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Sample records for fort sill tribal

  1. 77 FR 74870 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army, Fort Sill Museum, Fort Sill, OK...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ..., Fort Sill, OK, and Museum of the Great Plains, Lawton, OK AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence, Fort Sill, OK 73503... Great Plains. The human remains were removed from Fort Sill, Comanche County, OK. This notice is...

  2. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Brian K.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Sill, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Sill took place on June 10, 2010.

  3. Implementation of resource recovery guidelines at Fort Meade, Fort Lewis, and Fort Sill. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donahue, B.A.; Kraybill, D.D.; Mitchell, G.; Smith, M.; Deminco, P.

    1979-07-01

    This report documents the attempt to implement requirements of the 'Source Separation for Materials Recovery Guidelines' at Fort Meade, MD. These guidelines, one of six U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Solid Waste Management Guidelines, are primarily concerned with the source separation of high-grade paper, newspaper, and corrugated paper. The information obtained from the implementation at Fort Meade was compared with voluntary recycling programs at Fort Sill, OK, and Fort Lewis, WA. Extensive economic analysis at Fort Meade indicated that 'full' implementation of the program for cardboard at points of high generation was deemed economically feasible. The investigations at Fort Sill and Fort Lewis indicated that two key items are essential for successfully implementing voluntary resource recovery programs at installations: (1) interest in and understanding of the program by installation personnel at a meaningful level, and (2) public interest and motivation, maintained through an innovative incentive program. Another reason the programs at Forts Sill and Lewis were successful was because the labor was voluntary.

  4. 77 FR 57112 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army, Fort Sill Museum, Lawton, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... representatives of Fort Sill. Following the excavation, Dr. Clyde Snow, Chief of the Physical Anthropology Section... to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of...

  5. An annotated list of aquatic insects of Fort Sill, Oklahoma, excluding diptera with notes on several new state records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuellig, R.E.; Kondratieff, B.C.; Schmidt, J.P.; Durfee, R.S.; Ruiter, D.E.; Prather, I.E.

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative collections of aquatic insects were made at Fort Sill, Lawton, Oklahoma, between 2002 and 2004. Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera, Odonata, Coleoptera, aquatic Heteroptera, Neuroptera, and Megaloptera were targeted. Additional records are included from a survey that took place in 1999. More than 11,000 specimens from more than 290 collections were examined. Based on the current understanding of aquatic insect systematics, 276 taxa distributed over 8 orders, 46 families, and 141 genera were identified. Twenty-three of the 276 taxa, Plauditus texanus Wiersema, Tricorythodes allectus (Needham), Palmacorixa nana walleyi Hungerford, Climacia chapini Partin and Gurney, Oxyethira forcipata Mosely, Oxyethira janella Denning, Triaenodes helo Milne, Ylodes frontalis (Banks), Acilius fraternus Harris, Coptotomus loticus Hilsenhoff, Coptotomus venustus (Say), Desmopachria dispersa Crotch, Graphoderus liberus (Say), Hydrovatus pustulatus (Melsheimer), Hygrotus acaroides (LeConte), Liodessus flavicollis (LeConte), Uvarus texanus (Sharp), Gyrinus woodruffi Fall, Haliplus fasciatus Aube, Haliplus lewisii Crotch, Haliplus tortilipenis Brigham & Sanderson, Chaetarthria bicolor Sharp, Epimetopus costatus complex, and Hydrochus simplex LeConte are reported from Oklahoma for the first time. The three most diverse orders included Coleoptera (86 species), Odonata (67 species) and Trichoptera (59 species), and the remaining taxa were distributed among Heteroptera, (30 species), Ephemeroptera (21 species), Plecoptera (6 species), Megaloptera (4 species), and Neuroptera (3 species). Based on previous published records, many of the species collected during this study were expected to be found at Fort Sill; however, 276 taxa of aquatic insects identified from such a small geographic area is noteworthy, especially when considering local climatic conditions and the relatively small size of Fort Sill (38,300 ha). Despite agricultural practices in Oklahoma, the dust bowl days

  6. National Training Center - Fort Irwin, California. Tribal Consultations Held on 3-5 September 2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Britt, Tad

    2003-01-01

    .... The purpose of the consultation was to establish an open and constructive dialogue between the U.S. Army and those Native American tribes who have cultural resource interests at NTC-Fort Irwin...

  7. Tribal lands provide forest management laboratory for mainstream university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra J. Hoagland; Ronald Miller; Kristen M. Waring; Orlando Carroll

    2017-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) faculty and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) foresters initiated a partnership to expose NAU School of Forestry (SoF) graduate students to tribal forest management practices by incorporating field trips to the 1.68-million acre Fort Apache Indian Reservation as part of their silviculture curriculum. Tribal field trips were contrasted and...

  8. 49 CFR 231.8 - Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clearance, within 30 inches of side of car, until car is shopped for work amounting to practically... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with... APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.8 Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end...

  9. Evolution of late stage differentiates in the Palisades Sill, New York and New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Karin A.; Steiner, Jeffrey C.; Puffer, John H.; Jones, Kevin M.; Goldstein, Steven L.

    2015-08-01

    The Palisades Sill at Upper Nyack, NY contains evolved rocks that crystallized as ferrodiabase and ferrogranophyre and occupy 50% to 60% of the local thickness. 143Nd/144Nd isotope values for rocks representing Palisades diversity range between 0.512320 and 0.512331, and indicate a homogeneous source for the Palisades and little or no contamination from shallow crustal sediments. Petrographic analysis of ferrodiabase suggests that strong iron enrichment was the result of prolonged quiescence in cycles of magmatic input. Ferrogranophyres in the updip northern Palisades at Upper Nyack are members of a suite of cogenetic rocks with similar composition to 'sandwich horizon' rocks of the southern Palisades at Fort Lee, NJ, but display distinct mineralogical and textural features. Differences in textural and mineralogical features are attributed to a) updip (lateral) migration of residual liquid as the sill propagated closer to the surface; b) deformation caused by tectonic shifts; and c) crystallization in the presence of deuteric hydrothermal fluids resulting in varying degrees of alteration. A model connecting multiple magmatic pulses, compaction and mobilization of residual liquid by compositional convection, closed-system differentiation, synchronous with tapping of the sill for extrusion of coeval basaltic subaerial flows is presented. The persistence of a low-temperature mushy layer, represented by ferrogranophyres, supports the possibility of a long-lived conduit subject to reopening after periods of quiescence in magmatic input, leading to the extrusion of the multiple flows of the Orange Mountain Basalt and perhaps even subsequent Preakness Basalt flows, depending on solidification conditions. A sub-Newark Basin network of sills subjected to similar protracted input of pulses as hypothesized for the Palisades was likely responsible for 600 ka of magmatic activity required to emplace a third set of Watchung flood basalts, the Hook Mountain Basalt.

  10. Fort Monroe Historic Viewsheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    fort, date unknown (NARA College Park). ................................ 49 Figure 35. Diagram of Fort Monroe (Fort Monroe Cultural Resources...oysters, deer, gulf periwinkle, soft-shell clam, raccoon, beaver, and opossum. Floral material recovered includes hickory nuts and acorns.7 Woodland...Figure 35. Diagram of Fort Monroe (Fort Monroe Cultural Resources). ERDC/CERL SR-10-9 52 Fort Monroe Historic Viewshed Report This page left

  11. Sills of the San Rafael Volcanic Field, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial populations, such as Mexico City, Auckland, and Portland, are built within or near monogenetic fields, so it is important to understand both eruption precursors and magma plumbing systems in such areas. Directly observing the plumbing systems of this rarely witnessed eruption style provides valuable insight into the nature of magmatic transport and storage within the shallow crust, as well as the associated monogenetic eruptive processes. Within the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah is an exposed Pliocene complex of approximately 2000 mapped dikes, 12 sills, and 60 conduits eroded to a depth of 800 m below the paleosurface. A combination of airborne LiDAR (ALS), provided by NCALM, and terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) surveys are used to map the dip of 5 major sills within a 35 sq km area. The ALS provides a 1 m aerial resolution of exposed volcanic features and the TLS gives vertical measurements to cm accuracy. From these data we determine that the 5-25 m thick sills in this area dip approximately 1 to 6 degrees. Field observations show that steps in sills and related fabrics indicate flow direction in sills during emplacement and that sills normally propagate down dip in the Entrada sandstone host rock away from apparent feeder dikes and conduits. Some sills have foundered roofs, especially near conduits, suggesting that nearly neutrally buoyant magmas emplaced into sills along bed partings in the Entrada, differentiated, and in some cases flowed back into conduits. By volume, at 800 m depth in the San Rafael, nearly all igneous rock (approximately 90 percent) is located in sills rather than in dikes or conduits. These observations are consistent with geochemical models that suggest differentiation in shallow sills explains geochemical trends observed in single monogenetic volcanoes in some active fields. Deformation associated with sill inflation and deflation may be a significant precursor to eruptive activity in monogenetic volcanic fields.

  12. Tribal Science Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribal Science Council is a forum for interaction between Tribal and Agency representatives to work collaboratively on environmental science issues. It is committed to the development of sound scientific approaches to meet the needs of Tribes.

  13. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  14. Tribal Green Building Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Toolkit (Toolkit) is designed to help tribal officials, community members, planners, developers, and architects develop and adopt building codes to support green building practices. Anyone can use this toolkit!

  15. DISSOLVED METHANE IN THE SILLS AREA, GULF OF CALIFORNIA, MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    The northern part of the Gulf of California is physically separated from the rest of the Gulf by a series of sills and islands. Its waters are highly productive as several water masses interact with each other at the sills. One of the characteristics in the area is the presence o...

  16. 49 CFR 231.9 - Tank cars without end sills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clearance, within 30 inches of side of car, until car is shopped for work amounting to practically... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars without end sills. 231.9 Section 231.9..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.9 Tank cars without end sills. (a...

  17. 3 CFR - Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Recommendations for improving the plans and making the tribal consultation process more effective, if any, should... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tribal Consultation Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of November 5, 2009 Tribal Consultation Memorandum for the Heads of Executive...

  18. Controls on sill and dyke-sill hybrid geometry and propagation in the crust: The role of fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, J. L.; Rogers, B. D.; Boutelier, D.; Cruden, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    Analogue experiments using gelatine were carried out to investigate the role of the mechanical properties of rock layers and their bonded interfaces on the formation and propagation of magma-filled fractures in the crust. Water was injected at controlled flux through the base of a clear-Perspex tank into superposed and variably bonded layers of solidified gelatine. Experimental dykes and sills were formed, as well as dyke-sill hybrid structures where the ascending dyke crosses the interface between layers but also intrudes it to form a sill. Stress evolution in the gelatine was visualised using polarised light as the intrusions grew, and its evolving strain was measured using digital image correlation (DIC). During the formation of dyke-sill hybrids there are notable decreases in stress and strain near the dyke as sills form, which is attributed to a pressure decrease within the intrusive network. Additional fluid is extracted from the open dykes to help grow the sills, causing the dyke protrusion in the overlying layer to be almost completely drained. Scaling laws and the geometry of the propagating sill suggest sill growth into the interface was toughness-dominated rather than viscosity-dominated. We define KIc* as the fracture toughness of the interface between layers relative to the lower gelatine layer KIcInt / KIcG. Our results show that KIc* influences the type of intrusion formed (dyke, sill or hybrid), and the magnitude of KIcInt impacted the growth rate of the sills. KIcInt was determined during setup of the experiment by controlling the temperature of the upper layer Tm when it was poured into place, with Tm intermediate hybrid structures.

  19. Non-hydrostatic layered flows over a sill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Mirmosadegh, E-mail: jamali@sharif.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    This work takes a new approach to solving non-hydrostatic equations of layered flows over bottom topography. A perturbation technique is used to find explicit expressions for a flow for different regimes of single- and two-layer flows over a sill. Excellent agreement with previous solutions and experimental data is obtained, and more details of the non-hydrostatic flow over a sill are revealed. The proposed method is simple and compact and removes the need for complex numerical techniques to solve the non-hydrostatic equations. It is shown that in the approach-controlled regime of two-layer flow over a sill, the flow upstream and farther downstream the sill crest can be described by the hydrostatic theory, and the flow is non-hydrostatic over only a short distance on the downstream side of the crest. (paper)

  20. Non-hydrostatic layered flows over a sill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamali, Mirmosadegh

    2013-01-01

    This work takes a new approach to solving non-hydrostatic equations of layered flows over bottom topography. A perturbation technique is used to find explicit expressions for a flow for different regimes of single- and two-layer flows over a sill. Excellent agreement with previous solutions and experimental data is obtained, and more details of the non-hydrostatic flow over a sill are revealed. The proposed method is simple and compact and removes the need for complex numerical techniques to solve the non-hydrostatic equations. It is shown that in the approach-controlled regime of two-layer flow over a sill, the flow upstream and farther downstream the sill crest can be described by the hydrostatic theory, and the flow is non-hydrostatic over only a short distance on the downstream side of the crest. (paper)

  1. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  2. The role of igneous sills in shaping the Martian uplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelms, D. E.; Baldwin, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Relations among geologic units and landforms suggest that igneous sills lie beneath much of the intercrater and intracrater terrain of the Martian uplands. The igneous rocks crop out along the upland-lowland front and in crater floors and other depressions that are low enough to intersect the sill's intrusion horizons. It is suggested that heat from the cooling sills melted some of the ice contained in overlying fragmental deposits, creating valley networks by subsurface flow of the meltwater. Terrains with undulatory, smooth surfaces and softened traces of valleys were created by more direct contact with the sills. Widespread subsidence following emplacement of the sills deformed both them and the nonvolcanic deposits that overlie them, accounting for the many structures that continue from ridged plains into the hilly uplands. Crater counts show that the deposit that became valleyed, softened, and ridged probably began to form (and to acquire interstitial ice) during or shortly after the Middle Noachian Epoch, and continued to form as late as the Early Hesperian Epoch. The upper layers of this deposit, many of the visible valleys, and the ridged plains and postulated sills all have similar Early Hesperian ages. Continued formation of valleys is indicated by their incision of fresh-appearing crater ejecta. The dependence of valley formation on internal processes implies that Mars did not necessarily have a dense early atmosphere or warm climate.

  3. Single incision laparoscopic liver resection (SILL – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzing, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, minimally invasive liver resections for both benign and malignant tumors are routinely performed. Recently, some authors have described single incision laparoscopic liver resection (SILL procedures. Since SILL is a relatively young branch of laparoscopy, we performed a systematic review of the current literature to collect data on feasibility, perioperative results and oncological outcome.Methods: A literature research was performed on Medline for all studies that met the eligibility criteria. Titles and abstracts were screened by two authors independently. A study was included for review if consensus was obtained by discussion between the authors on the basis of predefined inclusion criteria. A thorough quality assessment of all included studies was performed. Data were analyzed and tabulated according to predefined outcome measures. Synthesis of the results was achieved by narrative review. Results: A total of 15 eligible studies were identified among which there was one prospective cohort study and one randomized controlled trial comparing SILL to multi incision laparoscopic liver resection (MILL. The rest were retrospective case series with a maximum of 24 patients. All studies demonstrated convincing results with regards to feasibility, morbidity and mortality. The rate of wound complications and incisional hernia was low. The cosmetic results were good.Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on SILL including prospective trials. The results of the existing studies reporting on SILL are favorable. However, a large body of scientific evidence on the field of SILL is missing, further randomized controlled studies are urgently needed.

  4. 76 FR 72969 - Proclaiming Certain Lands as Reservation for the Fort Sill Apache Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Affairs, Division of Real Estate Services, Mail Stop-4639-MIB, 1849 C Street NW., Washington, DC 20240... right-of-way, Township Twenty-four (24) south, Range Six (6) west, N.M.P.M., Luna County, New Mexico... this tract and on the North boundary of the Interstate 10 right-of-way; Thence adjoining the North...

  5. A Study of Health Record Control at Reynolds Army Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    other medical and surgical procedures appear on the walls of Paleolithic caverns of Spain that date back to about 25,000 B.C.1 Although these archaic...record revealed that they were more careful in taking medications, made improvements in their diets , stopped smoking and had fewer worries about their...Pod 19 Mar TMC 3 30 Apr Surg 6 Apr RAH 29 Apr Eye 27 Apr Audio Cl 27 Apr Hosp 27 Nov Diet Cl 23 Apr F.P. 18 Apr Ortho/Pod 30 Apr Pod 26 Apr RAN 30 Apr

  6. Experimental Modeling of the Formation of Saucer-Shaped sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Many magma intrusions in sedimentary basins are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features are observed in many places (i.e. South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; Siberia; Argentina). Sand injectites exhibit similar geometries. The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes in sedimentary basins. To understand such processes, we performed experimental modeling of saucer-shaped sill emplacement. The experiments consist of injecting a molten low viscosity vegetable oil (model magma) at a constant flow rate into a fine-grained Coulomb silica flour (model rock). When the oil starts intruding, the initially flat surface of the model inflates and forms a smooth dome. At the end of the experiment, the oil erupts at the edge of the dome. After the experiment, the oil cools and solidifies, the resulting solid intrusion is unburied and exposed, and its upper surface digitalized. For our purpose, we did our experiments without external deformation. We performed two series of experiments with varying depth of injection. The first series consisted of injection into a homogeneous medium. The resulting intrusions were cone-sheets and dykes. The second series consisted of heterogeneous models where the heterogeneity was a weak layer made of a flexible net. The resulting intrusions were made of (1) a horizontal basal sill emplaced along the weakness, and (2) inclined sheets nucleating at the edges of the basal sill and propagating upward and outward. The inclined sheets exhibited a convex shape, i.e. a decreasing slope outward. In addition, the deeper the sills emplaced, the larger they were. Our experimental results are consistent with saucer-shaped features in nature. We infer from our results that the transition between the basal sills and the inclined sheets results from a transition of emplacement processes. We suggest that the basal sill emplace by open (mode I) fracturing, whereas

  7. ACF Tribal Consultation Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The purpose of the ACF Tribal Consultation Policy is to build meaningful relationships with federally recognized tribes by engaging in open, continuous, and...

  8. Greening Existing Tribal Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance about improving sustainability in existing tribal casinos and manufactured homes. Many steps can be taken to make existing buildings greener and healthier. They may also reduce utility and medical costs.

  9. Tribal Consultation Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The consultation-related information the AIEO Consultation Team working with our Tribal Portal contractors has developed a Lotus Notes Database that is capable of...

  10. Temperature profile around a basaltic sill intruded into wet sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Leslie; Bernard, Andrew; Rember, William C.; Milazzo, Moses; Dundas, Colin M.; Abramov, Oleg; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of heat into wet sediments from magmatic intrusions or lava flows is not well constrained from field data. Such field constraints on numerical models of heat transfer could significantly improve our understanding of water–lava interactions. We use experimentally calibrated pollen darkening to measure the temperature profile around a basaltic sill emplaced into wet lakebed sediments. It is well known that, upon heating, initially transparent palynomorphs darken progressively through golden, brown, and black shades before being destroyed; however, this approach to measuring temperature has not been applied to volcanological questions. We collected sediment samples from established Miocene fossil localities at Clarkia, Idaho. Fossils in the sediments include pollen from numerous tree and shrub species. We experimentally calibrated changes in the color of Clarkia sediment pollen and used this calibration to determine sediment temperatures around a Miocene basaltic sill emplaced in the sediments. Results indicated a flat temperature profile above and below the sill, with T > 325 °C within 1 cm of the basalt-sediment contact, near 300 °C at 1–2 cm from the contact, and ~ 250 °C at 1 m from the sill contact. This profile suggests that heat transport in the sediments was hydrothermally rather than conductively controlled. This information will be used to test numerical models of heat transfer in wet sediments on Earth and Mars.

  11. Electricity Generation from Geothermal Resources on the Fort Peck Reservation in Northeast Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Garry J. [Gradient Geophysics Inc., Missoula, MT (United States); Birkby, Jeff [Birkby Consulting LLC, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Tribal lands owned by Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, located in Northeastern Montana, overlie large volumes of deep, hot, saline water. Our study area included all the Fort Peck Reservation occupying roughly 1,456 sq miles. The geothermal water present in the Fort Peck Reservation is located in the western part of the Williston Basin in the Madison Group complex ranging in depths of 5500 to 7500 feet. Although no surface hot springs exist on the Reservation, water temperatures within oil wells that intercept these geothermal resources in the Madison Formation range from 150 to 278 degrees F.

  12. Reprocessing seismic data: better results below diabase sills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makler, Marisa [Halliburton Servicos Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pellizzon, Marcela

    2008-07-01

    The effect of the diabase sills in the seismic data processing has been studied in the last twenty years. These rocks strongly influence the exploratory activities in a basin, because the diabase disturbs the sign and generates multiple and spherical divergence, increasing the exploratory risk in these areas. In the present work a method of 2D seismic reprocessing will be presented using Prestack Kirchhoff Time Migration in an older seismic data of Solimoes basin. The objective of this paper is to show the high results on the reprocessing seismic data below the diabase sills. The 2D lines processed give relevant improvement of the quality of signal, showing better the faults zones and preserving the geological structures than the older data. (author)

  13. SILL HILL, HAUSER, AND CALIENTE ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Victoria R.; Peters, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    Probable resource potential for metallic minerals and gemstones was identified during mineral-resource surveys in the Sill Hill, Hauser, and Caliente Roadless Areas, California. Parts of the Sill Hill Roadless Area have a probable potential for gold, tungsten, and nickel and by-product copper. Part of the Caliente Roadless Area has a probable potential for tourmaline, beryl, quartz, and possibly other specimen minerals and gemstones. No mineral-resource potential was identified in the Hauser Roadless Area, although potash feldspar is abundant as a rock-forming constituent in two parts of the area. The Caliente Roadless Area lies less than 1 mi from an area of hot springs activity which may be part of a low-grade geothermal resource area, but no geothermal resource potential was identified in this or any of the other areas. No resource potential for nuclear energy was identified in this study and the geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of hydrocarbon resources.

  14. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon

  15. Fortæller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    Siden Gerard Genettes ”Discours du récit” (1972) er distinktionen mellem hvem, der taler, og hvem, der ser, blevet cementeret som et grundparadigme i narratologien og litteraturteorien. Genettes pointe var, at den etablerede narrative teori – som fx Wayne C. Booths The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961...... narratologi blevet forsøgt udfordret, enten fordi det hævdes, at en tekst ikke nødvendigvis er udstyret med en fortæller, eller fordi begrebet om fortæller antages at bero på en misvisende og reduktiv antropomorficering. Eller omvendt fordi der i Genettes begrebsdannelse ligger en forkastelse af...... forestillingen om en implicit forfatter (implied author) og dermed også en afvisning af en upålidelige fortæller. Kapitlet præsenterer begreberne fortæller og synsvinkel i narratologien med afsæt i Genettes bestemmelser og diskutere de problemer, der opstår i kølvandet herpå. Det være sig både de rent...

  16. Deformation of poorly consolidated sediment during shallow emplacement of a basalt sill, Coso Range, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, W.A.; Bacon, C.R.; Delaney, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    A 150-m-long, wedge-shaped unit of folded and faulted marly siltstone crops out between undeformed sedimentary rocks on the north flank of the Coso Range, California. The several-meter-thick blunt end of this wedge abuts the north margin of a basaltic sill of comparable thickness. Chaotically deformed siltstone crops out locally at the margin of this sill, and at one locality breccia pipes about one meter in diameter crosscut the sill. The sill extends about 1 km south up the paleoslope, where it merges through continuous outcrop with a lava flow that in turn extends 1.4 km to a vent area marked by more than 100 m of agglutinate and scoria. Apparently, lava extruded at this vent flowed onto unconsolidated sediments, burrowed into them, and fed a sill at about 40 m depth within the sedimentary sequence. The sill initially propagated by wedging between sedimentary beds, but eventually began to push some beds ahead of itself, forming a remarkable train of folds in the process. The sediments apparently were wet at the time of sill emplacement, because hydrothermal alteration is common near the contact between the two rock types and because the breccia pipes that crosscut the sill apparently resulted from phreatic explosions of pore water heated at the base of the cooling sill. Comparison of deformation of the host material at the Coso locality with that reportedly caused by emplacement of sills elsewhere indicates that the character of deformation differs greatly among the various localities. The specific response of host material depends upon such parameters as initial properties of magma and host material, rate of sill growth and attendant rate of strain of host material, and depth of sill emplacement. Some properties may change considerably during an intrusive-deformational episode, thus complicating accurate reconstruction of such an event. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Tribal organizations and energy development: Recognized sovereignty, regulations, and planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Amy James

    Tribal governments' capacity to implement land use controls within their Nations is limited by the United States Constitution and federal law; however, tribal governments have inherent sovereignty to protect, guide, and govern the lands under their jurisdiction to protect and enhance the safety, health, and welfare of their members. The aim of this thesis was to investigate and identify (1) the extent to which tribal Nations have sovereignty over their lands and authority to regulate land use within their jurisdiction and (2) the present status and extent to which Native American tribal governments use their sovereignty over land use development concerning oil and natural gas development within their jurisdiction. The study was qualitative in nature and focused on a comprehensive archival review and a one-case case study. Constitutional law, federal Indian law, environmental law, and tribal law were considered. The thesis first examines the results of the archival review, which demonstrates that tribes, while limited by federal law, have sovereignty and authority to control land use within their territories. The Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation were also examined. The Tribes were chosen based on location, level of oil and natural gas production, and accessibility of information. The most current information available was used for the study. The data for the study was obtained from the Internet. The research suggests that tribes are implementing land use controls and participating in land use and comprehensive planning; however, they are not doing so to the extent of their sovereignty. This study demonstrates that tribal governments do indeed have authority over their lands and resources and cannot fully take advantage of their sovereignty without practicing self-governance over their natural, built, and human environments. Questions remain regarding the reasons that tribal governments are not implementing land use controls and engaging in

  18. Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadzow, Janet [Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich' in Tribal Government, Fort Yukon, AK (United States); Messier, Dave [Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich' in Tribal Government, Fort Yukon, AK (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich’in Tribal Government (GZGTG) applied for funding in 2014 under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Deployment of Clean Energy on Tribal Lands funding opportunity. They were awarded 50% of the project costs for the construction of an 18kW, grid-tied solar PV array on the fort Yukon Tribal Hall, the construction of a 3kW solar PV array on the tribally owned greenhouse, the replacement of inefficient florescent lighting fixtures in the tribal hall to higher efficiency LED lights and the addition of blow in cellulose insulation to the attic of the tribal hall to assist with heat retention. Total DOE Funding for the project was $124,735. Total GZGTG funding for the project was $133,321 for a total project cost of $258,056. The Project was completed with 100% local labor on the tribal hall solar PV installation, the LED lighting retrofit and the insulation on the tribal hall. Based on the results at the tribal hall/office, the tribe also used their own tribal funding to retrofit the lighting in the community hall from florescent to LED lights. The resulting project was completed by the end of Sept 2016 and results have shown a decrease in fuel used at the tribal hall/office of 35% and a decrease in electric costs at the tribal hall of 68%. The total energy costs before the project were approximately $28,000 a year and the energy equivalent of 385 MMBTU/yr. After the project the total energy costs decreased to $11,200/yr. and an energy equivalent of only 242 MMBTU. This represents an overall decrease in energy use of 38%. All in all the tribe and the community regard this project as a huge success!

  19. The impact of the Suwannee River Sill on the surface hydrology of Okefenokee Swamp, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhi-Yong; Brook, George A.

    1992-08-01

    Okefenokee Swamp, located in southeastern Georgia and northeastern Florida, is one of the largest freshwater wetland complexes and a National Wildlife Refuge in the United States. A low earthen dam, the Suwannee River Sill, was built on the largest outlet stream of Okefenokee Swamp in the early 1960s. The purpose was to raise the water level and thus reduce fire frequency in this National Wildlife Refuge. In this study, hydrologic conditions in the swamp prior to (1937-1962) and after (1963-1986) sill construction were compared by statistical procedures. An average 9 cm increase in swamp water level at the Suwannee Canal Recreation Area was attributed to the sill. Increased precipitation and decreased evapotranspiration during the study period caused another 5 cm increase in water levels. Seasonal changes in climatic factors were also responsible for seasonal changes in water levels and streamflow in the pre- and post-sill periods. Although the effect of the sill on water level was more significant during dry periods, it is doubtful that the Suwannee River Sill actually prevented occurrence of severe fibres in the post-sill period, which was wetter than the period before sill construction. The sill diverted 2.6% of swamp outflow from the Suwannee River to the St. Mary's River. Diversion of flow was more marked during low flow periods. Therefore, the discharge of the St. Mary's River in the post-sill increased more than the discharge of the Suwannee River and its variability became lower that of the Suwannee River. The relationships between swamp water level, streamflow and precipitation were also changed due to construction of the sill.

  20. Sill and lava geochemistry of the mid-Norway and NE Greenland conjugate margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Else-Ragnhild; Svensen, Henrik; Tegner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents major, trace-elements, and Sr-Nd isotopes for two prominent sills formed during the opening of the North Atlantic, sampled by the Utgard borehole (6607/5-2) in the VOring Plateau. The Utgard sills are compared to opening-related lavas recovered from ODP Leg 104 Hole 642E farth...

  1. Magnetic fabric of saucer-shaped sills in the Karoo Large Igneous Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polteau, S.; Ferre, E. C.; Planke, S.; Neumann, E.; Chevallier, L.

    2007-12-01

    Magmatic sill intrusions commonly exhibit a saucer geometry in undeformed sedimentary basins and volcanic rifted margins. Current emplacement models are based on the analysis of the intrusion geometry and their spatial relationships with potential feeders, not on the knowledge of the magma flow geometry. The Karoo Basin of South Africa hosts hundreds of saucer-shaped sills. Amongst these, the Golden Valley Sill is well-exposed and displays the connections with adjacent and nested saucers. A combination of detailed fieldwork observations and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to identify strain markers that can be interpreted in terms of magma flow directions. A total of 113 localities (6 specimens/site), mostly including opposite sill margins, have been sampled for anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analyses. The magnetic properties were defined by measuring hysteresis cycles and K-T curves on 34 and 19 specimens, respectively. The majority of the localities display well-defined magnetic foliations that consistently dip outward from the centre of the Golden Valley Sill. This orientation of the magnetic foliation most likely represents inflation/deflation cycles of the intruding sill that interacts with non-static enclosing walls. In addition, four magma channels were identified and display an imbrication of the magnetic foliation that indicates an outward magma flow direction. In conclusion, the observed magma flow geometries derived from macroscopic flow indicators and the AMS data correlate well and are used to constrain an emplacement model for the Golden Valley Sill Complex. Finally, the emplacement model of sill complexes repeats the cycle -injection of magma - formation of a saucer-shaped sill - pressure build up - fracturation and pressure drop - channeling of magma - injection of (new batch of) magma - formation of a new saucer-shaped sill- until the magma supply stops.

  2. Young Saucer-Shaped Sills Within Rapidly Accumulated Sediments of the Central Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluesner, J.; Lonsdale, P.

    2008-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic reflection profiles collected recently in the central Gulf of California display saucer- shaped igneous sills and associated overburden deformations, associated fluid migration pathways, and possible feeder networks; many sills 1-2 km in diameter have a characteristic concave-upwards profile. The shallow intrusions occur (I) within sediment ponded in the axial troughs of the oceanic Guaymas, Carmen, and Farallon Basins, (II) off-axis in the basin floors, and (III) within the sediment cover of subsided continental crust at the basin margins. In all three settings, some of the sills are very young, uplifting the present seafloor and disrupting turbidite deposition patterns creating onlap of the youngest strata. Seismic 'chimneys' or 'pipes' leading up from the inclined tips of the sills are probably fluid or gas migration pathways away from the super-heated magma-sediment contact zone. Directly above the sills, low-amplitude seismic zones may be lenses of homogenized sediments or gas filled, highly fractured cavities. Semblance velocity analysis of these blank zones shows a substantial decrease in stacking velocities (~1375 m/s), supporting the lower-velocity gas-filled hypothesis. The seismic profiles also reveal sub-vertical, cross-cutting reflectors below the sills. These features differ from seismic artifacts and sideswips, in that they do not resemble the unique diffractions caused by migration and are only found underlying areas of intrusions. Some of these 'feeders' can be traced directly below a sill and probably represent the inclined tips of older sills, feeding the overlying younger sills. All ROV-sampled sills at fault-scarp outcrops are doleritic or gabbroic textured tholeiites; plainly, tholeiitic melts are being delivered to the uppermost crust over a broad area, not just to the spreading centers.

  3. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  4. Magnetic fabric transposition in folded granite sills in Variscan orogenic wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Závada, Prokop; Calassou, Thibaud; Schulmann, Karel; Hrouda, František; Štípská, Pavla; Hasalová, Pavlína; Míková, Jitka; Magna, Tomáš; Mixa, Petr

    2017-01-01

    New approach involving evaluation of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data in stereoplots and Jelínek's Pj-T space, Vollmer's eigenvalue and microstructural analyses is proposed to discriminate between homogeneous and superposed deformation in granites. This method is used to decipher the internal AMS fabric and microstructural evolution of a folded array of granitic sills. The studied major sill shows a fabric and microstructural zonality marked by submagmatic and high-temperature Type I planar-linear fabric developed at sill margins, and the transpositional Type II subsolidus fabrics that formed at high to medium temperature deformation in the sill core. While Type I fabric is associated with dip slip magnetic lineations, Type II subsolidus fabrics are marked by subhorizontal magnetic lineations striking parallel to the long axis of the sill. The structural reconstruction of the fabrics in the granite and the host rocks as well as new U-Pb zircon ages suggest coeval emplacement of horizontal and vertical sills accounting for significant weakening of the host rock-magma multilayer. The model of folding of such multilayer and extrusion of residual magma parallel to axial planes is discussed with respect to structural record in other syn-contractional granite sill arrays forming sheeted plutons worldwide.

  5. EPA Region 1 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a dataset of Tribal/Native American lands in the New England region. EPA notes that there are some disputes over the exact boundaries of the territories of...

  6. Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains presentations from the Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during December 10-11, 2008 regarding Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands.

  7. Eddy Flow during Magma Emplacement: The Basemelt Sill, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.; Mirhadizadeh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys magmatic system, Antarctica, forms part of the Ferrar dolerite Large Igneous Province. Comprising a vertical stack of interconnected sills, the complex provides a world-class example of pervasive lateral magma flow on a continental scale. The lowermost intrusion (Basement Sill) offers detailed sections through the now frozen particle macrostructure of a congested magma slurry1. Image-based numerical modelling where the intrusion geometry defines its own unique finite element mesh allows simulations of the flow regime to be made that incorporate realistic magma particle size and flow geometries obtained directly from field measurements. One testable outcome relates to the origin of rhythmic layering where analytical results imply the sheared suspension intersects the phase space for particle Reynolds and Peclet number flow characteristic of macroscopic structures formation2. Another relates to potentially novel crystal-liquid segregation due to the formation of eddies locally at undulating contacts at the floor and roof of the intrusion. The eddies are transient and mechanical in origin, unrelated to well-known fluid dynamical effects around obstacles where flow is turbulent. Numerical particle tracing reveals that these low Re number eddies can both trap (remove) and eject particles back into the magma at a later time according to their mass density. This trapping mechanism has potential to develop local variations in structure (layering) and magma chemistry that may otherwise not occur where the contact between magma and country rock is linear. Simulations indicate that eddy formation is best developed where magma viscosity is in the range 1-102 Pa s. Higher viscosities (> 103 Pa s) tend to dampen the effect implying eddy development is most likely a transient feature. However, it is nice to think that something as simple as a bumpy contact could impart physical and by implication chemical diversity in igneous rocks. 1Marsh, D.B. (2004), A

  8. 25 CFR 547.4 - How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation comply with this part? 547.4 Section 547.4 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING...

  9. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  10. Infrastructure Task Force Tribal Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents describe 1) issues to consider when planning and designing community engagement approaches for tribal integrated waste management programs and 2) a proposed approach to improve tribal open dumps data and solid waste projects, and 3) an MOU.

  11. 75 FR 70122 - Office of Tribal Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of the Attorney General 28 CFR Part 0 [AG Order No. 3229-2010] Office of Tribal Justice AGENCY: Department of Justice. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule will amend... Tribal Justice as a distinct component of the Department of Justice. The Office of Tribal Justice was...

  12. Tribal Government Records Management Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno/Sparks Indian Colony, Reno, NV.

    Following the passage of the 1972 Indian Self-Determination Act, the volume of tribal government records has exploded. This manual is a guide to establishing a system for the effective organization, maintenance, and disposition of such records. Section A discusses the major goals of a records management program, defines relevant terms, suggests…

  13. TRIBALISM-VAGUE BUT VALID

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-09-02

    Sep 2, 1999 ... Indeed, as many researchers have pointed out, tribal identity often takes on greater importance in the ... In a provocative book, one of Africa's leading social scientists, Ali Mazrui, presently with academic tenure in ..... Ashley Montagu pinpoints the key issue with direct relevance for the issue of the term tribe.

  14. Gene expression programming for prediction of scour depth downstream of sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamathulla, H. Md.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryLocal scour is crucial in the degradation of river bed and the stability of grade control structures, stilling basins, aprons, ski-jump bucket spillways, bed sills, weirs, check dams, etc. This short communication presents gene-expression programming (GEP), which is an extension to genetic programming (GP), as an alternative approach to predict scour depth downstream of sills. Published data were compiled from the literature for the scour depth downstream of sills. The proposed GEP approach gives satisfactory results (R2 = 0.967 and RMSE = 0.088) compared to the existing predictors (Chinnarasri and Kositgittiwong, 2008) with R2 = 0.87 and RMSE = 2.452 for relative scour depth.

  15. Sill Emplacement and Forced Folding in the Canterbury Basin, offshore SE New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jennifer; Magee, Craig; Jackson, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Sill-complexes are common in sedimentary basins worldwide. The geometry of sill-complexes and their associated deformation can be used to unravel tectono-magmatic events. For example, intruding magma may uplift the overburden and the free surface to produce forced folds that are typically either dome-shaped or flat-topped. These four-way dip closures can form suitable hydrocarbon traps and dating of onlapping of sedimentary strata allows the timing of emplacement, relative to hydrocarbon generation and migration to be assessed. Furthermore, these forced folds directly overlie the forcing intrusion and their volume is commonly assumed to equal that of the emplaced magma. This relationship between folds, which may be expressed that the Earth's surface, and magma volume is fundamental for volcano predication due to the use of ground deformation as a proxy for the location and magnitude of future eruptions. However, recent studies have demonstrated that fluidization of weak host rock can accommodate magma during non-brittle emplacement, producing little or no overburden deformation. Assessing the mechanics of intrusion-induced forced folding is therefore critical to a variety of Earth Science disciplines. Here, we use 3D seismic reflection data map four sills at a high-resolution within the underexplored Canterbury Basin, offshore SE New Zealand. We demonstrate that: (i) despite similar emplacement levels, forced folds are only developed above two of the sills, with no apparent uplift above the other two sills; (ii) onlap of sedimentary onto forced folds and associated hydrothermal vents indicates two episodes of sill emplacement in the Whaingaroan (34.6-31.8 Ma) and Opoitian (5.33-3.7 Ma); and (iii) intra-fold thickness is variable, with lower intervals within the folds displaying a flat-topped geometry overlain by sedimentary strata displaying dome-shaped folding. We discuss the formation of these forced folds as assess the role of non-brittle and inelastic

  16. Structural control on basaltic dike and sill emplacement, Paiute Ridge mafic intrusion complex, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter Krogh, K.E.; Valentine, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Late Miocene basaltic sills and dikes in the Paiute Ridge area of southern nevada show evidence that their emplacement was structurally controlled. Basaltic dikes in this area formed by dilating pre-existing vertical to steeply E-dipping normal faults. Magma propagation along these faults must have required less energy than the creation of a self-propagated fracture at dike tips and the magma pressure must have been greater than the compressive stress perpendicular to the fault surface. N- to NE-trending en echelon dikes formed locally and are not obviously attached to the three main dikes in the area. The en echelon segments are probably pieces of deeper dikes, which are segmented perhaps as a result of a documented rotation of the regional stresses. Alternatively, changes in orientation of principal stresses in the vicinity of each en echelon dike could have resulted from local loads associated with paleotopographic highs or nearby structures. Sills locally branched off some dikes within 300 m of the paleosurface. These subhorizontal bodies occur consistently in the hanging wall block of the dike-injected faults, and intrude Tertiary tuffs near the Paleozoic-Tertiary contact. The authors suggest that the change in stresses near the earth's surface, the material strength of the tuff and paleozoic rocks, and the Paleozoic bedding dip direction probably controlled the location of sill formation and direction of sill propagation. The two largest sills deflected the overlying tuffs to form lopoliths, indicating that the magma pressure exceeded vertical stresses at that location and that the shallow level and large size of the sills allowed interaction with the free (earth's) surface. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. FORT UNION DEEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  18. FORT UNION DEEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-09-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback

  19. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed by...

  20. Climate Change Impacts on Fort Bragg, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    may remain a common resident at Fort Bragg ................. 57 B12 Fort Bragg is currently on the edge of the range of the Pond pine (Pinus...Forest migration changes near Fort Bragg. Ranges likely to increase to better include Fort Bragg: Loblolly bay Longleaf pine Pond pine Loblolly...various model scenario combinations while the most significant mini - mums are set by the A1B/giss_model_er arrangement. ERDC/CERL TR-13-22 45 Figure

  1. Region 9 Tribal Grant Program - Project Officer and Tribal Contact Information Map Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    This compilation of geospatial data is for the purpose of managing and communicating information about current EPA project officers, tribal contacts, and tribal grants, both internally and with external stakeholders.

  2. Environmental protection stability of river bed and banks using convex, concave, and linear bed sills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Alireza; Noori, Lila Khaje

    2010-12-01

    River bed scourings are a major environmental problem for fish and aquatic habitat resources. In this study, to prevent river bed and banks from scouring, different types of bed sills including convex, concave and linear patterns were installed in a movable channel bed in a laboratory flume. The bed sills were tested with nine different arrangements and under different flow conditions. To find the most effective bed sill pattern, the scouring depth was measured downstream of the bed sill for a long experimental duration. The scour depth was measured at the middle and at the end of each experimental test for different ratios of the arch radius to the channel width [r/w]. The experimental results indicated that the convex pattern with r/w=0.35 produced minimum bed scouring depth at the center line whereas the concave pattern with r/w=0.23 produced the minimum scour depth at the wall banks. Therefore, the convex pattern was the most effective configuration for prevention of scouring at the center line of the river while the concave pattern was very effective to prevent scouring at the river banks. These findings can be suggested to be used in practical applications.

  3. Magnetic fabric transposition in folded granite sills in Variscan orogenic wedge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Prokop; Calassou, T.; Schulmann, K.; Hrouda, F.; Štípská, P.; Hasalová, Pavlína; Míková, J.; Magna, T.; Mixa, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 94, January (2017), s. 166-183 ISSN 0191-8141 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15632S Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : orogenic sill * AMS fabric * folding Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.408, year: 2016

  4. Dissolved Methane in the Sills Region of the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    An unusual combination of features make the midriff islands region of the northern Gulf of California (NGC) a strong source of methane to the atmosphere. Oceanographic isolation from the rest of the NGC by a series of sills and islands along with enhanced upward transport of nutr...

  5. Large-scale sill emplacement in Brazil as a trigger for the end-Triassic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdal, Thea H; Svensen, Henrik H; Ramezani, Jahandar; Iyer, Karthik; Pereira, Egberto; Rodrigues, René; Jones, Morgan T; Callegaro, Sara

    2018-01-09

    The end-Triassic is characterized by one of the largest mass extinctions in the Phanerozoic, coinciding with major carbon cycle perturbations and global warming. It has been suggested that the environmental crisis is linked to widespread sill intrusions during magmatism associated with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). Sub-volcanic sills are abundant in two of the largest onshore sedimentary basins in Brazil, the Amazonas and Solimões basins, where they comprise up to 20% of the stratigraphy. These basins contain extensive deposits of carbonate and evaporite, in addition to organic-rich shales and major hydrocarbon reservoirs. Here we show that large scale volatile generation followed sill emplacement in these lithologies. Thermal modeling demonstrates that contact metamorphism in the two basins could have generated 88,000 Gt CO 2 . In order to constrain the timing of gas generation, zircon from two sills has been dated by the U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS method, resulting in 206 Pb/ 238 U dates of 201.477 ± 0.062 Ma and 201.470 ± 0.089 Ma. Our findings demonstrate synchronicity between the intrusive phase and the end-Triassic mass extinction, and provide a quantified degassing scenario for one of the most dramatic time periods in the history of Earth.

  6. Environmental Assessment: Fort Greely Installation, Fort Greely, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-18

    4-36 4.19 Natural or Depletable Resource Requirements and Conservation Potential .... 4-36 4.20 Federal Actions To Address Protection of Children ...Dominant tree species are black spruce, aspen, and balsam poplar. The understory and groundcover consist of mountain cranberry and bog blueberry ...during emergencies (Lee, 2005). The nearest hospital, Fairbanks Memorial , is located approximately 100 miles away. 3-20 Fort Greely Installation EA

  7. Tribal Geographic Area (RTOC) Polygons with Representative Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) is a working committee of EPA and Tribal personnel co-chaired by an EPA representative and a Tribal representative....

  8. ODDJP's Tribal Youth Initiatives: Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Kay

    The violent crime rate among American Indians is twice that of the United States as a whole. Tribal communities are also beset by high rates of domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, alcohol abuse, and gang involvement. Given such factors, it is not surprising that tribal youth are exposed to multiple risk factors for delinquency. Indeed,…

  9. 77 FR 3210 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-133223-08] RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public..., (REG-133223-08) relating to Indian tribal government plans. DATES: The public hearing is scheduled for...

  10. 77 FR 5442 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-133223-08] RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public... advance notice of proposed rulemaking, (REG-133223-08) relating to Indian tribal government plans. This...

  11. New Directions in Tribal Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the efforts of tribal communities building more coordinated and effective early childhood systems by taking advantage of federal funding opportunities and partnerships. Given a new level of understanding and response from federal agencies regarding the unique nature of tribal communities, efforts are being made to acknowledge…

  12. Mechanisms Of Saucer-Shaped Sill Emplacement: Insight From Experimental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; Polteau, S.; Svensen, H.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2006-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that magma intrusions in sedimentary basins had a strong impact on petroleum systems. Most of these intrusions are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features can be observed in many sedimentary basins (i.e. the Karoo basin, South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; the Tunguska basin, Siberia; the Neuquén basin in Argentina). The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes. However, the mechanisms that govern their formation remain poorly constrained. Experiments were conducted to simulate the emplacement of saucer-shaped magma intrusions in sedimentary basins. The model rock and magma were fine-grained silica flour and molten vegetable oil, respectively. This modeling technique allows simultaneous simulation of magma emplacement and brittle deformation at a basin scale. For our purpose, we performed our experiments without external deformation. During the experiments, the oil was injected horizontally at constant flow rate within the silica flour. Then the oil initially emplaced in a sill, whereas the surface of the model inflated into a smooth dome. Subsequently, the oil propagated upwards along inclined sheets, finally reaching the surface at the edge of the dome. The resulting geometries of the intrusions were saucer-shaped sills. Then the oil solidified, and the model was cut in serial cross-sections through which the structures of the intrusive body and of the overburden can be observed. In order to constraint the processes governing the emplacement of such features, we performed a parametric study based on a set of experiments in which we systematically varied parameters such as the depth of emplacement and the injection flow rate of the oil. Our results showed that saucer diameters are larger at deeper level of emplacement. Opposite trend was obtained with varying injection flow rates. Based on our results, we conducted a detailed

  13. Image-based modelling of lateral magma flow: the Basement Sill, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhadizadeh, Seyed

    2017-01-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys magmatic system, Antarctica, provides a world-class example of pervasive lateral magma flow on a continental scale. The lowermost intrusion (Basement Sill) offers detailed sections through the now frozen particle microstructure of a congested magma slurry. We simulated the flow regime in two and three dimensions using numerical models built on a finite-element mesh derived from field data. The model captures the flow behaviour of the Basement Sill magma over a viscosity range of 1–104 Pa s where the higher end (greater than or equal to 102 Pa s) corresponds to a magmatic slurry with crystal fractions varying between 30 and 70%. A novel feature of the model is the discovery of transient, low viscosity (less than or equal to 50 Pa s) high Reynolds number eddies formed along undulating contacts at the floor and roof of the intrusion. Numerical tracing of particle orbits implies crystals trapped in eddies segregate according to their mass density. Recovered shear strain rates (10−3–10−5 s−1) at viscosities equating to high particle concentrations (around more than 40%) in the Sill interior point to shear-thinning as an explanation for some types of magmatic layering there. Model transport rates for the Sill magmas imply a maximum emplacement time of ca 105 years, consistent with geochemical evidence for long-range lateral flow. It is a theoretically possibility that fast-flowing magma on a continental scale will be susceptible to planetary-scale rotational forces. PMID:28573002

  14. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  15. 25 CFR 224.106 - If a tribe has enacted tribal laws, regulations, or procedures for challenging tribal action, how...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If a tribe has enacted tribal laws, regulations, or... § 224.106 If a tribe has enacted tribal laws, regulations, or procedures for challenging tribal action, how must the tribe respond to a petition? If a tribe has enacted tribal laws, regulations, or...

  16. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  17. SILLi 1.0: a 1-D numerical tool quantifying the thermal effects of sill intrusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Iyer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Igneous intrusions in sedimentary basins may have a profound effect on the thermal structure and physical properties of the hosting sedimentary rocks. These include mechanical effects such as deformation and uplift of sedimentary layers, generation of overpressure, mineral reactions and porosity evolution, and fracturing and vent formation following devolatilization reactions and the generation of CO2 and CH4. The gas generation and subsequent migration and venting may have contributed to several of the past climatic changes such as the end-Permian event and the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum. Additionally, the generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons and cracking of pre-existing oil reservoirs around a hot magmatic intrusion are of significant interest to the energy industry. In this paper, we present a user-friendly 1-D finite element method (FEM-based tool, SILLi, which calculates the thermal effects of sill intrusions on the enclosing sedimentary stratigraphy. The model is accompanied by three case studies of sills emplaced in two different sedimentary basins, the Karoo Basin in South Africa and the Vøring Basin off the shore of Norway. An additional example includes emplacement of a dyke in a cooling pluton which forgoes sedimentation within a basin. Input data for the model are the present-day well log or sedimentary column with an Excel input file and include rock parameters such as thermal conductivity, total organic carbon (TOC content, porosity and latent heats. The model accounts for sedimentation and burial based on a rate calculated by the sedimentary layer thickness and age. Erosion of the sedimentary column is also included to account for realistic basin evolution. Multiple sills can be emplaced within the system with varying ages. The emplacement of a sill occurs instantaneously. The model can be applied to volcanic sedimentary basins occurring globally. The model output includes the thermal evolution of the sedimentary

  18. SILLi 1.0: a 1-D numerical tool quantifying the thermal effects of sill intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Svensen, Henrik; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2018-01-01

    Igneous intrusions in sedimentary basins may have a profound effect on the thermal structure and physical properties of the hosting sedimentary rocks. These include mechanical effects such as deformation and uplift of sedimentary layers, generation of overpressure, mineral reactions and porosity evolution, and fracturing and vent formation following devolatilization reactions and the generation of CO2 and CH4. The gas generation and subsequent migration and venting may have contributed to several of the past climatic changes such as the end-Permian event and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Additionally, the generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons and cracking of pre-existing oil reservoirs around a hot magmatic intrusion are of significant interest to the energy industry. In this paper, we present a user-friendly 1-D finite element method (FEM)-based tool, SILLi, which calculates the thermal effects of sill intrusions on the enclosing sedimentary stratigraphy. The model is accompanied by three case studies of sills emplaced in two different sedimentary basins, the Karoo Basin in South Africa and the Vøring Basin off the shore of Norway. An additional example includes emplacement of a dyke in a cooling pluton which forgoes sedimentation within a basin. Input data for the model are the present-day well log or sedimentary column with an Excel input file and include rock parameters such as thermal conductivity, total organic carbon (TOC) content, porosity and latent heats. The model accounts for sedimentation and burial based on a rate calculated by the sedimentary layer thickness and age. Erosion of the sedimentary column is also included to account for realistic basin evolution. Multiple sills can be emplaced within the system with varying ages. The emplacement of a sill occurs instantaneously. The model can be applied to volcanic sedimentary basins occurring globally. The model output includes the thermal evolution of the sedimentary column through time and

  19. Vent Complexes above Dolerite Sills in Phanerozoic LIPs: Implications for Proterozoic LIPs and IOCG Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R. E.; Bleeker, W.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Polozov, A. G.

    2009-05-01

    New insights into the origin of IOCG (iron oxide copper gold) deposits [e.g., 1, 2, 3] follow from recent studies of Phanerozoic Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). Detailed seismic studies of the 62-55 Ma North Atlantic Igneous Province and complementary studies in the 183 Ma Karoo and 250 Ma Siberian LIPs reveal thousands of hydrothermal vent complexes (HVCs). Up to 5-10 km across at the paleosurface, these vents connect to underlying dolerite sills at paleodepths of up to 8 km [4, 5, 6, 7]. They originate from explosive release of gases generated when thick sills (>50 m) are emplaced into volatile-rich but low-permeability sedimentary strata. HVCs are phreatomagmatic in origin. Their architecture, economic potential for IOCG-type deposits, and effects on climate strongly depend on the type of host rocks (black shales at Karoo and evaporites at Siberian LIPs) and its fluid (brines) saturation at the time of emplacement. About 250 HVCs associated with the Siberian LIP are mineralized having magnetite in the matrix. Some are being mined for Fe (Korshunovskoe and Rudnogorskoe), but their economic potential for copper and gold mineralization is understudied. These observations from the Phanerozoic LIP record suggest that HVCs should also be an essential component of sill provinces associated with Proterozoic LIPs, with a potential for causing major climatic shifts and IOCG-type deposits, particularly if the host sediments include substantial evaporites. Two examples are discussed here. The 725 Ma Franklin LIP covers 1.1 Mkm2 in northern Canada [8]; in the Minto Inlier of Victoria Island, this event comprises volcanics, sills, and breccia pipes [9, 10]. The breccia pipes appear identical to HVCs and, furthermore, the presence of evaporites in the host sediments of the Shaler Supergroup suggests (based on the Siberian trap example) the potential for IOCG-type mineralization. Could 1.59 Ga sills, as exemplified by the exposed Western Channel Diabase sills on the eastern

  20. 77 FR 71833 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... traditional cultural values and beliefs of the people they are designed to serve, including youth and at-risk... workplace safety while working to alleviate the high unemployment found on tribal lands. The Department is...

  1. 77 FR 23283 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... traditional cultural values and beliefs of the people they are designed to serve, including youth and at-risk... workplace safety while working to alleviate the high unemployment found on tribal lands. The Department is...

  2. Tribal-FERST Environmental Issue Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides links to the 45 issue profiles for Tribal-FERST users, organized with tabs to show issues related to pollutants, environmental media, health effects, other community issues, and all issues.

  3. Tribal Green Building Administrative Code Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Administrative Code Example can be used as a template for technical code selection (i.e., building, electrical, plumbing, etc.) to be adopted as a comprehensive building code.

  4. Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribal Green Building Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT) to create this framework for tribal building codes.

  5. Region 9 Tribal Environmental GAP Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 9 invites Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) grant proposals from federally recognized tribal governments and eligible intertribal consortia for FY2019 work plan program development activities.

  6. ETHNOMARKETING AND TRIBAL MARKETING – GENERAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica-Nicoleta NECULAESEI (ONEA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnomarketing and tribal marketing can be regarded as subdivisions of intercultural management. This is the perspective intended to be analyzed in the proposed study, by valuing cultural specificity features that can support the effort of adaptation to a group that can be described by common features. The aim is to provide a general theoretical framework and proposals to adapt the marketing mix to a certain ethnic or "tribal" profile, in order to increase the company's performance.

  7. Insights from analog gelatin experiments on the effect of bedding dip on sill morphology and crystal load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R. M.; Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.

    2010-12-01

    The profusion of sills the world over offers a wide spectrum of geologic conditions under which to study emplacement mechanisms and the establishment of the initial conditions governing the subsequent magmatic evolution. Many diabase/dolerite sills are featureless bodies whose only record of solidification is contained in the variation of crystal size. But other sills formed of magma containing crystals entrained from earlier crystallization episodes often show a rich history of interaction between settling crystals and solidification fronts such that the physical history of differentiation can be readily observed. This work explores this aspect of sills using visco-elastic gelatin as country rock, molten wax as magma and tiny particles as phenocrysts. Magmatic sills form mechanically, when an ascending dike encounters a more rigid layer, is diverted laterally, and systematically inflates as guided along by the interface. In this manner, sills grow about the injection site, and can do so symmetrically or asymmetrically. The degree of asymmetry is affected by the dip angle of the interface. An angled interface implies a directional pressure gradient, and magma flows preferentially in the direction of decreasing pressure, in this case, up tilt. So, the greater the tilt, the greater the asymmetry. By experimentally producing sills in layered, tilted, media, we have investigated the influence of bed dip on sill morphology. Experiments were performed by injecting wax and particles into gelatin where the layers were poured at set angles to mimic tilted bedding. In addition to its visco-elastic properties, gelatin also has the added benefit of transparency, allowing for direct observation during the experiment and can be washed away later to reveal the exact details of the remaining solid. To emulate magma as a multi-phase slurry, a magmatic analog was used consisting of a mixture of molten wax near its liquidus and ultrafine glitter. Wax solidifies in response to thermal

  8. Geochemistry of Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) sills from deep boreholes in the Amazonas and Solimões basins, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlen Heimdal, Thea; Svensen, Henrik H.; Pereira, Egberto; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is one of the most extensive Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), and is associated with the breakup of Pangea and the subsequent opening of the central Atlantic Ocean. A large part of the province, including > 1 M km2 basins containing sill intrusions, is located in Brazil but has received limited attention due to the lack of outcrops. We have studied CAMP sills from seven deep boreholes (up to 3100 m deep) in the Amazonas and Solimões basins, northern Brazil. The boreholes contain up to ~ 482 m of sills (18 % of the stratigraphy), with a maximum individual sill thickness of 140 m. The sills were partly emplaced into thick Carboniferous evaporites. The main mineral phases of the sills include plagioclase and pyroxene, with accessory apatite, biotite, ilmenite and quartz. The majority of the sills are low-Ti dolerites (TiO2 < 2 wt.%), with the exception of four samples (with 2.2 - 3.3 wt.% TiO2). The low-Ti rocks range from basalt to basaltic andesite and plot in the tholeiitic field defined within the total alkali versus silica (TAS) classification. C1 chondrite normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns for both Ti-groups show increasing LREE compared to HREE (La/Lu = 2.2 - 4.1) with no major anomalies, and attest to a relatively evolved nature (La = 17-65 ppm). Primitive mantle normalized patterns for low-Ti rocks show negative anomalies for Nb, Ta, P and Ti and positive for K, whereas the high-Ti rocks show generally opposite anomalies. Late stage patches in the dolerites contain apatite, quartz and Cl-bearing biotite, suggesting the presence of halogens that may partly derive from the host sedimentary rocks.

  9. The tribal girl child in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanti, R

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the status of the girl child among tribes in India. Tribes have son preference but do not discriminate against girls by female infanticide or sex determination tests. Girls do not inherit land, but they are not abused, hated, or subjected to rigid social norms. Girls are not veiled and are free to participate in dancing and other recreational programs. There is no dowry on marriage. The father of the bridegroom pays a brideprice to the father of the girl. Widowed or divorced women are free to marry again. Daughters care for young children, perform housework, and work in the field with their brothers. In the tribal village of Choti Underi girls were not discriminated against in health and nutrition, but there was a gender gap in education. Both girls and boys were equally exposed to infection and undernourishment. Tribals experience high rates of infant and child mortality due to poverty and its related malnutrition. Child labor among tribals is a way of life for meeting the basic needs of the total household. A recent report on tribals in Rajasthan reveals that 15-20% of child labor involved work in mines that were dangerous to children's health. Girl children had no security provisions or minimum wages. Tribal children were exploited by human service agencies. Child laborers were raped. Government programs in tribal areas should focus on improving living conditions for children in general. Special programs for girls are needed for providing security in the workplace and increasing female educational levels. More information is needed on the work burden of tribal girls that may include wage employment as well as housework.

  10. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY RESOURCE TRIBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Lopez

    2003-04-01

    The CERT Tribal Internship Program is part of the education and training opportunities provided by CERT to accelerate the development of American Indian technical professionals available to serve Tribes and expand the pool of these professionals. Tribes are severely impacted by the inadequate number of Indian professionals available to serve and facilitate Tribal participation and support of the energy future of Tribes,and subsequently the energy future of the nation. By providing interns with hands-on work experience in their field of study two goals are accomplished: (1) the intern is provided opportunities for professional enhancement; and (2) The pool of Indian professionals available to meet the needs of Tribal government and Tribal communities in general is increased. As of January 17, 2003, Lance M Wyatt successfully completed his internship with the Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice on the Task Force that specifically focuses their work on Tribal nations. While working as an intern with the National Transportation Program, Albuquerque operations, Jacqueline Agnew received an offer to work for the Alaska Native Health Board in Anchorage, Alaska. This was an opportunity that Ms. Agnew did not feel she could afford to forego and she left her internship position in February 2003. At present, CERT is in the process of finding another qualified individual to replace the internship position vacated by Ms. Agnew. Mr. Wyatt's and Ms. Agnew's final comments are given.

  11. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  12. Fort Davis National Historic Site : acoustical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    During the summer of 2010 (September - October 2010), the Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Fort Davis National Historic Site (FODA)at two sites deployed for approximately 30 days each. The baseline data collected during this period ...

  13. 76 FR 43958 - Safety Zone; Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race, New River, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that...-AA00 Safety Zone; Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race, New River, Fort Lauderdale, FL... Tunnel, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race. The...

  14. 76 FR 62301 - Safety Zone; Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race, New River, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... management systems practices) that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. This...-AA00 Safety Zone; Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race, New River, Fort Lauderdale, FL... Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race. The race is...

  15. Fortællinger fra praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortællinger fra praksis formidler erfaringer fra et udviklingsprojekt, hvor pædagoger sætter fokus på børns og brugeres livshistorier. En livshistorie er en dynamisk størrelse under stadig forandring og konstruktion. Vi fortæller historier om vores liv på den måde, det giver mening for os her og...

  16. Magmatic sill intrusions beneath El Hierro Island following the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Saz, María Á.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Parks, Michelle M.; García-Cañada, Laura; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2016-04-01

    El Hierro, the most southwestern island of Canary Islands, Spain, is a volcano rising from around 3600 m above the ocean floor and up to of 1500 m above sea level. A submarine eruption occurred off the coast of El Hierro in 2011-2012, which was the only confirmed eruption in the last ~ 600 years. Activity continued after the end of the eruption with six magmatic intrusions occurring between 2012-2014. Each of these intrusions was characterized by hundreds of earthquakes and 3-19 centimeters of observed ground deformation. Ground displacements at ten continuous GPS sites were initially inverted to determine the optimal source parameters (location, geometry, volume/pressure change) that best define these intrusions from a geodetic point of view. Each intrusive period appears to be associated with the formation of a separate sill, with inferred volumes between 0.02 - 0.3 km3. SAR images from the Canadian RADARSAT-2 satellite and the Italian Space Agency COSMO-SkyMed constellation have been used to produce high-resolution detailed maps of line-of-sight displacements for each of these intrusions. These data have been combined with the continuous GPS observations and a joint inversion undertaken to gain further constraints on the optimal source parameters for each of these separate intrusive events. The recorded activity helps to understand how an oceanic intraplate volcanic island grows through repeated sill intrusions; well documented by seismic, GPS and InSAR observations in the case of the El Hierro activity.

  17. Data Management-Supplement to Section 106 Tribal Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document supplements the Tribal 106 Guidance by providing useful suggestions and tips to tribes about how to establish a data management system that reflects tribal water quality goals and objectives.

  18. Improving safety on rural local and tribal roads safety toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Rural roadway safety is an important issue for communities throughout the country and presents a challenge for state, local, and Tribal agencies. The Improving Safety on Rural Local and Tribal Roads Safety Toolkit was created to help rural local ...

  19. 77 FR 2732 - Tribal Consultation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... on ACF programs and tribal priorities. DATES: March 5-6, 2012. ADDRESSES: Renaissance Hotel, 999 9th... United States has a unique legal and political relationship with Indian tribal governments, established...

  20. Tribal Energy Program for California Indian Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    A strategic plan is needed to catalyze clean energy in the more than 100 California Indian tribal communities with varying needs and energy resources. We propose to conduct a scoping study to identify tribal lands with clean energy potential, as well as communities with lack of grid-tied energy and communications access. The research focus would evaluate the energy mixture and alternatives available to these tribal communities, and evaluate greenhouse gas emissions associated with accessing fossil fuel used for heat and power. Understanding the baseline of energy consumption and emissions of communities is needed to evaluate improvements and advances from technology. Based on this study, we will develop a strategic plan that assesses solutions to address high energy fuel costs due to lack of electricity access and inform actions to improve economic opportunities for tribes. This could include technical support for tribes to access clean energy technologies and supporting collaboration for on-site demonstrations.

  1. 25 CFR 23.21 - Noncompetitive tribal government grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noncompetitive tribal government grants. 23.21 Section 23... Noncompetitive tribal government grants. (a) Grant application information and technical assistance. Information... Superintendent or Area Director. Pre-award and ongoing technical assistance to tribal governments shall be...

  2. Dreamweavers: Tribal College Presidents Build Institutions Bridging Two Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    When students graduate from a tribal college or university (TCU), everyone in the community celebrates. They recognize the sacrifices the students have made, juggling their responsibilities as students, parents, and community members. Many people have contributed to this success, including the tribal college presidents. Eight tribal college…

  3. Working with Indian Tribal Nations. A guide for DOE employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees and contractors frequently work with Indian tribes or nations as part of their jobs. The purpose of this guide is to help DOE employees and contractors initiate contact with tribes and build effective relationships. DOE maintains a unique government-to government relationship with tribal nations. This guide presents an overview of the history of the relationship between the tribes and the Federal government, as well as the laws and Executive Orders that define that relationship. The guide discusses the Federal government’s trust responsibility to the tribes, tribal treaty rights, and the Department of Energy’s American Indian policy. The guide also discusses important cultural differences that could lead to communication problems if not understood and provides examples of potential cultural misunderstandings. In particular the guide discusses tribal environmental beliefs that shape tribal responses to DOE actions. The guide also provides pointers on tribal etiquette during meetings and cultural ceremonies and when visiting tribal reservations. Appendix 1 gives examples of the tribal nations with whom DOE currently has Memoranda of Understanding. While this guide provides an introduction and overview of tribal relations for DOE staff and contractors, DOE has also designated Tribal Issues Points of Contacts at each of its facilities. A list of these Points of Contact for all DOE facilities is provided in Appendix 2. DOE staff and contractors should consult with the appropriate tribal representatives at their site before initiating contact with a tribal nation, because many tribes have rules and procedures that must be complied with before DOE staff or contractors may go on tribal lands or conduct interviews with tribal members. Appendix 3 is the complete DOE American Indian Policy. Appendices 4-6 are Executive Orders that govern the relationship of all federal agencies with tribal nations. DOE employees and staff are

  4. Within-unit Fracture Domains, Cretaceous Sills of Svalbard as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, H., Jr.; Senger, K.; Braathen, A.

    2017-12-01

    Tensile fracture patterns are known to differ within different rock units of an area, as described in the literature on fracture systems and mechanical stratigraphy. However, even within the same unit fracture patterns can locally differ substantially, leading to a concept of within-unit fracture domains (WUFDs). Given the importance of fractures to fluid flow, slope stability and landscape development, recognizing and documenting WUFDs is useful. Exceptional glacial-related outcrops of Cretaceous diabase sills in Svalbard covering km2 in area provide an example and opportunity to develop an initial framework for WUFD analysis. An initial working model for the tensile fracture history in the area includes: a) Early Cretaceous sill cooling fractures oriented by the ambient regional stress field b) joint development in host Triassic strata due to the local influence of intrusions and to Late Cretaceous unloading, c) fractures related to development of the Cenozoic West Spitsbergen Fold-Thrust Belt in a reoriented stress field, and d) subsequent transtension related fractures. Length-weighted fracture strike analysis of scaled and oriented outcrop images documents consistent regional preferred orientation sets. Yet, by site the contributions of the sets to the overall fracture pattern varies significantly, and sets can be missing (especially Cenozoic sets), defining different domains. WUFD boundaries can be gradual or sharp, and observed low-angle truncation domain boundaries may help constrain the stress field evolution and magnitudes. WUFDs with internally consistent fracture patterns are often hundreds of meters across in the sills. When using remote imagery to characterize WUFDs careful consideration must be given to the relationship between the underlying fracture pattern, and its visible topographic expression. In near shore exposures fractures at a high-angle to the shoreline are preferentially expressed. WUFDs are likely polygenetic, the complex product of

  5. Microstructural indicators of convection: insights from the Little Minch Sill Complex, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Gautier; Holness, Marian; Neufeld, Jerome; Farr, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The fluid dynamic behaviour of crystal-bearing magmas is a key parameter to understand the formation of magmatic bodies. There are two opposite views on the subject: Some argue that solidification in intrusive bodies is affected by convection whereas others claim solidification happens in a static environment. A consensus on the question may be reached by carefully studying the grain size distribution in the settled accumulations of cargo crystals. In the absence of significant crystal growth or particle coarsening by agglomeration, settling of a polydisperse crystal load will always result in a fining-upwards sequence in static magmas as well as in convecting environments. If we assume the particle concentration is always sufficiently low to prevent hindered settling, gravitational settling in a static magma leads to the settling of individual crystals at a constant rate determined by their Stokes' velocity. Each size class is deposited at a constant rate, until all the grains of that size class have fallen out of suspension, leading to a well-stratified sequence and the complete disappearance of progressively smaller size classes upwards in the accumulation. In contrast, in a vigorously convecting magma crystals settle when they enter the stagnant basal boundary layer. In a system containing a polydisperse crystal population most of the bigger particles are removed rapidly from the bulk magma, leading to the creation of a fining-upwards sequence on the floor. However, in detail the structure of this fining-upwards sequence is critically different from that created by settling from a stagnant magma, with the gradual phasing out of each size class instead of the abrupt termination of size classes seen in static systems. This provides us with the opportunity to distinguish between settling from static or convecting magma using the spatial variation of grain size in settled accumulations. We focus on the Little Minch Sill Complex in Scotland, which formed from

  6. 78 FR 44459 - Tribal Self-Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 137 Tribal Self-Governance CFR Correction In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 399, revised as of October 1, 2012, on page 932, in...

  7. 77 FR 895 - Tribal Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... October 1, 2009, section 479B(b) of the Social Security Act (the Act) authorizes direct Federal funding of... assistance and, at Tribal option, a kinship guardianship assistance program under title IV-E of the Act. The... affect the child's eligibility for title IV-E benefits or medical assistance under title XIX of the Act...

  8. 76 FR 18583 - Draft Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... drug-related crime, violence, and disease. In addition to its leadership role in developing and..., reduce drug-related crime, violence, and disease. In addition to its leadership role in developing and... organizations, and urban Indian organizations. ONDCP's tribal consultation activities will support Indian self...

  9. TRIBAL REMEDIES FOR SNAKEBITE FROM ORISSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, K S; Sharma, P C; Kishore, Prem

    1986-01-01

    This communication presents an account of usage of 13 species of plant in the treatment of Snakebite by the tribals of Orissa, Botanical name, family, local name and Sanskrit name, if available of the plants along with mode of administration and place collection of the claims are enumerated. PMID:22557560

  10. Cyberspace Is No Place for Tribalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Craig

    1998-01-01

    Because the Internet is independent of spatial location and users are anonymous, it is nondiscriminatory. American Indians may find the Internet useful for educating outsiders about historical realities, but its use within tribal communities is another matter. The universalism and individualism of this powerful, deceptive technology are…

  11. 76 FR 69188 - Indian Tribal Governmental Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... an Indian tribal casino because the operation of the casino was a commercial function. The court... operating a casino is not a traditional act of government, but is commercial in nature.\\15\\ The court in... of commercial activities (whether or not an essential governmental function). \\2\\ Section 906(a) of...

  12. 77 FR 13338 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ..., Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other issues affecting the delivery of Head Start...

  13. 78 FR 11891 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of two 1-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other issues affecting...

  14. 77 FR 5027 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ..., Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be held between... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... the needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and families, taking into consideration...

  15. 76 FR 48865 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ..., Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... meeting the needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and families, taking into consideration...

  16. 78 FR 57858 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of two 1-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... Native children and families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and...

  17. 77 FR 19020 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be held between the... needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration... children and families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other...

  18. 76 FR 28925 - Tribal Veterans Cemetery Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... cemetery operational areas of cleanliness, height and alignment of headstones and markers, leveling of... shall show each of the following items: * * * * * (2) Soil investigation. The State or Tribal Organization shall provide a soil investigation of the scope necessary to ascertain site characteristics for...

  19. 77 FR 4471 - Tribal Veterans Cemetery Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... operational areas of cleanliness, height and alignment of headstones and markers, leveling of gravesites, and... items: * * * * * (2) Soil investigation. The State or Tribal Organization shall provide a soil... determine foundation requirements and utility service connections. A new soil investigation is not required...

  20. Metagabro sill zircon dating: Archean age confirmation from the Aguas Claras formation, Carajas, Para State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Geraldo Sarquis; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Barros, Carlos Eduardo de Mesquita; Macambira, Moacir Jose Buenano; Soares, Anselmo Domingos Viana

    1996-01-01

    The Carajas region, situated at Para State, Brazil, presents a great diversity of the mafic rock occurrences, distributed between various units. The rocks have been described petrographically and its geochemical and geochronological data have been accumulated. However, these last data are relatively limited or inexact due to the difficulties to these rock dating using the Uranium-Lead (U-Pb) in zircons method. The Aguas Claras Formation age is another problem in the Carajas stratigraphy. The occurrence of metagabros sills in the Aguas Claras region and the fact of existing zircons in these metagabros, stimulated the authors to realize a geochronological study of these metagabros aiming to define its age and, consequently, the minimum age of the Aguas Claras Formation. The paper presents the geological context and the methodology to develop the geochronological studies of these rocks. (author)

  1. Testing mechanical characteristics of chestnut stakes used in bed sills for stream restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Benfratello

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Using of wood elements for constructing bed sills in Mediterranean streams, where the banks are not protected by tree vegetation, needs an evaluation of biological and mechanical characteristics for evaluating both the wood durability and the effectiveness of the stream restoration project. Very few studies have dealt both with the decay of mechanical characteristics of wood elements employed for stream restoration works and with the changes over time of physical and chemical wood characters. In this paper, for a wood and stone bed sill located in a stream having no shaded banks, the changes of physical and chemical characters detected after 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 and 48 months on chestnut stakes are preliminarily recalled. Then, using three chestnut stakes extracted after 96 and 108 months and two unaltered stakes, as reference condition, the mechanical compression tests were carried out. The results of the compression tests for both runs (altered and unaltered stake allowed to establish the influence of the ageing process on the compressive strength and stiffness of the chestnut wood. Finally, using two chestnut stake extracted after 108 and 120 months and two unaltered stakes, the flexural tests were carried out by a four points scheme (two supporting points and two loading points according to UNI EN 408-2012 standard. The results of the flexural tests for both runs (altered and unaltered stake allowed to establish that the wood ageing process determines the decay of mechanical strength of the material and reduces the bending strength of the chestnut wood. From an applicative point of view, the obtained results showed that after 10 years the mechanical resistance characteristics of the wood stakes are less than those corresponding to the undisturbed reference condition.

  2. Subtidal circulation in a deep-silled fjord: Douglas Channel, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Di; Hannah, Charles G.; Foreman, Michael G. G.; Dosso, Stan

    2017-05-01

    Douglas Channel, a deep fjord on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada, is the main waterway in the fjord system that connects the town of Kitimat to Queen Charlotte Sound and Hecate Strait. A 200 m depth sill divides Douglas Channel into an outer and an inner basin. This study examines the low-frequency (from seasonal to meteorological bands) circulation in Douglas Channel from data collected at three moorings deployed during 2013-2015. The deep flows are dominated by a yearly renewal that takes place from May/June to early September. A dense bottom layer with a thickness of 100 m that cascades through the system at the speed of 0.1-0.2 m s-1, which is consistent with gravity currents. Estuarine flow dominates the circulation above the sill depth, and the observed landward net volume flux suggests that it is necessary to include the entire complex channel network to fully understand the estuarine circulation in the system. The influence of the wind forcing on the subtidal circulation is not only at the surface, but also at middepth. The along-channel wind dominates the surface current velocity fluctuations and the sea level response to the wind produces a velocity signal at 100-120 m in the counter-wind direction. Overall, the circulation in the seasonal and the meteorological bands is a mix of estuarine flow, direct wind-driven flow, and the barotropic and baroclinic responses to changes to the surface pressure gradient caused by the wind stress.

  3. Kuidas tudengid Lasnamäed väänasid / Victor Enrich, Sille Pihlak ; intervjueerinud Hendrik Alla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Enrich, Victor, 1967-

    2016-01-01

    Kunstiakadeemia arhitektuuriosakonna üliõpilased uurisid töötoas "Kuidas väänata maju ilma viga saamata", mida võiks ette võtta Lasnamäega. Intervjuu juhendajate, hispaania fotograafi Victor Enrichi ja arhitekt Sille Pihlakuga

  4. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure

  5. Hydrologic assessment of the shallow groundwater flow system beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands, Suffolk County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Michael L.; Rivera, Simonette L.; Busciolano, Ronald J.

    2016-12-02

    west.Water levels in many of the wells in the network fluctuated in response to precipitation, upgradient groundwater flow, and tidal flux in Shinnecock Bay. Water level altitudes ranged from 6.66 to 0.47 feet (ft) above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 during the spring measurement period, and from 5.25 to -0.24 ft (NAVD 88) during fall 2014. Historically, annual and seasonal precipitation seem to indicate long-term water level trends in an index well located in the town of Southampton, correlates with changes in storage in the upper glacial aquifer, but does not necessarily indicate water level extremes in the shallow groundwater system. To place the study period in perspective, calendar year 2014 was the 32d wettest year on record, with precipitation for the year totaling 48.1 inches, a 2.6-percent increase from the annual average (46.9 inches per year), based on 81 years of complete record at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service cooperative meteorological station at Bridgehampton, New York. Estimated recharge to the water table beneath the tribal lands from precipitation for 2014 is 25.4 inches.Tidal flux caused water levels in wells to fluctuate from 0.30 to -0.24 ft during May 2014. Water levels in wells located north of Old Fort Pond and beneath the southernmost extent of the tribal lands were most influenced by tidal flux. During June 2014, hydrographs indicate that tidal flux influenced water levels by 0.48 ft in a well located near the southernmost extent of the tribal lands approximately 0.3 miles north of Shinnecock Bay, and was zero at a well located approximately 0.5 miles south of Montauk Highway, and 0.4 miles west of Heady Creek, near the geographic center of the tribal lands. Tidal-influence delay time (time interval between peak high-tide stage and corresponding peak high-water level) ranged from 1.75 hours at the well located near the southernmost extent of the tribal lands, to more than 4

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Polk, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Horner, Jacob A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gorrissen, Willy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orrell, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hand, James R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russo, Bryan J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williamson, Jennifer L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-11-17

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Polk, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Polk took place on February 16, 2010.

  7. Health Disparities Research Among Small Tribal Populations: Describing Appropriate Criteria for Aggregating Tribal Health Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Emily R; Blacksher, Erika; Echo-Hawk, Abigail L; Bassett, Deborah; Harris, Raymond M; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2016-07-01

    In response to community concerns, we used the Tribal Participatory Research framework in collaboration with 5 American-Indian communities in Washington, Idaho, and Montana to identify the appropriate criteria for aggregating health data on small tribes. Across tribal sites, 10 key informant interviews and 10 focus groups (n = 39) were conducted between July 2012 and April 2013. Using thematic analysis of focus group content, we identified 5 guiding criteria for aggregating tribal health data: geographic proximity, community type, environmental exposures, access to resources and services, and economic development. Preliminary findings were presented to focus group participants for validation at each site, and a culminating workshop with representatives from all 5 tribes verified our final results. Using this approach requires critical assessment of research questions and study designs by investigators and tribal leaders to determine when aggregation or stratification is appropriate and how to group data to yield robust results relevant to local concerns. At project inception, tribal leaders should be consulted regarding the validity of proposed groupings. After regular project updates, they should be consulted again to confirm that findings are appropriately contextualized for dissemination. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Die geskiedenis van die saw gedenkteken te Fort Klapperkop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Die SAW Gedenkteken se lotgevalle is nou verbonde aan die van die. Militere Museum Fort Klapperkop aangesien die Gedenkteken op die terrein van Fort Klapperkop opgerig is. Weens rasionalisasie is die voortbestaan van Fort Klapperkop Museum onseker. Dit plaas ongetwyfeld dan ook 'n vraagteken agter die ...

  9. Iraq: Tribal Structure, Social, and Political Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Services Group Summary For centuries the social and political organization of many Iraqi Arabs has centered on the tribe. Socially, tribes were divided...describes the political orientation of several Iraqi Arab tribes, including the Shammar, Dulaym, and Jibur tribes. This report will be updated as...Relations,” at [http://www.cfr/publication/7681/iraq/html#12], accessed Feb. 23, 2007. Tribal Origin. Many Arab tribes in Iraq are believed to

  10. FORT NAMUTONI: FROM MILITARY STRONGHOLD TO TOURIST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STRONGHOLD TO TOURIST CAMP. Col Dr Jan Ploeger*. "... this fortress was not just a white elephant, it was actually occupied and played a major role in the settlement of Germans in the far North." (own translation) - D.W. Krynauw Die Verhaal van. Namutoni, p 3. Introduction. Fort Namutoni, the last White outpost east of ...

  11. Tribal Ecosystem Research Program (TERP) Workshop ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    USEPA is developing alternative approaches to quantify improvements to impaired waterbodies (USEPA 303(d)/TMDL Draft Guidance). Tribal environmental programs are leading the way in the paradigm shift towards sustainability of natural resources. Resources such as wildlife, aquatic habitat are dependent on the development of a riparian and upland management strategy, which considers and adapts to certain ecological relationships. Tribal traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) is a central concept in the cultural and resource stewardship practices of Native Americans. Native American populations have been accumulating knowledge of these ecosystem relationships, and have relied on them for basic survival for thousands of years. As such, TEK is the accumulated understanding of ecosystem function. As North America’s first environmental stewards, Native American populations have developed a unique relationship with the land and its resources. Objective of this workshop is to fuse TEK with environmental science to create an ecosystem, or landscape, research program oriented toward land management practices. This is essentially translating and combining TEK with an ecosystem function approach to provide a comprehensive basis for identifying and evaluating current and historical land use practices. Tribal and USEPA cooperative stream and wetland research focuses on making the connections between upland and riparian ecosystems. Analyzing spatial relationships and short

  12. Marine Geophysical Study of Cyclic Sedimentation and Shallow Sill Intrusion in the Floor of the Central Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    A new marine geophysical study in the central Gulf of California provides new insights into uppercrustal processes associated with the transition from continental rifting to seafloor spreading. This research is based on the collection and processing of multibeam bathymetry, 3.5 kHz profiles, and two multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection grids collected throughout the central Gulf of California. One high-resolution MCS profile collected across the Southern Trough of Guaymas Basin shows alternations of seismically transparent sedimentary units and horizontally layered strata with high-amplitude internal reflectors. Correlation with DSDP drilling results reveals that reflector alternations are due to cyclical changes between diatomaceous mud turbidites and mud turbidites rich in terrigenous clastics driven by glacial/interglacial cyclicity. This correlation is also supported by the spatial extent of the seismic units, specifically the distance off-axis at which they intercept an intrusion-sediment complex that spreads away from the axis at ˜23 km/Myr. Seismic stratigraphy also shows that during glacials, accumulation rates in the southwest part of Guaymas Basin increased significantly, filling the axial trough. During interglacials, greater aridity and higher sea-level reduced the delivery of terrigneous clastics and axial extension outpaced sedimentation, resulting in regeneration of the axial rift relief. Throughout the central Gulf, analysis of MCS and 3.5 kHz profiles and multibeam bathymetry reveals extensive evidence of shallow, young magmatic intrusions into unconsolidated hemipelagic muds blanketing axial troughs, off-axis oceanic crust, and thinned continental crust. Multiple sills 1--2 km in diameter have a characteristic concave-upwards profile are most common as off-axis intrusions into unconsolidated hemipelagic muds flooring the Guaymas, Carmen, and Farallon Basins, and within the sediment cover of subsided continental crust at the basins' margins

  13. THE RATIONALE FOR EXTENDING THE SERVICES OF PASSENGER CARS WITH POCKETS OF CORROSION IN THE CENTER SILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The scientific work supposed: 1 the search of accounting ways of the local corrosion damages influence to the car design, that were expired the appointed time, for the purpose of renewal; 2 experimental verification of conformity of material construction requirements of the normative documentation and justification for extending the services of passenger cars with pockets of corrosion after 30 years of operation; 3 the conformity assessment of residual life of the structure of car bodies operating pressures in the next 5 years of use. Methodology. The developed algorithm of technical diagnostics of cars with pockets of corrosion of the center sill contains several stages. First, a survey of technical condition of structures is conducted by a visual-optical method and nondestructive control methods, and the degree of damage is determined. In the next phase the experimental verification of conformity of the structure and mechanical properties of the center sill of the car with the pockets of corrosion to regulatory requirements are executed. Next, the study of strength of the supporting structures of car bodies on the basis of experimental static and impact tests of strength is executed. Finally, the endurance tests are conducted on the effect of the longitudinal forces and the evaluation and prediction of compliance resource car bodies for the next period are executed. Findings. The actual work is completed by obtaining the experimental data on the feasibility of extending the service life of passenger cars as from the point of view of an operating time of load-bearing elements of the car body to the resource, and from the point of view of chemical composition, structure and mechanical properties of the center sill with pockets of corrosion. The presence of local corrosion damages of the center sill of the presented size is not a threat to the structural strength and safety. Originality. The authors conducted a comprehensive study to

  14. Fort St. Vrain operations and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    June 1989 resulted in the highest electric generation month in the history of the Fort St. Vrain plant. This culminated an excellent operating period involving the first half of 1988. The plant was then shutdown in July on a scheduled outage to make repairs in the main steam drive section of all of the helium circulators. This outage was significantly extended due to problems with moisture ingress into the primary coolant felt to be primarily from the core support floor section of the liner cooling system. 1989 also marks the 10th Anniversary of Fort St. Vrain as a commercial nuclear power plant. Electrical generation from this plant throughout this period has not been good, generally because of the prototypical nature of key plant components, primarily the helium circulators. Also, throughout this period there has been substantial increase in operations, maintenance, and fuel costs which could not be offset by the sale of electricity from the plant. This led to the decision to shutdown Fort St. Vrain permanently on or before June 30, 1990. The lessons learned and operational experiences from Fort St. Vrain have been substantial for the development of the Gas-Cooled Reactor Program and in achieving a safe, commercially viable plant design for the MHTGR. Superb fuel performance has not only provided a radiologically clean plant, but has achieved significant safety attributes in the licensing of the MHTGR. Equipment performance for Fort St. Vrain on key components and systems such as the steam generators, purification system control rod drives, and many others has been factored into the design of the MHTGR. Additional benefits are anticipated as the plant completes its operating phase and goes through defueling and decommissioning. As primary system components become available and are physically evaluated, further valuable data will be secured for the benefit of the MHTGR. (author)

  15. Oceanic sill-overflow systems: Investigations and simulation with the Poseidon ocean general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Whit G.

    Marginal seas transport dense water into the oceanic system by deep gravity currents through sill-overflow systems. This dense water is essential in establishing background characteristics and the density driven component of the meridional overturing of the ocean. This thesis investigates the controlling dynamics and several modeling issues related to oceanic deep gravity currents. The objectives and questions of this study center on the development of a climate scale model that adequately simulates sill-overflow deep gravity currents. These questions include the sensitivity of the model to resolution and various turbulence parameterizations when modeling these systems. A hybrid generalized vertical coordinate model is adapted to address these questions. This study uses theoretical model domains based on the Dynamics of Mixing and Entrainment group (DOME). Current, climate scale models typically have horizontal resolutions ranging from 1/2 to 1 degree resolution. The bulk of the vertical resolution in layered models is commonly placed in density or pressure space centered around the equatorial upper ocean, well away from the regions containing the deep gravity currents investigated in this study. Models solutions from this study show large dependence on both horizontal and vertical resolution. When horizontal resolution is decreased from 5 to 20 km, entrainment of ambient water into the gravity current decreases by approximately a factor of 3. The deep gravity currents in the lower (20 km) resolution experiments are deeper, denser and have larger along-slope velocities than the higher resolution experiments (5 km). This difference is explained by the homogenization of the gravity current in lower resolution simulations. The 5 km simulations show higher magnitudes and spatial variability of momentum. This homogenization results in underestimation of the applied bottom stress in the model. With a lower bottom stress, the current does not have sufficient shearing to

  16. 78 FR 26781 - Administration for Native Americans Tribal Consultation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... to regular and meaningful consultation and collaboration with tribal officials in policy decisions... Indian tribal governments, established through and confirmed by the Constitution of the United States... of federal policies that have tribal implications, and are responsible for strengthening the...

  17. Tectonic and geomechanical control of dikes and sill-like bodies: Evidence from the northwestern part of the Kola Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yu. A.; Galybin, A. N.; Mukhamediev, Sh. A.; Smul'skaya, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    A study of the meticulously documented Paleoproterozoic swarms of basic dikes and sill-like bodies, as well as granite veins crosscutting Archean granite-gneiss country rocks of the Central Kola Geoblock of the Fennoscandian Shield, elucidates the question of geomechanical control of the spatial location of syntectonic sheetlike magmatic bodies intruding into heterogeneous structured geomedium. Based on structural analysis and mapping results, the succession of emplacement of several dike generations has been reconstructed and linked to structural parageneses of the corresponding deformation stages. We evaluate the effect of geomechanical and tectonic factors as well as the structural elements of enclosing strata on the places of dike localization, the character of their spatial distribution, morphology of particular bodies, and patterns of swarm systems. Geomechanical problems on the intrusion of single bodies and their communities are solved taking into account their interaction and the heterogeneity of the medium. The conditions necessary for transition of nearly vertical dikes into sills are discussed.

  18. [The Paracelsus dramas of Martha Sills-Fuchs in the circumstances of Julius Streicher's Society of German Public Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzenhöfer, U

    1993-01-01

    Between 1936 and 1939 the Hungaro-Austrian author Martha Sills-Fuchs (1896-?) wrote three plays, in which Theophrast von Hohenheim, called Paracelsus is the main figure. Written for the ideological purposes of the 'Verein Deutsche Volksheilkunde', founded in 1935 by the radical German Nazi-leader Julius Streicher, Paracelsus was--totally neglecting the historical facts--shown as a precursor of Nazism. It could be demonstrated by detailed analysis, that Martha Sills-Fuchs sketched Paracelsus as a racist, a fighter against the jews, a follower of a mystical 'blood and soil'-ideology and as a medical doctor, who had great respect of 'mother nature' (as the Nazis claimed they had).

  19. SUGGESTIONS OF SCENARIOS FOR RESTORING LONGITUDINAL CONNECTIVITY TO SUSTAIN FISH FAUNA MIGRATION UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM OF APAHIDA BOTTOM SILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan VOICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rivers and their corridors form complex ecosystems that include adjacent land, flora and fauna and the actual courses of water. Given the ecological criteria for prioritizing the rehabilitation of longitudinal continuity of watercourses recommended by the International Commission for Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR (Appendix 1 and starting from the analysis of the Management Plan to ensure longitudinal continuity of watercourses in Some?-Tisa River Area (Annex 9.17.a in BMP – Basin Management Plan there have been proposed several scenarios in order to facilitate fish species migration above the bottom sill from Apahida. The selected case study is focused on the mentioned discharge or bottom sill in Apahida town (hm 985 located 45 m downstream of the bridge located at the intersection of two streets; this bottom sill is 0.8 m high and was built in order to correct the slope, to reduce erosion and to enhance water oxygenation. Currently the bottom sill is supervised by Some?-Tisa River Basin Water Administration, Cluj SGA. One of the important migratory fish species in the study area is the Common Nase (Chondrostoma nasus protected by Bern Convention (Appendix III; barbel (Barbus barbus- rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V,annex 4A of Low nr.462 and Red List of RBDD; bream (Abramis brama bream (Abramis brama - IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The water catchment area of the Apahida commune in Cluj County blocks migration of various species of migratory fish such as: Common Nase (Chondrostoma nasus protected by the Bern Convention (Appendix III; Barbel (Barbus barbus - rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V, Annex 4A of Low No 462 and Red List of RBDD; Bream (Abramis brama Bream (Abramis brama - IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. To help the three species of fish come the solutions proposed in this article.

  20. Rates, indications, and outcomes of caesarean section deliveries: A comparison of tribal and non-tribal women in Gujarat, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Desai

    Full Text Available Even though the caesarean section is an essential component of comprehensive obstetric and newborn care for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, there is a lack of data regarding caesarean section rates, its determinants and health outcomes among tribal communities in India.The aim of this study is to estimate and compare rates, determinants, indications and outcomes of caesarean section. The article provides an assessment on how the inequitable utilization can be addressed in a community-based hospital in tribal areas of Gujarat, India.Prospectively collected data of deliveries (N = 19923 from April 2010 to March 2016 in Kasturba Maternity Hospital was used. The odds ratio of caesarean section was estimated for tribal and non-tribal women. Decomposition analysis was done to decompose the differences in the caesarean section rates between tribal and non-tribal women.The caesarean section rate was significantly lower among tribal compared to the non-tribal women (9.4% vs 15.6%, p-value < 0.01 respectively. The 60% of the differences in the rates of caesarean section between tribal and non-tribal women were unexplained. Within the explained variation, the previous caesarean accounted for 96% (p-value < 0.01 of the variation. Age of the mother, parity, previous caesarean and distance from the hospital were some of the important determinants of caesarean section rates. The most common indications of caesarean section were foetal distress (31.2%, previous caesarean section (23.9%, breech (16% and prolonged labour (11.2%. There was no difference in case fatality rate (1.3% vs 1.4%, p-value = 0.90 and incidence of birth asphyxia (0.3% vs 0.6%, p-value = 0.26 comparing the tribal and non-tribal women.Similar to the prior evidences, we found higher caesarean rates among non-tribal compare to tribal women. However, the adverse outcomes were similar between tribal and non-tribal women for caesarean section deliveries.

  1. Sills, aureoles and pipes in the Karoo Basin, South Africa, as triggers for Early Jurassic environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Henrik H.; Planke, Sverre; Silkoset, Petter; Hammer, Øyvind; Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Dani W.; Chevallier, Luc

    2017-04-01

    Most of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) formed during the last 260 million years are associated with climatic change, oceanic anoxia, or extinctions in marine and terrestrial environments. Current hypotheses involve A) degassing of carbon either from oceans or shallow sea-bed reservoirs, B) carbon and sulfur degassing from flood basalts, C) degassing from sedimentary basins heavily intruded by LIPs. Here we present new data on gas generation and degassing from the Karoo LIP, based on fieldwork, borehole studies (geochemistry, petrography), and thermal modeling. Our data expand and corroborate earlier work on the sub-volcanic processes in the Karoo Basin. We show that 1) hundreds of breccia pipes are rooted in Early Jurassic sill complexes and contact aureoles within the organic-rich Ecca Group, 2) statistical analyses reveal a fractal distribution of pipes and that they are overdispersed at small scales (800 m), 3) contact aureoles show a reduction in organic matter content towards the sill contacts, reduced to zero in the nearest zones, producing more carbon gas compared to thermal model calculations, 4) we find up to 3 permil reduction in the d13C of the organic matter remaining in the aureoles, and finally 5) some pipes contain recent oil seeps. We conclude that the sill-pipe system released thermogenic gases to the Early Jurassic atmosphere and that the pipes may have acted as permanent fluid flow pathways.

  2. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  3. Fotografiske fortællinger fra SFO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    En artikel om børns fotos og fortællinger fra et udviklingsprojekt på nogle SFOer, hvor børn har fotograferet noget af det, de er optaget af. Artiklen beretter om nogle af de potentialer og muligheder, der ligger i visualisering integreret i pædagogisk praksis. Udgivelsesdato: september......En artikel om børns fotos og fortællinger fra et udviklingsprojekt på nogle SFOer, hvor børn har fotograferet noget af det, de er optaget af. Artiklen beretter om nogle af de potentialer og muligheder, der ligger i visualisering integreret i pædagogisk praksis. Udgivelsesdato: september...

  4. Enhanced Preliminary Assessment Fort Devens, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-30

    appearance. Malathion, Warfarin , Diazinon, Carbaryl, Bromacil, 2,4-D, and Pyrythrum were identified in 1977 (Nicholls et al., 1980) as the pesticides...entitled, "What You Can Do To Protect Your ’amily Against Possible Lead Poisoning ," (Enclosure) provides you rith important information about the lead...YOU CAN DO TO PROTECT YOUR FAMILY AGAINST POSSIBLE LEAD POISONING CURRENT SITUATION: The quarters on Fort Devens have been painted with non-lead paint

  5. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  6. Building Tribal Communities in the Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a groundswell of initiatives aimed at providing platforms to share resources among people. Collaborative consumption provides a model for a ‘sharing economy’ where the dominant logic of consumers is resource access rather than ownership. This study examines....... This is typically done by co-creating shared commonality, developing scalable electronic platforms, and building trust into platforms using social media to develop proxy social capital. Consequently, by using existing ecosystems of social media, tribal communities can be formed and scaled much more quickly than via...

  7. Tribal experiences and lessons learned in riparian ecosystem restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald K. Miller; James E. Enote; Cameron L. Martinez

    1996-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems have been part of the culture of land use of native peoples in the Southwest United States for thousands of years. The experiences of tribal riparian initiatives to incorporate modern elements of environment and development with cultural needs are relatively few. This paper describes tribal case examples and approaches in riparian management which...

  8. Training Tribal Lay Advocates at Sitting Bull College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Students in Sitting Bull College's lay advocate program develop a well-rounded understanding of the law, enabling them to represent defendants in tribal courts. The program offers legal training for its students--and illustrates how American Indian nations can broaden legal representation for Native defendants in tribal courts. It is one of only…

  9. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tribal forestry program financial support. 163.36 Section 163.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.36 Tribal forestry program financial support. (a) The...

  10. Political Role of Tribes : Analysis of Tribalism, Islamism and Gender ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Political Role of Tribes : Analysis of Tribalism, Islamism and Gender in Iraq, Jordan and Yemen. The institution of the tribe continues to represent a major component of social structure throughout the Middle East, particularly in Iraq, Jordan and Yemen. Tribal relations are deeply intertwined with political relations. In a country ...

  11. Mathematical Precision of Pitch Gaps in Tribal Tonal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOCIAL PATHOLOGY OF CLEFT PALATE IN THE AFRICAN: MATHEMATICAL PRECISION OF PITCH GAPS IN TRIBAL TONAL ... with Tonic Solfa precision. I have done this both in tribal tonal linguistics and in ... in English. My native ear enables me to hear 4 pitches in the word “Agriculture” in Queen's English [high.

  12. 25 CFR 141.11 - Tribal fees, taxes, and enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.11 Tribal... reservation businesses. (b) Nothing in the regulations of this part may be construed to preclude tribal...

  13. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  14. 44 CFR 201.7 - Tribal Mitigation Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MITIGATION PLANNING § 201.7 Tribal Mitigation Plans. The... events. (ii) A description of the Indian tribal government's vulnerability to the hazards described in... its impact on the tribe. The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of: (A) The types and numbers...

  15. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION... comprehensive database containing the official insignia of all federally- and State- recognized Native American... to create this database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys...

  16. Integrating Earth System Science Data Into Tribal College and University Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, P. J.; Perkey, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Universities Space Research Association and Sinte Gleska University (SGU) have teamed with eight Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) to participate in a NASA Earth Science funded project, TRibal Earth Science and Technology Education (TRESTE) project which focuses on TCU faculty teaching undergraduate Earth science courses to non-science and science students, with particular attention to TCU faculty teaching K-12 pre- and in- service teachers. The eight partner TCUs are: Blackfeet Community College (BCC), Browning, MT, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Cloquet, MN, Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, ND, Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago, NE, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge, SD, Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, ND, Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, ND, United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), Bismarck, ND. The goal of this 3-year project is to promote the use of NASA Earth science data and products in the classroom thereby enabling faculty to inspire undergraduate students to careers in Earth system science, the physical sciences, and related fields of science and engineering. To accomplish this goal we are targeting three areas: (1) course content - enhance the utilization of Earth system science and physical science concepts, (2) teaching methodology - develop problem-based learning (PBL) methods, and (3) tools and technology - increase the utilization of GIS and remote sensing in the classroom. We also have enlisted ESRI, NativeView and the USGS as collaborators. To date we have held an introductory "needs" workshop at the USGS EROS Data Center and two annual workshops, one at UTTC and the second at BCC. During these annual workshops we have divided our time among the three areas. We have modeled the workshops using the PBL or Case Study approach by starting with a story or current event. Topics for the annual workshops have been Drought and Forest and Grassland Fires. These topics led us into the solar radiation budget

  17. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Narayan Yadav

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi Taluk. Study participants were students of class eight, nine and ten. One school was randomly selected from the list of government schools in Brahmavar. The size of the sample was 76 which includes 38 from tribal category and 38 from general category and the sampling design was purposive sampling. Rosenberg’s scale was used to assess the self esteem of students. Questionnaires were self administered. Permission was taken from the principle of school. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results are reported as frequency and proportion. Independent t test was used to compare the self esteem of tribal and non tribal student. Study found that more than two third of the tribal student had low self esteem. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001 in self esteem between tribal and non tribal students.

  18. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Narayan Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi Taluk. Study participants were students of class eight, nine and ten. One school was randomly selected from the list of government schools in Brahmavar. The size of the sample was 76 which includes 38 from tribal category and 38 from general category and the sampling design was purposive sampling. Rosenberg’s scale was used to assess the self esteem of students. Questionnaires were self administered. Permission was taken from the principle of school. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results are reported as frequency and proportion. Independent t test was used to compare the self esteem of tribal and non tribal student. Study found that more than two third of the tribal student had low self esteem. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001 in self esteem between tribal and non tribal students.

  19. Deformation mechanisms accommodating the emplacement of an igneous sill-complex in the Irish sector of the Rockall Basin, offshore NW Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Craig; Jackson, Christopher; Schofield, Nick

    2013-04-01

    Magma intrusion within the subsurface is heavily influenced by the pre-existing architecture of the upper crust and, depending on the emplacement mechanisms, may modify basin structure and fluid flow pathways. Seismic reflection data reveal that intrusive networks predominantly consist of interconnected, saucer-shaped sills that are often associated with dome-shaped 'forced' folds generated by intrusion-induced uplift. Previous studies of intrusion-related forced folds have primarily focused on isolated sills or laccoliths and have shown that the fold amplitude is less than the intrusion thickness, suggesting that additional space-making mechanisms (e.g. grain comminution, fluidization) accompanied emplacement. Furthermore, forced folding is often considered as an instantaneous process over geological time. However, fold growth and the interplay between accompanying ductile and brittle deformation styles remains poorly understood. Here, we use 3D seismic reflection data from the eastern margin of the Irish Rockall Basin, NE Atlantic, to quantitatively study eighty-two igneous intrusions (i.e. saucer-shaped sills and inclined sheets) in order to constrain the emplacement history of a Palaeocene-to-Middle Eocene sill-complex. Emplacement occurred across a Cretaceous clastic-to-marl dominated succession at palaeodepths of <5 km. Northwards-dipping, planar transgressive sheet intrusions are most abundant in the deeper portion of the sill-complex and magma flow indicators within them (i.e. steps and broken bridges) reveal that magma flowed upwards and outwards, feeding into shallow-level saucer-shaped sills at the peak of the transgressive limbs. The saucer-shaped sills are characterized by radial magma flow patterns, emanating from the inner sill, distinguished by mapping the long axes of magma lobes and fingers. These magma flow indictors also provide a proxy for intrusion style; i.e. where sills intrude the Lower Cretaceous sandstones, magma propagation was

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  1. Independent origins of Indian caste and tribal paternal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaux, Richard; Aunger, Robert; Bentley, Gillian; Nasidze, Ivane; Sirajuddin, S M; Stoneking, Mark

    2004-02-03

    The origins of the nearly one billion people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent and following the customs of the Hindu caste system are controversial: are they largely derived from Indian local populations (i.e. tribal groups) or from recent immigrants to India? Archaeological and linguistic evidence support the latter hypothesis, whereas recent genetic data seem to favor the former hypothesis. Here, we analyze the most extensive dataset of Indian caste and tribal Y chromosomes to date. We find that caste and tribal groups differ significantly in their haplogroup frequency distributions; caste groups are homogeneous for Y chromosome variation and more closely related to each other and to central Asian groups than to Indian tribal or any other Eurasian groups. We conclude that paternal lineages of Indian caste groups are primarily descended from Indo-European speakers who migrated from central Asia approximately 3,500 years ago. Conversely, paternal lineages of tribal groups are predominantly derived from the original Indian gene pool. We also provide evidence for bidirectional male gene flow between caste and tribal groups. In comparison, caste and tribal groups are homogeneous with respect to mitochondrial DNA variation, which may reflect the sociocultural characteristics of the Indian caste society.

  2. 25 CFR 166.102 - Do tribal laws apply to permits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do tribal laws apply to permits? 166.102 Section 166.102 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 166.102 Do tribal laws apply to permits? Tribal laws will apply...

  3. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: General Electric - Fort Edward in Fort Edward, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 32-acre General Electric (GE) facility is located approximately 800 feet east of the Hudson River between the Villages of Fort Edward to the south and Hudson Falls to the north. A 200-foot-wide parcel west of the main portion of the site, between Alle

  4. 33 CFR 100.717 - Annual Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix; Fort Myers, FL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... involved with the Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix, exiting Big Carlos Pass between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m... seaward of the seaside legs of the racecourse at all times in the spectator areas defined in paragraph (b...

  5. Turbulence and finestructure in a deep ocean channel with sill overflow on the mid-Atlantic ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippenhauer, Sandra; Dengler, Marcus; Fischer, Tim; Kanzow, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    Diapycnal mixing in the deep ocean is known to be much stronger in the vicinity of rough topography of mid-ocean ridges than above abyssal plains. In this study a horizontally profiling microstructure probe attached to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is used to infer the spatial distribution of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (ε) in the central valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first successful realization of a horizontal, deep-ocean microstructure survey. More than 22 h of horizontal, near-bottom microstructure data from the Lucky Strike segment (37°N) are presented. The study focuses on a channel with unidirectional sill overflow. Density was found to decrease along the channel following the mean northward flow of 3 to 8 cm/s. The magnitude of the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation was distributed asymmetrically relative to the position of the sill. Elevated dissipation rates were present in a segment 1-4 km downstream (north) of the sill with peak values of 1 ×10-7 W/kg. Large flow speeds and elevated density finestructure were observed within this segment. Lowered hydrographic measurements indicated unstable stratification in the same region. The data indicate that hydraulic control was established at least temporarily. Inside the channel at wavelengths between 1 m and 250 m the slopes of AUV-inferred horizontal temperature gradient spectra were found to be consistent with turbulence in the inertial-convective subrange. Integrated temperature gradient variance in this wavelength interval was consistent with an ε2/3 dependence. The results illustrate that deep-reaching AUVs are a useful tool to study deep ocean turbulence over complex terrain where free-falling and lowered turbulence measurements are inefficient and time-consuming.

  6. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Willpinit, WA)

    2003-03-01

    The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

  7. Fort Mason Center: Pier 2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nester, Patrick [Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-08-30

    The rooftop Photovoltaic (PV) panels and radiant piping project was constructed by Fort Mason Center as part of its $21 million comprehensive rehabilitation of the Pier 2 shed which include the shed’s electrical, natural gas and water systems. Fort Mason Center improved performance while reducing energy and water usage and costs to demonstrate the efficiencies and opportunities available to large multi-function facilities. The scalable demand of these facilities required a layered approach to conservation, control and production. The project employed a comprehensive retrofit of electrical natural gas, and plumbing systems to maximize efficiency and lower carbon footprint specifically to demonstrate the effectiveness of these strategies in a public setting with varied and diverse use. The project was completed in July 2014 and met the expected outcomes regarding increased comfort and operational efficiency throughout the Pier 2 shed as well as on site electrical generation of current consumption. The entire Pier 2 shed project won a 2015 California Preservation Foundation design award for historic rehabilitation.

  8. Status of the Fort St. Vrain decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain is a high temperature gas cooled reactor. It has been shut down as a result of financial and technical difficulties. Fort St. Vrain has been planning for defueling and decommissioning for at least three years. The preliminary decommissioning plan, in accordance with the NRC's final rule, has been submitted and is being reviewed by the NRC. The basis of the preliminary decommissioning plan has been SAFSTOR. Public Service Company, who is the owner and operator of FSV, is scheduled to submit a proposed decommissioning plan to the NRC in the fourth quarter of 1990. PSC has gone out for bid on the decontamination and dismantlement of FSV. This paper includes the defueling schedule, the independent spent fuel storage installation status, the probability of shipping fuel to DOE, the status of the preliminary decommissioning plan submittal, the issuance of a possession only license and what are the results of obtaining this license amendment, preliminary decommissioning activities allowed prior to the approval of a proposed decommissioning plan, the preparation of a proposed decommissioning plan and the status of our decision to proceed with SAFSTOR or DECON as identified in the NRC's final decommissioning rule

  9. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  10. 76 FR 68625 - Establishment of the Fort Monroe National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... period of slavery in the colonies and, later, this Nation. Two hundred and forty-two years later, Fort... 1863. Thus, Old Point Comfort marks both the beginning and end of slavery in our Nation. The Fort... North Beach area lies the only undeveloped shoreline remaining on Old Point Comfort, providing modern...

  11. Nutritional status of tribal children in Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangam Sukhdas, Sairam Challa, Prakash Bhatia, A.R. Rao, Koteswara Rao.P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tribes constitute separate socio-cultural groups, having distinct customs, traditions, marriage, kinship, and property inheritance systems. They live largely in agricultural and pre-agricultural level of technology. Their dependency on nature and impoverished economy bear effect on the nutritional status different compared to the general population. Aims: To study the prevalence of malnutrition in the under-five years age group tribal children in the three regions of Andhra Pradesh and compare the same with national statistics. Methods and Material: A cross sectional survey was carried out to assess the nutritional status of under-five age group children in three Integrated Tribal Development Agency (ITDA blocks of Andhra Pradesh. Results & Conclusions: Based on the WHO Child Growth Standards, the prevalence of malnutrition was lower in the AP tribal blocks than the national averages among tribal populations, but higher than the overall national and state averages.

  12. Thinking Like an Indian: Healing Tribal Gang Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Describes a tribal school with a mission to gang-involved youth in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (Arizona). Explains disciplinary actions; involvement of parents, teachers, and police; and requirements for student participation in various activities. (LRW)

  13. 40 CFR 233.61 - Determination of Tribal eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., safety, and welfare of the affected population; taxation; and the exercise of the power of eminent domain; and (3) Identify the source of the Tribal government's authority to carry out the governmental...

  14. State, Local and Tribal Resources for Creating Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page will be a combination of three current pages on resources - ‘Resources for Healthier Schools’, ‘Schools: Student Curricula for Healthier School’ and ‘Schools: Regional, Tribal, State and Local Resources for Healthier Schools’ pages

  15. Feasibility Analysis For Heating Tribal Buildings with Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Clairmont; Micky Bourdon; Tom Roche; Colene Frye

    2009-03-03

    This report provides a feasibility study for the heating of Tribal buildings using woody biomass. The study was conducted for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. S&K Holding Company and TP Roche Company completed the study and worked together to provide the final report. This project was funded by the DOE's Tribal Energy Program.

  16. The Fort Smith radioactive belt, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Fort Smith Belt is an elongate zone, about 200 km x 50 km, extending from the East Arm of Great Slave Lake southerly into northeastern Alberta. The major feature of the belt is that it is one of the most radioactive regions so far recognized in the Canadian Shield. Potassium, uranium, and thorium are all enriched but the greatest increase is in thorium. The dominant rock type underlying the area is a foliated porphyritic granite. This rock contains an average of about 80 ppm thorium (with areas of tens of square kilometres containing up to 200 ppm) and approximately 11 ppm uranium. In places, dark elongate zones rich in biotite, apatite, and opaque minerals within the porphyritic granite may contain an order of magnitude more uranium and thorium than the porphyry. Radioactive minerals within both the porphyry and the dark zones are principally monazite (containing up to 16% ThO 2 ) and isolated grains of uraninite. This foliated porphyritic granite is interpreted as being pre- or syntectonic with respect to the Hudsonian event because its foliation parallels that of the surrounding rocks. There has been subsequent deformation. The second characteristic feature of the Fort Smith Belt is the development of a peripheral zone where eU is enriched relative to eTh correlating mainly with granitoid rocks which surround the thorium-rich area and wherein ratios of eU/eTh exceed 1:2 (compared to the crustal average of 1:4). Uranium may have moved laterally into this marginal area from the thorium-rich porphyry, possibly in a vapour phase. There is a possibility that concentrations of uranium as well as other metals such as Cu, Mo, Zn, Sn, and W could exist in the porphyry and its margin in appropriate chemical and/or structural traps. The radioactive granite rocks of the Fort Smith Belt are adjacent to uranium-thorium occurrences in the nearby Proterozoic Nonacho sediments but whether or not a genetic relationship exists between the two situations is uncertain. (auth)

  17. DOE's Tribal Energy Program Offers Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. MacCourt, Chair, Indian Law Practice, Ater Wynne LLP

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or who seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. Building upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in tribal energy workshops conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, it is designed to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process. It includes information on how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; a general overview of key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and a detailed discussion of ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects. The guide also includes a glossary of some of the most commonly used technical terms.

  18. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2004-05-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Combined fish stocking by the hatcheries and net pen rearing projects in 2003 included: 899,168 kokanee yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt; 1,087,331 kokanee fry/fingerlings released into Banks Lake, 44,000 rainbow trout fingerlings and; 580,880 rainbow trout yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt. Stock composition of 2003 releases consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2003 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to

  19. Morphological and Dimensional Characteristics of Dental Arch among Tribal and Non-tribal Population of Central India: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Naveen S; Saxena, Vrinda; Vyas, Rajesh; Sharma, Rohit; Sharva, Vijayta; Dwivedi, Ashish; Jain, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Background: Differences in the dental arch among Bhil Aboriginals were investigated and compared with non-tribal individuals residing in a tribal zone of Central India. Plaster models (120) were made with the help of alginate impression of tribal adults as well as non-tribal adults residing in the same area. The supposition as aboriginals being primitive due to dietary practices maxillary arch size and mandibular arch size is distended in comparison to the non-tribal population as adaptation of soft refined diet has disrupted the growth of the jaws. Hence, an attempt was made to evaluate the arch widths of tribal population and to associate it with non-tribe population in the same area of Central India. Materials and Methods: Difference in morphology and dimension of the maxillary and mandibular arches was aimed at Bhil tribes as well as non-tribal residents of tribe rich zone of Central India. The study was steered amid 120 individuals both tribal and non-tribe equally around 60 each through a well-organized out-reach program intermittently. Study models were made of dental arches of all participants. All measurements of the arch dimension were patent on the study casts using an electronic digital sliding caliper. Pair t-test was applied by using SPSS software version-19.0. Results: In the maxillary arch, on appraisal the non-tribal and Bhil tribe’s subjects, it showed a statistically significant difference in inter-incisor width (2.95 mm), inter-canine width (2.60 mm), arch depth (3.25 mm). While inter premolar width (0.20 mm) and inter molar width (0.80 mm) anterior arch length (0.60 mm), and posterior arch length (0.10 mm) showed statistically not significant difference between non-tribal population and Bhil tribe subjects. In the mandibular arch, it showed a statistically significant difference in inter-canine width (1.00 mm). Although, inter-incisor width (0.72 mm), inter-molar width (0.80 mm), arch depth (0.90 mm), anterior arch length (0.30 mm), posterior

  20. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    OpenAIRE

    Uday Narayan Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi ...

  1. Master environmental plan for Fort Devens, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biang, C.A.; Peters, R.W.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

    1991-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a master environmental plan (MEP) for Fort Devens, Massachusetts, for the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. The MEP is an assessment based on environmental laws and regulations of both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MEP assess the physical and environmental status of 58 potential hazardous waste sites, including 54 study areas (SAs) that pose a potential for releasing contamination into the environment and 4 areas of concern (AOCs) that are known to have substantial contamination. For each SA or AOC, this MEP describes the known history and environment, identifies additional data needs, and proposes possible response actions. Most recommended response actions consist of environmental sampling and monitoring and other characterization studies. 74 refs., 63 figs., 50 tabs.

  2. Fort St. Vrain defueling ampersand decommissioning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warembourg, D.

    1994-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station (FSV) is one of the first commercial reactors to be decommissioned under NRC's decommissioning rule. The defueling and decommissioning of this 330 MWe High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has involved many challenges for Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC) including defueling to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI), establishing decommissioning funding, obtaining regulatory approvals, arranging for waste disposal, and managing a large fixed price decommissioning contract. In 1990, a team comprised of the Westinghouse Corporation and Morrison Knudsen Corporation, with the Scientific Ecology Group as a major subcontractor, was contracted by PSC to perform the decommissioning under a fixed price contract. Physical work activities began in August 1992. Currently, physical dismantlement activities are about 45% complete, the project is on schedule, and is within budget

  3. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramblett, G.C.; Fisher, C.R.; Swart, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection. Later in the year, a scheduled shutdown was undertaken for surveillance tests, insertion of core region constraint devices (RCDs), and other maintenance. Fort St. Vrain has encountered problems of the type that would be expected in a first-of-a-kind system. The plant is currently restricted to 70% of design power by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pending resolution of the core region gas outlet temperature fluctuation problem. Even so, the basic performance of the HTGR concept and all of the unique design features have been successfully demonstrated. The system has been characterized by low personnel radiation exposures, operational flexibility, and long time afforded for status evaluation and response. (author)

  4. New physical examination tests for lumbar spondylolisthesis and instability: low midline sill sign and interspinous gap change during lumbar flexion-extension motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kang; Jhun, Hyung-Joon

    2015-04-22

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis (LS) and lumbar instability (LI) are common disorders in patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. However, few physical examination tests for LS and LI have been reported. In the study described herein, new physical examination tests for LS and LI were devised and evaluated for their validity. The test for LS was designated "low midline sill sign", and that for LI was designated "interspinous gap change" during lumbar flexion-extension motion. The validity of the low midline sill sign was evaluated in 96 patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. Validity of the interspinous gap change during lumbar flexion-extension motion was evaluated in 73 patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the two tests were also investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the low midline sill sign for LS were 81.3% and 89.1%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of the test were 78.8% and 90.5%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the interspinous gap change test for LI were 82.2% and 60.7%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of the test were 77.1% and 68.0%, respectively. The low midline sill sign and interspinous gap change tests are effective for the detection of LS and LI, and can be performed easily in an outpatient setting.

  5. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and

  6. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colah, Roshan B; Mukherjee, Malay B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with β-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of α-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Orissa and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease.

  7. Strategic Analysis and Plan for Implementing Telemedicine at Fort Greely

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolton, Karl

    2003-01-01

    .... To best accomplish this, a strategic analysis and business case analysis was conducted. Introspective strategic analysis tools revealed an organization that is capable of supporting a telemedicine program at Fort Greely...

  8. BIA Wingate High School WWTF, Fort Wingate, NM: NN0020958

    Science.gov (United States)

    NPDES Permit and Fact Sheet explaining EPA's action under the Clean Water Act to issue NPDES Permit No. NN0020958 to Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Wingate High School Wastewater Treatment Lagoon, Fort Wingate, NM.

  9. RadNet Air Data From Fort Madison, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Fort Madison, IA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  10. BRAND EQUITY OF LAHORE FORT AS A TOURISM DESTINATION BRAND

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Kashif; Siti Zakiah Melatu Samsi; Syamsulang Sarifuddin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTStudies that measure the brand equity of destination brands by using the Customer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE) model in a developing country context are scarce. The present study investigates the destination brand equity of the Lahore Fort by employing the CBBE model in a developing country context of Pakistan. Following the positivist tradition, we adopted a survey-based approach to collect data from 237 tourists visiting the Lahore Fort. Data were collected through a questionnaire deve...

  11. Undervisning mellem fortælling og feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten Margrethe

    2016-01-01

    Feedback gør det muligt for den enkelte at forstå, hvordan jeg kan blive bedre til det, jeg er ved at lære. Fortællinger gør det muligt for den enkelte at udvide horisonten og derved komme til en forståelse af, hvilke mulige perspektiver der er for at forholde sig til den verden, som fortællingen...

  12. Fort Collins Science Center fiscal year 2010 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2011-01-01

    The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), apply their diverse ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigate complicated ecological problems confronting managers of the Nation's biological resources. FORT works closely with U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agency scientists, the academic community, other USGS science centers, and many other partners to provide critical information needed to help answer complex natural-resource management questions. In Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), FORT's scientific and technical professionals conducted ongoing, expanded, and new research vital to the science needs and management goals of DOI, other Federal and State agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in the areas of aquatic systems and fisheries, climate change, data and information integration and management, invasive species, science support, security and technology, status and trends of biological resources (including the socioeconomic aspects), terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, and wildlife resources, including threatened and endangered species. This report presents selected FORT science accomplishments for FY10 by the specific USGS mission area or science program with which each task is most closely associated, though there is considerable overlap. The report also includes all FORT publications and other products published in FY10, as well as staff accomplishments, appointments, committee assignments, and invited presentations.

  13. 78 FR 27284 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Funding Availability: Solicitation of Grant Applications for FY 2013 Tribal Transit Program Funds...

  14. Fiscal Year 2013 Office of Environmental Information (OEI) Tribal Accomplishments Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is a compilation of EPA’s Office of Environmental Information tribal accomplishments that details efforts and activities conducted in support of the OEI Tribal Strategy during fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  15. Fiscal Year 2012 Office of Environmental Information (OEI) Tribal Accomplishments Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is a compilation of EPA’s Office of Environmental Information tribal accomplishments that details efforts and activities conducted in support of the OEI Tribal Strategy during fiscal year (FY) 2012.

  16. 76 FR 22412 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is submitting a proposed information collection...: New. Title: Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program Grants. Brief Description of Collection: Indian... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Information Collection for Tribal Energy...

  17. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs): Research, Collaborations, and Other Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribal Science Webinar Series provides a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities, and features a wide variety of expert guest speakers from government,.....

  18. Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Interagency Coordination and Collaboration for the Protection of Tribal Treaty Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) affirming protection of tribal treaty rights and similar tribal rights relating to natural resources when federal action is taken. It will be updated as additional federal agencies become signatories.

  19. Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Kim [EPA Specialist

    2013-09-17

    In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

  20. School Adjustment And Academic Achievement Among Tribal Dolescents In Manipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ch. Beda Devi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is an attempt to examine school adjustment and academic achievement among tribal adolescent students in two districts of Manipur. The study also attempts to examine the high and low academic achievers of tribal students of the two areas. The sample comprised of 629 XI standard tribal adolescent students. Out of which 136 were from Imphal West and 493 were from Ukhrul district. A standardized school adjustment inventory for adolescent students developed by the investigator was used. For academic achievement the last public examination i.e. H.S.L.C. marks were used as the index of academic achievement. The findings revealed that a low positive correlation between school adjustment and academic achievement in both the districts. It was also reveals that high academic achievers had better adaptability in school than that of low academic achievers

  1. Microbial Fuel Cell Possibilities on American Indian Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Kimberlynn [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief background of tribal reservations, the process of how Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) work, and the potential benefits of using MFCs on tribal reservations to convert waste water to energy as a means to sustainably generate electricity. There have been no known studies conducted on tribal lands that would be able to add to the estimated percentage of all renewable energy resources identified. Not only does MFC technology provide a compelling, innovative solution, it could also address better management of wastewater, using it as a form of energy generation. Using wastewater for clean energy generation could provide a viable addition to community infrastructure systems improvements.

  2. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  3. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  4. Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

    1980-01-04

    This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater

  5. Work Participation in Cultural Operations of Rice Farming by Tribal and Non-Tribal Labourers in Wayanad district : A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a traditional staple food crop of India, having high cultural and ecological significance in the present global scenario. Tribal labourers in Wayanad district of Kerala had been the traditional labourers in rice farming. The consequent migration of non-tribals to Wayanad district of Kerala had been changed the demographic and cultural entity of the district. The present study was conducted in Wayanad district to compare the work participation between tribal and non- tribal labourers. Twenty tribal and non-tribal labourers were selected from each selected panchayats and a total of one hundred and twenty respondents were included in the study. A well-structured interview schedule was used for collecting the data from the respondents. The data were tabulated and inferences were drawn after appropriate statistical analysis. The results show that majority of the tribal labourers had high work participation than non-tribals. While comparing based on gender, female labourers had high work participation than male labourers both in the case of tribal and non-tribal labourers.

  6. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lamds of Viejas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrence Meyer (Black & Veatch); Mike Elenbaas (Black & Veatch)

    2005-09-30

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of Renewable Energy Development on the lands of the Viejas Band of the Kumeyaay Indian Nation. In addition, the study will investigate the feasibility of forming a renewable energy based tribal utility. Viejas contracted with Black & Veatch and Fredericks, Pelcyger & Hester, LLC to assist in the development of a feasibility study to ascertain the economics and operational factors of forming an electric and water utility. This report is the result of the investigation conducted by Black & Veatch, with input from Viejas Tribal Government.

  7. Improving the Participation of Tribal Women in Developmental Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nisha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tribal women are gradually becoming integrated into village organizations. The present study was conducted among 120 tribal women respondents in four selected panchayats of Nilgiris district in Tamil Nadu. The respondents were selected using proportionate random sampling method. The data were collected from each respondent through a pre-tested interview schedule. The results were analysed with the help of statistical tools like mean, frequency and percentage. The results revealed that majority of the women respondents had more social taboos, superstitions and traditions as the major constraints in participating in various developmental programmes

  8. Native Geosciences: Strengthening the Future Through Tribal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.; Quigley, I.; Douville, V.; Hollow Horn Bear, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways in our natural sacred homelands and environments. Tribal cultures are the expression of deep understandings of geosciences shared through oral histories, language and ceremonies. Today, Native people as all people are living in a definite time of change. The developing awareness of "change" brings forth an immense opportunity to expand and elevate Native geosciences knowledge, specifically in the areas of earth, wind, fire and water. At the center of "change" is the need to balance the needs of the people with the needs of the environment. Native tradition and our inherent understanding of what is "sacred above is sacred below" is the foundation for an emerging multi-faceted approach to increasing the representation of Natives in geosciences. The approach is also a pathway to assist in Tribal language revitalization, connection of oral histories and ceremonies as well as building an intergenerational teaching/learning community. Humboldt State University, Sinte Gleska University and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in partnership with Northern California (Hoopa, Yurok, & Karuk) and Great Plains (Lakota) Tribes have nurtured Native geosciences learning communities connected to Tribal Sacred Sites and natural resources. These sites include the Black Hills (Mato Paha, Mato Tiplia, Hinhan Kaga Paha, Mako Sica etc.), Klamath River (Ishkêesh), and Hoopa Valley (Natinixwe). Native geosciences learning is centered on the themes of earth, wind, fire and water and Native application of remote sensing technologies. Tribal Elders and Native geoscientists work collaboratively providing Native families in-field experiential intergenerational learning opportunities which invite participants to immerse themselves spiritually, intellectually, physically and emotionally in the experiences. Through this immersion and experience Native students and families strengthen the circle of our future Tribal

  9. In the Service of Others: How Volunteering Is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talahongva, Patty

    2016-01-01

    Today, the spirit of volunteering is very much alive at every tribal college and university (TCU). From fundraisers for food pantries to educational activities that help fellow students, TCUs help forge reciprocity among students and staff. Volunteerism is integral to the tribal college experience. Volunteerism at three tribal colleges--Cankdeska…

  10. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities are...

  11. 42 CFR 137.15 - Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? 137... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.15 Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? Those...

  12. 75 FR 28103 - Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... , or [email protected] . Akiachak Native Community, George Peter, Tribal Administrator, P.O.../a. Aleknagik, Native Village of, Jane Gottschalk, Tribal Children Service Worker, P.O. Box 115... Eskimo Community) Goodnews Bay, Native Village of, Peter Julius, Tribal Administrator, P.O. Box 138...

  13. 76 FR 38655 - Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... consultation is integral to a deliberative process that results in effective collaboration and informed..., November 6, 2000, and the Presidential Memorandum of November 5, 2009 and September 23, 2004, Consultation... Tribal Consultation Session: Name: Tribal Advisory Committee (TAC) Meeting and 7th Biannual Tribal...

  14. 23 CFR 661.55 - How are BIA and Tribal owned IRR bridges inspected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are BIA and Tribal owned IRR bridges inspected? 661... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.55 How are BIA and Tribal owned IRR bridges inspected? BIA and Tribally owned IRR bridges are inspected in accordance with 25 CFR part...

  15. 25 CFR 170.148 - What is a tribal transit program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a tribal transit program? 170.148 Section 170.148... PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.148 What is a tribal transit program? A tribal transit program is the planning, administration, acquisition, and...

  16. Educating Students, Transforming Communities: Tribal Colleges Bridge Gap from Poverty to Prosperity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Sherrole

    2012-01-01

    Tribal colleges are often performing little miracles in their communities. Most tribal colleges operate without benefit of local and state taxes. Yet, they bring in new money from other sources that stimulate the local economy. Students gain knowledge and skills that can transform their communities and local economies. Tribal colleges not only…

  17. 25 CFR 162.204 - Must notice of applicable tribal laws and leasing policies be provided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Must notice of applicable tribal laws and leasing... applicable tribal laws and leasing policies be provided? (a) A tribe must provide us with an official copy of any tribal law or leasing policy that supersedes or modifies these regulations under §§ 162.109 or 162...

  18. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Fish produced by this project in 2004 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 1,655,722 kokanee fingerlings, 537,783 rainbow trout fingerlings and 507,660 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the

  19. Lunar floor-fractured craters: Modes of dike and sill emplacement and implications of gas production and intrusion cooling on surface morphology and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W.

    2018-05-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters (FFCs) represent the surface manifestation of a class of shallow crustal intrusions in which magma-filled cracks (dikes) rising to the surface from great depth encounter contrasts in host rock lithology (breccia lens, rigid solidified melt sheet) and intrude laterally to form a sill, laccolith or bysmalith, thereby uplifting and deforming the crater floor. Recent developments in the knowledge of lunar crustal thickness and density structure have enabled important revisions to models of the generation, ascent and eruption of magma, and new knowledge about the presence and behavior of magmatic volatiles has provided additional perspectives on shallow intrusion processes in FFCs. We use these new data to assess the processes that occur during dike and sill emplacement with particular emphasis on tracking the fate and migration of volatiles and their relation to candidate venting processes. FFCs result when dikes are capable of intruding close to the surface, but fail to erupt because of the substructure of their host impact craters, and instead intrude laterally after encountering a boundary where an increase in ductility (base of breccia lens) or rigidity (base of solidified melt sheet) occurs. Magma in dikes approaching the lunar surface experiences increasingly lower overburden pressures: this enhances CO gas formation and brings the magma into the realm of the low pressure release of H2O and sulfur compounds, both factors adding volatiles to those already collected in the rising low-pressure part of the dike tip. High magma rise velocity is driven by the positive buoyancy of the magma in the part of the dike remaining in the mantle. The dike tip overshoots the interface and the consequent excess pressure at the interface drives the horizontal flow of magma to form the intrusion and raise the crater floor. If sill intrusion were controlled by the physical properties at the base of the melt sheet, dikes would be required to approach to

  20. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    OpenAIRE

    Uday Narayan Yadav; Shradha Parsekar; Vidya Prabhu; Divya Sussan Patil; Sumit Kumar; Mannat Mohan Singh; Ravikant Singh; Poshan Thapa

    2013-01-01

    Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi Taluk. Study parti...

  1. Valuing Native American Tribal Elders and Stories for Sustainability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritter, Kristine; Scheurerman, Richard; Strong, Cindy; Schuster, Carrie Jim; Williams, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines a framework the authors have used to infuse sustainability study into humanities teaching at the middle school level. Native American tribal elders can act as co-teachers in such classrooms, and the place-based stories that shaped their views of the environment can serve as important classroom texts to investigate sustainable…

  2. 77 FR 12226 - Indian Tribal Government Plans; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... Correction As published, REG-133223-08, contains errors that may prove to be misleading and are in need of... preamble, under the caption ADDRESSES:, second paragraph, first line, the language ``Mail outlines to CC:PA... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans; Correction AGENCY...

  3. 76 FR 76633 - Indian Tribal Governmental Plans; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... errors that may prove to be misleading and are in need of clarification. Correction of Publication...'', second paragraph of the column, second line, the language ``Bingo & Casino, held that the operating'' is... [REG-133223-08] RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Governmental Plans; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue...

  4. 75 FR 48329 - Tribal Drinking Water Operator Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... operator has the skills, knowledge, education and experience necessary to deliver safe water supporting... demonstrates the operator has the skills, knowledge, education and experience necessary to deliver safe water... this program can be found at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/tribal.html . 2. Hard Copies. Hard copies of...

  5. Betting on Language: Gaming's Flush Flows to Tribal Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Liz

    2001-01-01

    Mainstream media spreads misperceptions that American Indian gaming benefits just a few, is not well regulated, and encourages criminal activity. The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act mandates that gaming revenues fund tribal government programs; now that they have their own revenue, tribes are enthusiastically funding educational programs to maintain…

  6. Tribalism as a Foiled Factor of Africa Nation-Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okogu, J. O.; Umudjere, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper tends to examine tribalism as a foiled factor on Africa nation-building and proffers useful tips to salvaging the Africa land from this deadly social problem. Africans in times past had suffered enormous attacks, injuries, losses, deaths, destruction of properties and human skills and ideas due to the presence of tribalistic views in…

  7. The impacts of climate change on tribal traditional foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathy Lynn; John Daigle; Jennie Hoffman; Frank Lake; Natalie Michelle; Darren Ranco; Carson Viles; Garrit Voggesser; Paul. Williams

    2013-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are uniquely affected by climate change. Indigenous peoples have depended on a wide variety of native fungi, plant and animal species for food, medicine, ceremonies, community and economic health for countless generations. Climate change stands to impact the species and ecosystems that constitute tribal traditional foods that...

  8. Chaparral Commerce Center Proposed Tribal Minor NSR Permit Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Minor New Source Review (NSR) Permit application for the two emergency diesel-fired generators (1,500 kW each) to be installed at the Chaparral Commerce Center in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC) in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  9. From the other end: Tribals and democratic decentralisation in Kerala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.; Krishnan, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the contradictions of India s development trajectory by taking the case of the tribal population in the state of Kerala. The wide appreciation for the Kerala Model of development (characterised by significant achievements in social development, without corresponding economic

  10. Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Tribal College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lopik, William

    2012-01-01

    The college classroom at a tribal college offers a dynamic perspective on the discussion of traditional ecological knowledge. It provides a unique view because it is one of the very few settings in higher education where the majority of students in the class are American Indian. It is here where traditional ecological knowledge should become…

  11. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Maria Perez, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Historically, American Indian Tribes have lacked sufficient numbers of trained, technical personnel from their communities to serve their communities; tribal expertise in the fields of science, business and engineering being extremely rare and programs to encourage these disciplines almost non-existent. Subsequently, Tribes have made crucial decisions about their land and other facets of Tribal existence based upon outside technical expertise, such as that provided by the United States government and/or private industries. These outside expert opinions rarely took into account the traditional and cultural values of the Tribes being advised. The purpose of this internship was twofold: Create and maintain a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU) to plan for the Summit on Tribal human resource development; and Evaluate and engage in current efforts to strengthen the Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering and Science (TRIBES) program. The intern lists the following as the project results: Positive interactions and productive meetings between CERT and CSU; Gathered information from Tribes; CERT database structure modification; Experience as facilitator in participating methods; Preliminary job descriptions for staff of future TRIBES programs; and Additions for the intern`s personal database of professional contacts and resources.

  12. Tribal Watershed Management: Culture, Science, Capacity, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Amanda; Ostergren, David M.

    2007-01-01

    This research focuses on two elements of contemporary American Indian natural resource management. First, the authors explore the capacity of tribes to manage natural resources, including the merging of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with Western science. Second, they analyze tribal management in the context of local and regional…

  13. Air Pollutants and Ecological Conditions Around Schools on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children are more vulnerable to exposures from their everyday environments compared to adults. Children from Tribal communities have a greater burden of adverse health and well-being outcomes versus children from other communities in the U.S. (US DHHS 2016). Stressors from chi...

  14. Resurgence of tribal levies: Double taxation for the rural poor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People in the former homelands waged a successful battle against the imposition of 'tribal levies' during the anti-apartheid struggle. Recently, however, there has been a resurgence of traditional authorities demanding annual levies. Those who refuse to pay cannot access government grants and identity books. This article ...

  15. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining

  16. 25 CFR 900.51 - What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Property Management System Standards § 900.51 What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do? An Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management...

  17. 25 CFR 900.41 - How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems General § 900.41 How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records? The... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep...

  18. Tribal Colleges and Universities in the 21st Century: Native American Female Leadership in Tribal Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitting Crow, Karen Paetz

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of Native American female leadership is becoming a more prevalent topic in the scholarly literature as more educated Native American women become visible in tribal higher education. This qualitative case study explored Native American female leadership, as a growing number of Native American women enter higher education and earn…

  19. Three-dimensional shuffling of horses in a strike-slip duplex: an example from the Lambertville sill, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Stephen E.; Gates, Alexander E.

    1996-06-01

    Detailed analysis of a dextral strike-slip duplex within the relatively isotropic rocks of the Lambertville sill, New Jersey indicates that horses have experienced vertical, horizontal and oblique movements resulting from extrusional shuffling within a restraining bend. This is the first documentation of the three-dimensional movement of horses within a strike-slip duplex. Deformation within the duplex shows a complex system of early synthetic fractures and reverse faults followed by antithetic fractures which dissect previously continuous slab-shaped horses into diamond-shaped lenses. Most faults are oblique slip. Antithetic fault movements and clockwise rigid rotation of horses dominate the south half of the duplex and synthetic movements and counterclockwise rotations dominate the north half. Slickenline plunges on curved horse-bounding fault surfaces within the duplex range from nearly horizontal to 40° resulting in both lateral movements (middle) to normal movements (tails) on a single horse. Curved slickensides commonly have opposite senses of movement on either side of individual horses indicating relative emergence or submergence. Such a geometry could also result from a group of horses moving in the same oblique direction but at different rates. These complex extrusional-type movements were observed in both cross-sectional and plan views. The net result of the movements is a contraction or flattening of the duplex normal to the bounding faults. The horses shifted to accommodate this flattening as overall displacement was transferred between the bounding faults along curved internal faults.

  20. Fort Collins Science Center - Fiscal Year 2008 Science Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2009-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) contribute a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigating complicated ecological problems that address critical management questions. In Fiscal Year 2008 (FY08), FORT's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to the science and management needs of U.S. Department of the Interior agencies and other entities. This annual report describes select FY08 accomplishments in research and technical assistance involving biological information management and delivery; aquatic, riparian, and managed-river ecosystems; invasive species; status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions and social science); terrestrial ecosystems; and fish and wildlife resources.

  1. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, K.; Markel, T.; Simpson, M.; Leahey, J.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Lisell, L.; Burman, K.; Singer, M.

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Army's Fort Carson installation was selected to serve as a prototype for net zero energy assessment and planning. NREL performed the comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of Fort Carson to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. This study is part of a larger cross-laboratory effort that also includes an assessment of renewable opportunities at seven other DoD Front Range installations, a microgrid design for Fort Carson critical loads and an assessment of regulatory and market-based barriers to a regional secure smart grid.

  2. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

  3. Fortælling og fortolkning i Jyske Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Charlotte

    Afhandlingen præsenterer en undersøgelse af et konkret eksempel på storytelling brugt som strategisk ledelses- og kommunikationsredskab i en organisations interne kommunikation. Eksemplet er fortællingen "Slaget ved Vejle", som stammer fra Jyske Bank og udgør under afhandlingens case. De overordn......Afhandlingen præsenterer en undersøgelse af et konkret eksempel på storytelling brugt som strategisk ledelses- og kommunikationsredskab i en organisations interne kommunikation. Eksemplet er fortællingen "Slaget ved Vejle", som stammer fra Jyske Bank og udgør under afhandlingens case. De...

  4. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2009 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2010-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center?many of whom are at the forefront of their fields?possess a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise. Because of this diverse talent, Fort Collins Science Center staff are able to apply a systems approach to investigating complicated ecological problems in a way that helps answer critical management questions. In addition, the Fort Collins Science Center has a long record of working closely with the academic community through cooperative agreements and other collaborations. The Fort Collins Science Center is deeply engaged with other U.S. Geological Survey science centers and partners throughout the Department of the Interior. As a regular practice, we incorporate the expertise of these partners in providing a full complement of ?the right people? to effectively tackle the multifaceted research problems of today's resource-management world. In Fiscal Year 2009, the Fort Collins Science Center's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to Department of the Interior's science and management needs. Fort Collins Science Center work also supported the science needs of other Federal and State agencies as well as non-government organizations. Specifically, Fort Collins Science Center research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management and delivery, enterprise information, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions), terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In the process, Fort Collins Science Center science addressed natural-science information needs identified in the U

  5. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Drum, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Scott A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Solana, Amy E.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rowley, Steven; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2010-10-20

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Drum, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Drum took place on May 4 and 5, 2010.

  6. Construction experience on PCRV liners at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, J.O.; Wunderlich, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of the steel liners for the Fort St. Vrain prestressed concrete reactor vessel presented many unique problems for which techniques were developed to satisfy the rigid specification requirements. The PCRV cavity liner was fabricated from 1.9cm carbon steel plate. The liners were partially fabricated by Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company at their Pittsburgh manufacturing facility. The liners were then shipped by rail to within approximately five miles of the jobsite and then trucked the remaining distance. The construction techniques, dimensional control, concrete support and testing utilized on the Fort St. Vrain project are presented in detail and demonstrate the flexibility of the PCRV for field construction. (author)

  7. En fascinerende fortælling om det 20. århundredes musik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Karl Aage Rasmussen: Musik i det tyvende århundrede: En fortælling. Gyldendal 2011.......Anmeldelse af Karl Aage Rasmussen: Musik i det tyvende århundrede: En fortælling. Gyldendal 2011....

  8. Rapid Fielding: Case Study Concerning the Fielding of the Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) M270A1 to 2d Battalion 4th Field Artillery Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saiz, Evangeline M

    2006-01-01

    .... This case study investigates one aspect of Army Transformation, accelerated fielding, to determine whether the Army's materiel fielding program properly supports rapidly fielding of essential major...

  9. 78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Fort Monroe Fireworks Display, Chesapeake Bay, Hampton, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Fort Monroe Fireworks Display, Chesapeake Bay, Hampton, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... navigable waters of the Chesapeake Bay in Hampton, VA to support the Fort Monroe Fireworks. This action is... Authority will host a fireworks display in the Chesapeake Bay off of Fort Monroe in Hampton, VA. The...

  10. 77 FR 35308 - Proposed Amendment of Restricted Area R-6601; Fort A.P. Hill, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ...-0561; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-7] Proposed Amendment of Restricted Area R-6601; Fort A.P. Hill, VA..., Fort A.P. Hill, VA. The U. S. Army requested this action to provide the additional airspace needed to... Garrison, Fort A.P. Hill, VA 22427; telephone: (804) 633-8223. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul...

  11. Case Study: Fort Mill High School--A Culture of Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This is the latest in a series of case studies highlighting best practices High Schools That Work (HSTW) network schools and districts are implementing to prepare students better for further studies and careers. Fort Mill High School is in Fort Mill, South Carolina, an outlying suburb of Charlotte, North Carolina. Fort Mill links high quality…

  12. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in...

  13. 78 FR 3479 - Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council AGENCY: The Presidio Trust. ACTION: Notice of public meeting of Fort Scott Council. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), notice is hereby given that a public meeting of the Fort Scott...

  14. 78 FR 18633 - Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council AGENCY: The Presidio Trust. ACTION: Notice of public meeting of Fort Scott Council. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), notice is hereby given that a public meeting of the Fort Scott...

  15. 76 FR 71611 - Notice of Establishment of the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Establishment of the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee AGENCY: The Presidio Trust. ACTION: Notice of establishment of the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee. SUMMARY... the Presidio Trust announces the intent to establish the Fort Winfield Scott Advisory Committee...

  16. An Asset-Based Approach to Tribal Community Energy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Rachael A. [Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, NY (United States). City and Regional Planning; Martino, Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies; Begay, Sandra K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies

    2016-08-01

    Community energy planning is a vital component of successful energy resource development and project implementation. Planning can help tribes develop a shared vision and strategies to accomplish their energy goals. This paper explores the benefits of an asset-based approach to tribal community energy planning. While a framework for community energy planning and federal funding already exists, some areas of difficulty in the planning cycle have been identified. This paper focuses on developing a planning framework that offsets those challenges. The asset-based framework described here takes inventory of a tribe’s capital assets, such as: land capital, human capital, financial capital, and political capital. Such an analysis evaluates how being rich in a specific type of capital can offer a tribe unique advantages in implementing their energy vision. Finally, a tribal case study demonstrates the practical application of an asset-based framework.

  17. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to: create a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU); involve and create relationships among individuals and departments at CSU; empower Native communities to run their own affairs; establish programs for the benefit of Tribes; and create Native American Program Development Office at CSU. The intern lists the following as the project results: revised a Native American Program Development document; confirmation from 45 departments across campus for Summit attendance [Tribal Human Resource Development Summit]; created initial invitee list from CSU departments and colleges; and informed CERT and CSU staff of results. Much of the response from the campus community has been positive and enthusiastic. They are ready to develop new Native American programs on campus, but need the awareness of what they can do to be respectful of Tribal needs.

  18. 32 CFR 552.168 - Fort Lewis Area Access Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of this subpart. (d) A wallet-sized permit (HFL Form 653) and a vehicle pass (HFL Form 652) will be... 552.168 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.168 Fort Lewis Area Access Office. (a) DPTM Range...

  19. Report on Adolescent Pregnancy in Fort Worth, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tees, Sandra

    Teenage pregnancy is an overwhelming problem in Fort Worth, Texas. To examine the problem of teenage pregnancy, figures on total live births by age, race, repeat pregnancy, and at-risk infants were gathered from 1981 and 1982 Department of Public Health data. In addition, consequences of teenage pregnancy and motivation factors were examined. An…

  20. Informal report on measurements of slant TEC by FORTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's Space and Atmospheric Sciences group is now operating the FORTE satellite, which has two sets of instruments: optical detectors and radio detectors. In this report the author describes work with one set of radio detectors that allow measurements of the total electron content (TEC) traversed by VHF radiation originating at an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator located at Los Alamos

  1. 25 CFR 162.501 - Fort Belknap Reservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fort Belknap Reservation. 162.501 Section 162.501 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Special... may be leased for the culture of sugar beets and other crops in rotation for terms not exceeding ten...

  2. Fort Peck-Wolf Point transmission line project, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the project is to replace the existing 36-mile Fort Peck-Wolf Point transmission line which has reached the end of its useful service life. Presently, the overall condition of this existing section of the 47-year-old line is poor. Frequent repairs have been required because of the absence of overhead ground wires. The continued maintenance of the line will become more expensive and customer interruptions will persist because of the damage due to lightning. The expense of replacing shell rotted poles, and the concern for the safety of the maintenance personnel because of hazards caused by severe shell rot are also of primary importance. The operational and maintenance problems coupled with power system simulation studies, demonstrate the need for improvements to the Wolf Point area to serve area loads. Western's Wolf Point Substation is an important point of interconnection for the power output from the Fort Peck Dam to area loads as far away as Williston, North Dakota. The proposed transmission line replacement would assure that there will continue to be reliable transmission capacity available to serve area electrical loads, as well as provide a reliable second high-voltage transmission path from the Fort Peck generation to back-up a loss of the Fort Peck-Wolf Point 115-kV Line No. 1

  3. Tile forts of the Liesbeeck Frontier | Sleigh | Scientia Militaria: South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 27 (1997) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Tile forts of the Liesbeeck Frontier.

  4. Frakturerede fortænder – behandling med direkte plast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    Kompositte plastmaterialer og adhæsivteknik har gjort det muligt at restaurere frakturerede fortænder med minimal risiko for pulpale og parodontale komplikationer hos både børn og voksne. Behandlingen kan udføres umiddelbart efter traumet, hvis skaden ikke involverer parodontium eller knogle. Kla...

  5. Calculation of Void in the Fort Saint Vrain Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Craig Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Coons, James Elmer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    The percent void of the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) material is estimated to be 21.1% based on the volume of the gap at the top of the drums, the volume of the coolant channels in the FSV fuel element, and the volume of the fuel handling channel in the FSV fuel element.

  6. Clinical Evaluation of the Efficacy of Arthocare Forte, A Chondro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthocare forte medication is made up of different constituents and the advantages offered by this disposition have not been explored in the management of chronic periodontitis. Aim: The aim was to assess the clinical response of bacterial plaque.induced generalized chronic periodontitis to arthocare ...

  7. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Melinda Jacquez, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the intern project was to write a comprehensive booklet on all state legislation proposed in 1995 on Native American issues. A second purpose was to contact tribal governments and request an ordinance, law or resolution on hazardous and nuclear waste transportation. This intern report contains a summary of bills proposed in 37 state legislatures pertaining to Native American issues. Time ran out before the second project objective could be met.

  8. Accuracy of Weight Perception Among American Indian Tribal College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Heather D; Pacheco, Christina; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Daley, Christine; Greiner, K Allen; Choi, Won S

    2016-11-01

    National data indicate a higher prevalence of obesity among American Indian (AI) populations and greater disparity of morbidity and mortality among younger age groups compared with other ethnicities. Diet and physical activity are important obesity preventive behaviors, but no published data exist that describe these behaviors in relation to obesity in AI young adults at tribal colleges. Study purposes were to: (1) identify fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity practices of AI young adults from three U.S. tribal colleges according to BMI categories; (2) identify the accuracy of body weight perceptions; and (3) identify predictor variables for weight misperception. In this observational study during 2011-2014, a total of 1,256 participants were recruited from three participating U.S. tribal colleges to complete an online survey addressing issues related to diet, physical activity, and weight perception. Reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI categories, and differences between BMI categories were examined. Gender differences related to accuracy of weight perception by BMI categories were also examined. Analyses were conducted in 2016. Based on self-reported height and weight, 68% of the sample was overweight or obese (BMI ≥25) and mean BMI was 28.9 (SD=6.9). Most did not meet recommendations for fruit intake (78.7%), vegetable intake (96.6%), or physical activity (65.6%). More than half (53.7%%) who were overweight/obese underestimated their weight category. Men more often underestimated their weight category (54.2%) than women (35.1%). Interventions are needed to improve weight-related lifestyle behaviors of AI tribal college students. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

  10. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program: Draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe's culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle

  11. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRESCHOOL TRIBAL CHILDREN IN NORTH KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu V

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tribals are one of the most vulnerable groups in India. Under-nutrition and various morbidities go hand in hand, particularly in children. Nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. The present study is an attempt to assess the nutritional status of pre-school children of Kozhikode district in Kerala. The objectives of this study were 1. To study the prevalence of malnutrition among the preschool tribal children 2. To study the associated risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was a community-based, cross- sectional. Study was carried out in randomly selected 10 panchayaths in Kozhikode. Cluster sampling method was used. Anthropometric measurements were taken. Various indices of nutritional status were expressed in standard deviation units (z scores from the reference median. RESULTS More than half of the children say 57.6% (152/246 had deficits in at least one of the two anthropometric indicators. The prevalence of underweight and stunting was 47.3% and .38.6% respectively. The analysis showed significant associations between under-nutrition and educational status of mother, tribe to which the child belonged, large family size, high birth order and low preschool attendance. CONCLUSION The findings of the present study revealed the widespread prevalence of under-nutrition among pre-school tribal children and highlight a need for an integrated approach towards improving the child health as well as nutritional status in this area.

  12. Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

  13. Against Schooling: Viewpoints of Tribal Students of Kanavu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena AUGUSTINE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Achieving what we believe to be the true purpose of education is a challenge in any society, particularly so in a society as diverse as contemporary India. Most attempts in this field are focussed on improving the access of children to education, but substantive questions such as: What is a school to a child? Does he/she enjoy learning? are seldom addressed prior to drafting any curriculum or policy. Even where they are, the exploration tends to be qualitatively poor and devoid of stake holders views. Alternative educational organisations might offer a perspective on the crisis education seems to be in today, with children lacking lifeskills, governments grappling with retention, disparities across gender and caste and declining standards of education. Kanavu is an educational organisation managed by tribal youth in Cheengode village of Wayanad, a hilly district in the southern state of Kerala, India. These are children who dropped out of mainstream schooling. In the light of efforts to mainstream tribal students into government schools and to control escalating dropout rates, this paper tries to understand the perspectives of the tribal students of Kanavu on schooling and their reasons for resisting mainstream schooling. This paper is a result of a 4 day visit and extensive correspondence the authors have had with this alternative learning organisation.

  14. Immunization Uptake among Children of a Migrant Tribal Community Living in an Eastern Indian city

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Suchismita; Kusuma, Yadlapalli; Babu, Bontha

    2013-01-01

    Background: In India, of the rural-urban migrants, a small segment of people migrated from tribal areas (hilly forest areas) and they possess more vulnerability due to their multiple disadvantage.Objective: To report immunization uptake of children of tribal migrants living in an urban city of Eastern India.Methods: Data were collected from 126 tribal households who migrated to the city during last 12 years. Data pertaining to the awareness of vaccines and reception of various vaccines were c...

  15. 77 FR 28616 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Department of the Interior Information Technology Infrastructure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... Interior Information Technology Infrastructure Consolidation and Reorganization AGENCY: Office of the... purpose of the sessions is to obtain tribal input on the 2012 Information Technology [[Page 28617

  16. Master Environmental Plan: Fort Wingate Depot Activity, Gallup, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biang, C.A.; Yuen, C.R.; Biang, R.P.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    The master environmental plan is based on an environmental assessment of the areas requiring environmental evaluation (AREEs) at Fort Wingate Depot Activity near Gallup, New Mexico. The Fort Wingate Depot Activity is slated for closure under the Base Closure and Realignment Act, Public Law 100--526. The MEP assesses the current status, describes additional data requirements, recommends actions for the sites, and establishes a priority order for actions. The plan was developed so that actions comply with hazardous waste and water quality regulations of the State of New Mexico and applicable federal regulations. It contains a brief history of the site, relevant geological and hydrological information, and a description of the current status for each AREE along with a discussion of the available site-specific data that pertain to existing or potential contamination and the impact on the environment. 35 refs., 27 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. 2014 Fort Hood, Texas, mass casualty incident: reviews and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Strommen, Joshua J.; Waterman, Scott M.; Mitchell, Christopher A.; Grogan, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    On April 2, 2014, in Fort Hood, Texas, an active shooter incident occurred where four active duty soldiers were tragically killed. Active shooter incidents are becoming alarmingly more frequent over the last decade in the USA. The authors provide a detailed account of the events that occurred within the hospital and an evaluation of the triage decisions made on that day. A detailed review of mass casualty preparedness and the general approach to triage processes are also described.

  18. Comprehensive Base Realignment/Closure and Fort Belvoir Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    areas are palus- i trine forested wetlands. Fort Belvoir’s wetlands encompass a wide range of water regimes and salinities . The I wetlands at the...become freshwater tidal wetlands and finally nontidal wetlands. The variety of salinities and tidal regimes support a diverse array of vegetation... Gammarus amphipods Leptocheirus tubicolus amphipods Cyanthura amphipod crustaceansI Corbicula bivalve molluscs Anodonta bivalve molluscsI Musculium

  19. Assessment of DOD Wounded Warrior Matters -- Fort Drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    identified a number of significant challenges that we recommend the Commanding General, 10th Mountain Division; Warrior Transition Command ( WTC ), MEDDAC...to the Warriors themselves. We suggest that the WTC , MEDDAC, and WTB leadership and staff consider Warrior comments, as discussed in this report...General, 10th Mountain Division, WTC , MEDDAC and WTB leadership: • Develop an operational definition of a successful transition end state for Fort

  20. Fort Peck Dam: 75 Years of Service, 1937-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    River Bridge begins. March 20 - Milk River bridge open to traffic. April 5 - Town buildings and services started under a group of contracts. April 12...amount of supplies and materials needed to build Fort Peck, a 12-mile railroad spur was built including this bridge across the Milk River. More than...in need. Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and 4-H clubs as well as sports, school dances, carnivals and traveling circuses kept kids and families entertained

  1. Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Herbivory 4. Granivory 5. Digging 6. Extreme events 7. Erosion 8. Dust 9. Restoration IV.1. Generic disturbance IV.1.1. General... Herbivory Clipping Insects Rodents kangaroo rats Lagomorphs Simulation of Vegetation Recovery from Military Disturbances on Fort Bliss 51 IV.4...Naturalist, 131: 459–490. 59. McAuliffe, J.R. (1994) Landscape evolution , soil formation, and ecological patterns and processes in Sonoran desert bajadas

  2. Black Swan Event Assessment for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    visioned in conventional risk- management activities. This sort of analysis is important for purposes of planning for disruptive events that seem only a...this event is one that should be already in Fort Leonard Wood’s Risk Management Plan. However, the plan should be checked to see if it con- siders... management should be developed in consultation with forest managers across the region. ERDC/CERL SR-16-1 28 7 Earthquake 7.1 Potential events

  3. Leaktightness in HTGRs - experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Barker, R.A.; Deardorff, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel is the first utilized to contain the helium coolant of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. Because the helium coolant contains fission products, leakage from the vessel is limited to 15 percent of vessel inventory per year. This paper describes the fabrication methods and development tests used to assure this leaktightness and the leakage test conducted to verify it. (author)

  4. National Training Center Fort Irwin expansion area aquatic resources survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.

    1996-02-01

    Biologists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were requested by personnel from Fort Irwin to conduct a biological reconnaissance of the Avawatz Mountains northeast of Fort Irwin, an area for proposed expansion of the Fort. Surveys of vegetation, small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and aquatic resources were conducted during 1995 to characterize the populations and habitats present with emphasis on determining the presence of any species of special concern. This report presents a description of the sites sampled, a list of the organisms found and identified, and a discussion of relative abundance. Taxonomic identifications were done to the lowest level possible commensurate with determining the status of the taxa relative to its possible listing as a threatened, endangered, or candidate species. Consultation with taxonomic experts was undertaken for the Coleoptera ahd Hemiptera. In addition to listing the macroinvertebrates found, the authors also present a discussion related to the possible presence of any threatened or endangered species or species of concern found in Sheep Creek Springs, Tin Cabin Springs, and the Amargosa River.

  5. The FORTE receiver and sub-band triggering unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enemark, D.C.; Shipley, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    The FORTE payload receiver and trigger unit represent a significant advance over the currently flying BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite. Not only is the polarization sensitive antenna array massive compared to the BLACKBEARD monopole, but the event triggering scheme is completely different. Electromagnetic pulses (EWs) are dispersed when they pass through the ionosphere creating a chirped frequency signal which can be helpful in discriminating between natural and man-made signals. Payloads designed to digitize and store the RF signatures of these signals must include sophisticated triggering circuitry to select events of interest and prevent false alarms from wasting the available memory storage resources. The FORTE wideband receiver tunes from 20 to 320 MHz with eight sub-band trigger channels distributed across the 20 MHz IF bandwidth. The conditions which must be satisfied to generate an event trigger are processor controlled. Early testing of the prototype indicates an ability to reliably trigger on chirped RF signals several dB below the noise level. FORTE is scheduled to be launched with a Pegasus XL vehicle in late 1995.

  6. BRAND EQUITY OF LAHORE FORT AS A TOURISM DESTINATION BRAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies that measure the brand equity of destination brands by using the Customer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE model in a developing country context are scarce. The present study investigates the destination brand equity of the Lahore Fort by employing the CBBE model in a developing country context of Pakistan. Following the positivist tradition, we adopted a survey-based approach to collect data from 237 tourists visiting the Lahore Fort. Data were collected through a questionnaire developed to explain the relationship of brand awareness, brand image, brand association, and brand loyalty with Lahore Fort’s overall brand equity. We used various robust statistical techniques such as correlation, regression and confirmatory factor analysis (using PLS method to reach meaningful conclusions and found that brand image and brand associations positively contribute to brand loyalty. Furthermore, brand loyalty significantly contributes towards overall brand equity. Pragmatically, this study measures the customer based brand equity of the Lahore Fort, a destination brand. The results are useful as they suggest a few strategies that can help policy makers to enhance Lahore Fort’s brand performance.

  7. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Manuel Steele, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this internship was to facilitate transfer of advancements in renewable energy to Native American lands for economic and educational benefits and to assist in evaluation of proposals submitted for government funding under Title 26 Indian Energy Resources Program. Specific objectives were to examine specific cost factors stated by each Tribe for economic assessment of each proposal; assess environmental impacts of proposed scope of work presented by each Tribe; monitor existing grants for disbursement of requested funds; and provide Tribal governments with a fair and impartial review of grant proposals for funding by the Department of Energy.

  8. Adoption of Indigenous Dairy Management Practices among Tribal Farm Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigasil M. Sangma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted among the tribal farm women of West Garo Hills District of Meghalaya, India with the objective to determine the extent of adoption of indigenous dairy management practices. Proportionate random sampling was used in selection of 120 respondents. Practices having rationality for adoption of indigenous dairy management practices were collected and the data were analyzed using percentage analysis. The findings revealed that majority of the respondents adopted care and management of dry and pregnant cows. This was followed by adoption of other practices viz.., selection of breed and feeding, care during and after calving and milking technique

  9. High-Efficiency Housing at the Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Opportunities and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisell, Lars J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Desai, Jal D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dean, Jesse D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rehder, Tim [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8

    2018-03-13

    This project was initiated to provide design assistance in an effort to maximize energy performance for affordable housing at the Fort Peck Indian Reservation near Poplar, Montana. The Make It Right Foundation (MIRF) built 20 high performing homes (LEED Platinum) in 2015 and 2016 with three (3) different design options. NREL and EPA set out to provide energy analysis along with measurement and verification (M and V) of the homes to characterize energy use and provide clarity for future decision making with regard to tribal housing options. The results included herein summarize the energy end uses and documents projected energy impacts from various aspects of the MIRF home designs and construction. This report includes an analysis of energy use in 5 MIRF homes, comparing energy use across the different styles and configurations. Energy models were created for the 2 styles of MIRF homes, including renewable energy assessment for photovoltaic (PV) systems. Existing tribal housing has also been analyzed, with 5 housing units being analyzed for energy use and an energy model being created for 1 housing unit. The findings of this study highlight many of the challenges that arise when attempting to construct high performance housing in a region where such construction practices are still relatively rare. Homes in Poplar are well designed and, for the most part, and include climate specific design considerations appropriate for northeastern Montana. The most significant issues identified in MIRF homes were related to the work done to put the homes on the foundation, insulate the crawlspaces, and do final connection with the utilities. The Taxed II Credit homes are well designed and well suited to northeastern Montana, and with slight modifications to the design and construction could be very efficient. All occupant comfort and energy usage issues that were identified during the site visits can be remedied through retrofit measures that are relatively inexpensive. Energy

  10. 77 FR 43353 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self- Governance Program... for Tribal Self-Governance Program authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0143. This information...-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB, Washington, DC 20240; telephone: (202) 219...

  11. 25 CFR 170.410 - What is the purpose of tribal long-range transportation planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...'s transportation needs and to fulfill tribal goals by developing strategies to meet these needs... years to match state transportation planning horizons. A tribe may develop a long-range transportation... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the purpose of tribal long-range transportation...

  12. Beyond Legitimation: A Tribal Response to Maori Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Huia Tomlins

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an intervention strategy, initiated under the New Zealand Government's tribal partnership scheme, which promotes a culture-based/place-based approach to education in mainstream schools and early childhood centres in one tribal region. Through place-based education children are immersed in local heritage, including language…

  13. Product recovery from tree grade 1 northern red oak on Menominee tribal lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    John P. Dwyer; Daniel C. Dey

    2007-01-01

    Since 1854 the Menominee Tribal people have practiced some level of forest management on their lands. In April of 2000, Menominee Tribal Enterprises (MTE) forestry staff along with federal, state, and university researchers began a comprehensive study of value in northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.). One of the objectives of this study was to relate...

  14. 75 FR 78709 - Public Comment on the Draft Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... understanding and comprehension. Consultation is integral to a deliberative process, which results in effective... the Draft Tribal Consultation Policy AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families, HHS. ACTION... Departments and Agencies on Tribal Consultation.'' The President stated that his Administration is committed...

  15. 75 FR 34752 - Proposed Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... consultation is integral to a deliberative process that results in effective collaboration and informed..., 2004, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), OSTLTS announces the following Tribal Consultation Advisory Committee (TCAC) Meeting and...

  16. 42 CFR 136a.16 - Beneficiary Identification Cards and verification of tribal membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Cards and verification of tribal membership. (a) The Indian Health Service will issue Beneficiary... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beneficiary Identification Cards and verification of tribal membership. 136a.16 Section 136a.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. 77 FR 46106 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on... conduct listening sessions with Indian tribes to obtain oral and written comments concerning sacred sites... the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this notice for the dates of the tribal listening sessions...

  18. 75 FR 48880 - Approval and Promulgation of Gila River Indian Community's Tribal Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... (AQMP). EPA approved the Tribe for treatment in the same manner as a State (Treatment as State or TAS..., nitrogen dioxide, ozone, lead and carbon monoxide, as Tribal standards \\2\\; permit requirements for new and... applications for TAS eligibility for tribal water pollution control grants under Section 106 of the Clean Water...

  19. 77 FR 47405 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... exceptions in the required annual audit of the Indian Tribe's Self-Determination contracts or Self-Governance...-2012-IHS-TSGN-0001] Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative... Opportunity Description Statutory Authority The Indian Health Service (IHS) Office of Tribal Self-Governance...

  20. 77 FR 47399 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... exceptions in the required annual audit of the Indian Tribe's Self-Determination contracts or Self-Governance...-2012-IHS-TSGP-0001] Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Planning Cooperative Agreement... Opportunity Description Statutory Authority The Indian Health Service (IHS) Office of Tribal Self-Governance...

  1. Different Hunting Grounds: American Indian Tribal College Student Perceptions of Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacek, Cheryl Birdhat

    2017-01-01

    American Indian students who have attended tribal colleges have expressed gratitude, appreciation and pride in their educational and cultural experiences at these institutions. Most of the 37 tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) in the US and Canada currently offer two-year degree and certificate programs. Many American Indian students who wish…

  2. Humility, Persistence, Dedication: Three Tribal College Presidents' Paths Began as TCU Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pember, Mary Annette

    2007-01-01

    Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) have a recognized track record of preparing graduates for leadership. Perhaps not as well known, however, is the role they have played in growing their own leaders from student to tribal college president. This article presents a few stories of those people who have risen from the student ranks to lead their…

  3. More than Words, A Way of Life: Language Restoration Programs Reach beyond Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskus, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In North America, and worldwide, Indigenous languages are disappearing at an alarming rate. There are, however, models of success for language revitalization in immersion language programs, usually found in tribal colleges and universities. Whether the language learners are tribal college students greeting one another in their native language,…

  4. 75 FR 74078 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... collection related to funds provided under the Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) program. Indian... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. 76 FR 35474 - Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Corporation Wood Products Division, Including On-Site Workers from Colville Tribal Construction and On-Site... Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division, Omak, Washington. The Department's... workers of the subject firm. The workers are engaged in activities related to the production of boards and...

  6. 25 CFR 170.913 - Do tribal-specific employment rights and contract preference laws apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Indian Preference § 170.913 Do tribal-specific employment rights and contract preference laws apply? Yes... tribe within the consortium, the benefitting tribe's employment rights and contracting preference laws... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do tribal-specific employment rights and contract...

  7. 77 FR 48167 - Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming compact between the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians...

  8. 78 FR 27341 - Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... sufficient legal training to preside over criminal proceedings; affording the defendant the right to... 45 CFR Part 1614 Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal... represent eligible persons in any and all criminal proceedings in tribal courts. Previously, the LSC Act and...

  9. 77 FR 41204 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight..., announcement is made for the committee meeting of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory...

  10. 75 FR 8508 - Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... automate Tribal child support enforcement operations. This regulation sets forth requirements for... comprehensive Tribal IV-D program may automate its case processing and record-keeping processes through... may elect to automate its case processing and record-keeping processes through the establishment of...

  11. 76 FR 60855 - Regional Tribal Consultation on Implementation of Indian Land Consolidation Program Under Cobell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Office of the Secretary Regional Tribal Consultation on Implementation of Indian Land Consolidation... Consolidation Program (ILCP) under the terms of the Cobell Settlement. Six consultation meetings in other... hold its last two tribal consultation meetings on the following schedule: Date Time Location Thursday...

  12. Individual tenure rights, citizenship, and conflicts: Outcomes from tribal India's forest governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bose, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how the new Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act 2006 shapes tribal households' claims to forest land rights in tribal India. It analyses the micro-dynamics of the Forest Rights Act using three dimensions: individual tenure

  13. 25 CFR 122.6 - Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. 122.6 Section 122.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.6 Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. (a) For...

  14. 25 CFR 122.4 - Establishment of the Osage Tribal Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. 122.4 Section 122.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.4 Establishment of the Osage Tribal Education...

  15. Beyond Assimilation: Tribal Colleges, Basic Writing, and the Exigencies of Settler Colonialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Christie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses basic writing pedagogy at a two-year tribal college, an institution type that has not been visible in the basic writing literature to date. In many tribal college contexts, socioeconomic challenges, under-resourced K-12 schools, and linguistic diversity all contribute to high student placement rates into…

  16. 75 FR 4836 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... ``Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs)'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for renewal... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...

  17. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Jeffrey W. [Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Marie, MI (United States)

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  18. Neodymium and strontium isotopic stratigraphy of the neo-archean Rio Jacare Sill-Bahia, Brazil and its relation to PGE mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Reinaldo S.C de; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Nilson, Ariplinio A.; Gioia, Simone M

    2001-01-01

    Platinum-Group Elements (PGE) deposition in magma chambers is generally accepted as being triggered by sulphur immiscibility via sulfidasation and/or felsification of magmas. These processes can be related to fractional crystallization, and mixing of batches of magmas, crustal contamination or by the combination of these process. Important isotopic studies have been carried out by many authors such as Lambert (1989) and Marcantonio (1995) in the Stillwater Complex, Kruger and Marsh (1989) and Cawthorn (1996) in the Bushveld Complex. Those works set out to understand the role of isotopic changes in the genesis of PGE deposits from JM and Merensky Reefs, respectively. They attributed those PGE mineralizations to isotopically constrained mixing/contamination episodes associated to subtle changes in steady vertical fractionation trends. This work presents stratigraphycally-plotted Nd and Sr isotopic data together with evidence of mineral and whole rock geochemistry disturbance in smooth fractionations trends of the Rio Jacare Sill. Data interpretation suggest the sill was formed via fractional crystallisation and mixing of at least three magma batches, combined with some degree of host rocks assimilation. Isotopic changes were also related to PGE anomalies associated with transitional facies formed during such mixing episodes (au)

  19. Association between tribal status and spacing contraceptive use in rural Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battala, Madhusudana; Raj, Anita; Ghule, Mohan; Nair, Saritha; Silverman, Jay; Dasgupta, Anindita; Donta, Balaiah; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2016-03-01

    This study examines associations between tribal status and spacing contraception use (SCU) in rural Maharashtra, India. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on baseline survey data from non-sterilized married couples (n = 867) participating in the CHARM family planning evaluation study. Participants were aged 18-30 years and 67.6% were tribal; 27.7% reported current SCU. Crude regression analyses indicated that tribals were less likely to use contraception (AOR = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.29, 0.54); this association was lost after adjusting for education, higher parity and desire for pregnancy, factors associated with tribal status. Findings suggest that lower SCU among tribals is driven by social vulnerabilities and higher fertility preferences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethics Review for a Multi-Site Project Involving Tribal Nations in the Northern Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Jyoti; Petersen, Julie M; Tobacco, Deborah; Elliott, Amy J

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, Tribal Nations are forming ethics review panels, which function separately from institutional review boards (IRBs). The emergence of strong community representation coincides with a widespread effort supported by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and other federal agencies to establish a single IRB for all multi-site research. This article underscores the value of a tribal ethics review board and describes the tribal oversight for the Safe Passage Study-a multi-site, community-based project in the Northern Plains. Our experience demonstrates the benefits of tribal ethics review and makes a strong argument for including tribal oversight in future regulatory guidance for multi-site, community-based research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. 25 CFR 900.40 - When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management standards and management systems evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Organization Management Systems General § 900.40 When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Indian tribe or tribal organization submits an initial contract proposal. (b) Management systems are...

  2. 25 CFR 900.43 - What are the general financial management system standards that apply to a tribal organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the general financial management system standards that apply to a tribal organization carrying out a self-determination contract? 900.43 Section 900...

  3. 25 CFR 224.104 - Must a tribe enact tribal laws, regulations, or procedures permitting a person or entity to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Must a tribe enact tribal laws, regulations, or... Petitions § 224.104 Must a tribe enact tribal laws, regulations, or procedures permitting a person or entity... enact tribal laws, regulations, or procedures permitting a person or entity that may be an interested...

  4. 78 FR 21355 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for October 24, 2013; Comment Sought on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-323] Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I... announce a reverse auction to award up to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support... Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions: Patricia Robbins at (202) 418-0660; for...

  5. 78 FR 61350 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-1986, DA 13-1978] Tribal Mobility... Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions: Patricia Robbins at (202) 418-0660. To... to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support, will now open at 12 noon Eastern...

  6. 78 FR 56875 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for December 19, 2013; Notice and Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-1672] Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I... requirements for a reverse auction to award up to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support..., Auctions and Spectrum Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions: Patricia Robbins at (202...

  7. Formation of D- and I-shaped geochemical profiles in saucer-shaped sills due to post- emplacement magma flow induced by thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnes, I.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Neumann, E.

    2007-12-01

    There are still unresolved problems in the processes of emplacement and crystallization of saucer shaped sill intrusions. We use geochemistry and numerical modelling in order to constrain identify processes in mafic sill intrusions. Profiles sampled through through a saucer-shaped sill complex in the Karoo igneous province, South Africa show a variety of geochemical variations. Some variations are observed repeatedly, i.e. the D- and I-shaped profiles. D-shaped profiles are recognized by having the least evolved composition in the center (high Mg#) with more evolved composition at the upper and lower margins (low Mg#), resulting in a D-shaped Mg# profile. I- shaped profiles are recognized by having no variation in the Mg# through the profile. The formation mechanism of D-shaped profiles is enigmatic, as classical fractional crystallization theory predicts C-shapes to occur. The least evolved composition will be at the margins where crystallization initiates, and with continued cooling and crystallization the center will be progressively more evolved. Hence, we need another formation mechanism. The most common explanation for D-shaped profiles is a movement of early formed phenocrysts towards the center due to flow segregation. However, petrographical evidences from a D-shaped profile in this study show no phenocryst assemblage in the center, and the modal composition is homogeneous through the profile. We propose that differentiation is caused by a melt flow from the central parts of the sill towards the margins driven by underpressure anomalies at the margins. The underpressures develop because of strong cooling gradients at the margins, assuming no volume change due to a rigid crystal network. The less compatible elements associated with the melt phase will be transported into the margins by advection, resulting in a more evolved total system composition from a higher total melt percentage. The central parts will progressively be depleted in the less compatible

  8. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Hamayun; Nazir, Jaweria; Firdous, Syeda Sadiqa; Khalid, Abd-Ur-Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%), hair growth (11%), bad breath (12%), facial spots (9%), allergy, (9%), fairness (8%), wrinkles (8%), eye and lip care (9%). Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%), Leaves (25.2%), seeds (13.4%) and roots (8.9%). Women of older (>30 years) age group showed greater (67%) response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area. PMID:25068138

  9. Firewood consumption pattern of different tribal communities in Northeast India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, B.P.; Sachan, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Excessive use of firewood, as a primary source of energy for domestic purposes, is leading to severe deforestation in the northeastern Himalayan region. Firewood consumption pattern of three tribal communities of Meghalaya, India- Garo, Khasi and Jaintia was studied under varying ecological, socio-economic and socio-cultural conditions. Fuelwood consumption was highest to Khasi community (5.81 kg/capita/day), followed by the Garo (5.32 kg/capita/day) and Jaintia (3.90 kg/capita/day), respectively, irrespective of their socio-economic status. The labour energy expenditure for fuelwood collection was highest for the Jaintia (88.56 MJ/capita/yr) and minimum to Garo (70.64 MJ/capita/yr). The fuelwood is burnt for various activities such as cooking, water heating, space heating, lighting and livestock rearing, etc. Among various activities, cooking required maximum energy. Commercial fuel is beyond the reach of the tribal communities due to their poor socio-economic conditions. The estimated growing stock is unable to sustain the rate of fuel consumption. This information could be utilized for developing appropriate technology for afforestation programmes in this region since 90% of the total population use biomass as an important source of energy

  10. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Duane Gopher, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The Rocky Boy Indian Reservation in north-central Montana has had difficulty in establishing a dependable source of drinking water. In 1993, due to a water shortage on the Rocky Boy Reservation, the Chippewa-Cree Council began negotiating water rights with the State of Montana in order to construct a pipeline that would pump water from an off-reservation source to reservation homes. The proposed plan is to pipe water from the Tiber Dam, located approximately 53 miles west, to the Rocky Boy Indian Reservation for treatment and distribution. The purpose of this internship was to initiate a ground water investigation on the Rocky Boy Reservation by writing a report and submitting it to the Tribe. The intern undertook this project because he felt there was no need for an expensive pipeline and from familiarity with the Reservation, thought a dependable supply of drinking water may already exist on the Reservation. The intern obtained topographic maps from the USGS, requested well logs, conducted a literature survey, and requested planimetric maps from the Montana Bureau of Mines. The preliminary ground water report has been completed, but final results of the investigation are dependent upon the review by the Rocky Boy Tribal Council. This intern report contains biographical data on the intern and his mentor, as well as the completed preliminary report submitted to the Tribal Council.

  11. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamayun Shaheen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%, hair growth (11%, bad breath (12%, facial spots (9%, allergy, (9%, fairness (8%, wrinkles (8%, eye and lip care (9%. Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%, Leaves (25.2%, seeds (13.4% and roots (8.9%. Women of older (>30 years age group showed greater (67% response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area.

  12. 78 FR 21817 - Amendment of Restricted Area R-6601; Fort A.P. Hill, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ...; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-7] RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Restricted Area R-6601; Fort A.P. Hill, VA AGENCY... limits and time of designation of restricted area R-6601, Fort A.P. Hill, VA. The U.S. Army requested... limits and increase the time of designation of restricted area R-6601, Fort A.P. Hill, VA, (77 FR 35308...

  13. The Use of Bifocal Soft Contact Lenses in the Fort Rucker Aviation Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    ... meet the visual requirements needed to fly military aircraft. Seventeen volunteer presbyopic aviators from Fort Rucker were fitted with five bifocal soft contact lens combinations and bifocal glasses...

  14. Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

    2009-03-31

    The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

  15. Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

    2008-03-17

    The Ft. Mojave tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada near the point where all three states meet, has a need for increased energy supplies. This need is a direct result of the aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources it was the desire of the tribal power company, AHA MACAV Power Service (AMPS) to investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable sources as an alternative to increased purchase of fossil fuel generated power and as a possible enterprise to export green power. Renewable energy generated on the reservation would serve to reduce the energy dependence of the tribal enterprises on off reservation sources of energy and if produced in excess of reservation needs, add a new enterprise to the current mix of economic activities on the reservation. Renewable energy development would also demonstrate the tribe’s support for improving environmental quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

  16. ALARA and decommissioning: The Fort St. Vrain experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borst, T.; Niehoff, M. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Platteville, CO (United States); Zachary, M. [Scientific Ecology Group, Platteville, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, the first and only commercial High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to operate in the United States, completed initial fuel loading in late 1973 and initial startup in early 1974. Due to a series of non-nuclear technical problems, Fort St. Vrain never operated consistently, attaining a lifetime capacity factor of slightly less than 15%. In August of 1989, the decision was made to permanently shut down the plant due to control rod drive and steam generator ring header failures. Public Service Company of Colorado elected to proceed with early dismantlement (DECON) as opposed to SAFSTOR on the bases of perceived societal benefits, rad waste, and exposure considerations, regulatory uncertainties associated with SAFSTOR, and cost. The decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain began in August of 1992, and is scheduled to be completed in early 1996. Decommissioning is being conducted by a team consisting of Westinghouse, MK-Ferguson, and Scientific Ecology Group. Public Service Company of Colorado as the licensee provides contract management and oversight of contractor functions. An aggressive program to maintain project radiation exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been established, with the following program elements: temporary and permanent shielding contamination control; mockup training; engineering controls; worker awareness; integrated work package reviews communication; special instrumentation; video camera usage; robotics application; and project committees. To date, worker exposures have been less than project estimates. from the start of the project through Februrary of 1994, total exposure has been 98.666 person-rem, compared to the project estimate of 433 person-rem and goal of 347 person-rem. The presentation will discuss the site characterization efforts, the radiological performance indicator program, and the final site release survey plans.

  17. Højer fortæller marsklivets historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    sin familie og også har værtsted og galleri. Hun faldt for huset charme og den historie, der gemmer sig i det grå, grønne og røde almuefarvede træværk, de udskårne døre og entreens rå gamle rødflammede mursten Hver landsdel og kommune har sine helt særlige fortællinger, som man kan opleve i de...

  18. Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement

  19. Fort Carson Building 1860 Biomass Heating Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsberger, Randolph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tomberlin, Gregg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gaul, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    As part of the Army Net-Zero Energy Installation program, the Fort Carson Army Base requested that NREL evaluate the feasibility of adding a biomass boiler to the district heating system served by Building 1860. We have also developed an Excel-spreadsheet-based decision support tool--specific to the historic loads served by Building 1860--with which users can perform what-if analysis on gas costs, biomass costs, and other parameters. For economic reasons, we do not recommend adding a biomass system at this time.

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support &apos

  1. Is education a determinant of knowledge about malaria among Indian tribal population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A K; Aggarwal, O P; Chaturvedi, S; Bhasin, S K

    2003-06-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in tribal villages of India, where 8% of the country's population lives. Literacy level among tribal population is very low. This study aims to examine the relation between education status and knowledge about malaria among Indian tribal communities. 125 randomly selected tribal respondents from one tribal village each of 17 states were administered a close ended questionnaire by trained interviewers to assess their knowledge about various aspects of malaria. Effect of educational status on the level of knowledge was analyzed using chi square test. Stratified analysis was performed using Mantel Haenszel chi square test to eliminate gender bias. 2125 respondents', randomly selected from 17 tribal villages in as many states, findings were analyzed. Fifty seven percent male and 72% female respondents were illiterate. Only 2% respondents had college level education. Educated females were more knowledgeable than their male counterparts. Mantel Haenszel chi square analysis showed that educated respondents were more knowledgeable than the illiterates, after adjusting for sex of respondents. However, there was gross lack of knowledge regarding diagnosis and treatment of malaria and use of insecticides irrespective of gender and educational status. Improvement in literacy status of tribal population will help in increasing awareness about malaria. Opportunities for disseminating information about various aspects of malaria should be utilized during treatment of malaria cases by health workers.

  2. The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy Initiative: Findings From a Collaborative, Participatory Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sheryl; D'Silva, Joanne; Hernandez, Carol; Villaluz, Nicole Toves; Martinez, Jaime; Matter, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While the reduction in the overall U.S. smoking prevalence has been declared one of the top 10 public health achievements of the past century, the growing disparity in smoking between American Indians and the general population is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Minnesota in particular has very high smoking rates among American Indians (59%). Tribal Nations in Minnesota share a past of attempted cultural genocide and a present of restoring the strength of their cultural teachings, including the prominence of traditional tobacco as a sacred "first medicine." The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy initiative works to address this complex and challenging context. This article describes results of a participatory evaluation from 2010 to 2013 in four Minnesota Tribal Nations-three Ojibwe and one Dakota. Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy coordinators used their cultural knowledge to develop community-level strategies, identifying appropriate strategies from best practices on tobacco advocacy, while drawing on the strengths of their own sovereignty and sacred tobacco traditions. Tribal coordinators generated support for policy change by conducting culturally relevant education, engaging tribal members, and nurturing relationships. This approach resulted in norm changes, practices toward restoring traditional tobacco, informal policies, and tribal resolutions to advance smoke-free policies.

  3. 25 CFR 224.105 - How may a person or entity obtain copies of tribal laws, regulations, or procedures that would...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Petitions § 224.105 How may a person or entity obtain copies of tribal laws, regulations, or procedures that... interested party may obtain copies of tribal laws, regulations, or procedures that establish tribal remedies... petition with the tribe under those tribal laws, regulations, or procedures. (c) If the person or entity...

  4. Stakeholder engagement: a model for tobacco policy planning in Oklahoma Tribal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Jessica W; Petherick, J T; Basara, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Oklahoma law pre-empts local governments from enacting smoking restrictions inside public places that are stricter than state law, but the sovereign status of Oklahoma's 38 Tribal nations means they are uniquely positioned to stand apart as leaders in the area of tobacco policy. To provide recommendations for employing university-Tribal partnerships as an effective strategy for tobacco policy planning in tribal communities. Using a community-based participatory research approach, researchers facilitated a series of meetings with key Tribal stakeholders in order to develop a comprehensive tobacco policy plan. Ongoing engagement activities held between January 2011 and May 2012, including interdepartmental visits, facility site tours, interviews, and attendance at tribal activities, were critical for fostering constructive and trusting relationships between all partners involved in the policy planning process. The 17-month collaborative engagement produced a plan designed to regulate the use of commercial tobacco in all Tribally owned properties. The extended period of collaboration between the researchers and Tribal stakeholders facilitated: (1) levels of trust between partners; and (2) a steadfast commitment to the planning process, ensuring completion of the plan amid uncertain political climates and economic concerns about tobacco bans. Extended engagement produced an effective foundation for policy planning that promoted collaboration between otherwise dispersed Tribal departments, and facilitated communication of diverse stakeholder interests related to the goal of tobacco policies. The findings of this study provide useful strategies and best practices for those looking to employ Tribal-university partnerships as strategies for tobacco control planning and policy-based research. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. From Conflict to Collaboration: How Tribal Ways of Knowing Can Improve the Environmental Review Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughen, S.

    2017-12-01

    Tribal ways of knowing are often neglected during the process of creating science-based environmental policies and in conducting environmental reviews. Yet, because government-to-government consultation between Tribes and government agencies is a vital component to policy and project planning, it behooves all parties to bring an understanding of different epistemologies to the table. This presentation discusses cases where Tribal knowledge has been neglected and ignored, leading to destructive conflicts and even violence, and presents an alternative vision of how Tribal ecological and cultural knowledge can inform and enhance the policy-making and review process, thus leading to more positive outcomes.

  6. Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by Paliyar tribals in Theni district of Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacimuthu, S; Ayyanar, M; Sankarasivaraman, K

    2008-12-01

    An ethnobotanical survey was carried out among the Paliyar tribals in various tribal villages of Theni district, Tamil Nadu, India during December 2004 to January 2006. A total of 101 species of ethnomedicinal plants belonging to 90 genera and 48 families were reported with the help of standardized questionnaires among 15 tribal informants between the ages of 26 to 82. The study shows a high degree of ethnobotanical novelty and the use of plants among the Paliyars reflects the revival of interest in traditional folk medicine.

  7. Alpha thalassaemia in tribal communities of coastal Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav G Deo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In a routine community health survey conducted in adult Adivasis of the costal Maharashtra, microcytosis and hyprochromia were observed in more than 80 per cent of both males and females having normal haemoglobin levels suggesting the possibility of α-thalassaemia in these communities. We conducted a study in Adivasi students in the same region to find out the magnitude of α-thalessaemia. Methods: The participants (28 girls and 23 boys were 14-17 yr old studying in a tribal school. Fasting venous blood samples (5 ml were subjected to complete blood count (CBC, Hb-HPLC and DNA analysis using gap-PCR for deletion of - α3.7 and - α4.2, the two most common molecular lesions observed in α-thalassaemia in India. Results: Microcytic hypochromic anaemia was observed 50 and 35 per cent girls and boys, respectively. Iron supplementation improved Hb levels but did not correct microcytois and hypochromia. m0 ore than 80 per cent non-anaemic students of both sexes showed microcytois and hypochromia. DNA analysis confirmed that the haematological alterations were due to α-thalassaemia trait characterized by deletion of - α3.7. Majority (> 60% of the affected students had two deletions (-α3.7/-α3.7 genotype α+ thalassaemia. Interpretation & conclusions: This is perhaps the first report on the occurrence of α-thalassaemia in tribal communities of coastal Maharashtra. Very high (78.4% haplotype frequency of -α3.7 suggests that the condition is almost genetically fixed. These preliminary observations should stimulate well planned large scale epidemiological studies on α-thalassaemia in the region.

  8. Alpha thalassaemia in tribal communities of coastal Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Madhav G; Pawar, Prakash V

    2014-08-01

    In a routine community health survey conducted in adult Adivasis of the costal Maharashtra, microcytosis and hyprochromia were observed in more than 80 per cent of both males and females having normal haemoglobin levels suggesting the possibility of α-thalassaemia in these communities. We conducted a study in Adivasi students in the same region to find out the magnitude of α-thalessaemia. The participants (28 girls and 23 boys) were 14-17 yr old studying in a tribal school. Fasting venous blood samples (5 ml) were subjected to complete blood count (CBC), Hb-HPLC and DNA analysis using gap-PCR for deletion of -α3.7 and -α4.2, the two most common molecular lesions observed in α-thalassaemia in India. Microcytic hypochromic anaemia was observed 50 and 35 per cent girls and boys, respectively. Iron supplementation improved Hb levels but did not correct microcytois and hypochromia. m0 ore than 80 per cent non-anaemic students of both sexes showed microcytois and hypochromia. DNA analysis confirmed that the haematological alterations were due to α-thalassaemia trait characterized by deletion of -α3.7. Majority (>60%) of the affected students had two deletions (-α3.7/-α3.7 genotype α+ thalassaemia. This is perhaps the first report on the occurrence of α-thalassaemia in tribal communities of coastal Maharashtra. Very high (78.4%) haplotype frequency of -α3.7 suggests that the condition is almost genetically fixed. These preliminary observations should stimulate well planned large scale epidemiological studies on α-thalassaemia in the region.

  9. Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

    2011-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ¢/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

  10. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  11. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  12. Neurosensory changes of palatal mucousa following Le Fort I osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Movahedian Attar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the sensation of palatal ucosa before and after Le Fort I osteotomy and compared it based on whether greater palatine nerve has been dissected or not.
    • METHODS: Sixteen patients were studied within one week before  urgery and then one week, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Four tests including sharp-blunt discrimination, cold perception, pin prick sensation and electrical stimulation were performed.
    • RESULTS: Mean values of electrical stimulation were significantly higher 6 months after surgery (p < 0.05, on the other hand mean values of pin-prick sensation were significantly lower (p < 0.05. All patients regardless of the condition of greater palatine nerve were responsive to cold perception and sharp-blunt discrimination 6 months after surgery.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Following Le Fort I osteotomy, palatal  esponsiveness to electrical stimulation decreases and mechanical hyper sensitization occurs. Dissection of greater palatine nerve was shown to have no effect on the results.
    • KEYWORDS: Lefort I Osteotomy, Palatal Mocousa, Nerve Recovery.

  13. Controls on Mannville coalbed methane production in Fort Assiniboine, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, D.; Majcher, M. [Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    A horizontal well exploitation scheme is being used in the Fort Assiniboine field in central Alberta to produce coalbed methane (CBM) from the under-saturated coals of the Mannville Formation. The Mannville coal seams in this region are under-saturated. In order to improve permeability to gas within the fracture system and achieve economic gas production rates, the reservoir's ability to dewater the coal through the fracture fabric to establish a gas phase is key. Across the field, a wide range of production rates can be found. A study was conducted to collect field wide data from core, wells, geological and geophysical mapping and production data in order to determine the major controls on gas production rates. The paper discussed the compilation of wellbore parameters, including borehole orientation and length; wellbore configuration; and production data. It also discussed the characterization of reservoir parameters such as reservoir thickness; structure; stress; and reservoir quality. It was concluded that the main controls on Mannville CBM production in the Fort Assiniboine field are coal seam thickness, effective stress, coal quality and face cleat exposure. 5 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Fort Lewis electric energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secrest, T.J.; Currie, J.W.; DeSteese, J.G.; Dirks, J.A.; Marseille, T.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

    1991-10-01

    In support of the US DOE Federal Energy Management Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations. Fort Lewis, a US Army installation near Tacoma, Washington, was selected as the pilot site for developing this approach. This site was chosen in conjunction with the interests of the Bonneville Power Administration to develop programs for its federal sector customers and the Army Forces Command to develop an in-house program to upgrade the energy efficiency of its installations. This report documents the electricity assessment portion of the approach, providing an estimate of the electricity use baseline and efficiency improvement potential for major sectors and end uses at the Fort. Although the assessment did not identify all possible efficiency improvement opportunities, it is estimated that electricity use can be reduced by at least 20% cost-effectively at the $0.045/kWh marginal cost of electricity in the Pacific Northwest. 12 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

    2001-10-31

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

  16. Von Braun Rocket Team at Fort Bliss, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1940-01-01

    The German Rocket Team, also known as the Von Braun Rocket Team, poses for a group photograph at Fort Bliss, Texas. After World War II ended in 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun led some 120 of his Peenemuende Colleagues, who developed the V-2 rocket for the German military during the War, to the United Sttes under a contract to the U.S. Army Corps as part of Operation Paperclip. During the following five years the team worked on high altitude firings of the captured V-2 rockets at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, and a guided missile development unit at Fort Bliss, Texas. In April 1950, the group was transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, and continued to work on the development of the guided missiles for the U.S. Army until transferring to a newly established field center of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Lower Devonian paleomagnetic dating of a large mafic sill along the western border of the Murzuq cratonic basin (Saharan metacraton, SE Algeria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-M. Derder, Mohamed; Maouche, Said; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Henry, Bernard; Amenna, Mohamed; Ouabadi, Aziouz; Bellon, Hervé; Bruguier, Olivier; Bayou, Boualem; Bestandji, Rafik; Nouar, Omar; Bouabdallah, Hamza; Ayache, Mohamed; Beddiaf, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The Murzuq basin located in central North Africa, in Algeria, Libya and Niger is a key area, delineating a relictual cratonic area within the Saharan metacraton (Liégeois et al., 2013). On its western border, we discovered a very large sill ("Arrikine" sill), with a thickness up to 250m and a minimum length of 35 km. It is made of mafic rocks and is interbedded within the Silurian sediments of the Tassilis series. In the vicinity, the only known post-Pan-African magmatism is the Cenozoic volcanism in the In Ezzane area. Further south in Niger, also along the SW border of the Murzuq basin, large Paleozoic dolerite (Carte géologique du Sahara central, 1962) are probably related to the "Arrikine" sill magmatism, as they are in the same stratigraphical position. Several hundred kilometers westward and southwestward of Arrikine, Paleozoic magmatic products are known: Carboniferous basic intrusives (346 Ma; Djellit et al., 2006) are located in the Tin Serririne basin and Devonian ring complexes (407 Ma; Moreau et al, 1994) in the Aïr Mountains. For the Arrikine sill, K/Ar data gave a rejuvenation age (326 Ma) related to a K-rich aplitic phase and the LA-ICP-MS U-Pb method on zircon showed that only inherited zircons are present (0.6 to 0.7, 2.0 and 2.7 Ga ages), pointing to ages from the underlying basement corresponding to the Murzuq craton covered by Pan-African sediments (Derder et al., 2016). By contrast, a well-defined paleomagnetic pole yielded an age of 410-400 Ma by comparison with the Gondwana Apparent Polar Wander Path (APWP). This age, similar to that reported for the Aïr complexes (Moreau et al., 1994), can be correlated with the deep phreatic eruption before Pragian time thought to be at the origin of sand injections, which gave circular structures observed on different borders of the Murzuq basin (Moreau et al,. 2012). This Lower Devonian magmatism had therefore a regional extension and can be related to a "Caledonian" transtensive reactivation of the

  18. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  19. 77 FR 21448 - Security Zone; 2012 Fleet Week, Port Everglades, Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ...-AA87 Security Zone; 2012 Fleet Week, Port Everglades, Fort Lauderdale, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... waters of Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during 2012 Fleet Week. 2012 Fleet Week will take... Everglades Harbor. The security zone will be enforced while U.S. Navy vessels participating in 2012 Fleet...

  20. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated area...

  1. 33 CFR 334.350 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone. 334.350 Section 334.350 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....350 Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone. (a) The danger zone. All of the...

  2. 75 FR 20774 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Fort A.P. Hill, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA-2009-0739; Airspace Docket No. 09-AEA-14] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Fort A.P. Hill, VA AGENCY... December 7, 2009 that establishes Class E airspace at Fort A.P. Hill, VA. DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC...

  3. Synoptisches Erzählen - Darstellungen des Bombenkriegs bei Gert Ledig, Alexander Kluge und Dieter Forte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birthe

    2009-01-01

    Artiklen foretager en sammenlignende analyse af Gert Ledigs roman "Vergeltung" (1956), Alexander Kluges hybride tekst "Der Luftangriff auf Halberstadt am 8. April 1945" (1976) og Dieter Fortes roman "Der Junge mit den Blutigen Schuhen" (1995) med henblik på en diskussion af fortællemæssige strate...... strategier overfor bombardementerne af den tyske civilbefolkning under 2. Verdenskrig....

  4. Comparative Demonstration and Evaluation of Classification Technologies: Closed Castner Range, Fort Bliss, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    DEMONSTRATION REPORT Comparative Demonstration and Evaluation of Classification Technologies: Closed Castner Range Fort Bliss , Texas ESTCP...54  Appendix A: Points of Contact...Detection System 2x2 (TEMTADS) data that was collected by URS Group, Inc. (URS) at the Castner Range (CR) at Fort Bliss , Texas. 1.1 BACKGROUND ESTCP

  5. 78 FR 60929 - Notice of Public Meeting of the Fort Scott Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... PRESIDIO TRUST Notice of Public Meeting of the Fort Scott Council AGENCY: The Presidio Trust. ACTION: Notice of public meeting of the Fort Scott Council. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Federal Advisory... Scott Council (Council) will be held from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 17, 2013. The...

  6. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  7. Sociale fortællinger - statusopdateringers funktion på sociale netværkssites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klastrup, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    I artiklen argumenterer internetforsker Lisbeth Klastrup for, at vi kan opfatte statusopdateringen som en ny form for fortællinger, af social og dialogisk karakter. Lisbeth Klastrup beskriver de elementer, der påvirker tilblivelsen og receptionen af sociale fortællinger og samspillet mellem disse...

  8. 76 FR 22338 - Proposed Fort Ross-Seaview Viticultural Area; Comment Period Reopening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... May 9, 2005, from all interested persons. In response to a request from a local wine industry member... the Fort Ross-Seaview viticultural area. Two local wine industry members supported the petition... expressing concern about the potential effect of the proposed viticultural area on his ``Fort Ross'' brand...

  9. Estimating forest structure parameters within Fort Lewis Military Reservation using airborne laser scanner (LIDAR) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Erik Andersen; Jeffrey R. Foster; Stephen E. Reutebuch

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) forest structure information is critical to support a variety of ecosystem management objectives on the Fort Lewis Military Reservation, including habitat assessment, ecological restoration, fire management, and commercial timber harvest. In particular, the Forestry Program at Fort Lewis requires measurements of shrub, understory, and overstory...

  10. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  11. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  12. 25 CFR 1200.14 - What must the Tribal Management Plan contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the following: (a) Tribal investment goals and the strategy for achieving them. (b) A description... companies; (iii) Research done in house; (iv) Recent changes in active portfolio managers; and (v) Any other...

  13. Geothermal access to federal and tribal lands: A progress report (Preprint)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, Barbara C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2002-09-01

    This paper traces the progress to date in resolving key barriers to geothermal energy use. It focuses primarily on two areas: improving geothermal access to federal lands and increasing understanding of the tribal aspects of geothermal energy use.

  14. Geothermal Access to Federal and Tribal Lands: A Progress Report; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B. C.

    2002-09-01

    This paper traces the progress to date in resolving key barriers to geothermal energy use. It focuses primarily on two areas: improving geothermal access to federal lands and increasing understanding of the tribal aspects of geothermal use.

  15. Report: EPA Needs an Agency-Wide Plan to Provide Tribal Solid Waste Management Capacity Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0171, March 21, 2011. EPA cannot determine whether its efforts are assisting tribal governments in developing the capacity to manage solid waste or reduce the risks of open dumps in Indian country.

  16. CCR Certification Form for Wyoming or EPA R8 Tribal Community Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CCR Certification Form can be used to certify that community water systems in Wyoming or on Tribal Lands in EPA Region 8 have completed and distributed their annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) or water quality report.

  17. 77 FR 39731 - Swinomish Indian Tribal Community-Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ..., sale and consumption of liquor within the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community's Indian country. This Code... license fee. Civic Center 10. Privately Owned Facility Open to the Public......... 20. Snack Bar 125...

  18. 25 CFR 141.15 - Consent to jurisdiction of Hopi and Zuni tribal courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS Licensing Requirements and Procedures § 141.15 Consent to jurisdiction of Hopi and Zuni tribal courts. As a condition to doing business on the...

  19. 77 FR 467 - Notice of Tribal Consultation Meetings Regarding How the Current SACWIS Regulations Affect Tribes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... a broad audience of interested parties. The teleconference on February 15, 2012, is intended for consultation with Tribal leaders; the teleconference on February 16, 2012, is intended to engage in...

  20. Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Shiprock Wastewater Treatment Facility; Draft NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing to issue a NPDES permit (No. NN0020621) to Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA) for the Shiprock wastewater treatment facility in San Juan County, New Mexico, within the northeastern portion of the Navajo Nation.

  1. Barriers and Strategies for Healthy Food Choices among American Indian Tribal College Students: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jill F; Stastny, Sherri; Brunt, Ardith; Agnew, Wanda

    2017-10-20

    American Indian and Alaskan Native individuals experience disproportionate levels of chronic health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and overweight and obesity that are influenced by dietary patterns and food choices. Understanding factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students can enrich education and programs that target dietary intake. To build an understanding of factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students at increased risk for college attrition. A nonexperimental cohort design was used for qualitative descriptive analysis. Participants (N=20) were purposively sampled, newly enrolled, academically underprepared tribal college students enrolled in a culturally relevant life skills course at an upper Midwest tribal college between September 2013 and May 2015. Participant demographic characteristics included various tribal affiliations, ages, and number of dependents. Participant responses to qualitative research questions about dietary intake, food choices, self-efficacy for healthy food choices, psychosocial determinants, and barriers to healthy food choices during telephone interviews were used as measures. Qualitative analysis included prestudy identification of researcher bias/assumptions, audiorecording and transcription, initial analysis (coding), secondary analysis (sorting and identifying meaning), and verification (comparative pattern analysis). Qualitative analysis revealed a variety of themes and subthemes about healthy food choices. Main themes related to barriers included taste, food gathering and preparation, and difficulty clarifying healthy food choices. Main themes related to strategies included taste, cultural traditions and practices, and personal motivation factors. Qualitative analysis identified barrier and strategy themes that may assist nutrition and dietetics practitioners working with tribal/indigenous communities, tribal college educators and health specialists, and tribal

  2. Comparative Economic and Gender, Labor Analysis of Conservation Agriculture Practices in Tribal Villages in India

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Cynthia; Chan, Catherine; Halbrendt, Jacqueline; Shariq, Linsey; Roul, Pravat; Idol, Travis; Ray, Chittanrajan; Evensen, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Marginal land use and subsequent natural resource degradation is a common issue among tribal villages in the Kendujhar district of India. In this study, Conservation Agriculture (CA) technologies at an experimental site, specifically the practices of intercropping and minimum tillage, were compared to conventional tillage practices of three tribal villages (145 households total) in this district. The impacts of CA implementation on gender, labor, and economic (yield and profitability) factors...

  3. The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W.

    OpenAIRE

    Magwaza, Duduzile Witness

    2011-01-01

    This mini–dissertation addresses the management of the potable water supply in the Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority's area of jurisdiction. The main objectives of the study were to determine the organisational structures and public policies governing the potable water supply in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality with a view to establishing the factors that hinder the provision of potable water to some parts of the Mkhwanazi Tribal Area and also determine how the present potable water situation is pe...

  4. Governmentality and Social Capital in Tribal/Federal Relations Regarding Heritage Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    discourse, in spite of overlapping goals. Using practice and agency theories and the concept of social capital (i.e., valued relations with others), we...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 08-04-2016 1-Jun-2012 31-Aug-2015 Final Report: Governmentality and Social Capital in Tribal/Federal Relations Regarding...published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Governmentality and Social Capital in Tribal/Federal Relations Regarding Heritage Consultation Report

  5. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  6. Articulating Indigenous Identity in Indonesia: Resource Politics and the Tribal Slot

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tania Murray

    2000-01-01

    It was the official line of Suharto’s regime that Indonesia is a nation which has no indigenous people, or that all Indonesians are equally indigenous.1 The internationally recognized category “indigenous and tribal peoples” (as defined in International Labour Organization convention 169) has no direct equivalent in Indonesia’s national legal system, nor are there reservations or officially recognized tribal territories. Under Suharto the national motto “unity in diversity” and the displays o...

  7. 77 FR 58354 - Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ...-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental Impact... Administration, USDOT. ACTION: Notice of withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District and FHWA are..., Project Leader, Bend- Fort Rock Ranger District, 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, OR 97701, phone 541...

  8. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  9. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  10. Fort St. Vrain graphite site mechanical separation concept selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the alternatives to the disposal of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor spent nuclear fuel involves the separation of the fuel rods composed of compacts from the graphite fuel block assembly. After the separation of these two components, the empty graphite fuel blocks would be disposed of as a low level waste (provided the appropriate requirements are met) and the fuel compacts would be treated as high level waste material. This report deals with the mechanical separation aspects concerning physical disassembly of the FSV graphite fuel element into the empty graphite fuel blocks and fuel compacts. This report recommends that a drilling technique is the preferred choice for accessing the, fuel channel holes and that each hole is drilled separately. This report does not cover any techniques or methods to separate the triso fuel particles from the graphite matrix of the fuel compacts

  11.  Mode, Mediation og Fortætninger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Jantzen, Laura Sophie

    empirisk kontekst; mode specifikt og det æstetisk-kulturelle felt generelt. Artiklen introducerer begrebet "mediation" (Hennion 1997, 2007) som en indgang til at diskutere teoretiske forbindelser mellem modens æstetik, socialitet og materialitet. Antoine Hennion tilhører en gruppe af post...... og æstetik - i samme empiriske studie - som både eksisterende objekter, og som medierende processer. Mediationsbegrebet peger på denne dobbelthed, men udpeger ikke konkrete måder at begribe relationen mellem de to sider af mediation. I denne sammenhæng afsøger artiklen om en kombination af Hennions...... mediationsbegreb med Laws begreb om "fortætning" (2004) og Latours begreb om "assemblages" (2005) vil kunne bidrage med nye analytiske greb, der udvikler nye måder at beskrive og diskutere smagens og æstetikkens sociomaterialitet og konkrete transformative potentiale.   Empirisk tager artiklen udgangspunkt i mode...

  12. System specification for Fort Hood Solar Cogeneration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The characteristics and design and environmental requirements are specified for a solar cogeneration facility at the Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Characteristics of the system and major elements are described, and applicable standards, codes, laws and regulations are listed. Performance requirements for the total system and for each individual subsystem are presented. Survival requirements are given for various environmental extremes, with consideration given to lightning protection and effects of direct or adjacent lightning strikes. Air quality control standards are briefly mentioned. The facility operates in two principal modes: energy collection and energy utilization. The plant is capable of operating in either mode independently or in both modes simultaneously. The system is also operational in transitional and standby/inactive modes. (LEW)

  13. Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

    1992-07-01

    This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events

  14. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

  15. Landscape Influences on Headwater Streams on Fort Stewart, Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Henriette I.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; King, Roy L.; Smith, Katy A.

    2011-10-01

    Military landscapes represent a mixture of undisturbed natural ecosystems, developed areas, and lands that support different types and intensities of military training. Research to understand water-quality influences of military landscapes usually involves intensive sampling in a few watersheds. In this study, we developed a survey design of accessible headwater watersheds intended to improve our ability to distinguish land-water relationships in general, and training influences, in particular, on Fort Stewart, GA. We sampled and analyzed water from watershed outlets. We successfully developed correlative models for total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), organic carbon (OC), and organic nitrogen (ON), which dominated in this blackwater ecosystem. TSS tended to be greater in samples after rainfall and during the growing season, and models that included %Wetland suggested a "build-and-flush" relationship. We also detected a positive association between TSS and tank-training, which suggests a need to intercept sediment-laden runoff from training areas. Models for OC showed a negative association with %Grassland. TN and ON both showed negative associations with %Grassland, %Wetland, and %Forest. Unexpected positive associations were observed between OC and equipment-training activity and between ON and %Bare ground + Roads. Future studies that combine our survey-based approach with more intensive monitoring of the timing and intensity of training would be needed to better understand the mechanisms for these empirical relationships involving military training. Looking beyond local effects on Fort Stewart streams, we explore questions about how exports of OC and nitrogen from coastal military installations ultimately influence estuaries downstream.

  16. Exploration Drilling and Technology Demonstration At Fort Bliss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ben; Moore, Joe [EGI; Segall, Marylin; Nash, Greg; Simmons, Stuart; Jones, Clay; Lear, Jon; Bennett, Carlon

    2014-02-26

    The Tularosa-Hueco basin in south-central New Mexico has long been known as an extensional area of high heat flow. Much of the basin is within the Fort Bliss military reservation, which is an exceptionally high value customer for power independent of the regional electric grid and for direct use energy in building climate control. A series of slim holes drilled in the 1990s established the existence of a thermal anomaly but not its practical value. This study began in 2009 with a demonstration of new exploration drilling technology. The subsequent phases reported here delivered a useful well, comparative exploration data sets and encouragement for further development. A production-size well, RMI56-5, was sited after extensive study of archival and newly collected data in 2010-2011. Most of 2012 was taken up with getting state and Federal authorities to agree on a lead agency for permitting purposes, getting a drilling permit and redesigning the drilling program to suit available equipment. In 2013 we drilled, logged and tested a 924 m well on the McGregor Range at Fort Bliss using a reverse circulation rig. Rig tests demonstrated commercial permeability and the well has a 7-inch slotted liner for use either in production or injection. An August 2013 survey of the completed well showed a temperature of 90 C with no reversal, the highest such temperature in the vicinity. The well’s proximity to demand suggests a potentially valuable resource for direct use heat and emergency power generation. The drilling produced cuttings of excellent size and quality. These were subjected to traditional analyses (thin sections, XRD) and to the QEMScan™ for comparison. QEMScan™ technology includes algorithms for determining such properties of rocks as density, mineralogy, heavy/light atoms, and porosity to be compared with direct measurements of the cuttings. In addition to a complete cuttings set, conventional and resistivity image logs were obtained in the open hole before

  17. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2004-04-01

    The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

  18. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  19. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program: Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management

  20. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program. Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia river juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increased competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management. Impacts to cultural resources can be avoided so impacts would be low. Soil impacts would be localized and their effects would be local and temporary during construction. Impacts to water quality would be low. Mitigation would be used if impacts to groundwater or surface water are greater than anticipated. No impacts to floodplains are expected. Impacts to all categories of fish range from no to high impacts

  1. Sobre a termodinamica dos buracos negros fortes e suas possiveis aplicações

    OpenAIRE

    Vilson Tonin Zanchin

    1987-01-01

    Resumo: Neste trabalho nós inicialmente fazemos uma revisão de uma teoria unificada das interações gravitacionais e fortes, baseada nos métodos geométricos da Relatividade Geral, segundo a qual hádrons podem ser considerados como soluções "tipo buraco negro" de novas equações de campo propostas para descreverem simultaneamente dois campos métricos tensoriais (o gravitacional ordinário e o 'forte'). [Com o objetivo de estender a termodinâmica de Bekenstein-Hawking aos "buracos negros fortes" (...

  2. Evaluation of Eurasian Watermilfoil Control Techniques Using Aquatic Herbicides in Fort Peck Lake, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Herbicides in Fort Peck Lake, Montana En vi ro nm en ta l L ab or at or y Toni G. Pennington, Kurt D. Getsinger, John G. Skogerboe, and Patricia L...Using Aquatic Herbicides in Fort Peck Lake, Montana Toni G. Pennington Tetra Tech, Inc. 1020 SW Taylor St., Suite 530 Portland, OR 97205 Kurt D...Omaha Omaha, NE 68102 ERDC/EL TR-15-6 ii Abstract In 2012, field trials were conducted in Fort Peck Lake to evaluate herbicides for

  3. 77 FR 14561 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Administrative Organizational Assessment Draft Report...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... McDowell Resort 2012. Hotel, 10438 N. Fort McDowell Road, Scottsdale/Fountain Hill, AZ 85264, (480) 789... description of each of the topics is provided below. Further information is available at: http://www...

  4. Building a sustainable GIS framework for supporting a tribal transportation problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Due to the recent oil boom, the Fort Berthold Reservation has experienced a dramatic increase in highway and local traffic. To support energy transportation and provide safe roads, the reservation needs cost-efficient and effective transportation pla...

  5. Tribal communities and coal in Northeast India: The politics of imposing and resisting mining bans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDuie-Ra, Duncan; Kikon, Dolly

    2016-01-01

    Bans on coal mining have been implemented in two tribal majority states in India's north-east frontier; Nagaland and Meghalaya. In Nagaland the state government imposed the ban in an attempt to capture control of coal extraction and trade, while in Meghalaya India's National Green Commission imposed the ban over concern for the environment and labour conditions. In both cases local communities have opposed the bans, and in some areas resumed mining under the authority of tribal councils and powerful civil society actors. In this paper we explore the politics of coal extraction that resulted in these bans and the response of communities and authorities. In doing so we made three main arguments that contribute to understanding of coal and communities in frontier regions where state control is partial and the legacy of armed conflict is powerful. First, in both locations the majority of the coal mining activity has been initiated and managed by members of tribal communities rather than profit-driven outsiders. Second, in contrast to other contexts in India (notably Orissa and Jharkhand) where large state or private enterprises seek to modify the law to enable coal extraction, in Nagaland and Meghalaya it has been communities that resent and challenge state and national laws being applied to their lands. Third, the right to extract coal is connected to the right of tribal communities to determine what happens on their lands. - Highlights: • Tribal communities initiate and manage coal mining in Nagaland and Meghalaya. • Laws banning coal extraction have been challenged and resisted by local communities. • The right to extract coal is tied to protecting tribal land rights. • Tribal autonomy in coal policy is progressive, yet enables capture by local elites. • Where there has been regulation of coal mining it has come from unexpected sources.

  6. Neonatal morbidity and mortality in tribal and rural communities in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu Niswade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Little is known about the natural history of neonates born in the rural and tribal areas in India. The Neonatal Disease Surveillance Study (NDSS measures the incidence of high-priority neonatal diseases, neonatal health events and associated risk factors to plan appropriate and effective actions. Materials and Methods: The NDSS is being conducted in Ramtek Revenue Block, Nagpur district, Maharashtra state, given its considerably high level of neonatal mortality. All households from five selected primary health centers were screened. Both active and passive surveillance systems were used for systematic collection of mother′s health during pregnancy and of baby′s health from birth to 4 months after birth. First-year results from November 2006 to October 2007 are presented. Results: Pregnancy outcomes were available for 1,136 women, with an overall neonatal mortality of 73 per 1,000 live births. The pregnancy outcomes varied by gestational age of the baby; miscarriages and abortions were higher in tribal than in non-tribal women, and tribal women had higher rates of low-birth weight (LBW neonates than non-tribal women. The main cause of neonatal mortality was LBW, followed by sepsis and respiratory illness. The mortality of non-tribal babies was most strongly associated with pre term. For tribal babies, mortality was also associated with maternal morbidity and delay in the initiation of breastfeeding. Interpretation and Conclusions: The NDSS provides valuable information on the potentially modifiable factors associated with increased likelihood of neonatal mortality and morbidity. The Neonatal Health Research Initiative is now developing community-based interventions to reduce the high rate of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the rural areas of India.

  7. Constraints on timescales and mechanics of magmatic underplating from InSAR observations of large active magma sills in the Earth's crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Theoretical models of the granitoid magma generation due to magmatic underplating predict that anatectic melts are produced on quite short timescales of the order of the crystallization time of typical mafic underplates (e.g., 102-10^3 years for sill intrusions that are a few tens to a few hundred meters thick). If so, the intrusion of mafic underplates, the volume changes associated with in situ melting, and the subsequent evacuation of the resulting granitoid magmas can each generate geodetically observable deformation. Geodetic measurements in areas of contemporaneous large active magma bodies may therefore provide critical constraints on the timescales and dynamics of crustal anatexis. We use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations in regions of the ongoing crustal magmatism to constrain typical rates of the large-scale melt generation and/or migration, and to test the proposed models of the granitic melt production. Our primary targets include large mid-crustal magma bodies imaged by seismic studies, in particular, the Socorro (New Mexico, USA), the Altiplano-Puna (south America), and the south Tibet (Asia) magma bodies. All these magma bodies are located at depth of 19-20 km, suggesting a strong rheological or buoyancy control on the transition from a vertical to a horizontal magma flow. Stacked interferometric data from the Socorro magma body indicate a quasi-steady uplift with a maximum rate of 3-4 mm/yr over the last 10 years covered by the InSAR observations. The uplift morphology can be well described by an elastic inflation of the Socorro sill. We show that deformation models that allow for the viscous-like rheology of the mid-to-lower crust cannot be easily reconciled with the geodetic data. However, thermodynamic modeling, in conjunction with inferences of the nearly constant uplift rates, suggest that the deformations associated with the intrusion emplacement must involve a significant inelastic component. Such inelastic

  8. Demographics of the Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) on Fort Hood, Texas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jette, Leslie

    1998-01-01

    .... To assist in conservation and recovery of the Golden-cheeked Warbler and comply with the Endangered Species Act, environmental managers need information on the demographic parameters of the population on Fort Hood...

  9. 75 FR 24930 - Fort Bliss (Texas) Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ...-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: [email protected] . FOR... Regional Branch Library, 551 Redd Road. In Las Cruces (NM), the New Mexico State University Zuhl Library...

  10. 75 FR 52733 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Fort Bliss Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ..., Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: [email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... Library, 551 Redd Road; Las Cruces, NM: New Mexico State University Zuhl Library, 2999 McFie Circle...

  11. 2009 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Fort Kent, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Camp Dresser McKee Inc. contracted with Sanborn Map Company to provide LiDAR mapping services for Fort Kent, Maine. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light Detection...

  12. A Floristic Inventory and Spatial Database for Fort Wainwright, Interior Alaska

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Racine, Charles H

    1997-01-01

    An inventory of the vascular and ground-inhabiting cryptogam flora of Fort Wainwright, in interior Alaska, was conducted during the summer of 1995 to support land management needs related to the impact of training...

  13. Quarterly Groundwater Monitoring Third Quarter Sampling Results, Fort Dix, New Jersey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1991-01-01

    ...), Fort Dix Follow-on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study, prepared by Dames & Moore. The sample containers were labeled, packed on ice in coolers, and shipped overnight with completed chain-of-custody forms to ESE for chemical analysis.

  14. Prometheus unbound: A study of the Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport. [Socio-economic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, J. D.; Brown, J.; Dominus, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    The history of the controversies in the development of the Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport is detailed. Present technological and organizational management problems are outlined. Maps and illustrations are included.

  15. Energy Engineering Analysis Program Study, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Volume 3, Appendices G and H

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1993-01-01

    ...) Energy Saving Opportunity Survey (ESOS) at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. This study was authorized under the contract DACA41-92-C-0098 with Corps of Engineers Kansas City District, Kansas City, Missouri...

  16. Final Sampling and Analysis Plan for Background Sampling, Fort Sheridan, Illinois

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... This Background Sampling and Analysis Plan (BSAP) is designed to address this issue through the collection of additional background samples at Fort Sheridan to support the statistical analysis and the Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA...

  17. 77 FR 51064 - Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, AR; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, AR; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated May 21, 2012, the State Workforce...

  18. Vendor Payments-Operation Mongoose, Fort Belvoir Defense Accounting Office and Rome Operating Location

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1996-01-01

    .... Due to the impending closure of the Defense Accounting Office at Fort Belvoir and the anticipated consolidation to the Rome Operating Location, New York, we did not perform a review of the management...

  19. Freight Advanced Traveler Information System (FRATIS) - Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) prototype : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the Final Report for the FRATIS Dallas-Fort Worth DFW prototype system. The FRATIS prototype in : DFW consisted of the following components: optimization algorithm, terminal wait time, route specific : navigation/traffic/weather, and advanced...

  20. Notification: Hotline Complaint – Drinking Water Treatment Plant at the Fort Belknap Indian Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY13-0076, November 13, 2012. On March 22, 2012, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) received a hotline complaint on the construction of the Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) at the Fort Belknap Indian Community.

  1. Biological Assessment of Streams Associated with the Northern Training Complex at Fort knox, Kentucky, August 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Payne, Berry

    2001-01-01

    .... The benthic macroinvertebrate aspect of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Rapid Bioassessment Protocol was applied in August 2000 to selected streams likely to be affected by proposed improvements of training facilities on Fort Knox...

  2. Inclusion of AIDS educational messages in rites of passage ceremonies: reaching young people in tribal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Nora; Mawar, Nita; Macnamara, Marina

    2006-01-01

    The impact of HIV on tribal populations has received little attention. Often living in remote areas, further isolated by language, tradition and endogamous marriage patters, members of such communities have been assumed to be at lower risk for HIV. However, there is growing awareness that tribal peoples are sometimes at considerable risk for HIV, as well as other sexually transmitted infections. Young people in such communities may be particularly vulnerable. Traditional practices may forbid discussion of sex at the same time as increasing exposure to outside influences bring new attitudes and expectations about sex and sexuality. Concerned about the implications of the HIV epidemic on tribal populations, a review was conducted of available data on the HIV epidemic within tribal groups. Based on findings from this review, we propose a largely unexplored avenue for reaching tribal populations: namely, the incorporation of the HIV and AIDS related messages into traditional coming of age ceremonies. Such an intervention however can be one component of a comprehensive approach to reaching these often hard-to-reach populations but it may be an especially effective way to reach young people within these communities.

  3. Dementia in a tribal landlocked elderly population at high altitude: What explains the lower prevalence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Raina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies across the populations have suggested that dementia is differentially distributed with a lower prevalence in developing regions than the developed ones. A comparison in the prevalence of dementia across populations may provide an insight into its risk factors. Earlier, we reported on the prevalence of dementia in elderly population in migrant, urban, rural, and tribal populations. The present study was conducted with a view to estimating the prevalence of dementia in Tribal Landlocked Elderly Population at high altitude and therefore to draw some conclusions on the differential distribution of dementia across populations. Methods: A cross-sectional comprehensive two-phase survey of all residents aged 60 years and older was conducted. Phase 1 involved screening of all individuals aged 60 and above with the help of a cognitive screen specifically developed for the tribal population. Phase 2 involved clinical examination of individuals who were suspected of dementia as per the developed cognitive screening test. Results: The results revealed that six individuals out of a total of 481 studied above 60 years of age in the studied population scored between 17 and 23, thus qualifying as suffering from mild cognitive impairment. Importantly, none of the individuals above 60 years of age scored <17. Discussion: The current study is in conformity with our previous study conducted on urban, rural, and migrant areas of the state of Himachal Pradesh again emphasizing on dementia being rare in tribal populations and thereby pointing to the presence of some protective factors among tribal people.

  4. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-03-01

    The following activities were completed by the end of the quarter: (1) The CERT Executive Director invited a cross section of CERT member Tribes to participate in the project. By the end of the quarter, three Tribes had the invitation under active consideration, four Tribes expressed interest but wanted to see the detailed workplan prior to making a final decision and one Tribe, the Navajo Nation has accepted the invitation. (2) The CERT Board of Directors Executive Committee has endorsed two significant environmental policy priorities for consideration in the project. First, how does the federal Indian trust responsibility to land and natural resources as well as for the health, safety and political integrity of Indian Tribes affect the federal responsibility for facility cleanup and other statutory mandates under federal environmental statutes? And second, What are the protocols of government-to-government relations within a federal system of shared sovereignty and shared governmental responsibilities? And the corollaries to that question, What is the federal obligation for consultation with Tribes and how is that different and similar to consultation with states? And, What is the federal obligation to work cooperatively with Tribes and states in recognition of the three sovereigns of the American federal system? (3) The CERT consulted with political leaders and environmental staff of member and non-member Tribes. This consultation centered on three environmental policy priorities: issues concerning the intergovernmental interface between states, Tribes and federal government agencies and programs; Issues with the cleanup of federal facilities and activities that have damaged Tribal environmental resources; and issues concerning the DOE cleanup of federal facilities used in the production of nuclear weapons.

  5. Mobile platform for fish migration upstream from the discharge sill situated near Dacia bridge on Crișul Repede River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan VOICU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal connectivity represent the way in which organisms move the energy and material exchanges located throughout the water. Fragmentation the longitudinal connectivity of watercourses caused by dams or other hydrotechnical constructions represent a major impact on sediment transport, hydrological regime, downstream moving and biota migration. The hydromorphological elements (river continuity, as well as chemical, biological, physicochemical elements characterize the ecological status of rivers. Migratory fish species: nase (Chondrostoma nasus - protected by Bern Convention - Appendix III, barbel (Barbus barbus - rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V, annex 4A of Low nr.462 and Red List of RBDD and Freshwater bream (Abramis brama - protected by Bern Convention (Appendix III are blocked by the hydrotechnical constructions (discharge sills, dams located across the watercourse Crișul Repede River. One of the important think of this system is the gravitational fall of water. This solution will lead to the restoration of the longitudinal connection of the Crișul Repede River in the Oradea City, near Dacia Bridge. Romania is part of the European Union and it has the obligation to implement the provisions of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC, transposed into Romanian legislation by the Water Law 107/1996 as supplemented and amended (Act 310/2004.

  6. Synthesis and structural characterization of a novel Sillén - Aurivillius bismuth oxyhalide, PbBi3VO7.5Cl, and its derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Plokhikh, Igor V.; Kazakov, Sergey M.; Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Akinfiev, Victor S.; Gorbachev, Anatoly V.; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M.; Teterin, Yury A.; Maslakov, Konstantin I.; Teterin, Anton Yu; Ivanov, Kirill E.

    2018-01-01

    A new Sillén - Aurivillius family of layered bismuth oxyhalides has been designed and successfully constructed on the basis of PbBiO2X (X = halogen) synthetic perites and γ-form of Bi2VO5.5 solid electrolyte. This demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the latter to serve as a building block in construction of mixed-layer structures. The parent compound PbBi3VO7.5-δCl (δ ≤ 0.05) has been investigated by powder XRD, TEM, XPS methods and magnetic susceptibility measurements. An unexpected but important condition for the formation of the mixed-layer structure is partial (ca. 5%) reduction of VV into VIV which probably suppresses competitive formation of apatite-like Pb - Bi vanadates. This reduction also stabilizes the γ polymorphic form of Bi2VO5.5 not only in the intergrowth structure, but in Bi2V1-xMxO5.5-y (M = Nb, Sb) solid solutions.

  7. Evaluation of the emergency warning system at the Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The Fort St. Vrain power plant is the only high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in commercial operation in the United States. All commercial reactors, regardless of technology, must conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission emergency planning regulations developed in light of Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements (NUREG-0737). This report analyzes the applicability of warning-related planning requirements to HTGRs and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of warning procedures at Fort St. Vrain.

  8. Rumlige fortællinger fra mobilt og web-baseret GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    Denne artikel handler om begrebet rumlige fortællinger med anvendelse af fortællingshenvisninger, og disses potentielle rolle ved implementation af fleksible og tematiske turistinformationssystemer. Artiklen fokuserer på brugen af mobile, positionsbekendte enheder, såsom visse PDA'er og smartphon......, samt på web-gis. Der præsenteres to anvendelseseksempler: et fra det centrale København og et fra et område nær Accra, Ghana....

  9. Data Mining the Corporate Dental System of USA DENTAC Fort Bragg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Data Mining the Corporate Dental System of USA DENTAC Fort Bragg FREDWIN HOLOMON, D.D.S. B.S. University of...thesis manuscript entitled: Data Mining the Corporate Dental System of USA DENTAC Fort Bragg Is appropriately acknowledged and beyond visual...The present study collected data from the Corporate Dental System encompassing the time period between October 2014 and October 2015. Patient

  10. Lateral incisor agenesis predicts maxillary hypoplasia and Le Fort I advancement surgery in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K; Nguyen, Phuong D; Yee, Kristen S; Martz, Martin G; Bradley, James P; Lee, Justine C

    2015-01-01

    Severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft patients is caused by a combination of pathogenic and iatrogenic factors. In this work, the authors investigated anatomical deficiencies in dentition for predicting Le Fort I maxillary advancement surgery for severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft patients. Cleft lip-cleft palate and cleft palate patients older than 14 years of age were reviewed for demographics, dental anomalies, and Le Fort I advancement. Chi-square tests, t tests, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to delineate the contribution of quantity and position of dental agenesis to maxillary advancement surgery. In the 114 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.2 years), 64.0 percent were male patients, 71.9 percent had dental agenesis, and 59.6 percent required Le Fort I advancement. In patients who did not exhibit dental agenesis, 18.8 percent required Le Fort I advancement compared with 74.4 percent of patients with dental agenesis (p agenesis was at the lateral incisor position (p agenesis is an independent predictor for Le Fort I advancement surgery (OR, 4.4; 95 percent CI, 1.42 to 13.64; p = 0.01). Lateral incisor agenesis correlated to maxillary hypoplasia and independently predicted the need for Le Fort I advancement in cleft patients, potentially as an anatomical readout of intrinsic growth deficiency. Risk, III.

  11. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-23

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  12. Fort St. Vrain fuel-handling system RAM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizi, S.M.; Berg, G.E.; Burton, J.H.; Durand, R.E.; Larson, E.M.; Pepe, D.J.; Rutherford, P.D.; Novachek, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    Public Service of Company of Colorado (PSC) is planning to decommission its Fort St. Vrain plant in 1990. This requires removal of 1,500 separate assemblies from the core. With the low historical availability of the fuel-handling system (FHS), defueling time was estimated at 36 months. With plant expenses of approximately $1.6 million per month during defueling, this would mean a schedule cost of $58 million. With their contractor, Rockwell International, PSC embarked on a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis to reduce projected defueling time. Key elements included (a) estimating availability of the FHS using a limited historical record, (b) assessing the defueling critical path, and (c) proposing and evaluating design/operational improvements. The most cost-effective improvements are being implemented and are expected to provide a reduction of >18 months in schedule and a net savings of $20 to 25 million. The paper describes the FHS design and operation, major problems associated with fuel-handling operations, and results and recommendations

  13. Fenologia do caquizeiro "Rama Forte'' em clima tropical Phenology of persimmon tree 'Rama Forte' in tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Corsato

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O cultivo do caqui (Diospyros kaki L. é uma atividade agrícola importante para pequenos produtores no Brasil. O conhecimento da sua fenologia em clima tropical é de grande importância para o estudo e manejo dessa espécie. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar os estádios fenológicos da cultivar 'Rama Forte'. O estudo foi realizado no Setor de Horticultura da Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz" (ESALQ, em Piracicaba, SP, durante o ciclo 2002/2003. Da brotação das gemas até a abscisão foliar foram caracterizados doze estádios fenológicos. Do intumescimento das gemas no fim do inverno, até o amadurecimento dos frutos no fim do verão passaram-se 203 dias. Do florescimento até o amadurecimento dos frutos transcorreram 169 dias. Ocorreram dois picos no abortamento de frutos. Os primeiros sintomas de senescência das folhas ocorreram aos 60 dias, a partir do término da expansão foliar. Do início da brotação das gemas no fim do inverno, até o completo desfolhamento das plantas, somaram-se 264 dias no decorrer de toda a primavera, verão e outono.Persimmon crop (Diospyros kaki L. is an important agricultural activity to small growers in Brazil. Knowledge about its phenology in tropical climate is very significant to its study and management. This work aimed the characterization of phenologic stages of persimmon tree cultivar 'Rama Forte'. The study was carried out at Horticulture Sector of the Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz" (ESALQ, in Piracicaba, State of São Paulo, during the cycle of 2002/2003. Twelve stages were characterized from shoot buds to leaf abscission. Two hundred and three days were taken from buds intumescence, at the end of the winter, to fruit fully ripeness at the end of the summer. One hundred and sixty nine days was the time length from flowering to fruit ripeness. Two distinct peaks of fruit abortion were observed. The first symptoms of leaf senescence appeared sixteen days

  14. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Arctic Research, One Health and the Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network: Ongoing Activities and Expansion to Lower 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities Seminar Series presents the Tribal Science Webinar Series that will look to develop a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities.

  15. Office of Environmental Information (OEI) Tribal Strategy: Partnership to Support Environmental Information and Decision-Making in Indian Country and Alaska Native Villages

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft strategy provides a description of goals OEI seeks to accomplish to support tribal information and environmental decision-making. States objectives to facilitate and strengthen tribal capacity to collect, analyze and share data.

  16. Understanding Malnutrition of Tribal Children in India: The Role of Women's Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Avijit; Bhattacharjee, Nairita

    2016-01-01

    Child malnutrition is considered to be the key risk factor for illness during adolescence and is responsible for about one-third of child deaths globally. Historically tribal communities have lagged behind the general population in terms of most socioeconomic aspects, and one such aspect is the nutritional status of children. The present study analyzes regional variations in child malnutrition and its association with women's empowerment in the tribal communities of India. The investigation is based on secondary data compiled from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS). Both bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to analyze data. We found a conditional inverse association between child malnutrition and women's empowerment in tribal communities. It is conditional in the sense that women's empowerment is effective when other factors supposed to influence nutritional status are proactive. Policy prescriptions are discussed.

  17. Essentials of Research Engagement With Native American Tribes: Data Collection Reflections of a Tribal Research Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockie, Teresa N; Dana-Sacco, Gail; López, Miriam Maga; Wetsit, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, particularly relevant when collecting data on sensitive topics, was employed to partner with reservation tribes to assess suicide risk among Native American (NA) youth. To share relationship-building strategies used by an NA research team to build a partnership for collecting data. Our collective knowledge was used to cultivate a deeper understanding of the community, build trust, and partner to engage in a respectful tribally appropriate research process. This approach provided a solid foundation for our inquiry on risk and protective factors for youth suicide. A culturally grounded approach recognizes the importance of (1) ethnic concordance, (2) cultural acceptance, (3) taking time to build trust, and (4) using CBPR principles. Significant participation of Native researchers in sensitive topics research with tribal communities is a promising strategy for trust building and partnership development. Understanding tribal context is imperative.

  18. 25 CFR 170.405 - Can tribal transportation planning funds be used for road construction and other projects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can tribal transportation planning funds be used for road... Reservation Roads Program Facilities Transportation Planning § 170.405 Can tribal transportation planning... funds as defined in 23 U.S.C. 204(j) transferred into construction funds for use on any eligible and...

  19. 25 CFR 170.412 - How is the tribal IRR long-range transportation plan developed and approved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-range transportation plan developed and approved? (a) The tribal IRR long-range transportation plan is... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the tribal IRR long-range transportation plan developed and approved? 170.412 Section 170.412 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  20. 45 CFR 309.75 - What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What administrative and management procedures must... ENFORCEMENT (IV-D) PROGRAM Tribal IV-D Plan Requirements § 309.75 What administrative and management... must include in its Tribal IV-D plan the administrative and management provisions contained in this...

  1. 45 CFR 309.160 - How will OCSE determine if Tribal IV-D program funds are appropriately expended?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (IV-D) PROGRAM Accountability and Monitoring § 309.160 How will OCSE determine if Tribal IV-D program funds are...

  2. 25 CFR 170.805 - What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? (a) State, county, and local governments... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? 170.805 Section 170.805 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  3. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized support...

  4. 45 CFR 309.170 - What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What statistical and narrative reporting... (IV-D) PROGRAM Statistical and Narrative Reporting Requirements § 309.170 What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs? (a) Tribes and Tribal organizations...

  5. A Special Issue of the Journal of Forestry—Tribal Forest Management: Innovations for Sustainable Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Serra J. Hoagland

    2017-01-01

    Native American forests and tribal forest management practices have sustained indigenous communities, economies, and resources for millennia. These systems provide a wealth of knowledge and successful applications of long-term environmental stewardship and integrated, sustainable forest management. Tribal forestry has received an increasing amount of attention from...

  6. 25 CFR 162.205 - Can individual Indian landowners exempt their agricultural land from certain tribal leasing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... agricultural land from certain tribal leasing policies? 162.205 Section 162.205 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... leasing policies? (a) Individual Indian landowners may exempt their agricultural land from the application of a tribal leasing policy of a type described in § 162.203(b) through (c) of this subpart, if the...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3402(r)-1 - Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... profits to tribal members. 31.3402(r)-1 Section 31.3402(r)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(r)-1 Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members. (a) (1) General rule. Section 3402(r...

  8. 78 FR 68839 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for February 25, 2014; Notice of Changes to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-2057] Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for February 25, 2014; Notice of Changes to Auction 902 Schedule Following Resumption... up to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support, will be conducted on February 25...

  9. Interfaces in Social Innovation: an Action Research Story on a Tribal Women's Collective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Banu Soletti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the nature of social interfaces that has emerged in the context of social innovations with vulnerable and marginalised tribal communities along the Tansa Reservoir in Maharashtra, India. This paper is part of a larger action research project that strives towards improving the livelihoods of tribal women through collectives such as self-help groups. The analysis presented in this paper pertains to the experiences of 13 tribal women who have come forward to form a self-help group to supplement their livelihoods. According to the tribal women, the collective spaces that the self-help group provide has itself been termed as innovation. In the above-mentioned context, this paper specifically examines the nature of diverse values and beliefs, interests, knowledge and power among different actors involved in promoting livelihood-based women’s collectives. It also explores the nature of response among tribal women to the intervention of outside experts in the day-to-day activities of their collective. The findings of this paper illustrate the discontinuities associated with the collective and specifically on the nature of frictions, disagreements and conflicts between actors, which are mediated and transformed at critical junctures. This signifies an underlying asymmetry between the knowledge systems of tribal women and outside experts respectively. Furthermore, this paper argues that if not properly nurtured, such innovative collective spaces can become sites of domination and agents for the perpetuation of mere socio-technical interest. Instead, the discourse of social innovation needs to be socially embedded within the issues of rights, recognition, representation and empowerment of those people who are vulnerable and marginalised in the society.

  10. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Shrikanth; Chauhan, Astha; Gowda, Srinivasa; Ambekar, Rutuja; Rathore, Bhupendra S; Chabra, Sakshi; Lalani, Afsheen; Harani, Harsh

    2018-01-01

    India is home to many tribes which have an interesting and varied history of origins, customs and social practices. Oral health care in tribal areas is limited due to shortage of dental manpower, financial constraints and the lack of perceived need for dental care among tribal masses. To assess orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India. A cross-sectional house to house survey was carried out among 800 tribal children aged 5 to 15 years old in two major tribal districts of Indore division. Permissions and consent were obtained from local administrative authorities, ethical committee and parents respectively. A structured proforma was used to record demographic data. Examination for dentofacial anomalies was conducted according to WHO 1997 survey methods. Descriptive tables and analytical tests like ANOVA, post-hoc and chi-square test were employed. The mean age was 9.75(±2.43) years. The mean DAI score among 12 to 15 years old children was 23.19±5.22. Female exhibited higher (24.51±5.34) mean DAI score compared to males (22.12±4.87) (p<0.05). The Patelia tribes (24.38±5.13) reported higher mean DAI score than Bhilala (23.02±5.69) and Bhil tribe (22.73±4.79) (p<0.005). The tribal children had minor malocclusion with no or slight treatment need. Categorization of orthodontic treatment need according to malocclusion severity is particularly important for the planning of corresponding public policies. The isolation of the villages, lack of transportation options imposes limitations on the availability of health professionals to provide dental services.

  11. Socioeconomic Correlates of Contraceptive Use among the Ethnic Tribal Women of Bangladesh: Does Sex Preference Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Mostafa Kamal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To examine the relationship between socioeconomic factors affecting contraceptive use among tribal women of Bangladesh with focusing on son preference over daughter.The study used data gathered through a cross sectional survey on four tribal communities resided in the Rangamati Hill District of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh. A multistage random sampling procedure was applied to collect data from 865 currently married women of whom 806 women were currently married, non-pregnant and had at least one living child, which are the basis of this study. The information was recorded in a pre-structured questionnaire. Simple cross tabulation, chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were performed to analyzing data.The contraceptive prevalence rate among the study tribal women was 73%. The multivariate analyses yielded quantitatively important and reliable estimates of likelihood of contraceptive use. Findings revealed that after controlling for other variables, the likelihood of contraceptive use was found not to be significant among women with at least one son than those who had only daughters, indicating no preference of son over daughter. Multivariate logistic regression analysis suggests that home visitations by family planning workers, tribal identity, place of residence, husband's education, and type of family, television ownership, electricity connection in the household and number of times married are important determinants of any contraceptive method use among the tribal women.The contraceptive use rate among the disadvantaged tribal women was more than that of the national level. Door-step delivery services of modern methods should be reached and available targeting the poor and remote zones.

  12. Tribal Colleges Initiative project. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiative (TCI) grant is in the second year of funding from the US Department of Energy Environmental Management program. This quarterly report includes activities for the first three months (April 1--June 30, 1998) of the Year 2 funding period. The TCI program office requested each Tribal College to write a quarterly report of activities at their respective institutions. These reports are attached. These institutions are Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Dine` College (DC, formerly Navajo Community College). The purpose of this program is to offer educational opportunities to Native Americans in the environmental field.

  13. Pattern of Decision Making of Irula Tribal Farm Women in Nilgiris District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeetha Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to find out the pattern of decision making of the Irula  tribal farm women of Nilgiris district in farm and home. The study revealed that Irula tribal farm women took self decision in the case of irrigating fields (85.00 followed by using plant protection measures (83.33 in case of farm management and took self decision in cases like selection and preparation of food (100.00, decorating the house (70.00 They had least participation in decisions like construction of new house (63.33 followed by borrowing and giving loans (38.33.

  14. Immunization Coverage In Urban, Rural And Tribal Populations-A Comparative Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj A K

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunization coverage assessment of 327 children in Himachal pradesh revealed that 66.7%, 42.2% and 50.6% children were fully immunized in urban, rural and tribal areas respectively. The coverage by all vaccines was well above the national average. Drop out rates were more in the rural areas followed by tribal and urban areas. The main reason for drop outs in immunization was parents’ preoccupation with their work. However in the opinion of the health workers, fear of side reactions and illness of the child were the main reasons for the poor response.

  15. Traditional use of medicinal plants as febrifuge by the tribals of Purulia district, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Dey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ethnobotanical excursions were carried out among the tribals of Purulia district, West Bengal, India to explore the traditional use of medicinal plants against fever. Methods: With the help of a semi structured questionnaire, informants were interviewed and their indigenous knowledge regarding antipyretic use of plants was documented. Results: A total number of 22 plants used as febrifuge were recorded along with their vernacular names, part(s used, method of preparation and route of administration. Conclusions: Different tribal communities residing in the area were found to possess traditional knowledge of using phytotherapy in the treatment of fevers.

  16. 25 CFR 162.203 - When can the regulations in this subpart be superseded or modified by tribal laws and leasing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... modified by tribal laws and leasing policies? 162.203 Section 162.203 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... When can the regulations in this subpart be superseded or modified by tribal laws and leasing policies... resolution establishing a general policy for the leasing of tribal and individually-owned agricultural land...

  17. The effect of a Le Fort I incision on nose and upper lip dynamics: Unraveling the mystery of the "Le Fort I lip".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Herman; Van Nassauw, Luc; San Miguel-Moragas, Joan; Lakiere, Eva; Stevens, Sten; Van Hemelen, Geert; Raffaini, Mirco; Nadjmi, Nasser

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative flattening of the upper lip with loss of lip pout and down turning of the corners of the mouth is often seen after Le Fort I surgery. We aim to determine which facial muscles are involved in this phenomenon to update the literature on this subject. In 6 cadavers, a unilateral Le Fort I incision was executed. After removal of the skin, all individual facial muscles were identified and submitted to bilateral tactile traction, comparing incised sides with non-incised sides. All the components of the deep layer of the modiolus alae nasi (transverse part of the nasalis muscle and the myrtiformis muscle) and the deep layer of the midface musculature (levator anguli oris muscle) were transected by the Le Fort I incision. After performing the incision, the majority of the depressor septi nasi is intact. Further, the superficial layer of the midface musculature is intact but it loses tension because of its connection to the deep layer. This study suggests the importance of correctly suturing the deep muscular layers to maintain the 3-dimensional facial contour. Moreover, in this cadaver study, we attempt to predict the functional consequences on the impairment of facial mimics related to the Le Fort I incision. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of maxillary stability after Le Fort I osteotomy for occlusal cant correction surgery and maxillary advanced surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Hashiba, Yukari; Marukawa, Kohei; Yoshida, Kan; Shimizu, Chika; Nakagawa, Kiyomasa; Yamamoto, Etsuhide

    2007-07-01

    To compare postoperative maxillary stability following Le Fort I osteotomy for the correction of occlusal cant as compared with conventional Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement. The subjects were 40 Japanese adults with jaw deformities. Of these, 20 underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) to correct asymmetric skeletal morphology and inclined occlusal cant. The other 20 patients underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy and sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) to advance the maxilla. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms were taken postoperatively and assessed statistically. Thereafter, the 2 groups were followed for time-course changes. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups with regard to time-course changes during the immediate postoperative period. This suggests that maxillary stability after Le Fort I osteotomy for cant correction does not differ from that after Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement.

  19. Slip Potential of Faults in the Fort Worth Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, P.; Osmond, J.; Lund Snee, J. E.; Zoback, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Similar to other areas of the southcentral United States, the Fort Worth Basin of NE Texas has experienced an increase in the rate of seismicity which has been attributed to injection of waste water in deep saline aquifers. To assess the hazard of induced seismicity in the basin we have integrated new data on location and character of previously known and unknown faults, stress state, and pore pressure to produce an assessment of fault slip potential which can be used to investigate prior and ongoing earthquake sequences and for development of mitigation strategies. We have assembled data on faults in the basin from published sources, 2D and 3D seismic data, and interpretations provided from petroleum operators to yield a 3D fault model with 292 faults ranging in strike-length from 116 to 0.4 km. The faults have mostly normal geometries, all cut the disposal intervals, and most are presumed to cut into the underlying crystalline and metamorphic basement. Analysis of outcrops along the SW flank of the basin assist with geometric characterization of the fault systems. The interpretation of stress state comes from integration of wellbore image and sonic data, reservoir stimulation data, and earthquake focal mechanisms. The orientation of SHmax is generally uniform across the basin but stress style changes from being more strike-slip in the NE part of the basin to normal faulting in the SW part. Estimates of pore pressure come from a basin-scale hydrogeologic model as history-matched to injection test data. With these deterministic inputs and appropriate ranges of uncertainty we assess the conditional probability that faults in our 3D model might slip via Mohr-Coulomb reactivation in response to increases in injected-related pore pressure. A key component of the analysis is constraining the uncertainties associated with each of the principal parameters. Many of the faults in the model are interpreted to be critically-stressed within reasonable ranges of uncertainty.

  20. The Penobscot River and environmental contaminants: Assessment of tribal exposure through sustenance lifeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Valerie; Kusnierz, Daniel; Hillger, Robert; Ferrario, Joseph; Hughes, Thomas; Diliberto, Janet; Orazio, Carl E.; Dudley, Robert W.; Byrne, Christian; Sugatt, Richard; Warren, Sarah; DeMarini, David; Elskus, Adria; Stodola, Steve; Mierzykowski, Steve; Pugh, Katie; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    EPA in collaboration with the Penobscot Indian Nation, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) collectively embarked on a four year research study to evaluate the environmental health of the riverine system by targeting specific cultural practices and using traditional science to conduct a preliminary contaminant screening of the flora and fauna of the Penobscot River ecosystem. This study was designed as a preliminary screening to determine if contaminant concentrations in fish, eel, snapping turtle, wood ducks, and plants in Regions of the Penobscot River relevant to where PIN tribal members hunt, fish and gather plants were high enough to be a health concern. This study was not designed to be a statistically validated assessment of contaminant differences among study sites or among species. The traditional methodology for health risk assessment used by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is based on the use of exposure assumptions (e.g. exposure duration, food ingestion rate, body weight, etc.) that represent the entire American population, either as a central tendency exposure (e.g. average, median) or as a reasonable maximum exposure (e.g. 95% upper confidence limit). Unfortunately, EPA lacked exposure information for assessing health risks for New England regional tribes sustaining a tribal subsistence way of life. As a riverine tribe, the Penobscot culture and traditions are inextricably tied to the Penobscot River watershed. It is through hunting, fishing, trapping, gathering and making baskets, pottery, moccasins, birch-bark canoes and other traditional practices that the Penobscot culture and people are sustained. The Penobscot River receives a variety of pollutant discharges leaving the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN) questioning the ecological health and water quality of the river and how this may affect the practices that sustain their way of life

  1. The Tribal Odisha Eye Disease Study (TOES) 1: prevalence and causes of visual impairment among tribal children in an urban school in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkad, Vivekanand U; Panda, Lapam; Behera, Pradeep; Das, Taraprasad; Mohanta, Bikash C; Khanna, Rohit

    2018-03-16

    To estimate the prevalence and causes of visual impairment and other ocular comorbidities among tribal children in an urban school population in eastern India. In this cross-sectional study, vision screening tests were administered to tribal school children. Demographic data, including name, age, sex, home district, height, and weight of each child, and examination data, including unaided and pinhole visual acuity, external eye examination with a flashlight, slit-lamp examination, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and undilated fundus photography, were collected. Children with visual acuity of less than 20/20, abnormal anterior or posterior segment findings, and IOP of >21 mm Hg were referred to for further evaluation. Of 10,038 children (5,840 males [58.2%]) screened, 335 (median age, 9 years; range, 6-17 years) were referred. Refractive error was the most common cause of visual impairment (59.52%; 95% CI, 51.97-66.65) followed by amblyopia (17.2%; 95% CI, 12.3-23.6) and posterior segment anomaly (14.88%; 95% CI, 10.2-21.0). The prevalence of best-corrected visual acuity of 20/40 was 0.13%. The prevalence of blindness was 0.03%. Visual impairment among tribal children in this residential school is an uncommon but important disability. Copyright © 2018 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper deposits related to picrite and (or) tholeiitic basalt dike-sill complexes-A preliminary deposit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Chandler, Val W.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits containing nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), with or without (?) platinum-group elements (PGEs), account for approximately 60 percent of the world's Ni production and are active exploration targets in the United States and elsewhere. On the basis of their principal metal production, magmatic sulfide deposits in mafic rocks can be divided into two major types: those that are sulfide-rich, typically with 10 to 90 percent sulfide minerals, and have economic value primarily because of their Ni and Cu contents; and those that are sulfide-poor, typically with 0.5 to 5 percent sulfide minerals, and are exploited principally for PGE. Because the purpose of this deposit model is to facilitate the assessment for undiscovered, potentially economic magmatic Ni-Cu?PGE sulfide deposits in the United States, it addresses only those deposits of economic significance that are likely to occur in the United States on the basis of known geology. Thus, this model focuses on deposits hosted by small- to medium-sized mafic and (or) ultramafic dikes and sills that are related to picrite and tholeiitic basalt magmatic systems generally emplaced in continental settings as a component of large igneous provinces (LIPs). World-class examples (those containing greater than 1 million tons Ni) of this deposit type include deposits at Noril'sk-Talnakh (Russia), Jinchuan (China), Pechenga (Russia), Voisey's Bay (Canada), and Kabanga (Tanzania). In the United States, this deposit type is represented by the Eagle deposit in northern Michigan, currently under development by Kennecott Minerals.

  3. 77 FR 71016 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self- Governance Program... Self-Governance Program. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076... comments to Ken Reinfeld, Office of Self-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB...

  4. Self-Determination in Health Research: An Alaska Native Example of Tribal Ownership and Research Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alaska Native (AN and American Indian (AI people are underrepresented in health research, yet many decline to participate in studies due to past researcher misconduct. Southcentral Foundation (SCF, an Alaska Native-owned and operated health care organization, is transforming the relationship between researchers and the tribal community by making trust and accountability required features of health research in AN/AI communities. In 1998, SCF assumed ownership from the federal government of health services for AN/AI people in south central Alaska and transformed the health system into a relationship-based model of care. This change reimagines how researchers interact with tribal communities and established community oversight of all health research conducted with AN/AI people in the region. We describe the SCF research review process, which requires tribal approval of the research concept, full proposal, and dissemination products, as well as local institutional review board approval, and a researcher-signed contract. This review evaluates research through the lens of tribal principles, practices, and priorities. The SCF example provides a framework for other tribes and organizations seeking to reshape the future of health research in AN/AI communities.

  5. 25 CFR 170.402 - What is the tribal role in transportation planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... traffic studies; (5) Developing short- and long-range transportation plans; (6) Mapping; (7) Developing... facilities; (10) Developing IRR Program budgets including transportation planning cost estimates; (11... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the tribal role in transportation planning? 170...

  6. 77 FR 58860 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for the Tribal Reassumption of Jurisdiction Over Child...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Jurisdiction Over Child Custody Proceedings AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... collection of information for approval for the Tribal Reassumption of Jurisdiction over Child Custody... occupies a reservation over which a state asserts any jurisdiction pursuant to federal law may reassume...

  7. 77 FR 27477 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for the Tribal Reassumption of Jurisdiction Over Child...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... Jurisdiction Over Child Custody Proceedings AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the collection of information for the Tribal Reassumption of Jurisdiction over Child Custody... a state asserts any jurisdiction pursuant to federal law may reassume jurisdiction over Indian child...

  8. Barrow's Living Room: How a Tribal College Library Connects Communities across the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Erin

    2015-01-01

    More than just storerooms of information, tribal college libraries are gathering spaces that bring people together. The Tuzzy Consortium Library at IIisagvik College builds community by providing services and programs that reflect the values of Alaska's North Slope Iñupiaq people. The college library collaborates with different organizations to…

  9. 77 FR 62269 - Draft Tribal Protocol Manual and Scoping for Proposed Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... intended to assist the NRC in developing an effective tribal consultation policy statement. III. Questions... it as a starting point for developing a policy statement on consultation with Native American tribes... policies and licensing actions, and therefore is committed to meaningful consultation and coordination with...

  10. 78 FR 33331 - Tribal Consultation and Coordination Policy for the U.S. Department of Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... ensure its consultations are as effective as possible. Comments to Section 3: Authority The Department... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE [Docket Number: 120530127-2127-02] Tribal Consultation and Coordination... Statement. SUMMARY: In compliance with Executive Order 13175, ``Consultation and Coordination with Indian...

  11. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... work participation rate? 261.25 Section 261.25 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Provisions Addressing State Accountability? § 261.25 Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate? At State option...

  12. The Effect of Inter-tribal Post Election Violence Conflict Trauma on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inter-tribal conflict in 2007-2008 in Mt. Elgon District was apparently over land dispute between the Soy and Ndorobo clans of the. Sabaot tribe. This research aimed at establishing the effect of trauma as a result of inter-ethnic conflicts on academic performance among secondary school students in Mt Elgon District, ...

  13. Mother Tongue First Multilingual Education among the Tribal Communities in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    India's rich multilingual, multicultural society creates a complex challenge to the Government as it attempts to address the educational needs of its tribal communities. Although access to schools has increased and enrolment rates are improving, the dropout rates are still alarmingly high and achievement levels are low compared to their non-tribal…

  14. An Array of Opportunities: Building a Sustainable Future at Leech Lake Tribal College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    With support from Leech Lake Tribal College (LLTC) in Cass Lake, Minnesota, solar energy infrastructure--as well as specialized training and well-paying jobs--are coming to the Leech Lake Nation. Rather than power LLTC's facilities, a 40- kilowatt solar garden installed on the college's campus during the 2017 fall semester, along with four similar…

  15. Burden of diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in tribal population of India: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ravi Prakash; Misra, Puneet; Chellaiyan, Vinoth G; Das, Timiresh K; Adhikary, Mrinmoy; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Yadav, Kapil; Sinha, Smita

    2013-10-01

    To estimate the burden of diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes in tribal populations of India. The authors reviewed studies from 2000 to 2011 that documented the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in various tribal populations of India. The search was performed using electronic and manual methods. Meta-analysis of data on point prevalence was performed. A total of seven studies were retrieved. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus ranged from 0.7% to 10.1%. The final estimate of diabetes prevalence obtained after pooling of data from individual studies, was 5.9% (95% CI; 3.1-9.5%). The prevalence for impaired fasting glucose (IFG) varied from 5.1% to 13.5% and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), from 6.6% to 12.9%. Chronic disease research in tribal populations is limited. The reported prevalence of IFG/IGT was higher than the prevalence of diabetes and this observation could be suggestive of a potential increase in diabetes in the coming years. Given that lifestyle changes have occurred in the tribal populations, there is a need to synthesize evidence(s) relating to diabetes and other chronic diseases in these marginalized populations and inform policy makers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. FOLKLORIC PLANT REMEDIES FOR STINGS OF INSECTS FROM THE TRIBALS OF THRISSUR DISTRICT, KERALA

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhadevi, P.K.; Aravindakshan, M.

    1994-01-01

    The authors conducted survey of medicinal plants used by the tribal of Thrissur district. The investigation revealed several plant remedies to escape from the attack of insects and flies which are described in this paper. These could be used as soft common remedies in our households also.

  17. Mumps outbreak in a tribal population from the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilavat, Siddharth M; Vaidya, Sunil R; Hamde, Venkat S

    2017-12-01

    A cluster of parotitis cases (n = 13) were observed in a tribal population of Vansda village from the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, India between 20th and 22nd week of 2016. Primary information was received by the local Infectious Disease Surveillance Program team, and subsequently field investigations were carried out in the affected area. Active surveillance was conducted till twice the incubation period from onset of the last surveyed case. For the laboratory investigations, 19 serum samples were collected from 11-suspected cases and their close contacts (n = 8). All samples were transported within 12 h on icepacks to the main laboratory at Pune. Majority of the suspected mumps cases were children except four adults. Mumps infection was confirmed in 8 of 11 suspected cases with post-onset ranging from 28 to 43 days and none from the close contacts. Both mumps specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in nine cases (including one equivocal) and single contact (equivocal result). Overall, ten cases and eight contacts (including one equivocal) showed mumps specific IgG antibodies. Present investigation provides information about the characteristics of mumps outbreak in a tribal community that resides in the remote areas. In addition, introduction of mumps containing vaccine in the tribal population may have added advantages in the tribal health program. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among tribal populations of India - Country scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Malay B; Colah, Roshan B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    It is believed that the tribal people, who constitute 8.6 per cent of the total population (2011 census of India), are the original inhabitants of India. Glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked genetic defect, affecting around 400 million people worldwide and is characterized by considerable biochemical and molecular heterogeneity. Deficiency of this enzyme is highly polymorphic in those areas where malaria is/has been endemic. G6PD deficiency was reported from India more than 50 years ago. t0 he prevalence varies from 2.3 to 27.0 per cent with an overall prevalence of 7.7 per cent in different tribal groups. Since the tribal populations live in remote areas where malaria is/has been endemic, irrational use of antimalarial drugs could result in an increased number of cases with drug induced haemolysis. Therefore, before giving antimalarial therapy, routine screening for G6PD deficiency should be undertaken in those tribal communities where its prevalence is high.

  19. Tribal CCDF Guide to "Financial Management, Grants Administration, and Program Accountability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Bureau, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Tribal managers and staff working with Federal grants must be fully knowledgeable of all applicable Federal requirements and skilled in applying these requirements to the daily operation of their programs, whether starting a new program or striving to maintain a quality program which meets the intent of the enacting legislation. It is the…

  20. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  1. 77 FR 55860 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on... conduct a listening session with Indian tribes to obtain oral and written comments concerning sacred sites located on Federal lands. This session in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the sixth in a series of listening sessions...

  2. 75 FR 53269 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Tribal Consultation; Justification and Approval of Sole-Source 8...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... and approval of sole-source contracts over $20 million under the 8(a) small business development... valuable component of its deliberations in preparing to implement this law, which includes contracting with... Regulation; Tribal Consultation; Justification and Approval of Sole-Source 8(a) Contracts AGENCIES...

  3. 25 CFR 290.12 - What information must the tribal revenue allocation plan contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uses for which you will allocate net gaming revenues. The percentage breakdown must total 100 percent... adequate portion of net gaming revenues from the tribal gaming activity for one or more of the following... such amounts as necessary for the health, education, or welfare of the minor or incompetent; (ii...

  4. Working Together: Wellness and Academic Achievement at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Bonnie; Magarati, Maya; Parker, Myra; Egashira, Leo; Kipp, Billie Jo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the activities of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI) at the University of Washington, Washington State, in collaborating with tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to examine alcohol, drug, and mental health issues among Native students. The authors provide first steps for the development of culturally…

  5. 78 FR 4868 - Notice of Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Notice of Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation... completed applications to begin participation in the tribal self-governance program in fiscal year 2014 or... 355-G-SIB, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr...

  6. 76 FR 70752 - Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal Self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the.../consortia to submit completed applications to begin participation in the tribal self-governance program in... Interior, Mail Stop 355-G-SIB, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  7. 76 FR 5395 - Notice of Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Notice of Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation... completed applications to begin participation in the tribal self-governance program in fiscal year 2012 or... 355-G-SIB, 1951 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr...

  8. 40 CFR 745.325 - Lead-based paint activities: State and Tribal program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lead-based paint activities: State and... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES State and Indian Tribal Programs § 745.325 Lead-based paint activities: State and...

  9. 75 FR 41896 - Colville Indian Precision Pine, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation, Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ..., Wood Products Division, Including On-Site Contract Workers From C & K General Contractor, Doran Richter... to workers of Colville Indian Precision Pine, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products... of the subject firm. The workers are engaged in activities related to the production of boards and...

  10. 75 FR 41896 - Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Corporation Wood Products Division Including On-Site Contract Workers From C & K General Contractor, Doran..., applicable to workers of Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood... for workers of the subject firm. The workers are engaged in activities related to the production of...

  11. Beyond Standing Rock: Seeking Solutions and Building Awareness at Tribal Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskus, Laura

    2017-01-01

    People around the world watched scenes unfold at Standing Rock as Indigenous people and their allies protested against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). One of the men at the center of all of this has been Standing Rock tribal chairman Dave Archambault II. Interviewed time and again on radio and television, Archambault called for prayer and…

  12. 78 FR 37828 - Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Qualifications Describe the organizational structure of the Tribe and its ability to manage the proposed project.... Organizational Capabilities, Key Personnel and Qualifications (20 Points) Describe the organizational structure... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement...

  13. Prescription Pattern in the Department of Surgery in A Tribal District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescription Pattern in the Department of Surgery in A Tribal District Hospital of Andhra Pradesh, India. A Khade, MSM Bashir, A Sheethal. Abstract. Background: Usually, surgical management cannot be completed without the use of antimicrobial and analgesic drugs. Irrational prescription may lead to severe postoperative ...

  14. 75 FR 80082 - State, Local, Tribal, And Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, And Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight... 41 CFR 101-6, the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) announces the inaugural meeting of the...

  15. 77 FR 45815 - Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    [email protected] Organized Village of Grayling (aka Holikachuk), Sue Ann Nicholi, Tribal Family Youth..., Grace Smith, Family Programs Coordinator, Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, 1131 East International... Village of Akutan, Grace Smith, Family Programs Coordinator, Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, 1131...

  16. 76 FR 22340 - Further Inquiry Into Tribal Issues Relating to Establishment of a Mobility Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Into Tribal Issues Relating to Establishment of a Mobility Fund AGENCY: Federal Communications... consideration by the Federal Communication Commission in connection with the proposed creation of a new Mobility.... Specifically, comment is sought on developing a more tailored approach that provides at least some Mobility...

  17. A Legacy of Sacrifice and Honor: Celebrating Tribal Resilience and Military Service at Haskell Nations University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Haskell Indian Nations University opened 133 years ago, on September 17, 1884, as the U.S. Training and Industrial School--one of three original tribal boarding schools funded by the United States Congress. Three years later the school changed its name to Haskell Institute in honor of Chase Dudley Haskell, a U.S. representative from the Second…

  18. Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nominelli, Gregg R.

    2012-12-17

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

  19. 75 FR 51609 - Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Order 13549 of August 18, 2010 Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal.... Establishment and Policy. Sec. 1.1. There is established a Classified National Security Information Program (Program) designed to safeguard and govern access to classified national security information shared by the...

  20. Tribal Militias: An Effective Tool to Counter Al-Qaida and Its Affiliates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    substitution of a euphemism intended to suggest a more modern organization rather than one based on a tribe, since a tribal label may carry a stigma in...Intel- ligence Cells in Diyala to Abort Al-Qaida’s Plans to Buy Protec- tion”), Al-Sabah, August 7, 2010, available from www.alsabah.com/ paper.php