FG temperature, gas density, metal abundance, and mass distributions, and to compare to normal (non-fossil) systems. Finally, the presence of a population of galaxy-poor systems may bias mass function determinations that measure richness from galaxy counts. When used to constrain power spectrum normalization and {Omega}{sub m}, these biased mass functions may in turn bias these results.

  4. Fossil group origins. III. The relation between optical and X-ray luminosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; De Grandi, S.; D'Onghia, E.; Barrena, R.; Boschin, W.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Zarattini, S.; Biviano, A.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Corsini, E. M.; del Burgo, C.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: This study is part of the Fossil group origins (FOGO) project which aims to carry out a systematic and multiwavelength study of a large sample of fossil systems. Here we focus on the relation between the optical luminosity (Lopt) and X-ray luminosity (LX). Methods: Out of a total sample of 28 candidate fossil systems, we consider a sample of 12 systems whose fossil classification has been confirmed by a companion study. They are compared with the complementary sample of 16 systems whose fossil nature has not been confirmed and with a subsample of 102 galaxy systems from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster survey. Fossil and normal systems span the same redshift range 0 cannibalism of other group galaxies with conservation of the optical light. We find no evidence for a peculiar state of the hot intracluster medium. Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Satellite galaxies in nearby groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vennik, J

    2015-01-01

    We analyse distribution, kinematics and star-formation (SF) properties of satellite galaxies in three different samples of nearby groups. We find that studied groups are generally well approximated by low-concentration NFW model, show a variety of LOS velocity dispersion profiles and signs of SF quenching in outskirts of dwarf satellite galaxies.

  6. Metallicity of the Fossil Group NGC 1550 Observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kosuke; Kawaharada, Madoka; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ohashi, Takaya

    2010-12-01

    We studied the temperature and metal abundance distributions of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in a group of galaxies, NGC 1550, observed with Suzaku. NGC 1550 is classified as a fossil group, which has few bright member galaxies, except for the central galaxy. Thus, such a type of galaxy is important to investigate how metals are enriched to the ICM. With the Suzaku XIS instrument, we directly measured not only the Si, S, and Fe lines, but also the O and Mg lines, and obtained those abundances to an outer region of ˜0.5r180 for the first time, and confirmed that the metals in the ICM of such a fossil group are indeed extending to a large radius. We found steeper gradients for the Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances, while O showed an almost flat abundance distribution. Abundance ratios of α-elements to Fe were similar to those of the other groups and poor clusters. We calculated the number ratio of type II to type Ia supernovae for the ICM enrichment to be 2.9±0.5 within 0.1r180; the value is consistent with those for the other groups and poor clusters observed with Suzaku. We also calculated the metal mass-to-light ratios (MLRs) for Fe, O, and Mg with the B-band and K-band luminosities of the member galaxies of NGC 1550. The derived MLRs are comparable to those of the NGC 5044 group in the r region, while those of NGC 1550 are slightly higher than those of NGC 5044 in the outer region.

  7. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Bernard J T; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this end, we constructed a catalogue of clean filaments containing edge-on galaxies. We started by applying the Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF) technique to the galaxies in a redshift-distortion corrected version of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5. From that sample we extracted those 426 filaments that contained edge-on galaxies (b/a < 0.2). These filaments were then visually classified relative to a variety of quality criteria. Statistical analysis using "feature measures" indicates that the distribution of orientations of these edge-on galaxies relative to their parent filament deviate significantly from what would be expected on the basis of a random distribution of orientations. The interpretat...

  8. Evolution of galaxy groups in the Illustris simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Raouf, Mojtaba; Dariush, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study of evolution of galaxy groups in the Illustris simulation. We focus on dynamically relaxed and unrelaxed galaxy groups representing dynamically evolved and evolving galaxy systems, respectively. The evolutionary state of a group is probed from its luminosity gap and separation between the brightest group galaxy and the center of mass of the group members. We find that the Illustris simulation, over-produces large luminosity gap galaxy systems, known as fossil systems, in comparison to observations and the probed semi-analytical predictions. However, this simulation is equally successful in recovering the correlation between luminosity gap and luminosity centroid offset, in comparison to the probed semi-analytic model. We find evolutionary tracks based on luminosity gap which indicate that a large luminosity gap group is rooted in a small luminosity gap group, regardless of the position of the brightest group galaxy within the halo. This simulation helps, for the first time, to explo...

  9. Dwarf galaxies in the dynamically evolved NGC 1407 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, Neil; Tully, R. Brent; Mahdavi, Andisheh

    2006-07-01

    The NGC 1407 Group stands out among nearby structures by its properties that suggest it is massive and evolved. It shares properties with entities that have been called fossil groups: the 1.4m differential between the dominant elliptical galaxy and the second brightest galaxy comes close to satisfying the definition that has been used to define the fossil class. There are few intermediate-luminosity galaxies, but a large number of dwarfs in the group. We estimate there are 250 group members to the depth of our survey. The slope of the faint end of the luminosity function (reaching MR = -12) is α = -1.35. Velocities for 35 galaxies demonstrate that this group with one dominant galaxy has a mass of 7 × 1013Msolar and M/LR = 340Msolar/Lsolar. Two galaxies in close proximity to NGC 1407 have very large blueshifts. The most notable is the second brightest galaxy, NGC 1400, with a velocity of -1072 km s-1 with respect to the group mean. We report the detection of X-ray emission from this galaxy and from the group.

  10. Dwarf galaxies in the Dynamically Evolved NGC 1407 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Trentham, N; Tully, R B; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Trentham, Neil

    2006-01-01

    The NGC 1407 Group stands out among nearby structures by its properties that suggest it is massive and evolved. It shares properties with entities that have been called fossil groups: the 1.4 magnitude differential between the dominant elliptical galaxy and the second brightest galaxy comes close to satisfying the definition that has been used to define the fossil class. There are few intermediate luminosity galaxies, but a large number of dwarfs in the group. We estimate there are 250 group members to the depth of our survey. The slope of the faint end of the luminosity function (reaching M_R = -12) is alpha = -1.35. Velocities for 35 galaxies demonstrate that this group with one dominant galaxy has a mass of 7 X 10^13 M_sun and M/L_R = 340. Two galaxies in close proximity to NGC 1407 have very large blueshifts. The most notable is the second brightest galaxy, NGC 1400, with a velocity of -1072 km/s with respect to the group mean. We report the detection of X-ray emission from this galaxy and from the group.

  11. Neutral Hydrogen in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, N P F; Brough, S; Forbes, D A; Barnes, D G

    2002-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of the neutral hydrogen (HI) properties of an X-ray selected sample of nearby loose galaxy groups. This forms part of a multi-wavelength investigation (X-ray, optical and radio) of the formation and evolution of galaxies within a group environment. Some initial findings of an ATNF Parkes Multibeam wide-area neutral hydrogen imaging survey of 17 nearby galaxy groups include two new, potentially isolated clouds of HI in the NGC 1052 and NGC 5044 groups and significant amounts of HI within the group virial radii of groups NGC 3557 and IC 1459 - two groups with complex X-ray structures that suggest they may still be in the act of virialisation. Here we present ATCA high-resolution synthesis-imaging follow-up observations of the distribution and kinematics of HI in these four groups.

  12. Fossil Groups Origins IV. The relation between optical and X-ray luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; De Grandi, S; D'Onghia, E; Barrena, R; Boschin, W; Mendez-Abreu, J; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Zarattini, S; Biviano, A; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; del Burgo, C; Iglesias-Paramo, J

    2014-01-01

    This study is part of the FOssil Groups Origin (FOGO) project which aims at carrying out a systematic and multiwavelength study of a large sample of fossil systems. Here we focus on the relation between the optical luminosity (Lopt) and X-ray luminosity (Lx). Out of a sample of 28 candidate fossil systems, we consider a sample of 12 systems whose fossil classification has been confirmed by a companion study. They are compared with the complementary sample of 16 systems whose fossil nature is not confirmed and with a subsample of 102 galaxy systems from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster survey. Fossil and normal systems span the same redshift range 0fossil system, the Lx in the 0.1-2.4 keV band is computed using data from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. For each fossil and normal system we homogeneously compute Lopt in the r-band within the characteristic cluster radius, using data from the SDSS DR7. We sample the Lx-Lopt relation over two orders of magnitude in Lx...

  13. Formation Histories of Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Ricotti, M; Ricotti, Massimo; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2004-01-01

    We compare the properties of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group with the simulated galaxies formed before reionization in a cosmological simulation of unprecedented spatial and mass resolution. We find that a subset of the Local Group dwarfs are remarkably similar to the simulated dwarf galaxies in all their properties. Based on this similarity, we propose the hypothesis that Local Group dwarfs form in a variety of ways: some of them are ``true fossils'' of the pre-reionization era, some of them form most of their stars later, after reionization (we call them ``survivors'' of the reionization era), and the rest of them form an intermediate group of ``polluted fossils''. We also identify a simple observational test that is able to falsify our hypothesis.

  14. The hot gas content of fossil galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, G. W.; Pointecouteau, E.; Arnaud, M.; van der Burg, R. F. J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the properties of the hot gas in four fossil galaxy systems detected at high significance in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations reveal overall temperatures of kT ~ 5-6 keV and yield hydrostatic masses M500,HE ≳ 3.5 × 1014M⊙, confirming their nature as bona fide massive clusters. We measure the thermodynamic properties of the hot gas in X-rays (out to beyond R500 in three cases) and derive their individual pressure profiles out to R ~ 2.5 R500 with the SZ data. We combine the X-ray and SZ data to measure hydrostatic mass profiles and to examine the hot gas content and its radial distribution. The average Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) concentration parameter, ⟨ c500 ⟩ = 3.2 ± 0.4, is the same as that of relaxed "normal" clusters. The gas mass fraction profiles exhibit striking variation in the inner regions, but converge to approximately the cosmic baryon fraction (corrected for depletion) at R500. Beyond R500 the gas mass fraction profiles again diverge, which we interpret as being due to a difference in gas clumping and/or a breakdown of hydrostatic equilibrium in the external regions. Our observations point to considerable radial variation in the hot gas content and in the gas clumping and/or hydrostatic equilibrium properties in these fossil clusters, at odds with the interpretation of their being old, evolved, and undisturbed. At least some fossil objects appear to be dynamically young.

  15. The Nearest Group of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Bergh, S

    1999-01-01

    The small Antlia-Sextans clustering of galaxies is located at a distance of only 1.36 Mpc from the Sun, and 1.72 Mpc from the adopted barycenter of the Local Group. The latter value is significantly greater than the radius of the zero- velocity surface of the Local Group which, for an assumed age of 14 Gyr, has Ro = 1.18 " 0.15 Mpc. This, together with the observation that the members of the Ant-Sex group have a mean redshift of +114 " 12 km s-1 relative to the centroid of the Local Group, suggests that the Antlia-Sextans group is not bound to our Local Group, and that it is expanding with the Hubble flow. If this conclusion is correct, then Antlia-Sextans may be the nearest external clustering of galaxies. The total galaxian population of the Ant-Sex group is ~ 1/5 that of the Local Group. However, the integrated luminosity of Ant-Sex is two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Local Group. Subject headings: Galaxies - clusters: individual (Antlia-Sextans)

  16. On the mass-to-light ratios of fossil groups. Are they simply dark clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Proctor, Robert N; Dupke, Renato; de Oliveira, Raimundo Lopes; Cypriano, Eduardo S; Miller, Eric D; Rykoff, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Defined as X-ray bright galaxy groups with large differences between the luminosities of their brightest and second brightest galaxies, "fossil groups" are believed to be some of the oldest galaxy systems in the universe. They have therefore been the subject of much recent research. In this work we present a study of 10 fossil group candidates with an average of 33 spectroscopically confirmed members per group, making this the deepest study of its type to-date. We also use this data to perform an analysis of the luminosity function of our sample of fossil groups. We confirm the high masses previously reported for many of fossil systems, finding values more similar to those of clusters than of groups. We also confirm the high dynamical mass-to-light ratios reported in many previous studies. While our results are consistent with previous studies in many ways, our interpretation is not. This is because we show that, while the luminosities of the BCGs in these systems are consistent with their high dynamical mass...

  17. Fossil group origins V. The dependence of the luminosity function on the magnitude gap

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Barrena, R; Boschin, W; del Burgo, C; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; D'Onghia, E; Girardi, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Kundert, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    In nature we observe galaxy aggregations that span a wide range of magnitude gaps between the two first-ranked galaxies of a system ($\\Delta m_{12}$). There are systems with gaps close to zero (e.g., the Coma cluster), and at the other extreme of the distribution, the largest gaps are found among the so-called fossil systems. Fossil and non-fossil systems could have different galaxy populations that should be reflected in their luminosity functions. In this work we study, for the first time, the dependence of the luminosity function parameters on $\\Delta m_{12}$ using data obtained by the fossil group origins (FOGO) project. We constructed a hybrid luminosity function for 102 groups and clusters at $z \\le 0.25$. We stacked all the individual luminosity functions, dividing them into bins of $\\Delta m_{12}$, and studied their best-fit Schechter parameters. We additionally computed a relative luminosity function, expressed as a function of the central galaxy luminosity, which boosts our capacity to detect differ...

  18. The hot gas content of fossil galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, G W; Arnaud, M; van der Burg, R F J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the hot gas in four fossil galaxy systems detected at high significance in the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) survey. XMM-Newton observations reveal overall temperatures of kT ~ 5-6 keV and yield hydrostatic masses M500,HE > 3.5 x 10e14 Msun, confirming their nature as bona fide massive clusters. We measure the thermodynamic properties of the hot gas in X-rays (out to beyond R500 in three cases) and derive their individual pressure profiles out to R ~ 2.5 R500 with the SZ data. We combine the X-ray and SZ data to measure hydrostatic mass profiles and to examine the hot gas content and its radial distribution. The average Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) concentration parameter, c500 = 3.2 +/- 0.4, is the same as that of relaxed `normal' clusters. The gas mass fraction profiles exhibit striking variation in the inner regions, but converge to approximately the cosmic baryon fraction (corrected for depletion) at R500. Beyond R500 the gas mass fraction profiles again diverge, which we int...

  19. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This indicates the fact that the action of large-scale tidal torques affected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this e

  20. Gemini Spectroscopy of Ultra-Compact Dwarfs in the Fossil Group NGC 1132

    CERN Document Server

    Madrid, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    A spectroscopic follow up of Ultra-Compact Dwarf (UCD) candidates in the fossil group NGC 1132 is undertaken with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph (GMOS). These new Gemini spectra prove the presence of six UCDs in the fossil group NGC 1132 at a distance of D~100 Mpc and a recessional velocity of v_r = 6935 +/- 11 km/s. The brightest and largest member of the UCD population is an M32 analog with a size of 77.1 pc and a magnitude of M_V=-14.8 mag with the characteristics in between those of the brightest UCDs and compact elliptical galaxies. The ensemble of UCDs have an average radial velocity of = 6966 +/- 208 km/s and a velocity dispersion of sigma_v = 169 +/-18 km/s similar to the one of poor galaxy groups. This work shows that UCDs can be used as test particles to determine the dynamical properties of galaxy groups. The presence of UCDs in the fossil group environment is confirmed and thus the fact that UCDs can form across diverse evolutionary conditions.

  1. The formation of compact groups of galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马駬; 俞允强

    1999-01-01

    In the compact group of galaxies the galaxies can merge into a few massive ones in a very short time, so they must be formed very recently. On the other hand, according to the theory of structure formation, the denser system should form earlier. By analyzing the apparent paradox, we suggest that the merging process of CDM halo plays an important role in the formation of the compact groups of galaxies: it delays the formation of compact groups of galaxies, and makes the groups of galaxies much denser.

  2. Galaxies and Groups in the Local Supercluster

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, D

    2009-01-01

    We present the catalog of galaxy groups in the Local Supercluster. Our algorithm bases on assumption that a total energy of physical pair of galaxies must be negative. About 54% of the galaxies in our sample have been gathered in 1082 groups. The groups are characterized by velocity dispersion 74 km/s and harmonic radius 204 kpc. These values are typical for small groups like Local Group or M81.

  3. The influence of halo assembly on galaxies and galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, Tatiana; Padilla, Nelson; Tissera, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    We study the variations of group galaxy properties according to their assembly history in groups identified in the SDSS-DR6 (hereafter SDSS) catalogue. Using mock SDSS group catalogues, we find that the isolation and concentration of a galaxy group are good observational discriminators of group assembly. However, analysing the mean spectral type of SDSS groups as a function of concentration and isolation, we find that while SDSS massive groups confirm the predicted correlation between concentration and age found in mock catalogues, they disagree with models in the isolation-age trend. This may be partially explained in terms of possible problems associated to the modelling of cold gas in satellite galaxies in semi-analytical models, which could be overestimating the effects of environment. We study properties of galaxies in groups of similar masses and different ages, finding important variations between model and observations. These variations can be explained in terms of the different isolation-age trends o...

  4. The shell galaxy NGC4104 in an X-ray group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Neto, G. B.; Durret, F.; Laganá, T.; Machado, R. E. G.; Martinet, N.

    2017-07-01

    Groups of galaxies are expected to collapse early in the history of the universe, in particular the so-called Fossil Groups, with a central galaxy that grows at the bottom of the gravitational potential well by cannibalizing smaller galaxies and/or by major mergers. An evidence of galactic cannibalism is the feature known as shells or ripples in early-type galaxies Shell galaxies are believed to be the result of a minor merger of a dwarf with an elliptical galaxy, resulting in a series of faint concentric ripples in surface brightness observed throughout the main stellar component. This contribution presents very deep r and g imaging of NGC 4104 - the brightest galaxy of an X-ray emitting group - obtained with MegaCam on the 3.6 m CFHT. Using both iraf/ellipse and galfit 2D image-fitting programs, we show the presence of strong shell features and an extended stellar halo around the group brightest galaxy. We have run a series of N-body simulations in order to gain insight on the dynamical process that shaped NGC 4104. Numerical modeling suggests a recent (around 5 Gyrs ago) collision occurred with a dwarf galaxy, which may have also led to a central absorption feature observed in the galaxy center. Moreover, given the magnitude gap between the first and second brightest galaxies, it seems that we are witnessing the formation of an object that falls within the fossil group classification.

  5. An optical and X-ray study of the fossil group RX J1340.6+4018

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Claudia L Mendes; Dupke, Renato A; Sodré, Laerte

    2009-01-01

    Fossil groups are systems with one single central elliptical galaxy and an unusual lack of luminous galaxies in the inner regions. The standard explanation for the formation of these systems suggests that the lack of bright galaxies is due to galactic cannibalism. In this study we show the results of an optical and X-ray analysis of RX J1340.6+4018, the prototype fossil group. The data indicates that RX J1340.6+4018 is similar to clusters in almost every sense, dynamical mass, X-ray luminosity, M/L and luminosity function, except for the lack of L* galaxies. There are claims in the literature that fossil systems have a lack of small mass haloes, compared to predictions based on the LCDM scenario. The observational data gathered on this and other fossil groups so far offer no support to this idea. Analysis of the SN Ia/SN II ejecta ratio in the inner and outer regions shows a marginally significant central dominance of SN Ia material. This suggests that either the merger which originated the central galaxy was...

  6. Satellite Luminosities in Galaxy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Sheth, Ravi K.; Martino, Matthew C.

    2007-01-01

    Halo model interpretations of the luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering assume that there is a central galaxy in every sufficiently massive halo, and that this central galaxy is very different from all the others in the halo. The halo model decomposition makes the remarkable prediction that the mean luminosity of the non-central galaxies in a halo should be almost independent of halo mass: the predicted increase is about 20% while the halo mass increases by a factor of more than 20. In c...

  7. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXY IN THE INTRACLUSTER FIELD OF THE VIRGO CENTER: A FOSSIL OF THE FIRST GALAXIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of a UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 ± 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H] =–2.4 ± 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be M{sub V} = –6.5 ± 0.2 and r {sub eff} = 81 ± 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is estimated to be as low as μ {sub V,} {sub 0} = 26.37 ± 0.05 mag arcsec{sup –2}. Its properties are similar to those of the Local Group analogs. No evidence of tidal features are found in this galaxy. Considering its narrow red giant branch with no asymptotic giant branch stars, low metallicity, and location, it may be a fossil remnant of the first galaxies.

  8. Discovery of an Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy in the Intracluster Field of the Virgo Center: A Fossil of the First Galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Sung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of a UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 ± 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H] =-2.4 ± 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be MV = -6.5 ± 0.2 and r eff = 81 ± 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is estimated to be as low as μ V, 0 = 26.37 ± 0.05 mag arcsec-2. Its properties are similar to those of the Local Group analogs. No evidence of tidal features are found in this galaxy. Considering its narrow red giant branch with no asymptotic giant branch stars, low metallicity, and location, it may be a fossil remnant of the first galaxies.

  9. Local Group galaxies emerge from the dark

    CERN Document Server

    Sawala, Till; Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Furlong, Michelle; Helly, John C; Jenkins, Adrian; Oman, Kyle A; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Trayford, James; White, Simon D M

    2014-01-01

    The "Lambda Cold Dark Matter" (LCDM) model of cosmic structure formation is eminently falsifiable: once its parameters are fixed on large scales, it becomes testable in the nearby Universe. Observations within our Local Group of galaxies, including the satellite populations of the Milky Way and Andromeda, appear to contradict LCDM predictions: there are far fewer satellite galaxies than dark matter halos (the "missing satellites" problem), galaxies seem to avoid the largest substructures (the "too big to fail" problem), and the brightest satellites appear to orbit their host galaxies on a thin plane (the "planes of satellites" problem). We present results from the first hydrodynamic simulations of the Local Group that match the observed abundance of galaxies. We find that when baryonic and dark matter are followed simultaneously in the context of a realistic galaxy formation model, all three "problems" are resolved within the LCDM paradigm.

  10. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-10-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This indicates the fact that the action of large-scale tidal torques affected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this end, we constructed a catalogue of clean filaments containing edge-on galaxies. We started by applying the multiscale morphology filter technique to the galaxies in a redshift-distortion-corrected version of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. From this sample, we extracted 426 filaments that contained edge-on galaxies (b/a spine of the parent filament (cosθ < 0.2). The candidate objects are found in relatively less dense filaments. This happens because galaxies in such locations suffer less interaction with surrounding galaxies and consequently better preserve their tidally induced orientations relative to the parent filament. These objects are also less intrinsically bright and smaller than their counterparts elsewhere in the filaments. The technique of searching for fossil evidence of alignment yields relatively few candidate objects, but it does not suffer from the dilution effects inherent in correlation analysis of large samples. The candidate objects could be the subjects of a programme of observations aimed at understanding in what way they might differ from their non-aligned counterparts.

  11. Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Cindy; Baildon, Taylor; Mehta, Shail; Garcia, Edgar; Massey, Philip; Hodge, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey of Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and seven dwarf galaxies in (NGC6822, IC10, WLM, Sextans A and B, Phoenix and Pegasus). Using data from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS - see Massey et al, 2006), we used continuum-subtracted Ha emission line images to define emission regions with a faint flux limit of 10 -17 ergs-sec-1-cm-2above the background. We have obtained photometric measurements for roughly 7450 Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and five of the seven dwarf galaxies (no regions for Phoenix or Pegasus). Using these regions, with boundaries defined by Hα-emission flux limits, we also measured fluxes for the continuum-subtracted [OIII] and [SII] images and constructed a catalog of Hα fluxes, region sizes and [OIII]/ Hα and [SII]/ Hα line ratios. The HII region luminosity functions and size distributions for the spiral galaxies M31 and M33 are compared with those of the dwarf galaxies NGC 6822 and IC10. For M31 and M33, the average [SII]/ Hα and [OIII]/ Hα line ratios, plotted as a function of galactocentric radius, display a linear trend with shallow slopes consistent with other studies of metallicity gradients in these galaxies. The galaxy-wide averages of [SII]/ Hα line ratios correlate with the masses of the dwarf galaxies following the previously established dwarf galaxy mass-metallicity relationship. The slope of the luminosity functions for the dwarf galaxies varies with galaxy mass. The Carleton Catalog of this Local Group Emission-line Survey will be made available on-line.

  12. Clusters and Groups of Galaxies : International Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Giuricin, G; Mezzetti, M

    1984-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe and systems Clusters, and Groups of galaxies are topics like Superclusters, They fully justify the meeting on "Clusters of great interest. and Groups of Galaxies". The topics covered included the spatial distribution and the clustering of galaxies; the properties of Superclusters, Clusters and Groups of galaxies; radio and X-ray observations; the problem of unseen matter; theories concerning hierarchical clustering, pancakes, cluster and galaxy formation and evolution. The meeting was held at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste (Italy) from September 13 to September 16, 1983. It was attended by about 150 participants from 22 nations who presented 67 invited lectures (il) and contributed papers (cp), and 45 poster papers (pp). The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of F. Bertola, P. Biermann, A. Cavaliere, N. Dallaporta, D. Gerba1, M. Hack, J . V . Peach, D. Sciama (Chairman), G. Setti, M. Tarenghi. We are particularly indebted to D. Scia...

  13. Segue 1: An unevolved fossil galaxy from the early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frebel, Anna [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present Magellan/MIKE and Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectra of six red giant stars in the dwarf galaxy Segue 1. Including one additional Segue 1 star observed by Norris et al., high-resolution spectra have now been obtained for every red giant in Segue 1. Remarkably, three of these seven stars have metallicities below [Fe/H] = –3.5, suggesting that Segue 1 is the least chemically evolved galaxy known. We confirm previous medium-resolution analyses demonstrating that Segue 1 stars span a metallicity range of more than 2 dex, from [Fe/H] = –1.4 to [Fe/H] = –3.8. All of the Segue 1 stars are α-enhanced, with [α/Fe] ∼ 0.5. High α-element abundances are typical for metal-poor stars, but in every previously studied galaxy [α/Fe] declines for more metal-rich stars, which is typically interpreted as iron enrichment from supernova Ia. The absence of this signature in Segue 1 indicates that it was enriched exclusively by massive stars. Other light element abundance ratios in Segue 1, including carbon enhancement in the three most metal-poor stars, closely resemble those of metal-poor halo stars. Finally, we classify the most metal-rich star as a CH star given its large overabundances of carbon and s-process elements. The other six stars show remarkably low neutron-capture element abundances of [Sr/H] < –4.9 and [Ba/H] < –4.2, which are comparable to the lowest levels ever detected in halo stars. This suggests minimal neutron-capture enrichment, perhaps limited to a single r-process or weak s-process synthesizing event. Altogether, the chemical abundances of Segue 1 indicate no substantial chemical evolution, supporting the idea that it may be a surviving first galaxy that experienced only one burst of star formation.

  14. Globular Clusters around Galaxies in Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, C D; Bolte, M; Ziegler, B L; Puzia, T

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained deep photometry of NGC 1199 (in the compact group HCG 22) and NGC 6868 (in the Telescopium loose group) with the Keck II and the VLT-I telescopes. Both galaxies are the optically brightest galaxy of their groups. NGC 1199 has two companion galaxies at a median projected distance of only 33 kpc and, based in its peculiar internal structure and large X-ray halo, NGC 6868 has been proposed to be a merger remnant. Our analysis of $B$ and $R$ images uncovered a population of globular clusters around both galaxies, with total (and local) specific frequency S_N = 3.6\\pm1.8 (3.4\\pm1.5) for NGC 1199 and S_N = 1.8\\pm1.1 (0.8\\pm0.4) for NGC 6868. The radial profile of the globulars of NGC 1199 follows the light distribution of the galaxy and can be fitted by a power--law and a ``core model'' with a very steep slope (\\alpha = 2.5\\pm0.3). In the case of NGC 6868, the profile of the globulars is well fitted by a power--law and a ``core model'' profile of slope 1.4\\pm0.3 and is shallower than the galaxy lig...

  15. The colour of galaxies in distant groups

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L; Wilman, Dave; Bower, Richard G; Hau, George; Morris, Simon L; Mulchaey, J S; Oemler, A; Parker, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We present new optical and near-infrared imaging for a sample of 98 spectroscopically-selected galaxy groups at 0.25group members and the surrounding field population, statistically complete above a stellar mass limit of M=1E10 Msun. The overall colour distribution is bimodal in both the field and group samples; but at fixed luminosity the fraction of group galaxies populating the red peak is larger, by 20+/-7 per cent, than that of the field. In particular, group members with early-type morphologies, as identified in HST imaging, exhibit a tight red sequence, similar to that seen for more massive clusters. We show that approximately 20-30 per cent of galaxies on the red sequence may be dust-reddened galaxies with non-negligible star formation and early-spiral morphologies. This is true of both the field and group sample, and shows little dependence on near infrared luminosity. Thus, the fraction of bright group members with no sign of star formation o...

  16. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Kilborn, Virginia, E-mail: sarah@sarahsweet.com.au [Swinburne University of Technology, Mail number H30, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  17. Spatially resolved stellar population parameters in the BCGs of two fossil groups

    CERN Document Server

    Proctor, Robert N; Eigenthaler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of Gemini/GMOS long-slit spectroscopic observations along the major and minor axes of the central galaxies in two fossil groups, SDSS J073422.21+265133.9 and SDSS J075828.11+374711.8 (the NGC 2484 group). Spatially resolved kinematics and stellar population parameters (ages, metallicities and $\\alpha$-element abundance ratios) derived using ~20 Lick indices are presented. Despite remarkable similarities in their morphologies, photometric properties (luminosity and colour) and kinematics, the two galaxies exhibit significantly different stellar population parameters. SDSS J073422.21+265133.9 exhibits a strong metallicity gradient (Delta[Z/H]/Delta R ~ -0.4) all the way into the centre of the galaxy. It also exhibits an age profile that suggest a relatively recent, centrally concentrated burst of star formation superimposed on an older, more spatially extended population. NGC 2484, a well known X-ray AGN, exhibits a flat core-like structure in its metallicity gradient, but no detectable ag...

  18. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buote, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Although fossil galaxy systems are thought to be very old, and thus should possess above-average halo concentrations, typically fossils have unexceptional concentrations of their masses. We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy/fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows the measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ∼ {r}2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, the stellar mass of the large central galaxy (BCG), and the dark matter (DM), we measure {c}200=32.2+/- 7.1 and {M}200=(4.5+/- 0.6)× {10}12 {M}ȯ using a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) DM profile. For a halo of this mass, the measured concentration c200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed ΛCDM halos by 3.5σ in terms of the observational error, and by 6σ considering the intrinsic scatter in the ΛCDM c–M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil system. We explored several variants of adiabatic contraction (AC) models and, while the AC models provide fits of the same quality as the uncontracted models, they do have the following advantages: (1) lower c200 that is less of an outlier in the ΛCDM c–M relation, and (2) baryon fractions ({f}{{b},200}) that agree better with the mean cosmic value. While the standard AC prescriptions yield a BCG stellar mass that is uncomfortably low compared to results from stellar population synthesis (SPS) models, a weaker AC variant that artificially shuts off cooling and star formation at z = 2 yields the same stellar mass as the uncontracted models. These are probably the reasons why our X-ray analysis prefers this

  19. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, R. S.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of 0.2 low(z ≤ 0.6) and high (z > 0.6) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index (U - B)0 can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at MB > -19.5 for both samples, and red objects being dominant at MB low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with R low-z sample than in the high-z sample. Our analysis indicates statistical evidence of kinematic segregation, at the 99% c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70% c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinct, although redder objects are more concentrated than the bluer ones at the 95% c.l. From the comparison of blue/red and bright/faint fractions, and considering the approximate lookback timescale between the two samples (˜3 Gyr), our results are consistent with a scenario where bright red galaxies had time to reach energy equipartition, while faint blue/red galaxies in the outskirts infall to the inner parts of the groups, thus reducing spatial segregation from z ˜ 0.8 to z ˜ 0.4.

  20. New group of the Early Palaeozoic conodont-like fossils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Szaniawski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the Upper Cambrian and Tremadocian organophosphatic microfossils which were hitherto treated as conodonts and assigned mainly to the genera Coelocerodontus and Viirodus. Individual elements of the fossils, similarly to the elements of conodonts, belonged originally to the multi-element apparatuses. Present studies, based mainly on the collections from Sweden, Poland (core sections, Estonia and Kazakhstan, show that despite the similarities of their individual elements to conodonts, they significantly differ from them in the inner structure, as well as in the construction of the apparatuses composed of them. Elements of their apparatuses are matched in shape to each other and certainly functioned in conjunction, while those belonging to the euconodont apparatuses are usually differentiated in shape and usually functioned in separation. All fossils of this group are provisionally named coelocerodonts in this paper. Their individual elements, as well as the apparatuses composed of them, are similar in construction to those of the genus Phakelodus, which is an ancestor of chaetognaths.

  1. Old stellar populations how to study the fossil record of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Cassisi, Santi

    2013-01-01

    The book discusses the theoretical path to decoding the information gathered from observations of old stellar systems. It focuses on old stellar systems because these are the fossil record of galaxy formation and provide invaluable information ont he evolution of cosmic structures and the universe as a whole. The aim is to present results obtained in the past few years for theoretical developments in low mass star research and in advances in our knowledge of the evolution of old stellar systems. A particularly representative case is the recent discovery of multiple stellar populations in galac

  2. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, Raquel S; Lopes, Paulo A A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of $0.20.6$) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index ${(U-B)_0}$ can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at $M_{B}>-19.5$ for both samples, and red objects being dominant at $M_{B}<-19.5$ only for the low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with $Rgalaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70%c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinc...

  3. The circular velocity function of group galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramson, Louis E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Williams, Rik J.; Benson, Andrew J.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Mulchaey, John S., E-mail: labramson@uchicago.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    A robust prediction of ΛCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. The correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain, however: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened compared to ΛCDM expectations at circular velocities v {sub c} ≲ 200 km s{sup –1}. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role environment plays in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v {sub c} estimators, we find no transition from field to ΛCDM-shaped CVF above v {sub c} = 50 km s{sup –1} as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 ≲ log M {sub halo}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs marginally suppressed at low v {sub c} compared to that of the field. Conversely, some agreement with N-body results emerges for samples saturated with late-type galaxies, with isolated late-types displaying a CVF similar in shape to ΛCDM predictions. We conclude that the flattening of the low-v {sub c} slope in groups is due to their depressed late-type fractions—environment affecting the CVF only to the extent that it correlates with this quantity—and that previous cluster analyses may suffer from interloper contamination. These results serve as useful benchmarks for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  4. SPIDER IX - Classifying Galaxy Groups SPIDER IX - Classifying Galaxy Groups according to their Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, A L B; de Carvalho, R R; La Barbera, F; Trevisan, M; Lopes, P A; Capelato, H V

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD) - designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD= 20) systems are significantly larger than in low multiplicity ones (N) and the gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (M_r <=-20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups, do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7groups, there is a remarkable difference between the galaxy properties of the inner and outer galaxy populations, testifying how the environment is affecting the galaxies. Instead, in NG groups there is no segregation b...

  5. Galaxy Groups: A 2MASS Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, R Brent

    2015-01-01

    A galaxy group catalog is built from the sample of the 2MASS Redshift Survey almost complete to Ks=11.75 over 91% of the sky. Constraints in the construction of the groups were provided by scaling relations determined by close examination of well defined groups with masses between 10^11 and 10^15 Msun. Group masses inferred from Ks luminosities are statistically in agreement with masses calculated from application of the virial theorem. While groups have been identified over the full redshift range of the sample, the properties of the nearest and farthest groups are uncertain and subsequent analysis has only considered groups with velocities between 3,000 and 10,000 km/s. The 24,044 galaxies in this range are identified with 13,607 entities, 3,461 of them with two or more members. A group mass function is constructed. The Sheth-Tormen formalism provides a good fit to the shape of the mass function for group masses above 6/h x 10^12 Msun but the count normalization is poor. Summing all the mass associated with...

  6. Galaxy groups in the 2dF galaxy redshift survey A Compactness Analysis of Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Zandivarez, A A; Ragone, C J; Muriel, H; Martínez, H J

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive study on compactness has been carried out on the 2dF Galaxy Group Catalogue constructed by Merch\\'an & Zandivarez. The compactness indexes defined in this work take into account different geometrical constraints in order to explore a wide range of possibilities. Our results show that there is no clear distinction between groups with high and low level of compactness when considering particular properties as the radial velocity dispersion, the relative fraction of galaxies per spectral type and luminosity functions of their galaxy members. Studying the trend of the fraction of galaxies per spectral type as a function of the dimensionless crossing time some signs of dynamical evolution are observed. From the comparison with previous works on compactness we realize that special care should be taken into account for some compactness criteria definitions in order to avoid possible biases in the identification.

  7. The Local Group and other neighboring galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, rapid progress has been made in distance measurements for nearby galaxies based on the magnitude of the tip of red giant branch stars. Current CCD surveys with HST and large ground- based telescopes bring $\\sim$10%-accurate distances for roughly a hundred galaxies within 5 Mpc. The new data on distances to galaxies situated in (and around) the nearest groups: the Local Group, M81 group, CenA/M83 group, IC342/Maffei group, Sculptor filament, and Canes Venatici cloud allowed us to determine their total mass from the radius of the zero- velocity surface, $R_0$, which separates a group as bound against the homogeneous cosmic expansion. The values of $R_0$ for the virialized groups turn out to be close each other, in the range of 0.9 -- 1.3 Mpc. As a result, the total masses of the groups are close to each other, too, yielding total mass-to-blue luminosity ratios of 10 -- 40 $M_{\\sun}/L_{\\sun}$. The new total mass estimates are 3 -- 5 times lower than old virial mass estimates of these gro...

  8. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies adopting λRe, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematical classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain λRe from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the λRe-ɛe distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass ≃109 M⊙), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as z = 2; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock λRe-ɛe distribution at z < 0.1 reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS3D/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed λRe-ɛe distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  9. Chemical Evolution models of Local Group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, M P

    2003-01-01

    Status quo and perspectives of standard chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies are summarized, discussing what we have learnt from them, what we know we have not learnt yet, and what I think we will learn in the near future. It is described how Galactic chemical evolution models have helped showing that: i) stringent constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis can be derived from the observed Galactic abundances of the light elements, ii) the Milky Way has been accreting external gas from early epochs to the present time, iii) the vast majority of Galactic halo stars have formed quite rapidly at early epochs. Chemical evolution models for the closest dwarf galaxies, although still uncertain so far, are expected to become extremely reliable in the nearest future, thanks to the quality of new generation photometric and spectroscopic data which are currently being acquired.

  10. The compact group--fossil group connection: observations of a massive compact group at z=0.22

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Claudia L Mendes

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fossil groups could be the cannibalized remains of compact groups, that lost energy through tidal friction. However, in the nearby universe, compact groups which are close to the merging phase and display a wealth of interacting features (such as HCG 31 and HCG 79) have very low velocity dispersions and poor neighborhoods, unlike the massive, cluster-like fossil groups studied to date. In fact, known z=0 compact groups are very seldom embedded in massive enough structures which may have resembled the intergalactic medium of fossil groups. In this paper we study the dynamical properties of CG6, a massive compact group at z=0.220 that has several properties in common with known fossil groups. We report on new g' and i' imaging and multi-slit spectroscopic performed with GMOS on Gemini South. The system has 20 members, within a radius of 1 h_70^-1 Mpc, a velocity dispersion of 700 km/s and has a mass of 1.8 x 10^14 h_70^-1 Msun, similar to that of the most massive fossil groups known. ...

  11. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Buote, David A

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy / fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ~r_2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, BCG stellar mass, and the dark matter (DM), we measure c_200 = 32.2 +/- 7.1 and M_200 = (4.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^12 M_sun using an NFW DM profile. For a halo of this mass, c_200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed LCDM halos by $3.5 \\sigma$ in terms of the observational error, and by $6 \\sigma$ considering the intrinsic scatter in the LCDM c-M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil syste...

  12. The Circular Velocity Function of Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Louis E; Benson, Andrew J; Kollmeier, Juna A; Mulchaey, John S

    2013-01-01

    A robust prediction of LCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. However, the correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened relative to LCDM expectations at circular velocities v_c < 200 km/s. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role of environment in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v_c estimators, we find no transition from field- to LCDM-shaped CVF above v_c = 50 km/s as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 < log(M_halo/M_sun) < 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs that are marginally suppressed at low-v_c compared to tha...

  13. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yozin, C

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies adopting $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematic classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$ from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the $\\lambda_{\\rm Re}$-$\\epsilon_{\\rm e}$ distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass $\\simeq$10$^{\\rm 9}$ M$_{\\odot}$), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as $z=2$; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to...

  14. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.

    2015-01-01

    on poststarburst galaxies with molecular reservoirs, indicates that galaxies do not need to expel their molecular reservoirs prior to quenching SF and transitioning from blue spirals to red early-type galaxies. This may imply that SF quenching can occur without the need to starve a galaxy of cold gas first....

  15. Fossil Groups Origins: I. RX J105453.3+552102 a very massive and relaxed system at z~0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Aguerri, J A L; Boschin, W; Barrena, R; Méndez-Abreu, J; Sánchez-Janssen, R; Borgani, S; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; del Burgo, C; D'Onghia, E; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Napolitano, N; Vilchez, J M

    2011-01-01

    The most accepted scenario for the origin of fossil groups (FGs) is that they are galaxy associations in which the merging rate was fast and efficient. These systems have assembled half of their mass at early epoch of the Universe, subsequently growing by minor mergers. They could contain a fossil record of the galaxy structure formation. We have started a project in order to characterize a large sample of FGs. In this paper we present the analysis of the fossil system RX J105453.3+552102. Optical deep images were used for studying the properties of the brightest group galaxy and for computing the photometric luminosity function of the group. We have also performed a detail dynamical analysis of the system based on redshift data for 116 galaxies. This galaxy system is located at z=0.47, and shows a quite large line-of-sight velocity dispersion \\sigma_{v}~1000 km/s. Assuming the dynamical equilibrium, we estimated a virial mass of M ~ 10^{15} h_{70} M_{\\odot}. No evidence of substructure was found within 1.4 M...

  16. The evolution of galaxies in compact and fossil groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mendes de Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos observaciones en el optico de algunos de los grupos compactos cercanos m as evolucionados que se conocen actualmente, HCG 31, HCG 79 y HCG 92, as como las propiedades de dos grupos f osiles a z 0.137, RX J1416.4+2315 y RX J1552.2+2013. A un cuando se sabe poco acerca de las propiedades opticas de los grupos f osiles, se ha sugerido que estos podr an ser el producto nal de los grupos compactos. En este art culo se discute la posible conexi on grupo compacto{grupo f osil. Los grupos compactos de galaxias m as evolucionados que se observan, los cuales despliegan una gran variedad de signos de interacci on y se piensa que est an cercanos a fusionarse (como HCG 31, por ejemplo son ricos en espirales y probablemente NO son los precursores de grupos f osiles, dada su baja dispersi on de velocidades y sus alrededores pobres en galaxias. Grupos compactos con alta dispersi on de velocidades, los cuales contienen principalmente galaxias el pticas brillantes y son ricos en compa~neros de baja luminosidad (grupos semejantes a HCG 62, por ejemplo pueden haber sido los precursores de grupos f osiles en epocas m as tempranas.

  17. Effects of Quasar Feedback in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of quasar feedback on distributions of baryons in galaxy groups using high-resolution numerical simulations. We use the entropy-conserving Gadget code that includes gas cooling and star formation, modified to include a physically-based model of quasar feedback. For a sample of ten galaxy group-sized dark matter halos with masses in the range of 1 to $5\\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}/h$, star formation is suppressed by more than 30% in the inner regions due to the additional pressure support by quasar feedback, while gas is driven from the inner region towards the outer region of the halos. As a result, the average gas density is 20% lower in the inner region and 10% higher in the outer region in the simulation, compared to a similar simulation with no quasar feedback. Gas pressure is also higher in the outer region, while temperature and entropy are enhanced in the inner region. The total group gas fraction in the two simulations generally differs by less than 10%. We also find a small enhancemen...

  18. X-Ray Groups of Galaxies at 0.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Lilly, Simon J.; Bolzonella, Micol; Carollo, C. Marcella; Contini, Thierry; Iovino, Angela; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lamareille, Fabrice; Le Fevre, Olivier; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Presotto, Valentina; Renzini, Alvio; Scodeggio, Marco; Silverman, John D.; Zamorani, Gianni; Bardelli, Sandro; Bongiorno, Angela; Caputi, Karina; Cucciati, Olga; de la Torre, Sylvain; de Ravel, Loic; Franzetti, Paolo; Garilli, Bianca; Kampczyk, Pawel; Knobel, Christian; Kovac, Katarina; Le Borgne, Jean-Francois; Le Brun, Vincent; Lopez-Sanjuan, Carlos; Maier, Christian; Mignoli, Marco; Pello, Roser; Peng, Yingjie; Perez-Montero, Enrique; Tasca, Lidia; Tresse, Laurence; Vergani, Daniela; Zucca, Elena; Barnes, Luke; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Cappi, Alberto; Cimatti, Andrea; Coppa, Graziano; Koekemoer, Anton M.; McCracken, Henry J.; Moresco, Michele; Nair, Preethi; Oesch, Pascal; Pozzetti, Lucia; Welikala, Niraj

    2012-01-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of galaxies at 0.5 galaxy properties depend on the mass of groups and clusters, in the sense that quiescent galaxies prefer more

  19. The 16 most common fossil groups from Danian found in Faxe Quarry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg

    2009-01-01

    Twelve folders dealing with the 16 most common fossil groups from Danian found in Faxe Quarry. The folders are for sale at the museum and designated for visitor......Twelve folders dealing with the 16 most common fossil groups from Danian found in Faxe Quarry. The folders are for sale at the museum and designated for visitor...

  20. Theory of galaxy dynamics in clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A

    2000-01-01

    Analytical estimates of the mass and radial dependence of the rates of galaxy mergers and of tidal interactions are derived for clusters and groups of galaxies, taking into account the tides from the system potential that limit the sizes of galaxies. Only high mass galaxies undergo significant major merging before being themselves cannibalized by more massive galaxies. Strong tides from the group/cluster potential severely limit the merger/tide cross-sections in the central regions, and while tides are most efficient at the periphery, one should see merging encounters further inside rich clusters.

  1. Morphological transformations of Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    In the Local Group there are three main types of dwarf galaxies: Dwarf Irregulars, Dwarf Spheroidals, and Dwarf Ellipticals. Intermediate/transitional types are present as well. This contribution reviews the idea that the present day variety of dwarf galaxy morphologies in the Local Group might reveal the existence of a transformation chain of events, of which any particular dwarf galaxy represents a manifestation of a particular stage. In other words, all dwarf galaxies that now are part of the Local Group would have formed identically in the early universe, but then evolved differently because of morphological transformations induced by dynamical processes like galaxy harassment, ram pressure stripping, photo-evaporation, and so forth. We start describing the population of dwarf galaxies and their spatial distribution in the LG. Then, we describe those phenomena that can alter the morphology of a dwarf galaxies, essentially by removing, partially or completely, their gas content. Lastly, we discuss morpholo...

  2. A New Look at Poor Groups of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zabludoff, A I

    1999-01-01

    We use a new fiber spectroscopic survey of 12 nearby, poor groups of galaxies to examine the dynamics and evolution of galaxies in these common, but poorly studied, environments. Some of our conclusions are: (1) The nine groups in our sample with diffuse X-ray emission are in fact bound systems with at least 20-50 group members with absolute magnitudes as faint as M_B ~ -14 + 5 log h. (2) Galaxies in each X-ray-detected group have not all merged together because a significant fraction of the group mass lies outside of the galaxies and in a common halo, thereby reducing the rate of galaxy-galaxy interactions. (3) The similarity of the recent star formation histories and the fraction of early type galaxies in some poor groups to those in rich clusters suggests that cluster-specific environmental effects may not play a dominant role in the recent evolution of cluster galaxies. The evolution of group and cluster members may be driven instead by galaxy-galaxy interactions, which are likely to occur with equal freq...

  3. The Hot Gas Halos of Galaxies in Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Mulchaey, John S

    2008-01-01

    We use Chandra observations of 13 nearby groups of galaxies to investigate the hot gas content of their member galaxies. We find that a large fraction of near-IR bright, early-type galaxies in groups have extended X-ray emission, indicating that they retain significant hot gas halos even in these dense environments. In particular, we detect hot gas halos in ~80% of L_K > L_star galaxies. We do not find a significant difference in the L_K-L_X relation for detected group and cluster early-type galaxies. However, we detect X-ray emission from a significantly higher fraction of galaxies brighter than L_star in groups compared to clusters, indicating that a larger fraction of galaxies in clusters experience significant stripping of their hot gas. In addition, group and cluster galaxies appear to be X-ray faint compared to field galaxies, though a Chandra based field sample is needed to confirm this result. The near-IR bright late-types galaxies in clusters and groups appear to follow the L_K-L_X relation for early...

  4. Density profiles of galaxy groups and clusters from SDSS galaxy-galaxy weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, R; Cool, R J; Blanton, M; Hirata, C M; Brinkmann, J; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uros; Cool, Richard J.; Blanton, Michael; Hirata, Christopher M.; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a measurement of the shape of the density profile of galaxy groups and clusters traced by 43 335 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) with spectroscopic redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The galaxies are selected such that they are the brightest within a cylindrical aperture, split into two luminosity samples, and modeled as the sum of stellar and dark matter components. We present a detailed investigation of many possible systematic effects that could contaminate our signal and develop methods to remove them, including a detected intrinsic alignment for galaxies within 100 kpc/h of LRGs which we remove using photometric redshift information. The resulting lensing signal is consistent with NFW profile dark matter halos; the SIS profile is ruled out at the 96 (conservatively) and 99.96 per cent confidence level (CL) for the fainter and brighter lens samples (respectively) when we fit using lensing data between 40 kpc/h and 2 Mpc/h with total signal-to-noise of 19 and 25 for the ...

  5. The History of Galaxy Formation in Groups: An Observational Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Conselice, C J

    2006-01-01

    We present a pedagogical review on the formation and evolution of galaxies in groups, utilizing observational information from the Local Group to galaxies at z~6. The majority of galaxies in the nearby universe are found in groups, and galaxies at all redshifts up to z~6 tend to cluster on the scale of nearby groups (~1 Mpc). This suggests that the group environment may play a role in the formation of most galaxies. The Local Group, and other nearby groups, display a diversity in star formation and morphological properties that puts limits on how, and when, galaxies in groups formed. Effects that depend on an intragroup medium, such as ram-pressure and strangulation, are likely not major mechanisms driving group galaxy evolution. Simple dynamical friction arguments however show that galaxy mergers should be common, and a dominant process for driving evolution. While mergers between L_* galaxies are observed to be rare at z < 1, they are much more common at earlier times. This is due to the increased densit...

  6. NUV signatures of environment driven galaxy quenching in SDSS groups

    CERN Document Server

    Crossett, Jacob P; Jones, D Heath; Brown, Michael J I; Stott, John P

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using Galex NUV galaxy photometry with the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007). We compared the (NUV $- r$) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV $- r$) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a > 4{\\sigma} difference in the distribution of (NUV $- r$) colours, and an (NUV $- r$) blue fraction $> 3{\\sigma}$ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of $\\sim2$ lower for satellite galaxies between $10^{10.5}M_{\\bigodot}$ and $10^{10.7}M_{\\bigodot}$, showing that higher mass galaxies are more able to form stars when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV $- r$) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sersic indices (n < 3) outside of ...

  7. ROSAT observations of compact groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, P; Saracco, P; Ciliegi, P

    1994-01-01

    A search for X-ray emission from compact groups revealed detection from 8 out of the 12 HCG images extracted from the ROSAT public archive. For two of them the X-ray emission originates from galaxies in the group. On the contrary, three groups show an extended emission clearly caused by hot intracluster gas. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit to the X-ray spectra. The estimated temperatures are distributed in a quite narrow range (from 0.73 to 0.92 keV) and are consistent, within the errors, with 0.9 keV. The luminosity ranging from 0.75 to 5.1\\cdot10^{42}erg s^{-1}. The most relevant result is the low metal abundance surely detected in two of them and likely in a third that characterizes the hot gas cloud responsible for the X-ray emission. The data concerning the remaining 3 detected compact groups are not sufficient to discriminate with certainty between diffuse and/or point-like X-ray emission. However the results of the spectral analysis point to the presence of a hot gas again wi...

  8. The prevalence of dwarf galaxy compact groups over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are critical to the evolution of the universe, influencing everything from star formation to the structure of the known universe. By studying galaxy interactions through computer simulations, we are instantaneously able to observe processes that normally take billions of years. “Compact groups” are extremely dense assemblies of at least 3 but typically no more than 10 galaxies that are interacting gravitationally. These groups yield much information about galaxy interactions and mergers in dense environments but are difficult to observe at high redshifts. Compact groups of only dwarf galaxies probe a regime of galaxy evolution that has been hypothesized to be common in the early universe. Here we investigate the populations of such dwarf galaxy compact groups in the Millennium II simulation. Millennium II is a massive n-body simulation of cold dark matter particles on a time scale equivalent to the known universe; allowing us to access to high redshift galaxies and the ability to track their descendants. Our preliminary findings indicate that these dwarf galaxy compact groups do exist in the Millennium II simulation. In the simulation, there is a non-inconsequential number of dwarf compact groups with an evolutionary track that mirrors the more massive compact groups with a peak in groups around a redshift of 2.

  9. Reproducing the entropy structure in galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Finoguenov, A; Tornatore, L; Böhringer, H

    2003-01-01

    We carry out a comparison between observations and hydrodynamic simulations of entropy profiles of groups and clusters of galaxies. We use the Tree+SPH GADGET code to simulate four halos of sizes in the M_500 = 1.0 - 16.e13 h^-1 Msun range, corresponding to poor groups up to Virgo-like clusters. We concentrate on the effect of introducing radiative cooling, star formation, and a variety of non-gravitational heating schemes on the entropy structure and the stellar fraction. We show that all the simulations result in a correct entropy profile for the Virgo-like cluster. With the heating energy budget of ~0.7 keV/particle injected at z_h=3, we are also able to reproduce the entropy profiles of groups. We obtain the flat entropy cores as a combined effect of preheating and cooling, while we achieve the high entropy at outskirts by preheating. The resulting baryon fraction locked into stars is in the 25-30% range, compared to 35-40% in the case of no preheating. Heating at higher redshift, z_h=9, strongly delays t...

  10. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  11. THE VERY FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OVER COSMIC TIME: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE LOCAL GROUP FOSSIL RECORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Conroy, Charlie, E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We present a new technique to estimate the evolution of the very faint end of the UV luminosity function (LF) out to z ∼ 5. Measured star formation histories (SFHs) from the fossil record of Local Group (LG) galaxies are used to reconstruct the LF down to M {sub UV} ∼–5 at z ∼ 5 and M {sub UV} ∼–1.5 at z < 1. Such faint limits are well beyond the current observational limits and are likely to remain beyond the limits of next-generation facilities. The reconstructed LFs, when combined with direct measurements of the LFs at higher luminosity, are well-fit by a standard Schechter function with no evidence of a break to the faintest limits probed by this technique. The derived faint-end slope, α, steepens from ≈ – 1.2 at z < 1 to ≈ – 1.6 at 4 < z < 5. We test the effects of burstiness in the SFHs and find the recovered LFs to be only modestly affected. Incompleteness corrections for the faintest LG galaxies and the (unlikely) possibility of significant luminosity-dependent destruction of dwarf galaxies between high redshift and the present epoch are important uncertainties. These and other uncertainties can be mitigated with more detailed modeling and future observations. The reconstructed faint end LF from the fossil record can therefore be a powerful and complementary probe of the high-redshift faint galaxies believed to play a key role in the reionization of the universe.

  12. Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Bruzual, GA; Charlot, S

    2010-01-01

    Within the Local Universe galaxies can be studied in great detail star by star. The Color-Magnitude Diagram synthesis analysis method is well established as the most accurate way to determine the detailed star formation history of galaxies going back to the earliest times. This approach received a s

  13. Segregation effects according to the evolutionary stage of galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Trevisan, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study segregation phenomena in 57 groups selected from the 2dF Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Groups (2PIGG) catalogue of galaxy groups. The sample corresponds to those systems located in areas of at least 80 per cent redshift coverage out to 10 times the radius of the groups. The dynamical state of the galaxy systems was determined after studying their velocity distributions. We have used the Anderson-Darling test to distinguish relaxed and non-relaxed systems. This analysis indicates that 84 per cent of groups have galaxy velocities consistent with the normal distribution, while 16 per cent of them have more complex underlying distributions. Properties of the member galaxies are investigated taking into account this classification. Our results indicate that galaxies in Gaussian groups are significantly more evolved than galaxies in non-relaxed systems out to distances of ~4R200, presenting significantly redder (B - R) colours. We also find evidence that galaxies with MR <= -21.5 in Gaussian groups are closer to the condition of energy equipartition.

  14. The accretion of galaxies into groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L; Bower, Richard G; Font, Andreea S; McCarthy, Ian G

    2009-01-01

    We use the galaxy stellar mass and halo merger tree information from the semi-analytic model galaxy catalogue of Font et al. (2009) to examine the accretion of galaxies into a large sample of groups and clusters, covering a wide range in halo mass (10E12.9 to 10E15.3 Msun/h), and selected from each of four redshift epochs (z=0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5). We find that clusters at all examined redshifts have accreted a significant fraction of their final galaxy populations through galaxy groups. A 10E14.5 Msun/h mass cluster at z=0 has, on average, accreted ~ 40% of its galaxies (Mstellar > 10E9 Msun/h) from halos with masses greater than 10E13 Msun/h. Further, the galaxies which are accreted through groups are more massive, on average, than galaxies accreted through smaller halos or from the field population. We find that at a given epoch, the fraction of galaxies accreted from isolated environments is independent of the final cluster or group mass. In contrast, we find that observing a cluster of the same halo mass a...

  15. The Colours of Satellite Galaxies in Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Font, Andreea S; McCarthy, Ian G; Benson, Andrew J; Frenk, Carlos S; Helly, John C; Lacey, Cedric G; Baugh, Carlton M; Cole, Shaun

    2008-01-01

    Current models of galaxy formation predict satellite galaxies in groups and clusters that are redder than observed. We investigate the effect on the colours of satellite galaxies produced by the ram pressure stripping of their hot gaseous atmospheres as the satellites orbit within their parent halo. We incorporate a model of the stripping process based on detailed hydrodynamic simulations within the Durham semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The simulations show that the environment in groups and clusters is less aggressive than previously assumed. The main uncertainty in the model is the treatment of gas expelled by supernovae. With reasonable assumptions for the stripping of this material, we find that satellite galaxies are able to retain a significant fraction of their hot gas for several Gigayears, thereby replenishing their reservoirs of cold, star forming gas and remaining blue for a relatively long period of time. A bimodal distribution of galaxy colours, similar to that observed in SDSS data, is...

  16. Star formation suppression in compact group galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.;

    2015-01-01

    , bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and earlytype galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression...... color space. This supports the idea that at least some galaxies in HCGs are transitioning objects, where a disruption of the existing molecular gas in the system suppresses SF by inhibiting the molecular gas from collapsing and forming stars efficiently. These observations, combined with recent work...

  17. Galaxy groups in the low-redshift Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lu, Yi; Wang, Huiyuan; Yang, Xiaohu

    2017-09-01

    We apply a halo-based group finder to four large redshift surveys, the 2MRS (Two Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey), 6dFGS (Six-degree Field Galaxy Survey), SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) and 2dFGRS (Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey), to construct group catalogues in the low-redshift Universe. The group finder is based on that of Yang et al. but with an improved halo mass assignment so that it can be applied uniformly to various redshift surveys of galaxies. Halo masses are assigned to groups according to proxies based on the stellar mass/luminosity of member galaxies. The performances of the group finder in grouping galaxies according to common haloes and in halo mass assignments are tested using realistic mock samples constructed from hydrodynamical simulations and empirical models of galaxy occupation in dark matter haloes. Our group finder finds ∼94 per cent of the correct true member galaxies for 90-95 per cent of the groups in the mock samples; the halo masses assigned by the group finder are un-biased with respect to the true halo masses, and have a typical uncertainty of ∼0.2 dex. The properties of group catalogues constructed from the observational samples are described and compared with other similar catalogues in the literature.

  18. SPIDER - IX. Classifying galaxy groups according to their velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Capelato, H. V.; La Barbera, F.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Schilling, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD), designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. Testing different approaches to measure normality of a distribution, we conclude that HD is the least vulnerable method to type I and II statistical errors. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD ) and the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (Mr ≤ -20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7 < Mr ≤ -17.9). In G groups, there is a remarkable difference between the galaxy properties of the inner and outer galaxy populations, testifying how the environment is affecting the galaxies. Instead, in NG groups there is no segregation between the properties of galaxies in the inner and outer regions, showing that the properties of these galaxies still reflect the physical processes prevailing in the environment where they were found earlier.

  19. Segregation Effects According to the Evolutionary Stage of Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Andre L B; Trevisan, Marina

    2010-01-01

    We study segregation phenomena in 57 groups selected from the 2PIGG catalog of galaxy groups. The sample corresponds to those systems located in areas of at least 80% redshift coverage out to 10 times the radius of the groups. The dynamical state of the galaxy systems was determined after studying their velocity distributions. We have used the Anderson-Darling test to distinguish relaxed and non-relaxed systems. This analysis indicates that 84% of groups have galaxy velocities consistent with the normal distribution, while 16% of them have more complex underlying distributions. Properties of the member galaxies are investigated taking into account this classification. Our results indicate that galaxies in Gaussian groups are significantly more evolved than galaxies in non-relaxed systems out to distances of about 4R200, presenting signficantly redder (B-R) color. We also find evidence that galaxies with M_R < -21.5 in Gaussian groups are closer to the condition of energy equipartition.

  20. The statistical nature of the brightest group galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Shiyin; Yang, Xiaohu [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Mo, Houjun [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Van den Bosch, Frank [Astronomy Department, Yale University, Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); More, Surhud, E-mail: ssy@shao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago 5640, S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We examine the statistical properties of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) by using a complete spectroscopic sample of groups/clusters of galaxies selected from the Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We test whether BGGs and other bright members of groups are consistent with an ordered population among the total population of group galaxies. We find that the luminosity distributions of BGGs do not follow the predictions from the order statistics (OS). The average luminosities of BGGs are systematically brighter than OS predictions. On the other hand, by properly taking into account the brightening effect of the BGGs, the luminosity distributions of the second brightest galaxies are in excellent agreement with the expectations of OS. The brightening of BGGs relative to the OS expectation is consistent with a scenario that the BGGs on average have overgrown about 20% masses relative to the other member galaxies. The growth (ΔM) is not stochastic but correlated with the magnitude gap (G {sub 1,} {sub 2}) between the brightest and the second brightest galaxy. The growth (ΔM) is larger for the groups having more prominent BGGs (larger G {sub 1,} {sub 2}) and averagely contributes about 30% of the final G {sub 1,} {sub 2} of the groups of galaxies.

  1. Clustering of Galaxies and Groups in the NOG Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Giuricin, G; Girardi, M; Mezzetti, M; Marinoni, C

    2000-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function in redshift space, $\\xi(s)$, to study the clustering of the galaxies and groups of the Nearby Optical Galaxy (NOG) Sample, which is a nearly all-sky, complete, magnitude-limited sample of \\~7000 bright and nearby optical galaxies. The correlation function of galaxies is well-described by a power-law, $\\xi(s)= (s/s_0)^{-\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma\\sim1.5$ and $s_0\\sim 6.4 h^{-1}$ Mpc. We find evidence of morphological segregation between early- and late-type galaxies, with a gradual decreasing of the strength of clustering from the S0 to the late-type spirals, on intermediate scales. Furthermore, luminous galaxies (with $M_B\\leq -19.5 + 5 \\log h$) are more clustered than dim galaxies. The groups show an excess of clustering with respect to galaxies. Groups with greater velocity dispersions, sizes, and masses are more clustered than those with lower values of these quantities.

  2. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F.; /UC, Berkeley; Newman, Jeffrey A.; /LBNL, NSD; Davis, Marc; /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Marinoni, Christian; /Brera Observ.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Faber, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; /Lick Observ.; Kaiser, Nick; /Hawaii U.; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; /Lick Observ.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  3. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F.; /UC, Berkeley; Newman, Jeffrey A.; /LBNL, NSD; Davis, Marc; /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Marinoni, Christian; /Brera Observ.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Faber, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; /Lick Observ.; Kaiser, Nick; /Hawaii U.; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; /Lick Observ.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  4. The Dwarf Galaxy Population in Nearby Groups. The data

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, E R; Infante, L; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Oliveira, Claudia M. de; Infante, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    We used V and I CCD photometry to search for low-surface brightness dwarf galaxies (LSBD) in the central ( 22.5 V mag/arcsec^2, h > 1.5 arcsec, and diameters larger than 1.2 h^-1 kpc. Twenty of the eighty galaxies are extended LSB galaxies that were detected only on smoothed images, after masking all high surface brightness objects. The completeness in the detection is ~80% for galaxies with V<=20 and 22.5galaxies in smoothed images instead. The detected LSBD galaxies are highly concentrated towards the center of the four groups in the inner 250 h^-1 kpc. The best fit power-law slope of the surface density distribution is, on average, beta ~ -1.5 (R < 250 h^-1 kpc), in agreement with the values found for satellites dwarfs around isolated E/S0 galaxies and in X-ray groups. The LSBD galaxies in the Mv-mu0 plane does not show a clear c...

  5. Origin of Disc Lopsidedness in the Eridanus Group of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Angiras, R A; Omar, A; Dwarakanath, K S

    2006-01-01

    The HI surface density maps for a sample of 18 galaxies in the Eridanus group are Fourier analysed. This analysis gives the radial variation of the lopsidedness in the HI spatial distribution. The lopsidedness is quantified by the Fourier amplitude $A_1$ of the $m=1$ component normalized to the average value. It is also shown that in the radial region where the stellar disc and HI overlap, their $A_1$ coefficients are comparable. All the galaxies studied show significant lopsidedness in HI. The mean value of $A_1$ in the inner regions of the galaxies (1.5 - 2.5 scale lengths) is $\\geq 0.2$. This value of $A_1$ is twice the average value seen in the field galaxies. Also, the lopsidedness is found to be smaller for late-type galaxies, this is opposite to the trend seen in the field galaxies. These two results indicate a different physical origin for disc lopsidedness in galaxies in a group environment compared to the field galaxies. Further, a large fraction ($\\sim$ 30%) shows a higher degree of lopsidedness ($...

  6. Properties of Galaxies and Groups: Nature versus Nurture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias

    2011-09-01

    Due to the inherently nonlinear nature of gravity cosmological N-body simulations have become an invaluable tool when the growth of structure is being studied and modelled closer to the present epoch. Large simulations with high dynamical range have made it possible to model the formation and growth of cosmic structure with unprecedented accuracy. Moreover, galaxies, the basic building blocks of the Universe, can also be modelled in cosmological context. However, despite all the simulations and successes in recent decades, there are still many unanswered questions in the field of galaxy formation and evolution. One of the longest standing issue being the significance of the formation place and thus initial conditions to a galaxy's evolution in respect to environment, often formulated simply as "nature versus nurture" like in human development and psychology. Unfortunately, our understanding of galaxy evolution in different environments is still limited, albeit, for example, the morphology-density relation has shown that the density of the galaxy's local environment can affect its properties. Consequently, the environment should play a role in galaxy evolution, however despite the efforts, the exact role of the galaxy's local environment to its evolution remains open. This thesis introduction discusses briefly the background cosmology, cosmological N-body simulations and semi-analytical models. The second part is reserved for groups of galaxies, whether they are gravitationally bound, and what this may imply for galaxy evolution. The third part of the thesis concentrates on describing results of a case study of isolated field elliptical galaxies. The final chapter discusses another case study of luminous infra-red galaxies.

  7. Galaxy groups in the 2MASS Redshift Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yi; Shi, Feng; Mo, H J; Tweed, Dylan; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Youcai; Li, Shijie; Lim, S H

    2016-01-01

    A galaxy group catalog is constructed from the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) with the use of a halo-based group finder. The halo mass associated with a group is estimated using a `GAP' method based on the luminosity of the central galaxy and its gap with other member galaxies. Tests using mock samples shows that this method is reliable, particularly for poor systems containing only a few members. On average 80% of all the groups have completeness >0.8, and about 65% of the groups have zero contamination. Halo masses are estimated with a typical uncertainty $\\sim 0.35\\,{\\rm dex}$. The application of the group finder to the 2MRS gives 29,904 groups from a total of 43,246 galaxies at $z \\leq 0.08$, with 5,286 groups having two or more members. Some basic properties of this group catalog is presented, and comparisons are made with other groups catalogs in overlap regions. With a depth to $z\\sim 0.08$ and uniformly covering about 91% of the whole sky, this group catalog provides a useful data base to study galaxies...

  8. Dynamical segregation of galaxies in groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lares, M; Sánchez, A G

    2004-01-01

    We have performed a systematic analysis of the dynamics of different galaxy populations in galaxy groups from the 2dFGRS. For this purpose we have combined all the groups into a single system, where velocities v and radius r are expressed adimensionally. We have used several methods to compare the distributions of relative velocities of galaxies with respect to the group centre for samples selected according to their spectral type (as defined by Madgwick et al., 2002), bj band luminosity and B-R colour index. We have found strong segregation effects: spectral type I objects show a statistically narrower velocity distribution than that of galaxies with a substantial star formation activity (type II-IV). Similarly, the same behavior is observed for galaxies with colour index B-R>1 compared to galaxies with B-R-19) galaxies show the same segregation. It is not important once the sample is restricted to a given spectral type. These effects are particularly important in the central region (Rp

  9. Cold gas in group-dominant elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    O'Sullivan, E; Hamer, S; Salomé, P; Babul, A; Raychaudhury, S

    2014-01-01

    We present IRAM 30m telescope observations of the CO(1-0) and (2-1) lines in a sample of 11 group-dominant elliptical galaxies selected from the CLoGS nearby groups sample. Our observations confirm the presence of molecular gas in 4 of the 11 galaxies at >4sigma significance, and combining these with data from the literature we find a detection rate of 43+-14%, significantly higher than for the wider population of elliptical galaxies, and comparable to the detection rate for nearby radio galaxies. Those group-dominant galaxies which are detected typically contain ~2x10^8 Msol of molecular gas, and although most have low star formation rates (<1 Msol/yr) they have short depletion times, indicating that the gas must be replenished on timescales ~10^8 yr. Almost all of the galaxies contain active nuclei, and we note that while CO detections are more common in the most radio-loud galaxies, the mass of molecular gas required to power the active nuclei through accretion is small compared to the masses observed. ...

  10. GMRT Hv Observations of the Eridanus Group of Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Omar; K. S. Dwarakanath

    2005-03-01

    The GMRT HI 21cm-line observations of galaxies in the Eridanus group are presented. The Eridanus group, at a distance of ∼ 23 Mpc, is a loose group of ∼ 200 galaxies. The group extends to more than 10 Mpc in projection. The velocity dispersion of the galaxies in the group is ∼ 240 km s-1. The galaxies are clustered into different sub-groups. The overall population mix of the group is 30% (E + S0) and 70% (Sp + Irr). The observations of 57 Eridanus galaxies were carried out with the GMRT for ∼ 200 h. HI emission was detected from 31 galaxies. The channel rms of ∼ 1 mJy beam-1 was achieved for most of the image-cubes made with 4 h of data. The corresponding HI column density sensitivity (3) is ∼ 1 × 1020 cm-2 for a velocity-width of ∼ 13.4 km s-1. The 3 detection limit of HI mass is ∼ 1.2 × 107 M⊙ for a line-width of 50 km s-1. Total H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ images, H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ velocity fields, global H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ line profiles, H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ mass surface densities, H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ disk parameters and H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ rotation curves are presented. The velocity fields are analysed separately for the approaching and the receding sides of the galaxies. These data will be used to study the H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ and the radio continuum properties, the Tully–Fisher relations, the dark matter halos, and the kinematical and H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ lopsidedness in galaxies.

  11. Gravitational Interactions in Poor Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, D S; Mulchaey, J S; Henning, P A; Davis, David S.; Keel, William C.; Mulchaey, John S.; Henning, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    We report the results of the spatial analysis of deep ROSAT HRI observations, optical imaging and spectroscopy, and high-resolution VLA H I and continuum imaging of NGC 1961 and NGC 2276. These spirals were selected as showing some previous evidence for interaction with a surrounding (hot) diffuse medium. Our results favor most aspects of these galaxies as being shaped by gravitational interactions with companions, rather than the asymmetric pressure from motion through an external medium. The old stars follow the asymmetric structures of young stars and ionized gas, which suggests a tidal origin for the lopsided appearance of these galaxies. In NGC 2276, the H I and star-forming regions are strongly concentrated along the western edge of the disk. In this case, the ROSAT HRI detects the brightest star-forming regions as well as the diffuse disk emission, the most distant galaxy with such a detection. An asymmetric ionization gradient in the H II regions suggests radial movement of gas, which might have occur...

  12. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): The GAMA Galaxy Group Catalogue (G3Cv1)

    CERN Document Server

    Robotham, A S G; Driver, S P; Baldry, I K; Bamford, S P; Hopkins, A M; Liske, J; Loveday, J; Merson, A; Peacock, J A; Brough, S; Cameron, E; Conselice, C J; Croom, S M; Frenk, C S; Gunawardhana, M; Hill, D T; Jones, D H; Kelvin, L S; Kuijken, K; Nichol, R C; Parkinson, H R; Pimbblet, K A; Phillipps, S; Popescu, C C; Prescott, M; Sharp, R G; Sutherland, W J; Taylor, E N; Thomas, D; Tuffs, R J; van Kampen, E; Wijesinghe, D

    2011-01-01

    Using the complete GAMA-I survey covering ~142 sq. deg. to r=19.4, of which ~47 sq. deg. is to r=19.8, we create the GAMA-I galaxy group catalogue (G3Cv1), generated using a friends-of-friends (FoF) based grouping algorithm. Our algorithm has been tested extensively on one family of mock GAMA lightcones, constructed from Lambda-CDM N-body simulations populated with semi-analytic galaxies. Recovered group properties are robust to the effects of interlopers and are median unbiased in the most important respects. G3Cv1 contains 14,388 galaxy groups (with multiplicity >= 2$), including 44,186 galaxies out of a possible 110,192 galaxies, implying ~40% of all galaxies are assigned to a group. The similarities of the mock group catalogues and G3Cv1 are multiple: global characteristics are in general well recovered. However, we do find a noticeable deficit in the number of high multiplicity groups in GAMA compared to the mocks. Additionally, despite exceptionally good local spatial completeness, G3Cv1 contains signif...

  13. Implications of the remarkable homogeneity of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    We measure the diversity of galaxy groups and clusters with mass M>1E13/h Msun, in terms of the star formation history of their galaxy populations, for the purpose of constraining the mass scale at which environmentally-important processes play a role in galaxy evolution. We consider three different group catalogues, selected in different ways, with photometry and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For each system we measure the fraction of passively-evolving galaxies within R200 and brighter than either Mr=-18 (and with z<0.05) or Mr=-20 (and z<0.1). We use the (u-g) and (r-i) galaxy colours to distinguish between star-forming and passively-evolving galaxies. By considering the binomial distribution expected from the observed number of members in each cluster, we are able to either recover the intrinsic scatter in this fraction, or put robust 95% confidence upper-limits on its value. The intrinsic standard deviation in the fraction of passive galaxies is consistent with a small value of &l...

  14. Mass-to-light ratios of nearby groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Materne, J

    1980-01-01

    The application of a probability density function gives the possibility of determining groups of galaxies and membership probabilities of the galaxies in a reliable unbiased way. For the five nearest groups so defined, the mean mass-to-light ratio was derived using the concept of negative energy. These groups have a mass-to- light ratio of 16 M/sub (.)//L/sub (.)/. The probability function gives also the possibility of deriving masses of groups in a direct and independent way. (22 refs).

  15. Characterising galaxy groups: spectroscopic observations of the Shakhbazyan sample

    CERN Document Server

    Capozzi, Diego; Barbati, Silvio; Paolillo, Maurizio; De Filippis, Elisabetta; Longo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Groups of galaxies are the most common cosmic structures. However, due to the poor statistics, projection effects and the lack of accurate distances, our understanding of their dynamical and evolutionary status is still limited. This is particularly true for the so called Shakhbazyan groups (SHK) which are still largely unexplored due to the lack of systematic spectroscopic studies of both their member galaxies and the surrounding environment. In our previous paper, we investigated the statistical properties of a large sample of SHK groups using SDSS data and photometric redshifts. Here we present the follow-up of 5 SHK groups (SHK 10, 71, 75, 80, 259) observed within our spectroscopic campaign with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, aimed at confirming their physical reality and strengthening our photometric results. For each of the selected groups we were able to identify between 6 and 13 spectroscopic members, thus confirming the robustness of the photometric redshift approach in identifying real galaxy ove...

  16. The nature of compact groups of galaxies from cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A

    2009-01-01

    The nature of compact groups (CGs) of galaxies, apparently so dense that the galaxies often overlap, is still a subject of debate: Are CGs roughly as dense in 3D as they appear in projection? Or are they caused by chance alignments of galaxies along the line-of-sight within larger virialized groups, or within even longer filamentary structures? The nature of CGs is re-appraised using the redshift zero outputs of three galaxy formation models, applied to the dissipationless Millennium Simulation. The same selection criteria are applied to mock galaxy catalogs from these models as have been applied by Hickson and co-workers in redshift space. We find 50 times as many mock CGs as the 'HCGs' found by Hickson within a distance corresponding to 9000 km/s. This very low (2%) completeness is caused by Hickson missing groups that were either faint, near the surface brightness threshold, of small angular size and with a dominant brightest galaxy. We find that most CGs are physically dense, regardless of the precise thr...

  17. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: Estimating galaxy group masses via caustic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kelvin, Lee S; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Merson, Alexander; Nichol, Robert C; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We have generated complementary halo mass estimates for all groups in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Galaxy Group Catalogue (GAMA G3Cv1) using a modified caustic mass estimation algorithm, originally developed by Diaferio & Geller (1997). We calibrate the algorithm by applying it on a series of 9 GAMA mock galaxy light cones and investigate the effects of using different definitions for group centre and size. We select the set of parameters that provide median-unbiased mass estimates when tested on mocks, and generate mass estimates for the real group catalogue. We find that on average, the caustic mass estimates agree with dynamical mass estimates within a factor of 2 in 90.8 +/- 6.1% groups and compares equally well to velocity dispersion based mass estimates for both high and low multiplicity groups over the full range of masses probed by the G3Cv1.

  18. X-ray bright groups and their galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Helsdon, S F; Helsdon, Stephen F.; Ponman, Trevor J.

    2002-01-01

    Combining X-ray data from the ROSAT PSPC and optical data drawn from the literature, we examine in detail the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties of X-ray bright galaxy groups. We find a relationship between optical luminosity and X-ray temperature consistent with that expected from self-similar scaling of galaxy systems, L_B \\propto T^{1.6 +/- 0.2}. The self-similar form and continuity of the L_B : T relation from clusters to groups and the limited scatter seen in this relation, implies that the star formation efficiency is rather similar in all these systems. We find that the bright extended X-ray components associated with many central galaxies in groups appear to be more closely related to the group than the galaxy itself, and we suggest that these are group cooling flows rather than galaxy halos. In addition we find that the optical light in these groups appears to be more centrally concentrated than the light in clusters. We also use the optical and X-ray data to investigate whether ea...

  19. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE VORONOI-DELAUNAY METHOD CATALOG OF GALAXY GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F. [KIPAC, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 29, Menlo Park, CA 94725 (United States); Newman, Jeffrey A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3941 O' Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Davis, Marc [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0424, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dutton, Aaron A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Konidaris, Nicholas; Lin, Lihwai [Astronomy Department, Caltech 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Noeske, Kai [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rosario, David J. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Yan, Renbin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2012-05-20

    We present a public catalog of galaxy groups constructed from the spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fourth data release from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Galaxy Redshift Survey, including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The catalog contains 1165 groups with two or more members in the EGS over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.5 and 1295 groups at z > 0.6 in the rest of DEEP2. Twenty-five percent of EGS galaxies and fourteen percent of high-z DEEP2 galaxies are assigned to galaxy groups. The groups were detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) after it has been optimized on mock DEEP2 catalogs following similar methods to those employed in Gerke et al. In the optimization effort, we have taken particular care to ensure that the mock catalogs resemble the data as closely as possible, and we have fine-tuned our methods separately on mocks constructed for the EGS and the rest of DEEP2. We have also probed the effect of the assumed cosmology on our inferred group-finding efficiency by performing our optimization on three different mock catalogs with different background cosmologies, finding large differences in the group-finding success we can achieve for these different mocks. Using the mock catalog whose background cosmology is most consistent with current data, we estimate that the DEEP2 group catalog is 72% complete and 61% pure (74% and 67% for the EGS) and that the group finder correctly classifies 70% of galaxies that truly belong to groups, with an additional 46% of interloper galaxies contaminating the catalog (66% and 43% for the EGS). We also confirm that the VDM catalog reconstructs the abundance of galaxy groups with velocity dispersions above {approx}300 km s{sup -1} to an accuracy better than the sample variance, and this successful reconstruction is not strongly dependent on cosmology. This makes the DEEP2 group catalog a promising probe of the growth of cosmic structure that can potentially be used for cosmological tests.

  20. Discovery of an Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy in the Intracluster Field of the Virgo Center : A fossil of the First Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, In Sung

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are newcomers among galaxies, and are the faintest galaxies in the observed universe. To date, they have only been found around the Milky Way Galaxy and M31 in the Local Group. We present the discovery of an UFD in the intracluster field in the core of the Virgo cluster (Virgo UFD1), which is far from any massive galaxies. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars in this galaxy shows a narrow red giant branch, similar to those of metal-poor globular clusters in the Milky Way. We estimate its distance by comparing the red giant branch with isochrones, and we obtain a value 16.4 +/- 0.4 Mpc. This shows that it is indeed a member of the Virgo cluster. From the color of the red giants we estimate its mean metallicity to be very low, [Fe/H]= -2.4 +/- 0.4. Its absolute V-band magnitude and effective radius are derived to be M_V = -6.5 +/- 0.2 and r_eff = 81 +/- 7 pc, much fainter and smaller than the classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Its central surface brightness is es...

  1. Probing the intra-group medium of a z = 0.28 galaxy group

    CERN Document Server

    Bielby, R; Fumagalli, M; Morris, S L; Stott, J P; Tejos, N; Cantalupo, S

    2016-01-01

    We present new MUSE observations of a galaxy group probed by a background quasar. The quasar sightline passes between multiple $z=0.28$ galaxies, whilst showing at the same redshift low ionised metal line species, including Ca II, Mg I, Mg II and Fe II. Based on the galaxy redshifts measured from the MUSE data, we estimate the galaxies to be part of a small galaxy group with a halo mass of $\\approx6\\times10^{12}$ M$_{\\odot}$. We use the MUSE data to reveal the two dimensional dynamical properties of the gas and stars in the group galaxies, and relate these to the absorber kinematics. With these data we consider four scenarios for the nature of the gas probed by the sightline absorbers: a co-rotating gas halo associated with a single galaxy within the group; outflowing material from a single group member powered by recent star-formation; and cool dense gas embedded within the intra-group medium. We find that the dynamics, alongside the galaxy impact parameters and star-formation rates, favour the latter, in wh...

  2. The Fastest Galaxy Evolution in an Unbiased Compact Group Sample with WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwang-Ho; Hwang, Ho Seong; Sohn, Jubee; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-02-01

    We study the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies in compact groups and their environmental dependence using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We use a volume-limited sample of 670 compact groups and their 2175 member galaxies with {M}rnoise ratio greater than 3. Among the 1541 galaxies, 433 AGN-host galaxies are identified by using both optical and MIR classification schemes. Using the remaining 1108 non-AGN galaxies, we find that the MIR [3.4]–[12] colors of compact group early-type galaxies are on average bluer than those of cluster early-type galaxies. When compact groups have both early- and late-type member galaxies, the MIR colors of the late-type members in those compact groups are bluer than the MIR colors of cluster late-type galaxies. As compact groups are located in denser regions, they tend to have larger early-type galaxy fractions and bluer MIR color galaxies. These trends are also seen for neighboring galaxies around compact groups. However, compact group member galaxies always have larger early-type galaxy fractions and bluer MIR colors than their neighboring galaxies. Our findings suggest that the properties of compact group galaxies depend on both internal and external environments of compact groups, and that galaxy evolution is faster in compact groups than in the central regions of clusters.

  3. Galaxy interactions in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    CERN Document Server

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-01-01

    I present observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new 28-inch telescope at the Wise Observatory. This galaxy group was advertised to be non-interacting, or to be in a very early interaction stage, but this is not the case. The observations reported here were done using a "luminance" filter, essentially a very broad R filter, reaching a low surface brightness level of about 26 mag per square arcsec. Additional observations were obtained in a narrow spectral band approximately centered on the rest-frame H-alpha line from the group. Contrary to previous studies, my observations show that at least two of the major galaxies have had significant interactions in the past, although probably not between themselves. I report the discovery of a faint extended tail emerging from the brightest of the group galaxies, severe isophote twisting and possible outer shells around another galaxy, and map the HII regions in all the galaxies.

  4. The Evolution of Galaxy Disks in Dense Environments - Lessons from Compact Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, J; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Yun, M S; Borthakur, S

    2008-01-01

    Disk galaxies in compact galaxy groups exhibit a remarkable shortfall of neutral hydrogen compared to both isolated spirals and spirals in more loose groups, but the origin of this HI deficiency remains unclear. Based on a sample of highly HI deficient compact galaxy groups, here updated to also include HCG 58 and HCG 93, we summarise the first results of a multi-wavelength campaign aimed at understanding the processes responsible for modifying the HI content of galaxy disks in these environments. While tidal stripping, ram pressure stripping by hot intragroup gas, and star-formation induced strangulation could individually be affecting the ISM in some of the group members, these processes each face specific difficulties in explaining the inferred deficiency of HI for the sample as a whole. A complete picture of the mechanisms driving the ISM evolution in the disk galaxies of these groups has thus yet to emerge, but promising avenues for further progress in this field are briefly discussed on the basis of the...

  5. Galaxy evolution in nearby galaxy groups. III. A GALEX view of NGC 5846, the largest group in the local universe

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Antonietta; Rampazzo, Roberto; Bianchi, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    We explore the co-evolution of galaxies in nearby groups (V < 3000 km/s) with a multi-wavelength approach. We analyze GALEX far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) imaging and SDSS u,g,r,i,z data of groups spanning a large range of dynamical phases. We characterize the photometric properties of spectroscopically-confirmed galaxy members and investigate the global properties of the groups through a dynamical analysis. Here we focus on NGC 5846, the third most massive association of Early-Type Galaxies (ETG) after the Virgo and Fornax clusters. The group, composed of 90 members, is dominated by ETGs (about 80 per cent), and among ETGs about 40\\% are dwarfs. Results are compared with those obtained for three groups in the LeoII cloud, which are radically different both in member-galaxy population and dynamical properties. The FUV-NUV cumulative colour distribution and the normalized UV luminosity function (LF) significantly differ due to the different fraction of late-type galaxy population. The UV LF of NGC 5846 rese...

  6. Dwarf galaxies beyond our doorstep: the Centaurus A group

    CERN Document Server

    Crnojević, D; Cole, A A; Koch, A; Rejkuba, M; Da Costa, G; Jerjen, H

    2010-01-01

    The study of dwarf galaxies in groups is a powerful tool for investigating galaxy evolution, chemical enrichment and environmental effects on these objects. Here we present results obtained for dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A complex, a dense nearby (~4 Mpc) group that contains two giant galaxies and about 30 dwarf companions of different morphologies and stellar contents. We use archival optical (HST/ACS) and near-infrared (VLT/ISAAC) data to derive physical properties and evolutionary histories from the resolved stellar populations of these dwarf galaxies. In particular, for early-type dwarfs we are able to construct metallicity distribution functions, find population gradients and quantify the intermediate-age star formation episodes. For late-type dwarfs, we compute recent (~1 Gyr) star formation histories and study their stellar distribution. We then compare these results with properties of the dwarfs in our Milky Way and in other groups. Our work will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the e...

  7. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies II. Searching For Signatures of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Skillman, Evan D; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Williams, Benjamin F

    2014-01-01

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10$^4$ $<$ M$_{\\star}$ $<$ 10$^9$ M$_{\\odot}$). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted `true fossils' identified by Bovill & Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environment...

  8. Hooking some stem-group "worms": fossil lophotrochozoans in the Burgess Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Nicholas J

    2006-12-01

    The fossil record plays a key role in reconstructing deep evolutionary relationships through its documentation of the early diverging stem groups leading to extant phyla. In the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale, two famously problematic worms, Odontogriphus and Wiwaxia, have recently been reinterpreted as stem-group molluscs based on their shared expression of a putative radula and putative ctenidia in Odontogriphus. More detailed analysis of these fossil structures, however, reveals pronounced anatomical and histological discrepancies with molluscan analogues, such that they are more reliably interpreted as primitive features of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. In the absence of any obviously derived characters, Odontogriphus could be placed in the stem group of the Lophotrochozoa or on the stem of any of its constituent phyla, whereas the dorsal covering of chaetae in Wiwaxia identifies it as a stem-group polychaete. Despite their close relationship, these two jawed, segmented worms could conceivably represent the early stages of two separate phyla.

  9. Constraints on the optical depth of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Flender, Samuel; McDonald, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth ($\\tau$) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on $\\tau$ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intra-cluster medium, which takes into account star-formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. By calibrating the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters and $M_{\\mathrm{gas}}-M$ relations of groups ...

  10. The clustering of SDSS galaxy groups: mass and color dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yu; Mo, H J; Bosch, Frank C van den; Weinmann, Simone W; Chu, Yaoquan

    2007-01-01

    We use a sample of galaxy groups selected from the SDSS DR 4 with an adaptive halo-based group finder to probe how the clustering strength of groups depends on their masses and colors. In particular, we determine the relative biases of groups of different masses, as well as that of groups with the same mass but with different colors. In agreement with previous studies, we find that more massive groups are more strongly clustered, and the inferred mass dependence of the halo bias is in good agreement with predictions for the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. Regarding the color dependence, we find that groups with red centrals are more strongly clustered than groups of the same mass but with blue centrals. Similar results are obtained when the color of a group is defined to be the total color of its member galaxies. The color dependence is more prominent in less massive groups and becomes insignificant in groups with masses $\\gta 10^{14}\\msunh$. We construct a mock galaxy redshift survey constructed from the large Mille...

  11. New dwarf galaxy candidates in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of the distribution and kinematics of the Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxy systems have confirmed the existence of coplanar, corotating structures of galaxies. In addition to the 'missing satellite problem', these structures pose a major challenge to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM scenario of structure formation. We complement the efforts made by the dwarf galaxy community to extend these studies to other nearby galaxy groups by systematically searching for faint, unresolved dwarf members with a low surface brightness in the Southern Centaurus group of galaxies. The aim is to determine whether these coplanar, corotating structures are a universal phenomenon. We imaged an area of 60 square degrees (0.3 Mpc$^2$) around the M83 subgroup with the wide-field Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope in $g$ and $r$ down to a limiting surface brightness of $\\mu_r\\approx 30$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$. Various image-filtering techniques were applied to the DECam data to enhance the visibili...

  12. Luminosity function of galaxies in groups in the SDSS DR7: the dependence on mass, environment and galaxy type

    CERN Document Server

    Zandivarez, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the luminosities of galaxies in groups in the SDSS DR7. We analyse the luminosity function (LF) as a function of group mass for different photometric bands, galaxy populations, galaxy positions within the groups, and the group surrounding large scale density. We find that M* brightens and alpha becomes steeper as a function of mass in all SDSS photometric bands, in agreement with previous results. From the analysis of different galaxy populations, we observe that different methods to split galaxy populations, based on the concentration index or the colour-magnitude diagram, produce quite different behaviours in the luminosity trends, mainly for alpha. These discrepancies and the trends with mass mentioned above are explained when analysing the LF of galaxies classified simultaneously according to their concentrations and colours. We find that only the red spheroids have a LF that strongly depends on group mass. Late type galaxies, whether blue or red, have luminosity functions that d...

  13. Most Distant Group of Galaxies Known in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    New VLT Discovery Pushes Back the Beginnings Summary Using the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) , a team of astronomers from The Netherlands, Germany, France and the USA [1] have discovered the most distant group of galaxies ever seen , about 13.5 billion light-years away. It has taken the light now recorded by the VLT about nine-tenths of the age of the Universe to cover the huge distance. We therefore observe those galaxies as they were at a time when the Universe was only about 10% of its present age . The astronomers conclude that this group of early galaxies will develop into a rich cluster of galaxies, such as those seen in the nearby Universe. The newly discovered structure provides the best opportunity so far for studying when and how galaxies began to form clusters after the initial Big Bang , one of the greatest puzzles in modern cosmology. PR Photo 11a/02 : Sky field with the distant cluster of galaxies. PR Photo 11b/02 : Spectra of some of the galaxies in the cluster. Radio Galaxies as cosmic signposts A most intriguing question in modern astronomy is how the first groupings or "clusters" of galaxies emerged from the gas produced in the Big Bang. Some theoretical models predict that densely populated galaxy clusters ("rich clusters" in current astronomical terminology) are built up through a step-wise process. Clumps develop in the primeval gas, and stars condense out of these clumps to form small galaxies. Then these small galaxies merge together to form larger units. The peculiar class of "radio galaxies" is particularly important for investigating such scenarios. They are called so because their radio emission - a result of violent processes believed to be related to massive black holes located at the centres of these galaxies - is stronger by 5 - 10 orders of magnitude than that of our own Milky Way galaxy. In fact, this radio emission is often so intense that the galaxies can be spotted at extremely large distances, and thus at the remote epoch when

  14. The Galaxy Content of SDSS Clusters and Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Sarah M; Wechsler, Risa H; Koester, Benjamin P

    2007-01-01

    Imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to characterize the population of galaxies in groups and clusters detected with the MaxBCG algorithm. We investigate the dependence of Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) luminosity, and the distributions of satellite galaxy luminosity and satellite color, on cluster properties over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.3. The size of the dataset allows us to make measurements in many bins of cluster richness, radius and redshift. We find that, within r_200 of clusters with mass above 3e13 h-1 M_sun, the luminosity function of both red and blue satellites is only weakly dependent on richness. We further find that the shape of the satellite luminosity function does not depend on cluster-centric distance for magnitudes brighter than ^{0.25}M_i - 5log(h) < -19. However, the mix of faint red and blue galaxies changes dramatically. The satellite red fraction is dependent on cluster-centric distance, galaxy luminosity and cluster mass, and also increases by ~5% b...

  15. The radial distribution of galaxies in groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Budzynski, J M; McCarthy, I G; McGee, S L; Belokurov, V

    2012-01-01

    We present a new catalogue of 55,121 groups and clusters centred on Luminous Red Galaxies from SDSS DR7 in the redshift range 0.15~2.6) that is approximately a factor of two lower than that of the dark matter (as predicted by N-body cosmological simulations) and nearly independent of halo mass. Interestingly, in spite of the difference in shape between the galaxy and dark matter radial distributions, both exhibit a high degree of self-similarity. A self-consistent comparison to several recent semi-analytic models of galaxy formation indicates that: (1) beyond ~0.3 r_500 current models are able to reproduce both the shape and normalisation of the satellite profiles; and (2) within ~0.3 r_500 the predicted profiles are sensitive to the details of the satellite-BCG merger timescale calculation. The former is a direct result of the models being tuned to match the global galaxy luminosity function combined with the assumption that the satellite galaxies do not suffer significant tidal stripping, even though their ...

  16. Nearby groups of galaxies in the Hercules-Bootes constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Kashibadze, O. G.; Karachentseva, V. E.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a sample of 412 galaxies with radial velocities $V_{\\rm LG} sky region of ${\\rm RA}=13^h\\hspace{-0.4em}.\\,0$ ... $19^h\\hspace{-0.4em}.\\,0$, ${\\rm Dec}=+10^{\\circ}$ ... $+40^{\\circ}$ between the Local Void and the Supergalactic plane. One hundred and eighty-one of them have individual distance estimates. Peculiar velocities of the galaxies as a function of Supergalactic latitude SGB show signs of Virgocentric infall at $SGB 60^{\\circ}$. A half of the Hercules-Bootes galaxies belong to 17 groups and 29 pairs, with the richest group around NGC5353. A typical group is characterized by the velocity dispersion of $67$ km s$^{-1}$, the harmonic radius of $182$ kpc, the stellar mass of $4.3 \\times10^{10} M_{\\odot}$ and the virial-to-stellar mass ratio of $32$. The binary galaxies have the mean radial velocity difference of $37$ km s$^{-1}$, the projected separation of $96$ kpc, the mean integral stellar mass of $2.6\\times 10^9 M_{\\odot}$ and the mean virial-to-stellar mass ratio of about $8$. The total dark-matter-to-stellar mass ratio in the considered sky region amounts to $37$ being almost the same as that in the Local Volume.

  17. Iron in galaxy groups and clusters: confronting galaxy evolution models with a newly homogenized data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Robert M.; Thomas, Peter A.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the iron abundance in the hot gas surrounding galaxy groups and clusters. To do this, we first compile and homogenize a large data set of 79 low-redshift (tilde{z} = 0.03) systems (159 individual measurements) from the literature. Our analysis accounts for differences in aperture size, solar abundance, and cosmology, and scales all measurements using customized radial profiles for the temperature (T), gas density (ρgas), and iron abundance (ZFe). We then compare this data set to groups and clusters in the L-GALAXIES galaxy evolution model. Our homogenized data set reveals a tight T-ZFe relation for clusters, with a scatter in ZFe of only 0.10 dex and a slight negative gradient. After examining potential measurement biases, we conclude that some of this negative gradient has a physical origin. Our model suggests greater accretion of hydrogen in the hottest systems, via stripping from infalling satellites, as a cause. In groups, L-GALAXIES over-estimates ZFe, indicating that metal-rich gas removal (via e.g. AGN feedback) is required. L-GALAXIES is consistent with the observed ZFe in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the hottest clusters at z = 0, and shows a similar rate of ICM enrichment as that observed from at least z ˜ 1.3 to the present day. This is achieved without needing to modify any of the galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model parameters. However, the ZFe in intermediate-T clusters could be under-estimated in our model. We caution that modifications to the GCE modelling to correct this disrupt the agreement with observations of galaxies' stellar components.

  18. Ultra-faint dwarfs: The living fossils of the first galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvadori, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the faintest dwarf galaxies and their connection with the recently discovered very metal-poor Damped Lyα Absorption systems (DLAs) is investigate in the context of the Milky Way formation. By using a cosmological model I will discuss the theoretical implications of the observed Fe-Lumi

  19. Mergers in Galaxy Groups. II. The Fundamental Plane of Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Taranu, Dan S; Yee, H K C

    2014-01-01

    Observations consistently show that elliptical galaxies follow a tight "fundamental plane" scaling relation between size, mean surface brightness and velocity dispersion, with the form R $\\propto {\\sigma}^a {\\mu}^b$. This relation not only has very small (<0.05 dex) intrinsic scatter, but also has significantly different coefficients from the expect virial scaling (a "tilt"). We analyze hundreds of simulations of elliptical galaxies formed from mergers of spiral galaxies in groups to determine if the fundamental plane can emerge from multiple, mostly minor and hierarchical collisionless mergers. We find that these simulated ellipticals lie on a similar fundamental plane with a~1.7 and b~0.3. The scatter about this plane is even smaller than observed, while the tilt is in the correct sense, although a is larger than for typical observations. This demonstrates that collisionless mergers can contribute significantly to the tilt of the fundamental plane, contrary to previous claims that only gas dissipation co...

  20. FOSSIL EVIDENCE FOR THE TWO-PHASE FORMATION OF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Song [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [Giant Magellan Telescope Organization, 251 South Lake Avenue, Suite 300, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Li Zhaoyu [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) have undergone dramatic structural evolution over the last 10 Gyr. A companion paper shows that nearby elliptical galaxies with M{sub *} {>=} 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} generically contain three photometric subcomponents: a compact inner component with effective radius R{sub e} {approx}< 1 kpc, an intermediate-scale middle component with R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 kpc, and an extended outer envelope with R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 10 kpc. Here we attempt to relate these substructures with the properties of ETGs observed at higher redshifts. We find that a hypothetical structure formed from combining the inner and middle components of local ellipticals follows a strikingly tight stellar mass-size relation, one that resembles the distribution of ETGs at z Almost-Equal-To 1. Outside of the central kpc, the median stellar mass surface density profiles of this composite structure agree closest with those of massive galaxies that have similar cumulative number density at 1.5 < z < 2.0 within the uncertainty. We propose that the central substructures in nearby ellipticals are the evolutionary descendants of the ''red nuggets'' formed under highly dissipative (''wet'') conditions at high redshifts, as envisioned in the initial stages of the two-phase formation scenario recently advocated for massive galaxies. Subsequent accretion, plausibly through dissipationless (''dry'') minor mergers, builds the outer regions of the galaxy identified as the outer envelope in our decomposition. The large scatter exhibited by this component on the stellar mass-size plane testifies to the stochastic nature of the accretion events.

  1. Iron in galaxy groups and clusters: Confronting galaxy evolution models with a newly homogenised dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, Robert M; Henriques, Bruno M B

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the iron abundance in the hot gas surrounding galaxy groups and clusters. To do this, we first compile and homogenise a large dataset of 79 low-redshift (|z| = 0.03) systems (159 individual measurements) from the literature. Our analysis accounts for differences in aperture size, solar abundance, and cosmology, and scales all measurements using customised radial profiles for the temperature (T), gas density, and iron abundance (Z). We then compare this dataset to groups and clusters in the L-Galaxies galaxy evolution model. Our homogenised dataset reveals a tight T-Z relation for clusters, with a scatter in Z of only 0.10 dex and a slight negative gradient. After examining potential measurement biases, we conclude that at least some of this negative gradient has a physical origin. Our model suggests greater accretion of hydrogen in the hottest systems, via stripping of gas from infalling satellites, as a cause. At lower temperatures, L-Galaxies over-estimates Z in groups, indicating ...

  2. The Galaxy Content of SDSS Clusters And Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Sarah M.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin S.; /CCPP, New York; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2007-11-09

    Imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to characterize the population of galaxies in groups and clusters detected with the MaxBCG algorithm. We investigate the dependence of Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) luminosity, and the distributions of satellite galaxy luminosity and satellite color, on cluster properties over the redshift range 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. The size of the dataset allows us to make measurements in many bins of cluster richness, radius and redshift. We find that, within r200 of clusters with mass above 3x10{sup 13}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}, the luminosity function of both red and blue satellites is only weakly dependent on richness. We further find that the shape of the satellite luminosity function does not depend on cluster-centric distance for magnitudes brighter than {sup 0.25}M{sub i} - 5log{sub 10}h = -19. However, the mix of faint red and blue galaxies changes dramatically. The satellite red fraction is dependent on cluster-centric distance, galaxy luminosity and cluster mass, and also increases by {approx}5% between redshifts 0.28 and 0.2, independent of richness. We find that BCG luminosity is tightly correlated with cluster richness, scaling as L{sub BCG} {approx} M{sup 0.3}{sub 200}, and has a Gaussian distribution at fixed richness, with {sigma}{sub log}L {approx} 0.17 for massive clusters. The ratios of BCG luminosity to total cluster luminosity and characteristic satellite luminosity scale strongly with cluster richness: in richer systems, BCGs contribute a smaller fraction of the total light, but are brighter compared to typical satellites. This study demonstrates the power of cross-correlation techniques for measuring galaxy populations in purely photometric data.

  3. Radio galaxy feedback in X-ray selected groups from COSMOS: the effect on the ICM

    CERN Document Server

    Giodini, S; Finoguenov, A; Boehringer, H; Birzan, L; Zamorani, G; Oklopcic, A; Pierini, D; Pratt, G W; Schinnerer, E; Massey, R; Koekemoer, A M; Salvato, M; Sanders, D B; Kartaltepe, J S; Thompson, D

    2010-01-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio-galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-AGN located inside X-ray detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intra-group medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  4. Loose Groups of Galaxies in the Perseus-Pisces Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Trasarti-Battistoni, R

    1997-01-01

    We present a large catalog of loose groups of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere, selected from the Perseus-Pisces redshift Survey (PPS). Particular care is taken in order to obtain group samples as homogeneous as possible to previously published catalogs. All our catalogs contain about 200 groups, significantly more than in most previous studies where group samples were obtained from galaxy data sets of comparable quality to (but smaller extent than) PPS. Groups are identified with the adaptive Friends--Of--Friends (FOF) algorithm of Huchra & Geller (1982), with suitable normalizations D_0=0.231 Mpc/h and V_0=350 km/s at cz_0=1000 km/s. The luminosity function (LF) normalization \\phi_*=0.02 (h/Mpc)^3} appropriate for PPS yields a number density threshold \\delta n/n\\approx 180 for the adopted D_0, instead of \\delta n/n\\approx 80 used in previous studies of other samples. This yield us to discuss how to self-consistently match FOF parameters among different galaxy samples. We then separately vary...

  5. AN H I SURVEY OF SIX LOCAL GROUP ANALOGS. II. H I PROPERTIES OF GROUP GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, D. J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnes, David G.; Kilborn, Virginia A. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Gibson, Brad K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Freeman, Ken C., E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu, E-mail: David.G.Barnes@gmail.com, E-mail: vkilborn@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: Lister.Staveley-Smith@icrar.org, E-mail: brad.k.gibson@gmail.com, E-mail: kcf@mso.anu.edu.au [RSAA, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2011-12-01

    We have conducted an H I 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a {approx}1 Mpc{sup 2} area and covering the full depth of each group, with an M{sub HI} sensitivity of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the H I properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an H I mass function (HIMF) for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which are shallower than that of clusters or predictions from cold dark matter models of galaxy formation.

  6. A systematic search for X-ray cavities in galaxy clusters, groups, and elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Jaejin; Mulchaey, John S

    2016-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of X-ray cavities using a large sample of X-ray targets selected from the Chandra archive. The sample is selected to cover a large dynamic range including galaxy clusters, groups, and individual galaxies. Using $\\beta$-modeling and unsharp masking techniques, we investigate the presence of X-ray cavities for 133 targets that have sufficient X-ray photons for analysis. We detect 148 X-ray cavities from 69 targets and measure their properties, including cavity size, angle, and distance from the center of the diffuse X-ray gas. We confirm the strong correlation between cavity size and distance from the X-ray center similar to previous studies (i.e., Birzan et al. 2004; Diehl et al. 2008; Dong et al. 2010). We find that the detection rates of X-ray cavities are similar among galaxy clusters, groups and individual galaxies, suggesting that the formation mechanism of X-ray cavities is independent of environment.

  7. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Erfanianfar, G; Finoguenov, A; Wuyts, S; Wilman, D; Biviano, A; Ziparo, F; Salvato, M; Nandra, K; Lutz, D; Elbaz, D; Dickinson, M; Tanaka, M; Mirkazemi, M; Balogh, M L; Altieri, M B; Aussel, H; Bauer, F; Berta, S; Bielby, R M; Brandt, N; Cappelluti, N; Cimatti, A; Cooper, M; Fadda, D; Ilbert, O; Floch, E Le; Magnelli, B; Mulchaey, J S; Nordon, R; Newman, J A; Poglitsch, A; Pozzi, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass and halo occupation distribution in massive halos by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from SED fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high redshift groups (0.5groups at z~0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive halos than in the more common lower mass ...

  8. How Typical Are The Local Group Dwarf Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Skillman, Evan D; Holtzman, Jon; Williams, Benjamin F; Gilbert, Karoline M; Seth, Anil C; Cole, Andrew; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Rosema, Keith; Karachentsev, Igor D; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    We compare the star formation histories (SFHs) of Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies with those in the volume-limited ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) sample (D~4Mpc). The SFHs were derived in a uniform manner from high quality optical color-magnitude diagrams constructed from HST imaging. The mean cumulative SFHs of the LG and ANGST dwarf galaxies are all very similar for the three different morphological types (dSph/dE, dI, dI/dSph). The star formation rates (SFRs) at earliest times are measurably higher than the average lifetime SFRs, while SFRs are lower at later times. We find that the systematic uncertainties, due to varying photometric depths and uncertainties in the stellar models, are similar to any differences between the mean cumulative SFHs of the LG and ANGST samples, indicating consistency between the samples. As for the ANGST galaxies alone, we find the combined LG and ANGST samples, are generally consistent with the cosmic SFH and that the mean cumulative SFHs are not well described by s...

  9. ASKAP HI imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459

    CERN Document Server

    Serra, P; Kilborn, V; Allison, J R; Amy, S W; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Bell, M E; Bock, D C -J; Bolton, R; Bowen, M; Boyle, B; Broadhurst, S; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Bunton, J D; Chapman, J; Cheng, W; Chippendale, A P; Chung, Y; Cooray, F; Cornwell, T; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Gupta, N; Hampson, G A; Harvey-Smith, L; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Heywood, I; Hotan, A W; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Indermuehle, B; Jacka, C; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Johnston, S; Joseph, J; Kamphuis, P; Leach, M; Lenc, E; Lensson, E; Mackay, S; Marquarding, M; Marvil, J; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Meyer, M; Mirtschin, P; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R P; O'Sullivan, J; Pathikulangara, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C; Popping, A; Qiao, R Y; Reynolds, J E; Roberts, P; Sault, R J; Schinckel, A E T; Shaw, R; Shimwell, T W; Staveley-Smith, L; Storey, M; Sweetnam, A W; Troup, E; Tzioumis, A; Voronkov, M A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C; Wong, O I; Wu, X

    2015-01-01

    We present HI imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian SKA Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve HI in eleven galaxies down to a column density of $\\sim10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$ inside a ~6 deg$^2$ field and with a resolution of ~1 arcmin on the sky and ~8 km/s in velocity. We present HI images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three HI clouds -- two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an HI mass of $10^9$ M$_\\odot$ and accounts for ~15% of the HI associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density HI emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg o...

  10. Star Formation in Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Haynes, Martha P.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Troischt, Parker; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around 36 nearby (zALFALFA HI observations, optical observations, and digital databases like SDSS, and incorporates work undertaken by faculty and students at different institutions within the UAT. Here we present results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO, including an analysis of radial star formation rates and extents of galaxies in the NGC 5846, Abell 779, NRGb331, and HCG 69 groups/clusters. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  11. The dynamical state of galaxy groups and their luminosity content

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the dependence of the luminosity function of galaxies in groups (LF) on group dynamical state. We use the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of galaxy members as a measurement of the dynamical equilibrium of groups identified in the SDSS Data Release 7 by Zandivarez & Martinez. We apply the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit test to distinguish between groups according to whether they have Gaussian or Non-Gaussian velocity distributions, i.e., whether they are relaxed or not. For these two subsamples, we compute the $^{0.1}r-$band LF as a function of group virial mass and group total luminosity. For massive groups, ${\\mathcal M}>5 \\times 10^{13} \\ M_{\\odot} \\ h^{-1}$, we find statistically significant differences between the LF of the two subsamples: the LF of groups that have Gaussian velocity distributions have a brighter characteristic absolute magnitude ($\\sim0.3$ mag) and a steeper faint end slope ($\\sim0.25$). We detect a similar effect when comparing the LF of bright ($M^{group}_{^{0...

  12. The intragroup medium in loose groups of galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Helsdon, S. F.; Ponman, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the ROSAT PSPC to study the properties of a sample of 24 X-ray bright galaxy groups, representing the largest sample examined in detail to date. Hot plasma models are fitted to the spectral data to derive temperatures, and modified King models are used to characterise the surface brightness profiles. In agreement with previous work, we find evidence for the presence of two components in the surface brightness profiles. The extended component is generally found to be much flatter ...

  13. Dust accretion and destruction in galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L

    2010-01-01

    We examine the dust distribution around a sample of 70,000 low redshift galaxy groups and clusters derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By correlating spectroscopically identified background quasars with the galaxy groups we obtain the relative colour excess due to dust reddening. We present a significant detection of dust out to a clustercentric distance of 30 Mpc/h in all four independent SDSS colours, consistent with the expectations of weak lensing masses of similar mass halos and excess galaxy counts. The wavelength dependence of this colour excess is consistent with the expectations of a Milky Way dust law with R_V=3.1. Further, we find that the halo mass dependence of the dust content is much smaller than would be expected by a simple scaling, implying that the dust-to-gas ratio of the most massive clusters (~10E14 Msun/h) is ~3% of the local ISM value, while in small groups (~10E12.7 Msun/h) it is ~55% of the local ISM value. We also find that the dust must have a covering fraction on the order ...

  14. Characterizing SL2S galaxy groups using the Einstein radius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdugo, T.; Motta, V.; Foex, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We aim to study the reliability of RA (the distance from the arcs to the center of the lens) as a measure of the Einstein radius in galaxy groups. In addition, we want to analyze the possibility of using RA as a proxy to characterize some properties of galaxy groups, such as luminosity (L......) and richness (N). Methods. We analyzed the Einstein radius, θE, in our sample of Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S) galaxy groups, and compared it with RA, using three different approaches: 1) the velocity dispersion obtained from weak lensing assuming a singular isothermal sphere profile (θE,I); 2) a strong.......7 ± 0.2)RA, θE,II = (0.4 ± 1.5) + (1.1 ± 0.4)RA, and θE,III = (0.4 ± 1.5) + (0.9 ± 0.3)RA for each method respectively. We found weak evidence of anti-correlation between RA and z, with Log RA = (0.58 ± 0.06) − (0.04 ± 0.1)z, suggesting a possible evolution of the Einstein radius with z, as reported...

  15. Abundance profiles and cool cores in galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ria; Ponman, Trevor J; Rasmussen, Jesper; Sanderson, Alastair J R

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Two Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey (2dXGS), we have examined the abundance profile properties of both cool core (CC) and non cool core (NCC) galaxy groups. The ten NCC systems in our sample represent a population which to date has been poorly studied in the group regime. Fitting the abundance profiles as a linear function of log radius, we find steep abundance gradients in cool core (CC) systems, with a slope of -0.54+/-0.07. In contrast, non cool core (NCC) groups have profiles consistent with uniform metallicity. Many CC groups show a central abundance dip or plateau, and we find evidence for anticorrelation between the core abundance gradient and the 1.4 GHz radio power of the brightest group galaxy (BGG) in CC systems. This may indicate the effect of AGN-driven mixing within the central ~0.1r_500. It is not possible to discern whether such behaviour is present in the NCC groups, due to the small and diverse sample with the requisite radio data. The lack of strong abundance gradien...

  16. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Muñoz, Roberto P; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W; Peng, Eric W; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\\!\\lesssim\\! r_{\\rm eff}/{\\rm kpc}\\! \\lesssim\\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\\!\\lesssim\\! M_U\\! \\lesssim\\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\\!\\lesssim\\! M_I\\! \\lesssim\\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\\!-\\!I)_0\\!\\simeq\\!1.1\\!-\\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\\mu_U\\!\\simeq\\!28.1\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\\mu_I\\!\\simeq\\!27.4\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\\odot} \\simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\\,Z_\\odot}\\!\\simeq\\!10^{6.3-8}\\,M_{\\odot}$. Three dwarfs are ol...

  17. The Astrophysics of galaxy groups and clusters with Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, Stefano

    The complete story of how groups and clusters of galaxies grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: • How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? • How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? • Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? Athena, the next-generation X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, offers the only way to make major advances in answering these questions. We present the impact of Athena on the study of galaxy group and cluster astrophysics. We focus on observations of nearby (z < 0.5) systems, where Athen+ will revolutionize our understanding of the basic process of energy transfer into the ICM, transform our view of the outer regions of galaxy clusters where material continues to accrete, and allow us to track the generation and diffusion of metals in the intracluster gas.

  18. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Jesper [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bai, Lei [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dariush, Ali, E-mail: jr@dark-cosmology.dk [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  19. Towards a realistic population of simulated galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Amandine M C Le; Schaye, Joop; Ponman, Trevor J

    2013-01-01

    We present a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations called cosmo-OWLS. They form an extension to the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project, and have been designed to help improve our understanding of cluster astrophysics and non-linear structure formation, which are now the limiting systematic errors when using clusters as cosmological probes. Starting from identical initial conditions in either the Planck or WMAP7 cosmologies, we systematically vary the most important 'sub-grid' physics, including feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We compare the properties of the simulated galaxy groups and clusters to a wide range of observational data, such as X-ray luminosity and temperature, gas mass fractions, entropy and density profiles, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, I-band mass-to-light ratio, dominance of the brightest cluster galaxy, and central massive black hole (BH) masses, by producing synthetic observations and mimicking observational analysis techniques...

  20. The origin of the galaxy and local group

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume contains the updated and expanded lecture notes of the 37th Saas-Fee Advanced Course organised by the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy. It offers the most comprehensive and up to date review of one of the hottest research topics in astrophysics - how our Milky Way galaxy formed. Joss Bland-Hawthorn & Ken Freeman lectured on Near Field Cosmology - The Origin of the Galaxy and the Local Group. Francesca Matteucci’s chapter is on Chemical evolution of the Milky Way and its Satellites. As designed by the SSAA, books in this series – and this one too – are targeted at graduate and PhD students and young researchers in astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology. Lecturers and researchers entering the field will also benefit from the book.

  1. An HI Survey of Six Local Group Analogs. II. HI properties of group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, D J; Staveley-Smith, L; Gibson, B K; Kilborn, V A; Freeman, K C

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted an HI 21 cm emission-line survey of six loose groups of galaxies chosen to be analogs to the Local Group. The survey was conducted using the Parkes Multibeam instrument and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) over a ~1 Mpc^2 area and covering the full depth of each group, with a M(HI) sensitivity of ~7x10^5 M(sun). Our survey detected 110 sources, 61 of which are associated with the six groups. All of these sources were confirmed with ATCA observations or were previously cataloged by HIPASS. The sources all have optical counterparts and properties consistent with dwarf irregular or late-type spiral galaxies. We present here the HI properties of the groups and their galaxies. We derive an HI mass function for the groups that is consistent with being flatter than the equivalent field HIMF. We also derive a circular velocity distribution function, tracing the luminous dark matter halos in the groups, that is consistent with those of the Local Group and HIPASS galaxies, both of which ar...

  2. Constraints on the Optical Depth of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flender, Samuel; Nagai, Daisuke; McDonald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth (τ) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on τ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intracluster medium, which takes into account star formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. We calibrate the free parameters in the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters, and gas masses of groups and clusters. Our observationally calibrated model predicts the average {τ }500 (i.e., the integrated τ within a disk of size R 500) to better than 6% modeling uncertainty (at 95% confidence level). If the remaining uncertainties associated with other astrophysical uncertainties and X-ray selection effects can be better understood, our model for the optical depth should break the degeneracy between optical depth and cluster velocity in the analysis of future pairwise kSZ measurements and improve cosmological constraints with the combination of upcoming galaxy and CMB surveys, including the nature of dark energy, modified gravity, and neutrino mass.

  3. Trace fossil assemblages in the tide-dominated estuarine system: Ameki Group, south-eastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwenye, O. C.; Nichols, G.; Okogbue, C. O.; Mode, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    A systematic ichnological analysis with sedimentological study of the Eocene Ameki Group in south-eastern Nigeria, was conducted to infer depositional and biogenic processes operating during basin fill, identify discontinuities using substrate controlled ichnofacies, and identify the paleocological conditions that affected the diversity of the trace fossils. The Ameki Group represents a tide-dominated estuarine system characterised by a range of trace fossils assemblages. Eighteen individual ichnogenera and nineteen ichnospecies observed in the study area, were grouped into six recurring ichnofacies namely Scoyenia, Psilonichnus, Skolithos, Cruziana, Glossifungites and Teredolites. Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies are predominant in the estuarine deposits indicating that the sedimentary successions of the Eocene are dominantly of moderate to high energy marginal marine environments. The estuarine deposits (senus stricto) were controlled by low to fluctuating salinity levels, high sedimentation rate and fluctuating hydrodynamic energy. These resulted in the occurrence of low diversity of Scoyenia and Teredolites ichnofacies and low to moderate ichnodiversity of mixed Skolithos and depauperate Cruziana ichnofacies. Low levels of dissolved oxygen in quiescent water-embayment (open estuarine) resulted in low diversity of impoverished Cruziana ichnofacies. Glossifungites ichnofacies marked an amalgamated sequence boundary/marine flooding and an initial flooding surface at the base of the tidally influenced fluvial deposits.

  4. Multi-frequency studies of galaxies and groups: I. Environmental effect on galaxy stellar mass and morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Poudel, A; Nurmi, P; Teerikorpi, P; Tempel, E; Lietzen, H; Einasto, M

    2016-01-01

    To understand the role of the environment in galaxy formation, evolution, and present-day properties, it is essential to study the multi-frequency behavior of different galaxy populations under various environmental conditions. We crossmatch the SDSS DR10 group catalog with GAMA Data Release 2 and Wide-field Survey Explorer (WISE) data to construct a catalog of 1651 groups and 11436 galaxies containing photometric information in 15 different wavebands ranging from ultraviolet (0.152 {\\mu}m) to mid-infrared (22 {\\mu}m). We perform the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies using the MAGPHYS code and estimate the rest frame luminosities and stellar masses. We use the 1/Vmax method to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and luminosity functions, and the luminosity density field of galaxies to define the large scale environment of galaxies. The stellar mass functions of both central and satellite galaxies in groups are different in low and high density large scale environments. Satellite galaxies in ...

  5. AEGIS: Chandra Observation of DEEP2 Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, T; Davis, D; Newman, J; Davis, M; Nandra, K; Laird, E; Koo, D; Coil, A; Cooper, M; Croton, D; Yan, R

    2006-01-01

    We present a 200 ksec Chandra observation of seven spectroscopically selected, high redshift (0.75 < z < 1.03) galaxy groups and clusters discovered by the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). X-ray emission at the locations of these systems is consistent with background. The 3-sigma upper limits on the bolometric X-ray luminosities (L_X) of these systems put a strong constraint on the relation between L_X and the velocity dispersion of member galaxies sigma_gal at z~1; the DEEP2 systems have lower luminosity than would be predicted by the local relation. Our result is consistent with recent findings that at high redshift, optically selected clusters tend to be X-ray underluminous. A comparison with mock catalogs indicates that it is unlikely that this effect is entirely caused by a measurement bias between sigma_gal and the dark matter velocity dispersion. Physically, the DEEP2 systems may still be in the process of forming and hence not fully virialized, or they may be defic...

  6. Evidence for AGN Feedback in Galaxy Clusters and Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Gitti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current generation of flagship X-ray missions, Chandra and XMM-Newton, has changed our understanding of the so-called “cool-core” galaxy clusters and groups. Instead of the initial idea that the thermal gas is cooling and flowing toward the center, the new picture envisages a complex dynamical evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM regulated by the radiative cooling and the nongravitational heating from the active galactic nucleus (AGN. Understanding the physics of the hot gas and its interplay with the relativistic plasma ejected by the AGN is key for understanding the growth and evolution of galaxies and their central black holes, the history of star formation, and the formation of large-scale structures. It has thus become clear that the feedback from the central black hole must be taken into account in any model of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we draw a qualitative picture of the current knowledge of the effects of the AGN feedback on the ICM by summarizing the recent results in this field.

  7. Evidence for AGN Feedback in Galaxy Clusters and Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gitti, Myriam; McNamara, Brian R

    2011-01-01

    The current generation of flagship X-ray missions, Chandra and XMM-Newton, has changed our understanding of the so-called "cool core" galaxy clusters and groups. Instead of the initial idea that the thermal gas is cooling and flowing toward the center, the new picture envisages a complex dynamical evolution of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) regulated by the radiative cooling and the nongravitational heating from the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Understanding the physics of the hot gas and its interplay with the relativistic plasma ejected by the AGN is key for understanding the growth and evolution of galaxies and their central black holes, the history of star formation, and the formation of large-scale structures. It has thus become clear that the feedback from the central black hole must be taken into account in any model of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we draw a qualitative picture of the current knowledge of the effects of the AGN feedback on the ICM by summarizing the recent results in this field.

  8. The redshift-space two-point correlation functions of galaxies and groups in the Nearby Optical Galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Giuricin, G; Girardi, M; Mezzetti, M; Marinoni, C; Giuricin, Giuliano; Samurovic, Srdjan; Girardi, Marisa; Mezzetti, Marino; Marinoni, Christian

    2001-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function in redshift space, $\\xi(s)$, to study the clustering of the galaxies and groups of the Nearby Optical Galaxy (NOG) sample, which is a nearly all-sky, complete, magnitude-limited sample of $\\sim$7000 bright and nearby optical galaxies. The correlation function of galaxies is well described by a power law, $\\xi(s)=(s/s_0)^{-\\gamma}$, with slope $\\gamma\\sim1.5$ and $s_0\\sim6.4 h^{-1}$Mpc (on scales $2.7 - 12 h^{-1}$Mpc), in agreement with previous results of several redshift surveys of optical galaxies. We confirm the existence of morphological segregation between early- and late-type galaxies and, in particular, we find a gradual decreasing of the strength of clustering from the S0 galaxies to the late-type spirals, on intermediate scales. Furthermore, luminous galaxies turn out to be more clustered than dim galaxies. The luminosity segregation, which is significant for both early- and late-type objects, starts to become appreciable only for galaxies brighter than $M_B\\...

  9. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an extensive CCD search for faint, unresolved dwarf galaxies of very low surface brightness in the whole Centaurus group region encompassing the Cen A and M 83 subgroups lying at a distance of roughly 4 and 5 Mpc, respectively. The aim is to significantly increase the sample of known Centaurus group members down to a fainter level of completeness, serving as a basis for future studies of the 3D structure of the group. Following our previous survey of 60 square degrees covering the M 83 subgroup, we extended and completed our survey of the Centaurus group region by imaging another 500 square degrees area in the g and r bands with the wide-field Dark Energy Survey Camera at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO. The limiting central surface brightness reached for suspected Centaurus members is $\\mu_r \\approx 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, corresponding to an absolute magnitude $M_r \\approx -9.5$. The images were enhanced using different filtering techniques. We found 41 new dwarf galaxy candidates, which togethe...

  10. A Joint GMRT/X-ray study of galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    O'Sullivan, E; Vrtilek, J M; Raychaudhuri, S; Athreya, R; Venturi, T; David, L P

    2009-01-01

    We present results from combined low-frequency radio and X-ray studies of nearby galaxy groups. We consider two main areas: firstly, the evolutionary process from spiral-dominated, HI-rich groups to elliptical-dominated systems with hot, X-ray emitting gas halos; secondly, the mechanism of AGN feedback which appears to balance radiative cooling of the hot halos of evolved groups. The combination of radio and X-ray observations provides a powerful tool for these studies, allowing examination of gas in both hot and cool phases, and of the effects of shock heating and AGN outbursts. Low-frequency radio data are effective in detecting older and less energetic electron populations and are therefore vital for the determination of the energetics and history of such events. We present results from our ongoing study of Stephan's Quintet, a spiral-rich group in which tidal interactions and shock heating appear to be transforming HI in the galaxies into a diffuse X-ray emitting halo, and show examples of AGN feedback fr...

  11. Mid-Infrared Evidence for Accelerated Evolution in Compact Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Lisa May; Gallagher, Sarah C; Hibbard, John E; Hornschemeier, Ann E; Charlton, Jane C; Jarrett, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    We find evidence for accelerated evolution in compact group galaxies from the distribution in mid-infrared colorspace of 42 galaxies from 12 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) compared to the the distributions of several other samples including the LVL+SINGS galaxies, interacting galaxies, and galaxies from the Coma Cluster. We find that the HCG galaxies are not uniformly distributed in colorspace, as well as quantitative evidence for a gap. Galaxies in the infall region of the Coma cluster also exhibit a non-uniform distribution and a less well defined gap, which may reflect a similarity with the compact group environment. Neither the Coma Center or interacting samples show evidence of a gap, leading us to speculate that the gap is unique to the environment of high galaxy density where gas has not been fully processed or stripped.

  12. Galaxy clusters and groups in the ALHAMBRA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ascaso, Begoña; Fernández-Soto, Alberto; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; López-Sanjuan, Carlos; Molino, Alberto; Schoenell, William; Jiménez-Teja, Yolanda; Merson, Alexander I; Huertas-Company, Marc; Díaz-García, Luis Alberto; Martínez, Vicent J; Cenarro, A Javier; Dupke, Renato; Márquez, Isabel; Masegosa, Josefa; Nieves-Seoane, Lorena; Povic, Mirjana; Varela, Jesús; Viironen, Kerttu; Aguerri, J Alfonso L; Del Olmo, Ascensión; Moles, Mariano; Perea, Jaime; Alfaro, Emilio; Aparicio-Villegas, Teresa; Broadhurst, Tom; Cabrera-Caño, Jesús; Castander, Francisco J; Cepa, Jordi; Cerviño, Miguel; González~Delgado, Rosa M; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hurtado-Gil, Lluis; Husillos, Cesar; Infante, Leopoldo; Prada, Francisco; Quintana, Jose María

    2015-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 348 galaxy clusters and groups with $0.2galaxy clusters and groups with both $70\\%$ completeness and purity down to dark matter halo masses of $M_h\\sim3\\times10^{13}\\rm M_{\\odot}$ for $z<0.85$. Cluster redshifts are expected to be recovered with $\\sim0.6\\%$ precision for $z<1$. We also expect to measure cluster masses with $\\sigma_{M_h|M^*_{CL}}\\sim0.25-...

  13. The Fossils in Shangxi Group and Its Implication for Tectonics, Southern Anhui, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐树桐; 陈冠宝; 陶正; 石永红; 孙枢; Kenneth J.Hsu; 尹磊明; 欧阳舒; 廖卓庭

    1994-01-01

    The Shangxi Group is the local name in southern Anhui Province and it is believed to be the equivalence of the well-known Banxi Group in Hunan Province, southern China. So the area occupied by the Shangxi Group was regarded as a part of the "Jiangnan old land" of Presinian till it was challenged by the present authors years ago. After we postulated that there may be some strata of Palaeozoic Era in Shangxi Group, some microfossils and then macrofossils of Palaeozoic were found in some part of it. The macrof os-sils, Lingula sp. , Conulariid and the microfossils indicate that most units of the Shangxi Group are Palaeozoic strata. Based on the discovery of these fossils and the recognition of the tectonic-setting of the different tectono-petrologic units in the Shangxi Group, three different stratigraphic sequences (island-arc volcanics, back-arc sediments and the cover of passive margin of Yangtze Continental Plate) are established and the tectonic evolution of them is postulated in the present paper. Al

  14. The Suppression of Star Formation and the Effect of Galaxy Environment in Low-Redshift Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use GALEX imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z=0.06 to explore how local and global group environment affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates of their member galaxies. The data provide star formation rates out to beyond 2R_200 in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M_sun/yr and 10^8 M_sun, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R ~ 1.5 Mpc ~ 2R_200, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time we also report a similar suppression of the specific star formation rate within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infallin...

  15. Near-ultraviolet signatures of environment-driven galaxy quenching in Sloan Digital Sky Survey groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-ultraviolet (NUV) galaxy photometry with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalogue of Yang et al. We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass-matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5 and 10^{10.7} M_{⊙}, showing that higher mass galaxies are more likely to have residual star formation when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  16. Do the stellar populations of the brightest two group galaxies depend on the magnitude gap?

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, M; Khosroshahi, H G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the stellar populations of first and second brightest group galaxies (respectively BGGs and SBGGs) vary as a function of the magnitude gap, {\\Delta}M_12, using an SDSS-based sample of 569 groups with elliptical BGGs. The sample is complete in redshift, luminosity and for {\\Delta}M_12 up to 2.5 mag, and contains 75 optical fossil groups (FGs, with {\\Delta}M_12 > 2.0 mag). We determine ages, metallicities, and star formation histories (SFHs) of BGGs and SBGGs using the STARLIGHT code with two single stellar population (SSP) models, one of which (MILES) leads to significantly more extended SFHs than the other (BC03). After removing the dependence with stellar mass, there is no correlation with magnitude gap of BGG ages, metallicities, and SFHs derived with the BC03 model. However, with the MILES model, the BGGs in FGs appear to have more extended SFHs than those in regular groups. But this signature with MILES is not seen in the colours, specific star formation rates nor in the 4000 A breaks, ...

  17. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  18. Investigating the cores of fossil systems with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, V; Sanders, J S; Schellenberger, G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cores of fossil galaxy groups and clusters (`fossil systems') using archival Chandra data for a sample of 17 fossil systems. We determined the cool-core fraction for fossils via three observable diagnostics, the central cooling time, cuspiness, and concentration parameter. We quantified the dynamical state of the fossils by the X-ray peak/brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and the X-ray peak/emission weighted centre separations. We studied the X-ray emission coincident with the BCG to detect the presence of potential thermal coronae. A deprojection analysis was performed for z < 0.05 fossils to obtain cooling time and entropy profiles, and to resolve subtle temperature structures. We investigated the Lx-T relation for fossils from the 400d catalogue to see if the scaling relation deviates from that of other groups. Most fossils are identified as cool-core objects via at least two cool-core diagnostics. All fossils have their dominant elliptical galaxy within 50 kpc of the X-ray peak, and mo...

  19. Galex Catalog And Atlas Of Our Local Group Of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Barry

    The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission contains the most comprehensive collection of ultraviolet imaging of Local Group galaxies likely to exist for decades. Unfortunately, this impressive resource will be under-utilized because the standard GALEX pipeline and source catalogs are not designed to properly measure point sources in crowded fields. We propose to solve this problem and unlock this great wealth of data obtained by NASA by constructing the GALEX Catalog and Atlas of Our Local Group Galaxies which shall include 49 GALEX observed Local Group members within 1.5 Mpc including the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds in their entirety. The PSF- fitting photometry method has already been tested and increases the number of detected point sources by 300% over the standard GALEX pipeline. Our catalogs will provide approximately 5-6 million point source measurements. We have also developed a novel method for producing wide field background-balanced mosaics of GALEX data. This has already been implemented for the Magellanic Clouds and the method will be applied to the other largest Local Group Members (M31 and M33). The Atlas images we produce will combine imaging data from all GALEX surveys to achieve maximum depth. Quality assurance of the images and catalogs will be done by the proposers in the course of undertaking a number of science-driven projects that require cross-matching the ultraviolet point sources of the Magellanic Clouds to similar resolution optical (MCPS) and infrared (SAGE) source catalogs. The Catalogs and Atlas (including the Magellanic Clouds cross-matched catalogs) will be made available to the astronomical community by providing them to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST, the official GALEX archive) as a High Level Science Product as well as assimilated on an object-by- object basis into the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) and thereby made immediately accessible in VO-compatible format. This program will enhance

  20. GALAXIES IN X-RAY GROUPS. III. SATELLITE COLOR AND MORPHOLOGY TRANSFORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Matthew R.; Ma, Chung-Pei [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bundy, Kevin; Leauthaud, Alexie; Vulcani, Benedetta [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Tinker, Jeremy [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Finoguenov, Alexis, E-mail: mgeorge@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-06-20

    While the star formation rates and morphologies of galaxies have long been known to correlate with their local environment, the process by which these correlations are generated is not well understood. Galaxy groups are thought to play an important role in shaping the physical properties of galaxies before entering massive clusters at low redshift, and transformations of satellite galaxies likely dominate the buildup of local environmental correlations. To illuminate the physical processes that shape galaxy evolution in dense environments, we study a sample of 116 X-ray selected galaxy groups at z = 0.2-1 with halo masses of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} and centroids determined with weak lensing. We analyze morphologies based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging and colors determined from 31 photometric bands for a stellar mass-limited population of 923 satellite galaxies and a comparison sample of 16,644 field galaxies. Controlling for variations in stellar mass across environments, we find significant trends in the colors and morphologies of satellite galaxies with group-centric distance and across cosmic time. Specifically at low stellar mass (log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 9.8-10.3), the fraction of disk-dominated star-forming galaxies declines from >50% among field galaxies to <20% among satellites near the centers of groups. This decline is accompanied by a rise in quenched galaxies with intermediate bulge+disk morphologies, and only a weak increase in red bulge-dominated systems. These results show that both color and morphology are influenced by a galaxy's location within a group halo. We suggest that strangulation and disk fading alone are insufficient to explain the observed morphological dependence on environment, and that galaxy mergers or close tidal encounters must play a role in building up the population of quenched galaxies with bulges seen in dense environments at low redshift.

  1. Giant Molecular Clouds in the Local Group Galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gratier, P; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N J; Schuster, K F; Kramer, C; Corbelli, E; Combes, F; Brouillet, N; van der Werf, P P; Röllig, M

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the systematic CO(2-1) survey at 12" resolution covering most of the local group spiral M 33 which, at a distance of 840 kpc, is close enough that individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) can be identified. The goal of this work is to study the properties of the GMCs in this subsolar metallicity galaxy. The CPROPS (Cloud Properties) algorithm (Rosolowsky & Leroy 2006) was used to identify 337 GMCs in M 33, the largest sample to date in an external galaxy. The sample is used to study the GMC luminosity function, or mass spectrum under the assumption of a constant N(H2)/ICO ratio. We find that n(L)dL = K*L^(-2.0\\pm0.1) for the entire sample. However, when the sample is divided into inner and outer disk samples, the exponent changes from 1.6 \\pm 0.2 for the centre 2 kpc to 2.3 \\pm 0.2 for galactocentric distances larger than 2 kpc. Based on the emission in the FUV, Halpha, 8mu, and 24mu bands, each cloud was classified in terms of its star forming activity - no star formation, embed...

  2. Clusters and groups of galaxies in the 2dF galaxy redshift survey

    CERN Document Server

    Tago, E; Einasto, M; Saar, E

    2005-01-01

    We create a new catalogue of groups and clusters for the 2dF GRS final release sample. We show that the variable linking length friends-of-friends (FoF) algorithms used so far yield groups with sizes that grow systematically with distance from the observer, but FoF algorithms with a constant linking length are free from this fault. We apply the FoF algorithm with a constant linking length for the 2dF GRS, compare for each group its potential and kinetic energies and remove galaxies with excess random velocities. Our sample contains 7657 groups in the Northern part, and 10058 groups in the Southern part of the 2dF survey with membership Ng >= 2. We analyze selection effects of the catalogue and compare our catalogue of groups with other recently published catalogues based on the 2dF GRS. We also estimate the total luminosities of our groups, correcting for group members fainter than the observational limit of the survey. The cluster catalogues are available at our web-site (http://www.aai.ee/~maret/2dfgr.html)

  3. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. I. WHICH ENVIRONMENT AFFECTS GALAXY EVOLUTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J.; Miniati, Francesco; Cameron, Ewan; Peng, Yingjie; Pipino, Antonio; Rudick, Craig S. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Norberg, Peder [Department of Physics, Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Silverman, John D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Van Gorkom, Jacqueline [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Finoguenov, Alexis, E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-84571 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-20

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is based on a sample of ∼1500 galaxy members of 141 groups in the mass range ∼10{sup 12.5-14.5} M{sub ☉} within the narrow redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.0585. ZENS adopts novel approaches, described here, to quantify four different galactic environments, namely: (1) the mass of the host group halo; (2) the projected halo-centric distance; (3) the rank of galaxies as central or satellites within their group halos; and (4) the filamentary large-scale structure density. No self-consistent identification of a central galaxy is found in ∼40% of <10{sup 13.5} M{sub ☉} groups, from which we estimate that ∼15% of groups at these masses are dynamically unrelaxed systems. Central galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups generally have similar properties, suggesting that centrals are regulated by their mass and not by their environment. Centrals in relaxed groups have, however, ∼30% larger sizes than in unrelaxed groups, possibly due to accretion of small satellites in virialized group halos. At M > 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, satellite galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups have similar size, color, and (specific) star formation rate distributions; at lower galaxy masses, satellites are marginally redder in relaxed relative to unrelaxed groups, suggesting quenching of star formation in low-mass satellites by physical processes active in relaxed halos. Overall, relaxed and unrelaxed groups show similar stellar mass populations, likely indicating similar stellar mass conversion efficiencies. In the enclosed ZENS catalog, we publish all environmental diagnostics as well as the galaxy structural and photometric measurements described in companion ZENS papers II and III.

  4. The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) of Galaxies in Groups along the Cosmic Web. I. Which Environment Affects Galaxy Evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Carollo, C M; Lilly, S J; Miniati, F; Norberg, P; Silverman, J D; van Gorkom, J; Cameron, E; Finoguenov, A; Pipino, A; Rudick, C S; Lu, T; Peng, Y

    2012-01-01

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is designed to compare the dependence of z=0 galaxy structural and stellar populations diagnostics at constant stellar mass on four measures of the environment: the mass of the host group halos; the projected distance from the center of the halo; the rank of galaxies as central or satellites; and the filamentary LSS density on which the groups reside. The complete ZENS sample contains 1630 galaxies in 141~10^{12.5-14}M_sun 2PIGG groups at z~0.06. We outline the survey motivation and describe novel approaches to quantify the environments of galaxies. We introduce a set of self-consistency checks to define the group centers and to rank galaxies as centrals or satellites, and describe an Nth-nearest-neighbor approach to determine the LSS density field using groups as tracers. We publish the ZENS catalogue of galaxy and group properties, which combines the environmental diagnostics presented here with structural and SED measurements described in subsequent papers. In a suite ...

  5. Pseudo bulges in galaxy groups: the role of environment in secular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Preetish K.; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Barway, Sudhanshu

    2017-01-01

    We examine the dependence of the fraction of galaxies containing pseudo bulges on environment for a flux limited sample of ˜5000 SDSS galaxies. We have separated bulges into classical and pseudo bulge categories based on their position on the Kormendy diagram. Pseudo bulges are thought to be formed by internal processes and are a result of secular evolution in galaxies. We attempt to understand the dependence of secular evolution on environment and morphology. Dividing our sample of disc+bulge galaxies based on group membership into three categories: central and satellite galaxies in groups and isolated field galaxies, we find that pseudo bulge fraction is almost equal for satellite and field galaxies. Fraction of pseudo bulge hosts in central galaxies is almost half of the fraction of pseudo bulges in satellite and field galaxies. This trend is also valid when only galaxies are considered only spirals or S0. Using the projected fifth nearest neighbour density as measure of local environment, we look for the dependence of pseudo bulge fraction on environmental density. Satellite and field galaxies show very weak or no dependence of pseudo bulge fraction on environment. However, fraction of pseudo bulges hosted by central galaxies decreases with increase in local environmental density. We do not find any dependence of pseudo bulge luminosity on environment. Our results suggest that the processes that differentiate the bulge types are a function of environment while processes responsible for the formation of pseudo bulges seem to be independent of environment.

  6. Pseudo bulges in galaxy groups: the role of environment in secular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Preetish K.; Wadadekar, Yogesh; Barway, Sudhanshu

    2017-05-01

    We examine the dependence of the fraction of galaxies containing pseudo bulges on environment for a flux limited sample of ˜5000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have separated bulges into classical and pseudo bulge categories based on their position on the Kormendy diagram. Pseudo bulges are thought to be formed by internal processes and are a result of secular evolution in galaxies. We attempt to understand the dependence of secular evolution on environment and morphology. Dividing our sample of disc + bulge galaxies based on group membership into three categories: central and satellite galaxies in groups and isolated field galaxies, we find that pseudo bulge fraction is almost equal for satellite and field galaxies. Fraction of pseudo bulge hosts in central galaxies is almost half of the fraction of pseudo bulges in satellite and field galaxies. This trend is also valid when only galaxies are considered only spirals or S0. Using the projected fifth nearest neighbour density as measure of local environment, we look for the dependence of pseudo bulge fraction on environmental density. Satellite and field galaxies show very weak or no dependence of pseudo bulge fraction on environment. However, fraction of pseudo bulges hosted by central galaxies decreases with increase in local environmental density. We do not find any dependence of pseudo bulge luminosity on environment. Our results suggest that the processes that differentiate the bulge types are a function of environment while processes responsible for the formation of pseudo bulges seem to be independent of environment.

  7. Seeking Shared Practice: A Juxtaposition of the Attributes and Activities of Organized Fossil Groups with Those of Professional Paleontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Ellis, Shari; Dunckel, Betty A.; Hendy, Austin J. W.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to define the attributes and practices of organized fossil groups (e.g., clubs, paleontological societies) as amateur paleontologists, as well as those of professional paleontologists, and explore the potential for these two groups to work collaboratively as a formalized community. Such an investigation is necessary to develop…

  8. Galaxy distribution and evolution around a sample of 2dF groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, A L B; Lopes, P A A; Schilling, A C

    2009-01-01

    We study galaxy evolution and spatial patterns in the surroundings of a sample of 2dF groups. Our aim is to find evidence of galaxy evolution and clustering out to 10 times the virial radius of the groups and so redefine their properties according to the spatial patterns in the fields and relate them to galaxy evolution. Group members and interlopers were redefined after the identification of gaps in the redshift distribution. We then used exploratory spatial statistics based on the second moment of the Ripley function to probe the anisotropy in the galaxy distribution around the groups. We found an important anticorrelation between anisotropy and the fraction of early-type galaxies in these fields. Our results illustrate how the dynamical state of galaxy groups can be determined through the systematic study of their neighborhoods.

  9. Towards a Phylogenetic Analysis of Galaxy Evolution a Case Study with the Dwarf Galaxies of the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Fraix-Burnet, D; Douzery, E J P; Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Choler, Philippe; Douzery, Emmanuel J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Context: The Hubble tuning fork diagram has always been the preferred scheme for classification of galaxies. It is based on morphology only. At the opposite, biologists have long taken into account the genealogical relatedness of living entities for classification purposes. Aims: Assuming branching evolution of galaxies as a 'descent with modification', we show here that the concepts and tools of phylogenetic systematics widely used in biology can be heuristically transposed to the case of galaxies. Methods: This approach that we call "astrocladistics" is applied to Dwarf Galaxies of the Local Group and provides the first evolutionary tree for real galaxies. Results: The trees that we present here are sufficiently solid to support the existence of a hierarchical organization in the diversity of dwarf galaxies of the Local Group. This also shows that these galaxies all derive from a common ancestral kind of objects. We find that some kinds of dIrrs are progenitors of both dSphs and other kinds of dIrrs.We also...

  10. Forming Early-type Galaxies in Groups Prior to Cluster Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Kautsch, Stefan J; Soto, Christian A; Tran, Kim-Vy H; Zaritsky, Dennis; Moustakas, John

    2008-01-01

    We study a unique proto-cluster of galaxies, the supergroup SG1120-1202. We quantify the degree to which morphological transformation of cluster galaxies occurs prior to cluster assembly in order to explain the observed early-type fractions in galaxy clusters at z=0. SG1120-1202 at z~0.37 is comprised of four gravitationally bound groups that are expected to coalesce into a single cluster by z=0. Using HST ACS observations, we compare the morphological fractions of the supergroup galaxies to those found in a range of environments. We find that the morphological fractions of early-type galaxies (~60 %) and the ratio of S0 to elliptical galaxies (0.5) in SG1120-1202 are very similar to clusters at comparable redshift, consistent with pre-processing in the group environment playing the dominant role in establishing the observed early-type fraction in galaxy clusters.

  11. The H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ Content of the Eridanus Group of Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Omar; K. S. Dwarakanath

    2005-03-01

    The H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ content of galaxies in the Eridanus group is studied using the GMRT observations and the HIPASS data. A significant H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ deficiency up to a factor of 2–3 is observed in galaxies in the high galaxy density regions. The H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ deficiency in galaxies is observed to be directly correlated to the local projected galaxy density, and inversely correlated to the line-of-sight radial velocity. Furthermore, galaxies with larger optical diameters are predominantly in the lower galaxy density regions. It is suggested that the H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ deficiency in Eridanus is due to tidal interactions. In some galaxies, evidences of tidal interactions are seen. An important implication is that significant evolution of galaxies can take place in the group environment. In the hierarchical way of formation of clusters via mergers of groups, a fraction of the observed H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ deficiency in clusters could have originated in groups. The co-existence of S0s and severely H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ deficient galaxies in the Eridanus group suggests that tidal interaction is likely to be an effective mechanism for transforming spirals to S0s.

  12. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): The halo mass of galaxy groups from maximum-likelihood weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jiaxin; Frenk, Carlos S; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Norberg, Peder; Schneider, Michael D; Peacock, John A; Jing, Yipeng; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J I; Loveday, Jon

    2014-01-01

    We present a maximum-likelihood weak lensing analysis of the mass distribution in optically selected spectroscopic Galaxy Groups (G3Cv1) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using background Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies. The scaling of halo mass, $M_h$, with various group observables is investigated. Our main results are: 1) the measured relations of halo mass with group luminosity, virial volume and central galaxy stellar mass, $M_\\star$, agree very well with predictions from mock group catalogues constructed from a GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model implemented in the Millennim $\\Lambda$CDM N-body simulation; 2) the measured relations of halo mass with velocity dispersion and projected half-abundance radius show weak tension with mock predictions, hinting at problems in the mock galaxy dynamics and their small scale distribution; 3) the median $M_h|M_\\star$ measured from weak lensing depends more sensitively on the dispersion in $M_\\star$ at fixed $M_h$ than it ...

  13. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkic, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Cardiff, Ann H.; Durell, Pat R.

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 m photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 m photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-red), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-blue) have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M yr1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  14. Galaxy Group Stephan's Quintet Video File HubbleMinute: Battle Royale in Stephan's Quintet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's closeup view of Stephan's Quintet, a group of five galaxies, reveals a string of brighter star clusters that separate like a diamond necklace. Astronomers studying the compact galaxy group Stephan's Quintet have seen creative destruction in the many collisions taking place among its galaxies. This HubbleMinute discusses what astronomers are learning and hope to learn from exploring the quintet.

  15. Intragroup dark matter distribution in small galaxy group-like systems in a LCDM cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Aceves, Hector; Altamirano-Devora, L; Ramon-Fox, F G; Cañas, R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the distribution of dark matter in small galaxy groups, in a LCDM cosmology, identified using a physical criterion. We quantify the amount of intra-group dark matter and characterize its distribution. We find that compact associations of galaxies, as well as those intermediate and loose groups, have a rather flat profiles with a logarithmic slope of gamma =-0.2. Hence, the intra-group dark matter does not follow the same cuspy tendency that haloes of galaxies have. In intermediate and loose galaxy associations the intragroup matter tends to be <50% that of the total mass of the group, and in compact associations is <20% within their group radius. So, in general, common dark matter haloes of small galaxy groups are not cuspy nor massive.

  16. Understanding `galaxy groups' as a unique structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; John, R. S.; Gupta, P.; Kumar, H.

    2017-10-01

    'Galaxy groups' have hardly been realized as a separate class of objects with specific characteristics in the structural hierarchy. The presumption that the self-similarity of dark matter structures is a valid prescription for the baryonic universe at all scales has rendered smaller structures undetectable by current observational facilities, leading to lesser dedicated studies on them. Some recent reports that indicate a deviation from LX-T scaling in groups compared to clusters have motivated us to study their physical properties in depth. In this article, we report the extensive study on physical properties of groups in comparison to the clusters through cosmological hydrodynamic plus N-body simulations using enzo 2.2 code. As additional physics, radiative cooling, heating due to supernova and star motions, star formation and stellar feedback have been implemented. We have produced a mock sample of 362 objects with mass ranging from 5 × 1012 M⊙ to 2.5 × 1015 M⊙. Strikingly, we have found that objects with mass below ∼8 × 1013 M⊙ do not follow any of the cluster self-similar laws in hydrostatics, not even in thermal and non-thermal energies. Two distinct scaling laws are observed to be followed with breaks at ∼8 × 1013 M⊙ for mass, ∼1 keV for temperature and ∼1 Mpc for radius. This places groups as a distinct entity in the hierarchical structures, well demarcated from clusters. This study reveals that groups are mostly far away from virialization, suggesting the need for formulating new models for deciphering their physical parameters. They are also shown to have high turbulence and more non-thermal energy stored, indicating better visibility in the non-thermal regime.

  17. Seeking Shared Practice: A Juxtaposition of the Attributes and Activities of Organized Fossil Groups with Those of Professional Paleontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Ellis, Shari; Dunckel, Betty A.; Hendy, Austin J. W.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2016-10-01

    This study sought to define the attributes and practices of organized fossil groups (e.g., clubs, paleontological societies) as amateur paleontologists, as well as those of professional paleontologists, and explore the potential for these two groups to work collaboratively as a formalized community. Such an investigation is necessary to develop design principles for an online environment that supports this community and encourages communication and shared practice among individuals with different backgrounds in paleontology and who are geographically isolated. A national survey of fossil group representatives and professional paleontologists was used to address the research questions. The results provide a rich description of the attributes and activities of both groups and are discussed in terms of three design principles for supporting the two groups in a form of collaboration and fellowship via a coherent shared practice within an online learning community.

  18. Assessing Colour-dependent Occupation Statistics Inferred from Galaxy Group Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Duncan; Hearin, Andrew; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Berlind, Andreas; Mo, H J; Tinker, Jeremy; Yang, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ability of current implementations of galaxy group finders to recover colour-dependent halo occupation statistics. To test the fidelity of group catalogue inferred statistics, we run three different group finders used in the literature over a mock that includes galaxy colours in a realistic manner. Overall, the resulting mock group catalogues are remarkably similar, and most colour-dependent statistics are recovered with reasonable accuracy. However, it is also clear that certain systematic errors arise as a consequence of correlated errors in group membership determination, central/satellite designation, and halo mass assignment. We introduce a new statistic, the halo transition probability (HTP), which captures the combined impact of all these errors. As a rule of thumb, errors tend to equalize the properties of distinct galaxy populations (i.e. red vs. blue galaxies or centrals vs. satellites), and to result in inferred occupation statistics that are more accurate for red galaxies than f...

  19. Galaxy distribution and evolution around a sample of 2dF groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Trevisan, M.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Schilling, A. C.

    2009-10-01

    Context: We study galaxy evolution and spatial patterns in the surroundings of a sample of 2dF groups. Aims: Our aim is to find evidence of galaxy evolution and clustering out to 10 times the virial radius of the groups and so redefine their properties according to the spatial patterns in the fields and relate them to galaxy evolution. Methods: Group members and interlopers were redefined after the identification of gaps in the redshift distribution. We then used exploratory spatial statistics based on the the second moment of the Ripley function to probe the anisotropy in the galaxy distribution around the groups. Results: We found an important anticorrelation between anisotropy around groups and the fraction of early-type galaxies in these fields. Our results illustrate how the dynamical state of galaxy groups can be ascertained by the systematic study of their neighborhoods. This is an important achievement, since the correct estimate of the extent to which galaxies are affected by the group environment and follow large-scale filamentary structure is relevant to understanding the process of galaxy clustering and evolution in the Universe.

  20. Interactions of Galaxies outside Clusters and Massive Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Jaswant K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of physical properties on small and large scale density environment. The galaxy population consists of mainly passively evolving galaxies in comparatively low density regions of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The environment is defined by (i) local density using adaptive smoothing kernel, (ii)projected distance, $r_p$, to the nearest neighbor and (iii) the morphology of the nearest neighbor. In order to detect long-range interaction effects we divide galaxy interactions into four cases depending on morphology of target and neighbor galaxies. We report that the impact of interaction on galaxy properties is detectable at least out to the pair separation corresponding to the virial radius of (the neighbor) galaxies in our sample, which is mostly between 210 and 360 $h^{-1}$kpc. We show that early type fraction, for isolated galaxies with $r_p > r_{vir,nei}$ are almost ignorant of the background density and, has a very weak density dependence for closed pairs. Star formation activi...

  1. Radio Continuum and Far-infrared Emission from the Galaxies in the Eridanus Group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Omar; K. S. Dwarakanath

    2005-03-01

    The Eridanus galaxies follow the well-known radio–FIR correlation. The majority (70%) of these galaxies have their star formation rates below that of the Milky Way. The galaxies that have a significant excess of radio emission are identified as low luminosity AGNs based on their radio morphologies obtained from the GMRT observations. There are no powerful AGNs (20cm > 1023W Hz-1) in the group. The two most far-infrared and radio luminous galaxies in the group have optical and HI morphologies suggestive of recent tidal interactions. The Eridanus group also has two far-infrared luminous but radio-deficient galaxies. It is believed that these galaxies are observed within a few Myr of the onset of an intense star formation episode after being quiescent for at least a 100 Myr. The upper end of the radio luminosity distribution of the Eridanus galaxies (20cm ∼ 1022W Hz-1) is consistent with that of the field galaxies, other groups, and late-type galaxies in nearby clusters.

  2. Galaxy Zoo: the interplay of quenching mechanisms in the group environment★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Bamford, S. P.; Hart, R. E.; Kruk, S. J.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Simmons, B. D.

    2017-08-01

    Does the environment of a galaxy directly influence the quenching history of a galaxy? Here, we investigate the detailed morphological structures and star formation histories of a sample of SDSS group galaxies with both classifications from Galaxy Zoo 2 and near ultra-violet (NUV) detections in GALEX. We use the optical and NUV colours to infer the quenching time and rate describing a simple exponentially declining star formation history for each galaxy, along with a control sample of field galaxies. We find that the time since quenching and the rate of quenching do not correlate with the relative velocity of a satellite but are correlated with the group potential. This quenching occurs within an average quenching time-scale of ∼ 2.5 Gyr from star forming to complete quiescence, during an average infall time (from ∼10R200 to 0.01R200) of ∼ 2.6 Gyr. Our results suggest that the environment does play a direct role in galaxy quenching through quenching mechanisms that are correlated with the group potential, such as harassment, interactions or starvation. Environmental quenching mechanisms that are correlated with satellite velocity, such as ram-pressure stripping, are not the main cause of quenching in the group environment. We find that no single mechanism dominates over another, except in the most extreme environments or masses. Instead, an interplay of mergers, mass and morphological quenching and environment-driven quenching mechanisms dependent on the group potential drive galaxy evolution in groups.

  3. Direct evidence of hierarchical assembly at low masses from isolated dwarf galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierwalt, S.; Liss, S. E.; Johnson, K. E.; Patton, D. R.; Privon, G. C.; Besla, G.; Kallivayalil, N.; Putman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The demographics of dwarf galaxy populations have long been in tension with predictions from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm 1-4 . If primordial density fluctuations were scale-free as predicted, dwarf galaxies should themselves host dark-matter subhaloes 5 , the most massive of which may have undergone star formation resulting in dwarf galaxy groups. Ensembles of dwarf galaxies are observed as sate­llites of more massive galaxies 6-9 , and there is observational 10 and theoretical 11 evidence to suggest that these satellites at redshift z = 0 were captured by the massive host halo as a group. However, the evolution of dwarf galaxies is highly susceptible to environment 12-14 , making these satellite groups imperfect probes of ΛCDM in the low-mass regime. Here we report one of the clearest examples yet of hierarchical structure formation at low masses: using deep multi-wavelength data, we identify seven isolated, spectroscopically confirmed groups of only dwarf galaxies. Each group hosts three to five known members, has a baryonic mass of ~4.4 × 109 to 2 × 1010 solar masses (M ⊙), and requires a mass-to-light ratio of <100 to be gravitationally bound. Such groups are predicted to be rare theoretically and found to be rare observationally at the current epoch, and thus provide a unique window into the possible formation mechanism of more massive, isolated galaxies.

  4. The radial structure of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ascasibar, Y; Müller, V; Gottlöber, S

    2003-01-01

    Simple self-consistent models of galaxy groups and clusters are tested against the results of high-resolution adiabatic gasdynamical simulations. We investigate two models based on the existence of a 'universal' dark matter density profile and two versions of the beta-model. The mass distribution of relaxed clusters can be fitted by phenomenological formulae proposed in the literature. Haloes that have experienced a recent merging event are systematically less concentrated and show steeper profiles than relaxed objects near the centre. The hot X-ray emitting gas is found to be in approximate hydrostatic equilibrium with the dark matter potential, and it is well described by a polytropic equation of state. Analytic formulae for the gas density and temperature can be derived from these premises. Though able to reproduce the X-ray surface brightness, the beta-model is shown to provide a poor description of our numerical clusters. We find strong evidence of a 'universal' temperature profile that decreases by a fa...

  5. Compression map, functional groups and fossilization: A chemometric approach (Pennsylvanian neuropteroid foliage, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, J. A.; Zodrow, E.L.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Nearly all of the spectrochemical studies involving Carboniferous foliage of seed-ferns are based on a limited number of pinnules, mainly compressions. In contrast, in this paper we illustrate working with a larger pinnate segment, i.e., a 22-cm long neuropteroid specimen, compression-preserved with cuticle, the compression map. The objective is to study preservation variability on a larger scale, where observation of transparency/opacity of constituent pinnules is used as a first approximation for assessing the degree of pinnule coalification/fossilization. Spectrochemical methods by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry furnish semi-quantitative data for principal component analysis.The compression map shows a high degree of preservation variability, which ranges from comparatively more coalified pinnules to less coalified pinnules that resemble fossilized-cuticles, noting that the pinnule midveins are preserved more like fossilized-cuticles. A general overall trend of coalified pinnules towards fossilized-cuticles, i.e., variable chemistry, is inferred from the semi-quantitative FTIR data as higher contents of aromatic compounds occur in the visually more opaque upper location of the compression map. The latter also shows a higher condensation of the aromatic nuclei along with some variation in both ring size and degree of aromatic substitution. From principal component analysis we infer correspondence between transparency/opacity observation and chemical information which correlate with varying degree to fossilization/coalification among pinnules. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Skillman, Evan D; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Williams, Benjamin F

    2015-01-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (10^4 < Mstar < 10^8 Msun) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived from analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) Lower mass galaxies quench earlier than higher mass galaxies; (2) Inside of virial radius there is no correlation between a satellite's current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; (3) There are hints of systematic differences in quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with literature results, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z=0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ~7 dex in stellar mass (10^4 < Mstar < 10^11.5 Msun). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases to...

  7. Kinematics of dwarf galaxies in gas-rich groups, and the survival and detectability of tidal dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sweet, Sarah M; Meurer, Gerhardt; Kilborn, Virginia; Audcent-Ross, Fiona; Baumgardt, Holger; Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We present DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) of 22 star-forming dwarf galaxies located in four gas-rich groups, including six newly-discovered dwarfs. Two of the galaxies are strong tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates based on our luminosity-metallicity relation definition. We model the rotation curves of these galaxies. Our sample shows low mass-to-light ratios (M/L=0.73$\\pm0.39M_\\odot/L_\\odot$) as expected for young, star-forming dwarfs. One of the galaxies in our sample has an apparently strongly-falling rotation curve, reaching zero rotational velocity outside the turnover radius of $r_{turn}=1.2r_e$. This may be 1) a polar ring galaxy, with a tilted bar within a face-on disk; 2) a kinematic warp. These scenarios are indistinguishable with our current data due to limitations of slit alignment inherent to MOS-mode observations. We consider whether TDGs can be detected based on their tidal radius, beyond which tidal stripping removes kinematic tracers such as H$\\alpha$ emission. When the tidal radius i...

  8. A KiDS weak lensing analysis of assembly bias in GAMA galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornik, Andrej; Cacciato, Marcello; Kuijken, Konrad; Viola, Massimo; Hoekstra, Henk; Nakajima, Reiko; van Uitert, Edo; Brouwer, Margot; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Fenech Conti, Ian; Farrow, Daniel J.; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hopkins, Andrew M.; McFarland, John; Norberg, Peder; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Valentijn, Edwin; Wang, Lingyu

    2017-07-01

    We investigate possible signatures of halo assembly bias for spectroscopically selected galaxy groups from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey using weak lensing measurements from the spatially overlapping regions of the deeper, high-imaging-quality photometric Kilo-Degree Survey. We use GAMA groups with an apparent richness larger than 4 to identify samples with comparable mean host halo masses but with a different radial distribution of satellite galaxies, which is a proxy for the formation time of the haloes. We measure the weak lensing signal for groups with a steeper than average and with a shallower than average satellite distribution and find no sign of halo assembly bias, with the bias ratio of 0.85^{+0.37}_{-0.25}, which is consistent with the Λ cold dark matter prediction. Our galaxy groups have typical masses of 1013 M⊙ h-1, naturally complementing previous studies of halo assembly bias on galaxy cluster scales.

  9. Properties of Galaxies and Groups: Nature versus Nurture

    CERN Document Server

    Niemi, Sami-Matias

    2011-01-01

    Due to the inherently nonlinear nature of gravity cosmological N-body simulations have become an invaluable tool when the growth of structure is being studied and modelled closer to the present epoch. Large simulations with high dynamical range have made it possible to model the formation and growth of cosmic structure with unprecedented accuracy. Moreover, galaxies, the basic building blocks of the Universe, can also be modelled in cosmological context. However, despite all the simulations and successes in recent decades, there are still many unanswered questions in the field of galaxy formation and evolution. One of the longest standing issue being the significance of the formation place and thus initial conditions to a galaxy's evolution in respect to environment, often formulated simply as "nature versus nurture" like in human development and psychology. Unfortunately, our understanding of galaxy evolution in different environments is still limited, albeit, for example, the morphology-density relation has...

  10. Assessing colour-dependent occupation statistics inferred from galaxy group catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Hearin, Andrew; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Berlind, Andreas; Mo, H. J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Yang, Xiaohu

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the ability of current implementations of galaxy group finders to recover colour-dependent halo occupation statistics. To test the fidelity of group catalogue inferred statistics, we run three different group finders used in the literature over a mock that includes galaxy colours in a realistic manner. Overall, the resulting mock group catalogues are remarkably similar, and most colour-dependent statistics are recovered with reasonable accuracy. However, it is also clear that certain systematic errors arise as a consequence of correlated errors in group membership determination, central/satellite designation, and halo mass assignment. We introduce a new statistic, the halo transition probability (HTP), which captures the combined impact of all these errors. As a rule of thumb, errors tend to equalize the properties of distinct galaxy populations (i.e. red versus blue galaxies or centrals versus satellites), and to result in inferred occupation statistics that are more accurate for red galaxies than for blue galaxies. A statistic that is particularly poorly recovered from the group catalogues is the red fraction of central galaxies as a function of halo mass. Group finders do a good job in recovering galactic conformity, but also have a tendency to introduce weak conformity when none is present. We conclude that proper inference of colour-dependent statistics from group catalogues is best achieved using forward modelling (i.e. running group finders over mock data) or by implementing a correction scheme based on the HTP, as long as the latter is not too strongly model dependent.

  11. Fossil woods (Coniferales from the Baqueró Group (Aptian, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel I. Vera

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new conifer morphospecies represented by a secondary xylem are reported for the Lower Cretaceous Baqueró Group (Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. Agathoxylon sp. is characterized by poorly defined growth rings, predominantly uniseriate pitting in the radial wall of the tracheids, cross fields with 1-6 pits and uniseriate rays. These features are shared with the leafy branches described for the unit as Araucaria grandifolia Feruglio emend. Del Fueyo and Archangelsky. The second taxon, Brachyoxylon sp. cf. B. boureaui, possesses poorly defined growth rings, mixed wood with predominantly uniseriate radial pitting, cross fields with 8-26 pits and uniseriate rays. These taxa represent the first fossil woods described for Baqueroan strata.Duas novas morfoespécies de coníferas representadas por xilema secundário são reportadas para o Cretáceo Inferior do Grupo Baqueró (Província de Santa Cruz, Argentina. Agathoxylon sp. é caracterizada por anéis de crescimento poucos definidos, sulcos predominantemente uniseriados na parede radial dos traqueídeos, campos de cruzamento com 1-6 perfurações e raios uniseriados. Estas características são comuns com os ramos frondosos descritos para a unidade como Araucaria grandifolia Feruglio emend. Del Fueyo e Archangelsky. O segundo taxon, Brachyoxylon sp. cf. B. boureaui, possui anéis de crescimento poucos definidos, lenho misto com predominância de sulcos radiais uniseriados, campos de cruzamento com 8-26 perfurações e raios uniseriados. Estes táxons representam a primeira descrição de madeira fóssil para o Grupo Baqueró.

  12. Do group dynamics play a role in the evolution of member galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Annie; Balogh, Michael L; McGee, Sean L; Wilman, David J; Connelly, Jennifer L; Harris, William E; Mok, Angus; Mulchaey, John S; Bower, Richard G; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    We examine galaxy groups from the present epoch to z = 1 to explore the impact of group dynamics on galaxy evolution. We use group catalagues from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) and the high redshift GEEC2 sample to study how the observed member properties depend on galaxy stellar mass, group dynamical mass and dynamical state of the host group. We find a strong correlation between the fraction of non-star-forming (quiescent) galaxies and galaxy stellar mass, but do not detect a significant difference in the quiescent fraction with group dynamical mass, within our sample halo mass range of 10^13-10^14.5 M_sun, or with dynamical sate. However, at a redshift of approximately 0.4 we do see some evidence that the quiescent fraction in low mass galaxies (log(M_star/M_sun) 10.5), evolution is most strongly correlated to the stellar mass of a galaxy with little or no additional effect related to either the group dynamical mass or dynamical state. For lo...

  13. Constraints on the dynamical evolution of the galaxy group M81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehm, W.; Thies, I.; Kroupa, P.

    2017-01-01

    According to the standard model of cosmology, galaxies are embedded in dark matter halos which are made of particles beyond the standard model of particle physics, thus extending the mass and the size of the visible baryonic matter by typically two orders of magnitude. The observed gas distribution throughout the nearby M81 group of galaxies shows evidence for past significant galaxy-galaxy interactions but without a merger having occurred. This group is here studied for possible dynamical solutions within the dark-matter standard model. In order to cover a comprehensive set of initial conditions, the inner three core members M81, M82 and NGC 3077 are treated as a three-body model based on Navarro-Frenk-White profiles. The possible orbits of these galaxies are examined statistically taking into account dynamical friction. Long living, non-merging initial constellations which allow multiple galaxy-galaxy encounters comprise unbound galaxies only, which are arriving from a far distance and happen to simultaneously encounter each other within the recent 500 Myr. Our results are derived by the employment of two separate and independent statistical methods, namely a Markov chain Monte Carlo method and the genetic algorithm using the SAP system environment. The conclusions reached are confirmed by high-resolution simulations of live self-consistent systems (N-body calculations). Given the observed positions of the three galaxies the solutions found comprise predictions for their proper motions.

  14. Galaxy Groups in the SDSS DR4: II. halo occupation statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Bosch, Frank C van den

    2007-01-01

    We investigate various halo occupation statistics using a large galaxy group catalogue constructed from the SDSS DR4 with an adaptive halo-based group finder. The conditional luminosity function (CLF) is measured separately for all, red and blue galaxies, as well as in terms of central and satellite galaxies. The CLFs for central and satellite galaxies can be well modelled with a log-normal distribution and a modified Schechter form, respectively. About 85% of the central galaxies and about 80% of the satellite galaxies in halos with masses $M_h\\ga 10^{14}\\msunh$ are red galaxies. These numbers decrease to 50% and 40%, respectively, in halos with $M_h \\sim 10^{12}\\msunh$. For halos of a given mass, the distribution of the luminosities of central galaxies, $L_c$, has a dispersion of about 0.15 dex. The mean luminosity (stellar mass) of the central galaxies scales with halo mass as $L_c\\propto M_h^{0.17}$ ($M_{*,c}\\propto M_h^{0.22}$) for halos with masses $M\\gg 10^{12.5}\\msunh$, and both relations are signific...

  15. The observed properties of dwarf galaxies in and around the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    McConnachie, Alan W

    2012-01-01

    Positional, structural and dynamical parameters for all dwarf galaxies in and around the Local Group are presented, and various aspects of our observational understanding of this volume-limited sample are discussed. Over 100 nearby galaxies that have distance estimates placing them within 3Mpc of the Sun are identified. This distance threshold samples dwarfs in a large range of environments, from the satellite systems of the MW and M31, to the dwarfs in the outer regions of the Local Group, to the numerous isolated galaxies found in its surroundings. It extends to, but does not include, the galaxies associated with the next nearest groups. Our basic knowledge of this important galactic subset and their resolved stellar populations will continue to improve dramatically over the coming years with existing and future observational capabilities, and they will continue to provide the most detailed information available on numerous aspects of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution. Basic observational parameters, suc...

  16. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Saha, Abhijit [NOAO, 950 Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J., E-mail: rosst@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bjat@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  17. Galaxy evolution near groups and clusters: ejected satellites and the spatial extent of environmental quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, Andrew R; Conroy, Charlie; Bosch, Frank C van den

    2013-01-01

    While satellite galaxies within groups/clusters are more likely to exhibit quiescent star formation rates (SFR) than central (field) galaxies, an enhanced quiescent likelihood extends to galaxies that are several virial radii beyond groups/clusters. Using a galaxy group/cluster catalog from SDSS DR7, we show that this enhancement has two causes. First, massive halos are clustered, so neighboring halos that host their own satellite galaxies boost the observed quiescent fraction out to large distances. Second, and more interestingly, central galaxies exhibit a strongly enhanced quiescent fraction out to 2.5 virial radii (with some enhancement out to 5 virial radii) beyond groups/clusters. We show that this enhancement for central galaxies can be explained by 'ejected' satellite galaxies that orbit beyond their host halo's virial radius. Using a cosmological N-body simulation, we examine the orbital histories of ejected satellites, showing that they extend out to 2.5 virial radii beyond their host halo and compo...

  18. Friends-of-friends galaxy group finder with membership refinement. Application to the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tempel, E; Tamm, A; Gramann, M; Einasto, M; Sepp, T; Tuvikene, T

    2016-01-01

    Context. Groups form the most abundant class of galaxy systems. They act as the principal drivers of galaxy evolution and can be used as tracers of the large-scale structure and the underlying cosmology. However, the detection of galaxy groups from galaxy redshift survey data is hampered by several observational limitations. Aims. We improve the widely used friends-of-friends (FoF) group finding algorithm with membership refinement procedures and apply the method to a combined dataset of galaxies in the local Universe. A major aim of the refinement is to detect subgroups within the FoF groups, enabling a more reliable suppression of the Fingers-of-God effect. Methods. The FoF algorithm is often suspected of leaving subsystems of groups and clusters undetected. We use a galaxy sample built of the 2MRS, CF2, and 2M++ survey data comprising nearly 80 000 galaxies within the local volume of 430 Mpc radius to carry out FoF group detection. We conduct a multimodality check on the detected groups in search for subgr...

  19. The effect of cosmic web filaments on the properties of groups and their central galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, A.; Heinämäki, P.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, M.; Lietzen, H.; Nurmi, P.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The nature versus nurture scenario in galaxy and group evolution is a long-standing problem not yet fully understood on cosmological scales. Aims: We study the properties of groups and their central galaxies in different large-scale environments defined by the luminosity density field and the cosmic web filaments. Methods: We use the luminosity density field constructed using 8 h-1 Mpc smoothing to characterize the large-scale environments. We use the Bisous model to extract the filamentary structures in different large-scale environments. We study the properties of galaxy groups as a function of their dynamical mass in different large-scale environments. Results: We find differences in the properties of central galaxies and their groups in and outside of filaments at fixed halo and large-scale environments. In high-density environments, the group mass function has higher number densities in filaments compared to that outside of filaments towards the massive end. The relation is the opposite in low-density environments. At fixed group mass and large-scale luminosity density, mass-to-light ratios show that groups in filaments are slightly more luminous than those outside of filaments. At fixed group mass and large-scale luminosity density, central galaxies in filaments have redder colors, higher stellar masses, and lower specific star formation rates than those outside of filaments. However, the differences in central galaxy and group properties in and outside of filaments are not clear in some group mass bins. We show that the differences in central galaxy properties are due to the higher abundances of elliptical galaxies in filaments. Conclusions: Filamentary structures in the cosmic web are not simply visual associations of galaxies, but rather play an important role in shaping the properties of groups and their central galaxies. The differences in central galaxy and group properties in and outside of cosmic web filaments are not simple effects related

  20. Sloshing cold fronts in galaxy groups and their perturbing disk galaxies: an X-ray, Optical and Radio Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Gastaldello, F; Ghizzardi, S; Giacintucci, S; Girardi, M; Roediger, E; Rossetti, M; Brighenti, F; Buote, D A; Eckert, D; Ettori, S; Humphrey, P J; Mathews, W G

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined X-ray, optical, and radio analysis of the galaxy group IC 1860 using the currently available Chandra and XMM data, literature multi-object spectroscopy data and GMRT data. The Chandra and XMM imaging and spectroscopy reveal two surface brightness discontinuities at 45 and 76 kpc shown to be consistent with a pair of cold fronts. These features are interpreted as due to sloshing of the central gas induced by an off-axis minor merger with a perturber. This scenario is further supported by the presence of a peculiar velocity of the central galaxy IC 1860 and the ide

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Trends in galaxy colours, morphology, and stellar populations with large scale structure, group, and pair environments

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Robotham, Aaron S G; Obreschkow, Danail; Andrae, Ellen; Cluver, Michelle; Kelvin, Lee S; Lange, Rebecca; Owers, Matt; Taylor, Edward N; Andrews, Stephen K; Bamford, Steven; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J I; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J M; Eardley, Elizabeth; Grootes, Meiert W; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kennedy, Rebecca; Liske, Jochen; Lara-Lopez, Maritza A; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; Loveday, Jon; Madore, Barry F; Mahajan, Smriti; Meyer, Martin; Moffett, Amanda; Norberg, Peder; Penny, Samantha; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Popescu, Cristina C; Seibert, Mark; Tuffs, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We explore trends in galaxy properties with Mpc-scale structures using catalogues of environment and large scale structure from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Existing GAMA catalogues of large scale structure, group and pair membership allow us to construct galaxy stellar mass functions for different environmental types. To avoid simply extracting the known underlying correlations between galaxy properties and stellar mass, we create a mass matched sample of galaxies with stellar masses between $9.5 \\leq \\log{M_*/h^{-2} M_{\\odot}} \\leq 11$ for each environmental population. Using these samples, we show that mass normalised galaxies in different large scale environments have similar energy outputs, $u-r$ colours, luminosities, and morphologies. Extending our analysis to group and pair environments, we show galaxies that are not in groups or pairs exhibit similar characteristics to each other regardless of broader environment. For our mass controlled sample, we fail to see a strong dependence of S\\...

  2. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Johnson, Benjamin D; Bullock, James S; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times ($z \\sim 2$ and $z \\sim 7$) by combining stellar population synthesis modeling with star formation histories derived from deep color-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-$z$ galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-$z$ Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe $z \\sim 7$ progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field lum...

  3. Tidal Interaction as the origin of early-type dwarf galaxies in group environment

    CERN Document Server

    Paudel, Sanjaya

    2014-01-01

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal force of nearby massive galaxies. Analysing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a `smoking gun' example of the formation of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment through the tidal stirring. Inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fitted with the Sersic functions, while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within the 50 kpc sky-projected distance from the center of host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocity larger than 205 km/s to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population (CSP) properties these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate ...

  4. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  5. The Effect of Halo Mass on the HI Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Ilsang

    2015-01-01

    We combine data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) to study the cold atomic gas content of galaxies in groups and clusters in local universe. A careful cross-matching of galaxies in the SDSS, ALFALFA and SDSS group catalogs provides a sample of group galaxies with stellar masses $10^{8.4} M_{\\odot} \\le M_{*} \\le 10^{10.6} M_{\\odot}$ and group halo masses $10^{12.5} h^{-1} M_{\\odot} \\le M_h \\le 10^{15.0} h^{-1} M_{\\odot}$. Controlling our sample in stellar mass and redshift, we find no significant radial variation in the galaxy \\hi\\ gas-to-stellar mass ratio for the halo mass range in our sample. However, the fraction of galaxies detected in ALFALFA declines steadily towards the centers of groups with the effect being most prominent in the most massive halos. In the outskirts of massive halos a hint of a depressed detection fraction for low mass galaxies suggests pre-processing that decreases the \\hi\\ in these galaxies before they fall into massive cluste...

  6. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Gas Fueling of Spiral Galaxies in the Local Universe. I. The Effect of the Group Environment on Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Popescu, C. C.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Liske, J.; Andrae, E.; Baldry, I. K.; Gunawardhana, M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Madore, B. F.; Seibert, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Alpaslan, M.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Driver, S. P.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Lopez-Sanchez, A. R.; Loveday, J.; Rushton, M.

    2017-03-01

    We quantify the effect of the galaxy group environment (for group masses of 1012.5–1014.0 M ⊙) on the current star formation rate (SFR) of a pure, morphologically selected sample of disk-dominated (i.e., late-type spiral) galaxies with redshift ≤0.13. The sample embraces a full representation of quiescent and star-forming disks with stellar mass M * ≥ 109.5 M ⊙. We focus on the effects on SFR of interactions between grouped galaxies and the putative intrahalo medium (IHM) of their host group dark matter halos, isolating these effects from those induced through galaxy–galaxy interactions, and utilizing a radiation transfer analysis to remove the inclination dependence of derived SFRs. The dependence of SFR on M * is controlled for by measuring offsets Δlog(ψ *) of grouped galaxies about a single power-law relation in specific SFR, {\\psi }* \\propto {M}* -0.45+/- 0.01, exhibited by non-grouped “field” galaxies in the sample. While a small minority of the group satellites are strongly quenched, the group centrals and a large majority of satellites exhibit levels of ψ * statistically indistinguishable from their field counterparts, for all M *, albeit with a higher scatter of 0.44 dex about the field reference relation (versus 0.27 dex for the field). Modeling the distributions in Δlog(ψ *), we find that (i) after infall into groups, disk-dominated galaxies continue to be characterized by a similar rapid cycling of gas into and out of their interstellar medium shown prior to infall, with inflows and outflows of ∼1.5–5 x SFR and ∼1–4 x SFR, respectively; and (ii) the independence of the continuity of these gas flow cycles on M * appears inconsistent with the required fueling being sourced from gas in the circumgalactic medium on scales of ∼100 kpc. Instead, our data favor ongoing fueling of satellites from the IHM of the host group halo on ∼Mpc scales, i.e., from gas not initially associated with the galaxies upon infall. Consequently

  7. Galaxies in X-ray Groups. III. Satellite Color and Morphology Transformations

    CERN Document Server

    George, Matthew R; Bundy, Kevin; Leauthaud, Alexie; Tinker, Jeremy; Wechsler, Risa H; Finoguenov, Alexis; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-01-01

    While the star formation rates and morphologies of galaxies have long been known to correlate with their local environment, the process by which these correlations are generated is not well understood. Galaxy groups are thought to play an important role in shaping the physical properties of galaxies before entering massive clusters at low redshift, and transformations of satellite galaxies likely dominate the buildup of local environmental correlations. To illuminate the physical processes that shape galaxy evolution in dense environments, we study a sample of 116 X-ray selected galaxy groups at z=0.2-1 with halo masses of 10^13-10^14 M_sun and centroids determined with weak lensing. We analyze morphologies based on HST imaging and colors determined from 31 photometric bands for a stellar mass-limited population of 923 satellite galaxies and a comparison sample of 16644 field galaxies. Controlling for variations in stellar mass across environments, we find significant trends in the colors and morphologies of ...

  8. Group, field and isolated early-type galaxies II. Global trends from nuclear data

    CERN Document Server

    Denicolo, G; Terlevich, E; Forbes, D A; Terlevich, A I; Denicolo, Glenda; Terlevich, Roberto; Terlevich, Elena; Forbes, Duncan A.; Terlevich, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    We have derived ages, metallicities and enhanced-element ratios [alpha/Fe] for a sample of 83 early-type galaxies essentially in groups, the field or isolated objects. The stellar population properties derived for each galaxy corresponds to the nuclear r_e/8 aperture extraction. The median age found for Es is 5.8 +- 0.6 Gyr and the average metallicity is +0.37 +- 0.03 dex. For S0s, the median age is 3.0 +- 0.6 Gyr and [Z/H] = 0.53 +- 0.04 dex. We compare the distribution of our galaxies in the Hbeta-[MgFe] diagram with Fornax galaxies. Our elliptical galaxies are 3-4 Gyr younger than Es in the Fornax cluster. We find that the galaxies lie in a plane defined by [Z/H] = 0.99 log sigma_0 - 0.46 log Age - 1.60. More massive (larger sigma_0) and older galaxies present, on average, large [alpha/Fe] values, and therefore, must have undergone shorter star-formation timescales. Comparing group against field/isolated galaxies, it is not clear that environment plays an important role in determining their stellar populat...

  9. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  10. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Lenkic, Laura; Gallagher, Sarah; Desjardins, Tyler; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann; Durrell, Pat; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended timescales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by \\citet{tzanavaris10} and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFR$_{\\mathrm{UV}}$) using the UVOT uvw2photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFR$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-"red"), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific star formation rates, and tend to lie in H~{\\sc i}-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-"blue") have redder ...

  11. The Hot and Energetic Universe: AGN feedback in galaxy clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Croston, J H; Heinz, S; Hardcastle, M J; Zhuravleva, I; Bîrzan, L; Bower, R G; Brüggen, M; Churazov, E; Edge, A C; Ettori, S; Fabian, A C; Finoguenov, A; Kaastra, J; Gaspari, M; Gitti, M; Nulsen, P E J; McNamara, B R; Pointecouteau, E; Ponman, T J; Pratt, G W; Rafferty, D A; Reiprich, T H; Sijacki, D; Worrall, D M; Kraft, R P; McCarthy, I; Wise, M

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical feedback via Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets in the centres of galaxy groups and clusters is a crucial ingredient in current models of galaxy formation and cluster evolution. Jet feedback is believed to regulate gas cooling and thus star formation in the most massive galaxies, but a robust physical understanding of this feedback mode is currently lacking. The large collecting area, excellent spectral resolution and high spatial resolution of Athena+ will provide the breakthrough diagnostic ability necessary to develop this understanding, via: (1) the first kinematic measurements on relevant spatial scales of the hot gas in galaxy, group and cluster haloes as it absorbs the impact of AGN jets, and (2) vastly improved ability to map thermodynamic conditions on scales well-matched to the jets, lobes and gas disturbances produced by them. Athena+ will therefore determine for the first time how jet energy is dissipated and distributed in group and cluster gas, and how a feedback loop operates in group...

  12. Searching for intermediate groups of galaxies with Suzaku in Bootes field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawara, Yuzuru; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki

    2016-07-01

    To investigate redshift evolution of groups of galaxies is significant also in terms of galaxy evolution. Recent observational studies show that an AGN fraction and a magnitude gap between the first and the second brightest group galaxies increase in group environments at lower redshifts (Oh et al. 2014 & Gozaliasl et al. 2014). Thus, comprehension for the evolution of the systems will bring us to hints on both morphological evolution of galaxies and galaxy-galaxy interactions. However, observational samples of groups of galaxies at higher redshifts are limited due to its low flux and surface brightness. Thus, we aimed at searching for new samples using both X-ray and optical data. To identify the group systems at higher redshifts, deep optical imaging and spectroscopic data are needed. Bootes field is one of the best regions for this purpose because there are up to 17 bands of data available per source from infrared, optical, UV, and X-ray (e.g., Kenter et al. 2005, Chung et al. 2014). XBootes survey was conducted in 2003 using Chandra (Murray et al. 2005) and X-ray extended sources were detected around intermediate optically-identified groups of galaxies even though Chandra could not reveal their origins due to poor photon statistics. Thus, we conducted X-ray follow-up observations using Suzaku which has low and stable background and thus is optimum for such low surface brightness sources for brightest 6 group candidates with redshifts of 0.15-0.42. Consequently, Suzaku detected excess emissions from all the targets in their images and spectral analysis reveals that 6 sources are originated from group- or poor-cluster-scale halos with temperatures, abundances and luminosities of 1.6-3.0 keV, conference, we will report on the details of our analysis and results using multiwavelength data such as radio, optical and X-ray to examine the AGN fractions and magnitude gaps in our samples and discuss the redshift evolution.

  13. The Merger History, AGN and Dwarf Galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Hill, A. R.; Zabludoff, A. I.; Maier, M. L.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Charlton, J. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Walker, L. M.; Eracleous, M.; Maybhate, A.; Gronwall, C.; English, J.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 x 10(exp 13) Stellar Mass), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic HII regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at approx. 1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity AGN in HCG 59A by its approx. 10(exp 40) erg/s X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR SED. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  14. THE MERGER HISTORY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS, AND DWARF GALAXIES OF HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 59

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Charlton, J. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Hill, A. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zabludoff, A. I. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maier, M. L. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, Colina el Pino S/N, La Serena (Chile); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P. O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Maybhate, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); English, J. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MN (Canada); Mulchaey, J. S., E-mail: iraklis@astro.psu.edu [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (Hubble Space Telescope), infrared (Spitzer), and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun }), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other are two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic H II regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at {approx}1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity active galactic nucleus in HCG 59A by its {approx}10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR spectral energy distribution. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  15. The ACS LCID Project. XI. On the Early Time Resolution of SFHs of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies: Comparing the Effects of Reionization in Models with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan; Cassisi, Santi; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel; Bernard, Edouard; Dolphin, Andrew; Stetson, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations, is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between 1.3× {10}6 and 7.2× {10}6 {M}⊙ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the outer regions of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10505.

  16. The 10k zCOSMOS : Morphological transformation of galaxies in the Group Environment since z ~1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovač, K.; Lilly, S. J.; Knobel, C.; Bolzonella, M.; Iovino, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Scarlata, C.; Sargent, M.; Cucciati, O.; Zamorani, G.; Pozzetti, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Scodeggio, M.; Kampczyk, P.; Peng, Y.; Oesch, P.; Zucca, E.; Finoguenov, A.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Coppa, G.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Perez Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Fumana, M.; Guzzo, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2010-01-01

    We study the evolution of galaxies inside and outside of the group environment since z = 1 using a large well-defined set of groups and galaxies from the zCOSMOS-bright redshift survey in the COSMOS field. The fraction of galaxies with early-type morphologies increases monotonically with MB luminosi

  17. The Effect of Environment on Milky Way-mass galaxies in a Constrained Simulation of the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Creasey, Peter; Nuza, Sebastian E; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottloeber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we present, for the first time, a study of star formation rate, gas fraction and galaxy morphology of a constrained simulation of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies, compared to other MW-mass galaxies. By combining with unconstrained simulations we cover a sufficient volume to compare these galaxies environmental densities ranging from the field to that of the Local Group (LG). This is particularly relevant as it has been shown that, quite generally, galaxy properties depend intimately upon their environment, most prominently when galaxies in clusters are compared to those in the field. For galaxies in loose groups such as the LG, however, environmental effects have been less clear. We consider the galaxy's environmental density in spheres of 1200 kpc (comoving) and find that whilst environment does not appear to directly affect morphology, there is a positive trend with star formation rates. This enhancement in star formation occurs systematically for galaxies in higher density en...

  18. The evolution of the galaxy Red Sequence in simulated clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, Alessio D; Covone, G; Sommer-Larsen, J; Antonuccio-Delogu, V; Capaccioli, M

    2008-01-01

    N-body + hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxy groups and clusters in a LambdaCDM cosmology are used in order to follow the building-up of the colour-magnitude relation in two clusters and in 12 groups. We have found that galaxies, starting from the more massive, move to the Red Sequence (RS) as they get aged over times and eventually set upon a ``dead sequence'' (DS) once they have stopped their bulk star formation activity. Fainter galaxies keep having significant star formation out to very recent epochs and lie broader around the RS. Environment plays a role as galaxies in groups and cluster outskirts hold star formation activity longer than the central cluster regions. However galaxies experiencing infall from the outskirts to the central parts keep star formation on until they settle on to the DS of the core galaxies. Merging contributes to mass assembly until z~1, after which major events only involve the brightest cluster galaxies. The emerging scenario is that the evoluti...

  19. Ram pressure profiles in galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tecce, Tomás E; Tissera, Patricia B

    2011-01-01

    Using a hybrid method which combines non-radiative hydrodynamical simulations with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we determine the ram pressure as a function of halocentric distance experienced by galaxies in haloes with virial masses 12.5 <= log (M_200 h/M_Sun) < 15.35, for redshifts 0 <= z <= 3. The ram pressure is calculated with a self-consistent method which uses the simulation gas particles to obtain the properties of the intergalactic medium. The ram pressure profiles obtained can be well described by beta profile models, with parameters that depend on redshift and halo virial mass in a simple fashion. The fitting formulae provided here will prove useful to include ram pressure effects into semi-analytic models based on methods which lack gas physics, such as dark matter-only simulations or the Press-Schechter formalism.

  20. Stellar systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44. I. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Castelli, A. V.; Faifer, F. R.; Escudero, C. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims: In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (μeffg' ≃ 27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods: We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also searched for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results: We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associations. In that case, their sizes would be rather larger than those displayed by the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We have detected a few unresolved sources in the sky zone occupied by these galaxies showing colors and brightnesses typical of blue globular clusters. Conclusions: From the comparison of the properties of the galaxies presented in this work with those of similar objects reported in the literature, we have found that LSB galaxies display sizes covering a quite extended continous range (reff 0.3-4.5 kpc), in contrast to "normal" early-type galaxies, which show reff 1.0 kpc with a low dispersion. This fact might point to different formation processes for both types of galaxies.

  1. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3813, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I., E-mail: tdesjar@uwo.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 95721 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  2. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  3. Evidence for tidal interaction and merger as the origin of galaxy morphology evolution in compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    Coziol, R

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a morphological study based on NIR images of 25 galaxies, with different levels of nuclear activity, in 8 Compact Groups of Galaxies (CGs). We perform independently two different analysis: a isophotal study and a study of morphological asymmetries. The results yielded by the two analysis are highly consistent. For the first time, it is possible to show that deviations from pure ellipses are produced by inhomogeneous stellar mass distributions related to galaxy interactions and mergers. We find evidence of mass asymmetries in 74% of the galaxies in our sample. In 59% of these cases, the asymmetries come in pairs, and are consistent with tidal effects produced by the proximity of companion galaxies. The symmetric galaxies are generally small in size or mass, inactive, and have an early-type morphology. In 20% of the galaxies we find evidence for cannibalism. In 36% of the early-type galaxies the color gradient is positive (blue nucleus) or flat. Summing up these results, as much as 52%...

  4. Galaxy ecology: groups and low-density environments in the SDSS and 2dFGRS

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, M; Miller, C; Lewis, I; Bower, R; Couch, W; Bridges, T J; Cannon, R; Cole, S; Colless, M; Collins, C; Cross, N; Dalton, G B; De Propris, R; Driver, S P; Efstathiou, G P; Ellis, Richard S; Frenk, C S; Glazebrook, K; Gómez, P; Gray, A; Hawkins, E; Jackson, C; Lahav, O; Lumsden, S; Maddox, S; Madgwick, D; Norberg, P; Peacock, J A; Percival, W; Peterson, B A; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K; Balogh, Michael; Eke, Vince; Miller, Chris; Lewis, Ian; Bower, Richard; Couch, Warrick; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Cross, Nicholas; Dalton, Gavin; Propris, Roberto De; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Gomez, Percy; Gray, Alex; Hawkins, Edward; Jackson, Carole; Lahav, Ofer; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A.; Percival, Will; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2004-01-01

    We analyse the observed correlation between galaxy environment and H-alpha emission line strength, using volume-limited samples and group catalogues of 24968 galaxies drawn from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (Mb<-19.5) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Mr<-20.6). We characterise the environment by 1) Sigma_5, the surface number density of galaxies determined by the projected distance to the 5th nearest neighbour; and 2) rho1.1 and rho5.5, three-dimensional density estimates obtained by convolving the galaxy distribution with Gaussian kernels of dispersion 1.1 Mpc and 5.5 Mpc, respectively. We find that star-forming and quiescent galaxies form two distinct populations, as characterised by their H-alpha equivalent width, EW(Ha). The relative numbers of star-forming and quiescent galaxies varies strongly and continuously with local density. However, the distribution of EW(Ha) amongst the star-forming population is independent of environment. The fraction of star-forming galaxies shows strong sensitivity t...

  5. Southern GEMS groups II: HI distribution, mass functions and HI deficient galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kilborn, Virginia A; Barnes, David G; Koribalski, Baerbel S; Brough, Sarah; Kern, Katie

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of sixteen groups for which we have multi-wavelength data including X-ray observations. Wide-field imaging of the groups was obtained with the 20-cm multibeam system on the 64-m Parkes telescope. We have detected ten previously uncatalogued HI sources, one of which has no visible optical counterpart. We examine the HI properties of the groups, compared to their X-ray characteristics, finding that those groups with a higher X-ray temperature and luminosity contain less HI per galaxy. The HI content of a group depends on its morphological make-up, with those groups dominated by early-type galaxies containing the least total HI. We determined the expected HI for the spiral galaxies in the groups, and found that a number of the galaxies were HI deficient. The HI deficient spirals were found both in groups with and without a hot intra-group medium. The HI deficient galaxies were not necessarily found at the centre of the groups, however, we did find that two thirds ...

  6. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Teresa L; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, 1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams, and 2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter, and produces MDFs 30-50 % narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEM) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spher...

  7. Friends-of-friends galaxy group finder with membership refinement. Application to the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, E.; Kipper, R.; Tamm, A.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, M.; Sepp, T.; Tuvikene, T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Groups form the most abundant class of galaxy systems. They act as the principal drivers of galaxy evolution and can be used as tracers of the large-scale structure and the underlying cosmology. However, the detection of galaxy groups from galaxy redshift survey data is hampered by several observational limitations. Aims: We improve the widely used friends-of-friends (FoF) group finding algorithm with membership refinement procedures and apply the method to a combined dataset of galaxies in the local Universe. A major aim of the refinement is to detect subgroups within the FoF groups, enabling a more reliable suppression of the fingers-of-God effect. Methods: The FoF algorithm is often suspected of leaving subsystems of groups and clusters undetected. We used a galaxy sample built of the 2MRS, CF2, and 2M++ survey data comprising nearly 80 000 galaxies within the local volume of 430 Mpc radius to detect FoF groups. We conducted a multimodality check on the detected groups in search for subgroups. We furthermore refined group membership using the group virial radius and escape velocity to expose unbound galaxies. We used the virial theorem to estimate group masses. Results: The analysis results in a catalogue of 6282 galaxy groups in the 2MRS sample with two or more members, together with their mass estimates. About half of the initial FoF groups with ten or more members were split into smaller systems with the multimodality check. An interesting comparison to our detected groups is provided by another group catalogue that is based on similar data but a completely different methodology. Two thirds of the groups are identical or very similar. Differences mostly concern the smallest and largest of these other groups, the former sometimes missing and the latter being divided into subsystems in our catalogue. The catalogues are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  8. A COMPACT GROUP OF GALAXIES AT Z = 2.48 HOSTING AN AGN-DRIVEN OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi [Gemini Observatory, 670 N Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Stockton, Alan, E-mail: jshih@gemini.edu, E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ⊙} and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass–metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow.

  9. Functional groups of fossil marattialeans: Chemotaxonomic implications for Pennsylvanian tree ferns and pteridophylls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psenicka, J.; Zodrow, E.L.; Mastalerz, Maria; Bek, J.

    2005-01-01

    Marattialean-fossil foliage, assigned to Pecopteris Brongniart, was an important and widespread floral component in Late Pennsylvanian mires, with phylogenetic affinity to extant marattialean taxa in tropical regions. Marattialean fossil taxonomy is, however, still uncertain. Specimens from the Pilsen limnic Basin, Westphalian D, Czech Republic, represent fertile marattialean foliage of Pecopteris (Asterotheca) nyranensis and Pecopteris (Asterotheca) miltonii, and sterile foliage of Pecopteris aspidioides and Pecopteris polypodioides. Taxonomic parameters for their assignments included cuticle, stomatal morphologies (studied for the first time), and in situ reproductive organs and spores. Chemotaxonomic interpretations hinge on fidelity of preservation of compounds, or molecular fragments thereof, that were synthesized by the once-living plants. This preservation state was possibly due to the thermal history (maximum temperature of 130 ??C) in the Pilsen Basin, acidic preservation conditions, lithology and facies stability. Although subtle, the four pecopterid species are differentiable from one another by combined FTIR characteristics, supporting taxonomy. The ratio of CH2/CH3 is hypothesized to be a chemotaxonomic parameter for Pennsylvanian pteridophylls, both in seed and true ferns that have previously been studied. It will, however, be supplemented by additional biochemical markers. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. EXPLORING X-RAY BINARY POPULATIONS IN COMPACT GROUP GALAXIES WITH CHANDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Spaceflight Center, Mail Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkić, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Centre for Planetary and Space Exploration, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Desjardins, T. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 177 Chem.-Phys. Building, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington KY 40506-0055202 (United States); Walker, L. M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Mulchaey, J. S. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We obtain total galaxy X-ray luminosities, L{sub X}, originating from individually detected point sources in a sample of 47 galaxies in 15 compact groups of galaxies (CGs). For the great majority of our galaxies, we find that the detected point sources most likely are local to their associated galaxy, and are thus extragalactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) or nuclear active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For spiral and irregular galaxies, we find that, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are either within the ±1σ scatter of the Mineo et al. L{sub X}–star formation rate (SFR) correlation or have higher L{sub X} than predicted by this correlation for their SFR. We discuss how these “excesses” may be due to low metallicities and high interaction levels. For elliptical and S0 galaxies, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are consistent with the Boroson et al. L{sub X}–stellar mass correlation for low-mass XRBs, with larger scatter, likely due to residual effects such as AGN activity or hot gas. Assuming non-nuclear sources are low- or high-mass XRBs, we use appropriate XRB luminosity functions to estimate the probability that stochastic effects can lead to such extreme L{sub X} values. We find that, although stochastic effects do not in general appear to be important, for some galaxies there is a significant probability that high L{sub X} values can be observed due to strong XRB variability.

  11. VIMOS Integral Field Spectroscopy of Gaseous Nebulae in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, E. V.; Gullieuszik, M.; Saviane, I.; Sabbadin, F.; Momany, Y.; Rizzi, L.; Bresolin, F.

    The study of very metal-poor dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies is fundamental to test the cosmological scenarios of galaxy formation. Among Local Group galaxies, Leo A and SagDIG are probably the most metal-poor dwarfs, as suggested by estimates of their nebular abundances based on the empirical method [I. Saviane, L. Rizzi, E.V. Held, F. Bresolin, Y. Momany in Astron. Astrophys. 390, 59 (2002); E.D. Skillman, R. Terlevich, J. Melnick in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 240, 563 (1989); L. van Zee, E.D. Skillman, M.P. Haynes in Astrophys. J. 637, 269 (2006)].

  12. A 3D analysis of the metal distribution in the compact group of galaxies HCG 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, Sergio; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Alfaro-Cuello, Mayte; Rodrigo Carrasco, Eleazar; de Mello, Duilia; Amram, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    We present new Gemini/GMOS integral field unit observations of the central region of the merging compact group of galaxies HCG 31. Using this data set, we derive the oxygen abundances for the merging galaxies HCG 31A and HCG 31C. We found a smooth metallicity gradient between the nuclei of these galaxies, suggesting a mixing of metals between these objects. These results are confirmed by high-resolution Fabry-Perot data, from which we infer that gas is flowing between HCG 31A and HCG 31C.

  13. Herschel observations of Hickson compact groups of galaxies: Unveiling the properties of cold dust

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Appleton, P N; Diaz-Santos, T; Floc'h, E Le; da Cunha, E; Alatalo, K; Cluver, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a Herschel far-IR and sub-mm study of a sample of 120 galaxies in 28 Hickson Compact Groups. Fitting their UV to sub-mm spectral energy distributions with the model of da Cunha et al. (2008), we accurately estimate the dust masses, luminosities and temperatures of the individual galaxies. We find that nearly half of the late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups, those with more than 25% of early-type members and redder UV-optical colours, have also significantly lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to those of actively star-forming galaxies of the same mass found both in HCGs and the field. Examining their dust-to-gas mass ratios we conclude that dust was stripped out of these systems as a result of the gravitational and hydrodynamic interactions, experienced due to previous encounters with other group members. About 40% of the early-type galaxies (mostly lenticulars), in dynamically "old" groups, display dust properties similar to those of the UV-optical red late-type galaxies. Given th...

  14. The GEEC2 spectroscopic survey of Galaxy Groups at $0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L; Mok, Angus; Wilman, David J; Finoguenov, Alexis; Bower, Richard; Mulchaey, John S; Parker, Laura C; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    We present the data release of the Gemini-South GMOS spectroscopy in the fields of 11 galaxy groups at $0.850$ per cent complete for galaxies within the virial radius, and with stellar mass $M_{\\rm star}>10^{10.3}M_\\odot$. Including galaxies with photometric redshifts we have an effective sample size of $\\sim 400$ galaxies within the virial radii of these groups. We present group velocity dispersions, dynamical and stellar masses. Combining with the GCLASS sample of more massive clusters at the same redshift we find the total stellar mass is strongly correlated with the dynamical mass, with $\\log{M_{200}}=1.20\\left(\\log{M_{\\rm star}}-12\\right)+14.07$. This stellar fraction of $~\\sim 1$ per cent is lower than predicted by some halo occupation distribution models, though the weak dependence on halo mass is in good agreement. Most groups have an easily identifiable most massive galaxy (MMG) near the centre of the galaxy distribution, and we present the spectroscopic properties and surface brightness fits to thes...

  15. SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY GROUPS AND THEIR PERTURBING DISK GALAXIES: AN X-RAY, OPTICAL, AND RADIO CASE STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Di Gesu, Laura; Ghizzardi, Simona; Rossetti, Mariachiara [IASF-Milano, INAF, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Giacintucci, Simona [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Girardi, Marisa [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Sezione di Astronomia, via Tiepolo 11, I-34133 Trieste (Italy); Roediger, Elke [Jacobs University Bremen, P.O. Box 750 561, D-28725 Bremen (Germany); Brighenti, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Buote, David A.; Humphrey, Philip J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Eckert, Dominique [ISDC Data Centre for Astrophysics, Geneva Observatory, ch. d' Ecogia, 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Ettori, Stefano [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Mathews, William G. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We present a combined X-ray, optical, and radio analysis of the galaxy group IC 1860 using the currently available Chandra and XMM data, multi-object spectroscopy data from the literature, and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data. The Chandra and XMM imaging and spectroscopy reveal two surface brightness discontinuities at 45 and 76 kpc shown to be consistent with a pair of cold fronts. These features are interpreted as due to sloshing of the central gas induced by an off-axis minor merger with a perturber. This scenario is further supported by the presence of a peculiar velocity of the central galaxy IC 1860 and the identification of a possible perturber in the optically disturbed spiral galaxy IC 1859. The identification of the perturber is consistent with the comparison with numerical simulations of sloshing. The GMRT observation at 325 MHz shows faint, extended radio emission contained within the inner cold front, as seen in some galaxy clusters hosting diffuse radio mini-halos. However, unlike mini-halos, no particle reacceleration is needed to explain the extended radio emission, which is consistent with aged radio plasma redistributed by the sloshing. There is a strong analogy between the X-ray and optical phenomenology of the IC 1860 group and that of two other groups, NGC 5044 and NGC 5846, showing cold fronts. The evidence presented in this paper is among the strongest supporting the currently favored model of cold-front formation in relaxed objects and establishes the group scale as a chief environment for studying this phenomenon.

  16. The environmental history of group and cluster galaxies in a $\\Lambda$CDM Universe

    CERN Document Server

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Poggianti, Bianca; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    We use publicly available galaxy merger trees, obtained applying semi-analytic techniques to a large high resolution cosmological simulation, to study the environmental history of group and cluster galaxies. Our results highlight the existence of an intrinsic history bias which makes the nature versus nurture (as well as the mass versus environment) debate inherently ill posed. In particular we show that: (i) surviving massive satellites within clusters were accreted later than their less massive counterparts, from more massive haloes; (ii) the mixing of galaxy populations is incomplete during cluster assembly, which creates a correlation between the time a galaxy becomes satellite and its present distance from the cluster centre. The weakest trends are found for the most massive satellites as a result of efficient dynamical friction and late formation times of massive haloes. A large fraction of the most massive cluster members are accreted onto the main progenitor of the final group/cluster as central galax...

  17. The merger history, AGN and dwarf galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Tzanavaris, P; Hill, A R; Zabludoff, A I; Maier, M L; Elmegreen, D M; Charlton, J C; Johnson, K E; Brandt, W N; Walker, L M; Eracleous, M; Maybhate, A; Gronwall, C; English, J; Hornschemeier, A E; Mulchaey, J S

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8e13 Msun), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical o...

  18. The luminosity-specific Planetary Nebulae density in Local Group galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Buzzoni, A.; Arnaboldi, M.

    The value of the α ratio, the number of PNe per unit bolometric luminosity in a galaxy, is computed using stellar population synthesis models covering the whole range of Hubble types of galaxies.Model predictions are compared with the PNe counts in the Local Group, which indicate a fairly constant value of α - between 1 and 6 PNe per 10^7 solar luminosities - along the Hubble sequence.

  19. Modeling the production of intergalactic light in the pre-collapse phase of galaxy groups

    OpenAIRE

    Solanes, Jose M.; Darriba, Laura; Collaboration, for the IDILICO

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports one recent result from a set of pre-virialized galaxy group simulations that are being used in an investigation of measurement techniques for the quantity of intragroup light (IGL). We present evidence that the binding energy of the stellar material stripped from the galaxies is essentially uncorrelated with the local mass density. This suggests that IGL detection methods based on the distribution of luminosity perform poorly in detecting the unbound stars.

  20. Probing the mass distribution in groups of galaxies using gravitational lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Möller, O.; Natarajan, P.; Kneib, J. P.; Blain, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    Published in: Astrophys. J. 573 (2002) 562-575 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: In this paper, we study gravitational lensing by groups of galaxies. Since groups are abundant and therefore have a large covering fraction on the sky, lensing by groups is likely to be very impor

  1. Probing the mass distribution in groups of galaxies using gravitational lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, O; Natarajan, P; Kneib, JP; Blain, AW

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical study of gravitational lensing by groups of galaxies. Since groups are abundant and therefore have a large covering fraction on the sky, lensing by groups is likely to be very important observationally. Besides, it has recently become clear that many models for

  2. The tree clustering technique and the physical reality of galaxy groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sabry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the tree clustering technique (the Euclidean separation distance coefficients is suggested to test how the Hickson compact groups of galaxies (HCGs are really physical groups. The method is applied on groups of 5 members only in Hickson’s catalog.

  3. Identifying dynamically young galaxy groups via wide-angle tail galaxies: A case study in the COSMOS field at z=0.53

    CERN Document Server

    Oklopcic, A; Giodini, S; Zamorani, G; Birzan, L; Schinnerer, E; Carilli, C L; Finoguenov, A; Lilly, S; Koekemoer, A; Scoville, N Z

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of a wide-angle tail (WAT) radio galaxy located in a galaxy group in the COSMOS field at a redshift of z=0.53 (hereafter CWAT-02). We find that the host galaxy of CWAT-02 is the brightest galaxy in the group, although it does not coincide with the center of mass of the system. Estimating a) the velocity of CWAT-02, relative to the intra-cluster medium (ICM), and b) the line-of-sight peculiar velocity of CWAT-02's host galaxy, relative to the average velocity of the group, we find that both values are higher than those expected for a dominant galaxy in a relaxed system. This suggests that CWAT-02's host group is dynamically young and likely in the process of an ongoing group merger. Our results are consistent with previous findings showing that the presence of a wide-angle tail galaxy in a galaxy group or cluster can be used as an indicator of dynamically young non-relaxed systems. Taking the unrelaxed state of CWAT-02's host group into account, we discuss the impact of radio-AGN heating...

  4. Interstellar Medium Oxygen Abundances of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies in Centaurus A and Nearby Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Henry; Grebel, E K; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2007.11481.x

    2008-01-01

    We present results of optical spectroscopy of 35 H II regions from eight dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group. [O III]4363 A is detected in ESO272-G025 and ESO324-G024, and direct oxygen abundances of 12+log(O/H) = 7.76 +/- 0.09 and 7.94 +/- 0.11 are derived, respectively. For the remaining galaxies, abundances are derived using common bright-line methods. To compare the influence of group environments on dwarf galaxies, we have also gathered data for additional dwarf irregular galaxies from the Cen A and the Sculptor groups from the literature. We have examined possible relationships between oxygen abundance, gas fraction, effective chemical yield, and tidal indices. Despite large positive tidal indices for a number of Cen A dwarfs in the present sample, there is no clear separation between galaxies with positive tidal indices and galaxies with negative tidal indices in the luminosity-metallicity, metallicity-gas fraction, and metallicity-tidal index diagrams. The H I surface mass density decreases with i...

  5. Spatial and Kinematical Lopsidedness of Atomic Hydrogen in the Ursa Major Group of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Angiras, R A; Dwarakanath, K S; Verheijen, M A W

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out the harmonic analysis of the atomic hydrogen (HI) surface density maps and the velocity fields for 11 galaxies belonging to the Ursa Major group, over a radial range of 4-6 disc scalelengths in each galaxy. This analysis gives the radial variation of spatial lopsidedness, quantified by the Fourier amplitude A$_1$ of the m=1 component normalised to the average value. The kinematical analysis gives a value for the elongation of the potential to be $\\sim 10 % $. The mean amplitude of spatial lopsidedness is found to be $\\sim 0.14$ in the inner disc, similar to the field galaxies, and is smaller by a factor of $\\sim 2$ compared to the Eridanus group galaxies. It is also shown that the the average value of A$_1$ does not increase with the Hubble type, contrary to what is seen in field galaxies. We argue that the physical origin of lopsidedness in the Ursa Major group of galaxies is tidal interactions, albeit weaker and less frequent than in Eridanus. Thus systematic studies of lopsidedness in g...

  6. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  7. Chemical Abundances of Seven Irregular and Three Tidal Dwarf Galaxies in the M81 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Croxall, Kevin V; Lee, Henry; Skillman, Evan D; Lee, Janice C; Côté, Stéphanie; Kennicutt, Robert C; Miller, Bryan W; 10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/723

    2009-01-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H \\ii regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H \\ii region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [OIII] $\\lambda$4363 line, allowing a "direct" determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate "tidal dwarf" galaxies lie well off this relation, UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sigh...

  8. The Isolated Elliptical NGC 1132 Evidence For a Merged Group of Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Mulchaey, J S; Mulchaey, John S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulations predict that some poor groups of galaxies have merged by the present epoch into giant ellipticals (cf. Barnes 1989). To identify the possible remnants of such mergers, we have compiled a sample of nearby, isolated ellipticals (Colbert, Mulchaey, & Zabludoff 1998). ASCA observations of the first galaxy studied, NGC 1132 reveal an X-ray halo that extends out to at least 250 kpc. The temperature, metallicity and luminosity of NGC 1132's X-ray halo are comparable to those of poor group halos. The total mass inferred from the X-ray emission is also like that of an X-ray detected group. Optical imaging uncovers a dwarf galaxy population clustered about NGC 1132 that is consistent in number density and in projected radial distribution with that of an X-ray group. The similarities of NGC 1132 to poor groups in both the X-ray band and at the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function, combined with the deficit of luminous galaxies in the NGC 1132 field, are compatible with the merged group p...

  9. The frequency and properties of young tidal dwarf galaxies in nearby gas-rich groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lee-Waddell, K; Chandra, P; Patra, N; Cuillandre, J -C; Wang, J; Haynes, M P; Cannon, J; Stierwalt, S; Sick, J; Giovanelli, R

    2016-01-01

    We present high-resolution Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI observations and deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical imaging of two galaxy groups: NGC 4725/47 and NGC 3166/9. These data are part of a multi-wavelength unbiased survey of the gas-rich dwarf galaxy populations in three nearby interacting galaxy groups. The NGC 4725/47 group hosts two tidal knots and one dIrr. Both tidal knots are located within a prominent HI tidal tail, appear to have sufficient mass (M_gas~10^8 M_sol) to evolve into long-lived tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) and are fairly young in age. The NGC 3166/9 group contains a TDG candidate, AGC 208457, at least three dIrrs and four HI knots. Deep CFHT imaging confirms that the optical component of AGC 208457 is bluer -- with a 0.28 mag g-r colour -- and a few Gyr younger than its purported parent galaxies. Combining the results for these groups with those from the NGC 871/6/7 group reported earlier, we find that the HI properties, estimated stellar ages and baryonic con...

  10. Galaxy Evolution in Hickson Compact Groups: The Role of Ram Pressure Stripping and Strangulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Yun, Min S; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2008-01-01

    Galaxies in compact groups tend to be deficient in neutral hydrogen compared to isolated galaxies of similar optical properties. In order to investigate the role played by a hot intragroup medium (IGM) for the removal and destruction of HI in these systems, we have performed a Chandra and XMM-Newton study of eight of the most HI deficient Hickson compact groups. Diffuse X-ray emission associated with an IGM is detected in four of the groups, suggesting that galaxy-IGM interactions are not the dominant mechanism driving cold gas out of the group members. No clear evidence is seen for any of the members being currently stripped of any hot gas, nor for galaxies to show enhanced nuclear X-ray activity in the X-ray bright or most HI deficient groups. Combining the inferred IGM distributions with analytical models of representative disc galaxies orbiting within each group, we estimate the HI mass loss due to ram pressure and viscous stripping. While these processes are generally insufficient to explain observed HI ...

  11. Compact Groups of Galaxies with Complete Spectroscopic Redshifts in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Gwang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical analysis of compact groups provides important tests of models of compact group formation and evolution. By compiling 2066 redshifts from FLWO/FAST, from the literature, and from SDSS DR12 in the fields of compact groups in \\citet{McC09}, we construct the largest sample of compact groups with complete spectroscopic redshifts in the redshift range $0.01 < z < 0.22$. This large redshift sample shows that the interloper fraction in the \\citet{McC09} compact group candidates is $\\sim 42\\%$. A secure sample of 332 compact groups includes 192 groups with four or more member galaxies and 140 groups with three members. The fraction of early-type galaxies in these compact groups is 62\\%, slightly higher than for the original Hickson compact groups. The velocity dispersions of early- and late-type galaxies in compact groups change little with groupcentric radius; the radii sampled are less than $100 ~h^{-1}$ kpc, smaller than the radii typically sampled by members of massive clusters of galaxies. The phy...

  12. Fossil Hunting: Intracluster Stars in Virgo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murphy, Eric; Bridge, Carrie; Desai, Vandana; Kenney, Jeffrey; Krick, Jessica; Surace, Jason; van Gorkom, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    In dense clusters, galaxy interactions and mergers play a significant role in galaxy evolution. During these interactions, tidal forces can lead to the ejection of stars from their parent galaxies; these stars are a fossil record of environmentally-driven galaxy evolution. We propose to map the intr

  13. CHANDRA observations of the NGC 1550 galaxy group: Implication for the temperature and entropy profiles of 1 keV galaxy groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, M.; Forman, W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed Chandra study of the galaxy group NGC 1550. For its temperature (1.37 +/- 0.01 keV) and velocity dispersion (similar to300 km s(-1)), the NGC 1550 group is one of the most luminous known galaxy groups (L-bol = 1.65 x 10(43) ergs s(-1) within 200 kpc, or 0.2r(vir)). We find...... that within similar to 60 kpc, where the gas cooling time is less than a Hubble time, the gas temperature decreases continuously toward the center, implying the existence of a cooling core. The temperature also declines beyond similar to 100 kpc (or 0.1r(vir)). The temperature pro. le of NGC 1550...

  14. The 2dF QSO Redshift Survey - X. Lensing of Background QSOs by Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, A D; Shanks, T; Boyle, B J; Croom, S M; Loaring, N S; Miller, L; Smith, R J

    2003-01-01

    We cross-correlate QSOs from the 2dF Survey with galaxy groups. The galaxy samples are limited to B < 20.5. We use an objective algorithm to detect galaxy groups. A 3sigma anti-correlation is observed between QSOs and galaxy groups. This paucity of faint QSOs around groups is neither a selection effect nor due to restrictions on the placement of 2dF fibres. By observing the colours of QSOs on the scales of the anti-correlation, we limit dust in galaxy groups, finding a maximum reddening of E(b_j-r) < 0.012 at the 95% level. The small amount of dust thus inferred is insufficient to cause the anti-correlation, supporting the suggestion by Croom & Shanks that the signal is due to gravitational lensing. The possibility remains that tailored dust models, such as grey dust, heavy patches of radially distributed dust or a combination of dust and lensing, could explain the anti-correlation. Assuming the signal is caused by lensing rather than dust, we measure the average velocity dispersion of a Singular Is...

  15. The nature of the nearest compact group of galaxies from precise distance measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies as those catalogued by Hickson appear to be the densest galaxy structures in the Universe. Redshift information is not sufficient to determine whether a compact group is roughly as dense in 3 dimensions as it appears in projection, or whether it is caused by a chance alignment along the line of sight within a larger galaxy system. Recent precise measurements can lift this uncertainty for the nearest compact group, situated in the Virgo cluster, and whose dominant member is M60. I perform a statistical analysis of the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distances measured by Mei et al. in Virgo, for 4 of the 5 compact group members. Taking the SBF distances at face value, M59 and NGC 4660 lie roughly 2 Mpc to the foreground of M60, NGC 4638, and the rest of the Virgo cluster. The compact group turns out to be the result of a chance alignment of 4 galaxies, with NGC 4638 lying at least 800 kpc further from us (with 99% confidence) than either M59 or NGC 4660. The first two galaxy dis...

  16. The HI Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters as Measured by ALFALFA

    CERN Document Server

    Odekon, Mary Crone; Haynes, Martha P; Finn, Rose A; McGowan, Christopher; Micula, Adina; Reed, Lyle; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    We present the HI content of galaxies in nearby groups and clusters as measured by the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey, including constraints from ALFALFA detection limits. Our sample includes 22 systems at distances between 70-160 Mpc over the mass range 12.5galaxies. We find that late-type galaxies in the centers of groups lack HI at fixed stellar mass relative to the regions surrounding them. Larger groups show evidence of a stronger dependence of HI properties on environment, despite a similar dependence of color on environment at fixed stellar mass. We compare several environment variables to determine which is the best predictor of galaxy properties; group-centric distance r and r/R_200 are similarly effective predictors, while local density is slightly more effective and group size and halo mass are slightly less effective. While both central and satellite galaxies in the blue cloud exhibit a significant dependence of HI cont...

  17. Chandra Observations of the Components of Clusters, Groups, and Galaxies and their Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. First, we review the merging process as seen through the high angular resolution of Chandra. We present examples of sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures ``cold fronts'', the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components and the Chandra observations of CL0657, the first clear example of a strong cluster merger shock. In addition to reviewing already published work, we present observations of the cold front around the elliptical galaxy NGC1404 which is infalling into the Fornax cluster and we discuss multiple ``edges'' in ZW3146. Second, we review the effects of relativistic, radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We review published work and also discuss the unusual X-ray structures surrounding the galaxies NGC4636 and NGC507.

  18. The evolutionary history of low-luminosity local group dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, Sidney

    1994-06-01

    The stellar content of Local Group dwarfs fainter than MV = -14.0 is found to correlate with distance from the Galaxy (or M31). Dwarf spheroidals located close to the Galaxy, such as Ursa Minor and Draco, only experienced star formation early in their lifetimes. Dwarf spheroidals at intermediate distances, like Leo I, Fornax, and Carina, underwent significant star formation more recently. Finally, star formation is presently still going on in distant dwarfs such as DDO 210 and Phoenix. Leo II and Tucana are, however, dwarfs that do not conform to this pattern. It is tentatively suggested that ram pressure stripping, strong supernova-driven winds, or a high UV flux form the protoGalaxy (or proto-M31) might have removed gas from dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances.

  19. The Chandra Deep Group Survey -- cool core evolution in groups and clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pascut, Aurelia

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a study which assembles deep observations with the ACIS-I instrument on the Chandra Observatory to study the evolution in the core properties of a sample of galaxy groups and clusters out to redshifts $z\\approx 1.3$. A search for extended objects within these fields yields a total of 62 systems for which redshifts are available, and we added a further 24 non-X-ray-selected clusters, to investigate the impact of selection effects and improve our statistics at high redshift. Six different estimators of cool core strength are applied to these data: the entropy (K) and cooling time ($t_{cool}$) within the cluster core, the cooling time as a fraction of the age of the Universe ($t_{cool}/t_{Uni}$), and three estimators based on the cuspiness of the X-ray surface brightness profile. A variety of statistical tests are used to quantify evolutionary trends in these cool core indicators. In agreement with some previous studies, we find that there is significant evolution in $t_{cool}/t_{Uni}$, ...

  20. X-Ray Groups of Galaxies in the Aegis Deep and Wide Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Erfanianfar, G; Tanaka, M; Lerchster, M; Nandra, K; Laird, E; Connelly, J L; Bielby, R; Mirkazemi, M; Faber, S M; Kocevski, D; Cooper, M; Newman, J A; Jeltema, T; Coil, A L; Brimioulle, F; Davis, M; McCracken, H J; Willmer, C; Gerke, B; Cappelluti, N; Gwyn, S; 10.1088/0004-637X/765/1/1

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for extended X-ray sources and their corresponding galaxy groups from 800-ks Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). This yields one of the largest X-ray selected galaxy group catalogs from a blind survey to date. The red-sequence technique and spectroscopic redshifts allow us to identify 100$%$ of reliable sources, leading to a catalog of 52 galaxy groups. The groups span the redshift range $z\\sim0.066-1.544$ and virial mass range $M_{200}\\sim1.34\\times 10^{13}-1.33\\times 10^{14}M_\\odot$. For the 49 extended sources which lie within DEEP2 and DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify spectroscopic counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. We select member galaxies by applying different cuts along the line of sight or in projected spatial coordinates. A constant cut along the line of sight can cause a large scatter in scaling relations in low-mass or high-mass systems depending on the size of cut. A velocity d...

  1. Efficient satellite quenching at z~1 from the GEEC2 spectroscopic survey of galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Mok, Angus; McGee, Sean L; Wilman, David J; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Giodini, Stefania; Bower, Richard G; Connelly, Jennifer L; Hou, Annie; Mulchaey, John S; Parker, Laura C

    2013-01-01

    We present deep GMOS-S spectroscopy for 11 galaxy groups at 0.866%) for eight of the eleven groups. Using an optical-NIR colour-colour diagram, the galaxies in the sample were separated with a dust insensitive method into three categories: passive (red), star-forming (blue), and intermediate (green). The strongest environmental dependence is observed in the fraction of passive galaxies, which make up only ~20 per cent of the field in the mass range 10^{10.3}groups. If we assume that the properties of the field are similar to those of the `pre-accreted' population, the environment quenching efficiency (\\epsilon_\\rho) is defined as the fraction of field galaxies required to be quenched in order to match the observed red fraction inside groups. The efficiency obtained is ~0.4, similar to its value in intermediate-density environments locally. While green (intermediate) galaxies represent ~20 per cent of the star-forming population in both the gr...

  2. The stripping of a galaxy group diving into the massive cluster A2142

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, D; Owers, M; Gaspari, M; Venturi, T; Rudnick, L; Ettori, S; Paltani, S; Gastaldello, F; Rossetti, M

    2014-01-01

    Structure formation in the current Universe operates through the accretion of group-scale systems onto massive clusters. The detection and study of such accreting systems is crucial to understand the build-up of the most massive virialized structures we see today. We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an irregular X-ray substructure in the outskirts of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2142. The tip of the X-ray emission coincides with a concentration of galaxies. The bulk of the X-ray emission of this substructure appears to be lagging behind the galaxies and extends over a projected scale of at least 800 kpc. The temperature of the gas in this region is 1.4 keV, which is a factor of ~4 lower than the surrounding medium and is typical of the virialized plasma of a galaxy group with a mass of a few 10^13M_sun. For this reason, we interpret this structure as a galaxy group in the process of being accreted onto the main dark-matter halo. The X-ray structure trailing behind the group is due to gas stripped f...

  3. The stellar-to-halo mass relation for Local Group galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, C B; Knebe, A; Gottlöber, S; Hoffman, Y; Yepes, G

    2013-01-01

    We contend that a single power law halo mass distribution is appropriate for direct matching to the stellar masses of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies, allowing the determination of the slope of the stellar mass-halo mass relation for low mass galaxies. Errors in halo masses are well defined as the Poisson noise of simulated local group realisations, which we determine using constrained local universe simulations (CLUES). For the stellar mass range 10$^7$galaxies, we find that the stellar mass-halo mass relation follows a power law with slope of 3.1, significantly steeper than most values in the literature. The steep relation between stellar and halo masses indicates that Local Group dwarf galaxies are hosted by dark matter halos with a small range of mass. Our methodology is robust down to the stellar mass to which the census of observed Local Group galaxies is complete, highlighting the importance of pushing the completenes...

  4. Evolutionary properties of the low-luminosity galaxy population in the NGC5044 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzoni, A; Saracco, P; Zucca, E

    2011-01-01

    With this third paper of a series we present Johnson-Gunn B,g,V,r,i,z multicolour photometry for 79 objects, including a significant fraction of the faintest galaxies around NGC5044, assessing group membership on the basis of apparent morphology and low-resolution optical spectroscopy to estimate redshift for 21 objects. Together, dE's and Im's provide the bulk of the galaxy luminosity function, around M(g)\\sim-18.0, while the S0 and dSph components dominate, respectively, the bright and faint-end tails of the distribution. This special mix places the NGC 5044 group just "midway" between the high-density cosmic aggregation scale typical of galaxy clusters, and the low-density environment of looser galaxy clumps like our Local Group. The bright mass of the 136 member galaxies with available photometry and morphological classification, amounts to a total of 2.3x10^{12}M_sun while current SFR within the group turns to be about or higher than 23M_sun/yr. In this regard, a drift toward bluer integrated colours is ...

  5. The HI Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters as Measured by ALFALFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odekon, Mary Crone; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Finn, Rose A.; McGowan, Christopher; Micula, Adina; Reed, Lyle; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    We present the HI content of galaxies in nearby groups and clusters as measured by the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey, including constraints from ALFALFA detection limits. Our sample includes 22 systems at distances between 70 and 160 Mpc over the mass range 12.5<' {log} M/{M}⊙ < 15.0, for a total of 1986 late-type galaxies. We find that late-type galaxies in the centers of groups lack HI at fixed stellar mass relative to the regions surrounding them. Larger groups show evidence of a stronger dependence of HI properties on environment, despite a similar dependence of color on environment at fixed stellar mass. We compare several environment variables to determine which is the best predictor of galaxy properties; group-centric distance r and r/{R}200 are similarly effective predictors, while local density is slightly more effective and group size and halo mass are slightly less effective. While both central and satellite galaxies in the blue cloud exhibit a significant dependence of HI content on local density, only centrals show a strong dependence on stellar mass, and only satellites show a strong dependence on halo mass. Finally, we see evidence that HI is deficient for blue cloud galaxies in denser environments even when both stellar mass and color are fixed. This is consistent with a picture where HI is removed or destroyed, followed by reddening within the blue cloud. Our results support the existence of pre-processing in isolated groups, along with an additional rapid mechanism for gas removal within larger groups and clusters, perhaps ram-pressure stripping.

  6. A Catalog of Faint Interacting Galaxies in Pairs and Groups: Erratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Duilia F.; Infante, Leopoldo; Menanteau, Felipe

    In the paper ``A Catalog of Faint Interacting Galaxies in Pairs and Groups'' by Duília F. de Mello, Leopoldo Infante, and Felipe Menanteau (ApJS, 108, 99 [1997]), a correction should be made to Table 2. No sextet was found in this survey. The total number of groups is 29.

  7. Reconstruction of halo power spectrum from redshift-space galaxy distribution: cylinder-grouping method and halo exclusion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Okumura, Teppei; More, Surhud; Masaki, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    The peculiar velocity field measured by redshift-space distortions (RSD) in galaxy surveys provides a unique probe of the growth of large-scale structure. However, systematic effects arise when including satellite galaxies in the clustering analysis. Since satellite galaxies tend to reside in massive halos with a greater halo bias, the inclusion boosts the clustering power. In addition, virial motions of the satellite galaxies cause a significant suppression of the clustering power due to nonlinear RSD effects. We develop a novel method to recover the redshift-space power spectrum of halos from the observed galaxy distribution by minimizing the contamination of satellite galaxies. The cylinder grouping method (CGM) we study effectively excludes satellite galaxies from a galaxy sample. However, we find that this technique produces apparent anisotropies in the reconstructed halo distribution over all the scales which mimic RSD. On small scales, the apparent anisotropic clustering is caused by exclusion of halos...

  8. Non-Gaussian velocity distributions - The effect on virial mass estimates of galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Andre L B; Trevisan, Marina

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of 9 galaxy groups with evidence for non-Gaussianity in their velocity distributions out to 4R200. This sample is taken from 57 groups selected from the 2PIGG catalog of galaxy groups. Statistical analysis indicates that non-Gaussian groups have masses significantly higher than Gaussian groups. We also have found that all non-Gaussian systems seem to be composed of multiple velocity modes. Besides, our results indicate that multimodal groups should be considered as a set of individual units with their own properties. In particular, we have found that the mass distribution of such units are similar to that of Gaussian groups. Our results reinforce the idea of non-Gaussian systems as complex structures in the phase space, likely corresponding to secondary infall aggregations at a stage before virialization. The understanding of these objects is relevant for cosmological studies using groups and clusters through the mass function evolution.

  9. Kinematics of the ionized gas in the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613

    CERN Document Server

    Valdez-Gutierrez, M; Georgiev, L; Borissova, J; Kurtev, R

    2000-01-01

    We present Halpha and [SII] observations for the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613 using the PUMA scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. Our goal is to analyze the kinematics of the ionized gas in the complex sample of superbubbles located in the whole extension of our field (10 arcmin), which includes most of the optical emission of this galaxy, and to study the inter-relationship between young stellar associations and nebulae based on a previous study that we have made on the stellar associations of the central region of this galaxy. The ionized gas in this galaxy is distributed in classical HII regions and in a series of superbubbles (also called giant shells) covering a large fraction of the optical extent of the galaxy. We present a catalog of kinematical properties of both the HII regions of this galaxy and the superbubbles. We have also compared the kinematics of the ionized gas in HII regions to search for possible dynamic differences between neutral and ionized gas.

  10. Chronos and Kairos: Mosfire Observations of Post-Starburst Galaxies in z~1 Clusters and Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaux, Brian C; Lubin, Lori M; Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Kocevski, Dale D; Squires, amd Gordon K

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present the exploration of $\\sim$500 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in and around two large scale structures at $z\\sim1$ drawn from the ORELSE survey. A sub-sample of these galaxies ($\\sim$150) were targeted for the initial phases of a near-infrared MOSFIRE spectroscopic campaign investigating the differences in selections of galaxies which had recently ended a burst of star formation or had rapidly quenched (i.e., post-starburst or K+A galaxies). Selection with MOSFIRE resulted in a post-starburst sample more than double that selected by traditional $z\\sim1$ (observed-frame optical) methods even after the removal of the relatively large fraction of dusty starburst galaxies selected through traditional methods. While the traditional post-starburst fraction increased with increased global density, the MOSFIRE-selected post-starburst fraction was found to be constant in field, group, and cluster environments. However, this fraction relative to the number of galaxies with ongoing star form...

  11. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Jens; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day dormant descendants of this population of active black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall - the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600 - a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 Mpc from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the ...

  12. Evolution in the Disks and Bulges of Group Galaxies since z=0.4

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L; Henderson, Robert D E; Wilman, David J; Bower, Richard G; Mulchaey, John S; Oemler, Augustus

    2008-01-01

    We present quantitative morphology measurements of a sample of optically selected group galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.55 using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the GIM2D surface brightness--fitting software package. The group sample is derived from the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Redshift survey (CNOC2) and follow-up Magellan spectroscopy. We compare these measurements to a similarly selected group sample from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue (MGC) at 0.05 < z < 0.12. We find that, at both epochs, the group and field fractional bulge luminosity (B/T) distributions differ significantly, with the dominant difference being a deficit of disk--dominated (B/T < 0.2) galaxies in the group samples. At fixed luminosity, z=0.4 groups have ~ 5.5 +/- 2 % fewer disk--dominated galaxies than the field, while by z=0.1 this difference has increased to ~ 19 +/- 6 %. Despite the morphological evolution we see no evidence that the group environment is actively...

  13. XMM-Newton First-Light Observations of the Hickson Galaxy Group 16

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, M J L; Ponman, T J; Arnaud, M; Barbera, M; Bennie, P J; Boër, M; Briel, U G; Butler, I; Clavel, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the XMM-Newton first-light observations of the Hickson-16 compact group of galaxies. Groups are possibly the oldest large-scale structures in the Universe, pre-dating clusters of galaxies, and are highly evolved. This group of small galaxies, at a redshift of 0.0132 (or 80 Mpc) is exceptional in the having the highest concentration of starburst or AGN activity in the nearby Universe. So it is a veritable laboratory for the study of the relationship between galaxy interactions and nuclear activity. Previous optical emission line studies indicated a strong ionising continuum in the galaxies, but its origin, whether from starbursts, or AGN, was unclear. Combined imaging and spectroscopy with the EPIC X-ray CCDs unequivocally reveals a heavily obscured AGN and a separately identified thermal (starburst) plasma, in NGC 835, NGC 833 and NGC 839. NGC 838 shows only starburst thermal emission. Starbursts and AGN can evidently coexist in members of this highly evolved system of merged and merging g...

  14. Local dark energy: HST evidence from the vicinity of the M 81/M 82 galaxy group

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, A D; Kashibadze, O G; Makarov, D I; Teerikorpi, P; Valtonen, M J; Dolgachev, V P; Domozhilova, L M

    2007-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observations of the nearby galaxy group M 81/M 82 and its vicinity indicate that the expansion outflow around the group is dominated by the antigravity of the dark energy background. The local density of dark energy in the area is estimated to be near the global dark energy density or perhaps exactly equal to it. This conclusion agrees with our previous results for the Local group vicinity and the vicinity of the Cen A/M 83 group.

  15. The Observational Mass Function of Loose Galaxy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Girardi, M.; Giuricin, G.; ;

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the three catalogs of nearby loose groups identified by Garcia (1993). She used a percolation and a hierarchical method, and proposed a third group catalog defined as a combination of the two. Each catalog contains almost 500 groups. In agreement with previous works on earlier catalogs, we find that groups can be described as collapsing systems. Their sampled size is much larger than their expected virialized region. We compute the virial masses and correct them by taking into acco...

  16. HOT AND COLD GALACTIC GAS IN THE NGC 2563 GALAXY GROUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Jesper [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Bai, Xue-Ning [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Van Gorkom, J. H.; Lee, Duane [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Mail Code 5246, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E. [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Wilcots, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Martini, Paul [Department of Astronomy, 4055 McPherson Laboratory, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH (United States); Roberts, Timothy P., E-mail: jr@dark-cosmology.dk [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    The role of environmentally induced gas stripping in driving galaxy evolution in groups remains poorly understood. Here we present extensive Chandra and Very Large Array mosaic observations of the hot and cold interstellar medium within the members of the nearby, X-ray bright NGC 2563 group, a prime target for studies of the role of gas stripping and interactions in relatively small host halos. Our observations cover nearly all group members within a projected radius of 1.15 Mpc ({approx}1.4 R{sub vir}) of the group center, down to a limiting X-ray luminosity and H I mass of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. The X-ray data are consistent with efficient ram pressure stripping of the hot gas halos of early-type galaxies near the group core, but no X-ray tails are seen and the limited statistics preclude strong conclusions. The H I results suggest moderate H I mass loss from the group members when compared to similar field galaxies. Six of the 20 H I-detected group members show H I evidence of ongoing interactions with other galaxies or with the intragroup medium. Suggestive evidence is further seen for galaxies with close neighbors in position-velocity space to show relatively low H I content, consistent with tidal removal of H I. The results thus indicate removal of both hot and cold gas from the group members via a combination of ram pressure stripping and tidal interactions. We also find that 16 of the 20 H I detections occur on one side of the group, reflecting an unusual morphological segregation whose origin remains unclear.

  17. The effect of cosmic web filaments on the properties of groups and their central galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Poudel, Anup; Tempel, Elmo; Einasto, Maret; Lietzen, Heidi; Nurmi, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    The nature versus nurture scenario in galaxy and group evolution is a long-standing problem not yet fully understood on cosmological scales. We study the properties of groups and their central galaxies in different large-scale environments defined by the luminosity density field and the cosmic web filaments. We use the luminosity density field constructed using 8 Mpc/h smoothing to characterize the large-scale environments and the Bisous model to extract the filamentary structures in different large-scale environments. We find differences in the properties of central galaxies and their groups in and outside of filaments at fixed halo and large-scale environments. In high-density environments, the group mass function has higher number densities in filaments compared to that outside of filaments towards the massive end. The relation is opposite in low-density environments. At fixed group mass and large-scale luminosity density, groups in filaments are slightly more luminous and their central galaxies have redde...

  18. Fossil systems in the 400d cluster catalog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voevodkin, Alexey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Heitmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    of both X-ray and optical data. Our selection criteria identify 12 fossil systems, out of which five are known from previous studies. While in general agreement with earlier results, our larger sample size allows us to put tighter constraints on the number density of fossil clusters. It has been......We report the discovery of seven new fossil systems in the 400d cluster survey. Our search targets nearby, z ≤ 0.2, and X-ray bright, LX ≥ 10^43 erg s-1, clusters of galaxies. Where available, we measure the optical luminosities from Sloan Digital Sky Survey images, thereby obtaining uniform sets...... previously reported that fossil groups are more X-ray bright than other X-ray groups of galaxies for the same optical luminosity. We find, however, that the X-ray brightness of massive fossil systems is consistent with that of the general population of galaxy clusters and follows the same LX-Lopt scaling...

  19. Star Formation and Environmental Quenching of GEEC2 Group Galaxies at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Mok, Angus; McGee, Sean L; Wilman, David J; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Bower, Richard G; Hou, Annie; Mulchaey, John S; Parker, Laura C

    2013-01-01

    We present new analysis from the GEEC2 spectroscopic survey of galaxy groups at $0.8galaxies. Only $\\sim5$ per cent of star-forming galaxies in both the group and field sample show a significant enhancement in star formation, which suggests that quenching is the primary process in the transition from the star-forming to the quiescent state. To model the environmental quenching scenario, we have tested the use of different exponential quenching timescales and delays between satellite accretion and the onset of quenching. We find that with no delay, the quenching timescale needs to be long in order to match the observed quiescent fraction, but then this model produces too many intermediate galaxies. Fixing a delay time of 3 Gyr, as suggested from the local universe, produces too few quiescent galaxies. The observed fractions are be...

  20. Properties of Local Group galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations of sterile neutrino dark matter cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lovell, Mark R; Boyarsky, Alexey; Crain, Robert A; Frenk, Carlos S; Hellwing, Wojciech A; Ludlow, Aaron D; Navarro, Julio F; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We study galaxy formation in sterile neutrino dark matter models that differ significantly from both cold and from `warm thermal relic' models. We use the EAGLE code to carry out hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of pairs of galaxies chosen to resemble the Local Group, as part of the APOSTLE simulations project. We compare cold dark matter (CDM) with two sterile neutrino models with 7 keV mass: one, the warmest among all models of this mass (LA120) and the other, a relatively cold case (LA10). We show that the lower concentration of sterile neutrino subhalos compared to their CDM counterparts makes the inferred inner dark matter content of galaxies like Fornax (or Magellanic Clouds) less of an outlier in the sterile neutrino cosmologies. In terms of the galaxy number counts the LA10 simulations are \\emph{indistinguishable} from CDM when one takes into account halo-to-halo (or `simulation-to-simulation') scatter. In order for the LA120 model to match the number of Local Group dwarf galaxies, a higher f...

  1. A catalog of compact groups of galaxies in the RSDSS commissioning data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brian C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Annis, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Johnston, David E.; Scranton, Ryan; Acebo, Yamina; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bartelmann, Matthias; Bohringer, Hans; Ellman, Nancy; Grebel, Eva K.; Infante, Leopoldo; Loveday, Jon; McKay, Timothy A.; Prada, Francisco; Schneider, Donald P.; Stoughton, Chris; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2003-11-18

    Compact groups (CGs) of galaxies--relatively poor groups of galaxies in which the typical separations between members is of the order of a galaxy diameter--offer an exceptional laboratory for the study of dense galaxian environments with short (<1Gyr) dynamical time-scales. In this paper, we present an objectively defined catalog of CGs in 153 sq deg of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS EDR). To identify CGs, we applied a modified version of Hickson's (1982) criteria aimed at finding the highest density CGs and thus reducing the number of chance alignments. Our catalog contains 175 CGs down to a limiting galaxy magnitude of r* = 21. The resulting catalog has a median depth of approximately z = 0.13, substantially deeper than previous CG catalogs. Since the SDSS will eventually image up to one quarter of the celestial sphere, we expect our final catalog, based upon the completed SDSS, will contain on the order of 5,000-10,000 CGs. This catalog will be useful for conducting studies of the general characteristics of CGs, their environments, and their component galaxies.

  2. The Observational Mass Function of Loose Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the three catalogs of nearby loose groups identified by Garcia (1993). She used a percolation and a hierarchical method, and proposed a third group catalog defined as a combination of the two. Each catalog contains almost 500 groups. In agreement with previous works on earlier catalogs, we find that groups can be described as collapsing systems. Their sampled size is much larger than their expected virialized region. We compute the virial masses and correct them by taking into account the young dynamical status. We estimate group masses, M, for two cosmological models, a flat one with Omega_0=1 and an open one with Omega_0=0.2. For each of the three catalogs we calculate the mass function, MF. The number density of groups with M>9x10^{12}\\msun, which is the adopted limit of sample completeness, ranges within 1.3-1.9x10^{-3}h^3/Mpc^3 for Omega_0=1, and it is about a factor of 15% lower for Omega_0=0.2. The MFs of the hierarchical and combined catalogs have essentially the same shape, while the MF of...

  3. Non-Gaussian velocity distributions - the effect on virial mass estimates of galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Trevisan, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a study of nine galaxy groups with evidence for non-Gaussianity in their velocity distributions out to 4R200. This sample is taken from the 57 groups selected from the 2dF Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Groups (2PIGG) catalogue of galaxy groups. Statistical analysis indicates that the non-Gaussian groups have masses significantly higher than that of the Gaussian groups. We also have found that all non-Gaussian systems seem to be composed of multiple velocity modes. Besides, our results indicate that multimodal groups should be considered as a set of individual units with their own properties. In particular, we have found that the mass distributions of such units are similar to that of the Gaussian groups. Our results reinforce the idea of non-Gaussian systems as complex structures in the phase space, likely corresponding to secondary infall aggregations at a stage before virialization. The understanding of these objects is relevant for cosmological studies using groups and clusters through the mass function evolution.

  4. A new method for finding and characterizing galaxy groups via low-frequency radio surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croston, J. H.; Ineson, J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-09-01

    We describe a new method for identifying and characterizing the thermodynamic state of large samples of evolved galaxy groups at high redshifts using high-resolution, low-frequency radio surveys, such as those that will be carried out with LOFAR and the Square Kilometre Array. We identify a sub-population of morphologically regular powerful [Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II)] radio galaxies and demonstrate that, for this sub-population, the internal pressure of the radio lobes is a reliable tracer of the external intragroup/intracluster medium (ICM) pressure, and that the assumption of a universal pressure profile for relaxed groups enables the total mass and X-ray luminosity to be estimated. Using a sample of well-studied FR II radio galaxies, we demonstrate that our method enables the estimation of group/cluster X-ray luminosities over three orders of magnitude in luminosity to within a factor of ∼2 from low-frequency radio properties alone. Our method could provide a powerful new tool for building samples of thousands of evolved galaxy groups at z > 1 and characterizing their ICM.

  5. The Low-luminosity Galaxy Population in the NGC 5044 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellone, S. A.; Buzzoni, A.

    Detailed surface photometry for 79 (mostly dwarf) galaxies in the NGC5044 Group area is analysed, revealing the existence of different morphologies among objects originally classified as early-type dwarfs. Particularly, a significant fraction of bright dwarf "ellipticals" show a distinct bulge+disc structure; we thus re-classify these objects as dwarf lenticulars (dS0).

  6. The Hot and Energetic Universe: The evolution of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pointecouteau, E; Adami, C; Arnaud, M; Biffi, V; Borgani, S; Borm, K; Bourdin, H; Brueggen, M; Bulbul, E; Clerc, N; Croston, J H; Dolag, K; Ettori, S; Finoguenov, A; Kaastra, J; Lovisari, L; Maughan, B; Mazzotta, P; Pacaud, F; de Plaa, J; Pratt, G W; Ramos-Ceja, M; Rasia, E; Sanders, J; Zhang, Y -Y; Allen, S; Boehringer, H; Brunetti, G; Elbaz, D; Fassbender, R; Hoekstra, H; Hildebrandt, H; Lamer, G; Marrone, D; Mohr, J; Molendi, S; Nevalainen, J; Ohashi, T; Ota, N; Pierre, M; Romer, K; Schindler, S; Schrabback, T; Schwope, A; Smith, R; Springel, V; von der Linden, A

    2013-01-01

    Major astrophysical questions related to the formation and evolution of structures, and more specifically of galaxy groups and clusters, will still be open in the coming decade and beyond: what is the interplay of galaxy, supermassive black hole, and intergalactic gas evolution in the most massive objects in the Universe - galaxy groups and clusters? What are the processes driving the evolution of chemical enrichment of the hot diffuse gas in large-scale structures? How and when did the first galaxy groups in the Universe, massive enough to bind more than 10^7 K gas, form? Focussing on the period when groups and clusters assembled (0.5

  7. Molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Henkel, C.; Corbelli, E.; Israel, F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Calzetti, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Sievers, A.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.; Brouillet, N.; Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Aalto, S.; Koribalski, B.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Röllig, M.; Mookerjea, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present high-resolution large-scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations were carried out using the HEterodyne Receiver Array (HERA) at the 30 m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line, achieving a resolution of 12” × 2.6 km s-1, enabling indivi

  8. Molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Henkel, C.; Corbelli, E.; Israel, F.; Calzetti, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Sievers, A.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.; Brouillet, N.; Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Aalto, S.; Koribalski, B.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Roellig, M.; Mookerjea, B.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    We present high-resolution large-scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations were carried out using the HEterodyne Receiver Array (HERA) at the 30 m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line, achieving a resolution of 12 '' x 2.6 km s(-1), enabling in

  9. Radial Velocities of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies in the M81 Group

    OpenAIRE

    Sharina, M. E.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Burenkov, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Long-slit observations of 4 dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the M81 group are presented. We have obtained a heliocentric velocity of globular cluster candidate located near the center of DDO78 to be +55 +- 10 km/s by cross-correlation with template stars. We estimated a heliocentric radial velocity of -116 +- 21 km/s for an HII region seen in the K 61. A red diffuse object near the K64 center is found to be a remote galaxy with a heliocentric velocity of +46530 km/s.

  10. Galaxies in X-ray Groups I: Robust Membership Assignment and the Impact of Group Environments on Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    George, Matthew R; Bundy, Kevin; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tinker, Jeremy; Lin, Yen-Ting; Mei, Simona; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Aussel, Hervé; Behroozi, Peter S; Busha, Michael T; Capak, Peter; Coccato, Lodovico; Covone, Giovanni; Faure, Cecile; Fiorenza, Stephanie L; Ilbert, Olivier; Floc'h, Emeric Le; Koekemoer, Anton M; Tanaka, Masayuki; Wechsler, Risa H; Wolk, Melody

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that lead dense environments to host galaxies with redder colors, more spheroidal morphologies, and lower star formation rates than field populations remains an important problem. As most candidate processes ultimately depend on host halo mass, accurate characterizations of the local environment, ideally tied to halo mass estimates and spanning a range in halo mass and redshift are needed. In this work, we present and test a rigorous, probabalistic method for assigning galaxies to groups based on precise photometric redshifts and X-ray selected groups drawn from the COSMOS field. The groups have masses in the range 10^13 < M_200c/M_sun < 10^14 and span redshifts 0group member galaxy sample has a purity of 84% and completeness of 92% within 0.5 R200c. We measure the impact of u...

  11. The low-luminosity galaxy population in the NGC 5044 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Cellone, S A; Cellone, Sergio A.; Buzzoni, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    We present multicolour imaging for 33 dwarf and intermediate-luminosity galaxies in the field of the NGC 5044 Group, complemented with mid-resolution spectroscopy for a subsample of 13 objects. With these data, a revised membership and morphological classification is made for the galaxies in the sample. We were able to confirm all but one of the "definite members" included in the spectroscopic subsample, which were originally classified based on morphological criteria; however, an important fraction of background galaxies is probably present among "likely" and "possible" members. The presence of a nucleus could be detected in just five out of the nine galaxies originally classified as dE,N, thus confirming the intrisic difficulty of photographic-plate morphological classification for this kind of object. Our deep surface photometry provided clear evidences for disc structure in at least three galaxies previously catalogued as dE or dS0. Their transition-type properties are also evident from the colour-magnitu...

  12. A Multiwavelength View of Star Formation in Interacting Galaxies in the Pavo Group

    CERN Document Server

    Machacek, M; Jones, C; Forman, W R; Bastian, N

    2008-01-01

    We combine Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared (MIR) and Chandra X-ray observations of the dominant galaxies NGC6872 and NGC6876 in the Pavo group with archival optical and HI data to study interaction-induced star formation. In spiral galaxy NGC6872, 8.0 and 5.8 micron nonstellar emission having colors consistent with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is concentrated in clumps in three regions: in a 5 kpc radius outer ring about the center of the spiral galaxy, in a bridge of emission connecting NGC6872's northern spiral arm to IC4970, and along the full extent of NGC6872's tidal arms. PAH emission is correlated with young star clusters and dense HI regions. We find no strong differences in the MIR colors of star-forming regions in the spiral galaxy NGC6872 as a function of position relative to the tidally interacting companion galaxy IC4970. We find 11 very luminous X-ray sources (>~ (0.5 - 5) x 10^{39} ergs/s) clustered to the southwest in NGC6872, near bright star-forming regions. In NGC6872's tidal features,...

  13. Galaxy Rotation Curves from General Relativity with Infrared Renormalization Group Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Davi C; Shapiro, Ilya L

    2011-01-01

    We review our contribution to infrared Renormalization Group (RG) effects to General Relativity in the context of galaxies. Considering the effective action approach to Quantum Field Theory in curved background, we argued that the proper RG energy scale, in the weak field limit, should be related to the Newtonian potential. In the galaxy context, even without dark matter, this led to a remarkably small gravitational coupling G variation (about or less than 10^{-12} of its value per light-year), while also capable of generating galaxy rotation curves about as good as the best phenomenological dark matter profiles (considering both the rotation curve shape and the expected mass-to-light ratios). Here we also comment on related developments, open issues and perspectives.

  14. First OB-stars in the iron-poor Local Group galaxy sextans A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Ines

    2015-01-01

    The study of the early Universe relies on our ability to check our models by analyzing the behaviour of astrophysical objects at conditions close to those of the first epochs. Low-metallicity nearby galaxies with young massive stars may be used as laboratories to study these objects that have been proposed as active agents of the reionization of the Universe and dominate the energy budget of galaxies.We present observations and analyses of individual OB stars in the sub-SMC metallicity galaxy Sextans A (which the lowest confirmed Fe abundance in the Local Group, kaufer et al. 2004 & Hosek et al. 2014), obtained with OSIRIS@GTC. This work extends the limits of this kind of studies to unprecedented low metallicities.

  15. The low-luminosity galaxy population in the NGC 5044 Group (Conference proceeding)

    CERN Document Server

    Cellone, S A; Cellone, Sergio A.; Buzzoni, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Detailed surface photometry for 79 (mostly dwarf) galaxies in the NGC 5044 Group area is analysed, revealing the existence of different morphologies among objects originally classified as early-type dwarfs. Particularly, a significant fraction of bright dwarf "ellipticals" show a distinct bulge+disc structure; we thus re-classify these objects as dwarf lenticulars (dS0). Our finding points at a possible scenario where these systems are the remnants of "harassed" disc galaxies. This is emphasized by the discovery of a few objects with hints for very low-surface brightness spiral-like structure. The colours, structure, and spatial distribution of the different galaxy types suggest that our classification may indeed be separating objects with different origins and/or evolutionary paths.

  16. Mechanical Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei in Galaxies, Groups, and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R

    2012-01-01

    The radiative cooling timescales at the centers of hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters are much shorter than their ages. Therefore, hot atmospheres are expected to cool and to form stars. Cold gas and star formation are observed in central cluster galaxies but at levels below those expected from an unimpeded cooling flow. X-ray observations have shown that wholesale cooling is being offset by mechanical heating from radio active galactic nuclei. Feedback is widely considered to be an important and perhaps unavoidable consequence of the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes. We show that cooling X-ray atmospheres and the ensuing star formation and nuclear activity are probably coupled to a self-regulated feedback loop. While the energetics are now reasonably well understood, other aspects of feedback are not. We highlight the problems of atmospheric heating and transport processes, accretion, and nuclear activity, and we discuss the potential role of black hole sp...

  17. Hierarchical Formation in Action: Characterizing Accelerated Galaxy Evolution in Compact Groups Using Whole-sky WISE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Catherine; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher, Sarah; Alatalo, Katherine; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2016-04-01

    Compact groups provide an environment to study the growth of galaxies amid multiple prolonged interactions. With their dense galaxy concentrations and relatively low velocity dispersions, compact groups mimic the conditions of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Compact group galaxies are known to show a bimodality in Spitzer IRAC infrared color space: galaxies are preferentially either quiescent with low specific star formation rates (SSFRs) or prolifically forming stars—galaxies with moderate levels of specific star formation are rare. Previous Spitzer IRAC studies identifying this “canyon” have been limited by small number statistics. We utilize whole-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to study 163 compact groups, thereby tripling our previous sample and including more galaxies with intermediate mid-IR colors indicative of moderate SSFRs. We define a distinct WISE mid-IR color space ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}12}{{f}4.6}\\right]\\right) versus ≤ft({log}≤ft[\\tfrac{{f}22}{{f}3.4}\\right]\\right) that we use to identify canyon galaxies from the larger sample. We confirm that compact group galaxies show a bimodal distribution in the mid-infrared and identify 37 canyon galaxies with reliable photometry and intermediate mid-IR colors. Morphologically, we find that the canyon harbors a large population of both Sa-Sbc and E/S0 type galaxies, and that they fall on the optical red sequence rather than the green valley. Finally, we provide a catalog of WISE photometry for 567 of 652 galaxies selected from the sample of 163 compact groups.

  18. Star formation quenching in simulated group and cluster galaxies: When, how, and why?

    CERN Document Server

    Bahe, Yannick M

    2014-01-01

    Star formation is observed to be suppressed in group and cluster galaxies compared to the field. To gain insight into the quenching process, we have analysed ~2000 galaxies formed in the GIMIC suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The time of quenching varies from ~2 Gyr before accretion (first crossing of r200,c) to >4 Gyr after, depending on satellite and host mass. Once begun, quenching is rapid (>~ 500 Myr) in low-mass galaxies (M* < 10^10 M_Sun), but significantly more protracted for more massive satellites. The simulations predict a substantial role of outflows driven by ram pressure -- but not tidal forces -- in removing the star-forming interstellar matter (ISM) from satellite galaxies, especially dwarfs (M* ~ 10^9 M_Sun) where they account for nearly two thirds of ISM loss in both groups and clusters. Immediately before quenching is complete, this fraction rises to ~80% even for Milky Way analogues (M* ~ 10^10.5 M_Sun) in groups (M_host ~ 10^13.5 M_Sun). We show that (i) ISM stripping ...

  19. 75 FR 45623 - Morris Energy Group, LLC v.PSEG Energy Resources & Trade LLC; PSEG Fossil LLC; and PSEG Power LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Morris Energy Group, LLC v.PSEG Energy Resources & Trade LLC; PSEG Fossil LLC; and PSEG Power LLC; Notice of Complaint July 27, 2010. Take notice that on July 23, 2010, Morris Energy Group, LLC (Morris Energy) (Complainant) filed a complaint against PSEG Energy Resources &...

  20. Hot and Cold Galactic Gas in the NGC 2563 Galaxy Group

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S; van Gorkom, J H; Jeltema, Tesla E; Zabludoff, Ann I; Wilcots, Eric; Martini, Paul; Lee, Duane; Roberts, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    The role of environmentally induced gas stripping in driving galaxy evolution in groups remains poorly understood. Here we present extensive Chandra and Very Large Array mosaic observations of the hot and cold interstellar medium within the members of the nearby, X-ray bright NGC 2563 group, a prime target for studies of the role of gas stripping and interactions in relatively small host halos. Our observations cover nearly all group members within a projected radius of 1.15 Mpc (~1.4 R_vir) of the group center, down to a limiting X-ray luminosity and HI mass of 3e39 erg/s and 2e8 M_sun, respectively. The X-ray data are consistent with efficient ram pressure stripping of the hot gas halos of early-type galaxies near the group core, but no X-ray tails are seen and the limited statistics preclude strong conclusions. The HI results suggest moderate HI mass loss from the group members when compared to similar field galaxies. Six of the 20 HI-detected group members show HI evidence of ongoing interactions with oth...

  1. Groups of Galaxies in the Nearby Universe Proceedings of the ESO Workshop held at Santiago de Chile

    CERN Document Server

    Saviane, Ivo; Borissova, Jordanka

    2007-01-01

    For every galaxy in the field or in clusters, there are about three galaxies in groups. The Milky Way itself resides in a group, and groups can be found at high redshift. The current generation of 10-m class telescopes and space facilities allows the observation of the members of nearby groups with exquisite detail, and their properties can be correlated with the global properties of their host group. Groups in the local Universe offer us the chance to study galaxies in environments characterized by strong interactions. In the cosmological context, groups trace large-scale structures better than clusters, and the evolution of groups and clusters appears to be related. All these aspects of research on groups of galaxies are summarized in this book written by scientists working in various fields.

  2. Weak lensing mass estimates of galaxy groups and the line-of-sight contamination

    CERN Document Server

    Spinelli, P F; Lerchster, M; Brimioulle, F; Finoguenov, A

    2011-01-01

    Weak lensing is an important technique to determine the masses of galaxy groups. However, the distortion imprint on the shape of the background galaxies is affected by all the mass content along the line-of-sight. Using COSMOS shear mock data we study the shear profile of 165 groups and investigate the level at which the neighbouring groups can enhance or suppress the shear signal from the main halo. Our mock data are based on CFHT and Subaru observations and the information on the galaxy groups is taken from the COSMOS X-ray catalogue of extended sources. The expected gravitational shear field of these groups is calculated assuming that the haloes follow NFW density profiles. We conclude that, on average, the signal-to-noise for a detection of the main halo is affected by ~15%x\\sqrt{ngal/30} with respect to the signal-to-noise the same halo would have if it was isolated in the sky. Groups with neighbours that are close in projected distance (<1') are the most affected, but haloes located at larger angular...

  3. New Galaxies Discovered in the First Blind HI Survey of the Centaurus A Group

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, G D; Knezek, P M; Jerjen, H; Barnes, D; Bhathal, R; De Blok, W J G; Boyce, P J; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; Gibson, B K; Henning, P; Kilborn, V A; Koribalski, B S; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Malin, D; Minchin, R F; Mould, J; Oosterloo, T A; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Ryder, S D; Sadler, E M; Staveley-Smith, L; Stewart, I; Stootman, F; Vaile, R A; Webster, R; Wright, A E

    1999-01-01

    We have commenced a 21-cm survey of the entire southern sky (\\delta < 0 degrees, -1200 km/s < v < 12700 km/s) which is ''blind'', i.e. unbiased by previous optical information. In the present paper we report on the results of a pilot project which is based on data from this all-sky survey. The project was carried out on an area of 600 square degrees centred on the nearby Centaurus A (Cen A) group of galaxies at a mean velocity of v ~ 500 km/s. This was recently the subject of a separate and thorough optical survey. We found 10 new group members to add to the 21 galaxies already known in the Cen A group: five of these are previously uncatalogued galaxies, while five were previously catalogued but not known to be associated with the group. We found optical counterparts for all the HI detections, most of them intrinsically very faint low surface brightness dwarfs. The new group members add approximately 6% to the HI mass of the group and 4% to its light. The HI mass function, derived from all the known ...

  4. IMAGE RELEASE: New Hydrogen Clouds in the M81 Group of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A composite radio-optical image shows five new clouds of hydrogen gas discovered using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The spiral galaxy M81 and its satellite, M82, are seen in visible light (white); intergalactic hydrogen gas revealed by the GBT is shown in red; and additional hydrogen gas earlier detected by the Very Large Array is shown in green. The M81 Group of galaxies, 11.8 million light-years from Earth, are interacting gravitationally with each other, as shown clearly by the gas streaming among them. The newly-discovered gas clouds, each containing from 14 to 57 million times the mass of our Sun, are similar to gas clouds also found near our own Milky Way Galaxy. Astronomers analyzing these M81 Group clouds conclude that they are likely remnants of earlier interactions among the galaxies and that this indicates that their analogs near the Milky Way had a similar origin. The research team is: Katie Chynoweth, a graduate student at Vanderbilt University; Glen Langston of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO); Min Yun of the University of Massachusetts; Felix J. Lockman of NRAO; Kate Rubin of Lick Observatory; and Sarah Scoles of Cornell University. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas. Credit: Chynoweth et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, Digital Sky Survey. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Do the stellar populations of the brightest two group galaxies depend on the magnitude gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, M.; Mamon, G. A.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate how the stellar populations of the inner regions of the first and the second brightest group galaxies (respectively BGGs and SBGGs) vary as a function of magnitude gap, using a Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based sample of 550 groups with elliptical BGGs. The sample is complete in redshift, luminosity, and for Δ M_{12} up to 2.5 mag, and contains 59 large-gap groups (LGGs, with Δ M_{12} > 2.0 mag). We determine ages, metallicities, and star formation histories (SFHs) of BGGs and SBGGs using the STARLIGHT code with two different single stellar population models (which lead to important disagreements in SFHs), and also compute [α/Fe] from spectral indices. After removing the dependence with galaxy velocity dispersion or with stellar mass, there is no correlation with magnitude gap of BGG ages, metallicities, [α/Fe], and SFHs. The lack of trends of BGG SFHs with magnitude gap suggests that BGGs in LGGs have undergone more mergers than those in small-gap groups, but these mergers are either dry or occurred at very high redshift, which in either case would leave no detectable imprint in their spectra. We show that SBGGs in LGGs lie significantly closer to the BGGs (in projection) than galaxies with similar stellar masses in normal groups, which appears to be a sign of the earlier entry of the former into their groups. Nevertheless, the stellar population properties of the SBGGs in LGGs are compatible with those of the general population of galaxies with similar stellar masses residing in normal groups.

  6. Detailed photometric analysis of young star groups in the galaxy NGC 300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M. J.; Baume, G.; Feinstein, C.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The purpose of this work is to understand the global characteristics of the stellar populations in NGC 300. In particular, we focused our attention on searching young star groups and study their hierarchical organization. The proximity and orientation of this Sculptor Group galaxy make it an ideal candidate for this study. Methods: The research was conducted using archival point spread function (PSF) fitting photometry measured from images in multiple bands obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope (ACS/HST). Using the path linkage criterion (PLC), we cataloged young star groups and analyzed them from the observation of individual stars in the galaxy NGC 300. We also built stellar density maps from the bluest stars and applied the SExtractor code to identify overdensities. This method provided an additional tool for the detection of young stellar structures. By plotting isocontours over the density maps and comparing the two methods, we could infer and delineate the hierarchical structure of the blue population in the galaxy. For each region of a detected young star group, we estimated the size and derived the radial surface density profiles for stellar populations of different color (blue and red). A statistical decontamination of field stars was performed for each region. In this way it was possible to build the color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) and compare them with theoretical evolutionary models. We also constrained the present-day mass function (PDMF) per group by estimating a value for its slope. Results: The blue population distribution in NGC 300 clearly follows the spiral arms of the galaxy, showing a hierarchical behavior in which the larger and loosely distributed structures split into more compact and denser ones over several density levels. We created a catalog of 1147 young star groups in six fields of the galaxy NGC 300, in which we present their fundamental characteristics. The mean and the mode radius values

  7. Detailed photometric analysis of young star groups in the galaxy NGC 300

    CERN Document Server

    Jimena, Rodríguez María; Carlos, Feinstein

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to understand the global characteristics of the stellar populations in NGC 300. In particular, we focused our attention on searching young star groups and study their hierarchical organization. The research was conducted using archival point spread function fitting photometry measured from images in multiple bands obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope. Using the path linkage criterion, we cataloged young star groups and analyzed them from the observation of individual stars in the galaxy NGC 300. We also built stellar density maps from the bluest stars and applied the SExtractor code to identify overdensities. By plotting isocontours over the density maps and comparing the two methods, we could infer and delineate the hierarchical structure of the blue population in the galaxy. For each region of a detected young star group, we estimated the size and derived the radial surface density profiles for stellar populations of different color. A stati...

  8. Dwarf galaxy planes: the discovery of symmetric structures in the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Marcel S.; Kroupa, Pavel; Jerjen, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Both major galaxies in the Local Group (LG) are surrounded by thin planes of mostly co-orbiting satellite galaxies, the vast polar structure (VPOS) around the Milky Way (MW) and the Great Plane of Andromeda (GPoA) around M31. We summarize the current knowledge concerning these structures and compare their relative orientations by re-determining their properties in a common coordinate system. The existence of similar, coherent structures around both major LG galaxies motivates an investigation of the distribution of the more distant non-satellite galaxies in the LG. This results in the discovery of two planes (diameters of 1-2 Mpc) which contain almost all nearby non-satellite galaxies. The two LG planes are surprisingly symmetric. They are inclined by only 20° relative to the galactic disc of M31, are similarly thin (heights of ≈60 kpc) and have near-to-identical offsets from the MW and from M31. They are inclined relative to each other by 35°. Comparing the plane orientations with each other and with additional features reveals indications for an intimate connection between the VPOS and the GPoA. They are both polar with respect to the MW, have similar orbital directions and are inclined by about 45°±7° relative to each other. The Magellanic Stream approximately aligns with the VPOS and the GPoA, but also shares its projected position and line-of-sight velocity trend with a part of the dominating structure of non-satellite dwarf galaxies. In addition, the recent proper motion measurement of M31 indicates a prograde orbit of the MW-M31 system, the VPOS and the GPoA. The alignment with other features such as the Supergalactic Plane and the overdensity in hypervelocity stars are discussed as well. We end with a short summary of the currently proposed scenarios trying to explain the LG galaxy structures as either originating from cosmological structures or from tidal debris of a past galaxy encounter. We emphasize that there currently exists no full detailed

  9. Direct observational evidence for a large transient galaxy population in groups at 0.85

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L; Wilman, David J; Finoguenov, Alexis; Parker, Laura C; Connelly, Jennifer L; Mulchaey, John S; Bower, Richard G; Tanaka, Masayuki; Giodini, Stefania

    2010-01-01

    (abridged) We introduce our survey of galaxy groups at 0.8515 members. The dynamical mass estimates are in good agreement with the masses estimated from the X-ray luminosity, with most of the groups having 131E10.1 Msun, and for blue galaxies we sample masses as low as Mstar=1E8.8 Msun. Like lower-redshift groups, these systems are dominated by red galaxies, at all stellar masses Mstar>1E10.1 Msun. Few group galaxies inhabit the ``blue cloud'' that dominates the surrounding field; instead, we find a large and possibly distinct population of galaxies with intermediate colours. The ``green valley'' that exists at low redshift is instead well-populated in these groups, containing ~30 per cent of galaxies. These do not appear to be exceptionally dusty galaxies, and about half show prominent Balmer-absorption lines. Furthermore, their HST morphologies appear to be intermediate between those of red-sequence and blue-cloud galaxies of the same stellar mass. We postulate that these are a transi ent population, migrat...

  10. Local dark energy: HST evidence from the vicinity of the M81/M82 galaxy group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kashibadze, O. G.; Makarov, D. I.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observations of the nearby galaxy group M81/M82 and its vicinity indicate that the dynamics of the expansion outflow around the group is dominated by the antigravity of the dark energy background. The local density of dark energy in the area is estimated to be near the global dark energy density or perhaps exactly equal to it. This conclusion agrees well with our previous results for the Local Group vicinity and the vicinity of the Cen A/M83 group.

  11. Evolutionary properties of the low-luminosity galaxy population in the NGC 5044 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, A.; Cellone, S. A.; Saracco, P.; Zucca, E.

    2012-03-01

    In this third paper of a series we present Johnson-Gunn B, g, V, r, i, z multicolour photometry for 79 objects, including a significant fraction of the faintest galaxies around NGC 5044, assessing group membership on the basis of apparent morphology (through accurate Sérsic-profile fitting) and low-resolution (R= 500-1000) optical spectroscopy to estimate the redshift for 21 objects. Early- and late-type systems are found to be clearly separate in Sérsic parameter space, with the well-known luminosity versus shape relation being mostly traced by different morphological types spanning different ranges in the shape parameter n. A significantly blue colour is confirmed for Magellanic irregulars (Sm/Ims), while a drift toward bluer integrated colours is also an issue for dwarf ellipticals (dEs). Both features point to moderate but pervasive star-formation activity even among nominally 'quiescent' stellar systems. Together, dEs and Ims provide the bulk of the galaxy luminosity function, around M(g) ≃-18.0 ± 1.5, while the S0 and dwarf spheroidal (dSph) components dominate the bright and faint-end tails of the distribution respectively. This special mix places the NGC 5044 Group just 'midway' between the high-density cosmic aggregation scale typical of galaxy clusters and the low-density environment of looser galaxy clumps like our Local Group. The bright mass of the 136 member galaxies with available photometry and morphological classification, as inferred from appropriate M/L model fitting, amounts to a total of 2.3 × 1012 M⊙. This is one seventh of the total dynamical mass of the group, according to its X-ray emission. The current star-formation rate within the group turns to be about 23 M⊙ yr-1, a figure that may however be slightly increased as a result of the evident activity among dwarf ellipticals, as shown by enhanced Hβ emission in their spectra. Lick narrow-band indices have been computed for 17 galaxies, probing all the relevant atomic and

  12. Fossil Explorers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Sean; McLaughlin, Cheryl; MacFadden, Bruce; Jacobbe, Elizabeth; Poole, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many young learners are fascinated with fossils, particularly charismatic forms such as dinosaurs and giant sharks. Fossils provide tangible, objective evidence of life that lived millions of years ago. They also provide a timescale of evolution not typically appreciated by young learners. Fossils and the science of paleontology can, therefore,…

  13. Marquee Fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2008-01-01

    Professors of an online graduate-level paleontology class developed the concept of marquee fossils--fossils that have one or more unique characteristics that capture the attention and direct observation of students. In the classroom, Marquee fossils integrate the geology, biology, and environmental science involved in the study of fossilized…

  14. Fossil Explorers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Sean; McLaughlin, Cheryl; MacFadden, Bruce; Jacobbe, Elizabeth; Poole, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many young learners are fascinated with fossils, particularly charismatic forms such as dinosaurs and giant sharks. Fossils provide tangible, objective evidence of life that lived millions of years ago. They also provide a timescale of evolution not typically appreciated by young learners. Fossils and the science of paleontology can, therefore,…

  15. Weak lensing calibrated M-T scaling relation of galaxy groups in the cosmos field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Massey, R. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, J. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hoekstra, H. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333-CA Leiden (Netherlands); Taylor, J. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Spinelli, P. F. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas (IAG), Rua do Matão, 1226 Cidade Universitária 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tanaka, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ilbert, O. [LAM, CNRS-UNiv Aix-Marseille, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curis, F-13013 Marseille (France); Capak, P. [Spitzer Science Center, 314-6 Caltech, 1201 East California Boulevard Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McCracken, H. J. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Koekemoer, A., E-mail: kimmo.kettula@iki.fi [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10 galaxy groups in the COSMOS field, combined with 55 higher-mass clusters from the literature. The COSMOS data includes Hubble Space Telescope imaging and redshift measurements of 46 source galaxies per arcminute{sup 2}, enabling us to perform unique weak lensing measurements of low-mass systems. Our sample extends the mass range of the lensing calibrated M-T relation an order of magnitude lower than any previous study, resulting in a power-law slope of 1.48{sub −0.09}{sup +0.13}. The slope is consistent with the self-similar model, predictions from simulations, and observations of clusters. However, X-ray observations relying on mass measurements derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium have indicated that masses at group scales are lower than expected. Both simulations and observations suggest that hydrostatic mass measurements can be biased low. Our external weak lensing masses provide the first observational support for hydrostatic mass bias at group level, showing an increasing bias with decreasing temperature and reaching a level of 30%-50% at 1 keV.

  16. The mass distribution in an assembling super galaxy group at $z=0.37$

    CERN Document Server

    Smit, Merijn; Velander, Malin; Kuijken, Konrad; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Moustakas, John; Tran, Kim-Vy H

    2015-01-01

    We present a weak gravitational lensing analysis of supergroup SG1120$-$1202, consisting of four distinct X-ray-luminous groups, that will merge to form a cluster comparable in mass to Coma at $z=0$. These groups lie within a projected separation of 1 to 4 Mpc and within $\\Delta v=550$ km s$^{-1}$ and form a unique protocluster to study the matter distribution in a coalescing system. Using high-resolution {\\em HST}/ACS imaging, combined with an extensive spectroscopic and imaging data set, we study the weak gravitational distortion of background galaxy images by the matter distribution in the supergroup. We compare the reconstructed projected density field with the distribution of galaxies and hot X-ray emitting gas in the system and derive halo parameters for the individual density peaks. We show that the projected mass distribution closely follows the locations of the X-ray peaks and associated brightest group galaxies. One of the groups that lies at slightly lower redshift ($z\\approx 0.35$) than the other ...

  17. A Compact Group of Galaxies at z = 2.48 Hosting an AGN-driven Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 1011M⊙ and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass-metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The work is also based, in part, on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  18. Stellar Systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44 - I. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Escudero, C G

    2016-01-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims. In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (mueff_g'~27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods. We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also search for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results. We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associati...

  19. The High Velocity Galaxy Problem of $\\Lambda$CDM in the Local Group $-$ Including External Perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    We recently used an axisymmetric model of the Local Group (LG) to show that the observed positions and velocities of galaxies inside it are difficult to reconcile with the standard cosmological model, $\\Lambda$CDM (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We now extend this investigation using a 3D model of the LG. This makes it feasible to directly include several other mass concentrations within and just outside the LG e.g. M33 and IC 342, respectively. As before, LG dwarf galaxies are treated as test particles. Although our best-fitting 3D model yields different velocity predictions for individual galaxies, the overall picture remains unchanged. In particular, observed radial velocities (RVs) tend to exceed $\\Lambda$CDM model predictions. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our earlier axisymmetric analysis, with a root mean square value of $\\sim$50 km/s. \\emph{Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy prob...

  20. The Revealing Dust: Mid-Infrared Activity in Hickson Compact Group Galaxy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Hornschemeier, A E; Charlton, J C; Hibbard, J E

    2007-01-01

    We present a sample of 46 galaxy nuclei from 12 nearby (z<4500 km/s) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with a complete suite of 1-24 micron 2MASS+Spitzer nuclear photometry. For all objects in the sample, blue emission from stellar photospheres dominates in the near-IR through the 3.6 micron IRAC band. Twenty-five of 46 (54%) galaxy nuclei show red, mid-IR continua characteristic of hot dust powered by ongoing star formation and/or accretion onto a central black hole. We introduce alpha_{IRAC}, the spectral index of a power-law fit to the 4.5-8.0 micron IRAC data, and demonstrate that it cleanly separates the mid-IR active and non-active HCG nuclei. This parameter is more powerful for identifying low to moderate-luminosity mid-IR activity than other measures which include data at rest-frame lambda<3.6 micron that may be dominated by stellar photospheric emission. While the HCG galaxies clearly have a bimodal distribution in this parameter space, a comparison sample from the Spitzer Nearby Galaxy Survey (SIN...

  1. Revised Mass-to-Light Ratios For Nearby Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Yutong; Courteau, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the cluster stellar mass-to-light (M*/L) ratio and cumulative stellar masses, derived on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis, for 12 massive (M500 ~ 10^14 - 10^15 Msun), nearby clusters with available optical imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 and X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our method involves a statistical cluster membership using both photometric and spectroscopic redshifts when available to maximize completeness whilst minimizing contamination effects. We show that different methods of estimating the stellar mass-to-light ratio from observed photometry result in systematic discrepancies in the total stellar masses and average mass-to-light ratios of cluster galaxies. Nonetheless, all conversion methodologies point to a lack of correlation between M*/Li and total cluster mass, even though low-mass groups contain relatively more blue galaxies. We also find no statistically significant correlation between M*/Li and the fraction of blu...

  2. Star Formation Suppression in Compact Group Galaxies: A New Path to Quenching?

    CERN Document Server

    Alatalo, K; Lisenfeld, U; Bitsakis, T; Lanz, L; Lacy, M; Charmandaris, V; Cluver, M; Dopita, M A; Guillard, P; Jarrett, T; Kewley, L J; Nyland, K; Ogle, P M; Rasmussen, J; Rich, J A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Xu, C K; Yun, M

    2015-01-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H$_2$-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H$_2$ bright galaxies, with CARMA. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and early-type galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies show star formation suppression of $\\langle$S$\\rangle$=10$\\pm$5, distributed bimodally, with five objects exhibiting suppressions of S$\\gtrsim$10 and depletion timescales $\\gtrsim$10Gyr. This star formation inefficiency is also seen in the efficiency per freefall time. We investigate the gas-to-dust ratios of these galaxies to determine if an incorrect conversion caused the apparent suppression and find that HCGs have normal ratios. It is likely that the cause of the suppression in these objects is associated with shocks injecting turbulence int...

  3. X-ray Cavities in Galaxy Groups and Clusters: Central Gas Entropy Excess as Direct Evidence for AGN Feedback

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Wang

    2011-03-01

    Observations of X-ray jets and cavities in clusters of galaxies observed by Chandra are briefly reviewed. A recent study on the excess of central gas entropy, which can be considered as direct evidence for AGN feedback in galaxy groups and clusters is presented. An expanded account of this study has been presented in RAA (Wang et al. 2010).

  4. Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Analysis of Spatially-Resolved Star-Formation in Nearby Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Rose; Collova, Natasha; Spicer, Sandy; Whalen, Kelly; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    As part of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, we are conducting a survey of the gas and star-formation properties of galaxies in 36 groups and clusters in the local universe. The galaxies in our sample span a large range of galactic environments, from the centers of galaxy groups and clusters to the surrounding infall regions. One goal of the project is to map the spatial distribution of star-formation; the relative extent of the star-forming and stellar disks provides important information about the internal and external processes that deplete gas and thus drive galaxy evolution. We obtained wide-field H-alpha observations with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory for galaxies in the vicinity of the MKW11 and NRGb004 galaxy groups and the Abell 1367 cluster. We present a preliminary analysis of the relative size of the star-forming and stellar disks as a function of galaxy morphology and local galaxy density, and we calculate gas depletion times using star-formation rates and HI gas mass. We will combine these results with those from other UAT members to determine if and how environmentally-driven gas depletion varies with the mass and X-ray properties of the host group or cluster. This work has supported by NSF grants AST-0847430, AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  5. New occurrences of microvertebrate fossil accumulations in Bauru Group, Late Cretaceous of western São Paulo state, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alveş, Y. M.; Bergqvist, L. P.; Brito, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the results of several palaeontological expeditions to four Upper Cretaceous fossil microsites of the Adamantina and Presidente Prudente formations in western São Paulo State, Brazil. Despite the fragmentary condition of the fossils recovered, they represent an important record of vertebrate microremains. The material, recovered through screen washing, comprises teeth and scales of Lepisosteidae; two morphotypes of Halecostomi teeth with similarities to Characiformes and Amiiformes; a Teleostei tooth of molariform shape; fin spines of Siluriformes; teeth of possible Baurusuchidae, Notosuchia (probably Adamantinasuchus or Mariliasuchus), Neosuchia (probably Itasuchus or Goniopholis), and other Mesoeucrocodylia indet.; probable teeth of Abelisauroidea, other Theropoda indet., and a phalanx of Aves. The comparative microvertebrate fossil accumulation from western São Paulo State provides evidence that: 1) floodplain channels accumulate large concentrations of microremains; 2) coarse sandstone privileges enamel tissues like teeth and scales; 3) new vertebrate fossil records have been discovered in Florida Paulista, Alfredo Marcondes, and Alvares Machado outcrops.

  6. Trace fossils from Bhuban Formation, Surma Group (Lower to Middle Miocene) of Mizoram India and their palaeoenvironmental significance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghavendra P Tiwari; Chinmoy Rajkonwar; Lalchawimawii; Paul Lalnuntluanga Jehova Malsawma; Victor Z Ralte; Satish J Patel

    2011-12-01

    A detailed ichnological study performed on the Bhuban Formation, Surma Group (Lower to Middle Miocene) of Mizoram, India reveals the occurrence of rich and diverse trace fossils. These have been collected from the two localities in Aizawl, i.e., Bawngkawn and Ropaiabawk, where sandstone-shale sequence is well exposed. Total 20 ichnospecies of 14 ichnogenera have been identified which include Arenicolites isp., Cochlichnus anguineus, Helminthopsis abeli, Laevicyclus mongraensis, Ophiomorpha borneensis, Palaeophycus tubularis, Palaeophycus heberti, Palaeophycus sulcatus, Palaeophycus alternatus, Pholeus abomasoformis, Pholeus bifurcatus, Planolites beverleyensis, Planolites annularis, Polykladichnus irregularis, Rhizocorallium isp., Skolithos linearis, Taenidium satanassi, Teichichnus rectus, Thalassinoides horizontalis and Thalassinoides paradoxicus. Ethologically these ichnogenera display dwelling and feeding activities of the infaunal organisms. Arenicolites, Ophiomorpha, Polykladichnus and Skolithos are the members of the Skolithos ichnofacies while Palaeophycus, Planolites, Rhizocorallium and Thalassinoides are the members of the Cruziana ichnofacies. The presence of Skolithos ichnofacies indicates sandy shifting substrate and high energy conditions in foreshore zone while the Cruziana ichnofacies indicate unconsolidated, poorly sorted soft substrate and low energy condition in the shoreface/offshore zone. These ichnogenera indicate foreshore to shoreface-offshore zone of shallow marine environment for the deposition of the rocks of the Bhuban Formation of Mizoram.

  7. AGN Feedback in Galaxy Groups: the Delicate Touch of Self-Regulated Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; D'Ercole, A; Melioli, C

    2011-01-01

    AGN heating, through massive subrelativistic outflows, might be the key to solve the long-lasting `cooling flow problem' in cosmological systems. In a previous paper, we showed that cold accretion feedback and, to a lesser degree, Bondi self-regulated models are in fact able to quench cooling rates for several Gyr, at the same time preserving the mainc ool core features, like observed density and temperature profiles. Is it true also for lighter systems, such as galaxy groups? The answer is globally yes, although with remarkable differences. Adopting a modified version of the AMR code FLASH 3.2, we found that successful 3D simulations with cold and Bondi models are almost convergent in the galaxy group environment, with mechanical efficiencies in the range 5.e-4 - 1.e-3 and 5.e-2 - 1.e-1, respectively. The evolutionary storyline of galaxy groups is dominated by a quasi-continuous gentle injection with sub-Eddington outflows (with mechanical power and velocity around 1.e44 erg/s and 1.e4 km/s). The cold and hy...

  8. CLASS B 1359 + 154: Modelling Lensing by a Group of Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunita Nair

    2002-03-01

    The recently discovered gravitationally lensed system CLASS B1359+154 appears to have six detectable images of a single background source at a redshift of 3.235. A group of galaxies acts as the lens, at a redshift of ∼ 1. The present work identifies two distinct, physically plausible image configurations, a 7-image one and a 9-image one. Mass models are constructed corresponding to realizations of these two configurations. Both models call for, in addition to non-singular galaxy-type lenses, a larger scale mass component that resembles the extended dark matter distributions seen in relatively low-redshift galaxy groups. It is presently observationally impossible to study the extended X-ray emission from a group at such a high redshift, hence lensing studies are of some interest. A lensed system with a high image multiplicity does not necessarily admit of a unique lensing interpretation; discrimination is possible with additional observable details (e.g., the image parities, which are uncommon among even the simpler systems).

  9. The special growth history of central galaxies in groups and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Central galaxies (CGs) in galaxy groups and clusters are believed to form and assemble a good portion of their stellar mass at early times, but they also accrete significant mass at late times via galactic cannibalism, that is merging with companion group or cluster galaxies that experience dynamical friction against the common host dark-matter halo. The effect of these mergers on the structure and kinematics of the CG depends not only on the properties of the accreted satellites, but also on the orbital parameters of the encounters. Here we present the results of numerical simulations aimed at estimating the distribution of merging orbital parameters of satellites cannibalized by the CGs in groups and clusters. As a consequence of dynamical friction, the satellites' orbits evolve losing energy and angular momentum, with no clear trend towards orbit circularization. The distributions of the orbital parameters of the central-satellite encounters are markedly different from the distributions found for halo-halo mergers in cosmological simulations. The orbits of satellites accreted by the CGs are on average less bound and less eccentric than those of cosmological halo-halo encounters. We provide fits to the distributions of the central-satellite merging orbital parameters that can be used to study the merger-driven evolution of the scaling relations of CGs.

  10. The special growth history of central galaxies in groups and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, Carlo

    2017-05-01

    Central galaxies (CGs) in galaxy groups and clusters are believed to form and assemble a good portion of their stellar mass at early times, but they also accrete significant mass at late times via galactic cannibalism, that is merging with companion group or cluster galaxies that experience dynamical friction against the common host dark-matter halo. The effect of these mergers on the structure and kinematics of the CG depends not only on the properties of the accreted satellites, but also on the orbital parameters of the encounters. Here we present the results of numerical simulations aimed at estimating the distribution of merging orbital parameters of satellites cannibalized by the CGs in groups and clusters. As a consequence of dynamical friction, the satellites' orbits evolve losing energy and angular momentum, with no clear trend towards orbit circularization. The distributions of the orbital parameters of the central-satellite encounters are markedly different from the distributions found for halo-halo mergers in cosmological simulations. The orbits of satellites accreted by the CGs are on average less bound and less eccentric than those of cosmological halo-halo encounters. We provide fits to the distributions of the central-satellite merging orbital parameters that can be used to study the merger-driven evolution of the scaling relations of CGs.

  11. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey: Precursor Observations of the NGC 628 group

    CERN Document Server

    Auld, R; Davies, J I; Catinella, B; Henning, P A; Linder, S; Momjian, E; Müller, E; O'Neil, K; Sabatini, S; Schneider, S; Bothun, G; Cortese, L; Disney, M; Hoffman, G L; Putman, M; Rosenberg, J L; Baes, M; De Blok, W J G; Boselli, A; Brinks, E; Brosch, N; Irwin, J; Karachentsev, I D; Kilborn, V A; Koribalski, B; Spekkens, K

    2006-01-01

    The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) is one of several HI surveys utilising the new Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) fitted to the 305m radio telescope at Arecibo. The survey is specifically designed to investigate various galactic environments to higher sensitivity, higher velocity resolution and higher spatial resolution than previous fully sampled, 21 cm multibeam surveys. The emphasis is on making detailed observations of nearby objects although the large system bandwidth (100 MHz) will allow us to quantify the HI properties over a large instantaneous velocity range. In this paper we describe the survey and its goals and present the results from the precursor observations of a 5 degree x 1 degree region containing the nearby (~10 Mpc) NGC 628 group. We have detected all the group galaxies in the region including the low mass (M{HI}~10^7Mo) dwarf, dw0137+1541 (Briggs, 1986). The fluxes and velocities for these galaxies compare well with previously published data. There is no intra-group neutral gas...

  12. Galaxy Group at z=0.3 Associated with the Damped Lyman Alpha System Towards Quasar Q1127-145

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, G G; Churchill, C W

    2010-01-01

    We performed a spectroscopic galaxy survey, complete to $m_{F814W}\\leq20.3$ ($L_B>0.15L_B^{\\star}$ at z=0.3), within 100x100'' of the quasar Q1127-145 ($z_{em}=1.18$). The VLT/UVES quasar spectrum contains three $z_{abs}<0.33$ MgII absorption systems. We obtained eight new galaxy redshifts, adding to the four previously known, and galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) and metallicities were computed where possible. A strong MgII system [$W_r(2796)=1.8$A], which is a known damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorber (DLA), had three previously identified galaxies; we found two additional galaxies associated with this system. These five galaxies form a group with diverse properties, such as a luminosity range of $0.04\\leq L_B\\leq0.63 L_B^{\\star}$, an impact parameter range of $17\\leq D \\leq 241$ kpc and velocity dispersion of $\\sigma$=115 km/s. The DLA group galaxy redshifts span beyond the 350 km/s velocity spread of the metallic absorption lines of the DLA itself. The two brightest group galaxies have SFRs of $\\sim$few $M_{\\o...

  13. Hot Halo Emission Detected at Outskirts of Two Poor Galaxy Groups Using Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Jenna; Dai, Xinyu; Sun, Ming

    2015-01-01

    We present Suzaku off-center observations of two poor galaxy groups, NGC 3402 and NGC 5129, with temperatures below 1 keV. Through spectral decomposition, we measure their surface brightnesses and temperatures out to 420 and 300 times the critical density of the universe for NGC 3402 and NGC 5129, respectively. These quantities are consistent with extrapolations from existing inner measurements of the two groups. With the refined X-ray luminosities, the two groups prefer LX-T relations without a break in the group regime. Furthermore, we measure the electron number densities and hydrostatic masses at these radii. We find that the electron number density profiles require three β-model components, including one with a flat slope, for both groups. Adding the gas mass measured from the X-ray data and stellar mass from group galaxy members, we measure baryon fractions of fb = 0.120 and 0.116 for NGC 3402 and NGC 5129, respectively. Combining other poor groups with well measured X-ray emission to the outskirts, we find an average baryon fraction of fb,ave = 0.111 for X-ray bright groups with temperatures between 0.8-1.3 keV, extending existing constraints to lower mass systems.

  14. The Properties of the Heterogeneous Shakhbazyan Groups of Galaxies in the SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Capozzi, D; Paolillo, M; D'Abrusco, R; Longo, G

    2009-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the sub-sample of Shakhbazyan groups (SHKs) covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release--5 (SDSS-5). SHKs probe an environment with characteristics which are intermediate between those of loose and very compact groups. Surprisingly, we found that several groups identifying algorithms (e.g. Berlind qt al. 2006, Tago et al. 2008) miss this type of structures. Using the SDSS-5 spectroscopic data and the photometric redshifts derived in D'Abrusco et al. 2007, we identified possible group members in photometric redshift space and derived, for each group, several individual properties. We also combined pointed and stacked Rosat All Sky Survey data to investigate the X-ray luminosities of these systems. Our study confirms that the majority of groups are physical entities with richness in the range 3--13 galaxies, and properties ranging between those of loose and compact groups. We confirm that SHK groups are richer in early-type galaxies than the surrounding environment and ...

  15. Alignment of galaxies relative to their local environment in SDSS-DR8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirv, A.; Pelt, J.; Saar, E.; Tago, E.; Tamm, A.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, M.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: We study the alignment of galaxies relative to their local environment in SDSS-DR8 and, using these data, we discuss evolution scenarios for different types of galaxies. Methods: We defined a vector field of the direction of anisotropy of the local environment of galaxies. We summed the unit direction vectors of all close neighbours of a given galaxy in a particular way to estimate this field. We found the alignment angles between the spin axes of disc galaxies, or the minor axes of elliptical galaxies, and the direction of anisotropy. The distributions of cosines of these angles are compared to the random distributions to analyse the alignment of galaxies. Results: Sab galaxies show perpendicular alignment relative to the direction of anisotropy in a sparse environment, for single galaxies and galaxies of low luminosity. Most of the parallel alignment of Scd galaxies comes from dense regions, from 2...3 member groups and from galaxies with low luminosity. The perpendicular alignment of S0 galaxies does not depend strongly on environmental density nor luminosity; it is detected for single and 2...3 member group galaxies, and for main galaxies of 4...10 member groups. The perpendicular alignment of elliptical galaxies is clearly detected for single galaxies and for members of ≤10 member groups; the alignment increases with environmental density and luminosity. Conclusions: We confirm the existence of fossil tidally induced alignment of Sab galaxies at low z. The alignment of Scd galaxies can be explained via the infall of matter to filaments. S0 galaxies may have encountered relatively massive mergers along the direction of anisotropy. Major mergers along this direction can explain the alignment of elliptical galaxies. Less massive, but repeated mergers are possibly responsible for the formation of elliptical galaxies in sparser areas and for less luminous elliptical galaxies.

  16. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  17. Central gas entropy excess as direct evidence for AGN feedback in galaxy groups and clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Hai-Guang Xu; Jun-Hua Gu; Li-Yi Gu; Jing-Ying Wang; Zhong-Li Zhang

    2010-01-01

    By analyzing Chandra X-ray data of a sample of 21 galaxy groups and 19galaxy clusters,we find that in 31 sample systems there exists a significant central(R ≤10h-171 kpc)gas entropy excess(△K0),which corresponds to(=)0.1-0.5 keV per gas particle,beyond the power-law model that best fits the radial entropy profile of the outer regions.We also find a distinct correlation between the central entropy excess△K0 and K-band luminosity LK of the central dominating galaxies(CDGs),which is scaled as △K0 ∝ L1.6±0.4K,where LK is tightly associated with the mass of the supermassive black hole hosted in the CDG.In fact,if an effective mass-to-energy conversion-efficiency of 0.02 is assumed for the accretion process,the cumulative AGN feedback EAGNfeedback(=)ηMBHC2 yields an extra heating of(=)0.5-17.0keV per particle,which feedback is sufficient to explain the central entropy excess.In most cases,the AGN contribution can compensate the radiative loss of the X-ray gas within the cooling radius((=)0.002-2.2 keV per particle),and apparently exceeds the energy required to cause the scaling relations to deviate from the self-similar predictions((=)0.2-1.0 keV per particle).In contrast to the AGN feedback,the extra heating provided by supernova explosions accounts for(=)0.01-0.08 keV per particle in groups and is almost negligible in clusters.Therefore,the observed correlation between ΔK0 and LK can be considered as direct evidence for AGN feedback in galaxy groups and clusters.

  18. The NGC 672 and NGC 784 Galaxy Groups: Evidence for Galaxy Formation and Growth Along a Nearby Dark Matter Filament

    CERN Document Server

    Zitrin, Adi

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged): We present U, B, V, R, I, H-alpha and NUV photometry of 14 galaxies in the very local Universe (within 10 Mpc that are dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrr), are at low redshift (511-10 Gyr) and one "young" population (<30 Myr) with the recent SF bursts occurring a few to a few 10s of Myr ago, arguing for synchronicity in star formation in these objects. We propose that the ~synchronous star formation in all objects is caused by the accretion of cold gas from intergalactic space onto dark matter haloes arranged along a filament threading the void where these dwarf galaxies reside and point out this galaxy sample as an ideal target to study hierarchical clustering and galaxy formation among very nearby objects.

  19. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The evolution of the blue fraction in groups and the field

    CERN Document Server

    Gerke, B F; Faber, S M; Cooper, M C; Croton, D J; Davis, M; Willmer, C N A; Yan, R; Coil, A L; Guhathakurta, P; Koo, D C; Weiner, B J; Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Croton, Darren J.; Davis, Marc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the behavior of the blue galaxy fraction over the redshift range 0.75 <= z <= 1.3 in the DEEP2 Survey, both for field galaxies and for galaxies in groups. The primary aim is to determine the role that groups play in driving the evolution of galaxy colour at high z. The colour segregation observed between local group and field samples is already in place at z ~ 1: DEEP2 groups have a significantly lower blue fraction than the field. At fixed z, there is also a correlation between blue fraction and galaxy magnitude, such that brighter galaxies are more likely to be red, both in groups and in the field. In addition, there is a negative correlation between blue fraction and group richness. In terms of evolution, the blue fraction in groups and the field remains roughly constant from z=0.75 to z ~ 1, but beyond this redshift the blue fraction in groups rises rapidly with z, and the group and field blue fractions become indistinguishable at z ~ 1.3. Careful tests indicate that this effect does not ...

  20. Groups of Galaxies in AEGIS: The 200 ksec Chandra Extended X-ray Source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Laird, Elise S; Willmer, Christopher N A; Coil, Alison L; Cooper, Michael C; Davis, Marc; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    We present the discovery of seven X-ray emitting groups of galaxies selected as extended X-ray sources in the 200 ksec Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). In addition, we report on AGN activity associated to these systems. Using the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify optical counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. In particular, we find three massive high-redshift groups at z>0.7, one of which is at z=1.13, the first X-ray detections of spectroscopically selected DEEP2 groups. We also present a first look at the the L_X-T, L_X-sigma, and sigma-T scaling relations for high-redshift massive groups. We find that the properties of these X-ray selected systems agree well with the scaling relations of similar systems at low redshift, although there are X-ray undetected groups in the DEEP2 catalogue with similar velocity dispersions. The other three X-ray groups with identified redshifts are associated with lower mass groups at z~0.07 and...

  1. CLUES to the past: Local Group progenitors amongst high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    dayal, Pratika; Dunlop, James S

    2013-01-01

    We use state-of-the-art numerical simulations to explore the observability and the expected physical properties of the progenitors of the local group galaxies at z=6-8, within 1 billion years of the big bang. We find that the most massive progenitors of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) at z=6 and 7 are predicted to have absolute UV continuum magnitudes between -17 and -18, suggesting that their analogues lie close to the detection limits of the deepest near-infrared surveys conducted to date (i.e. HST WFC3/IR UDF12). This in turn confirms that the majority of currently known z=6-8 galaxies are expected to be the seeds of present-day galaxies which are more massive than L* spirals. We also discuss the properties of the local-group progenitors at these early epochs, extending down to absolute magnitudes M_UV = -13. The most massive MW/M31 progenitors at z=7 have stellar masses of about 10^7.5-8 solar masses, stellar metallicities between 3 and 6% of the solar value, and predicted observed UV continuum slo...

  2. Galaxy Interactions in Compact Groups I : The Galactic Winds of HCG16

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Frédéric P A; Kewley, Lisa J

    2013-01-01

    Using the WiFeS integral field spectrograph, we have undertaken a series of observations of star-forming galaxies in Compact Groups. In this first paper dedicated to the project, we present the analysis of the spiral galaxy NGC838, a member of the Hickson Compact Group 16, and of its galactic wind. Our observations reveal that the wind forms an asymmetric, bipolar, rotating structure, powered by a nuclear starburst. Emission line ratio diagnostics indicate that photoionization is the dominant excitation mechanism at the base of the wind. Mixing from slow shocks (up to 20%) increases further out along the outflow axis. The asymmetry of the wind is most likely caused by one of the two lobes of the wind bubble bursting out of its HI envelope, as indicated by line ratios and radial velocity maps. The characteristics of this galactic wind suggest that it is caught early (a few Myr) in the wind evolution sequence. The wind is also quite different to the galactic wind in the partner galaxy NGC839 which contains a sy...

  3. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    CERN Document Server

    Grossi, M; Pritzl, B J; Knezek, P M; Gallagher, J S; Minchin, R F; Freeman, K C

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas-rich (M_{HI}/L_{B} > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed Colour Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas-rich because their star formation rates (SFRs) have been very low (< 10^{-3} M_{sun}/yr) throughout. In such systems, sta...

  4. Scaling Properties of a Complete X-ray Selected Galaxy Group Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Lovisari, Lorenzo; Schellenberger, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Upcoming X-ray surveys like eROSITA require precise calibration between X-ray observables and mass down to the low mass regime to set tight constraints on the fundamental cosmological parameters. Since an individual mass measurement is only possible for a relatively small number of objects it is crucial to have robust and well understood scaling relations that relate the total mass to easily observable quantities. The main goal of this work is to constrain the galaxy group scaling relations corrected for selection effects, and to quantify the influence of non-gravitational physics at the low-mass regime. We analyzed XMM-Newton observations for a complete sample of galaxy groups selected from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and we compared the derived scaling properties with a galaxy cluster sample. To investigate the role played by the different non-gravitational processes we then compared the observational data with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations. After applying the correction for selection effects (...

  5. WFPC2 Observations of Leo A A Predominantly Young Galaxy within the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, E; Cole, A A; Hössel, J G; Saha, A; Dohm-Palmer, R C; Skillman, E D; Mateo, M; Hurley-Keller, D A; Tolstoy, Eline; Mateo, Mario

    1998-01-01

    The unprecedented detail of the WFPC2 colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar population of Leo A presented here allows us to determine a new distance and an accurate star formation history for this extremely metal-poor Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy. From the position of the red clump, the helium-burning blue loops and the tip of the red giant branch, we obtain a distance modulus, m-M=24.2+/-0.2, or 690 +/- 60 kpc, which places Leo A firmly within the Local Group. Our interpretation of these features in the WFPC2 CMDs at this new distance based upon extremely low metallicity (Z=0.0004) theoretical stellar evolution models suggests that this galaxy is predominantly young, i.e. <2 Gyr old. A major episode of star formation 900 - 1500 Gyr ago can explain the red clump luminosity and also fits in with our interpretation of the number of anomalous Cepheid variable stars seen in this galaxy. We cannot rule out the presence of an older, underlying globular cluster age stellar population with these ...

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Southern Groups and Clusters of Galaxies (Duus, Newell 1977)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duus, A.; Newell, E. B.

    1997-01-01

    The catalog is the result of a survey of film copies of the ESO B plates for southern clusters of galaxies. Because of the varying quality of the ESO films and the scattered placement of the fields searched, the present survey is not intended for use in statistical studies. Nevertheless, the clusters and groups are listed from a representative sample of nearby to distant systems that is spread across the southern sky. The catalog contains cluster identification number based on a right ascension, declination numbering scheme; the ESO field number (see ADC catalog 6030); position of cluster center on plate (in mm); concentration class type of cluster; estimate of the number of galaxies; asterisk for uncertainty assignment previous value; distance class; and previous designations. (1 data file).

  7. Stellar Contents and Globular Cluster Candidates in the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 300

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S C; Lee, M G; Kim, Sang Chul; Sung, Hwankyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2002-01-01

    We present UBVI CCD photometry of the stellar contents and globular cluster(GC) candidates in the spiral galaxy NGC 300 in the Sculptor group. Color-magnitude diagrams for 18 OB associations having more than 30 member stars are presented. The slope of the initial mass function for the bright stars in NGC 300 is estimated to be Gamma = -2.6 +/- 0.3. Assuming the distance to NGC 300 of (m-M)_0 = 26.53 +/- 0.07, the mean absolute magnitude of three brightest blue stars is obtained to be = -8.95 mag. We have performed search for GCs in NGC 300 and have found 17 GC candidates in this galaxy. Some characteristics of these GC candidates are discussed.

  8. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON MILKY-WAY-MASS GALAXIES IN A CONSTRAINED SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creasey, Peter; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Yepes, Gustavo [Grupo de Astrofísica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid E-28049 (Spain)

    2015-02-10

    In this Letter, we present, for the first time, a study of star formation rate (SFR), gas fraction, and galaxy morphology of a constrained simulation of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies compared to other MW-mass galaxies. By combining with unconstrained simulations, we cover a sufficient volume to compare these galaxies’ environmental densities ranging from the field to that of the Local Group (LG). This is particularly relevant as it has been shown that, quite generally, galaxy properties depend intimately upon their environment, most prominently when galaxies in clusters are compared to those in the field. For galaxies in loose groups such as the LG, however, environmental effects have been less clear. We consider the galaxy’s environmental density in spheres of 1200 kpc (comoving) and find that while environment does not appear to directly affect morphology, there is a positive trend with SFRs. This enhancement in star formation occurs systematically for galaxies in higher density environments, regardless whether they are part of the LG or in filaments. Our simulations suggest that the richer environment at megaparsec scales may help replenish the star-forming gas, allowing higher specific SFRs in galaxies such as the MW.

  9. Galaxy evolution in nearby groups. II. Galaxy evolution in nearby loose groups. II. Photometric and kinematic characterization of USGC U268 and USGC U376 group members in the Leo cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, A; Rampazzo, R; Bianchi, L; Rosado, M; Bettoni, D; Galletta, G; Mazzei, P; Buson, L; Ambrocio-Cruz, P; Gabbasov, R F

    2012-01-01

    We present the photometric and kinematic characterization of two groups, USGC U268 and USGC U376 located in different regions of the Leo cloud. U268, composed of 10 catalogued members and 11 new added members, has a small fraction (~24%) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). U376 has 16 plus 8 new added members, with ~38% of ETGs. We find the presence of significant substructures in both groups suggesting that they are likely accreting galaxies. U268 is located in a more loose environment than U376. For each member galaxy, broad band integrated and surface photometry have been obtained in far-UV and near-UV with GALEX, and in u,g, r, i, z (SDSS) bands. H_alpha imaging and 2D high resolution kinematical data have been obtained using PUMA Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 2.12 m telescope in San Pedro M\\'artir, (Baja California, M\\'exico). We improved the galaxy classification and we detected morphological and kinematical distortions that may be connected to either on-going and/or past interaction/accretion e...

  10. EVOLUTION IN THE H I GAS CONTENT OF GALAXY GROUPS: PRE-PROCESSING AND MASS ASSEMBLY IN THE CURRENT EPOCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Kelley M. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Wilcots, Eric M., E-mail: hess@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (H I) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey α.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the H I properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA H I detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS Data Release 7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group ''proximity' membership to H I detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude—thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group H I mass. We find that only 25% of the H I detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and H I detections in groups as a function of parent dark matter halo mass to reveal strong evidence that H I is being processed in galaxies as a result of the group environment: as optical membership increases, groups become increasingly deficient of H I rich galaxies at their center and the H I distribution of galaxies in the most massive groups starts to resemble the distribution observed in comparatively more extreme cluster environments. We find that the lowest H I mass objects lose their gas first as they are processed in the group environment, and it is evident that the infall of gas rich objects is important to the continuing growth of large scale structure at the present epoch, replenishing the neutral gas supply of groups. Finally, we compare our results to those of cosmological simulations and find that current models cannot simultaneously predict the H I selected halo occupation distribution for both low and high mass halos.

  11. The statistical challenge of constraining the low-mass IMF in Local Group dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Weisz, Daniel R.; Quataert, Eliot

    2017-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to explore the statistical challenges of constraining the characteristic mass (mc) and width (σ) of a lognormal sub-solar initial mass function (IMF) in Local Group dwarf galaxies using direct star counts. For a typical Milky Way (MW) satellite (MV = -8), jointly constraining mc and σ to a precision of ≲ 20 per cent requires that observations be complete to ≲ 0.2 M⊙, if the IMF is similar to the MW IMF. A similar statistical precision can be obtained if observations are only complete down to 0.4 M⊙, but this requires measurement of nearly 100× more stars, and thus, a significantly more massive satellite (MV ˜ -12). In the absence of sufficiently deep data to constrain the low-mass turnover, it is common practice to fit a single-sloped power law to the low-mass IMF, or to fit mc for a lognormal while holding σ fixed. We show that the former approximation leads to best-fitting power-law slopes that vary with the mass range observed and can largely explain existing claims of low-mass IMF variations in MW satellites, even if satellite galaxies have the same IMF as the MW. In addition, fixing σ during fitting leads to substantially underestimated uncertainties in the recovered value of mc (by a factor of ˜4 for typical observations). If the IMFs of nearby dwarf galaxies are lognormal and do vary, observations must reach down to ˜mc in order to robustly detect these variations. The high-sensitivity, near-infrared capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope have the potential to dramatically improve constraints on the low-mass IMF. We present an efficient observational strategy for using these facilities to measure the IMFs of Local Group dwarf galaxies.

  12. Hierarchical Formation in Action: Characterizing Accelerated Galaxy Evolution in Compact Groups Using Whole-Sky WISE Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zucker, Catherine; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher, Sarah; Alatalo, Katherine; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups provide an environment to study the growth of galaxies amid multiple prolonged interactions. With their dense galaxy concentrations and relatively low velocity dispersions, compact groups mimic the conditions of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Compact group galaxies are known to show a bimodality in $Spitzer$ IRAC infrared colorspace: galaxies are preferentially either quiescent with low specific star formation rates, or are prolifically forming stars---galaxies with moderate levels of specific star formation are rare. Previous $Spitzer$ IRAC studies identifying this "canyon" have been limited by small number statistics. We utilize whole-sky WISE data to study 163 compact groups, thereby tripling our previous sample and including more galaxies with intermediate mid-IR colors indicative of moderate specific star formation rates (SSFRs). We define a distinct WISE mid-IR color-space ($\\log[{\\frac{\\rm f_{12}}{\\rm f_{4.6}}}]$ vs. $\\log[{\\frac{\\rm f_{22}}{\\rm f_{3.4}}}]$) that we use to identify canyon...

  13. Dynamical analysis of strong-lensing galaxy groups at intermediate redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, R P; Verdugo, T; Garrido, F; Limousin, M; Padilla, N; Foëx, G; Cabanac, R; Gavazzi, R; Barrientos, L F; Richard, J

    2012-01-01

    We present VLT spectroscopic observations of 7 discovered galaxy groups between 0.3groups were selected from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S), a survey that consists in a systematic search for strong lensing systems in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). We give details about the target selection, spectroscopic observations and data reduction for the first release of confirmed SL2S groups. The dynamical analysis of the systems reveals that they are gravitationally bound structures, with at least 4 confirmed members and velocity dispersions between 300 and 800 km/s. Their virial masses are between 10^13 and 10^14 M_sun, and so can be classified as groups or low mass clusters. Most of the systems are isolated groups, except two of them that show evidence of an ongoing merger of two sub-structures. We find a good agreement between the velocity dispersions estimated from the analysis of the kinematics of group galaxies and the weak lensing measurements, and conclude...

  14. Probing the dusty inhabitants of the Local Group Galaxies: JWST/MIRI colors of infrared stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Olivia; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies involves the life cycle of mass, metal enrichment and dust that JWST will probe. Detailed studies of nearby galaxies provides guidance for interpreting the more distant forming galaxies. JWST/MIRI will enable stellar population studies akin to work done with HST on the Local Group galaxies but over a new wavelength range. MIRI's imaging capability over nine photometric bands from 5 to 28 microns is particularly suited to survey stars with an infrared excess and to detangle the extinction or thermal emission from various species of dust. These dusty stellar populations include young stellar objects, evolved stars and supernovae that are bright in the infrared. Using the rich Spitzer-IRS spectroscopic dataset and spectral classifications from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE)-Spectroscopic survey of over a thousand objects in the Magellanic Clouds, we calculate the expected flux -densities and colors in the MIRI broadband filters for these prominent infrared sources. We uses these fluxes to illustrate what JWST will see in stellar population studies for other Local Group galaxies. JWST/MIRI observations of infrared sources in Local Group Galaxies will constrain the life cycle of galaxies through their dust emission. For example, how much of the interstellar dust is supplied by dying stars? Do the number of young stellar objects agree with star formation diagnostic for the galaxy? We discuss the locations of the post- and pre-main-sequence populations in MIRI color-color and color-magnitude space and examine which filters are best for identifying populations of sources. We connect these results to existing galaxies with HST data for instance Andromeda and M33.

  15. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the absence of stellar mass segregation in galaxy groups and consistent predictions from GALFORM and EAGLE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, P. R.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Lagos, C. del P.; Davies, L. J.; Moffett, A. J.; Driver, S. P.; Andrews, S. K.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Finnegan, R.; Hopkins, A. M.; Loveday, J.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the contentious issue of the presence, or lack thereof, of satellites mass segregation in galaxy groups using the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, the GALFORM semi-analytic, and the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation catalogues of galaxy groups. We select groups with halo mass 12 ≤ log (Mhalo/h-1 M⊙) study shows negligible mass segregation in galaxy group environments with absolute gradients of ≲0.08 dex and also shows a lack of any redshift evolution. Moreover, we find that our results at least for the GAMA data are robust to different halo mass and group centre estimates. Furthermore, the EAGLE data allows us to probe much fainter luminosities (r-band magnitude of 22) as well as investigate the three-dimensional spatial distribution with intrinsic halo properties, beyond what the current observational data can offer. In both cases we find that the fainter EAGLE data show a very mild spatial mass segregation at z ≤ 0.22, which is again not apparent at higher redshift. Interestingly, our results are in contrast to some earlier findings using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We investigate the source of the disagreement and suggest that subtle differences between the group-finding algorithms could be the root cause.

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The absence of stellar mass segregation in galaxy groups and consistent predictions from GALFORM and EAGLE simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kafle, P R; Lagos, C del P; Davies, L J; Moffett, A J; Driver, S P; Andrews, S K; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Cortese, L; Drinkwater, M J; Finnegan, R; Hopkins, A M; Loveday, J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the contentious issue of the presence, or lack thereof, of satellites mass segregation in galaxy groups using the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, the GALFORM semi-analytic and the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation catalogues of galaxy groups. We select groups with halo mass $12 \\leqslant \\log(M_{\\text{halo}}/h^{-1}M_\\odot) <14.5$ and redshift $z \\leqslant 0.32$ and probe the radial distribution of stellar mass out to twice the group virial radius. All the samples are carefully constructed to be complete in stellar mass at each redshift range and efforts are made to regularise the analysis for all the data. Our study shows negligible mass segregation in galaxy group environments with absolute gradients of $\\lesssim0.08$ dex and also shows a lack of any redshift evolution. Moreover, we find that our results at least for the GAMA data are robust to different halo mass and group centre estimates. Furthermore, the EAGLE data allows us to probe much fainter luminosities ($r$-ban...

  17. The faint-end of the galaxy luminosity function in groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, R E; Lambas, D G; Valotto, C

    2005-01-01

    We compute the galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We apply a background subtraction method to a sample of 728 spectroscopically selected groups. The sample comprises systems in the redshift range $0.03 < z < 0.06$ and the virial mass range is $10^{11}M_\\odot < M_{vir} < 2\\times 10^{14}M_\\odot$. In the $r$ band, the composite galaxy luminosity function shows a slope of $\\alpha=-1.3$ in the bright--end, and an upturn of the slope in the faint--end ranging from -1.6 to -1.9. The upturn of the slope occurs at $M_r\\sim-18+5log(h)$ depending only weakly on group properties. We find that this feature is present also in the $i,g$ and $z$ bands and for all explored group subsamples, irrespective of the group mass or the presence of a hot intra-cluster gas with associated X-ray emission.

  18. The Tully–Fisher Relations of the Eridanus Group of Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Omar; K. S. Dwarakanath

    2006-03-01

    The Tully–Fisher (TF) or the luminosity–linewidth relations of the galaxies in the Eridanus group are constructed using the HI rotation curves and the luminosities in the optical and in the near-infrared bands. The slopes of the TF relations (absolute magnitude log 2flat) are -8.6 ± 1.1, -10.0 ± 1.5, -10.7 ± 2.1, and -9.7 ± 1.3 in the R, J, H, and K bands respectively for galaxies having flat HI rotation curves. These values of the slopes are consistent with those obtained from studies of other groups and clusters. The scatter in the TF relations is in the range 0.5–1.1 mag in different bands. This scatter is considerably larger compared to those observed in other groups and clusters. It is suggested that the larger scatter in the TF relations for the Eridanus group is related to the loose structure of the group. If the TF relations are constructed using the baryonic mass (stellar + H${\\rm\\tiny I}$ + Helium mass) instead of the stellar luminosity, nearly identical slopes are obtained in the R and in the near-infrared bands. The baryonic TF (baryonic mass log 2flat) slope is in the range 3.5–4.1.

  19. X-ray groups and clusters of galaxies in the Subaru-XMM Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Finoguenov, A; Tanaka, M; Simpson, C; Cirasuolo, M; Dunlop, J S; Peacock, J A; Farrah, D; Akiyama, M; Ueda, Y; Smolcic, V; Stewart, G; Rawlings, S; van Breukelen, C; Almaini, O; Clewley, L; Bonfield, D G; Jarvis, M J; Barr, J M; Foucaud, S; McLure, R J; Sekiguchi, K; Egami, E

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a search for galaxy clusters in Subaru-XMM Deep Field. We reach a depth for a total cluster flux in the 0.5-2 keV band of 2x10^{-15} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} over one of the widest XMM-Newton contiguous raster surveys, covering an area of 1.3 square degrees. Cluster candidates are identified through a wavelet detection of extended X-ray emission. The red sequence technique allows us to identify 57 cluster candidates. We report on the progress with the cluster spectroscopic follow-up and derive their properties based on the X-ray luminosity and cluster scaling relations. In addition, 3 sources are identified as X-ray counterparts of radio lobes, and in 3 further sources, X-ray counterpart of radio lobes provides a significant fraction of the total flux of the source. In the area covered by NIR data, our identification success rate achieves 86%. We detect a number of radio galaxies within our groups and for a luminosity-limited sample of radio galaxies we compute halo occupation statistics ...

  20. ISO observations of Hickson Compact Group 31 with the central Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741

    CERN Document Server

    O'Halloran, B; McBreen, B; Laureijs, R J; Leech, K; Delaney, M; Watson, D; Hanlon, L O

    2002-01-01

    Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 31, consisting of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741 and its irregular dwarf companions, was observed using the Infrared Space Observatory. The deconvolved ISOCAM maps of the galaxies using the 7.7 micron and 14.3 micron (LW6 and LW3) filters are presented, along with ISOPHOT spectrometry of the central starburst region of NGC 1741 and the nucleus of galaxy HCG 31A. Strong mid-IR emission was detected from the central burst in NGC 1741, along with strong PAH features and a blend of features including [S IV] at 10.5 micron. The 14.3/6.75 micron flux ratio, where the 6.75 micron flux was synthesized from the PHT-S spectrum, and 14.3/7.7 micron flux ratios suggest that the central burst within NGC 1741 may be moving towards the post-starburst phase. Diagnostic tools including the ratio of the integrated PAH luminosity to the 40 to 120 micron infrared luminosity and the far-infrared colours reveal that despite the high surface brightness of the nucleus, the properties of NGC 1741 can be ex...

  1. Revealing O VII from stacked X-ray grating spectra of clusters, groups and elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J S

    2010-01-01

    We stack 4.6 Ms of high spectral resolution XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectra from galaxy clusters, groups of galaxies and elliptical galaxies. For those objects with a central temperature of less than 1 keV, we detect O VII for the first time, with a probability of false detection of 2.5x10^-4. The flux ratio of the O VII to Fe XVII lines is 1/4 to 1/8 of the emission expected for isobaric radiative cooling in the absence of heating. There is either a process preventing cooling below 0.5 keV, anomalous O/Fe abundance ratios, absorbing material around the coolest X-ray emitting gas or non-radiative cooling taking place. The mean N VII emission line is strong in the sub-keV sample. As the ratio of the hydrogenic N and O lines is largely independent of temperature, we measure a mean N/O ratio of 4.0 +- 0.6 Solar. Although the continuum around the C VI lines is difficult to measure we can similarly estimate that the C/O ratio is 0.9 +- 0.3 Solar.

  2. xGASS: gas-rich central galaxies in small groups and their connections to cosmic web gas feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Saintonge, Amélie; Brown, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We use deep H i observations obtained as part of the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey (xGASS) to study the cold gas properties of central galaxies across environments. We find that below stellar masses of 1010.2 M⊙, central galaxies in groups have an average atomic hydrogen gas fraction ˜0.3 dex higher than those in isolation at the same stellar mass. At these stellar masses, group central galaxies are usually found in small groups of N = 2 members. The higher H i content in these low-mass group central galaxies is mirrored by their higher average star formation activity and molecular hydrogen content. At larger stellar masses, this difference disappears and central galaxies in groups have similar (or even smaller) gas reservoirs and star formation activity compared to those in isolation. We discuss possible scenarios able to explain our findings and suggest that the higher gas content in low-mass group central galaxies is likely due to the contributions from the cosmic web or H i-rich minor mergers, which also fuel their enhanced star formation activity.

  3. xGASS: Gas-rich central galaxies in small groups and their connections to cosmic web gas feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Saintonge, Amélie; Brown, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    We use deep HI observations obtained as part of the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey (xGASS) to study the cold gas properties of central galaxies across environments. We find that, below stellar masses of 1010.2 M⊙, central galaxies in groups have an average atomic hydrogen gas fraction ˜0.3dex higher than those in isolation at the same stellar mass. At these stellar masses, group central galaxies are usually found in small groups of N=2 members. The higher HI content in these low mass group central galaxies is mirrored by their higher average star formation activity and molecular hydrogen content. At larger stellar masses, this difference disappears and central galaxies in groups have similar (or even smaller) gas reservoirs and star formation activity compared to those in isolation. We discuss possible scenarios able to explain our findings and suggest that the higher gas content in low mass group central galaxies is likely due to contributions from the cosmic web or HI-rich minor mergers, which also fuel their enhanced star formation activity.

  4. Are the oldest 'fossils', fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A comparative statistical study has been carried out on populations of modern algae, Precambrian algal microfossils, the 'organized elements' of the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite, and the oldest microfossil-like objects now known (spheroidal bodies from the Fig Tree and Onverwacht Groups of the Swaziland Supergroup, South Africa). The distribution patterns exhibited by the more than 3000 m.y.-old Swaziland microstructures bear considerable resemblance to those of the abiotic 'organized elements' but differ rather markedly from those exhibited by younger, assuredly biogenic, populations. Based on these comparisons, it is concluded that the Swaziland spheroids could be, at least in part, of nonbiologic origin; these oldest known fossil-like microstructures should not be regarded as constituting firm evidence of Archean life.

  5. Galaxy interactions in compact groups - II. Abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Yun, Min S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star-forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of H II regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star-forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three H II regions harbour an oxygen abundance ˜0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star-forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km s-1 with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. H I observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broad-band optical images from Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System) suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain the origin of the peculiar star-forming regions detected with WiFeS, and show that evidence points towards infalling and collapsing extraplanar gas clouds at the disc-halo interface, possibly as a consequence of long-range gravitational perturbations of HCG 91c from the other group members. As such, HCG 91c provides evidence that some of the perturbations possibly associated with the early phase of galaxy evolution in compact groups impact the star-forming disc locally, and on sub-kpc scales.

  6. Searching for Fossil Evidence of AGN Feedback in WISE-selected Stripe-82 Galaxies by Measuring the Thermal Sunyaev–Zel’dovich Effect with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Alexander; Scannapieco, Evan; Cohen, Seth; Joshi, Bhavin; Mauskopf, Philip

    2017-01-01

    We directly measure the thermal energy of the gas surrounding galaxies through the thermal Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (tSZ) effect. We perform a stacking analysis of microwave background images from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, around 1179 massive quiescent elliptical galaxies at 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.0 (“low-z”) and 3274 galaxies at 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 (“high-z”), selected using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) within the SDSS Stripe-82 field. The gas surrounding these galaxies is expected to contain energy from past episodes of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, and after using modeling to subtract undetected contaminants, we detect a tSZ signal at a significance of 0.9σ for our low-z galaxies and 1.8σ for our high-z galaxies. We then include data from the high-frequency Planck bands for a subset of 227 low-z galaxies and 529 high-z galaxies and find low-z and high-z tSZ detections of 1.0σ and 1.5σ , respectively. These results indicate an average thermal heating around these galaxies of ({5.6}-5.6+5.9)× {10}60 erg for our low-z galaxies and ({7.0}-4.4+4.7)× {10}60 erg for our high-z galaxies. Based on simple heating models, these results are consistent with gravitational heating without additional heating due to AGN feedback.

  7. Intra-group diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies. HCG 79, HCG 88 and HCG 95

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, C D; Rocha, Cristiano Da; Oliveira, Claudia Mendes de

    2005-01-01

    Deep $B$ and $R$ images of three Hickson Compact Groups, HCG 79, HCG 88 and HCG 95, were analyzed using a new wavelet technic to measure possible intra-group diffuse light present in these systems. The method used, OV\\_WAV, is a wavelet technic particularly suitable to detect low-surface brightness extended structures, down to a $S/N = 0.1$ per pixel, which corresponds to a 5-$\\sigma$-detection level in wavelet space. The three groups studied are in different evolutionary stages, as can be judged by their very different fractions of the total light contained in their intra-group halos: $46\\pm11$\\% for HCG 79 and $11\\pm26$\\% for HCG 95, in the $B$ band, and HCG 88 had no component detected down to a limiting surface brightness of $29.1~B~mag~arcsec^{-2}$. For HCG 95 the intra-group light is red, similar to the mean colors of the group galaxies themselves, suggesting that it is formed by an old population with no significant on-going star formation. For HCG 79, however, the intra-group material has significantl...

  8. An observer's guide to the (Local Group) dwarf galaxies: predictions for their own dwarf satellite populations

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Gregory A; Yang, Tianyi; Willman, Beth; Griffen, Brendan F; Frebel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A recent surge in the discovery of new ultrafaint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way has inspired the idea of searching for faint satellites, $10^3\\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}99\\%$ chance that at least one satellite with stellar mass $M_*> 10^5 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ exists around the combined five Local Group field dwarf galaxies with the largest stellar mass. When considering satellites with $M_*> 10^4 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$, we predict a combined $5-25$ satellites for the five largest field dwarfs, and $10-50$ for the whole Local Group field dwarf population. Because of the relatively small number of predicted dwarfs, and their extended spatial distribution, a large fraction each Local Group dwarf's virial volume will need to be surveyed to guarantee discoveries. We compute the predicted number of satellites in a given field of view of specific Local Group galaxies, as a function of minimum satellite luminosity, and explicitly obtain such values for the Solitary Local dwarfs survey. Uncertainties in abundance matc...

  9. A Systematic Search for X-ray Cavities in the Hot Gas of Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Ruobing; Mulchaey, John S

    2010-01-01

    We have performed a systematic search for X-ray cavities in the hot gas of 51 galaxy groups with Chandra archival data. The cavities are identified based on two methods: subtracting an elliptical beta model fitted to the X-ray surface brightness, and performing unsharp masking. 13 groups in the sample 25% are identified as clearly containing cavities, with another 13 systems showing tentative evidence for such structures. We find tight correlations between the radial and tangential radii of the cavities, and between their size and projected distance from the group center, in quantitative agreement with the case for more massive clusters. This suggests that similar physical processes are responsible for cavity evolution and disruption in systems covering a large range in total mass. We see no clear association between the detection of cavities and the current 1.4 GHz radio luminosity of the central brightest group galaxy, but there is a clear tendency for systems with a cool core to be more likely to harbor de...

  10. Satellite Dwarf Galaxies in a Hierarchical Universe: Infall Histories, Group Preprocessing, and Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, Andrew R; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2015-01-01

    In the Local Group, almost all satellite dwarf galaxies that are within the virial radius of the Milky Way (MW) and M31 exhibit strong environmental influence. The orbital histories of these satellites provide the key to understanding the role of the MW/M31 halo, lower-mass groups, and cosmic reionization on the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We examine the virial-infall histories of satellites with M_star = 10 ^ {3 - 9} M_sun using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of 48 MW/M31-like halos. Satellites at z = 0 fell into the MW/M31 halos typically 5 - 8 Gyr ago at z = 0.5 - 1. However, they first fell into any host halo typically 7 - 10 Gyr ago at z = 0.7 - 1.5. This difference arises because many satellites experienced "group preprocessing" in another host halo, typically of M_vir ~ 10 ^ {10 - 12} M_sun, before falling into the MW/M31 halos. Satellites with lower-mass and/or those closer to the MW/M31 fell in earlier and are more likely to have experienced group preprocessing; ...

  11. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies II. HCG 15, 35 and 51

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rocha, C; de Oliveira, C Mendes

    2008-01-01

    This continuing study of intragroup light in compact groups of galaxies aims to establish new constraints to models of formation and evolution of galaxy groups, specially of compact groups, which are a key part in the evolution of larger structures, such as clusters. In this paper we present three additional groups (HCG 15, 35 and 51) using deep wide field $B$ and $R$ band images observed with the LAICA camera at the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA). This instrument provides us with very stable flatfielding, a mandatory condition for reliably measuring intragroup diffuse light. The images were analyzed with the OV\\_WAV package, a wavelet technique that allows us to uncover the intragroup component in an unprecedented way. We have detected that 19, 15 and 26% of the total light of HCG 15, 35 and 51, respectively, is in the diffuse component, with colours that are compatible with old stellar populations and with mean surface brightness that can be as low as $28.4 {\\rm B mag arcsec^{-2}}$. Dyn...

  12. The masses of satellites in GAMA galaxy groups from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    CERN Document Server

    Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; van Uitert, Edo; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J I; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; de Jong, Jelte T A; Kuijken, Konrad; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola; Norberg, Peder; Robotham, Aaron S G; Schneider, Peter; Klein, Gijs Verdoes

    2015-01-01

    We use the first 100 sq. deg. of overlap between the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to determine the galaxy halo mass of ~10,000 spectroscopically-confirmed satellite galaxies in massive ($M > 10^{13}h^{-1}{\\rm M}_\\odot$) galaxy groups. Separating the sample as a function of projected distance to the group centre, we jointly model the satellites and their host groups with Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profiles, fully accounting for the data covariance. The probed satellite galaxies in these groups have total masses $\\log M_{\\rm sub} /(h^{-1}{\\rm M}_\\odot) \\approx 11.7 - 12.2$ consistent across group-centric distance within the errorbars. Given their typical stellar masses, $\\log M_{\\rm \\star,sat}/(h^{-2}{\\rm M}_\\odot) \\sim 10.5$, such total masses imply stellar mass fractions of $M_{\\rm \\star,sat} /M_{\\rm sub} \\approx 0.04 h^{-1}$ . The average subhalo hosting these satellite galaxies has a mass $M_{\\rm sub} \\sim 0.015M_{\\rm host}$ independent of host halo mass, i...

  13. Finding Fossil Evidence of AGN Feedback in WISE-Selected Stripe-82 Galaxies By Measuring the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect With the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Spacek, Alexander; Cohen, Seth; Joshi, Bhavin; Mauskopf, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We directly measure the thermal energy of the gas surrounding galaxies through the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. We perform a stacking analysis of microwave background images from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), around 1179 massive quiescent elliptical galaxies at 0.5 <= z <= 1.0 ('low-z') and 3274 galaxies at 1.0 <= z <= 1.5 ('high-z'), selected using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) within the SDSS Stripe-82 field. The gas surrounding these galaxies is expected to contain energy from past episodes of AGN feedback, and after using modeling to subtract undetected contaminants, we detect a tSZ signal at a significance of 0.9-sigma for our low-z galaxies and 1.8-sigma for our high-z galaxies. We then include data from the high-frequency Planck bands for a subset of 227 low-z galaxies and 529 high-z galaxies and find low-z and high-z tSZ detections of 1.0-sigma and 1.5-sigma, respectively. These results i...

  14. Ediacara Fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Now, a research team from Virginia Tech and Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology has discovered uniquely well-preserved fossil forms from 550-million-year-old rocks of the Ediacaran Period. The research appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discovery of these unusually preserved fossils reveals unprecedented…

  15. Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  16. Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  17. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  18. LOFAR MSSS: Discovery of a 2.56 Mpc giant radio galaxy associated with a disturbed galaxy group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. O.; Heald, G.; Jarrett, T.; Bray, J. D.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Cantwell, T. M.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Brienza, M.; Bonafede, A.; Breton, R. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Carbone, D.; Croston, J. H.; Farnes, J. S.; Harwood, J. J.; Heesen, V.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; Iacobelli, M.; Jurusik, W.; Kokotanekov, G.; McKean, J. P.; Morabito, L. K.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Nikiel-Wroczyñski, B. S.; Orrú, E.; Paladino, R.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Pratley, L.; Riseley, C. J.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Rowlinson, A.; Sabater, J.; Sendlinger, K.; Shulevski, A.; Sridhar, S. S.; Stewart, A. J.; Tasse, C.; van Velzen, S.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wise, M. W.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the discovery in the LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) of a giant radio galaxy (GRG) with a projected size of 2.56 ± 0.07 Mpc projected on the sky. It is associated with the galaxy triplet UGC 9555, within which one is identified as a broad-line galaxy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at a redshift of 0.05453 ± 1 × 10-5, and with a velocity dispersion of 215.86 ± 6.34 km s-1. From archival radio observations we see that this galaxy hosts a compact flat-spectrum radio source, and we conclude that it is the active galactic nucleus (AGN) responsiblefor generating the radio lobes. The radio luminosity distribution of the jets, and the broad-line classification of the host AGN, indicate this GRG is orientated well out of the plane of the sky, making its physical size one of the largest known for any GRG. Analysis of the infrared data suggests that the host is a lenticular type galaxy with a large stellar mass (log M/M⊙ = 11.56 ± 0.12), and a moderate star formation rate (1.2 ± 0.3 M⊙/ year). Spatially smoothing the SDSS images shows the system around UGC 9555 to be significantly disturbed, with a prominent extension to the south-east. Overall, the evidence suggests this host galaxy has undergone one or more recent moderate merger events and is also experiencing tidal interactions with surrounding galaxies, which have caused the star formation and provided the supply of gas to trigger and fuel the Mpc-scale radio lobes.

  19. Local Group Dwarf Galaxies and the Star Formation Law at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, N Yu

    2000-01-01

    I show how the existing observational data on Local Group dwarf galaxies can be used to estimate the average star formation law during the first 3 Gyr of the history of the universe. I find that the observational data are consistent with the orthodox Schmidt law with a star formation efficiency of about 4 percent if the star formation is continuous (during the first 3 Gyr). The efficiency is proportionally higher if most of the gas in the dwarfs was consumed (and never replenished) in a short time interval well before the universe turned 3 Gyr.

  20. Optical Observations of M81 Galaxy Group in Narrow Band [SII] and H_alpha Filters: Holmberg IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbutina, B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of the nearby tidal dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX in M81 galaxy group in narrow band [SII] and H$alpha$ filters, carried out in March and November 2008 with the 2m RCC telescope at NAO Rozhen, Bulgaria. Our search for resident supernova remnants (identified as sources with enhanced [SII] emission relative to their H$alpha$ emission in this galaxy yielded no sources of this kind, besides M&H 10-11 or HoIX X-1. Nevertheless, we found a number of objects with significant H$alpha$ emission that probably represent uncatalogued HII regions.

  1. Discovery of a giant HI tail in the galaxy group HCG 44

    CERN Document Server

    Serra, Paolo; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Oosterloo, Tom; McDermid, Richard M; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Emsellem, Eric; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a giant HI tail in the intra-group medium of HCG 44 as part of the Atlas3D survey. The tail is ~300 kpc long in projection and contains ~5x10^8 M_sun of HI. We detect no diffuse stellar light at the location of the tail down to ~28.5 mag/arcsec^2 in g band. We speculate that the tail might have formed as gas was stripped from the outer regions of NGC 3187 (a member of HCG 44) by the group tidal field. In this case, a simple model indicates that about 1/3 of the galaxy's HI was stripped during a time interval of <1 Gyr. Alternatively, the tail may be the remnant of an interaction between HCG 44 and NGC 3162, a spiral galaxy now ~650 kpc away from the group. Regardless of the precise formation mechanism, the detected HI tail shows for the first time direct evidence of gas stripping in HCG 44. It also highlights that deep HI observations over a large field are needed to gather a complete census of this kind of events in the local Universe.

  2. Observational Mass-to-Light Ratio of Galaxy Systems from Poor Groups to Rich Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Mezzetti, M; Giuricin, G; Limboz, F

    2002-01-01

    We study the mass-to-light ratio of galaxy systems from poor groups to rich clusters, and present for the first time a large database for useful comparisons with theoretical predictions. We extend a previous work, where B_j band luminosities and optical virial masses were analyzed for a sample of 89 clusters. Here we also consider a sample of 52 more clusters, 36 poor clusters, 7 rich groups, and two catalogs, of about 500 groups each, recently identified in the Nearby Optical Galaxy sample by using two different algorithms. We obtain the blue luminosity and virial mass for all systems considered. We devote a large effort to establishing the homogeneity of the resulting values, as well as to considering comparable physical regions, i.e. those included within the virial radius. By analyzing a fiducial, combined sample of 294 systems we find that the mass increases faster than the luminosity: the linear fit gives M\\propto L_B^{1.34 \\pm 0.03}, with a tendency for a steeper increase in the low--mass range. In agr...

  3. Star formation in the intragroup medium and other diagnostics of the evolutionary stages of compact groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Torres-Flores, S; De Mello, D F; Amram, P; Plana, H; Epinat, B; Iglesias-Páramo, J

    2009-01-01

    Context: Compact groups of galaxies are entities that have high densities of galaxies and serve as laboratories to study galaxy interactions, intergalactic star formation and galaxy evolution. Aims: The main goal of this study is to search for young objects in the intragroup medium of seven compact groups of galaxies: HCG 2, 7, 22, 23, 92, 100 and NGC 92 as well as to evaluate the stage of interaction of each group. Methods: We used Fabry-Perot velocity fields and rotation curves together with GALEX NUV and FUV images and optical R-band and HI maps. Results: (i) HCG 7 and HCG 23 are in early stages of interaction, (ii) HCG 2 and HCG 22 are mildly interacting, and (iii) HCG 92, HCG 100 and NGC 92 are in late stages of evolution. We find that all three evolved groups contain populations of young blue objects in the intragroup medium, consistent with ages < 100 Myr, of which several are younger than < 10 Myr. We also report the discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy candidate in the tail of NGC 92. These three ...

  4. A New Species Group in the Genus Tanytarsus van der Wulp(Diptera:Chironomidae)Based on a Fossil Record from Baltic Amber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech GI(L)KA

    2010-01-01

    A new fossil chironomid,Tanytarsus serafini,found in Baltic amber is described and illustrated based on adult males.The new species and similar extant species of the genus Tanytarsus van der Wulp are compared.Due to several distinct characters of wing,legs and hypopygium,a new species group for Tanytarsus serafini is proposed,and its diagnostic features are evaluated.

  5. Active Galactic Nuclei in Groups and Clusters of Galaxies: Detection and Host Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Timothy J; Mulchaey, John S; Berti, Angela; Jeltema, Tesla E

    2009-01-01

    The incidence and properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the field, groups, and clusters can provide new information about how these objects are triggered and fueled, similar to how these environments have been employed to study galaxy evolution. We have obtained new XMM-Newton observations of seven X-ray selected groups and poor clusters with 0.02 10^{41}; M_R2.5}(L_X>10^{41}; M_Rgroups (92% significance), a result consistent with the hypothesis that the change in AGN fraction is directly connected to environment.

  6. Chemo-dynamical evolution of the Local Group dwarf galaxies: The origin of r-process elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Y.; Ishimaru, Y.; Saitoh, T. R.; Fujii, M. S.; Hidaka, J.; Kajino, T.

    2016-06-01

    The r-process elements such as Au, Eu, and U are observed in the extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo and the Local Group dwarf galaxies. However, the origin of r-process elements has not yet been identified. The abundance of r-process elements of stars in the Local Group galaxies provides clues to clarify early evolutionary history of galaxies. It is important to understand the chemical evolution of the Local Group dwarf galaxies which would be building blocks of the Milky Way. In this study, we perform a series of N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies. We show that neutron star mergers can reproduce the observation of r-process elements. We find that the effects of gas mixing processes including metals in the star-forming region of a typical scale of giant molecular clouds ¥sim 10-100 pc play significant roles in the early chemical enrichment of dwarf galaxies. We also find that the star formation rate of ˜ 10^{-3} M_{⊙}yr^{-1} in early epoch (<1 Gyr) of galactic halo evolution is necessary for these results. Our results suggest that neutron star mergers are a major site of r-process.

  7. A mid-IR study of Hickson Compact Groups I : Probing the Effects of Environment in Galaxy Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Le Floc'h, E; Diaz-Santos, T; Slater, S K; Xilouris, E; Haynes, M P

    2010-01-01

    Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) are among the densest galaxy environments of the local universe. To examine the effects of the environment on the infrared properties of these systems, we present an analysis of Spitzer and ISO mid-infrared imaging as well as deep ground based near-infrared imaging of 14 HCGs containing a total of 69 galaxies. Based on mid-infrared color diagnostics we identify the galaxies which appear to host an active nucleus, while using a suite of templates, we fit the complete infrared spectral energy distribution for each group member. We compare our estimates of galaxy mass, star formation rate, total infrared luminosities, and specific star formation rates (sSFR) for our HCG sample, to samples of isolated galaxies and interacting pairs and find that overall there is no discernible difference among them. However, HCGs which can be considered as dynamically "old", host late-type galaxies with a slightly lower sSFR than the one found in dynamically "young" groups. This could be attributed t...

  8. Mass-to-Light-Ratios of the galaxy clusters and groups observed with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T.; Matsushita, K.; Sato, K.; Abe, Y.; Akamatsu, H.; Fujita, Y.; Kanno, Y.; Simionescu, A.; Tamura, T.; Werner, N.

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed 15 nearby (z band luminosities of galaxies and calculated the ratio of the cumulative gas mass and Fe mass in the ICM to the K-band luminosity (gas-mass-to-light ratio and iron-mass-to-light ratio, respectively). The Coma, Perseus, and medium systems have relatively flat radial profiles of the metal abundances at 0.3 solar within 0.5-1 r_{500}, and ˜ 0.2 solar beyond r_{500}. The gas-mass-to-light-ratios and iron-mass-to-light-ratios ratios increase with radius out to r_{500} and become flatter beyond the radius. The weighted average of the iron-mass-to-light ratios of the clusters at 1.6 r_{500} agrees with the expectation with the Salpeter initial-mass-function of stars, and we do not need a top-heavy slope. In contrast, groups and poor clusters have lower gas-mass-to-light ratios and lower iron-mass-to-light ratios than that of rich systems, with the higher entropy excess. Above these results, we discuss an early metal enrichment in galaxy clusters and groups.

  9. X-ray analysis of the galaxy group UGC03957 beyond R200 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Thölken, S; Reiprich, T H; Hasenbusch, J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the gas properties of the galaxy group UGC03957 up to $1.4R_{200} \\approx 1.4$Mpc in four azimuthal directions with the Suzaku satellite and performed a spectral analysis of five Suzaku observations with 138ks good exposure time in total as well as five Chandra snapshot observations for point source detection. We found a temperature drop of a factor of ${\\sim} 3$ from the center to the outskirts which is consistent with previous results for galaxy clusters. The metal abundance profile shows a flat behavior towards large radii which is a hint for galactic winds as the primary ICM enrichment process. The entropy profile is consistent with numerical simulations after applying a gas mass fraction correction. Previous analyses for clusters and groups often showed an entropy flattening or even a drop around ${\\sim} R_{200}$ which can be an indicator for clumping or non-equilibrium states in the outskirts. Such entropy behaviour is absent in UGC03957. The gas mass fraction is well below the cosmic me...

  10. Halo ellipticity of GAMA galaxy groups from KiDS weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    van Uitert, Edo; Joachimi, Benjamin; Schneider, Peter; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hopkins, Andrew M; Klaes, Dominik; Kuijken, Konrad; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola R; Schrabback, Tim; Valentijn, Edwin; Viola, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the average halo ellipticity of ~2 600 galaxy groups from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using the weak gravitational lensing signal measured from the overlapping Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). To do so, we quantify the azimuthal dependence of the stacked lensing signal around seven different proxies for the orientation of the dark matter distribution, as it is a priori unknown which one traces the orientation best. On small scales, the major axis of the brightest group/cluster member (BCG) provides the best proxy, leading to a clear detection of an anisotropic signal. In order to relate that to a halo ellipticity, we have to adopt a model density profile. We derive new expressions for the quadrupole moments of the shear field given an elliptical model surface mass density profile. Modeling the signal with an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile on scales < 250 kpc, which roughly corresponds to half the virial radius, and assuming that the BCG is perfectly aligned with the dar...

  11. Galaxy Interactions in Compact Groups II: abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, F P A; Borthakur, S; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Heckman, T M; Yun, M S; Chambers, K C

    2015-01-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of HII regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three HII regions harbor an oxygen abundance ~0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km/s with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. HI observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broadband optical images from Pan-STARRS suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain...

  12. Gamma Rays from Clusters and Groups of Galaxies: Cosmic Rays versus Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies have not yet been detected at gamma-ray frequencies; however, the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly known as GLAST, could provide the first detections in the near future. Clusters are expected to emit gamma rays as a result of (1) a population of high-energy primary and re-accelerated secondary cosmic rays (CR) fueled by structure formation and merger shocks, active galactic nuclei and supernovae, and (2) particle dark matter (DM) annihilation. In this paper, we ask the question of whether the Fermi telescope will be able to discriminate between the two emission processes. We present data-driven predictions for a large X-ray flux limited sample of galaxy clusters and groups. We point out that the gamma ray signals from CR and DM can be comparable. In particular, we find that poor clusters and groups are the systems predicted to have the highest DM to CR emission at gamma-ray energies. Based on detailed Fermi simulations, we study observational handles that might ...

  13. Life at the Periphery of the Local Group: the kinematics of the Tucana Dwarf Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Fraternali, F; Irwin, M; Cole, A

    2009-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group are usually located close to the Milky Way or M31. Currently, there are two clear exceptions to this rule, and the Tucana dwarf galaxy is the most distant at almost 1 Mpc from the Milky Way. Using the VLT/FORS2 spectrograph in multi-object mode we were able to measure the velocities of 23 individual Red Giant Branch stars in and around Tucana using the Ca triplet absorption lines. From this sample 17 reliable members have been identified. We measured the systemic velocity and dispersion of Tucana to be v_hel = +194.0+-4.3 km/s and sigma_l.o.s. = 15.8+4.1-3.1 km/s respectively. These measures are derived after removing the signature of rotation using a linear gradient of 6.5 x R/R_core+-2.9 km/s, which corresponds to a rotation of 16 km/s at the reliable limit of our data. Our systemic velocity corresponds to a receding velocity from the barycentre of the Local Group of v_LG = +73.3 km/s. We also determined the mean metallicity of Tucana to be [Fe/H] = -1.95+-0.15 w...

  14. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. I. The nuclear activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Ciesla, L; Krongold, Y; Charmandaris, V; Zezas, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the first -- of a series -- study of the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. This paper focuses on the evolution of the nuclear activity and how it has been affected by the dense environment of the groups. Our analysis is based on the largest multiwavelength compact group sample to-date, containing complete ultraviolet-to-infrared (UV-to-IR) photometry for 1,770 isolated groups (7,417 galaxies). We classified the nuclear activity of the galaxies based on optical emission line and mid-infrared diagnostic methods, as well as using spectral energy distribution fitting. We observe a 15% increase on the number of the AGN-hosting late-type galaxies found in dynamically old groups, over the past 3 Gyr, accompanied by the corresponding decrease of their circumnuclear star formation. Comparing our compact group results with those of local isolated field and interacting pair galaxies, we find no differences in the AGN at the same redshift range. Based on both optical and mid-IR colou...

  15. Physical Implications of the X-ray Properties of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Babul, A; Lewis, G F; Poole, G B; Babul, Arif; Balogh, Michael L.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Poole, Gregory B.

    2002-01-01

    Within the standard framework of structure formation, where clusters and groups of galaxies are built up from the merging of smaller systems, the physical properties of the intracluster medium, such as the gas temperature and the total X-ray luminosity, are predicted to possess well defined self-similar scaling relations. Observed clusters and groups, however, show strong deviations from these predicted relations. We argue that these deviations are unlikely to be entirely due to observational biasses; we assume they are physically based, due to the presence of excess entropy in the intracluster medium in addition to that generated by accretion shocks during the formation of the cluster. Several mechanisms have been suggested as a means of generating this entropy. Focussing on those mechanisms that preheat the gas before it becomes a constituent of the virialized cluster environment, we present a simple, intuitive, physically motivated, analytic model that successfully captures the important physics associated...

  16. Stellar Populations in Compact Galaxy Groups: a Multi-wavelength Study of HCGs 16, 22, and 42, Their Star Clusters, and Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Maybhate, A.; Charlton, J. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Mulchaey, J. S.; English, J.; Desjardins, T. D.; Gallagher, S. C.; Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gronwall, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer) and ground-based (Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) imaging and spectroscopy.We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 "associates" (possible members) radically changes group dynamical masses, which in turn may affect previous evolutionary classifications. The extended membership paints a picture of relative isolation in HCGs 16 and 22, but shows HCG 42 to be part of a larger structure, following a dichotomy expected from recent studies. We conclude that (1) star cluster populations provide an excellent metric of evolutionary state, as they can age-date the past epochs of star formation; and (2) the extended dwarf galaxy population must be considered in assessing the dynamical state of a compact group.

  17. The Baryonic Fraction in Groups of Galaxies from X-Ray Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Henriksen, M J; Henriksen, Mark J.; Mamon, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    The recent {\\sl ROSAT \\/} X-ray detections of hot intergalactic gas in three groups of galaxies are reviewed and the resulting baryonic fraction in these groups is reevaluated. We show that the baryonic fraction obtained, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, should depend, perhaps sensitively, on the radius out to which the X-rays are detected, and the temperature profile of the gas. We find that the NGC 2300 group has a baryonic fraction out to $25'$ of at least 20\\%, thus over five times higher than in the original analysis of Mulchaey \\etal\\ (1993), and also much higher than one would obtain from big-bang nucleosynthesis, but similar to the other two groups as well as rich clusters. With this baryonic fraction, groups would be fair tracers of the distribution of baryons in the Universe if $\\Omega h_{50}^2 = 0.3$. A baryonic fraction that increases with radius is consistent with the X-ray data from all three groups. However, a detailed analysis of the NGC 2300 group shows that the dependence of baryonic fracti...

  18. Evolution in the H I Gas Content of Galaxy Groups: Pre-Processing and Mass Assembly in the Current Epoch

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Kelley M

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (HI) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey alpha.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the HI properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the SDSS and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA HI detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS DR7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group "proximity" membership to HI detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude--thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group HI mass. We find that only 25% of the HI detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and HI detections in groups as a function of parent dark matt...

  19. HI in NGC 5433 and its Environment: High-Latitude Emission in a Small Galaxy Group

    CERN Document Server

    Spekkens, K; Saikia, D J

    2004-01-01

    We present HI synthesis maps of the edge-on starburst NGC 5433 and its environment, obtained with the VLA in its C and D configurations. The observations and spectral model residuals of the main disc emission in NGC 5433 reveal 3 extraplanar features. We associate 2 of these features with coherent extraplanar extensions across multiple spectral channels in our data, including a complete loop in position-velocity space. Interpreting the latter as an expanding shell we derive a corresponding input energy of 2 x 10^54 ergs, comparable to that for the largest supershells found in the Galaxy and those in other edge-on systems. NGC 5433 is in a richer environment than previously thought. We confirm that KUG 1359+326 is a physical companion to NGC 5433 and find two new faint companions, both with Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner identifications, that we label SIS-1 and SIS-2. Including the more distant IC 4357, NGC 5433 is the dominant member of a group of at least 5 galaxies, spanning over 750 kpc in a filamentary...

  20. The effect of non--gravitational gas heating in groups and clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Borgani, S; Wadsley, J; Menci, N; Tozzi, P; Quinn, T; Stadel, J; Lake, G

    2002-01-01

    We present a set of gas-dynamical simulations of galaxy groups and clusters aimed at exploring the effect of non-gravitational heating. We use GASOLINE, a parallel Tree+SPH code, to simulate the formation of four cosmic halos with temperature 0.5galaxy formation. Our main results are the following. (a) An extra heating energy of about 1 keV per gas particle is required to reproduce the observed Lx-T relation, independent of whether it is provided so as to create an entropy floor of 50-100 keV cm^2, or is modulated in redshift; our SN feedback recipe provides only 1/3 keV/part. (b) The M-T relation is almost unaffected by non-gravitational heating and follows the M T^{3/2} scaling, with a normalization ~40% higher than observed, independent of the heating sch...

  1. Molecular and Atomic Gas in the Local Group Galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gratier, P; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N J; Schuster, K F; Kramer, C; Xilouris, E M; Tabatabaei, F S; Henkel, C; Corbelli, E; Israel, F; van der Werf, P P; Calzetti, D; Garcia-Burillo, S; Sievers, A; Combes, F; Wiklind, T; Brouillet, N; Herpin, F; Bontemps, S; Aalto, S; Koribalski, B; van der Tak, F; Wiedner, M C; Roellig, M; Mookerjea, B

    2010-01-01

    We present high resolution large scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group Galaxy M33. The observations were carried out using the HERA multibeam receiver at the 30m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line achieving a resolution of 12" x 2.6km/s, enabling individual Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) to be resolved. The observed region is 650 square arcminutes mainly along the major axis and out to a radius of 8.5 kpc, and covers entirely the 2' x40' radial strip observed with the HIFI and PACS Spectrometers as part of the HERM33ES Herschel key program. The achieved sensitivity in main beam temperature is 20-50mK at 2.6km/s velocity resolution. The CO(2-1) luminosity of the observed region is 1.7+/-0.1x10^7 Kkm/s pc^2 and is estimated to be 2.8+/-0.3x10^7 Kkm/s pc^2 for the entire galaxy, corresponding to H_2 masses of 1.9x10^8 M_sun and 3.3x10^8 M_sun respectively (including He), calculated with a NH2/ICO twice the Galactic value due to the half-solar metallicity of M33. HI 21 cm VLA archiv...

  2. Chandra studies of the X-ray gas properties of galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, M; Donahue, M; Jones, C; Forman, W

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of 40 galaxy groups (kT_500=0.7-2.7 keV or M_500=10^13-10^14 h^-1 M_solar, 0.012r_2500 for all 40 groups. For 11 groups, gas properties can be robustly derived to r_500. We show that in spite of the large variation in T profiles inside 0.15 r_500, the T profiles of these groups are similar at >0.15 r_500 and are consistent with a ``universal temperature profile''. We present the K-T relations at six characteristics radii (30 kpc - r_500), for 40 groups from this work and 14 clusters from Vikhlinin et al. (2008). Despite large scatter in the entropy values at <0.15 r_500, the intrinsic scatter from r_2500 is much smaller and remains the same (~11%) to r_500. The entropy excess at r_500 is confirmed, but the magnitude is smaller than previous results. We also find that the average gas fraction between r_2500 and r_500 has no temperature dependence, ~0.12 for 1-10 keV systems. The group gas fractions within r_2500 are generally low and have large scatter. This scatter is shown...

  3. Avoiding progenitor bias: The structural and mass evolution of Brightest Group and Cluster Galaxies in Hierarchical models since z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco; Rettura, Alessandro; Bouillot, Vincent; Moreno, Jorge; Licitra, Rossella; Bernardi, Mariangela; Huertas-Company, Marc; Mei, Simona; Ascaso, Begoña; Sheth, Ravi; Delaye, Lauriane; Raichoor, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The mass and structural evolution of massive galaxies is one of the hottest topics in galaxy formation. This is because it may reveal invaluable insights into the still debated evolutionary processes governing the growth and assembly of spheroids. However, direct comparison between models and observations is usually prevented by the so-called "progenitor bias", i.e., new galaxies entering the observational selection at later epochs, thus eluding a precise study of how pre-existing galaxies actually evolve in size. To limit this effect, we here gather data on high-redshift brightest group and cluster galaxies, evolve their (mean) host halo masses down to z=0 along their main progenitors, and assign as their "descendants" local SDSS central galaxies matched in host halo mass. At face value, the comparison between high redshift and local data suggests a noticeable increase in stellar mass of a factor of >2 since z~1, and of >2.5 in mean effective radius. We then compare the inferred stellar mass and size growth ...

  4. HST Imaging of the Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies Pisces A&B: Prototypes for Local Group Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Tollerud, Erik J; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E; Weisz, Daniel R; Dolphin, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the Pisces A and B galaxies with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Photometry from these images clearly resolve a Red Giant Branch for both objects, demonstrating that they are nearby dwarf galaxies. We describe a Bayesian inferential approach to determining the distance to these galaxies using the magnitude of the tip of the RGB, and then apply this approach to these galaxies. We also provide the full probability distributions for parameters derived using this approach. This reveals the distance to these galaxies as $5.64^{+0.13}_{-0.15} \\, {\\rm Mpc}$ and $8.89^{+0.75}_{-0.85} \\, {\\rm Mpc}$ for Pisces A and B, respectively, placing both within the Local Volume but not the Local Group. We estimate the star formation histories of these galaxies, which suggests that they have recently undergone an increase in their star formation rates. Together these yield luminosities for Pisces A and B of $M_V=-11.57^{+0.06}_{-0.05}$ and $-12.9 \\pm 0.2$, respectively, a...

  5. The Early Chemical Enrichment Histories of Two Sculptor Group Dwarf Galaxies as Revealed by RR Lyrae Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Soung-Chul; Sarajedini, Ata; Kim, Sang Chul; Kyeong, Jaemann

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have identified a sample of RR Lyrae candidates in both dTrans galaxies [219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005]. The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of _{ESO294} = -1.77 +/- 0.03 and _{ESO410} = -1.64 +/- 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the...

  6. Deep Chandra observations of the stripped galaxy group falling into Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Gaspari, M.; Owers, M. S.; Roediger, E.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Paltani, S.; Ettori, S.; Venturi, T.; Rossetti, M.; Rudnick, L.

    2017-09-01

    In the local Universe, the growth of massive galaxy clusters mainly operates through the continuous accretion of group-scale systems. The infalling group in Abell 2142 is the poster child of such an accreting group, and as such, it is an ideal target to study the astrophysical processes induced by structure formation. We present the results of a deep (200 ks) observation of this structure with Chandra that highlights the complexity of this system in exquisite detail. In the core of the group, the spatial resolution of Chandra reveals a leading edge and complex AGN-induced activity. The morphology of the stripped gas tail appears straight in the innermost 250 kpc, suggesting that magnetic draping efficiently shields the gas from its surroundings. However, beyond 300 kpc from the core, the tail flares and the morphology becomes strongly irregular, which could be explained by a breaking of the drape, for example, caused by turbulent motions. The power spectrum of surface-brightness fluctuations is relatively flat (P2D ∝ k-2.3), which indicates that thermal conduction is strongly inhibited even beyond the region where magnetic draping is effective. The amplitude of density fluctuations in the tail is consistent with a mild level of turbulence with a Mach number M3D 0.1 - 0.25. Overall, our results show that the processes leading to the thermalization and mixing of the infalling gas are slow and relatively inefficient.

  7. A Comprehensive HST BVI Catalogue Of Star Clusters In Five Hickson Compact Groups Of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Bastian, N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Charlton, J; Johnson, K E; Chandar, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a photometric catalogue of star cluster candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 7, 31, 42, 59, and 92, based on observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogue contains precise cluster positions (right ascension and declination), magnitudes, and colours in the BVI filters. The number of detected sources ranges from 2200 to 5600 per group, from which we construct the high-confidence sample by applying a number of criteria designed to reduce foreground and background contaminants. Furthermore, the high-confidence cluster candidates for each of the 16 galaxies in our sample are split into two sub-populations: one that may contain young star clusters and one that is dominated by globular older clusters. The ratio of young star cluster to globular cluster candidates varies from group to group, from equal numbers to the extreme of HCG 31 which has a ratio of 8 to 1, due to a recent starburst induced by interactions in the grou...

  8. Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA:How does the far-IR luminosity function depend on galaxy group properties?

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Qi; Norberg, Peder; Cole, Shaun; Baugh, Carlton; Frenk, Carlos; Cooray, Asantha; Dye, Simon; Bourne, N; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Ivison, R J; Maddox, S J; Alpasan, M; Baldry, I; Driver, S P; Robotham, A

    2014-01-01

    We use the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) Phase I data to study the conditional luminosity function of far-IR (250 um) selected galaxies in optically-selected galaxy groups from the GAMA spectroscopic survey, as well as environmental effects on the far-IR-to-optical colour. We applied two methods, which gave consistent results for the far-IR conditional luminosity functions. The direct matching method matches H-ATLAS sources to GAMA/SDSS galaxies, then links the optical counterparts to GAMA groups. The stacking method counts the number of far-IR sources within the projected radii of GAMA groups, subtracting the local background. We investigated the dependence of the far-IR (250 um) luminosity function on group mass in the range 10d12 10d12Msun/h. We also find that the far-IR-to-optical colours of H-ATLAS galaxies are independent of group mass over the range 10d12 < M_h <10d14Msun/h in the local universe. We also compare our observational results with recent semi-analytical models, and find that none of these...

  9. An HI line search for optically identified dwarf galaxy candidates in the M81 group

    CERN Document Server

    Van Driel, W; Binggeli, B; Huchtmeier, W K

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive 21cm HI line observations were performed for 23 dwarf members and possible members of the nearby M81 group of galaxies, including five objects of a clustering of extremely low-surface brightness objects of unknown nature. With the Nancay decimetric radio telescope the radial velocity range of -529 to 1826 km/s was searched to an rms noise of ~3-5 mJy. Only three objects were detected. However, their high radial velocities (between 600 and 1150 km/s) show them to lie behind the M81 group. These three objects, classified as dS0: (UGC 4998) and Im (Kar 1N and UGC 5658), have HI masses of 0.5, 2.0 and 2.5 10^8 Msun, for the assumed distance of 4 Mpc, and HI mass-to-blue light ratios of 0.05, 0.91 and 0.22 Msun/LBsun, respectively. Considering that half of the observed objects are classified as irregular dwarfs, hence expected to be relatively gas-rich, the resulting detection rate of about 1/3 is quite low. However, the mean redshift and velocity dispersion of the M81 group ( = 101 km/s, sigma=114 km/s)...

  10. Nature of the absorbing gas associated with a galaxy group at z˜0.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péroux, Céline; Rahmani, Hadi; Quiret, Samuel; Pettini, Max; Kulkarni, Varsha; York, Donald G.; Straka, Lorrie; Husemann, Bernd; Milliard, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We present new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer observations of quasar field Q2131-1207 with a log N(H I} = 19.50 ± 0.15 sub-damped Lyman α at zabs = 0.42980. We detect four galaxies at a redshift consistent with that of the absorber where only one was known before this study. Two of these are star-forming galaxies, while the ones further away from the quasar (>140 kpc) are passive galaxies. We report the metallicities of the H II regions of the closest objects (12 + log(O/H) = 8.98 ± 0.02 and 8.32 ± 0.16) to be higher or equivalent within the errors to the metallicity measured in absorption in the neutral phase of the gas (8.15 ± 0.20). For the closest object, a detailed morphokinematic analysis indicates that it is an inclined large rotating disc with Vmax = 200 ± 3 km s-1. We measure the masses to be Mdyn = 7.4 ± 0.4 × 1010 M⊙ and Mhalo = 2.9 ± 0.2 × 1012 M⊙. Some of the gas seen in absorption is likely to be corotating with the halo of that object, possibly due to a warped disc. The azimuthal angle between the quasar line-of-sight and the projected major axis of the galaxy on the sky is 12° ± 1° which indicates that some other fraction of the absorbing gas might be associated with accreting gas. This is further supported by the galaxy to gas metallicity difference. Based on the same arguments, we exclude outflows as a possibility to explain the gas in absorption. The four galaxies form a large structure (at least 200 kpc wide) consistent with a filament or a galaxy group so that a fraction of the absorption could be related to intragroup gas.

  11. Compact groups in theory and practice - III. Compact groups of galaxies in the Sixth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    McConnachie, Alan; Ellison, Sara; Simard, Luc

    2008-01-01

    We present the largest publicly available catalogue of compact groups of galaxies identified using the original selection criteria of Hickson, selected from the Sixth Data Release (DR6) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We identify 2297 compact groups down to a limiting magnitude of r = 18 (~0.24groups degree^{-2}), and 74791 compact groups down to a limiting magnitude of r = 21 (~6.7groups degree^{-2}). This represents 0.9% of all galaxies in the SDSS DR6 at these magnitude levels. Contamination due to gross photometric errors has been removed from the bright sample of groups, and we estimate it is present in the large sample at the 14% level. Spectroscopic information is available for 4131 galaxies in the bright catalogue (43% completeness), and we find that the median redshift of these groups is z_{med} = 0.09. The median line-of-sight velocity dispersion within the compact groups from the bright catalogue is sigma_{LOS} ~ 230km/s and their typical inter-galactic separations are of order 50 - 100kpc....

  12. Chandra Studies of the X-ray gas properties of fossil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-03-01

    We study ten galaxy groups and clusters suggested in the literature to be “fossil systems (FSs)” based on Chandra observations. According to the M500 - T and LX - T relations, the gas properties of FSs are not physically distinct from ordinary galaxy groups or clusters. We also first study the fgas, 2500 - T relation and find that the FSs exhibit the same trend as ordinary systems. The gas densities of FSs within 0.1r200 are ˜ 10-3 cm-3, which is the same order of magnitude as galaxy clusters. The entropies within 01r200 (S0.1r200) of FSs are systematically lower than those inordinary galaxy groups, which is consistent with previous reports, but we find their S0.1r200 - T relation is more similar to galaxy clusters. The derived mass profiles of FSs are consistent with the Navarro, Frenk and White model in (0.1 - 1)r200, and the relation between scale radius rs and characteristic mass density δc indicates self-similarity of dark matter halos of FSs. The ranges of rs and δc for FSs are also close to those of galaxy clusters. Therefore, FSs share more common characteristics with galaxy clusters. The special birth place of the FS makes it a distinct type of galaxy system.

  13. The Dawn of the Red: Star formation histories of group galaxies over the past 5 billion years

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L; Wilman, David J; Bower, Richard G; Mulchaey, John S; Parker, Laura C; Oemler, Augustus

    2010-01-01

    We examine the star formation properties of group and field galaxies in two surveys, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; at z ~ 0.08) and the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC; at z ~ 0.4). Using UV imaging from the GALEX space telescope, along with optical and, for GEEC, near infrared photometry, we compare the observed spectral energy distributions to large suites of stellar population synthesis models. This allows us to accurately determine star formation rates and stellar masses. We find that star forming galaxies of all environments undergo a systematic lowering of their star formation rate between z=0.4 and z=0.08 regardless of mass. Nonetheless, the fraction of passive galaxies is higher in groups than the field at both redshifts. Moreover, the difference between the group and field grows with time and is mass-dependent, in the sense the the difference is larger at low masses. However, the star formation properties of star forming galaxies, as measured by their average specific star f...

  14. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  15. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN COMPACT GALAXY GROUPS: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF HCGs 16, 22, AND 42, THEIR STAR CLUSTERS, AND DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Maybhate, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fedotov, K.; Desjardins, T. D.; Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Mulchaey, J. S. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); English, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Walker, L. M.; Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3813, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Tzanavaris, P., E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Spitzer) and ground-based (Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) imaging and spectroscopy. We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at <1 Gyr. This represents the possible detection of a tidal feature at the end of its phase of optical observability. Our HST images also resolve what were thought to be double nuclei in HCG 16C and D into multiple, distinct sources, likely to be star clusters. Beyond our phenomenological treatment, we focus primarily on contrasting the stellar populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 ''associates'' (possible members) radically changes group dynamical masses, which in turn may affect previous evolutionary classifications. The extended membership paints a picture of relative isolation in HCGs 16 and 22, but shows HCG 42 to be part of a larger structure, following a dichotomy expected from recent studies. We conclude that (1) star cluster populations provide an excellent metric of evolutionary state, as they can age-date the past epochs of star formation; and (2) the extended dwarf galaxy population must be considered in assessing the dynamical state of a compact group.

  16. Molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratier, P.; Braine, J.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N. J.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Henkel, C.; Corbelli, E.; Israel, F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Calzetti, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Sievers, A.; Combes, F.; Wiklind, T.; Brouillet, N.; Herpin, F.; Bontemps, S.; Aalto, S.; Koribalski, B.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Röllig, M.; Mookerjea, B.

    2010-11-01

    We present high-resolution large-scale observations of the molecular and atomic gas in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations were carried out using the HEterodyne Receiver Array (HERA) at the 30 m IRAM telescope in the CO(2-1) line, achieving a resolution of 12” × 2.6 km s-1, enabling individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) to be resolved. The observed region is 650 square arcminutes mainly along the major axis and out to a radius of 8.5 kpc, and covers entirely the 2' × 40' radial strip observed with the HIFI and PACS Spectrometers as part of the HERM33ES Herschel key program. The achieved sensitivity in main-beam temperature is 20-50 mK at 2.6 km s-1 velocity resolution. The CO(2-1) luminosity of the observed region is 1.7±0.1 × 107 K km s-1 pc2 and is estimated to be 2.8±0.3 × 107 K km s-1 pc2 for the entire galaxy, corresponding to H2 masses of 1.9 × 108 Msun and 3.3 × 108 Msun respectively (including He), calculated with N(H2)/ICO(1-0) twice the Galactic value due to the half-solar metallicity of M 33. The H i 21 cm VLA archive observations were reduced, and the mosaic was imaged and cleaned using the multi-scale task in the CASA software package, yielding a series of datacubes with resolutions ranging from 5” to 25”. The H i mass within a radius of 8.5 kpc is estimated to be 1.4 × 109 Msun. The azimuthally averaged CO surface brightness decreases exponentially with a scale length of 1.9±0.1 kpc whereas the atomic gas surface density is constant at ΣH I = 6±2 Msun pc-2 deprojected to face-on. For an N(H2)/ICO(1-0) conversion factor twice that of the Milky Way, the central kiloparsec H2 surface density is ΣH2 = 8.5±0.2 Msun pc-2. The star formation rate per unit molecular gas (SF efficiency, the rate of transformation of molecular gas into stars), as traced by the ratio of CO to Hα and FIR brightness, is constant with radius. The SFE, with a N(H2)/ICO(1-0) factor twice galactic, appears 2-4 times greater than for large spiral

  17. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group: I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Vergara, N; Hidalgo, S L; Durazo, R

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the LCID project from deep color-magnitude dia- grams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 percent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 percent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t approximately 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxi...

  18. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspari, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Brighenti, F. [Astronomy Department, University of Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Temi, P. [Astrophysics Branch, NASA/Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ettori, S., E-mail: mgaspari@mpa-garching.mpg.de [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  19. A Dynamically Driven, Universal Thermal Profile of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reiss, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Groups and clusters of galaxies show a universal, nearly linear entropy radial profile $K(r)$. Using deprojected 13 clusters and 9 groups from the literature, we find that $K(r)\\propto r^{0.97\\pm0.01}$, consistent with the mean power-law index $\\sim(0.9-1.1)$ of previous studies. An equally good fit to the data is given by a $(t_{cool}/t_{ff})\\propto r^{0.73\\pm0.01}$ ratio between cooling and free-fall times. Both profiles slightly flatten at small radii, as $(t_{cool}/t_{ff})$ becomes of order unity. The entropy profile is usually attributed to the primordial gas crossing the virial shock, to non-standard heat conduction, or to turbulent heating. We argue that a dynamical mechanism is needed to sustain such a simple profile, oblivious to the temperature peak at the edge of the core and to the virial shock at the outskirts, and robust to the presence of ongoing cooling, merger, and AGN activity. In particular, we show that such a profile is naturally obtained in a spiral flow, which is likely to exist in most...

  20. A Search for Triggered Star Formation in the Compact Group of Galaxies NGC 5851, NGC 5852 and CGCG 077-007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Charlotte Alexandra; Basu-Zych, Antara; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; NASA / GSFC X-ray Galaxies Group

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy interactions provide ideal conditions for triggering star formation, and impact galaxy evolution and the structure of the universe. The aim of this research is to study the key factors during galaxy interactions that influence star formation events by studying close pairs of galaxies to find the relationship between interaction properties (e.g. relative velocities and distances, mass ratios, orientation, and merger stage) and star formation rate (SFR). We present our analysis on one compact group of star-forming galaxies CGCG 077-007, NGC 5851, and their quiescent companion NGC 5852. Within this group we investigate the conditions where galaxy interactions cause higher SFR or supermassive black hole accretion (i.e. AGN activity), which might rather quench SFR. Areas of increased star formation are classified by the identification of the most UV bright regions within the galaxies. We find these areas by taking the Swift UVOT W2 filter and subtracting from it the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) z-band image in order to remove the underlying stellar population. The regions identified by this process allow us to conduct a multi-wavelength study of stellar populations within this compact group. We use Spectral Energy Distribution models to fit ultraviolet to mid-infrared photometry from Swift UVOT, SDSS, 2MASS and WISE and measure global star formation histories for the galaxies and for the identified star forming regions within the galaxies. In the future we will include analysis of Swift XRT data to place constraints on AGN activity, and relate to the star formation history. This group serves as a pilot study and we will apply these methods to a sample of 30 galaxy groups and close pairs in order to investigate the relationship between galaxy interactions, SFR, and AGN activity and gain deeper insight into how mergers drive galaxy evolution.

  1. On the occupation of X-ray selected galaxy groups by radio AGN since z=1.3

    CERN Document Server

    Smolcic, V; Zamorani, G; Schinnerer, E; Tanaka, M; Giodini, S; Scoville, N

    2011-01-01

    Previous clustering analysis of low-power radio AGN has indicated that they preferentially live in massive groups. The X-ray surveys of the COSMOS field have achieved a sensitivity at which these groups are directly detected out to z=1.3. Making use of Chandra-, XMM- and VLA-COSMOS surveys we identify radio AGN members (10**23.6 < L_1.4GHz/(W/Hz) < 10**25) of galaxy groups (10**13.2 < M_200/M_sun < 10**14.4; 0.1group occupation statistics as a function of group mass, and ii) the distribution of radio AGN within the groups. We find that radio AGN are preferentially associated with galaxies close to the center (< 0.2r_200). Compared to our control sample of group members matched in stellar mass and color to the radio AGN host galaxies, we find a significant enhancement of radio AGN activity associated with 10**13.6 < M_200/M_sun < 10**14 halos. We present the first direct measurement of the halo occupation distribution (HOD) for radio AGN, b...

  2. Finding Galaxy Groups In Photometric Redshift Space: the Probability Friends-of-Friends (pFoF) Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Li, I-hui

    2008-01-01

    We present a structure finding algorithm designed to identify galaxy groups in photometric redshift data sets: the probability friends-of-friends (pFoF) algorithm. This algorithm is derived by combining the friends-of-friends algorithm in the transverse direction and the photometric redshift probability densities in the radial dimension. The innovative characteristic of our group-finding algorithm is the improvement of redshift estimation via the constraints given by the transversely connected galaxies in a group, based on the assumption that all galaxies in a group have the same redshift. Tests using the Virgo Consortium Millennium Simulation mock catalogs allow us to show that the recovery rate of the pFoF algorithm is larger than 80% for mock groups of at least $2\\times10^{13}M_{\\sun}$, while the false detection rate is about 10% for pFoF groups containing at least $\\sim8$ net members. Applying the algorithm to the CNOC2 group catalogs gives results which are consistent with the mock catalog tests. From al...

  3. Development of a hot intergalactic medium in spiral-rich galaxy groups: the example of HCG 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtilek, Jan M.; O'Sullivan, Ewan; David, Laurence P.; Giacintucci, Simona; Zezas, Andreas; Mamon, Gary; Ponman, Trevor J; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2014-08-01

    Galaxy groups provide the environment in which the majority of galaxies evolve, with low velocity dispersions and small galaxy separations that are conducive to tidal interactions and mergers between group members. X-ray observations reveal the frequent presence of hot gas in groups, with larger quantities linked to early-type galaxies, whereas cold gas is common in spiral-dominated groups. Clarification of the origin and role of the hot medium is central to the understanding of the evolution of the galaxy population and of all phases of the IGM.We here report on the nuclear activity, star formation and the high luminosity X-ray binary populations of the spiral-dominated, likely not yet virialized, group HCG 16, as well as on its intra-group medium, based principally on deep (150 ks) Chandra X-ray observations of the group, as well as new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 610 MHz radio data. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify what may be a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838; all are variable. NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with galactic superwinds that show X-ray and radio evidence of IGM interaction, but only weak nuclear activity; NGC 848 is also dominated by emission from its starburst.We confirm the existence of a faint, extended low-temperature (0.3 keV) intra-group medium, a subject of some uncertainty in earlier studies. The diffuse emission is strongest in a ridge linking the four principal galaxies, and is at least partly coincident with a large-scale HI tidal filament, indicating that the IGM in the inner part of the group is highly multi-phase. We conclude that starburst winds and shock-heating of stripped HI may play an important role in the early stages of IGM formation, with galactic winds contributing 20-40% of the observed hot gas in the system.

  4. The matter distribution in the local Universe as derived from galaxy groups in SDSS DR12 and 2MRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulder, Christoph; van Kampen, Eelco; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Mieske, Steffen; Zeilinger, Werner W.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Friends-of-friends algorithms are a common tool to detect galaxy groups and clusters in large survey data. In order to be as precise as possible, they have to be carefully calibrated using mock catalogues. Aims: We create an accurate and robust description of the matter distribution in the local Universe using the most up-to-date available data. This will provide the input for a specific cosmological test planned as follow-up to this work, and will be useful for general extragalactic and cosmological research. Methods: We created a set of galaxy group catalogues based on the 2MRS and SDSS DR12 galaxy samples using a friends-of-friends based group finder algorithm. The algorithm was carefully calibrated and optimised on a new set of wide-angle mock catalogues from the Millennium simulation, in order to provide accurate total mass estimates of the galaxy groups taking into account the relevant observational biases in 2MRS and SDSS. Results: We provide four different catalogues: (i) a 2MRS based group catalogue; (ii) an SDSS DR12 based group catalogue reaching out to a redshift z = 0.11 with stellar mass estimates for 70% of the galaxies; (iii) a catalogue providing additional fundamental plane distances for all groups of the SDSS catalogue that host elliptical galaxies; (iv) a catalogue of the mass distribution in the local Universe based on a combination of our 2MRS and SDSS catalogues. Conclusions: While motivated by a specific cosmological test, three of the four catalogues that we produced are well suited to act as reference databases for a variety of extragalactic and cosmological science cases. Our catalogue of fundamental plane distances for SDSS groups provides further added value to this paper. The full catalogues (Tables A.1 to A.8) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A14

  5. Mineralization of fossil wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, P.

    1972-01-01

    Several pieces of fossil wood have been analyzed with X-ray diffraction and were grouped on the basis of mineralogical composition. Various mineralizations were studied in thin sections and by means of the scanning electron microscope. Wood-opals appear to show a structure preservation that points t

  6. Fossils and decapod phylogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, Frederick R.; Dixon, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    An expanded series of morphological characters developed for a cladistic analysis of extant decapods has yielded a new hypothesis for the phylogeny of the group. Application of this database to selected fossil genera produces some interesting results and demonstrates the feasibility of treating foss

  7. Entropy amplification from energy feedback in simulated galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Borgani, S; Kay, S T; Ponman, T J; Springel, V; Tozzi, P; Voit, G M

    2005-01-01

    We use hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters and groups to study the effect of pre-heating on the entropy structure of the ICM. Our simulations account for non-gravitational heating of the gas either by imposing a minimum entropy floor at redshift z=3, or by considering feedback by galactic winds powered by supernova (SN) energy. In the adiabatic simulations we find that the entropy is increased out to the external regions as a consequence of the transition from clumpy to smooth accretion induced by extra heating. This result is in line with the predictions of the semi-analytical model by Voit et al. However, the introduction of radiative cooling substantially reduces this entropy amplification effect. While galactic winds of increasing strength are effective in regulating star formation, they have a negligible effect on the entropy profile of cluster-sized halos. Only in models where the action of the winds is complemented with diffuse heating corresponding to a pre-collapse entropy do we find a siza...

  8. Detecting Sub-lunar Mass Compact Objects toward the Local Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2016-01-01

    By monitoring a large number of stars in the Local Group galaxies such as M33 with an 8\\,m-class telescope with time integration of $\\sim 100\\,$sec per shot, we can detect microlensing events by sub-lunar mass compact objects (SULCOs) such as primordial black holes (PBHs) and rogue (free-floating) dwarf planets. For one night observation, we would be able to detect $10^{3-4}$ microlensing events caused by SULCOs with a mass of $10^{-9}$ to $10^{-7}$ solar mass for sources with S/N$>5$ if SULCOs constitute all the dark matter components. Moreover, we expect $10^{1-2}$ events in which sources with S/N$>100$ are weakly amplified due to lensing by SULCOs with a mass range of $10^{-11}$ to $10^{-7}$ solar mass. The method would provide a stringent constraint on the abundance of SULCOs at the distance $0.1-100$ kpc from us.

  9. Gas Sloshing and Radio Galaxy Dynamics in the Core of the 3C 449 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Randall, Scott W.; Forman, William R.; Nulsen, Paul E.; Roediger, Elke; ZuHone, John A.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Jones, Christine; Croston, Judith H.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a 140 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of the hot gas around the canonical FR I radio galaxy 3C 449. An earlier, shorter 30 ks Chandra observation of the group gas showed an unusual entropy distribution and a surface brightness edge in the gas that could be a strong shock around the inner radio lobes. In our deeper data we find no evidence for a temperature increase inside of the brightness edge, but a temperature decrease across part of the edge. This suggests that the edge is a "sloshing" cold front due to a merger within the last 1.3-1.6 Gyr. Both the northern and southern inner jets are bent slightly to the west in projection as they enter their respective lobes, suggesting that the sloshing core is moving to the east. The straight inner jet flares at approximately the position where it crosses the contact edge, suggesting that the jet is entraining and thermalizing some of the hot gas as it crosses the edge.We also detect filaments of X-ray emission around the southern inner radio jet and lobe which we attribute to low entropy entrained gas. The lobe flaring and gas entrainment were originally predicted in simulations of Loken et al. and are confirmed in our deep observation.

  10. Estimating ancestral distributions of lineages with uncertain sister groups: a statistical approach to Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis and a case using Aesculus L. (Sapindaceae) including fossils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.J. HARRIS; Qiu-Yun (Jenny) XIANG

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple statistical approach for using Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis (DIVA) software to infer biogeographic histories without fully bifurcating trees. In this approach, ancestral ranges are first optimized for a sample of Bayesian trees. The probability P of an ancestral range r at a node is then calculated as P(rY)= Σnt=1 F(rY)tPt where Y is a node, and F(rY) is the frequency of range r among all the optimal solutions resulting from DIVA optimization at node Y, t is one of n topologies optimized, and Pt is the probability of topology t. Node Y is a hypothesized ancestor shared by a specific crown lineage and the sister of that lineage "x", where x may vary due to phylogenetic uncertainty (polytomies and nodes with posterior probability <100%). Using this method, the ancestral distribution at Y can be estimated to provide inference of the geographic origins of the specific crown group of interest. This approach takes into account phylogenetic uncertainty as well as uncertainty from DIVA optimization. It is an extension of the previously described method called Bayes-DIVA, which pairs Bayesian phylogenetic analysis with biogeographic analysis using DIVA. Further, we show that the probability P of an ancestral range at Y calculated using this method does not equate to pp* F(rY) on the Bayesian consensus tree when both variables are < 100%, where pp is the posterior probability and F(rY) is the frequency of range r for the node containing the specific crown group. We tested our DIVA-Bayes approach using Aesculus L., which has major lineages unresolved as a polytomy. We inferred the most probable geographic origins of the five traditional sections of Aesculus and ofAesculus californica Nutt. and examined range subdivisions at parental nodes of these lineages.Additionally, we used the DIVA-Bayes data from Aesculus to quantify the effects on biogeographic inference of including two wildcard fossil taxa in phylogenetic analysis. Our analysis resolved the

  11. The matter distribution in the local universe as derived from galaxy groups in SDSS DR12 and 2MRS

    CERN Document Server

    Saulder, Christoph; Mieske, Steffen; Zeilinger, Werner W

    2015-01-01

    Context. Friends-of-friends algorithms are a common tool to detect galaxy groups and clusters in large survey data. For them to be as precise as possible, they have to be carefully calibrated using mock-catalogues. Aims. To create an accurate and robust description of the matter distribution in the local universe using the most up-to-date available data. This will provide input for a specific cosmological test planned as follow-up to this work, and will be useful for general extra- galactic and cosmological research. Methods. We create a set of galaxy group catalogues based on the 2MRS and SDSS DR12 catalogues using a friends-of-friends based group finder algorithm. The algorithm is carefully calibrated and optimised on a new set of wide-angle mock catalogues from the Millennium simulation, such as to provide accurate total mass estimates of the galaxy groups taking into account the relevant observational biases in 2MRS and SDSS. Results. We provide four different catalogues: 1) a 2MRS based group catalogue; ...

  12. Spectroscopic confirmation of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy d0944+71 as a member of the M81 group of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Chiboucas, Kristin; Crnojevic, Denija; Simon, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    We use Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to measure the first velocity and metallicity of a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy beyond the Local Group using resolved stars. Our target, d0944+71, is a faint dSph found in the halo of the massive spiral galaxy M81 by Chiboucas et al. We coadd the spectra of 27 individual stars and measure a heliocentric radial velocity of $-38\\pm10$~km/s. This velocity is consistent with d0944+71 being gravitationally bound to M81. We coadd the spectra of the 23 stars that are consistent with being red giant branch stars and measure an overall metallicity of ${\\rm [Fe/H]}=-1.3 \\pm 0.3$ based on the calcium triplet lines. This metallicity is consistent with d0944+71 following the metallicity$-$luminosity relation for Local Group dSphs. We investigate several potential sources of observational bias but find that our sample of targeted stars is representative of the metallicity distribution function of d0944+71 and any stellar contamination due to seeing effects is negligible. The low ellipticit...

  13. Stellar Populations in Compact Galaxy Groups: a Multi-Wavelength Study of HCGs 16, 22, and 42, their Star Clusters and Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Charlton, J C; Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Mulchaey, J S; English, J; Desjardins, T D; Gallagher, S C; Walker, L M; Johnson, K E; Tzanavaris, P; Gronwall, C

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of three compact galaxy groups, HCGs 16, 22, and 42, which describe a sequence in terms of gas richness, from space- (Swift, HST, Spitzer) and ground-based (LCO, CTIO) imaging and spectroscopy. We study various signs of past interactions including a faint, dusty tidal feature about HCG 16A, which we tentatively age-date at <1 Gyr. This represents the possible detection of a tidal feature at the end of its phase of optical observability. Our HST images also resolve what were thought to be double nuclei in HCG 16C and D into multiple, distinct sources, likely to be star clusters. Beyond our phenomenological treatment, we focus primarily on contrasting the stellar populations across these three groups. The star clusters show a remarkable intermediate-age population in HCG 22, and identify the time at which star formation was quenched in HCG 42. We also search for dwarf galaxies at accordant redshifts. The inclusion of 33 members and 27 'associates' (possible members) rad...

  14. Dark matter halo properties of GAMA galaxy groups from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    CERN Document Server

    Viola, M; Brouwer, M; Kuijken, K; Hoekstra, H; Norberg, P; Robotham, A S G; van Uitert, E; Alpaslan, M; Baldry, I K; Choi, A; de Jong, J T A; Driver, S P; Erben, T; Grado, A; Graham, Alister W; Heymans, C; Hildebrandt, H; Hopkins, A M; Irisarri, N; Joachimi, B; Loveday, J; Miller, L; Nakajima, R; Schneider, P; Sifón, C; Kleijn, G Verdoes

    2015-01-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field survey designed to map the matter distribution in the Universe using weak gravitational lensing. In this paper, we use these data to measure the density profiles and masses of a sample of $\\sim \\mathrm{1400}$ spectroscopically identified galaxy groups and clusters from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We detect a highly significant signal (signal-to-noise-ratio $\\sim$ 120), allowing us to study the properties of dark matter haloes over one and a half order of magnitude in mass, from $M \\sim 10^{13}-10^{14.5} h^{-1}\\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$. We interpret the results for various subsamples of groups using a halo model framework which accounts for the mis-centring of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (used as the tracer of the group centre) with respect to the centre of the group's dark matter halo. We find that the density profiles of the haloes are well described by an NFW profile with concentrations that agree with predictions from numerical simulations. ...

  15. An extremely optically dim tidal feature in the gas-rich interacting galaxy group NGC 871/NGC 876/NGC 877

    CERN Document Server

    Lee-Waddell, K; Cuillandre, J -C; Cannon, J; Haynes, M P; Sick, J; Chandra, P; Patra, N; Stierwalt, S; Giovanelli, R

    2014-01-01

    We present GMRT HI observations and deep CFHT MegaCam optical images of the gas-rich interacting galaxy group NGC 871/NGC 876/NGC 877 (hereafter NGC 871/6/7). Our high-resolution data sets provide a census of the HI and stellar properties of the detected gas-rich group members. In addition to a handful of spiral, irregular and dwarf galaxies, this group harbours an intriguing HI feature, AGC 749170, that has a gas mass of ~10^9.3 M_sol, a dynamical-to-gas mass ratio of ~1 (assuming the cloud is rotating and in dynamical equilibrium) and no optical counterpart in previous imaging. Our observations have revealed a faint feature in the CFHT g'- and r'-bands; if it is physically associated with AGC 749170, the latter has M/L_g > 1000 M_sol/L_sol as well as a higher metallicity (estimated using photometric colours) and a significantly younger stellar population than the other low-mass gas-rich group members. These properties, as well as its spectral and spatial location with respect to its suspected parent galaxie...

  16. A derivation of masses and total luminosities of galaxy groups and clusters in the maxBCG catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Proctor, Robert N; Azanha, Luiz; Dupke, Renato; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a multi-waveband analysis of the masses and luminosities of $\\sim$600 galaxy groups and clusters identified in the maxBCG catalogue. These data are intended to form the basis of future work on the formation of the "$m_{12}$ gap" in galaxy groups and clusters. We use SDSS spectroscopy and $g$, $r$ and $i$ band photometry to estimate galaxy group/cluster virial radii, masses and total luminosities. In order to establish the robustness of our results, we compare them with literature studies that utilize a variety of mass determinations techniques (dynamical, X-ray, weak lensing) and total luminosities estimated in the $B$, $r$, $i$, and $K$ wavebands. We also compare our results to predictions derived from the Millennium Simulation. We find that, once selection effects are properly accounted for, excellent agreement exists between our results and the literature with the exception of a single observational study. We also find that the Millennium Simulation does an excellent job of predict...

  17. Metal distributions out to 0.5 r {sub 180} in the intracluster medium of four galaxy groups observed with Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke, E-mail: j1213703@ed.tus.ac.jp, E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the distributions of metal abundances and metal-mass-to-light ratios in the intracluster medium (ICM) of four galaxy groups, MKW 4, HCG 62, the NGC 1550 group, and the NGC 5044 group, out to ∼0.5 r {sub 180} observed with Suzaku. The iron abundance decreases with radius and is about 0.2-0.4 solar beyond 0.1 r {sub 180}. At a given radius in units of r {sub 180}, the iron abundance in the ICM of the four galaxy groups was consistent with or smaller than those of clusters of galaxies. The Mg/Fe and Si/Fe ratios in the ICM are nearly constant at the solar ratio out to 0.5 r {sub 180}. We also studied systematic uncertainties in the derived metal abundances, comparing the results from two versions of atomic data for astrophysicists (ATOMDB) and single- and two-temperature model fits. Since the metals have been synthesized in galaxies, we collected K-band luminosities of galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog and calculated the integrated iron-mass-to-light-ratios (IMLR), or the ratios of the iron mass in the ICM to light from stars in galaxies. The groups with smaller gas-mass-to-light ratios have smaller IMLR values and the IMLR is inversely correlated with the entropy excess. Based on these abundance features, we discussed the past history of metal enrichment processes in groups of galaxies.

  18. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  19. Fundamental parameters of FR II radio galaxies and their impact on groups and clusters' environments

    CERN Document Server

    Kapinska, Anna D

    2012-01-01

    Radio galaxies are among the largest and most powerful single objects known and are found at variety of redshifts, hence they are believed to have had a significant impact on the evolving Universe. Their relativistic jets inject considerable amounts of energy into the environments in which the sources reside; thus the knowledge of the fundamental properties (such as kinetic luminosities, lifetimes and ambient gas densities) of these sources is crucial for understanding AGN feedback in galaxy clusters. In this work, we explore the intrinsic and extrinsic fundamental properties of Fanaroff-Riley II (FR II) objects through the construction of multidimensional Monte Carlo simulations which use complete, flux limited radio catalogues and semi-analytical models of FR IIs' time evolution to create artificial samples of radio galaxies. This method allows us to set better limits on the confidence intervals of the intrinsic and extrinsic fundamental parameters and to investigate the total energy produced and injected t...

  20. Archean Age Fossils from Northwestern Australia (Approximately 3.3 to 3.5 GA, Warrawoona Group, Towers Formation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Penny A. Morris

    1999-01-01

    Archean aged rocks from the Pilbara Block area of western Australia (Warrawoona Group, Towers Formation, -3.3-3.5 Ga) contain microfossils that are composed of various sizes of spheres and filaments. The first descriptions of these microfossils were published in the late 1970's (Dunlop, 1978; Dunlop, et. al., 1978). The authenticity of the microfossils is well established. The small size of the microfossils prevents isotope dating, at least with the present technology. Microbiologists, however, have established guidelines to determine the authenticity of the Archean aged organic remains (Schopf, Walter, 1992).

  1. The bow shock, cold fronts and disintegrating cool core in the merging galaxy group RXJ0751.3+5012

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; McNamara, B R; Edge, A C; Sanders, J S; Nulsen, P E J; Baum, S A; Donahue, M; O'Dea, C P

    2014-01-01

    We present a new Chandra X-ray observation of the off-axis galaxy group merger RXJ0751.3+5012. The hot atmospheres of the two colliding groups appear highly distorted by the merger. The images reveal arc-like cold fronts around each group core, produced by the motion through the ambient medium, and the first detection of a group merger shock front. We detect a clear density and temperature jump associated with a bow shock of Mach number M=1.9+/-0.4 ahead of the northern group. Using galaxy redshifts and the shock velocity of 1100+/-300 km/s, we estimate that the merger axis is only 10deg from the plane of the sky. From the projected group separation of 90 kpc, this corresponds to a time since closest approach of 0.1 Gyr. The northern group hosts a dense, cool core with a ram pressure stripped tail of gas extending 100 kpc. The sheared sides of this tail appear distorted and broadened by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We use the presence of this substructure to place an upper limit on the magnetic field stren...

  2. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, E.; Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th; Khosroshahi, H.; Abedi, A.; Bamber, J.; Hashemi, S. A.; Nikzat, F.; Molaei Nezhad, A.

    2017-06-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss.

  3. Fundamental parameters of FR II radio galaxies and their impact on groups and clusters' environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapińska, A.D.; Uttley, P.

    2013-01-01

    Radio galaxies are among the largest and most powerful single objects known and are found at variety of redshifts, hence they are believed to have had a significant impact on the evolving Universe. Their relativistic jets inject considerable amounts of energy into the environments in which the sourc

  4. Dust In Hell: Discovery Of Dust In Hot Gas Around Group-Centered Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temi, Pasquale; Brighenti, F.; Mathews, W. G.

    2007-05-01

    Observations with the Spitzer infrared telescope reveal extended internally produced dust in the hot gas (KT 1 KeV) atmospheres surrounding two optically normal galaxies, NGC 5044 and NGC 4636. We interpret this as a dusty buoyant outflow resulting from energy released by gas accretion onto supermassive black holes in the galaxy cores. Both galaxies have highly disturbed, transient activities in the hot gas and contain strong dust emission at 70 and 160 microns in excess of what expected from normal stellar mass loss. The 70 micron image is clearly extended. The lifetime of dust in hot (KT=1KeV) interstellar gas to destruction by sputtering (ion impacts), 10 million years, establishes the time when the dust first entered the hot gas. Remarkably, in NGC 5044 we observe interstellar PAH dust-molecular emission at 8 microns out to about 5 Kpc that is spatially coincident with extended Halpha+[NII] emission from warm gas. We propose that this dust comes from the destruction and heating of dusty disks in the nuclei of these galaxies, followed by buoyant transport. A simple calculation shows that dust-assisted cooling in outflowing buoyant gas in NGC 5044 can cool the gas within a few Kpc in about 10 million years, explaining the optical line emission observed.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy groups and clouds in the local universe (Makarov+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, D.; Karachentsev, I.

    2014-10-01

    We use the HyperLEDA (Paturel et al., 2003, http://atlas.obs-hp.fr/hyperleda/) and the NED (http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu) data bases as the main sources of data on radial velocities, apparent magnitudes, morphological types and other parameters of galaxies. (1 data file).

  6. A comparison of galaxy group luminosity functions from semi-analytic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaith, Owain N.; Gibson, Brad K.; Brook, Chris B.; Courty, Stéphanie; Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia; Kawata, Daisuke; Knebe, Alexander; Sales, Laura V.

    Semi-analytic models (SAMs) are currently one of the primary tools with which we model statistically significant ensembles of galaxies. The underlying physical prescriptions inherent to each SAM are, in many cases, different from one another. Several SAMs have been applied to the dark matter merger

  7. The Araucaria Project. The distance to the Sculptor group galaxy NGC 7793 from near-infrared photometry of Cepheid variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgirski, Bartlomiej; Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Karczmarek, Paulina; Górski, Marek; Graczyk, Dariusz; Pilecki, Bogumil; Taormina, Mónica; Suchomska, Ksenia; Wielgórski, Piotr; Konorski, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    We performed deep near-infrared J and K photometry of a field in the Sculptor Group spiral galaxy NGC 7793 using ESO VLT and HAWK-I instrument. We produced a sample of 14 Cepheids whose locations and periods of pulsation were known from our previous paper on distance determination to this galaxy based on V and I bands. We determined mean J and K magnitudes based on measurements from two nights and produced period-luminosity relations for both filters. Using those near-infrared dependencies together with relations for bands V and I obtained before, we were able to obtain true distance modulus for NGC 7793. We also calculated the mean reddening affecting our Cepheids.

  8. An Extraordinary Group of 3.6micron Galaxies with Extremely Bright, Extended Far-IR Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin

    2013-08-01

    Based on WISE, Spitzer and recent Herschel far-IR data, we have discovered W0010+32, a remarkable object with extremely bright (detected by IRAS) and extended far-IR emission, coinciding with a group of 3.6micron sources with very faint optical magnitudes. The bright 70micron emission was resolved into two peaks, separated by 10arcseconds. The photo-z estimates based on optical and IR data are largely uncertain, ranging from 0.7 to >2. The bright far-IR emission from W0010+32 could either be magnified by the gravitational lensing of a foreground cluster of galaxies or is a rare case of a cluster of intrinsically luminous hyperLIRGs. Either case offers a rare window on the rapid transformation of galaxies and clusters during a short episode of the most energetic activity. To unravel the mystery of W0010+32, we request 0.5 nights of Keck I time to obtain J, H & K-band multi-object near-IR spectra using MOSFIRE. The proposed near-IR spectra will detect emission lines ! from galaxies with SFR as low as 0.4-3.4Msun/yr at z 1-2.3. This data will enable the following critical measurements: (1) redshifts of galaxies, and determine if it is indeed a group/cluster, (2) metallicities and AGN content based on emission line ratios and widths, (3) unobscured SFR based on Halpha line fluxes as well as dust extinctions based on spectral lines and continuum slopes, (4) kinematic velocity measurements with spatially and spectrally resolved emission lines (gas outflows) commonly seen among extreme starbursts.

  9. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr - II. The importance of environment in the suppression of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Ciesla, L; Diaz-Santos, T; Appleton, P; Charmandaris, V; Krongold, Y; Guillard, P; Alatalo, K; Zezas, A; Gonzalez, J; Lanz, L

    2016-01-01

    We present an in depth study on the evolution of galaxy properties in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. We are using the largest multi-wavelength sample to-date, comprised 1770 groups (containing 7417 galaxies), in the redshift range of 0.01galaxies we rely on ultraviolet (UV)-to-infrared spectral energy distribution modeling, using CIGALE. Our results suggest that during the 3 Gyr period covered by our sample, the star formation activity of galaxies in our groups has been substantially reduced (3-10 times). Moreover, their star formation histories as well as their UV-optical and mid-infrared colors are significantly different from those of field and cluster galaxies, indicating that compact group galaxies spend more time transitioning through the green valley. The morphological transformation from late-type spirals into early-type galaxies occurs in the mid-infrared transition zone rather than in the UV-optical green valley. We find evidence of shocks...

  10. Early-type galaxies at z = 1.3. I. The Lynx supercluster: cluster and groups at z=1.3. Morphology and color-magnitude relation

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Simona; Holden, Brad P; Raichoor, Anand; Postman, Marc; Nakata, Fumiaki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ford, Holland C; Illingworth, Garth D; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rosati, Piero; Tanaka, Masayuki; Huertas-Company, Marc; Rettura, Alessandro; Shankar, Francesco; Carrasco, E Rodrigo; Demarco, Ricardo; Eisenhardt, Peter; Jee, Myungkook J; Koyama, Yusei; White, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    We confirm the detection of 3 groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z~1.3, and give their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies as compared to the central clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453, selecting 89 galaxies in the clusters and 74 galaxies in the groups. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30% -40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g. based on Sersic index). In luminosity selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of Sa galaxies. The ETG fractions never rise above ~50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in clusters at z~1. However, ETG plus Sa fractions are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z~1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as Sas might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star ...

  11. Local dark energy: HST evidence from the expansion flow around Cen A/M83 galaxy group

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, A D; Makarov, D I; Kashibadze, O G; Teerikorpi, P; Valtonen, M J; Dolgachev, V P; Domozhilova, L M

    2007-01-01

    A structure with a massive group in its center and a cool expansion outflow outside is studied around the Cen A galaxy with the use of the Hubble Space Telescope observations. It is demonstrated that the dynamics of the flow is dominated by the antigravity of the dark energy background. The density of dark energy in the cell is estimated to be near the global cosmological density. This agrees with our previous result from the neighborhood of the Local group. A notion of the ``Hubble cell'' is introduced as a building block of the local structure of the universe.

  12. The High Velocity Galaxy Challenge to ΛCDM in the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indranil

    2017-06-01

    In the Local Group (LG), Andromeda (M31) is approaching the Milky Way (MW) at ˜110 km/s despite the large scale cosmic expansion. To turn it around locally to this extent, their combined mass must lie in a narrow range of values. This constrains the gravitational field in the LG as there are no other objects of similar masses. We have conducted calculations solving test particle trajectories in this gravitational field using a 2D dynamical model including Cen A and the LMC (MNRAS, 459, 2237). Although few objects have radial velocities (RVs) much below the predictions of the best-fitting model, some have RVs much above them, sometimes by as much as 100 km/s. This situation persists even when we used a 3D model including perturbers and satellites (MNRAS, 467, 2180).The observations may be explained by a past close flyby of the MW and M31, which arises in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) but not ΛCDM. In this context, a simplified calculation suggests that the recently discovered plane of satellites around the MW and a similar plane around M31 could be explained by a past MW-M31 flyby, but only if they orbit within a particular plane. We used this information in a more detailed MOND simulation of the flyby and its effect on the rest of the LG, treating it as a cloud of ˜3×105 test particles. The high speeds of the MW and M31 at pericentre allow for efficient gravitational slingshots of these particles. Those flung out to the greatest distance tend to lie very close to the MW-M31 orbital plane, probably because the greatest impulses occur for objects flung out almost parallel to the motion of the perturber.I will describe this simulation and recent work (Arxiv: 1701.06559) showing that LG dwarfs with the most anomalously high RVs (relative to our 3D model) indeed lie close to a plane oriented similarly to our expected MW-M31 orbital plane based on considering their satellite systems. This plane of distant LG dwarfs passes within 140 kpc of the MW and M31 and

  13. Pre-existing dwarfs, tidal knots and a tidal dwarf galaxy: an unbiased HI study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy group NGC 3166/9

    CERN Document Server

    Lee-Waddell, Karen; Haynes, Martha P; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Chengalur, Jayaram; Chandra, Poonam; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    We present Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) and follow-up Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI observations of the gas-rich interacting group NGC 3166/9. The sensitive ALFALFA data provide a complete census of HI-bearing systems in the group while the high-resolution GMRT data elucidate their origin, enabling one of the first unbiased physical studies of gas-rich dwarf companions and the subsequent identification of second generation, tidal dwarf galaxies in a nearby group. The ALFALFA maps reveal an extended HI envelope around the NGC 3166/9 group core, which we mosaic at higher resolution using six GMRT pointings spanning ~1 square degree. A thorough search of the GMRT datacube reveals eight low-mass objects with gas masses ranging from 4x10^7 to 3x10^8 M_sol and total dynamical masses up to 1.4x10^9 M_sol. A comparison of the HI fluxes measured from the GMRT data to those measured in the ALFALFA data suggests that a significant fraction (~60%) of the HI is smoothly distributed on scales greater than...

  14. The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) of Galaxies in Groups along the Cosmic Web. V. Properties and Frequency of Merging Satellites and Centrals in Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Pipino, A; Tacchella, S; Carollo, C M; Lilly, S J; Miniati, F; Silverman, J D; van Gorkom, J H; Finoguenov, A

    2014-01-01

    We use the Zurich ENvironmental Study (ZENS) database to investigate the dependence of the merger fraction and merging galaxy properties on environment in a sample of ~1300 group galaxies with $M>10^{9.2}$ $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.05$10^{13.5}$ $M_{\\odot}$, indicating a suppression of merger activity in massive groups. The observed dependence on halo mass is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >$10^{10.2}$ $M_{\\odot}$, most mergers are `dry' accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of the merger fraction with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of non-merging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses < $10^{10.2}$ $M_{\\odot}$ -- where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star forming systems -- close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instea...

  15. Chemo-dynamical evolution model: Enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2016-08-01

    Neutron star mergers are one of the candidate astrophysical site(s) of r-process. Several chemical evolution studies however pointed out that the observed abundance of r-process is difficult to reproduce by neutron star mergers. In this study, we aim to clarify the enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies. We carry out numerical simulations of galactic chemo-dynamical evolution using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, ASURA. We construct a chemo-dynamical evolution model for dwarf galaxies assuming that neutron star mergers are the major source of r-process elements. Our models reproduce the observed dispersion in [Eu/Fe] as a function of [Fe/H] with neutron star mergers with a merger time of 100 Myr. We find that star formation efficiency and metal mixing processes during the first <~ 300 Myr of galaxy evolution are important to reproduce the observations. This study supports that neutron star mergers are a major site of r-process.

  16. A Multi-band Photometric Study of Tidal Debris in A Compact Group of Galaxies Seyfert's Sextet

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiura, S; Murayama, T; Sato, Y; Nagao, T; Taniguchi, Y; Sanders, D B

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of the prominent tidal debris feature extending to the northeast of the compact group of galaxies Seyfert's Sextet, we analyzed multi-band (U, B, V, VR, R, I, J, H and K') photometric imaging data and obtained the following results: 1) The radial surface brightness distribution of this tidal debris in Seyfert's Sextet (TDSS) in each band appears to be well approximated by an exponential profile. 2) The observed B-V color of TDSS is similar to those of dwarf elliptical galaxies in nearby clusters. 3) Comparing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of TDSS with theoretical photometric evolution models and with the SED of the stars in the outer part of HCG 79b, we find that its SED is comparable to that of a $\\sim$ 10 Gyr-old stellar population with solar metallicity, similar to the stellar population in the outer part of HCG 79b. This suggests that TDSS consists of stars that may have been liberated from HCG 79b by strong galaxy interactions, not a pre-existing dwarf gala...

  17. Non-parametric star formation histories for 5 dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the local group

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, X; Valls-Gabaud, D; Gilmore, Gerard; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2000-01-01

    We use recent HST colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar populations of a sample of local dSph galaxies (Carina, LeoI, LeoII, Ursa Minor and Draco) to infer the star formation histories of these systems, $SFR(t)$. Applying a new variational calculus maximum likelihood method which includes a full Bayesian analysis and allows a non-parametric estimate of the function one is solving for, we infer the star formation histories of the systems studied. This method has the advantage of yielding an objective answer, as one need not assume {\\it a priori} the form of the function one is trying to recover. The results are checked independently using Saha's $W$ statistic. The total luminosities of the systems are used to normalize the results into physical units and derive SN type II rates. We derive the luminosity weighted mean star formation history of this sample of galaxies.

  18. Unveiling the Important Role of Groups in the Evolution of Massive Galaxies: Insights from an Infrared Passive Sequence at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wilman, D J; Tyler, K; McGee, S L; Oemler, A; Morris, S L; Balogh, M L; Bower, R G; Mulchaey, J S

    2008-01-01

    The most massive galaxies in the Universe are also the oldest. To overturn this apparent contradiction with hierarchical growth models, we focus on the group scale haloes which host most of these galaxies. A stellar mass selected M_* >~ 2x10^10M_sol sample at z~0.4 is constructed within the CNOC2 redshift survey. A sensitive Mid InfraRed (MIR) IRAC colour is used to isolate passive galaxies. It produces a bimodal distribution, in which passive galaxies (highlighted by morphological early-types) define a tight MIR colour sequence (Infrared Passive Sequence, IPS). This is due to stellar atmospheric emission from old stellar populations. Significantly offset from the IPS are galaxies where reemission by dust boosts emission at 8microns (InfraRed-Excess or IRE galaxies). They include all known morphological late-types. Comparison with EW[OII] shows that MIR colour is highly sensitive to low levels of activity, and allows us to separate dusty-active from passive galaxies. The fraction of IRE galaxies, f(IRE) drops...

  19. Nature of the Absorbing Gas associated with a Galaxy Group at z~0.4

    CERN Document Server

    Peroux, Celine; Quiret, Samuel; Pettini, Max; Kulkarni, Varsha P; York, Donald G; Straka, Lorrie; Husemann, Bernd; Milliard, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We present new MUSE observations of quasar field Q2131-1207 with a log N(HI)=19.50+/-0.15 sub-DLA at z_abs=0.42980. We detect four galaxies at a redshift consistent with that of the absorber where only one was known before this study. Two of these are star forming galaxies, while the ones further away from the quasar (>140 kpc) are passive galaxies. We report the metallicities of the HII regions of the closest objects (12+log(O/H)=8.98+/-0.02 and 8.32+/-0.16) to be higher or equivalent within the errors to the metallicity measured in absorption in the neutral phase of the gas (8.15+/-0.20). For the closest object, a detailed morpho-kinematic analysis indicates that it is an inclined large rotating disk with V_max=200+/-3 km/s. We measure the masses to be M_dyn=7.4+/-0.4 x 10^10 M_sun and M_halo=2.9+/-0.2 x 10^12 M_sun. Some of the gas seen in absorption is likely to be co-rotating with the halo of that object, possibly due to a warped disk. The azimuthal angle between the quasar line of sight and the projecte...

  20. Stellar population gradients from cosmological simulations: dependence on mass and environment in local galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tortora, C; Napolitano, N R; Antonuccio-Delogu, V; Meza, A; Sommer-Larsen, J; Capaccioli, M

    2010-01-01

    The age and metallicity gradients for a sample of group and cluster galaxies from N-body+hydrodynamical simulation are analyzed in terms of galaxy stellar mass. Dwarf galaxies show null age gradient with a tail of high and positive values for systems in groups and cluster outskirts. Massive systems have generally zero age gradients which turn to positive for the most massive ones. Metallicity gradients are distributed around zero in dwarf galaxies and become more negative with mass; massive galaxies have steeper negative metallicity gradients, but the trend flatten with mass. In particular, fossil groups are characterized by a tighter distribution of both age and metallicity gradients. We find a good agreement with both local observations and independent simulations. The results are also discussed in terms of the central age and metallicity, as well as the total colour, specific star formation and velocity dispersion.

  1. A Bound Violation on the Galaxy Group Scale: the Turn-Around Radius of NGC 5353/4

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The first observational evidence for the violation of the maximum turn-around radius on the galaxy group scale is presented. The NGC 5353/4 group is chosen as an ideal target of our investigation of the bound-violation because of its proximity, low-density environment, optimal mass scale, and existence of a nearby thin straight filament. Using the observational data on the line-of-sight velocities and three dimensional distances of the filament galaxies located in the bound zone of the NGC 5353/4 group, we construct their radial velocity profile as a function of separation distance from the group center and then compares it with the analytic formula obtained empirically by Falco et al. (2014) to find the best-fit value of an adjustable parameter with the help of the maximum likelihood method. The turn-around radius of NGC 5353/4 is determined as the separation distance where the adjusted analytic formula for the radial velocity profile yields zero. The estimated turn-around radius of NGC 5353/4 turns out to s...

  2. A Bound Violation on the Galaxy Group Scale: The Turn-around Radius of NGC 5353/4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghun; Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-12-01

    The first observational evidence for the violation of the maximum turn-around radius on the galaxy group scale is presented. The NGC 5353/4 group is chosen as an ideal target for our investigation of the bound-violation because of its proximity, low-density environment, optimal mass scale, and the existence of a nearby thin straight filament. Using the observational data on the line-of-sight velocities and three-dimensional distances of the filament galaxies located in the bound zone of the NGC 5353/4 group, we construct their radial velocity profile as a function of separation distance from the group center and then compare it to the analytic formula obtained empirically by Falco et al. to find the best-fit value of an adjustable parameter with the help of the maximum likelihood method. The turn-around radius of NGC 5353/4 is determined to be the separation distance where the adjusted analytic formula for the radial velocity profile yields zero. The estimated turn-around radius of NGC 5353/4 turned out to substantially exceed the upper limit predicted by the spherical model based on the ΛCDM cosmology. Even when the restrictive condition of spherical symmetry is released, the estimated value is found to be only marginally consistent with the ΛCDM expectation.

  3. Observations of environmental quenching in groups in the 11 Gyr since z=2.5: different quenching for central and satellite galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tal, Tomer; Oesch, Pascal; Muzzin, Adam; Brammer, Gabriel B; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D; Leja, Joel; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J; Patel, Shannon G; Quadri, Ryan F; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E; Wake, David A; Whitaker, Katherine E

    2014-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z~0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M=6.5x10^10 M\\solar) to nearby massive ellipticals (M=1.5x10^11 M\\solar). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M=6.5x10^9 M\\solar). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates...

  4. Reconstructing the Cosmic Velocity and Tidal Fields with Galaxy Groups Selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yang, Xiaohu; Bosch, Frank C van den

    2011-01-01

    [abridge]Cosmic velocity and tidal fields are important for the understanding of the cosmic web and the environments of galaxies, and can also be used to constrain cosmology. In this paper, we reconstruct these two fields in SDSS volume from dark matter halos represented by galaxy groups. Detailed mock catalogues are used to test the reliability of our method against uncertainties arising from redshift distortions, survey boundaries, and false identifications of groups by our group finder. We find that both the velocity and tidal fields, smoothed on a scale of ~2Mpc/h, can be reliably reconstructed in the inner region (~66%) of the survey volume. The reconstructed tidal field is used to split the cosmic web into clusters, filaments, sheets, and voids, depending on the sign of the eigenvalues of tidal tensor. The reconstructed velocity field nicely shows how the flows are diverging from the centers of voids, and converging onto clusters, while sheets and filaments have flows that are convergent along one and t...

  5. Observations of asymmetric velocity fields and gas cooling in the NGC 4636 galaxy group X-ray halo

    CERN Document Server

    Ahoranta, Jussi; Pinto, Ciro; Sanders, Jeremy; Kaastra, Jelle; de Plaa, Jelle; Fabian, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to probe the thermodynamic properties of the hot intragroup medium (IGM) plasma in the core regions of the NGC 4636 galaxy group by detailed measurements of several emission lines and their relative intensities. We analyzed deep XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) data in five adjacent spectral regions in the central parts of the NGC 4636 galaxy group. We examined the suppression of the Fe xvii resonance line (15.01 {\\AA}) as compared to the forbidden lines of the same ion (17.05 {\\AA} and 17.10 {\\AA}). The presence and radial dependence of the cooling flow was investigated through spectral modeling. In addition, a parallel analysis with deep Chandra Advances CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) data was conducted to gain additional information about the thermodynamical properties of the IGM. We find that the plasma at the group center to the north shows efficient Fe xvii ion resonant scattering, wheras no resonant scattering was detected at the south side. The regions featuring resona...

  6. A Measurement of the Galaxy Group-Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Cross-Correlation Function

    CERN Document Server

    Vikram, Vinu; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2016-01-01

    Stacking cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps around known galaxy clusters and groups provides a powerful probe of the distribution of hot gas in these systems via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. A stacking analysis allows one to detect the average SZ signal around low mass halos, and to extend measurements out to large scales, which are too faint to detect individually in the SZ or in X-ray emission. In addition, cross correlations between SZ maps and other tracers of large-scale structure (with known redshifts) can be used to extract the redshift-dependence of the SZ background. Motivated by these exciting prospects, we measure the two-point cross-correlation function between a catalog of $\\sim 380,000$ galaxy groups (with redshifts spanning $z=0.01-0.2$) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Compton-y parameter maps constructed by the Planck collaboration. We find statistically significant correlations between the group catalog and Compton-y maps in each of six separate mass bins, with estimat...

  7. First confirmed ultra-compact dwarf galaxy in the NGC 5044 group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faifer, Favio R.; Escudero, Carlos G.; Scalia, María C.; Smith Castelli, Analía V.; Norris, Mark; De Rossi, María E.; Forte, Juan C.; Cellone, Sergio A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs) are stellar systems displaying colours and metallicities between those of globular clusters (GCs) and early-type dwarf galaxies, as well as sizes of Reff ≲ 100 pc and luminosities in the range -13.5 GMOS deep images of several fields around NGC 5044 and in spectroscopic multi-object data of one of these fields, we detected an unresolved source with g' 20.6 mag, compatible with being an UCD. Its radial velocity was obtained with FXCOR and the penalized pixel-fitting (pPXF) code. To study its stellar population content, we measured the Lick/IDS indices and compared them with predictions of single stellar population models, and we used the full spectral fitting technique. Results: The spectroscopic analysis of the UCD revealed a radial velocity that agrees with the velocity of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5044. From the Lick/IDS indices, we have obtained a luminosity-weighted age and metallicity of 11.7+ 1.4-1.2 Gyr and [Z/H] = -0.79 ± 0.04 dex, respectively, as well as [α/ Fe] = 0.30 ± 0.06. From the full spectral fitting technique, we measured a lower age (8.52 Gyr) and a similar total metallicity ([Z/H] = -0.86 dex). Conclusions: Our results indicate that NGC 5044-UCD1 is most likely an extreme GC (MV -12.5 mag) belonging to the GC system of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5044.

  8. UBVI Surface Photometry of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 300 in the Sculptor Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Chul Kim; Hwankyung Sung; Hong Soo Park; Eon-Chang Sung

    2004-01-01

    We present UB Visurface photometry over a 20.5'× 20.5' area of the latetype spiral galaxy NGC 300.We have derived isophotal maps,surface brightness profiles,ellipticity profiles,position angle profiles,and color profiles.By merging ourI-band measurements with those of Boker et al.Based on Hubble Space Telescope observations,we have obtained combinedI-band surface brightness profiles for the region 0.02″< r < 500″ and have decomposed the profiles into three components:a nucleus,a bulge,and an exponential disk.

  9. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. V. PROPERTIES AND FREQUENCY OF MERGING SATELLITES AND CENTRALS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipino, A.; Cibinel, A.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-PauiI-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Silverman, J. D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Van Gorkom, J. H. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Finoguenov, A., E-mail: anna.cibinel@cea.fr [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-12-20

    We use the Zurich Environmental Study database to investigate the environmental dependence of the merger fraction Γ and merging galaxy properties in a sample of ∼1300 group galaxies with M > 10{sup 9.2} M {sub ☉} and 0.05 < z < 0.0585. In all galaxy mass bins investigated in our study, we find that Γ decreases by a factor of ∼2-3 in groups with halo masses M {sub HALO} > 10{sup 13.5} M {sub ☉} relative to less massive systems, indicating a suppression of merger activity in large potential wells. In the fiducial case of relaxed groups only, we measure a variation of ΔΓ/Δlog (M {sub HALO}) ∼ –0.07 dex{sup –1}, which is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >10{sup 10.2} M {sub ☉}, most mergers are dry accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of Γ with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high-mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of nonmerging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses of <10{sup 10.2} M {sub ☉} where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star-forming systems close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instead ∼2 × enhanced (specific) star formation rates and ∼1.5 × larger sizes than similar mass, nonmerging satellites. The increase in both size and star formation rate leads to similar surface star formation densities in the merging and control-sample satellite populations.

  10. Carbon-rich dust production in metal-poor galaxies in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, G C; Lagadec, E; van Loon, J Th; Kraemer, K E; McDonald, I; Groenewegen, M A T; Wood, P R; Bernard-Salas, J; Zijlstra, A A

    2012-01-01

    We have observed a sample of 19 carbon stars in the Sculptor, Carina, Fornax, and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra show significant quantities of dust around the carbon stars in Sculptor, Fornax, and Leo I, but little in Carina. Previous comparisons of carbon stars with similar pulsation properties in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds revealed no evidence that metallicity affected the production of dust by carbon stars. However, the more metal-poor stars in the current sample appear to be generating less dust. These data extend two known trends to lower metallicities. In more metal-poor samples, the SiC dust emission weakens, while the acetylene absorption strengthens. The bolometric magnitudes and infrared spectral properties of the carbon stars in Fornax are consistent with metallicities more similar to carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds than in the other dwarf spheroidals in our sample. A study of the carbon budget in these sta...

  11. The Oldest Stars of the Extremely Metal-Poor Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy Leo A

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte-Ladbeck, R E; Drozdovsky, I O; Greggio, L; Crone, M M; Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Hopp, Ulrich; Drozdovsky, Igor O.; Greggio, Laura; Crone, Mary M.

    2002-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope single-star photometry of Leo A in B, V, and I. Our new field of view is offset from the centrally located field observed by Tolstoy et al. (1998) in order to expose the halo population of this galaxy. We report the detection of metal-poor red horizontal branch stars, which demonstrate that Leo A is not a young galaxy. In fact, Leo A is as least as old as metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters which exhibit red horizontal branches, and are considered to have a minimum age of about 9 Gyr. We discuss the distance to Leo A, and perform an extensive comparison of the data with stellar isochrones. For a distance modulus of 24.5, the data are better than 50% complete down to absolute magnitudes of 2 or more. We can easily identify stars with metallicities between 0.0001 and 0.0004, and ages between about 5 and 10 Gyr, in their post-main-sequence phases, but lack the detection of main-sequence turnoffs which would provide unambiguous proof of ancient (>10 Gyr) stellar generation...

  12. H0LiCOW II. Spectroscopic survey and galaxy-group identification of the strong gravitational lens system HE0435-1223

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D; Rumbaugh, N; Rusu, C E; Fassnacht, C D; Treu, T; Suyu, S H; Wong, K C; Auger, M W; Bonvin, V; Collett, T; Courbin, F; Hilbert, S; Koopmans, L V E; Marshall, P J; Meylan, G; Spiniello, C; Tewes, M

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies located in the environment or on the line of sight towards gravitational lenses can significantly affect lensing observables, and can lead to systematic errors on the measurement of $H_0$ from the time-delay technique. We present the results of a systematic spectroscopic identification of the galaxies in the field of view of the lensed quasar HE0435-1223, using the W. M. Keck, Gemini and ESO-Very Large telescopes. Our new catalog triples the number of known galaxy redshifts in the vicinity of the lens, expanding to 100 the number of measured redshifts for galaxies separated by less than 3 arcmin from the lens. We complement our catalog with literature data to gather redshifts up to 15 arcmin from the lens, and search for galaxy groups or cluster projected towards HE0435-1223. We confirm that the lens is a member of a small group that includes at least 12 galaxies, and find 8 other group candidates near the line of sight of the lens. The flexion shift, namely the shift of lensed images produced by hig...

  13. The Effect of Environment on the Formation of Halpha Filaments and Cool Cores in Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a combined X-ray and Halpha study of 10 galaxy groups and 17 galaxy clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter. We find no difference in the morphology or detection frequency of Halpha filaments in groups versus clusters, over the mass range 10^13 < M_500 < 10^15 Msun. The detection frequency of Halpha emission is shown to be only weakly dependent on the total mass of the system, at the 52% confidence level. In contrast, we find that the presence of Halpha filaments is strongly correlated with both the global (89% confidence level) and core (84%) ICM entropy, as well as the X-ray cooling rate (72%). The Halpha filaments are therefore an excellent proxy for the cooling ICM. The Halpha filaments are more strongly correlated with the cooling properties of the ICM than with the radio properties of the BCG; this further supports the scenario where these filaments are directly associated with a thermally-unstable, rapidly cooling ICM, rather...

  14. A Very Deep Chandra Observation of the Galaxy Group NGC 5813: AGN Shocks, Feedback, and Outburst History

    CERN Document Server

    Randall, S