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Sample records for fort sill tribal

  1. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Brian K.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Sill, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Sill took place on June 10, 2010.

  2. 77 FR 57112 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army, Fort Sill Museum, Lawton, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... Landmark and Museum, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence, Fort Sill, OK 73503, telephone (580) 442-6570... trapping, 3 metal rings, 2 metal rivets, 17 metal nails, 53 metal bracelets, 1 metal pail, 1,500 glass... A. Neel, Director, Fort Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum, U.S. Army Fires Center of...

  3. Tribal lands provide forest management laboratory for mainstream university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra J. Hoagland; Ronald Miller; Kristen M. Waring; Orlando Carroll

    2017-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) faculty and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) foresters initiated a partnership to expose NAU School of Forestry (SoF) graduate students to tribal forest management practices by incorporating field trips to the 1.68-million acre Fort Apache Indian Reservation as part of their silviculture curriculum. Tribal field trips were contrasted and...

  4. Tribal Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ; the U.S. Departments of Defense, Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, Housing and Urban Development . Department of Commerce seal U.S. Department of Agriculture logo U.S. Department of Housing and Urban five existing cultural heritage trails for the benefit of the local tribal community and visiting

  5. Convection and crystal settling in sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Fergus G. F.; Henderson, C. Michael B.

    1992-02-01

    It has been advocated that convective and crystal settling processes play significant, and perhaps crucial, roles in magmatic differentiation. The fluid dynamics of magma chambers have been extensively studied in recent years, both theoretically and experimentally, but there is disagreement over the nature and scale of the convection, over its bearing on fractionation and possibly over whether it occurs at all. The differential distribution of modal olivine with height in differentiated alkaline basic sills provides critical evidence to resolve this controversy, at least for small to medium-large magma chambers. Our own and others' published data for such sills show that, irrespective of overall olivine content, modal olivine contents tend to increase in a roughly symmetrical manner inwards from the upper and lower margins of the sill, i.e. the distribution patterns are more often approximately D-shaped rather than the classic S-shape generally ascribed to gravity settling. We concur with the majority of other authors that this is an original feature of the filling process which has survived more or less unchanged since emplacement. We therefore conclude that the magmas have not undergone turbulent convection and that gravity settling has usually played only a minor modifying role since the intrusion of these sills. We offer a possible explanation for the apparent contradiction between fluid dynamical theory and the petrological evidence by suggesting that such sills rarely fill by the rapid injection of a single pulse of magma. Rather, they form from a series of pulses or a continuous pulsed influx over a protracted interval during which marginal cooling severely limits the potential for thermal convection.

  6. Mainosjulkaisun suunnittelu ja toteutus Mum'sille

    OpenAIRE

    Kaketti, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli suunnitella ja toteuttaa mainosjulkaisu eettisen designin yritykselle Mum’sille. Julkaisun oli määrä keskittyä yrityksen uusiin tuotteisiin, joten toteutus vaati myös uusien tuotekuvien ottamista. Julkaisusta ei kuitenkaan haluttu katalogia vaan enemmänkin siinä haluttiin keskittyä mielikuvilla markkinoimiseen, joten tuotekuvien ei tarvinnut olla katalogimaisen selkeitä. Tutkimuksella pyrittiin kartuttamaan kattava tietopohja suunnittelun lähtökohdaksi ja tu...

  7. 49 CFR 231.8 - Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with... APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.8 Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end platforms. (a) Hand brakes—(1) Number. Same as specified for “Box and other house cars” (see § 231.1(a)(1...

  8. Geochemical reversals within the lower 100 m of the Palisades sill, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorring, Matthew L.; Naslund, H. R.

    1995-03-01

    Transects through the lower part of the Palisades sill were made at Fort Lee and Alpine, New Jersey in order to characterize the petrologic signature of previously proposed “reversals” in the normal, tholeiitic differentiation trend. Petrographic and geochemical data include: (1) modal and grain size analyses, (2) bulk rock major and trace element concentrations by DCP-AES, and (3) augite, orthopyroxene, magnetite, and olivine compositions by electron microprobe analysis. Anomalous horizons, defined by increased bulk rock Mg?, Cr, Ni, and Co concentrations and abrupt modal and grain-size changes, occur at 10 m (the well known olivine zone), 27 m, 45 m, and 95 m above the basal contact. Thermal models coupled with estimates of the emplacement rate and total magma volume indicate that the olivine zone (OZ) is an early-stage feature, related to the emplacement of initial magma into the Palisades chamber. Stoke’s Law calculations indicate that the settling velocity of average-sized olivine crystals in a high-titanium, quartz-normative (HTQ) magma is too slow for significant gravity settling to have occurred prior to the solidification of the basal 20 m of the sill. It is suggested that the OZ resulted from the emplacement of a heterogeneous initial magma from a compositionally stratified, sub-Palisades storage chamber located within the upper crust; however, heterogeneity may have been derived directly from the mantle or during rapid ascent. Geochemical models indicate that the OZ contains accumulated olivine that is not in cotectic (or constant) proportions with the other cumulus phases, suggesting a mechanical sorting process. Magma chamber recharge is proposed to have occurred at the 27 m and 45 m levels, when a slightly more-primitive HTQ magma was injected into the Palisades sill cha- mber. Zones of elevated Mg? and Cr, 6 to 10 m thick, at these two horizons may indicate the thickness of the hybrid magma formed by the mixing of these two compositions

  9. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  10. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ , ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  11. 49 CFR 231.9 - Tank cars without end sills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clearance, within 30 inches of side of car, until car is shopped for work amounting to practically... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars without end sills. 231.9 Section 231.9..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.9 Tank cars without end sills. (a...

  12. Tribal Green Building Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Toolkit (Toolkit) is designed to help tribal officials, community members, planners, developers, and architects develop and adopt building codes to support green building practices. Anyone can use this toolkit!

  13. 3 CFR - Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Recommendations for improving the plans and making the tribal consultation process more effective, if any, should... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tribal Consultation Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of November 5, 2009 Tribal Consultation Memorandum for the Heads of Executive...

  14. Fortællingen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlsted, Annemette

    Fortællingen - teori og analyse introducerer til teorier om fortællingen og præsenterer et sæt af analytiske tilgange til fortællinger af enhver art. Bogen lægger vægt på læsersynsvinklen og retter opmærksomheden mod de vilkår for menings- og betydningsdannelse, der kendetegner fortællingen. Begr....... Begreber om plot, fortællingens verden, karakterer, fortæller, modus og genre behandles, og deres anvendelse demonstreres på dansk og nordisk litteratur - med inddragelse af eksempler fra film og tv-reklamer....

  15. Dome Structures Above Sills and Saucer-Shaped Sills: Insights From Experimental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planke, S.; Galland, O.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Saucer-shaped magma and sand intrusions are common features in sedimentary basins. They result from fundamental processes for the emplacement of fluids in shallow sedimentary basins. Seismic data show that the overburden above saucer-shaped intrusions is usually deformed and exhibits a dome-like structure. The formation of such structures, and the associated deformation, are of primary importance in the evolution of petroleum systems. In this presentation, we report on experimental investigation of the deformation processes associated with the intrusion of saucer-shaped intrusions into sedimentary basins. The experimental setup consists of molten low-viscosity oil injected into fine-grained silica flour (see Galland et al., this session). It properly simulates the emplacement of saucer-shaped intrusions and the deformation of the country rock. During experiments, the surface of the model is digitalized through a structured light technique based on moiré projection principle. Such a tool provides topographic maps of the model and allows a periodic (every 1.5 s) monitoring of the model surface. When the model magma starts intruding, a symetrical dome rises above the inlet. As injection proceeds, the dome inflates and widens. Subsequently, the dome evolves to a plateau-like feature, with nearly flat surface and steep edges. The plateau keeps lifting up, but nearly stoppes widening. At the end of the experiments, the intruding liquid erupts at the edge of the plateau. The intrusion formed in the experiment is a typical saucer-shaped sill. The evolution of the deforming surface reflects the evolution of the intrusion. We infer that the first doming phase corresponds to the emplacement of a horizontal basal sill by open fracturing. The dome-to-plateau transition corresponds to a transition of the liquid emplacement mechanism from basal sill to inclined sheet. We suggest that the emplacement of the inclined sheets results from shear fracturing at the dome edge.

  16. Non-hydrostatic layered flows over a sill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamali, Mirmosadegh

    2013-01-01

    This work takes a new approach to solving non-hydrostatic equations of layered flows over bottom topography. A perturbation technique is used to find explicit expressions for a flow for different regimes of single- and two-layer flows over a sill. Excellent agreement with previous solutions and experimental data is obtained, and more details of the non-hydrostatic flow over a sill are revealed. The proposed method is simple and compact and removes the need for complex numerical techniques to solve the non-hydrostatic equations. It is shown that in the approach-controlled regime of two-layer flow over a sill, the flow upstream and farther downstream the sill crest can be described by the hydrostatic theory, and the flow is non-hydrostatic over only a short distance on the downstream side of the crest. (paper)

  17. Single incision laparoscopic liver resection (SILL – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzing, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, minimally invasive liver resections for both benign and malignant tumors are routinely performed. Recently, some authors have described single incision laparoscopic liver resection (SILL procedures. Since SILL is a relatively young branch of laparoscopy, we performed a systematic review of the current literature to collect data on feasibility, perioperative results and oncological outcome.Methods: A literature research was performed on Medline for all studies that met the eligibility criteria. Titles and abstracts were screened by two authors independently. A study was included for review if consensus was obtained by discussion between the authors on the basis of predefined inclusion criteria. A thorough quality assessment of all included studies was performed. Data were analyzed and tabulated according to predefined outcome measures. Synthesis of the results was achieved by narrative review. Results: A total of 15 eligible studies were identified among which there was one prospective cohort study and one randomized controlled trial comparing SILL to multi incision laparoscopic liver resection (MILL. The rest were retrospective case series with a maximum of 24 patients. All studies demonstrated convincing results with regards to feasibility, morbidity and mortality. The rate of wound complications and incisional hernia was low. The cosmetic results were good.Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on SILL including prospective trials. The results of the existing studies reporting on SILL are favorable. However, a large body of scientific evidence on the field of SILL is missing, further randomized controlled studies are urgently needed.

  18. The role of igneous sills in shaping the Martian uplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelms, D. E.; Baldwin, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Relations among geologic units and landforms suggest that igneous sills lie beneath much of the intercrater and intracrater terrain of the Martian uplands. The igneous rocks crop out along the upland-lowland front and in crater floors and other depressions that are low enough to intersect the sill's intrusion horizons. It is suggested that heat from the cooling sills melted some of the ice contained in overlying fragmental deposits, creating valley networks by subsurface flow of the meltwater. Terrains with undulatory, smooth surfaces and softened traces of valleys were created by more direct contact with the sills. Widespread subsidence following emplacement of the sills deformed both them and the nonvolcanic deposits that overlie them, accounting for the many structures that continue from ridged plains into the hilly uplands. Crater counts show that the deposit that became valleyed, softened, and ridged probably began to form (and to acquire interstitial ice) during or shortly after the Middle Noachian Epoch, and continued to form as late as the Early Hesperian Epoch. The upper layers of this deposit, many of the visible valleys, and the ridged plains and postulated sills all have similar Early Hesperian ages. Continued formation of valleys is indicated by their incision of fresh-appearing crater ejecta. The dependence of valley formation on internal processes implies that Mars did not necessarily have a dense early atmosphere or warm climate.

  19. Fort Sill Oklahoma/Post Field. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-23

    TEMPERATURE DEPRESSIO (F) TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 t .2 3-4 5 6 7 - ,9 I 1 1 1 .1 516 17 -18119 -20 21 22 23 -2412S.26 27 -2 9 3, 1i ’’WB ~ ub e ub~ we.. 2/ 1...Temp WET BULB TEMPERATURE DEPRESSIO (F) TOTAL _ TOTAL F)/ 03 1 .2 3C 4, 0 1-1 I3- 5, 6 1 .1 9-20 2 2_3- 5-." 26 27 -28 D.B W .2 0 31b We B lle on 90

  20. 76 FR 72969 - Proclaiming Certain Lands as Reservation for the Fort Sill Apache Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Affairs, Division of Real Estate Services, Mail Stop-4639-MIB, 1849 C Street NW., Washington, DC 20240...[deg]47'40'', a chord which bears S. 73[deg]39'52'' W., 445.63 feet through an arc length of 451.77... feet, through an arc length of 764.78 feet to I-10 P.C. marker 45+11.53; Thence N. 82[deg]45'27'' W., a...

  1. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  2. Sill intrusion in volcanic calderas: implications for vent opening probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Martini, Marcello; D'Auria, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Calderas show peculiar behaviors with remarkable dynamic processes, which do not often culminate in eruptions. Observations and studies conducted in recent decades have shown that the most common cause of unrest in the calderas is due to magma intrusion; in particular, the intrusion of sills at shallow depths. Monogenic cones, with large areal dispersion, are quite common in the calderas, suggesting that the susceptibility analysis based on geological features, is not strictly suitable for estimating the vent opening probability in calderas. In general, the opening of a new eruptive vent can be regarded as a rock failure process. The stress field in the rocks that surrounds and tops the magmatic reservoirs plays an important role in causing the rock failure and creating the path that magma can follow towards the surface. In this conceptual framework, we approach the problem of getting clues about the probability of vent opening in volcanic calderas through the study of the stress field produced by the intrusion of magma, in particular, by the intrusion of a sill. We simulate the intrusion of a sill free to expand radially, with shape and dimensions which vary with time. The intrusion process is controlled by the elastic response of the rock plate above the sill, which bends because of the intrusion, and by gravity, that drives the magma towards the zones where the thickness of the sill is smaller. We calculated the stress field in the plate rock above the sill. We found that at the bottom of the rock plate above the sill the maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and spreads radially with it, over time. For this reason, we think that the front of the spreading sill is prone to open for eruptive vents. Even in the central area of the sill the intensity of stress is relatively high, but at the base of the rock plate stress is compressive. Under isothermal conditions, the stress soon reaches its maximum value (time interval

  3. Experimental Modeling of the Formation of Saucer-Shaped sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Many magma intrusions in sedimentary basins are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features are observed in many places (i.e. South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; Siberia; Argentina). Sand injectites exhibit similar geometries. The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes in sedimentary basins. To understand such processes, we performed experimental modeling of saucer-shaped sill emplacement. The experiments consist of injecting a molten low viscosity vegetable oil (model magma) at a constant flow rate into a fine-grained Coulomb silica flour (model rock). When the oil starts intruding, the initially flat surface of the model inflates and forms a smooth dome. At the end of the experiment, the oil erupts at the edge of the dome. After the experiment, the oil cools and solidifies, the resulting solid intrusion is unburied and exposed, and its upper surface digitalized. For our purpose, we did our experiments without external deformation. We performed two series of experiments with varying depth of injection. The first series consisted of injection into a homogeneous medium. The resulting intrusions were cone-sheets and dykes. The second series consisted of heterogeneous models where the heterogeneity was a weak layer made of a flexible net. The resulting intrusions were made of (1) a horizontal basal sill emplaced along the weakness, and (2) inclined sheets nucleating at the edges of the basal sill and propagating upward and outward. The inclined sheets exhibited a convex shape, i.e. a decreasing slope outward. In addition, the deeper the sills emplaced, the larger they were. Our experimental results are consistent with saucer-shaped features in nature. We infer from our results that the transition between the basal sills and the inclined sheets results from a transition of emplacement processes. We suggest that the basal sill emplace by open (mode I) fracturing, whereas

  4. Evaluation of Sille Settlement in the Context of Ecological Tourizm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arife Deniz Oktaç Beycan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In our time people began to search for resting in historical, cultural and natural environments being other than coast, sea and urban tourism and they began to prefer different tourism activities. Tourism requests focusing on traditional settlements with cultural and natural values, have causes a sustainable tourism approach to come out.  Ecological tourism, which is one of the sustainable tourism types, is being used as a development tool by protecting the history, culture and nature.  Ecological tourism has the least impact on natural environment, ecological and cultural heritage while it contributes to the tourism area where it is applied by protecting values, providing local economical benefits and with the educational aspects it has. In the study it is being focused on making use of  Sille, which is newly opened to tourism as having natural, historical and cultural structure and bearing value with regards to alternative tourism, through ecological tourism. In the first part of the study ecological tourism has been defined. In the second part natural, cultural and architectural features of Sille have been explained and in the third part changes lived through in Sille with regards to sociocultural and architectural aspects have been mentioned. As the conclusion the particulars to be realized in Sille with regards to ecological tourism have been recommended in order to protect its values and to benefit from tourism while transfering these values to the future.

  5. Greening Existing Tribal Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance about improving sustainability in existing tribal casinos and manufactured homes. Many steps can be taken to make existing buildings greener and healthier. They may also reduce utility and medical costs.

  6. Tribal Consultation Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The consultation-related information the AIEO Consultation Team working with our Tribal Portal contractors has developed a Lotus Notes Database that is capable of...

  7. Electricity Generation from Geothermal Resources on the Fort Peck Reservation in Northeast Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Garry J. [Gradient Geophysics Inc., Missoula, MT (United States); Birkby, Jeff [Birkby Consulting LLC, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Tribal lands owned by Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, located in Northeastern Montana, overlie large volumes of deep, hot, saline water. Our study area included all the Fort Peck Reservation occupying roughly 1,456 sq miles. The geothermal water present in the Fort Peck Reservation is located in the western part of the Williston Basin in the Madison Group complex ranging in depths of 5500 to 7500 feet. Although no surface hot springs exist on the Reservation, water temperatures within oil wells that intercept these geothermal resources in the Madison Formation range from 150 to 278 degrees F.

  8. Modelling non-hydrostatic processes in sill regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, A.; Xing, J.; Davies, A.; Berntsen, J.

    2007-12-01

    We use a non-hydrostatic model to compute tidally induced flow and mixing in the region of bottom topography representing the sill at the entrance to Loch Etive (Scotland). This site is chosen since detailed measurements were recently made there. With non-hydrostatic dynamics in the model our results showed that the model could reproduce the observed flow characteristics, e.g., hydraulic transition, flow separation and internal waves. However, when calculations were performed using the model in the hydrostatic form, significant artificial convective mixing occurred. This influenced the computed temperature and flow field. We will discuss in detail the effects of non-hydrostatic dynamics on flow over the sill, especially investigate non-linear and non-hydrostatic contributions to modelled internal waves and internal wave energy fluxes.

  9. Reprocessing seismic data: better results below diabase sills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makler, Marisa [Halliburton Servicos Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pellizzon, Marcela

    2008-07-01

    The effect of the diabase sills in the seismic data processing has been studied in the last twenty years. These rocks strongly influence the exploratory activities in a basin, because the diabase disturbs the sign and generates multiple and spherical divergence, increasing the exploratory risk in these areas. In the present work a method of 2D seismic reprocessing will be presented using Prestack Kirchhoff Time Migration in an older seismic data of Solimoes basin. The objective of this paper is to show the high results on the reprocessing seismic data below the diabase sills. The 2D lines processed give relevant improvement of the quality of signal, showing better the faults zones and preserving the geological structures than the older data. (author)

  10. Analysis of turbulent mixing in Dewakang Sill, Southern Makassar Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risko; Atmadipoera, A. S.; Jaya, I.; Sudjono, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Dewakang Sill is located in southern Makassar Strait, conveying major path of Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), as a confluence region of different water masses, such as salty Pacific water and fresh Java Sea water. Its depth is about 680 m which blocks the ITF flow below this depth into Flores Sea. This research aimed to estimate turbulent mixing in the Dewakang Sill by applying Thorpe analysis using 24 hours “yoyo” CTD data sets, acquired from MAJAFLOX Cruise in August 2015. The results showed that stratification of water masses is dominated by Pacific water origin. Those are North Pacific Subtropical thermocline and Intermediate water masses. Mean dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ) and turbulent vertical diffusivity (Kρ ) value in the Dewakang Sill are of O(1.08 × 10-6)Wkg-1, and O(2.84 × 10-4) m2s-1 respectively. High correlation between epsilon and internal waves oscillation suggested that internal tidal waves activities are the major forcing for turbulent mixing in the study area.

  11. National Tribal Building Codes Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Tribal Building Codes summit statement developed to support tribes interested in adopting green and culturally-appropriate building systems to ensure safe, sustainable, affordable, and culturally-appropriate buildings on tribal lands.

  12. Growth of Transgressive Sills in Mechanically Layered Media: Faroe Islands, NE Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Igneous sills represent an important contribution to upper crustal magma transport, acting as magma conduits and stores (i.e. as sill networks, or as nascent magma chambers). Complex sill-network intrusion in basin settings can have significant impact on subsurface fluid flow (e.g., water aquifer and hydrocarbon systems), geothermal systems, the maturation of hydrocarbons, and methane release. Models for these effects are critically dependent on the models for sill emplacement. This study focuses on staircase-geometry sills in the Faroe Islands, on the European Atlantic Margin, which are hosted in mechanically layered lavas (1-20 m thick) and basaltic volcaniclastic units (1-30 m thick). The sills range from 20-50 m thick, with each covering ~17 km2, and transgressing a vertical range of ~480 m. Steps in the sills are elliptical in cross section, and discontinuous laterally, forming smooth transgressive ramps, hence are interpreted as representing initial stages of sill propagation as magma fingers, which inflate through time to create a through-going sheet. Although steps correspond to the position of some host rock layer interfaces and volcaniclastic horizons, most interfaces are bypassed. The overall geometry of the sills is consistent with ENE-WSW compression, and NNW-SSE extension, and stress anisotropy-induced transgression. Local morphology indicates that mechanical layering suppressed tensile stress ahead of the crack tip, leading to a switch in minimum and intermediate stress axes, facilitating lateral sill propagation as fingers, and resulting in a stepped transgressive geometry.

  13. Fortæller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    Siden Gerard Genettes ”Discours du récit” (1972) er distinktionen mellem hvem, der taler, og hvem, der ser, blevet cementeret som et grundparadigme i narratologien og litteraturteorien. Genettes pointe var, at den etablerede narrative teori – som fx Wayne C. Booths The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961...... narratologi blevet forsøgt udfordret, enten fordi det hævdes, at en tekst ikke nødvendigvis er udstyret med en fortæller, eller fordi begrebet om fortæller antages at bero på en misvisende og reduktiv antropomorficering. Eller omvendt fordi der i Genettes begrebsdannelse ligger en forkastelse af...... forestillingen om en implicit forfatter (implied author) og dermed også en afvisning af en upålidelige fortæller. Kapitlet præsenterer begreberne fortæller og synsvinkel i narratologien med afsæt i Genettes bestemmelser og diskutere de problemer, der opstår i kølvandet herpå. Det være sig både de rent...

  14. Fortællerfiktionen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitan, Rolf

    Bogen er en kritisk nærlæsning af Gérard Genettes Discours du récit og viser, hvorden den franske teoretiker løser og forenkler en række centrale problemer i traditionel fortælleteori, idet han uudtalt forudsætter et fiktionsbegreb, som han eksplicit afviser som narratologisk relevant. Det...

  15. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon

  16. The impact of the Suwannee River Sill on the surface hydrology of Okefenokee Swamp, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhi-Yong; Brook, George A.

    1992-08-01

    Okefenokee Swamp, located in southeastern Georgia and northeastern Florida, is one of the largest freshwater wetland complexes and a National Wildlife Refuge in the United States. A low earthen dam, the Suwannee River Sill, was built on the largest outlet stream of Okefenokee Swamp in the early 1960s. The purpose was to raise the water level and thus reduce fire frequency in this National Wildlife Refuge. In this study, hydrologic conditions in the swamp prior to (1937-1962) and after (1963-1986) sill construction were compared by statistical procedures. An average 9 cm increase in swamp water level at the Suwannee Canal Recreation Area was attributed to the sill. Increased precipitation and decreased evapotranspiration during the study period caused another 5 cm increase in water levels. Seasonal changes in climatic factors were also responsible for seasonal changes in water levels and streamflow in the pre- and post-sill periods. Although the effect of the sill on water level was more significant during dry periods, it is doubtful that the Suwannee River Sill actually prevented occurrence of severe fibres in the post-sill period, which was wetter than the period before sill construction. The sill diverted 2.6% of swamp outflow from the Suwannee River to the St. Mary's River. Diversion of flow was more marked during low flow periods. Therefore, the discharge of the St. Mary's River in the post-sill increased more than the discharge of the Suwannee River and its variability became lower that of the Suwannee River. The relationships between swamp water level, streamflow and precipitation were also changed due to construction of the sill.

  17. Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadzow, Janet [Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich' in Tribal Government, Fort Yukon, AK (United States); Messier, Dave [Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich' in Tribal Government, Fort Yukon, AK (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich’in Tribal Government (GZGTG) applied for funding in 2014 under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Deployment of Clean Energy on Tribal Lands funding opportunity. They were awarded 50% of the project costs for the construction of an 18kW, grid-tied solar PV array on the fort Yukon Tribal Hall, the construction of a 3kW solar PV array on the tribally owned greenhouse, the replacement of inefficient florescent lighting fixtures in the tribal hall to higher efficiency LED lights and the addition of blow in cellulose insulation to the attic of the tribal hall to assist with heat retention. Total DOE Funding for the project was $124,735. Total GZGTG funding for the project was $133,321 for a total project cost of $258,056. The Project was completed with 100% local labor on the tribal hall solar PV installation, the LED lighting retrofit and the insulation on the tribal hall. Based on the results at the tribal hall/office, the tribe also used their own tribal funding to retrofit the lighting in the community hall from florescent to LED lights. The resulting project was completed by the end of Sept 2016 and results have shown a decrease in fuel used at the tribal hall/office of 35% and a decrease in electric costs at the tribal hall of 68%. The total energy costs before the project were approximately $28,000 a year and the energy equivalent of 385 MMBTU/yr. After the project the total energy costs decreased to $11,200/yr. and an energy equivalent of only 242 MMBTU. This represents an overall decrease in energy use of 38%. All in all the tribe and the community regard this project as a huge success!

  18. Indoor Air Quality Tribal Partners Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    IAQ Tribal Partners Program. Empowering champions of healthy IAQ in tribal communities with tools for networking, sharing innovative and promising programs and practices and a reservoir of the best available tribal-specific IAQ information and materials.

  19. Sill and lava geochemistry of the mid-Norway and NE Greenland conjugate margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Else-Ragnhild; Svensen, Henrik; Tegner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents major, trace-elements, and Sr-Nd isotopes for two prominent sills formed during the opening of the North Atlantic, sampled by the Utgard borehole (6607/5-2) in the VOring Plateau. The Utgard sills are compared to opening-related lavas recovered from ODP Leg 104 Hole 642E farth...

  20. 75 FR 39730 - Tribal Economic Development Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Tribal Economic Development Bonds AGENCY: Department of the Treasury... (``Treasury'') seeks comments from Indian Tribal Governments regarding the Tribal Economic Development Bond... governments, known as ``Tribal Economic Development Bonds,'' under Section 7871(f) of the Internal Revenue...

  1. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  2. ACHP | Tribal Historic Preservation Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    preservation of significant historic properties. Those functions include identifying and maintaining Working with Section 106 Federal, State, & Tribal Programs Training & Education Publications Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Historic Preservation Programs & Officers arrow THPOs

  3. Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains presentations from the Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during December 10-11, 2008 regarding Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands.

  4. Turbine Siting Metrics for Simulated Tidal Flow in a Double-Silled Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyng, K. M.; Kawase, M.; Riley, J. J.; Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center

    2010-12-01

    An important component of site and resource characterization for marine renewable energy projects is to identify areas with large potential resource but also with easy extractability of the available resource for commercial develop- ment. Metrics that characterize potential resource include mean kinetic power density and speed over a tidal cycle, while important metrics for extractability include measures of the bidirectionality of the tidal flow (asymmetry, directional deviation, and power bias of ebb versus flood tide) as well as percentage of time spent by the device producing power at the particular site. This study examines the character of a tidal flow over an idealized two- dimensional (x-z) double sill in a rectangular channel in terms of these resource characterization metrics. This domain is meant to capture the bulk features of Admiralty Inlet, the main entrance to the Puget Sound, a fjord-like estuary in western Washington State. Admiralty Inlet is an area of interest for build- ing a commercial-scale tidal turbine array, and is currently the location of two potential pilot-scale tidal hydrokinetic projects. Initial results point to the speed up of the incoming flow due to the shallowest sill as an area of strong resource. The presence of the deeper sill affects the character of this strong resource in a way that the metrics can help quantify in terms of extractability of the resource and vertical structure. Together, these metrics will give a clear understanding of the tidal turbine siting characteristics of the domain. In the case of the idealized double sill simulation, the mean speed is increased by a factor of more than 2 over the mean incoming speed at the entrance of the channel due to the shallower, more prominent sill, while the deeper sill sees a multiplication factor of close to 1.5. This is a modest increase in mean speed, but translates to a multiplication factor of over 8 from the nominal far field value near the shallow sill in the mean

  5. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  6. 25 CFR 547.4 - How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation comply with this part? 547.4 Section 547.4 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING...

  7. Infrastructure Task Force Tribal Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents describe 1) issues to consider when planning and designing community engagement approaches for tribal integrated waste management programs and 2) a proposed approach to improve tribal open dumps data and solid waste projects, and 3) an MOU.

  8. Vertical linear feeder to elliptical igneous saucer-shaped sills: evidences from structural observations, geochemistry and experimental modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galerne, C. Y.; Galland, O.; Neumann, E. R.; Planke, S.

    2009-12-01

    The structural relationships between sills and their feeders are poorly documented because they are rarely observed in the field and difficult to image on seismic data. For instance, it is unclear whether sills are fed by pipes, dikes or other sills. Nevertheless, the geometrical relationships between sills and their feeders provide first-order constraints on magma emplacement mechanisms. Here, we investigate the structural and geochemical relationships between sills and potential feeder dikes in a remarkably well-preserved and exposed sill complex, the Golden Valley Sill Complex (GVSC), Karoo Basin, South Africa. The GVSC consists of five major saucer-shaped sills and six dikes. The Golden Valley sill itself is an elliptical saucer, with a N-S trend. A one meter thick dike (D4) crops out underneath the southern tip of the Golden Valley sill. The strike of this dike is parallel to the long axis of the Golden Valley sill. Detailed sampling and geochemical analyses of the GVSC show that each sill and dike exhibits a specific geochemical signature. The Golden Valley sill and its underlying dike D4 have identical signatures. Although there is no clear structural evidence, the consistent geometrical and geochemical relationships between the Golden Valley sill and the D4 dike suggest that this vertical linear structure is the feeder of the overlying saucer-shaped sill. In order to investigate the relationships between sills and feeders, we resorted to scaled laboratory experiments. The experiments consisted of a low-viscosity vegetable oil representing magma and a cohesive fine-grained silica flour representing brittle rocks. We placed a horizontal weak layer into the silica flour, just above the top of the inlet, to simulate strata. Such a weak layer controlled the formation of horizontal sill that subsequently turned into a transgressive sheet leading to the formation of a saucer geometry. We ran experiments with varying inlet shapes: 1) a point inlet representing a

  9. Gene expression programming for prediction of scour depth downstream of sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamathulla, H. Md.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryLocal scour is crucial in the degradation of river bed and the stability of grade control structures, stilling basins, aprons, ski-jump bucket spillways, bed sills, weirs, check dams, etc. This short communication presents gene-expression programming (GEP), which is an extension to genetic programming (GP), as an alternative approach to predict scour depth downstream of sills. Published data were compiled from the literature for the scour depth downstream of sills. The proposed GEP approach gives satisfactory results (R2 = 0.967 and RMSE = 0.088) compared to the existing predictors (Chinnarasri and Kositgittiwong, 2008) with R2 = 0.87 and RMSE = 2.452 for relative scour depth.

  10. Structural control on basaltic dike and sill emplacement, Paiute Ridge mafic intrusion complex, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter Krogh, K.E.; Valentine, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Late Miocene basaltic sills and dikes in the Paiute Ridge area of southern nevada show evidence that their emplacement was structurally controlled. Basaltic dikes in this area formed by dilating pre-existing vertical to steeply E-dipping normal faults. Magma propagation along these faults must have required less energy than the creation of a self-propagated fracture at dike tips and the magma pressure must have been greater than the compressive stress perpendicular to the fault surface. N- to NE-trending en echelon dikes formed locally and are not obviously attached to the three main dikes in the area. The en echelon segments are probably pieces of deeper dikes, which are segmented perhaps as a result of a documented rotation of the regional stresses. Alternatively, changes in orientation of principal stresses in the vicinity of each en echelon dike could have resulted from local loads associated with paleotopographic highs or nearby structures. Sills locally branched off some dikes within 300 m of the paleosurface. These subhorizontal bodies occur consistently in the hanging wall block of the dike-injected faults, and intrude Tertiary tuffs near the Paleozoic-Tertiary contact. The authors suggest that the change in stresses near the earth's surface, the material strength of the tuff and paleozoic rocks, and the Paleozoic bedding dip direction probably controlled the location of sill formation and direction of sill propagation. The two largest sills deflected the overlying tuffs to form lopoliths, indicating that the magma pressure exceeded vertical stresses at that location and that the shallow level and large size of the sills allowed interaction with the free (earth's) surface. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. 77 FR 16120 - Tribal Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... regulations governing Federal grants for the establishment, expansion, and improvement of veterans cemeteries... Information Technology Act of 2006,'' which establishes eligibility for Tribal Organizations to apply for grants for Veterans cemeteries on Trust Lands. Public Law 109-461, 120 Stat. 3403 (Dec. 22, 2006); see...

  12. Konya’da tarihi bir yerleşim merkezi: Sille

    OpenAIRE

    Tapur, Tahsin

    2015-01-01

    Sille, that is located in 8 km. northwest of the city centre, draws attention being differentwith geographical structure, culture, manner of life, belief and traditions. Because after Greeks, Orthodox Turks and Seljuk, Muslims and non-Muslims lived here together. Sille, was a developed settlement in aspect of socio-economy and especially for  rade, rug business, pottery, viticulture, stonework and chandler until the first half of the 19th century. However, with the Lausanne Treaty, while the ...

  13. NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale | Art Museum in Fort Lauderdale

    Science.gov (United States)

    NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Visit Admissions Hours & Admission Policies & Accessibility Airports Shop & Dine About the Café & Store Store Café Menu Art Exhibitions Currently on View Thursday 2-for-1 specials on wine and craft beer in the Museum Café, and hands-on art projects for all

  14. Environmental protection stability of river bed and banks using convex, concave, and linear bed sills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Alireza; Noori, Lila Khaje

    2010-12-01

    River bed scourings are a major environmental problem for fish and aquatic habitat resources. In this study, to prevent river bed and banks from scouring, different types of bed sills including convex, concave and linear patterns were installed in a movable channel bed in a laboratory flume. The bed sills were tested with nine different arrangements and under different flow conditions. To find the most effective bed sill pattern, the scouring depth was measured downstream of the bed sill for a long experimental duration. The scour depth was measured at the middle and at the end of each experimental test for different ratios of the arch radius to the channel width [r/w]. The experimental results indicated that the convex pattern with r/w=0.35 produced minimum bed scouring depth at the center line whereas the concave pattern with r/w=0.23 produced the minimum scour depth at the wall banks. Therefore, the convex pattern was the most effective configuration for prevention of scouring at the center line of the river while the concave pattern was very effective to prevent scouring at the river banks. These findings can be suggested to be used in practical applications.

  15. Magnetic fabric transposition in folded granite sills in Variscan orogenic wedge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závada, Prokop; Calassou, T.; Schulmann, K.; Hrouda, F.; Štípská, P.; Hasalová, Pavlína; Míková, J.; Magna, T.; Mixa, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 94, January (2017), s. 166-183 ISSN 0191-8141 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15632S Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : orogenic sill * AMS fabric * folding Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.408, year: 2016

  16. Fort Saint Vrain operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain (FSV), on the system of the Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) power reactor in the United States. The plant features a helium-cooled reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The paper describes the experience made during its operation. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Region 9 Tribal Grant Program - Project Officer and Tribal Contact Information Map Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    This compilation of geospatial data is for the purpose of managing and communicating information about current EPA project officers, tribal contacts, and tribal grants, both internally and with external stakeholders.

  18. Tribal Geographic Area (RTOC) Polygons with Representative Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) is a working committee of EPA and Tribal personnel co-chaired by an EPA representative and a Tribal representative....

  19. Ecological Baseline, Fort Hood, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    cedar eTm (Uiimus crassifolia), Texas ash (Fraxinus texansis), and Texas persimmon ( Diospyros texana). Conversely, the two predominant tree species...Ilex decidua), Mex- ican buckeye (Ungnadia spjeciosa), and Texas persimmon ( Diospyros texana). Vines included greenbrier (Smilax bona-nox) and white...Hedgehey Cactus (Echinocereus sp.) has been observed on Fort Hood. Due to the brief period of flowering for this genus , the individual species were not

  20. Inventory of Forts in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinandi, N.; Suryaningsih, F.

    2015-08-01

    The great archipelago in Indonesia with its wealthy and various nature, the products and commodities of tropic agriculture and the rich soil, was through the centuries a region of interest for other countries all over the world. For several reasons some of these countries came to Indonesia to establish their existence and tried to monopolize the trading. These countries such as the Portuguese, the Spanish, the Dutch and the British built strengthened trade stations which later became forts all over Indonesia to defend their interest. The archipelago of Indonesia possesses a great number of fortification-works as legacies of native rulers and those which were built by European trading companies and later became colonial powers in the 16th to the 19th centuries. These legacies include those specific structures built as a defence system during pre and within the period of World War II. These fortresses are nowadaysvaluable subjects, because they might be considered as shared heritage among these countries and Indonesia. It's important to develop a vision to preserve these particular subjects of heritage, because they are an interesting part of the Indonesian history and its cultural treasures. The Government of the Republic of Indonesia has national program to compile a comprehensive documentation of the existing condition of these various types of forts as cultural heritage. The result of the 3 years project was a comprehensive 442 forts database in Indonesia, which will be very valuable to the implementation of legal protection, preservation matters and adaptive re-use in the future.

  1. Tapping into Our Tribal Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes The Lord of the Rings by using cognitive and neurological theory in combination with evolutionary theory. It first provide a short introduction to bio-culturalist theories of how biology and culture interact. It then describes the basic human emotional systems and how...... they are activated in The Lord of the Rings. It further describe how fundamental psychological dispositions are linked to tribalism, to group living, including dispositions for in-group altruism and warrior bonding, and how group living enhanced dispositions to submit to social hierarchies, that in The Lord...

  2. 77 FR 48159 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Anchorage Hotel, 500 West Third Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Linehan... convention. As much as possible, OHS Tribal Consultations are scheduled in conjunction with other Tribal... delivery of Head Start services in their geographic locations. In addition, OHS will share actions taken...

  3. 77 FR 71833 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Relationship and Tribal Self- Determination B. Open Communications and Respect for Cultural Values and... viewed online in their entirety at: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail ;dct=FR%252BPR%252BN%252BO...-Government Relationship and Tribal Self-Determination One commenter recommended editing this section to...

  4. Tribal child welfare. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is issuing this interim final rule to implement statutory provisions related to the Tribal title IV-E program. Effective October 1, 2009, section 479B(b) of the Social Security Act (the Act) authorizes direct Federal funding of Indian Tribes, Tribal organizations, and Tribal consortia that choose to operate a foster care, adoption assistance and, at Tribal option, a kinship guardianship assistance program under title IV-E of the Act. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 requires that ACF issue interim final regulations which address procedures to ensure that a transfer of responsibility for the placement and care of a child under a State title IV-E plan to a Tribal title IV-E plan occurs in a manner that does not affect the child's eligibility for title IV-E benefits or medical assistance under title XIX of the Act (Medicaid) and such services or payments; in-kind expenditures from third-party sources for the Tribal share of administration and training expenditures under title IV-E; and other provisions to carry out the Tribal-related amendments to title IV-E. This interim final rule includes these provisions and technical amendments necessary to implement a Tribal title IV-E program.

  5. 78 FR 20658 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... been sent to tribal leaders via email and posted on the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Tribal Consultation Meeting AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families' Office of Head Start (OHS), HHS. ACTION...

  6. Mechanisms Of Saucer-Shaped Sill Emplacement: Insight From Experimental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; Polteau, S.; Svensen, H.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2006-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that magma intrusions in sedimentary basins had a strong impact on petroleum systems. Most of these intrusions are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features can be observed in many sedimentary basins (i.e. the Karoo basin, South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; the Tunguska basin, Siberia; the Neuquén basin in Argentina). The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes. However, the mechanisms that govern their formation remain poorly constrained. Experiments were conducted to simulate the emplacement of saucer-shaped magma intrusions in sedimentary basins. The model rock and magma were fine-grained silica flour and molten vegetable oil, respectively. This modeling technique allows simultaneous simulation of magma emplacement and brittle deformation at a basin scale. For our purpose, we performed our experiments without external deformation. During the experiments, the oil was injected horizontally at constant flow rate within the silica flour. Then the oil initially emplaced in a sill, whereas the surface of the model inflated into a smooth dome. Subsequently, the oil propagated upwards along inclined sheets, finally reaching the surface at the edge of the dome. The resulting geometries of the intrusions were saucer-shaped sills. Then the oil solidified, and the model was cut in serial cross-sections through which the structures of the intrusive body and of the overburden can be observed. In order to constraint the processes governing the emplacement of such features, we performed a parametric study based on a set of experiments in which we systematically varied parameters such as the depth of emplacement and the injection flow rate of the oil. Our results showed that saucer diameters are larger at deeper level of emplacement. Opposite trend was obtained with varying injection flow rates. Based on our results, we conducted a detailed

  7. Image-based modelling of lateral magma flow: the Basement Sill, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, Nick; Mirhadizadeh, Seyed

    2017-05-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys magmatic system, Antarctica, provides a world-class example of pervasive lateral magma flow on a continental scale. The lowermost intrusion (Basement Sill) offers detailed sections through the now frozen particle microstructure of a congested magma slurry. We simulated the flow regime in two and three dimensions using numerical models built on a finite-element mesh derived from field data. The model captures the flow behaviour of the Basement Sill magma over a viscosity range of 1-10 4  Pa s where the higher end (greater than or equal to 10 2  Pa s) corresponds to a magmatic slurry with crystal fractions varying between 30 and 70%. A novel feature of the model is the discovery of transient, low viscosity (less than or equal to 50 Pa s) high Reynolds number eddies formed along undulating contacts at the floor and roof of the intrusion. Numerical tracing of particle orbits implies crystals trapped in eddies segregate according to their mass density. Recovered shear strain rates (10 -3 -10 -5  s -1 ) at viscosities equating to high particle concentrations (around more than 40%) in the Sill interior point to shear-thinning as an explanation for some types of magmatic layering there. Model transport rates for the Sill magmas imply a maximum emplacement time of ca 10 5 years, consistent with geochemical evidence for long-range lateral flow. It is a theoretically possibility that fast-flowing magma on a continental scale will be susceptible to planetary-scale rotational forces.

  8. Geology of the saucer-shaped sill near Mahad, western Deccan Traps, India, and its significance to the Flood Basalt Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraiswami, Raymond A.; Shaikh, Tahira N.

    2013-07-01

    An ˜22-m-thick saucer-shaped sill occurs near Mahad and is exposed as a curvilinear, miniature ridge within the Deccan Traps. The sill has variable dips (42-55°). It has a 7.1-km long axis and 5.3 km short axis (aspect ratio of 1.4) and is larger than the MV sill of the Golden Valley sill complex, South Africa and the Panton sill, Australia. The sill has distinct glassy upper and lower chilled margins with a coarse-grained highly jointed core. The samples from the margin are invariably fractured and iron stained because of deuteric alteration. The rock from the sill is plagioclase-phyric basalt. At least three thick sill-like apophyses emanate from the base of the main sill. The apophyses change direction because of bending and thinning from a horizontal concordant sheet at the top to a discordant inclined form that bends again to pass into a lower horizontal concordant sheet. We interpret such features as `nascent saucer-shaped sills' that did not inflate to form nested sills. Geochemically, the sill consists of poorly differentiated tholeiitic basalt that has a restricted geochemical range. Critical trace element ratios and primitive mantle normalised trace and REE patterns indicate that the sills have geochemical affinities to the Poladpur chemical type and that the pahoehoe flow they intrude belongs to the Bushe Formation. Calculated magmatic overpressures during sill emplacement range from 8.4 to 11.3 MPa (for Young's modulus E = 5 GPa) and 16.7 to 22.5 MPa (for E=10 GPa) and depth to magma chamber ranges from 8.5 to 11.5 km ( E = 5 GPa) and 17.1 to 22.9 km ( E = 10 GPa), consistent with petrological and gravity modelling. The volume of the Mahad sill is approximately 276 km3 and is constant irrespective of the variations in the values of host-rock Young's modulus. In 1980, Cox (J Petrol 21:629-650, 1980) proposed a conceptual model of the crust-mantle section beneath the Karoo CFB which is considered as the fundamental model for flood basalt volcanism. Our

  9. Evaluating a Prefabricated Submerged Breakwater and Double-T Sill for Beach Erosion Prevention, Cape May Point, NJ

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stauble, Donald K; Giovannozzi, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    ...) and a linear prefabricated concrete sill called the Double-T across the seaward end of two adjacent groin compartments, in order to assess the effectiveness of these structures in retaining sand...

  10. A unique fossil record from neptunian sills: the world's most extreme example of stratigraphic condensation (Jurassic, western Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Jobst

    2017-06-01

    Neptunian sills at Rocca Busambra, a fragment of the Trapanese/Saccense Domain in western Sicily, host the most abundant ammonite and gastropod fauna which has ever been recorded from the Jurassic of the western Tethys. The fauna is dominated by parautochthonous organisms which were swept into the sills by gentle transport. Ammonites are characterized by perfect preservation and small size, a feature which is due to the predominance of microconchs but also of stunting. The most complete sill is 0.7 m thick and could be separated into 17 levels which range in age from the early Toarcian into the late Kimmeridgian, thus representing the most extreme case of palaeontologically and depositionally documented stratigraphic condensation in Earth history. The unique feature of the Rocca Busambra sills is due to the interaction of three processes: extreme stratigraphic condensation on the sea floor, weak tectonic fracturing of the host rock and repeated reopening on top of already existing sills. Contrasting percentages of gastropods in individual levels reflect sea-level oscillations which correspond to long known low- and highstands during the Jurassic of the western Tethys. Comparisons with other ammonite-bearing sill faunas reveal several similarities, but represent only short-timed phases of tectonic pulses and deposition.

  11. SILLi 1.0: a 1-D numerical tool quantifying the thermal effects of sill intrusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Iyer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Igneous intrusions in sedimentary basins may have a profound effect on the thermal structure and physical properties of the hosting sedimentary rocks. These include mechanical effects such as deformation and uplift of sedimentary layers, generation of overpressure, mineral reactions and porosity evolution, and fracturing and vent formation following devolatilization reactions and the generation of CO2 and CH4. The gas generation and subsequent migration and venting may have contributed to several of the past climatic changes such as the end-Permian event and the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum. Additionally, the generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons and cracking of pre-existing oil reservoirs around a hot magmatic intrusion are of significant interest to the energy industry. In this paper, we present a user-friendly 1-D finite element method (FEM-based tool, SILLi, which calculates the thermal effects of sill intrusions on the enclosing sedimentary stratigraphy. The model is accompanied by three case studies of sills emplaced in two different sedimentary basins, the Karoo Basin in South Africa and the Vøring Basin off the shore of Norway. An additional example includes emplacement of a dyke in a cooling pluton which forgoes sedimentation within a basin. Input data for the model are the present-day well log or sedimentary column with an Excel input file and include rock parameters such as thermal conductivity, total organic carbon (TOC content, porosity and latent heats. The model accounts for sedimentation and burial based on a rate calculated by the sedimentary layer thickness and age. Erosion of the sedimentary column is also included to account for realistic basin evolution. Multiple sills can be emplaced within the system with varying ages. The emplacement of a sill occurs instantaneously. The model can be applied to volcanic sedimentary basins occurring globally. The model output includes the thermal evolution of the sedimentary

  12. SILLi 1.0: a 1-D numerical tool quantifying the thermal effects of sill intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Svensen, Henrik; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2018-01-01

    Igneous intrusions in sedimentary basins may have a profound effect on the thermal structure and physical properties of the hosting sedimentary rocks. These include mechanical effects such as deformation and uplift of sedimentary layers, generation of overpressure, mineral reactions and porosity evolution, and fracturing and vent formation following devolatilization reactions and the generation of CO2 and CH4. The gas generation and subsequent migration and venting may have contributed to several of the past climatic changes such as the end-Permian event and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Additionally, the generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons and cracking of pre-existing oil reservoirs around a hot magmatic intrusion are of significant interest to the energy industry. In this paper, we present a user-friendly 1-D finite element method (FEM)-based tool, SILLi, which calculates the thermal effects of sill intrusions on the enclosing sedimentary stratigraphy. The model is accompanied by three case studies of sills emplaced in two different sedimentary basins, the Karoo Basin in South Africa and the Vøring Basin off the shore of Norway. An additional example includes emplacement of a dyke in a cooling pluton which forgoes sedimentation within a basin. Input data for the model are the present-day well log or sedimentary column with an Excel input file and include rock parameters such as thermal conductivity, total organic carbon (TOC) content, porosity and latent heats. The model accounts for sedimentation and burial based on a rate calculated by the sedimentary layer thickness and age. Erosion of the sedimentary column is also included to account for realistic basin evolution. Multiple sills can be emplaced within the system with varying ages. The emplacement of a sill occurs instantaneously. The model can be applied to volcanic sedimentary basins occurring globally. The model output includes the thermal evolution of the sedimentary column through time and

  13. Genetic portrait of Tamil non-tribal and Irula tribal population using Y chromosome STR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Rajshree; Krishnamoorthy, Kamalakshi; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Kunka Mohanram, Ramkumar

    2016-03-01

    The 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeat loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit were used to analyse the genetic diversity of 517 unrelated males representing the non-tribal and Irula tribal population of Tamil Nadu. A total of 392 unique haplotypes were identified among the 400 non-tribal samples whereas 111 were observed among the 117 Irula tribal samples. Rare alleles for the loci DYS458, DYS635 and YGATAH4.1 were also observed in both population. The haplotype diversity for the non-tribal and Irula tribal population were found to be 0.9999, and the gene diversity ranged from 0.2041 (DYS391) to 0.9612 (DYS385). Comparison of the test population with 26 national and global population using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and determination of the genetic distance matrix using phylogenetic molecular analysis indicate a clustering of the Tamil Nadu non-tribal and Irula tribal population away from other unrelated population and proximity towards some Indo-European (IE) and Asian population. Data are available in the Y chromosome haplotype reference database (YHRD) under accession number YA004055 for Tamil non-tribal and YA004056 for the Irula tribal group.

  14. Multiple reinjections and crystal mush compaction in the solidification evolution of the Karaj Dam basement Sill, Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghdour-Mashhour, Reza; Shabani, Amir Ali Tabbakh

    2017-07-01

    The Karaj Dam basement Sill is a 460 m-thick saucer shaped sill, situated in the Alborz Magmatic Belt, Northern Iran. The results of geochemical, textural and field relations reveal characteristics of a sill with a well-developed S-shaped compositional profile which could be subdivided into distinct parts and suggest that the sill was repeatedly split and reinjected with fresh magma in the upper half of the previous emplacements (over- to partly intra-accretion). Whole rock and mineral compositional profiles have recorded five to six discrete injections of magma, each of which individually show an upward increase in terms of primitivity which represents partial crystallization in feeder conduits. The first three small successive pulses of magma, emplaced in the basal 150 m of the floor sequence, were followed by voluminous fourth and fifth pulses in the upper portion of the sill. During final two pulses the system acts as a closed system for each independently, and evolves through compositional convection or compaction aided in-situ crystallization. Theoretical models for convection and compaction shows the significance of both processes. Considering the final porosity of 0.1 rate of the basal 150 m and upper portion of the sill (Va = 1 and 0.1 m/year), when the crystal mush varies between 1 to 0.01 m with the liquid viscosity ranging from 85 to 15 Pa·s. Our calculations further indicate that compaction driven velocity of liquid expulsion (ω - w) hardly exceeds the Va in the basal 150 m of the floor sequence. The highest velocity is reached (ω - w = 1 m/year) only if the crystal mush thickness is no less than 240 m with the porosity of 0.6 and the liquid viscosity of no more than 15 Pa·s. On the other hand, compaction is highly effective in the upper portion of the sill. Transfer of residual liquid from the compacting lower solidification front to the dilating upper solidification front resulted in characteristic chemical and mineralogical effects, such as the

  15. Fort St. Vrain core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, D.W.; Brown, J.R.; Heller, R.A.; Franek, W.J.

    1977-07-01

    The Fort St. Vrain High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor core performance has been evaluated during the startup testing phase of the reactor operation. The reactor is graphite moderated, helium cooled, and uses coated particle fuel and on-line flow control to each of the 37 refueling regions. Principal objectives of startup testing were to determine: core and control system reactivity, radial power distribution, flow control capability, and initial fission product release. Information from the core demonstrates that Technical Specifications are being met, performance of the core and fuel is as expected, flow and reactivity control are predictable and simple for the operator to carry out

  16. Vent Complexes above Dolerite Sills in Phanerozoic LIPs: Implications for Proterozoic LIPs and IOCG Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R. E.; Bleeker, W.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Polozov, A. G.

    2009-05-01

    New insights into the origin of IOCG (iron oxide copper gold) deposits [e.g., 1, 2, 3] follow from recent studies of Phanerozoic Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). Detailed seismic studies of the 62-55 Ma North Atlantic Igneous Province and complementary studies in the 183 Ma Karoo and 250 Ma Siberian LIPs reveal thousands of hydrothermal vent complexes (HVCs). Up to 5-10 km across at the paleosurface, these vents connect to underlying dolerite sills at paleodepths of up to 8 km [4, 5, 6, 7]. They originate from explosive release of gases generated when thick sills (>50 m) are emplaced into volatile-rich but low-permeability sedimentary strata. HVCs are phreatomagmatic in origin. Their architecture, economic potential for IOCG-type deposits, and effects on climate strongly depend on the type of host rocks (black shales at Karoo and evaporites at Siberian LIPs) and its fluid (brines) saturation at the time of emplacement. About 250 HVCs associated with the Siberian LIP are mineralized having magnetite in the matrix. Some are being mined for Fe (Korshunovskoe and Rudnogorskoe), but their economic potential for copper and gold mineralization is understudied. These observations from the Phanerozoic LIP record suggest that HVCs should also be an essential component of sill provinces associated with Proterozoic LIPs, with a potential for causing major climatic shifts and IOCG-type deposits, particularly if the host sediments include substantial evaporites. Two examples are discussed here. The 725 Ma Franklin LIP covers 1.1 Mkm2 in northern Canada [8]; in the Minto Inlier of Victoria Island, this event comprises volcanics, sills, and breccia pipes [9, 10]. The breccia pipes appear identical to HVCs and, furthermore, the presence of evaporites in the host sediments of the Shaler Supergroup suggests (based on the Siberian trap example) the potential for IOCG-type mineralization. Could 1.59 Ga sills, as exemplified by the exposed Western Channel Diabase sills on the eastern

  17. Doctors for tribal areas: Issues and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Mavalankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's. Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions.

  18. CULTURAL TOURISM: BANGLADESH TRIBAL AREAS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnuba NASIR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the world's largest industry which is linked with thousands of associated business. Though Bangladesh is a small country in terms of its size it contains huge prospect in its tourism including culture. Bangladesh culture is very rich which initiated long ago with different dimensions. Chittagong hill tracts of Bangladesh are a place of tribal. Tribal are having their own rich culture which is very attractive and nice looking. This study focused on tribal culture and its tourists. This paper also seeks about problems of cultural tourism in Bangladesh.

  19. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  20. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (∼2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere, particularly where magma intersects shallow, and often weak, sedimentary rocks. Results from this study support growing evidence of the important role of shallow sills in active monogenetic fields.

  1. Tribal Green Building Administrative Code Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Administrative Code Example can be used as a template for technical code selection (i.e., building, electrical, plumbing, etc.) to be adopted as a comprehensive building code.

  2. Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribal Green Building Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT) to create this framework for tribal building codes.

  3. 77 FR 895 - Tribal Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... note that for title IV-E funding purposes, criminal record and child abuse and neglect registry checks... Administration for Children and Families 45 CFR Parts 1355 and 1356 Tribal Child Welfare; Interim Final Rule #0... 896

  4. Tribal-FERST Environmental Issue Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides links to the 45 issue profiles for Tribal-FERST users, organized with tabs to show issues related to pollutants, environmental media, health effects, other community issues, and all issues.

  5. Indoor Air Quality in Tribal Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Website can help you improve IAQ in your tribal community. You can find information to educate your community about the simple actions they can take to improve their IAQ and protect their health.

  6. Waveform modeling of the seismic response of a mid-ocean ridge axial melt sill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Stephen, R. A.; Canales, J. Pablo

    2017-12-01

    Seismic reflections from axial magma lens (AML) are commonly observed along many mid-ocean ridges, and are thought to arise from the negative impedance contrast between a solid, high-speed lid and the underlying low-speed, molten or partially molten (mush) sill. The polarity of the AML reflection ( P AML P) at vertical incidence and the amplitude vs offset (AVO) behavior of the AML reflections (e.g., P AML P and S-converted P AML S waves) are often used as a diagnostic tool for the nature of the low-speed sill. Time-domain finite difference calculations for two-dimensional laterally homogeneous models show some scenarios make the interpretation of melt content from partial-offset stacks of P- and S-waves difficult. Laterally heterogeneous model calculations indicate diffractions from the edges of the finite-width AML reducing the amplitude of the AML reflections. Rough seafloor and/or a rough AML surface can also greatly reduce the amplitude of peg-leg multiples because of scattering and destructive interference. Mid-crustal seismic reflection events are observed in the three-dimensional multi-channel seismic dataset acquired over the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Study Site at East Pacific Rise (EPR, cruise MGL0812). Modeling indicates that the mid-crustal seismic reflection reflections are unlikely to arise from peg-leg multiples of the AML reflections, P-to- S converted phases, or scattering due to rough topography, but could probably arise from deeper multiple magma sills. Our results support the identification of Marjanović et al. (Nat Geosci 7(11):825-829, 2014) that a multi-level complex of melt lenses is present beneath the axis of the EPR.

  7. Characteristics and Significance of Magma Emplacement Horizons, Black Sturgeon Sill, Nipigon, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieg, M. J.; Hone, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial scales strongly control the timescales of processes in igneous intrusions, particularly through the thermal evolution of the magma, which in turn governs the evolution of crystallinity, viscosity, and other important physical and chemical properties of the system. In this study, we have collected a highly detailed data set comprising geochemical (bulk rock composition), textural (size and alignment of plagioclase crystals), and mineralogical (modal abundance) profiles through the central portion of the 250 m thick Black Sturgeon diabase sill. In this data, we have identified characteristic signals in texture (soft and somewhat diffuse chills), composition (reversals in differentiation trends), and mineralogy (olivine accumulations), all coinciding and recurring at roughly 10 meter intervals. Based on these signatures, we are able to map out multiple zones representing discrete pulses of magma that were emplaced sequentially as the intrusion was inflated. Simple thermal calculations suggest that each 10 meters of new crystallization would require repose times on the order of 10-100 years. To build up 250 meters of magma at this rate would only require approximately 250-2500 years, significantly less than the thermal lifetime of the entire sill. The soft chills we observe in the Black Sturgeon sill are therefore consistent with a system that remained warm throughout the emplacement process. Successive pulses were injected into partially crystalline mush, rather than pure liquid (which would result in hybridization) or solid (which would produce sharp hard chills). Episodic emplacement is by now widely recognized as a fundamental process in the formation of large felsic magma chambers; our results suggest that this also may be an important consideration in understanding the evolution of smaller mafic intrusions.

  8. Fort St. Vrain decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.

    1998-01-01

    Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), owner of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear generating station, achieved its final decommissioning goal on August 5, 1997 when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission terminated the Part 50 reactor license. PSCo pioneered and completed the world's first successful decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant after many years of operation. In August 1989, PSCo decided to permanently shutdown the reactor and proceed with its decommissioning. The decision to proceed with early dismantlement as the appropriate decommissioning method proved wise for all stake holders - present and future - by mitigating potential environmental impacts and reducing financial risks to company shareholders, customers, employees, neighboring communities and regulators. We believe that PSCo's decommissioning process set an exemplary standard for the world's nuclear industry and provided leadership, innovation, advancement and distinguished contributions to other decommissioning efforts throughout the world. (author)

  9. Magmatic sill intrusions beneath El Hierro Island following the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Saz, María Á.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Parks, Michelle M.; García-Cañada, Laura; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2016-04-01

    El Hierro, the most southwestern island of Canary Islands, Spain, is a volcano rising from around 3600 m above the ocean floor and up to of 1500 m above sea level. A submarine eruption occurred off the coast of El Hierro in 2011-2012, which was the only confirmed eruption in the last ~ 600 years. Activity continued after the end of the eruption with six magmatic intrusions occurring between 2012-2014. Each of these intrusions was characterized by hundreds of earthquakes and 3-19 centimeters of observed ground deformation. Ground displacements at ten continuous GPS sites were initially inverted to determine the optimal source parameters (location, geometry, volume/pressure change) that best define these intrusions from a geodetic point of view. Each intrusive period appears to be associated with the formation of a separate sill, with inferred volumes between 0.02 - 0.3 km3. SAR images from the Canadian RADARSAT-2 satellite and the Italian Space Agency COSMO-SkyMed constellation have been used to produce high-resolution detailed maps of line-of-sight displacements for each of these intrusions. These data have been combined with the continuous GPS observations and a joint inversion undertaken to gain further constraints on the optimal source parameters for each of these separate intrusive events. The recorded activity helps to understand how an oceanic intraplate volcanic island grows through repeated sill intrusions; well documented by seismic, GPS and InSAR observations in the case of the El Hierro activity.

  10. Understanding the mechanical coupling between magma emplacement and the resulting deformation: the example of saucer-shaped sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Neumann, E. R.; Planke, S.

    2009-12-01

    The mechanical coupling between magma intrusions and the surrounding rocks plays a major role in the emplacement of volcanic plumbing systems. The deformation associated with magma emplacement has been widely studied, such as caldera inflation/deflation, volcano deformation during dike intrusion, and doming above laccoliths. However, the feedback processes, i.e. the effect of deformation resulting from intruding magma on the propagation of the intrusion itself, have rarely been studied. Saucer-shaped sills are adequate geological objects to understand such processes. Indeed, observation show that saucer-shaped sills are often associated with dome-like structures affecting the overlying sediments. In addition, there is a clear geometrical relation between the sills and the domes: the dome diameters are almost identical to those of saucers, and the tips of the inclined sheets of saucers are superimposed on the edges of the domes. In this presentation, we report on experimental investigations of the emplacement mechanisms of saucer-shaped sills and associated deformation. The model materials were (1) cohesive fine-grained silica flour, representing brittle crust, and (2) molten low-viscosity oil, representing magma. A weak layer located at the top of the injection inlet simulates strata. The main variable parameter is injection depth. During experiments, the surface of the model is digitalized through a structured light technique based on the moiré projection principle. Such a tool provides topographic maps of the surface of the model and allows a periodic (every 1.5 s) monitoring of the model topography. When the model magma starts intruding, a symmetrical dome rises above the inlet. Subsequently, the dome inflates and widens, and then evolves to a plateau-like feature, with nearly flat upper surface and steep sides. At the end of the experiments, the intruding liquid erupts at the edge of the plateau. The intrusions formed in the experiments are saucer-shaped sills

  11. The tribal girl child in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanti, R

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the status of the girl child among tribes in India. Tribes have son preference but do not discriminate against girls by female infanticide or sex determination tests. Girls do not inherit land, but they are not abused, hated, or subjected to rigid social norms. Girls are not veiled and are free to participate in dancing and other recreational programs. There is no dowry on marriage. The father of the bridegroom pays a brideprice to the father of the girl. Widowed or divorced women are free to marry again. Daughters care for young children, perform housework, and work in the field with their brothers. In the tribal village of Choti Underi girls were not discriminated against in health and nutrition, but there was a gender gap in education. Both girls and boys were equally exposed to infection and undernourishment. Tribals experience high rates of infant and child mortality due to poverty and its related malnutrition. Child labor among tribals is a way of life for meeting the basic needs of the total household. A recent report on tribals in Rajasthan reveals that 15-20% of child labor involved work in mines that were dangerous to children's health. Girl children had no security provisions or minimum wages. Tribal children were exploited by human service agencies. Child laborers were raped. Government programs in tribal areas should focus on improving living conditions for children in general. Special programs for girls are needed for providing security in the workplace and increasing female educational levels. More information is needed on the work burden of tribal girls that may include wage employment as well as housework.

  12. Structure and forcing of the overflow at the Storfjorden sill and its connection to the Arctic coastal polynya in Storfjorden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Geyer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Storfjorden (Svalbard is a sill-fjord with an active polynya and exemplifies the dense water formation process over the Arctic shelves. Here we report on our simulations of Storfjorden covering the freezing season of 1999–2000 using an eddy-permitting 3-D ocean circulation model with a fully coupled dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice model. The model results in the polynya region and of the dense water plume flowing over the sill crest are compared to observations. The connections of the overflow at the sill to the dense water production at the polynya and to the local wind forcing are investigated. Both the overflow and the polynya dynamics are found to be sensitive to wind forcing. In response to freezing and brine rejection over the polynya, the buoyancy forcing initiates an abrupt positive density anomaly. While the ocean integrates the buoyancy forcing over several polynya events (about 25 days, the wind forcing dominates the overflow response at the sill at weather scale. In the model, the density excess is diluted in the basin and leads to a gradual build-up of dense water behind the sill. The overflow transport is typically inferred from observations using a single current profiler at the sill crest. Despite the significant variability of the plume width, we show that a constant overflow width of 15 km produces realistic estimates of the overflow volume transport. Another difficulty in monitoring the overflow is measuring the plume thickness in the absence of hydrographic profiles. Volume flux estimates assuming a constant plume width and the thickness inferred from velocity profiles explain 58% of the modelled overflow volume flux variance and agrees to within 10% when averaged over the overflow season.

  13. Fort Davis National Historic Site : acoustical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    During the summer of 2010 (September - October 2010), the Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Fort Davis National Historic Site (FODA)at two sites deployed for approximately 30 days each. The baseline data collected during this period ...

  14. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  15. THE EFFECT OF INNER DIAPHRAGMS AND NON-CONTINUOUS SILL SECTION ON THE STIFFNESS OF AUTOMOTIVE B-PILLAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Tan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the knowledge on the behaviour of T-frame under specific loading will be obtained by experimental methods in order to investigate the deflection of the vehicle B-pillar or T-frame. In addition, a series of T-frame were designed with inner diaphragm at various location in the sill member in order to investigate the effect of inner diaphragm and noncontinuous closed hat section in the sill member. Lastly, the results from the experimental tests were compared with the finite element analysis results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the inner diaphragm in the automotive B-pillar.

  16. Hydrologic Analysis of Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    drainage areas are different, hydrological analysis will be conducted on the two basins individually. The results of the two analyses will be combined to...ER D C TR -1 5- 4 Environmental Quality and Installations Hydrologic Analysis of Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri En gi ne er R es ea rc h...Environmental Quality and Installations ERDC TR-15-4 August 2015 Hydrologic Analysis of Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri Michael L. Follum, Darla C. McVan

  17. Bent's Old Fort: Amphibians and Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, E.

    2008-01-01

    Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site sits along the Arkansas River in the semi-desert prairie of southeastern Colorado. The USGS provided assistance in designing surveys to assess the variety of herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles) resident at this site. This brochure is the results of those efforts and provides visitors with information on what frogs, toads, snakes and salamanders might be seen and heard at Bent's Old Fort.

  18. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY RESOURCE TRIBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Lopez

    2003-04-01

    The CERT Tribal Internship Program is part of the education and training opportunities provided by CERT to accelerate the development of American Indian technical professionals available to serve Tribes and expand the pool of these professionals. Tribes are severely impacted by the inadequate number of Indian professionals available to serve and facilitate Tribal participation and support of the energy future of Tribes,and subsequently the energy future of the nation. By providing interns with hands-on work experience in their field of study two goals are accomplished: (1) the intern is provided opportunities for professional enhancement; and (2) The pool of Indian professionals available to meet the needs of Tribal government and Tribal communities in general is increased. As of January 17, 2003, Lance M Wyatt successfully completed his internship with the Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice on the Task Force that specifically focuses their work on Tribal nations. While working as an intern with the National Transportation Program, Albuquerque operations, Jacqueline Agnew received an offer to work for the Alaska Native Health Board in Anchorage, Alaska. This was an opportunity that Ms. Agnew did not feel she could afford to forego and she left her internship position in February 2003. At present, CERT is in the process of finding another qualified individual to replace the internship position vacated by Ms. Agnew. Mr. Wyatt's and Ms. Agnew's final comments are given.

  19. 77 FR 2732 - Tribal Consultation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... on ACF programs and tribal priorities. DATES: March 5-6, 2012. ADDRESSES: Renaissance Hotel, 999 9th... United States has a unique legal and political relationship with Indian tribal governments, established...

  20. Improving safety on rural local and tribal roads safety toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Rural roadway safety is an important issue for communities throughout the country and presents a challenge for state, local, and Tribal agencies. The Improving Safety on Rural Local and Tribal Roads Safety Toolkit was created to help rural local ...

  1. Data Management-Supplement to Section 106 Tribal Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document supplements the Tribal 106 Guidance by providing useful suggestions and tips to tribes about how to establish a data management system that reflects tribal water quality goals and objectives.

  2. Tribal Energy Program for California Indian Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    A strategic plan is needed to catalyze clean energy in the more than 100 California Indian tribal communities with varying needs and energy resources. We propose to conduct a scoping study to identify tribal lands with clean energy potential, as well as communities with lack of grid-tied energy and communications access. The research focus would evaluate the energy mixture and alternatives available to these tribal communities, and evaluate greenhouse gas emissions associated with accessing fossil fuel used for heat and power. Understanding the baseline of energy consumption and emissions of communities is needed to evaluate improvements and advances from technology. Based on this study, we will develop a strategic plan that assesses solutions to address high energy fuel costs due to lack of electricity access and inform actions to improve economic opportunities for tribes. This could include technical support for tribes to access clean energy technologies and supporting collaboration for on-site demonstrations.

  3. 25 CFR 23.22 - Purpose of tribal government grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose of tribal government grants. 23.22 Section 23.22... Grants to Indian Tribes for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23.22 Purpose of tribal government grants. (a) Grants awarded under this subpart are for the establishment and operation of tribally...

  4. Ethnobotanical observations on the tribals of chinnar wildlife sanctuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeev, K K; Sasidharan, N

    1997-04-01

    Studies on the flora and ethnobotany of the tribals of chinnar wildlife sanctuary were carried out. Though the sancturary has over 200 species of medicinal plants, the tribals are using 55 species, Ethnobotanical details of 64 species used by the tribals in the sanctuary are presented in this paper.

  5. The origin of Karaj dam basement sill marginal reversal by Soret fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghdour-Mashhour, Reza; Esmaeily, Dariush

    2010-05-01

    The Karaj dam basement sill (KDBS), located North West of Tehran, northern Iran, is one of the several E-W-trending plutons in the Albourz Mountains. The KDBS consists of a layered series between upper and lower chilled margins. The rocks of the chilled margins are gabbroic in composition and porphyritic, with euhedral to subhedral plagioclase and clinopyroxene megacrysts up to 5 mm long. The rocks become coarse-grained toward the center of the sill and show a gradual transition from porphyritic to equigranular texture. Field and petrographic observations reveal a reverse trend in marginal units crystallization from the eutectic point to the main magma composition; i.e., the olivine-bearing gabbro (porphyritic chilled margin), which has a eutectic composition, crystallized prior to the marginal gabbros, which have a cotectic or near-cotectic composition, as plagioclase laths in the gabbroic unit are embedded in large crystals of clinopyroxene and this phenomenon is believed to result from the cotectic crystallization of plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Four major mechanisms are proposed and discussed in order to find the exact mechanism responsible for marginal reversal formation as following: 1) Crystal settling is a gravity-dependent mechanism and phenocrysts must have settled to form a layer at the bottom of the sill, showing sharp upper boundary which is not observable in KDBS. Besides, the reverse fractionation of inwardly-dipping sequence of mentioned sill occurs in layers with primary dips up to 55°. Consequently capability of marginal reversals to develop along steeply inclined chamber margins, by this mechanism is implausible. 2) Multiple injections of successive magma pulses fails to explain the origin of marginal reversal since the transition along the entire length of marginal reversal is gradual also there is no compositional break or chilled contact between two mentioned units of KDBS margin (Olivine-gabbro and marginal gabbro). 3) The idea of

  6. Kuidas tudengid Lasnamäed väänasid / Victor Enrich, Sille Pihlak ; intervjueerinud Hendrik Alla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Enrich, Victor, 1967-

    2016-01-01

    Kunstiakadeemia arhitektuuriosakonna üliõpilased uurisid töötoas "Kuidas väänata maju ilma viga saamata", mida võiks ette võtta Lasnamäega. Intervjuu juhendajate, hispaania fotograafi Victor Enrichi ja arhitekt Sille Pihlakuga

  7. Working with Indian Tribal Nations. A guide for DOE employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees and contractors frequently work with Indian tribes or nations as part of their jobs. The purpose of this guide is to help DOE employees and contractors initiate contact with tribes and build effective relationships. DOE maintains a unique government-to government relationship with tribal nations. This guide presents an overview of the history of the relationship between the tribes and the Federal government, as well as the laws and Executive Orders that define that relationship. The guide discusses the Federal government’s trust responsibility to the tribes, tribal treaty rights, and the Department of Energy’s American Indian policy. The guide also discusses important cultural differences that could lead to communication problems if not understood and provides examples of potential cultural misunderstandings. In particular the guide discusses tribal environmental beliefs that shape tribal responses to DOE actions. The guide also provides pointers on tribal etiquette during meetings and cultural ceremonies and when visiting tribal reservations. Appendix 1 gives examples of the tribal nations with whom DOE currently has Memoranda of Understanding. While this guide provides an introduction and overview of tribal relations for DOE staff and contractors, DOE has also designated Tribal Issues Points of Contacts at each of its facilities. A list of these Points of Contact for all DOE facilities is provided in Appendix 2. DOE staff and contractors should consult with the appropriate tribal representatives at their site before initiating contact with a tribal nation, because many tribes have rules and procedures that must be complied with before DOE staff or contractors may go on tribal lands or conduct interviews with tribal members. Appendix 3 is the complete DOE American Indian Policy. Appendices 4-6 are Executive Orders that govern the relationship of all federal agencies with tribal nations. DOE employees and staff are

  8. 78 FR 44459 - Tribal Self-Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 137 Tribal Self-Governance CFR Correction In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 399, revised as of October 1, 2012, on page 932, in the second column, the heading ``Subpart P--Secretarial Responsibilities...

  9. Building Tribal Communities in the Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    during 2014–15. The results suggest that these organisations face many common issues. We develop and apply a framework to understand some of these. We find that collaborative consumption entrepreneurs strive to build a tribal community by matching, in an innovative way, supply and demand...... traditional marketing approaches....

  10. TRIBAL REMEDIES FOR SNAKEBITE FROM ORISSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, K S; Sharma, P C; Kishore, Prem

    1986-01-01

    This communication presents an account of usage of 13 species of plant in the treatment of Snakebite by the tribals of Orissa, Botanical name, family, local name and Sanskrit name, if available of the plants along with mode of administration and place collection of the claims are enumerated. PMID:22557560

  11. 76 FR 55678 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... types of agency actions that will require tribal consultation in the future. ACF's response was that due... disparities of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) and ensuring that access to critical health and... within ACF, many of which already consult with AI/ANs. 3. Background Since the formation of the Union...

  12. 77 FR 13338 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ..., Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other issues affecting the delivery of Head Start...

  13. 78 FR 11891 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of two 1-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other issues affecting...

  14. 77 FR 5027 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ..., Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be held between... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... the needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and families, taking into consideration...

  15. 76 FR 48865 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ..., Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the... American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration funding... meeting the needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and families, taking into consideration...

  16. 77 FR 19020 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be held between the... needs of American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families, taking into consideration... children and families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other...

  17. 77 FR 4471 - Tribal Veterans Cemetery Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... means to promote consistency and communication in the grant application process. Further, the final rule... Regulatory Review) emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, reducing costs... standards of appearance that is or will be owned by the State, or operated by a Tribal Organization on trust...

  18. 78 FR 57858 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... and posted on the Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center Web site at http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Tribal Consultation Meeting AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families' Office of Head Start (OHS), HHS. ACTION...

  19. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure

  20. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Polk, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Horner, Jacob A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gorrissen, Willy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orrell, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hand, James R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russo, Bryan J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williamson, Jennifer L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-11-17

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Polk, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Polk took place on February 16, 2010.

  1. Hydrologic assessment of the shallow groundwater flow system beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands, Suffolk County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Michael L.; Rivera, Simonette L.; Busciolano, Ronald J.

    2016-12-02

    west.Water levels in many of the wells in the network fluctuated in response to precipitation, upgradient groundwater flow, and tidal flux in Shinnecock Bay. Water level altitudes ranged from 6.66 to 0.47 feet (ft) above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 during the spring measurement period, and from 5.25 to -0.24 ft (NAVD 88) during fall 2014. Historically, annual and seasonal precipitation seem to indicate long-term water level trends in an index well located in the town of Southampton, correlates with changes in storage in the upper glacial aquifer, but does not necessarily indicate water level extremes in the shallow groundwater system. To place the study period in perspective, calendar year 2014 was the 32d wettest year on record, with precipitation for the year totaling 48.1 inches, a 2.6-percent increase from the annual average (46.9 inches per year), based on 81 years of complete record at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service cooperative meteorological station at Bridgehampton, New York. Estimated recharge to the water table beneath the tribal lands from precipitation for 2014 is 25.4 inches.Tidal flux caused water levels in wells to fluctuate from 0.30 to -0.24 ft during May 2014. Water levels in wells located north of Old Fort Pond and beneath the southernmost extent of the tribal lands were most influenced by tidal flux. During June 2014, hydrographs indicate that tidal flux influenced water levels by 0.48 ft in a well located near the southernmost extent of the tribal lands approximately 0.3 miles north of Shinnecock Bay, and was zero at a well located approximately 0.5 miles south of Montauk Highway, and 0.4 miles west of Heady Creek, near the geographic center of the tribal lands. Tidal-influence delay time (time interval between peak high-tide stage and corresponding peak high-water level) ranged from 1.75 hours at the well located near the southernmost extent of the tribal lands, to more than 4

  2. Mineralogy and petrology of cretaceous subsurface lamproite sills, southeastern Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullers, R.L.; Dorais, M.J.; Berendsen, P.; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas

    1996-01-01

    Cores and cuttings of lamproite sills and host sedimentary country rocks in southeastern Kansas from up to 312 m depth were analyzed for major elements in whole rocks and minerals, certain trace elements in whole rocks (including the REE) and Sr isotopic composition of the whole rocks. The lamproites are ultrapotassic (K2O/Na2O = 2.0-19.9), alkalic [molecular (K2O/Na2O)/Al2O3 = 1.3-2.8], enriched in mantle-incompatible elements (light REE, Ba, Rb, Sr, Th, Hf, Ta) and have nearly homogeneous initial Sr isotopic compositions (0.707764-0.708114). These lamproites could have formed by variable degrees of partial melting of harzburgite country rock and cross-cutting veins composed of phlogopite, K-Ti richterite, titanite, diopside, K-Ti silicates, or K-Ba-phosphate under high H2O/CO2 ratios and reducing conditions. Variability in melting of veins and wall rock and variable composition of the metasomatized veins could explain the significantly different composition of the Kansas lamproites. Least squares fractionation models preclude the derivation of the Kansas lamproites by fractional crystallization from magmas similar in composition to higher silica phlogopite-sanidine lamproites some believe to be primary lamproite melts found elsewhere. In all but one case, least squares fractionation models also preclude the derivation of magmas similar in composition to any of the Kansas lamproites from one another. A magma similar in composition to the average composition of the higher SiO2 Ecco Ranch lamproite (237.5-247.5 m depth) could, however, have marginally crystallized about 12% richterite, 12% sanidine, 7% diopside and 6% phlogopite to produce the average composition of the Guess lamproite (305-312 m depth). Lamproite from the Ecco Ranch core is internally fractionated in K2O, Al2O3, Ba, MgO, Fe2O3, Co and Cr most likely by crystal accumulation-removal of ferromagnesian minerals and sanidine. In contrast, the Guess core (305-312 m depth) has little fractionation

  3. THE RATIONALE FOR EXTENDING THE SERVICES OF PASSENGER CARS WITH POCKETS OF CORROSION IN THE CENTER SILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The scientific work supposed: 1 the search of accounting ways of the local corrosion damages influence to the car design, that were expired the appointed time, for the purpose of renewal; 2 experimental verification of conformity of material construction requirements of the normative documentation and justification for extending the services of passenger cars with pockets of corrosion after 30 years of operation; 3 the conformity assessment of residual life of the structure of car bodies operating pressures in the next 5 years of use. Methodology. The developed algorithm of technical diagnostics of cars with pockets of corrosion of the center sill contains several stages. First, a survey of technical condition of structures is conducted by a visual-optical method and nondestructive control methods, and the degree of damage is determined. In the next phase the experimental verification of conformity of the structure and mechanical properties of the center sill of the car with the pockets of corrosion to regulatory requirements are executed. Next, the study of strength of the supporting structures of car bodies on the basis of experimental static and impact tests of strength is executed. Finally, the endurance tests are conducted on the effect of the longitudinal forces and the evaluation and prediction of compliance resource car bodies for the next period are executed. Findings. The actual work is completed by obtaining the experimental data on the feasibility of extending the service life of passenger cars as from the point of view of an operating time of load-bearing elements of the car body to the resource, and from the point of view of chemical composition, structure and mechanical properties of the center sill with pockets of corrosion. The presence of local corrosion damages of the center sill of the presented size is not a threat to the structural strength and safety. Originality. The authors conducted a comprehensive study to

  4. Deformation mechanisms accommodating the emplacement of an igneous sill-complex in the Irish sector of the Rockall Basin, offshore NW Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Craig; Jackson, Christopher; Schofield, Nick

    2013-04-01

    Magma intrusion within the subsurface is heavily influenced by the pre-existing architecture of the upper crust and, depending on the emplacement mechanisms, may modify basin structure and fluid flow pathways. Seismic reflection data reveal that intrusive networks predominantly consist of interconnected, saucer-shaped sills that are often associated with dome-shaped 'forced' folds generated by intrusion-induced uplift. Previous studies of intrusion-related forced folds have primarily focused on isolated sills or laccoliths and have shown that the fold amplitude is less than the intrusion thickness, suggesting that additional space-making mechanisms (e.g. grain comminution, fluidization) accompanied emplacement. Furthermore, forced folding is often considered as an instantaneous process over geological time. However, fold growth and the interplay between accompanying ductile and brittle deformation styles remains poorly understood. Here, we use 3D seismic reflection data from the eastern margin of the Irish Rockall Basin, NE Atlantic, to quantitatively study eighty-two igneous intrusions (i.e. saucer-shaped sills and inclined sheets) in order to constrain the emplacement history of a Palaeocene-to-Middle Eocene sill-complex. Emplacement occurred across a Cretaceous clastic-to-marl dominated succession at palaeodepths of limbs. The saucer-shaped sills are characterized by radial magma flow patterns, emanating from the inner sill, distinguished by mapping the long axes of magma lobes and fingers. These magma flow indictors also provide a proxy for intrusion style; i.e. where sills intrude the Lower Cretaceous sandstones, magma propagation was facilitated by brittle fracturing while non-brittle processes (e.g. fluidization) accompanied shallow-level intrusions into the Upper Cretaceous marls. Directly overlying the sill-complex, within the Palaeocene-Mid-Eocene succession, are a series of 22 forced folds that are interpreted to have formed via intrusion-induced uplift

  5. Defense.gov Special Report: Fort Hood Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    identify possible insider threats, Army Secretary John M. McHugh told lawmakers. Story Obama: Soldiers ," Army Secretary John M. McHugh told lawmakers. Story President Praises Swift Response to Fort Hood Remarks on Fort Hood Shooting at White House McHugh, Odierno Address Fort Hood Shooting Before Congress

  6. Smithsonian Marine Station (SMS) at Fort Pierce

    Science.gov (United States)

    share current Smithsonian research on the plants and animals of the Indian River Lagoon and marine Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce Website Search Box Search Field: SMS Website Search Twitter SMS Home › Welcome to the Smithsonian Marine Station Homepage slideshow Who We Are... The

  7. FORT NAMUTONI: FROM MILITARY STRONGHOLD TO TOURIST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STRONGHOLD TO TOURIST CAMP. Col Dr Jan Ploeger*. "... this fortress was not just a white elephant, it was actually occupied and played a major role in the settlement of Germans in the far North." (own translation) - D.W. Krynauw Die Verhaal van. Namutoni, p 3. Introduction. Fort Namutoni, the last White outpost east of ...

  8. Den tabte fortælling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2008-01-01

    Ledelse er et af nøgleordene i fornyelsen af den offentlige sektor. Vi har imidlertid glemt et væsentligt aspekt af ledelse. Dette skyldes ikke mindst, at omgangsformen i dag er reguleret af information, mens den tidligere var reguleret af fortælleevnen. Evnen til dialog, indlevelse og nærvær er...

  9. 25 CFR 170.932 - Are there other funding sources for tribal transportation departments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are there other funding sources for tribal transportation....932 Are there other funding sources for tribal transportation departments? There are many sources of... additional funding sources: (a) Tribal general funds; (b) Tribal Priority Allocation; (c) Tribal permits and...

  10. Health Disparities Research Among Small Tribal Populations: Describing Appropriate Criteria for Aggregating Tribal Health Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Emily R; Blacksher, Erika; Echo-Hawk, Abigail L; Bassett, Deborah; Harris, Raymond M; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2016-07-01

    In response to community concerns, we used the Tribal Participatory Research framework in collaboration with 5 American-Indian communities in Washington, Idaho, and Montana to identify the appropriate criteria for aggregating health data on small tribes. Across tribal sites, 10 key informant interviews and 10 focus groups (n = 39) were conducted between July 2012 and April 2013. Using thematic analysis of focus group content, we identified 5 guiding criteria for aggregating tribal health data: geographic proximity, community type, environmental exposures, access to resources and services, and economic development. Preliminary findings were presented to focus group participants for validation at each site, and a culminating workshop with representatives from all 5 tribes verified our final results. Using this approach requires critical assessment of research questions and study designs by investigators and tribal leaders to determine when aggregation or stratification is appropriate and how to group data to yield robust results relevant to local concerns. At project inception, tribal leaders should be consulted regarding the validity of proposed groupings. After regular project updates, they should be consulted again to confirm that findings are appropriately contextualized for dissemination. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, L.; Swartz, G.; Cooley, C.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection

  12. SUGGESTIONS OF SCENARIOS FOR RESTORING LONGITUDINAL CONNECTIVITY TO SUSTAIN FISH FAUNA MIGRATION UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM OF APAHIDA BOTTOM SILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan VOICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rivers and their corridors form complex ecosystems that include adjacent land, flora and fauna and the actual courses of water. Given the ecological criteria for prioritizing the rehabilitation of longitudinal continuity of watercourses recommended by the International Commission for Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR (Appendix 1 and starting from the analysis of the Management Plan to ensure longitudinal continuity of watercourses in Some?-Tisa River Area (Annex 9.17.a in BMP – Basin Management Plan there have been proposed several scenarios in order to facilitate fish species migration above the bottom sill from Apahida. The selected case study is focused on the mentioned discharge or bottom sill in Apahida town (hm 985 located 45 m downstream of the bridge located at the intersection of two streets; this bottom sill is 0.8 m high and was built in order to correct the slope, to reduce erosion and to enhance water oxygenation. Currently the bottom sill is supervised by Some?-Tisa River Basin Water Administration, Cluj SGA. One of the important migratory fish species in the study area is the Common Nase (Chondrostoma nasus protected by Bern Convention (Appendix III; barbel (Barbus barbus- rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V,annex 4A of Low nr.462 and Red List of RBDD; bream (Abramis brama bream (Abramis brama - IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The water catchment area of the Apahida commune in Cluj County blocks migration of various species of migratory fish such as: Common Nase (Chondrostoma nasus protected by the Bern Convention (Appendix III; Barbel (Barbus barbus - rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V, Annex 4A of Low No 462 and Red List of RBDD; Bream (Abramis brama Bream (Abramis brama - IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. To help the three species of fish come the solutions proposed in this article.

  13. Global City, tribal Citizenship: Dubai's paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Lavergne, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the contrast between the beduin tribal origins of the rulers of this wealthy and dynamic Emirate and the globalized economy and society which makes for the majority of its dwellers. It raises the question of the sustainability of the model, faced with the tendency of the foreign population to settle there on the long run, and the need to involve this population, or at least the middle and upper middle class in the project for Dubaï.

  14. Petrological constraints on the recycling of mafic crystal mushes, magma ascent and intrusion of braided sills in the Torres del Paine mafic complex (Patagonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthold, Julien; Müntener, Othmar; Baumgartner, Lukas; Putlitz, Benita

    2014-05-01

    Cumulate and crystal mush disruption and reactivation are difficult to recognise in coarse grained shallow plutonic rocks. Mafic minerals included in hornblende and zoned plagioclase provide snapshots of early crystallization and cumulate formation, but are difficult to interpret in terms of the dynamics of magma ascent and possible links between silicic and mafic rock emplacement. We will present the field relations, the microtextures and the mineral chemistry of the Miocene mafic sill complex of the Torres del Paine intrusive complex (Patagonia, Chile) and its sub-vertical feeder-zone. The mafic sill complex was built up by a succession of braided sills of shoshonitic and high-K calc-alkaline porphyritic hornblende-gabbro and fine grained monzodioritic sills. The mafic units were over-accreted over 41±11 ka, underplating the overlying granite. Local diapiric structures and felsic magma accumulation between sills indicate limited separation of intercumulus liquid from the mafic sills. Anhedral hornblende cores, with olivine + clinopyroxene ± plagioclase ± apatite inclusions, crystallized at temperatures >900°C and pressures of ~300 to ~500 MPa. The corresponding rims and monzodiorite matrix crystallized at 950°C) from the middle crust reservoir to the emplacement level. We show that hornblende-plagioclase thermobarometry is a useful monitor for the determination of segregation conditions of granitic magmas from gabbroic crystal mushes, and for monitoring the evolution of shallow crustal magmatic crystallization, decompression and cooling.

  15. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2014, Series Information File for the Current Tribal Block Group National Shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — A tribal block group is a cluster of census tabulation blocks within a single tribal census tract delineated by American Indian tribal participants or the Census...

  16. Rates, indications, and outcomes of caesarean section deliveries: A comparison of tribal and non-tribal women in Gujarat, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Desai

    Full Text Available Even though the caesarean section is an essential component of comprehensive obstetric and newborn care for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, there is a lack of data regarding caesarean section rates, its determinants and health outcomes among tribal communities in India.The aim of this study is to estimate and compare rates, determinants, indications and outcomes of caesarean section. The article provides an assessment on how the inequitable utilization can be addressed in a community-based hospital in tribal areas of Gujarat, India.Prospectively collected data of deliveries (N = 19923 from April 2010 to March 2016 in Kasturba Maternity Hospital was used. The odds ratio of caesarean section was estimated for tribal and non-tribal women. Decomposition analysis was done to decompose the differences in the caesarean section rates between tribal and non-tribal women.The caesarean section rate was significantly lower among tribal compared to the non-tribal women (9.4% vs 15.6%, p-value < 0.01 respectively. The 60% of the differences in the rates of caesarean section between tribal and non-tribal women were unexplained. Within the explained variation, the previous caesarean accounted for 96% (p-value < 0.01 of the variation. Age of the mother, parity, previous caesarean and distance from the hospital were some of the important determinants of caesarean section rates. The most common indications of caesarean section were foetal distress (31.2%, previous caesarean section (23.9%, breech (16% and prolonged labour (11.2%. There was no difference in case fatality rate (1.3% vs 1.4%, p-value = 0.90 and incidence of birth asphyxia (0.3% vs 0.6%, p-value = 0.26 comparing the tribal and non-tribal women.Similar to the prior evidences, we found higher caesarean rates among non-tribal compare to tribal women. However, the adverse outcomes were similar between tribal and non-tribal women for caesarean section deliveries.

  17. Fortælleværksteder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøjer, Jo; Hutters, Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Unges valg af videregående uddannelse er omgærdet af forventninger. Forventninger til hvad man skal vælge. Forventninger til hvor lang tid, man skal være om at tage en uddannelse. Og forventninger til, hvad uddannelsen skal føre til. Artiklen præsenterer fortælleværkstedet, en metode til kollekti...... refleksioner over egne og adres forventninger til og tanker om uddannelsesvalg....

  18. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brey, H. L.

    1988-08-15

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs.

  19. Rail Outloading Capability Study, Fort Polk, Louisiana,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    regardless of experience, to avoid wasted man -hours. The main problem at Fort Polk is that no blocking and bracing material stockpile exists and no...ti1 hottul only thtrough the 0111crinost hole; to defect within 20 days after it is determined to -tuit Owt ttrtk in tuse. III thle caste of classes 3...wheels, slipping, or similar trak (meh causes. 1 -------------------- (12) " Shelly spots" means a condition 2 ------------------------ % where a thin

  20. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  2. FIND: Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.H.

    1976-07-01

    This index is presented for the microfiche material of Docket 50548 which concerns the application of Omaha Public Power District to build and operate Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 2. The information includes both application and review material dated from September 1975 through March 1976. There are five amendments to the PSAR and one supplement to the ER which have been incorporated by reference into the respective reports. Docket RESAR-3 is used as a reference for portions of the PSAR

  3. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  4. Tribal experiences and lessons learned in riparian ecosystem restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald K. Miller; James E. Enote; Cameron L. Martinez

    1996-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems have been part of the culture of land use of native peoples in the Southwest United States for thousands of years. The experiences of tribal riparian initiatives to incorporate modern elements of environment and development with cultural needs are relatively few. This paper describes tribal case examples and approaches in riparian management which...

  5. 76 FR 18457 - Regulatory Review Schedule; Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... that the NIGC provide tribal gaming commissions access to licensing information via an online database... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule; Tribal Consultation AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice of Regulatory...

  6. Collaborations for Building Tribal Resiliency to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamzai, A.; Taylor, A.; Winton, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sixty-eight tribes are located in the U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) region. The SCCSC made it a priority to include the tribes as partners from its inception and both the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma participate in the center's activities as consortium members. Under this arrangement, the SCCSC employs a full-time tribal liaison to facilitate relations with the tribes, develop partnerships for climate-relevant projects, build tribal stakeholder capacity, and organize tribal youth programs. In 2014, the SCCSC published its Tribal Engagement Strategy (USGS Circular 1396) to outline its approach for developing tribal relationships. The conceptual plan covers each step in the multi-year process from initial introductory meetings and outreach to demonstrate commitment and interest in working with tribal staff, building tribal capacity in climate related areas while also building researcher capacity in ethical research, and facilitating the co-production of climate-relevant research projects. As the tribes begin to develop their internal capacity and find novel ways to integrate their interests, the plan ultimately leads to tribes developing their own independent research projects and integrating climate science into their various vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans. This presentation will outline the multiple steps in the SCCSC's Tribal Engagement Strategy and provide examples of our ongoing work in support of each step.

  7. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  8. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION... comprehensive database containing the official insignia of all federally- and State- recognized Native American... to create this database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys...

  9. 25 CFR 23.21 - Noncompetitive tribal government grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noncompetitive tribal government grants. 23.21 Section 23... ACT Grants to Indian Tribes for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23.21 Noncompetitive tribal government grants. (a) Grant application information and technical assistance. Information...

  10. Training Tribal Lay Advocates at Sitting Bull College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Students in Sitting Bull College's lay advocate program develop a well-rounded understanding of the law, enabling them to represent defendants in tribal courts. The program offers legal training for its students--and illustrates how American Indian nations can broaden legal representation for Native defendants in tribal courts. It is one of only…

  11. Integrating Earth System Science Data Into Tribal College and University Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, P. J.; Perkey, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Universities Space Research Association and Sinte Gleska University (SGU) have teamed with eight Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) to participate in a NASA Earth Science funded project, TRibal Earth Science and Technology Education (TRESTE) project which focuses on TCU faculty teaching undergraduate Earth science courses to non-science and science students, with particular attention to TCU faculty teaching K-12 pre- and in- service teachers. The eight partner TCUs are: Blackfeet Community College (BCC), Browning, MT, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Cloquet, MN, Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, ND, Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago, NE, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge, SD, Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, ND, Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, ND, United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), Bismarck, ND. The goal of this 3-year project is to promote the use of NASA Earth science data and products in the classroom thereby enabling faculty to inspire undergraduate students to careers in Earth system science, the physical sciences, and related fields of science and engineering. To accomplish this goal we are targeting three areas: (1) course content - enhance the utilization of Earth system science and physical science concepts, (2) teaching methodology - develop problem-based learning (PBL) methods, and (3) tools and technology - increase the utilization of GIS and remote sensing in the classroom. We also have enlisted ESRI, NativeView and the USGS as collaborators. To date we have held an introductory "needs" workshop at the USGS EROS Data Center and two annual workshops, one at UTTC and the second at BCC. During these annual workshops we have divided our time among the three areas. We have modeled the workshops using the PBL or Case Study approach by starting with a story or current event. Topics for the annual workshops have been Drought and Forest and Grassland Fires. These topics led us into the solar radiation budget

  12. 78 FR 17087 - Special Local Regulation; New River Raft Race, New River; Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; New River Raft Race, New River; Fort Lauderdale, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard... on the New River in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft... States during the Rotary Club of Fort Lauderdale New River Raft Race. On March 23, 2013, Fort Lauderdale...

  13. The WIMS-E module W-FORTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, M.J.

    1983-09-01

    There are three distinct versions of the WIMS lattice cell program. WIMS-E is the most general, WIMSD4 is restricted to clusters or to one dimensional slab or annular geometry, and LWRWIMS is designed principally for light water reactor geometries. W-FORTE is used to transfer data from WIMSD4 or LWRWIMS to WIMS-E. A description of the W-FORTE module is given, and includes the relevant data for WIMSD4, LWRWIMS and W-FORTE. (UK)

  14. Turbulence and finestructure in a deep ocean channel with sill overflow on the mid-Atlantic ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippenhauer, Sandra; Dengler, Marcus; Fischer, Tim; Kanzow, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    Diapycnal mixing in the deep ocean is known to be much stronger in the vicinity of rough topography of mid-ocean ridges than above abyssal plains. In this study a horizontally profiling microstructure probe attached to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is used to infer the spatial distribution of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (ε) in the central valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first successful realization of a horizontal, deep-ocean microstructure survey. More than 22 h of horizontal, near-bottom microstructure data from the Lucky Strike segment (37°N) are presented. The study focuses on a channel with unidirectional sill overflow. Density was found to decrease along the channel following the mean northward flow of 3 to 8 cm/s. The magnitude of the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation was distributed asymmetrically relative to the position of the sill. Elevated dissipation rates were present in a segment 1-4 km downstream (north) of the sill with peak values of 1 ×10-7 W/kg. Large flow speeds and elevated density finestructure were observed within this segment. Lowered hydrographic measurements indicated unstable stratification in the same region. The data indicate that hydraulic control was established at least temporarily. Inside the channel at wavelengths between 1 m and 250 m the slopes of AUV-inferred horizontal temperature gradient spectra were found to be consistent with turbulence in the inertial-convective subrange. Integrated temperature gradient variance in this wavelength interval was consistent with an ε2/3 dependence. The results illustrate that deep-reaching AUVs are a useful tool to study deep ocean turbulence over complex terrain where free-falling and lowered turbulence measurements are inefficient and time-consuming.

  15. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Narayan Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi Taluk. Study participants were students of class eight, nine and ten. One school was randomly selected from the list of government schools in Brahmavar. The size of the sample was 76 which includes 38 from tribal category and 38 from general category and the sampling design was purposive sampling. Rosenberg’s scale was used to assess the self esteem of students. Questionnaires were self administered. Permission was taken from the principle of school. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results are reported as frequency and proportion. Independent t test was used to compare the self esteem of tribal and non tribal student. Study found that more than two third of the tribal student had low self esteem. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001 in self esteem between tribal and non tribal students.

  16. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Narayan Yadav

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi Taluk. Study participants were students of class eight, nine and ten. One school was randomly selected from the list of government schools in Brahmavar. The size of the sample was 76 which includes 38 from tribal category and 38 from general category and the sampling design was purposive sampling. Rosenberg’s scale was used to assess the self esteem of students. Questionnaires were self administered. Permission was taken from the principle of school. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results are reported as frequency and proportion. Independent t test was used to compare the self esteem of tribal and non tribal student. Study found that more than two third of the tribal student had low self esteem. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001 in self esteem between tribal and non tribal students.

  17. A Physical Model of Sill Expansion to Explain the Dynamics of Unrest at Calderas with Application to Campi Flegrei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Giudicepietro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many calderas show remarkable unrest, which often does not culminate in eruptions (non-eruptive unrest. In this context the interpretation of the geophysical data collected by the monitoring networks is difficult. When the unrest is eruptive, a vent opening process occurs, which leads to an eruption. In calderas, vent locations typically are scattered over a large area and monogenic cones form. The resulting pattern is characterized by a wide dispersion of eruptive vents, therefore, the location of the future vent is not easily predictable. We propose an interpretation of the deformation associated to unrest and vent pattern commonly observed at calderas, based on a physical model that simulates the intrusion and the expansion of a sill. The model can explain both the uplift and any subsequent subsidence through a single process. Considering that the stress mainly controls the vent opening process, we try to gain insight on the vent opening in calderas through the study of the stress field produced by the intrusion of an expanding sill. We find that the tensile stress in the rock above the sill is concentrated at the sill edge in a ring-shaped area with radius depending on the physical properties of magma and rock, the feeding rate and the magma cooling rate. This stress field is consistent with widely dispersed eruptive vents and monogenic cone formation, which are often observed in the calderas. However, considering the mechanical properties of the elastic plate and the rheology of magma, we show that remarkable deformations may be associated with low values of stress in the rock at the top of the intrusion, thereby resulting in non-eruptive unrest. Moreover, we have found that, under the assumption of isothermal conditions, the stress values decrease over time during the intrusion process. This result may explain why the long-term unrest, in general, do not culminate in an eruption. The proposed approach concerns a general process and is

  18. 25 CFR 18.101 - May a tribe create and adopt its own tribal probate code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribe create and adopt its own tribal probate code... PROBATE CODES Approval of Tribal Probate Codes § 18.101 May a tribe create and adopt its own tribal probate code? Yes. A tribe may create and adopt a tribal probate code. ...

  19. Independent origins of Indian caste and tribal paternal lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaux, Richard; Aunger, Robert; Bentley, Gillian; Nasidze, Ivane; Sirajuddin, S M; Stoneking, Mark

    2004-02-03

    The origins of the nearly one billion people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent and following the customs of the Hindu caste system are controversial: are they largely derived from Indian local populations (i.e. tribal groups) or from recent immigrants to India? Archaeological and linguistic evidence support the latter hypothesis, whereas recent genetic data seem to favor the former hypothesis. Here, we analyze the most extensive dataset of Indian caste and tribal Y chromosomes to date. We find that caste and tribal groups differ significantly in their haplogroup frequency distributions; caste groups are homogeneous for Y chromosome variation and more closely related to each other and to central Asian groups than to Indian tribal or any other Eurasian groups. We conclude that paternal lineages of Indian caste groups are primarily descended from Indo-European speakers who migrated from central Asia approximately 3,500 years ago. Conversely, paternal lineages of tribal groups are predominantly derived from the original Indian gene pool. We also provide evidence for bidirectional male gene flow between caste and tribal groups. In comparison, caste and tribal groups are homogeneous with respect to mitochondrial DNA variation, which may reflect the sociocultural characteristics of the Indian caste society.

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  1. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  2. Status of the Fort St. Vrain decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain is a high temperature gas cooled reactor. It has been shut down as a result of financial and technical difficulties. Fort St. Vrain has been planning for defueling and decommissioning for at least three years. The preliminary decommissioning plan, in accordance with the NRC's final rule, has been submitted and is being reviewed by the NRC. The basis of the preliminary decommissioning plan has been SAFSTOR. Public Service Company, who is the owner and operator of FSV, is scheduled to submit a proposed decommissioning plan to the NRC in the fourth quarter of 1990. PSC has gone out for bid on the decontamination and dismantlement of FSV. This paper includes the defueling schedule, the independent spent fuel storage installation status, the probability of shipping fuel to DOE, the status of the preliminary decommissioning plan submittal, the issuance of a possession only license and what are the results of obtaining this license amendment, preliminary decommissioning activities allowed prior to the approval of a proposed decommissioning plan, the preparation of a proposed decommissioning plan and the status of our decision to proceed with SAFSTOR or DECON as identified in the NRC's final decommissioning rule

  3. Fort Mason Center: Pier 2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nester, Patrick [Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-08-30

    The rooftop Photovoltaic (PV) panels and radiant piping project was constructed by Fort Mason Center as part of its $21 million comprehensive rehabilitation of the Pier 2 shed which include the shed’s electrical, natural gas and water systems. Fort Mason Center improved performance while reducing energy and water usage and costs to demonstrate the efficiencies and opportunities available to large multi-function facilities. The scalable demand of these facilities required a layered approach to conservation, control and production. The project employed a comprehensive retrofit of electrical natural gas, and plumbing systems to maximize efficiency and lower carbon footprint specifically to demonstrate the effectiveness of these strategies in a public setting with varied and diverse use. The project was completed in July 2014 and met the expected outcomes regarding increased comfort and operational efficiency throughout the Pier 2 shed as well as on site electrical generation of current consumption. The entire Pier 2 shed project won a 2015 California Preservation Foundation design award for historic rehabilitation.

  4. 76 FR 68625 - Establishment of the Fort Monroe National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... period of slavery in the colonies and, later, this Nation. Two hundred and forty-two years later, Fort... 1863. Thus, Old Point Comfort marks both the beginning and end of slavery in our Nation. The Fort... North Beach area lies the only undeveloped shoreline remaining on Old Point Comfort, providing modern...

  5. Microgrid Enabled Distributed Energy Solutions (MEDES) Fort Bliss Military Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FINAL REPORT Microgrid Enabled Distributed Energy Solutions (MEDES) Fort Bliss Military Reservation ESTCP Project EW-201140 FEBRUARY...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microgrid Enabled Distributed Energy Solutions (MEDES) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-11-C-0082 Fort Bliss, Texas...Lockheed Martin’s Intelligent Microgrid Solution can provide more energy security while also lowering electric utility costs and greenhouse gas emissions

  6. Fort Valley's early scientists: A legacy of distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Susan D. Olberding

    2008-01-01

    When the Riordan brothers of Flagstaff, Arizona, asked Gifford Pinchot to determine why there was a deficit in ponderosa pine seedlings, neither party understood the historical significance of what they were setting in motion for the field of forest research. The direct result of that professional favor was the establishment of the Fort Valley Experiment Station (Fort...

  7. Fort Valley's early scientists: A legacy of distinction (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Susan D. Olberding

    2008-01-01

    When the Riordan brothers of Flagstaff, Arizona asked Gifford Pinchot to determine why there was a deficit in ponderosa pine seedlings, neither party understood the historical significance of what they were setting in motion for the field of forest research. The direct result of that professional favor was the establishment of the Fort Valley Experiment Station (Fort...

  8. Caracterização magnetométrica de Sill de diabásio na região de Limeira - SP

    OpenAIRE

    Seixas, Adriano da Rosa [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    The magnetometry is an important tool in geological mapping, especially in studies of basic rocks in the context of sedimentary basin. There are few geophysical works directly related to Sills, therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the geological subsurface structure of the Sill diabase in the Paraná Magmatic Province exposed beneath sandstones in the Itararé group, located near the city of Limeira, in the east-central region of São Paulo state. In this study, we present map...

  9. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  10. The Fort Smith radioactive belt, Northwest Territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Fort Smith Belt is an elongate zone, about 200 km x 50 km, extending from the East Arm of Great Slave Lake southerly into northeastern Alberta. The major feature of the belt is that it is one of the most radioactive regions so far recognized in the Canadian Shield. Potassium, uranium, and thorium are all enriched but the greatest increase is in thorium. The dominant rock type underlying the area is a foliated porphyritic granite. This rock contains an average of about 80 ppm thorium (with areas of tens of square kilometres containing up to 200 ppm) and approximately 11 ppm uranium. In places, dark elongate zones rich in biotite, apatite, and opaque minerals within the porphyritic granite may contain an order of magnitude more uranium and thorium than the porphyry. Radioactive minerals within both the porphyry and the dark zones are principally monazite (containing up to 16% ThO 2 ) and isolated grains of uraninite. This foliated porphyritic granite is interpreted as being pre- or syntectonic with respect to the Hudsonian event because its foliation parallels that of the surrounding rocks. There has been subsequent deformation. The second characteristic feature of the Fort Smith Belt is the development of a peripheral zone where eU is enriched relative to eTh correlating mainly with granitoid rocks which surround the thorium-rich area and wherein ratios of eU/eTh exceed 1:2 (compared to the crustal average of 1:4). Uranium may have moved laterally into this marginal area from the thorium-rich porphyry, possibly in a vapour phase. There is a possibility that concentrations of uranium as well as other metals such as Cu, Mo, Zn, Sn, and W could exist in the porphyry and its margin in appropriate chemical and/or structural traps. The radioactive granite rocks of the Fort Smith Belt are adjacent to uranium-thorium occurrences in the nearby Proterozoic Nonacho sediments but whether or not a genetic relationship exists between the two situations is uncertain. (auth)

  11. Political Role of Tribes : Analysis of Tribalism, Islamism and Gender ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Political Role of Tribes : Analysis of Tribalism, Islamism and Gender in Iraq, Jordan ... When countries such as Jordan and Yemen adopted political pluralism, the ... Sign up now for IDRC news and views sent directly to your inbox each month.

  12. Tribal Alliances: Ways, Means, and Ends to Successful Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    .... Recognition of the potential value of tribal organizations, particularly in the "arc of instability stretching from the Western Hemisphere, through Africa and the Middle East and extending to Asia...

  13. State, Local and Tribal Resources for Creating Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page will be a combination of three current pages on resources - ‘Resources for Healthier Schools’, ‘Schools: Student Curricula for Healthier School’ and ‘Schools: Regional, Tribal, State and Local Resources for Healthier Schools’ pages

  14. Gynecologic Malignancies Post-LeFort Colpocleisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Elkattah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. LeFort colpocleisis (LFC is a safe and effective obliterative surgical option for older women with advanced pelvic organ prolapse who no longer desire coital activity. A major disadvantage is the limited ability to evaluate for post-LFC gynecologic malignancies. Methods. We present the first case of endometrioid ovarian cancer diagnosed after LFC and review all reported gynecologic malignancies post-LFC in the English medical literature. Results. This is the second reported ovarian cancer post-LFC and the first of the endometrioid subtype. A total of nine other gynecologic malignancies post-LFC have been reported in the English medical literature. Conclusions. Gynecologic malignancies post-LFC are rare. We propose a simple 3-step strategy in evaluating post-LFC malignancies.

  15. Master environmental plan for Fort Devens, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biang, C.A.; Peters, R.W.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

    1991-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a master environmental plan (MEP) for Fort Devens, Massachusetts, for the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. The MEP is an assessment based on environmental laws and regulations of both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MEP assess the physical and environmental status of 58 potential hazardous waste sites, including 54 study areas (SAs) that pose a potential for releasing contamination into the environment and 4 areas of concern (AOCs) that are known to have substantial contamination. For each SA or AOC, this MEP describes the known history and environment, identifies additional data needs, and proposes possible response actions. Most recommended response actions consist of environmental sampling and monitoring and other characterization studies. 74 refs., 63 figs., 50 tabs.

  16. Fort St. Vrain defueling ampersand decommissioning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warembourg, D.

    1994-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station (FSV) is one of the first commercial reactors to be decommissioned under NRC's decommissioning rule. The defueling and decommissioning of this 330 MWe High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) has involved many challenges for Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC) including defueling to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI), establishing decommissioning funding, obtaining regulatory approvals, arranging for waste disposal, and managing a large fixed price decommissioning contract. In 1990, a team comprised of the Westinghouse Corporation and Morrison Knudsen Corporation, with the Scientific Ecology Group as a major subcontractor, was contracted by PSC to perform the decommissioning under a fixed price contract. Physical work activities began in August 1992. Currently, physical dismantlement activities are about 45% complete, the project is on schedule, and is within budget

  17. Reflector dowel strength test, Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    The strength of the 44.45 mm (1.75 in.) diameter Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reflector dowel for loads directed radially inward toward the center of the element was measured. For a statically applied load, the strength exceeded 5783 N (1300 lb) in direct shear. This strength remained after load cycling 100 times to 4448 N (1000 lb), 10 times to 4893 N (1100 lb), 10 times to 5338 N (1200 lb), and two times to 5783 N (1300 lb). Typically, the deflection to ultimate failure was approximately 1.0 mm (0.04 in.). At about 3316 N (750 lb) and 0.20 mm (0.008 in.) deflection, one of the webs between the dowel and a coolant hole cracked, apparently redistributing the load. No further failure occurred up to the ultimate load of 5783+ N (1300+ lb)

  18. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jim; Melcher, C.; Bowen, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Complex natural resource issues require understanding a web of interactions among ecosystem components that are (1) interdisciplinary, encompassing physical, chemical, and biological processes; (2) spatially complex, involving movements of animals, water, and airborne materials across a range of landscapes and jurisdictions; and (3) temporally complex, occurring over days, weeks, or years, sometimes involving response lags to alteration or exhibiting large natural variation. Scientists in the Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, investigate a diversity of these complex natural resource questions at the landscape and systems levels. This Fact Sheet describes the work of the Ecosystems Dynamics Branch, which is focused on energy and land use, climate change and long-term integrated assessments, herbivore-ecosystem interactions, fire and post-fire restoration, and environmental flows and river restoration.

  19. Operational testing highlights of Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, J.J.; McEachern, D.W.; Read, J.W.; Simon, W.A.; Walker, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain program has progressed through construction, preoperational testing, fuel loading, initial criticality, and operational testing at power levels up to 2 percent related power. To date, all tests necessary before the rise to full power have been completed, and the rise-to-power program is expected to be resumed again in late 1975. Major plant systems, including the prestressed concrete reactor vessel and circulators, have demonstrated adequate performance. Extensive tests on the reactor core at zero power and up to 2 percent power have demonstrated the accuracy in the design predictions of such core characteristics as critical rod position, control system worths, neutron flux distributions, and temperature coefficients. Gaseous fission product release measurements to date have confirmed the extensive analytical estimates. 6 references

  20. DOE's Tribal Energy Program Offers Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. MacCourt, Chair, Indian Law Practice, Ater Wynne LLP

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or who seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. Building upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in tribal energy workshops conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, it is designed to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process. It includes information on how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; a general overview of key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and a detailed discussion of ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects. The guide also includes a glossary of some of the most commonly used technical terms.

  1. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramblett, G.C.; Fisher, C.R.; Swart, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection. Later in the year, a scheduled shutdown was undertaken for surveillance tests, insertion of core region constraint devices (RCDs), and other maintenance. Fort St. Vrain has encountered problems of the type that would be expected in a first-of-a-kind system. The plant is currently restricted to 70% of design power by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pending resolution of the core region gas outlet temperature fluctuation problem. Even so, the basic performance of the HTGR concept and all of the unique design features have been successfully demonstrated. The system has been characterized by low personnel radiation exposures, operational flexibility, and long time afforded for status evaluation and response. (author)

  2. Morphological and Dimensional Characteristics of Dental Arch among Tribal and Non-tribal Population of Central India: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Naveen S; Saxena, Vrinda; Vyas, Rajesh; Sharma, Rohit; Sharva, Vijayta; Dwivedi, Ashish; Jain, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Background: Differences in the dental arch among Bhil Aboriginals were investigated and compared with non-tribal individuals residing in a tribal zone of Central India. Plaster models (120) were made with the help of alginate impression of tribal adults as well as non-tribal adults residing in the same area. The supposition as aboriginals being primitive due to dietary practices maxillary arch size and mandibular arch size is distended in comparison to the non-tribal population as adaptation of soft refined diet has disrupted the growth of the jaws. Hence, an attempt was made to evaluate the arch widths of tribal population and to associate it with non-tribe population in the same area of Central India. Materials and Methods: Difference in morphology and dimension of the maxillary and mandibular arches was aimed at Bhil tribes as well as non-tribal residents of tribe rich zone of Central India. The study was steered amid 120 individuals both tribal and non-tribe equally around 60 each through a well-organized out-reach program intermittently. Study models were made of dental arches of all participants. All measurements of the arch dimension were patent on the study casts using an electronic digital sliding caliper. Pair t-test was applied by using SPSS software version-19.0. Results: In the maxillary arch, on appraisal the non-tribal and Bhil tribe’s subjects, it showed a statistically significant difference in inter-incisor width (2.95 mm), inter-canine width (2.60 mm), arch depth (3.25 mm). While inter premolar width (0.20 mm) and inter molar width (0.80 mm) anterior arch length (0.60 mm), and posterior arch length (0.10 mm) showed statistically not significant difference between non-tribal population and Bhil tribe subjects. In the mandibular arch, it showed a statistically significant difference in inter-canine width (1.00 mm). Although, inter-incisor width (0.72 mm), inter-molar width (0.80 mm), arch depth (0.90 mm), anterior arch length (0.30 mm), posterior

  3. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2004-05-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Combined fish stocking by the hatcheries and net pen rearing projects in 2003 included: 899,168 kokanee yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt; 1,087,331 kokanee fry/fingerlings released into Banks Lake, 44,000 rainbow trout fingerlings and; 580,880 rainbow trout yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt. Stock composition of 2003 releases consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2003 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to

  4. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    OpenAIRE

    Uday Narayan Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi ...

  5. New physical examination tests for lumbar spondylolisthesis and instability: low midline sill sign and interspinous gap change during lumbar flexion-extension motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kang; Jhun, Hyung-Joon

    2015-04-22

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis (LS) and lumbar instability (LI) are common disorders in patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. However, few physical examination tests for LS and LI have been reported. In the study described herein, new physical examination tests for LS and LI were devised and evaluated for their validity. The test for LS was designated "low midline sill sign", and that for LI was designated "interspinous gap change" during lumbar flexion-extension motion. The validity of the low midline sill sign was evaluated in 96 patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. Validity of the interspinous gap change during lumbar flexion-extension motion was evaluated in 73 patients with low back or lumbar radicular pain. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the two tests were also investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the low midline sill sign for LS were 81.3% and 89.1%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of the test were 78.8% and 90.5%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the interspinous gap change test for LI were 82.2% and 60.7%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values of the test were 77.1% and 68.0%, respectively. The low midline sill sign and interspinous gap change tests are effective for the detection of LS and LI, and can be performed easily in an outpatient setting.

  6. Geometry and controls on the development of igneous sill-related forced folds: 2D seismic reflection case study from offshore Southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher; Schofield, Nick; Magee, Craig; Golenkov, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    Emplacement of magma in the shallow subsurface can result in the development of dome-shaped folds at the Earth's surface. These so-called 'forced folds' have been described in the field and in subsurface datasets, although the exact geometry of the folds and the nature of their relationship to underlying sills remains unclear and, in some cases, controversial. As a result, the utility of these features in tracking the subsurface movement of magma, and predicting the potential size and location of potentially hazardous volcanic eruptions, is uncertain. Here we use high-quality, 2D seismic reflection and borehole data from the Ceduna sub-basin, offshore southern Australia to describe the structure and infer the evolution of igneous sill-related forced folds in the Bight Basin Igneous Complex (BBIC). We mapped 33 igneous sills, which were emplaced 200-1500 m below the palaeo-seabed in an Upper Cretaceous, coal-bearing, predominantly coastal-plain succession. The intrusions, which are expressed as packages of high-amplitude reflections, are 32-250 m thick and 7-19 km in diameter. They are overlain by dome-shaped folds, which are up to 17 km wide and display up to 210 m of relief. The edges of these folds coincide with the margins of the underlying sills and the folds display the greatest relief where the underlying sills are thickest; the folds are therefore interpreted as forced folds that formed in response to emplacement of magma in the shallow subsurface. The folds are onlapped by Lutetian (middle Eocene) strata, indicating they formed and the intrusions were emplaced during the latest Ypresian (c. 48 Ma). We demonstrate that fold amplitude is typically less than sill thickness even for sills with very large diameter-to-depth ratios, suggesting that pure elastic bending (forced folding) of the overburden is not the only process accommodating magma emplacement, and that supra-sill compaction may be important even at relatively shallow depths. Based on the

  7. Structural remains at the early mediaeval fort at Raibania, Orissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratati Sen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fortifications of mediaeval India occupy an eminent position in the history of military architecture. The present paper deals with the preliminary study of the structural remains at the early mediaeval fort at Raibania in the district of Balasore in Orissa. The fort was built of stone very loosely kept together. The three-walled fortification interspersed by two consecutive moats, a feature evidenced at Raibania, which is unparallel in the history of ancient and mediaeval forts and fortifications in India. Several other structures like the Jay-Chandi Temple Complex, a huge well, numerous tanks and remains of an ancient bridge add to the uniqueness of the Fort in the entire eastern region.

  8. Fortælling og fortolkning i Jyske Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Charlotte

    Afhandlingen præsenterer en undersøgelse af et konkret eksempel på storytelling brugt som strategisk ledelses- og kommunikationsredskab i en organisations interne kommunikation. Eksemplet er fortællingen "Slaget ved Vejle", som stammer fra Jyske Bank og udgør under afhandlingens case. De overordn......Afhandlingen præsenterer en undersøgelse af et konkret eksempel på storytelling brugt som strategisk ledelses- og kommunikationsredskab i en organisations interne kommunikation. Eksemplet er fortællingen "Slaget ved Vejle", som stammer fra Jyske Bank og udgør under afhandlingens case. De......, at medarbejderne forholder sig reflekteret, nuanceret og kritisk til den strategiske fortælling, og at der er stor diversitet i deres oplevelser, fortolkninger og vurderinger af fortællingen. Desuden ser afhandlingen nærmere på hvad begrebet "storytelling" dækker over, og hvordan der hidtil er forsket i...

  9. Strategic Analysis and Plan for Implementing Telemedicine at Fort Greely

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolton, Karl

    2003-01-01

    .... To best accomplish this, a strategic analysis and business case analysis was conducted. Introspective strategic analysis tools revealed an organization that is capable of supporting a telemedicine program at Fort Greely...

  10. RadNet Air Data From Fort Smith, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Fort Smith, AR from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  11. Wood-Fired Boiler System Evaluation at Fort Stewart, GA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Potts, Noel

    2002-01-01

    Part of the plan to modernize the central energy plant (CEP) at Fort Stewart, GA is focused on the installations wood-fired boiler, which provides steam for heating, cooling, and domestic hot water. The U.S...

  12. Le Fort I Maxillary Advancement Using Distraction Osteogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Combs, Patrick D.; Harshbarger, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of maxillary hypoplasia has traditionally involved conventional Le Fort I osteotomies and advancement. Advancements of greater than 10 mm risk significant relapse. This risk is greater in the cleft lip and palate population, whose anatomy and soft tissue scarring from prior procedures contributes to instability of conventional maxillary advancement. Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis has emerged as viable, stable treatment modality correction of severe maxillary hyp...

  13. Structural remains at the early mediaeval fort at Raibania, Orissa

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Bratati

    2013-01-01

    The fortifications of mediaeval India occupy an eminent position in the history of military architecture. The present paper deals with the preliminary study of the structural remains at the early mediaeval fort at Raibania in the district of Balasore in Orissa. The fort was built of stone very loosely kept together. The three-walled fortification interspersed by two consecutive moats, a feature evidenced at Raibania, w...

  14. Undervisning mellem fortælling og feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten Margrethe

    2016-01-01

    Feedback gør det muligt for den enkelte at forstå, hvordan jeg kan blive bedre til det, jeg er ved at lære. Fortællinger gør det muligt for den enkelte at udvide horisonten og derved komme til en forståelse af, hvilke mulige perspektiver der er for at forholde sig til den verden, som fortællingen...

  15. BRAND EQUITY OF LAHORE FORT AS A TOURISM DESTINATION BRAND

    OpenAIRE

    KASHIF, MUHAMMAD; SAMSI, SITI ZAKIAH MELATU; SARIFUDDIN, SYAMSULANG

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTStudies that measure the brand equity of destination brands by using the Customer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE) model in a developing country context are scarce. The present study investigates the destination brand equity of the Lahore Fort by employing the CBBE model in a developing country context of Pakistan. Following the positivist tradition, we adopted a survey-based approach to collect data from 237 tourists visiting the Lahore Fort. Data were collected through a questionnaire deve...

  16. FOUR YEARS OF OPERATIONS AND RESULTS WITH FORTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. ROUSSEL-DUPRE; P. KLINGNER; L. CARLSON; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems

  17. Cancer incidence in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta : 1995-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Alberta Cancer Board, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Division of Population Health and Information Surveillance

    2009-02-15

    A high number of cases of cholangiocarcinoma, a rare form of bile duct cancer, as well as high rates of other cancers were reported by a physician working in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta in 2006. Concerns were raised by local residents, attributing cancers in their community to environmental contamination from a range of industrial development including the oil sands development, uranium mining and pulp mills. However, an initial review of the Alberta Cancer Registry did not confirm an increased incidence of cancer in Fort Chipewyan. In the summer/fall of 2007, a working group was formed to support the Alberta Cancer Board in doing a cluster investigation based on the guidelines of the United States Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. This report presented an investigation to determine if there was an elevated rate of cholangiocarcinoma in Fort Chipewyan and whether there was an elevated rate of cancers overall in Fort Chipewyan. The report provided background information on the Athabasca oil sands, uranium mining, and Fort Chipewyan as well as previous investigations of cancer incidence in Fort Chipewyan. Study methods were also presented with particular reference to study and comparison populations; cancer classification and inclusion criteria; active case ascertainment and verification; methods of analysis; and ethical approval. Results were also presented. The specific cancers that were discussed were cholangiocarcinoma, leukemia, colon cancer, and cancer in First Nations in Alberta. It was concluded that the observed number of cases of cholangiocarcinoma was within the expected range. 121 refs., 12 tabs., 3 figs., 5 appendices.

  18. Fort Collins Science Center fiscal year 2010 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2011-01-01

    The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), apply their diverse ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigate complicated ecological problems confronting managers of the Nation's biological resources. FORT works closely with U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agency scientists, the academic community, other USGS science centers, and many other partners to provide critical information needed to help answer complex natural-resource management questions. In Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), FORT's scientific and technical professionals conducted ongoing, expanded, and new research vital to the science needs and management goals of DOI, other Federal and State agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in the areas of aquatic systems and fisheries, climate change, data and information integration and management, invasive species, science support, security and technology, status and trends of biological resources (including the socioeconomic aspects), terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, and wildlife resources, including threatened and endangered species. This report presents selected FORT science accomplishments for FY10 by the specific USGS mission area or science program with which each task is most closely associated, though there is considerable overlap. The report also includes all FORT publications and other products published in FY10, as well as staff accomplishments, appointments, committee assignments, and invited presentations.

  19. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colah, Roshan B; Mukherjee, Malay B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with β-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of α-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Orissa and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease.

  20. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramblett, G. C.; Fisher, C. R.; Swart, F. E. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)

    1981-01-15

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection.

  1. Miniplate fixation of Le Fort I osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H M

    1986-12-01

    The use of rigid, internal, three-dimensional fixation using vitallium bone plates in 28 consecutive Le Fort I osteotomies is presented. A minimum follow-up period of 6 months was required for inclusion in this patient group. Maxillary movements included advancements (17), intrusions (9), lengthenings (5), and retrusions (2). The majority of maxillae were moved in more than one plane of space. Technical details, complications, and relapse potential are discussed. Advantages of rigid plate fixation include marked reductions in the length of intermaxillary fixation with light training elastics only. Immediate postoperative airway problems are thereby eliminated. Six months of follow-up would appear to indicate a low potential for osseous relapse when compared to wire osteosynthesis, regardless of the direction of maxillary movement. The major disadvantage is the decreased ability of postoperative orthodontics to move dento-osseous segments if skeletal occlusal disharmony persists postoperatively. For this reason, close attention to preoperative planning and operative technique is critical for the success of this fixation method.

  2. Fort St. Vrain hot functional test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.D.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of Fort St. Vrain hot functional tests performed to evaluate the initial nonnuclear performance of the primary coolant system and the associated effects on the various internal components of the reactor vessel and primary coolant system. The components included the twelve steam generator modules, the four helium circulators, the PCRV thermal barrier and liner coolant system, the helium purification system, and the primary and secondary closures at each of the PCRV penetrations. Additional objectives included analysis of the parallel operation of the four helium circulators and the performance of several circulator start/stop transients under various conditions of primary coolant temperature and pressure. Vibration and acoustical phenomena within the vessel were measured, recorded, and compared to theoretical analyses; a verification of reverse flow in the shutdown loop steam generator during one loop operation was performed; the PCRV was again observed for its structural response to internal pressure; and comparisons were made relative to data recorded during the initial pressure test completed in July 1971. (U.S.)

  3. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and

  4. Lunar floor-fractured craters: Modes of dike and sill emplacement and implications of gas production and intrusion cooling on surface morphology and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W.

    2018-05-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters (FFCs) represent the surface manifestation of a class of shallow crustal intrusions in which magma-filled cracks (dikes) rising to the surface from great depth encounter contrasts in host rock lithology (breccia lens, rigid solidified melt sheet) and intrude laterally to form a sill, laccolith or bysmalith, thereby uplifting and deforming the crater floor. Recent developments in the knowledge of lunar crustal thickness and density structure have enabled important revisions to models of the generation, ascent and eruption of magma, and new knowledge about the presence and behavior of magmatic volatiles has provided additional perspectives on shallow intrusion processes in FFCs. We use these new data to assess the processes that occur during dike and sill emplacement with particular emphasis on tracking the fate and migration of volatiles and their relation to candidate venting processes. FFCs result when dikes are capable of intruding close to the surface, but fail to erupt because of the substructure of their host impact craters, and instead intrude laterally after encountering a boundary where an increase in ductility (base of breccia lens) or rigidity (base of solidified melt sheet) occurs. Magma in dikes approaching the lunar surface experiences increasingly lower overburden pressures: this enhances CO gas formation and brings the magma into the realm of the low pressure release of H2O and sulfur compounds, both factors adding volatiles to those already collected in the rising low-pressure part of the dike tip. High magma rise velocity is driven by the positive buoyancy of the magma in the part of the dike remaining in the mantle. The dike tip overshoots the interface and the consequent excess pressure at the interface drives the horizontal flow of magma to form the intrusion and raise the crater floor. If sill intrusion were controlled by the physical properties at the base of the melt sheet, dikes would be required to approach to

  5. 77 FR 14465 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian... in funding provided by the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit... establishing the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program or TTP). This...

  6. 76 FR 27859 - 8(a) Business Development Program Regulation Changes; Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... the same tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC will submit identical data describing the benefits provided by the tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC. II. Tribal Consultation Meetings The purpose of these tribal consultation...

  7. 75 FR 80082 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of Establishment of... that the establishment of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee is...

  8. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs): Research, Collaborations, and Other Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribal Science Webinar Series provides a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities, and features a wide variety of expert guest speakers from government,.....

  9. Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Interagency Coordination and Collaboration for the Protection of Tribal Treaty Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) affirming protection of tribal treaty rights and similar tribal rights relating to natural resources when federal action is taken. It will be updated as additional federal agencies become signatories.

  10. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  11. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  12. Microbial Fuel Cell Possibilities on American Indian Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Kimberlynn [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief background of tribal reservations, the process of how Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) work, and the potential benefits of using MFCs on tribal reservations to convert waste water to energy as a means to sustainably generate electricity. There have been no known studies conducted on tribal lands that would be able to add to the estimated percentage of all renewable energy resources identified. Not only does MFC technology provide a compelling, innovative solution, it could also address better management of wastewater, using it as a form of energy generation. Using wastewater for clean energy generation could provide a viable addition to community infrastructure systems improvements.

  13. Historical review: Does falciparum malaria destroy isolated tribal populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G Dennis

    Many isolated populations of tribal peoples were nearly destroyed when they first contacted infectious diseases particularly respiratory pathogens such as measles and smallpox. Surviving groups have often been found to have declining populations in the face of multiple social and infectious threats. Malaria, especially Plasmodium falciparum, was thought to be a major cause of depopulation in some tribal peoples isolated in tropical jungles. The dynamics of such host parasite interactions is unclear especially since most such populations would have had long histories of exposure to malaria. Three groups are individually reviewed: Meruts of Borneo, Yanomami of Amazonia, Jarawas of the Andaman Islands. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of falciparum malaria in the depopulation of some isolated tribal groups in order to understand what measures, if any, would be likely to prevent such losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Kim [EPA Specialist

    2013-09-17

    In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

  15. 75 FR 41922 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport, Fort Smith, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... rule and invites public comment on the release of land at Fort Smith Regional Airport under the.... John Parker, Airport Director, Fort Smith Regional Airport, at the following address: Fort Smith...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities are...

  17. 42 CFR 137.15 - Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? 137... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.15 Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? Those...

  18. Tribal wilderness research needs and issues in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan McDonald; Tom McDonald; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents a dialogue between tribal wilderness managers and researchers on the primary research needs of tribal wilderness in the United States and Canada. The authors identify a number of research priorities for tribal wildlands. The paper also discusses some major issues and challenges faced by researchers conducting research in areas that are culturally...

  19. 25 CFR 170.148 - What is a tribal transit program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a tribal transit program? 170.148 Section 170.148... PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Transit Facilities § 170.148 What is a tribal transit program? A tribal transit program is the planning, administration, acquisition, and...

  20. In the Service of Others: How Volunteering Is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talahongva, Patty

    2016-01-01

    Today, the spirit of volunteering is very much alive at every tribal college and university (TCU). From fundraisers for food pantries to educational activities that help fellow students, TCUs help forge reciprocity among students and staff. Volunteerism is integral to the tribal college experience. Volunteerism at three tribal colleges--Cankdeska…

  1. 23 CFR 661.55 - How are BIA and Tribal owned IRR bridges inspected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are BIA and Tribal owned IRR bridges inspected? 661... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.55 How are BIA and Tribal owned IRR bridges inspected? BIA and Tribally owned IRR bridges are inspected in accordance with 25 CFR part...

  2. 43 CFR 30.268 - May I demand a hearing regarding the tribal purchase option decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tribal purchase option decision? 30.268 Section 30.268 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INDIAN PROBATE HEARINGS PROCEDURES Tribal Purchase of Interests Under Special Statutes § 30.268 May I demand a hearing regarding the tribal purchase option decision? Yes. You may file with...

  3. 25 CFR 115.807 - Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Tribal Trust Funds § 115.807 Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds? Upon... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds? 115.807 Section 115.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  4. 76 FR 80971 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ..., Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... made for the committee meeting of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory..., Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. DATES: The meeting will be held on January 18, 2012, 10 a.m...

  5. 77 FR 41204 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ..., Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight..., announcement is made for the committee meeting of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory..., Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. DATES: The meeting will be held on July 25, 2012, 10:00 a.m...

  6. 77 FR 76076 - Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... made for the committee meeting of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory..., Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. DATES: The meeting will be held on January 30, 2013, 10:00 a...

  7. 78 FR 75376 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ...] State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives... (NARA) announces a meeting of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee... Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. The meeting will be open to the...

  8. 75 FR 80082 - State, Local, Tribal, And Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ..., Tribal, And Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight... State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC). The SLTPS-PAC will..., Tribal, and Private Sector Entities, as specified in Executive Order 13549 and its implementing directive...

  9. 76 FR 38655 - Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... consultation is integral to a deliberative process that results in effective collaboration and informed..., November 6, 2000, and the Presidential Memorandum of November 5, 2009 and September 23, 2004, Consultation... Tribal Consultation Session: Name: Tribal Advisory Committee (TAC) Meeting and 7th Biannual Tribal...

  10. 25 CFR 170.917 - Can tribes receive direct payment of tribal employment taxes or fees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preference § 170.917 Can tribes receive direct payment of tribal employment taxes or fees? This section... payment schedule. Tribes may consider requesting direct payment of tribal employment taxes or fees from... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can tribes receive direct payment of tribal employment...

  11. Native Geosciences: Strengthening the Future Through Tribal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.; Quigley, I.; Douville, V.; Hollow Horn Bear, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways in our natural sacred homelands and environments. Tribal cultures are the expression of deep understandings of geosciences shared through oral histories, language and ceremonies. Today, Native people as all people are living in a definite time of change. The developing awareness of "change" brings forth an immense opportunity to expand and elevate Native geosciences knowledge, specifically in the areas of earth, wind, fire and water. At the center of "change" is the need to balance the needs of the people with the needs of the environment. Native tradition and our inherent understanding of what is "sacred above is sacred below" is the foundation for an emerging multi-faceted approach to increasing the representation of Natives in geosciences. The approach is also a pathway to assist in Tribal language revitalization, connection of oral histories and ceremonies as well as building an intergenerational teaching/learning community. Humboldt State University, Sinte Gleska University and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in partnership with Northern California (Hoopa, Yurok, & Karuk) and Great Plains (Lakota) Tribes have nurtured Native geosciences learning communities connected to Tribal Sacred Sites and natural resources. These sites include the Black Hills (Mato Paha, Mato Tiplia, Hinhan Kaga Paha, Mako Sica etc.), Klamath River (Ishkêesh), and Hoopa Valley (Natinixwe). Native geosciences learning is centered on the themes of earth, wind, fire and water and Native application of remote sensing technologies. Tribal Elders and Native geoscientists work collaboratively providing Native families in-field experiential intergenerational learning opportunities which invite participants to immerse themselves spiritually, intellectually, physically and emotionally in the experiences. Through this immersion and experience Native students and families strengthen the circle of our future Tribal

  12. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lamds of Viejas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrence Meyer (Black & Veatch); Mike Elenbaas (Black & Veatch)

    2005-09-30

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of Renewable Energy Development on the lands of the Viejas Band of the Kumeyaay Indian Nation. In addition, the study will investigate the feasibility of forming a renewable energy based tribal utility. Viejas contracted with Black & Veatch and Fredericks, Pelcyger & Hester, LLC to assist in the development of a feasibility study to ascertain the economics and operational factors of forming an electric and water utility. This report is the result of the investigation conducted by Black & Veatch, with input from Viejas Tribal Government.

  13. Delitto d’onore, ordine tribale e Stato - Honour crimes, tribal order and the State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Baghaï

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization does not only mean that the Western world is pervading the non-Western world but also that the non-Western world, through migration processes, moves and settles in the Western world. The impressive number of honor crimes committed every year in the Western world suggests that a different social political order is acting on the Western stage. Honor crimes are committed in Muslim communities that have their roots in those parts of the Muslim world which have tribal societies on their territories, i.e. tribal institutions and laws which interact with or ignore State law. This is a political order which is stateless and based on blood ties – the author calls it an “ematocracy” – and it is perfectly able to survive within the different shapes taken by the State – when there is the State – but also without the State when it is considered as unreliable or when, for some reasons, it collapses. The author argues that political order based on blood ties is considered as reliable by the social actors since it is permanent and in expansion: blood ties reproduce themselves as long as there is life. And women – as protagonists of reproduction processes – are unfortunately at the heart of the conflict between State laws and customary law both in their home countries and in their new homes. Through an analysis of the intertwinement between State law and customary law, in some of the home countries of the migrants, and between shariya and customary law in the classical doctrine, the author shows how this process of ordering the world carries on its political projects in the post-global context.

  14. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Fish produced by this project in 2004 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 1,655,722 kokanee fingerlings, 537,783 rainbow trout fingerlings and 507,660 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the

  15. Three-dimensional shuffling of horses in a strike-slip duplex: an example from the Lambertville sill, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Stephen E.; Gates, Alexander E.

    1996-06-01

    Detailed analysis of a dextral strike-slip duplex within the relatively isotropic rocks of the Lambertville sill, New Jersey indicates that horses have experienced vertical, horizontal and oblique movements resulting from extrusional shuffling within a restraining bend. This is the first documentation of the three-dimensional movement of horses within a strike-slip duplex. Deformation within the duplex shows a complex system of early synthetic fractures and reverse faults followed by antithetic fractures which dissect previously continuous slab-shaped horses into diamond-shaped lenses. Most faults are oblique slip. Antithetic fault movements and clockwise rigid rotation of horses dominate the south half of the duplex and synthetic movements and counterclockwise rotations dominate the north half. Slickenline plunges on curved horse-bounding fault surfaces within the duplex range from nearly horizontal to 40° resulting in both lateral movements (middle) to normal movements (tails) on a single horse. Curved slickensides commonly have opposite senses of movement on either side of individual horses indicating relative emergence or submergence. Such a geometry could also result from a group of horses moving in the same oblique direction but at different rates. These complex extrusional-type movements were observed in both cross-sectional and plan views. The net result of the movements is a contraction or flattening of the duplex normal to the bounding faults. The horses shifted to accommodate this flattening as overall displacement was transferred between the bounding faults along curved internal faults.

  16. A comparative study on self-esteem among tribal and non-tribal students in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka, India

    OpenAIRE

    Uday Narayan Yadav; Shradha Parsekar; Vidya Prabhu; Divya Sussan Patil; Sumit Kumar; Mannat Mohan Singh; Ravikant Singh; Poshan Thapa

    2013-01-01

    Self esteem is defined as the positive or negative attitude about self, the degree of liking or satisfaction within self, and owns feeling of perceived worth as compared with others. Healthy self-esteem is important to be successful and happy throughout one’s life. The aim of this study was to compare the self esteem among tribal and non-tribal student in Udupi Taluk. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in November 2012 in government school of Brahmavar, Udupi Taluk. Study parti...

  17. Kimberlite emplacement time and duration of kimberlite magmatism in the Zimnii Bereg diamond-diferrous district, Arkhangelsk Region: Rb-Sr age of kimberlite sills, Mela River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervov, V.A.; Larchenko, V.A.; Minchenko, G.V.; Stepanov, V.P.; Bogomolov, E.S.; Levskij, L.K.; Sergeev, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Rb-Sr isotope data for kimberlites and carbonate-rich sills of the Mela River were obtained for identifying the age and duration of magmatism in the Zimnii Bereg district of the Archangelsk region. It is shown that estimated age of the kimberlite (366.4 mln. years) falls in the age range corresponding to the main phase of alkaline magmatism in the Kola Peninsula (410-362 mln. years) [ru

  18. Thunderstorm and Lightning Studies using the FORTE Optical Lightning System (FORTE/OLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argo, P.; Franz, R.; Green, J.; Guillen, J.L.; Jacobson, A.R.; Kirkland, M.; Knox, S.; Spalding, R.; Suszcynsky, D.M.

    1999-02-01

    Preliminary observations of simultaneous RF and optical emissions from lightning as seen by the FORTE spacecraft are presented. RF/optical pairs of waveforms are routinely collected both as individual lightning events and as sequences of events associated with cloud-to-ground (CG) and intra-cloud (IC) flashes. CG pulses can be distinguished from IC pulses based on the properties of the RF and optical waveforms, but mostly based on the associated RF spectrograms. The RF spectrograms are very similar to previous ground-based VHF observations of lightning and show signatures associated with return strokes, stepped and dart leaders, and attachment processes,. RF emissions are observed to precede the arrival of optical emissions at the satellite by a mean value of 280 microseconds. The dual phenomenology nature of these observations are discussed in terms of their ability to contribute to a satellite-based lightning monitoring mission.

  19. Thunderstorm and Lightning Studies using the FORTE Optical Lightning System (FORTE/OLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argo, P.; Franz, R.; Green, J.; Guillen, J.L.; Jacobson, A.R.; Kirkland, M.; Knox, S.; Spalding, R.; Suszcynsky, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary observations of simultaneous RF and optical emissions from lightning as seen by the FORTE spacecraft are presented. RF/optical pairs of waveforms are routinely collected both as individual lightning events and as sequences of events associated with cloud-to-ground (CG) and intra-cloud (IC) flashes. CG pulses can be distinguished from IC pulses based on the properties of the RF and optical waveforms, but mostly based on the associated RF spectrograms. The RF spectrograms are very similar to previous ground-based VHF observations of lightning and show signatures associated with return strokes, stepped and dart leaders, and attachment processes,. RF emissions are observed to precede the arrival of optical emissions at the satellite by a mean value of 280 microseconds. The dual phenomenology nature of these observations are discussed in terms of their ability to contribute to a satellite-based lightning monitoring mission

  20. Taxation and the Preservation of Tribal Political and Geographical Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, Richmond L.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the complexities of the taxation issue in Indian affairs, both for American Indian reservations and adjacent local governments. Demonstrates the role of statutes and case law in the recurring struggle to balance tribal immunities guaranteed by the federal government with the expectations of non-Indian taxpayers. (SV)

  1. 76 FR 79567 - Tribal Background Investigations and Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... previous business relationships with the gaming industry generally, including ownership interests in those... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Parts 556 and 558 RIN 3141-AA15 Tribal Background Investigations and Licensing AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION...

  2. 75 FR 48329 - Tribal Drinking Water Operator Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... operator has the skills, knowledge, education and experience necessary to deliver safe water supporting... demonstrates the operator has the skills, knowledge, education and experience necessary to deliver safe water... this program can be found at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/tribal.html . 2. Hard Copies. Hard copies of...

  3. Tribalism as a Foiled Factor of Africa Nation-Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okogu, J. O.; Umudjere, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper tends to examine tribalism as a foiled factor on Africa nation-building and proffers useful tips to salvaging the Africa land from this deadly social problem. Africans in times past had suffered enormous attacks, injuries, losses, deaths, destruction of properties and human skills and ideas due to the presence of tribalistic views in…

  4. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Maria Perez, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Historically, American Indian Tribes have lacked sufficient numbers of trained, technical personnel from their communities to serve their communities; tribal expertise in the fields of science, business and engineering being extremely rare and programs to encourage these disciplines almost non-existent. Subsequently, Tribes have made crucial decisions about their land and other facets of Tribal existence based upon outside technical expertise, such as that provided by the United States government and/or private industries. These outside expert opinions rarely took into account the traditional and cultural values of the Tribes being advised. The purpose of this internship was twofold: Create and maintain a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU) to plan for the Summit on Tribal human resource development; and Evaluate and engage in current efforts to strengthen the Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering and Science (TRIBES) program. The intern lists the following as the project results: Positive interactions and productive meetings between CERT and CSU; Gathered information from Tribes; CERT database structure modification; Experience as facilitator in participating methods; Preliminary job descriptions for staff of future TRIBES programs; and Additions for the intern`s personal database of professional contacts and resources.

  5. Air Pollutants and Ecological Conditions Around Schools on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children are more vulnerable to exposures from their everyday environments compared to adults. Children from Tribal communities have a greater burden of adverse health and well-being outcomes versus children from other communities in the U.S. (US DHHS 2016). Stressors from chi...

  6. Chaparral Commerce Center Proposed Tribal Minor NSR Permit Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Minor New Source Review (NSR) Permit application for the two emergency diesel-fired generators (1,500 kW each) to be installed at the Chaparral Commerce Center in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC) in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  7. 44 CFR 201.7 - Tribal Mitigation Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... initiatives. (2) A risk assessment that provides the factual basis for activities proposed in the strategy to... significant, even if they cannot be valued in monetary terms. (3) A mitigation strategy that provides the Indian tribal government's blueprint for reducing the potential losses identified in the risk assessment...

  8. Political Role of Tribes : Analysis of Tribalism, Islamism and Gender ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tribal relations are deeply intertwined with political relations. ... When countries such as Jordan and Yemen adopted political pluralism, the political parties ... annuelle de l'Institut d'étude du développement international de l'Université McGill.

  9. Le Fort I Maxillary Advancement Using Distraction Osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Patrick D.; Harshbarger, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of maxillary hypoplasia has traditionally involved conventional Le Fort I osteotomies and advancement. Advancements of greater than 10 mm risk significant relapse. This risk is greater in the cleft lip and palate population, whose anatomy and soft tissue scarring from prior procedures contributes to instability of conventional maxillary advancement. Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis has emerged as viable, stable treatment modality correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft, syndromic, and noncleft patients. In this article, the authors provide a review of current data and recommendations concerning Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis. In addition, they outline their technique for treating severe maxillary hypoplasia with distraction osteogenesis using internal devices. PMID:25383054

  10. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, K.; Markel, T.; Simpson, M.; Leahey, J.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Lisell, L.; Burman, K.; Singer, M.

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Army's Fort Carson installation was selected to serve as a prototype for net zero energy assessment and planning. NREL performed the comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of Fort Carson to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. This study is part of a larger cross-laboratory effort that also includes an assessment of renewable opportunities at seven other DoD Front Range installations, a microgrid design for Fort Carson critical loads and an assessment of regulatory and market-based barriers to a regional secure smart grid.

  11. Cranial nerve injury after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Chin, B-R; Park, H-S; Lee, S-H; Kwon, T-G

    2011-03-01

    A Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformity because it is a safe and reliable surgical method. Although rare, various complications have been reported in relation to pterygomaxillary separation. Cranial nerve damage is one of the serious complications that can occur after Le Fort I osteotomy. In this report, a 19-year-old man with unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent surgery to correct maxillary hypoplasia, asymmetry and mandibular prognathism. After the Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, the patient showed multiple cranial nerve damage; an impairment of outward movement of the eye (abducens nerve), decreased vision (optic nerve), and paraesthesia of the frontal and upper cheek area (ophthalmic and maxillary nerve). The damage to the cranial nerve was related to an unexpected sphenoid bone fracture and subsequent trauma in the cavernous sinus during the pterygomaxillary osteotomy. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining

  13. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2009 science accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2010-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center?many of whom are at the forefront of their fields?possess a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise. Because of this diverse talent, Fort Collins Science Center staff are able to apply a systems approach to investigating complicated ecological problems in a way that helps answer critical management questions. In addition, the Fort Collins Science Center has a long record of working closely with the academic community through cooperative agreements and other collaborations. The Fort Collins Science Center is deeply engaged with other U.S. Geological Survey science centers and partners throughout the Department of the Interior. As a regular practice, we incorporate the expertise of these partners in providing a full complement of ?the right people? to effectively tackle the multifaceted research problems of today's resource-management world. In Fiscal Year 2009, the Fort Collins Science Center's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to Department of the Interior's science and management needs. Fort Collins Science Center work also supported the science needs of other Federal and State agencies as well as non-government organizations. Specifically, Fort Collins Science Center research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management and delivery, enterprise information, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions), terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In the process, Fort Collins Science Center science addressed natural-science information needs identified in the U

  14. Black Swan Event Assessment for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    ER D C/ CE RL S R- 16 -1 Net Zero Planning for Fort Leonard Wood Black Swan Event Assessment for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri Co ns...search for other technical reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Net Zero Planning for...1.8 degrees Celsius knots 0.5144444 meters per second miles (US statute) 1,609.347 meters miles per hour 0.44704 meters per second ERDC/CERL SR

  15. Sundhedsprofessionelles begejstring for fortællinger fra levet erfaring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liveng, Anne; Larsen, Christine; Lange, Mads

    2018-01-01

    I 2013 etablerede psykiatrien i Region Hovedstaden, Danmark, et undervisningsprogram om recovery for sundhedsprofessionelle. Evalueringer af programmet viste et udtalt engagement i fortællingen fra underviseren med levet erfaring. Artiklen diskuterer hvordan dette kan forstås. Evalueringsmaterialet...... analyseres ud fra et læringsteoretisk perspektiv og fokuserer på: 1) Betydningen af fortællingens emotionelle indhold, 2) Rolle-bytningen mellem personen med levet erfaring og sundhedsprofessionelle, og 3) Workshoppene som et læringsrum, der aktiverer refleksioner over strukturer og organisering af...

  16. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

  17. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Drum, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Scott A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Solana, Amy E.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rowley, Steven; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2010-10-20

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Drum, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Drum took place on May 4 and 5, 2010.

  18. Construction experience on PCRV liners at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliff, J.O.; Wunderlich, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of the steel liners for the Fort St. Vrain prestressed concrete reactor vessel presented many unique problems for which techniques were developed to satisfy the rigid specification requirements. The PCRV cavity liner was fabricated from 1.9cm carbon steel plate. The liners were partially fabricated by Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company at their Pittsburgh manufacturing facility. The liners were then shipped by rail to within approximately five miles of the jobsite and then trucked the remaining distance. The construction techniques, dimensional control, concrete support and testing utilized on the Fort St. Vrain project are presented in detail and demonstrate the flexibility of the PCRV for field construction. (author)

  19. En fascinerende fortælling om det 20. århundredes musik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Karl Aage Rasmussen: Musik i det tyvende århundrede: En fortælling. Gyldendal 2011.......Anmeldelse af Karl Aage Rasmussen: Musik i det tyvende århundrede: En fortælling. Gyldendal 2011....

  20. Fort Independence: An Eighteenth-Century Frontier Homesite and Militia Post in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    included in this instance as a condiment , but it could also indicate that the Fort Independence garrison was familiar with the strategy employed by the Fort...archeological investigation of Fort Charlotte, McCormick County, South Carolina. Notebook, Institute of Archeology and Anthropology, University of South

  1. 40 CFR 81.63 - Metropolitan Fort Smith Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Fort Smith Interstate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.63 Metropolitan Fort Smith Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Fort Smith Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Oklahoma) has been revised to consist...

  2. Case Study: Fort Mill High School--A Culture of Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This is the latest in a series of case studies highlighting best practices High Schools That Work (HSTW) network schools and districts are implementing to prepare students better for further studies and careers. Fort Mill High School is in Fort Mill, South Carolina, an outlying suburb of Charlotte, North Carolina. Fort Mill links high quality…

  3. Fort Peck-Wolf Point transmission line project, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the project is to replace the existing 36-mile Fort Peck-Wolf Point transmission line which has reached the end of its useful service life. Presently, the overall condition of this existing section of the 47-year-old line is poor. Frequent repairs have been required because of the absence of overhead ground wires. The continued maintenance of the line will become more expensive and customer interruptions will persist because of the damage due to lightning. The expense of replacing shell rotted poles, and the concern for the safety of the maintenance personnel because of hazards caused by severe shell rot are also of primary importance. The operational and maintenance problems coupled with power system simulation studies, demonstrate the need for improvements to the Wolf Point area to serve area loads. Western's Wolf Point Substation is an important point of interconnection for the power output from the Fort Peck Dam to area loads as far away as Williston, North Dakota. The proposed transmission line replacement would assure that there will continue to be reliable transmission capacity available to serve area electrical loads, as well as provide a reliable second high-voltage transmission path from the Fort Peck generation to back-up a loss of the Fort Peck-Wolf Point 115-kV Line No. 1

  4. Safety and licensing analyses for the Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Conklin, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.; Cleveland, J.C.; Clapp, N.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) safety analysis program for the HTGR includes development and verification of system response simulation codes, and applications of these codes to specific Fort St. Vrain reactor licensing problems. Licensing studies addressed the oscillation problems and the concerns about large thermal stresses in the core support blocks during a postulated accident

  5. Site-Based Budgeting in Fort Worth, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternick, Lauri; Sherman, Joel

    1998-01-01

    Examines the Fort Worth Independent School District's decentralized decision-making system through three lenses: a review of site-based decision-making procedures at several schools; an examination of who participates; and stakeholders' perceptions. Some schools operated democratically, significantly including teachers, parents, and community…

  6. 22nd Spring Research Festival Showcases Fort Detrick Science | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainy weather couldn’t dampen the spirits of visitors to the 2018 Spring Research Festival, which brought together scientists from the Frederick National Laboratory (FNL), NCI at Frederick, and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) and showcased the important research that takes place every day at Fort Detrick.

  7. The health of loblolly pine stands at Fort Benning, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung-Ryoul Ryu; G. Geoff Wang; Joan L. Walker

    2013-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) (RCW) groups at Fort Benning, GA, depend on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands for nesting or foraging. However, loblolly pine stands are suspected to decline. Forest managers want to replace loblolly pine with longleaf pine (P. palustris...

  8. Forest pathology and entomology at Fort Valley Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian W. Geils

    2008-01-01

    Forest pathology and entomology have been researched at Fort Valley Experimental Forest throughout its history. The pathogens and insects of particular interest are mistletoes, decay and canker fungi, rusts, bark beetles, and various defoliators. Studies on life history, biotic interactions, impacts, and control have been published and incorporated into silvicultural...

  9. Tile forts of the Liesbeeck Frontier | Sleigh | Scientia Militaria: South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 27 (1997) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Tile forts of the Liesbeeck Frontier.

  10. Opening remarks for the Fort Valley Centennial Celebration

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Sam Foster

    2008-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Research Station recognizes and values the contributions of our scientists and collaborators for their work over the past century at Fort Valley Experimental Forest. With the help of our partners and collaborators, Rocky Mountain Research Station is working to improve coordination across its research Program Areas and Experimental Forests and Ranges...

  11. Opening remarks for the Fort Valley Centennial Celebration (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Sam Foster

    2008-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Research Station recognizes and values the contributions of our scientists and collaborators for their work over the past century at Fort Valley Experimental Forest. With the help of our partners and collaborators, Rocky Mountain Research Station is working to improve coordination across its research Program Areas and Experimental Forests and Ranges...

  12. Informal report on measurements of slant TEC by FORTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's Space and Atmospheric Sciences group is now operating the FORTE satellite, which has two sets of instruments: optical detectors and radio detectors. In this report the author describes work with one set of radio detectors that allow measurements of the total electron content (TEC) traversed by VHF radiation originating at an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator located at Los Alamos

  13. Assessment of DoD Wounded Warrior Matters -- Fort Riley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    acceptable excuses included At Remote Care, Regular Leave, Maternity and Paternity Leave, Terminal Leave, Permanent Change of Station, and Transferred to...risk of negative medication interactions and reactions for Soldiers assigned to the Fort Riley WTB. B.2. Background The Joint Commission, an...reconciliation is to minimize medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, and drug interactions . Medical reconciliation should

  14. The Forte Kreis : an Attempt to Spiritual Leadership over Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Just before the outbreak of World War 1, a group of writers, artists and philosophers decided to establish a spiritual rule over Europe, the Forte Kreis. The group aimed at a reconciliation in Europe, by establishing pacifism, but also between East and West by creating a new language. Their thoughts

  15. Early thinning experiments established by the Fort Valley Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin P. De Blois; Alex. J. Finkral; Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore

    2008-01-01

    Between 1925 and 1936, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest (FVEF) scientists initiated a study to examine a series of forest thinning experiments in second growth ponderosa pine stands in Arizona and New Mexico. These early thinning plots furnished much of the early background for the development of methods used in forest management in the Southwest. The plots ranged...

  16. 77 FR 24579 - Establishment of the Fort Ord National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... 1775-1776, Anza established the first overland route from ``New Spain,'' as Mexico was then known, to..., approximately 6 miles of which pass through the Fort Ord area. Although much of the historic route currently... tourists and recreationalists from near and far, and enhance its unique natural resources, for the...

  17. Fort Valley studies: A natural laboratory for research and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian W. Geils

    2008-01-01

    Drought, wildfire, extinction, and invasive species are considered serious threats to the health of our forests. Although these issues have global connections, we most readily see their consequences locally and attempt to respond with management based on science. For 100 years, the Fort Valley Experimental Forest (FVEF) has provided educational and experimental support...

  18. Calculation of Void in the Fort Saint Vrain Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Craig Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Coons, James Elmer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    The percent void of the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) material is estimated to be 21.1% based on the volume of the gap at the top of the drums, the volume of the coolant channels in the FSV fuel element, and the volume of the fuel handling channel in the FSV fuel element.

  19. Utilization of maternal health-care services by tribal women in Kerala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jinu Annie; Sarkar, Sonali; Kumar, S Ganesh; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    The coverage of maternal care services among the tribal women in Kerala is better as compared to other states in India. This study was done to identify the factors contributing to better coverage of maternal care services among the tribal women in Kerala and to study the reasons for remaining differences that exists in utilization of services between tribal and non-tribal pregnant women. This was a descriptive cum qualitative study conducted in Thariode Gramapanchayat in the Wayanad district of Kerala. Among all women who had registered their pregnancies in the 5 sub-centres under CHC Thariode and had delivered between September 2009 and October 2010, equal numbers of tribal and non-tribal ante-natal women, 35 each were interviewed in-depth using a semi-structured questionnaire. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS Version 16.0. Content analysis was done for qualitative data. The determinants of utilization in tribal women were general awareness, affordability, accessibility and quality of services along with motivation by health workers. Among tribal antenatal women, 85% utilized maternal health care facilities fully compared to 100% among non-tribal women. Lower levels of education and lack of transport facilities were prime factors contributing to under utilization by tribal women. Affordable, accessible and good quality of services in the public health system in Kerala and motivation by health workers were important contributing factors for better utilization of maternal care services.

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDIES ON MAN-BITING POPULATION OF FILARIAL VECTOR Cx. quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae BETWEEN TRIBAL AND NON-TRIBAL AREAS OF BANKURA DISTRICT, WEST BENGAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chandra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available West Bengal, India is endemic for filariasis and the number of patients infected with bancroftian filariasis is increasing. There are no observation on the potential vector of filariasis from the tribal areas that make up considerable part in this state. This study investigate population of Cx. quinquefasciatus in tribal and non-tribal areas of Bankura district. Species composition of mosquitoes, per man-hour density, hourly densities of night biting Cx. quinquefasciatus, number of Cx. quinquefasciatus biting per man per day and per man per night. Preferential biting site and peak period of filarial transmission were recorded from both the study areas. Infection rate, infectivity rate of man-landing vector population and annual transmission potential were observed to be 0.31%, 0.00% and 0.00 in tribal areas and 0.73%, 0.23% and 359.71 in non-tribal areas respectively.

  1. Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics of American Indian Tribal College Students Participating in a Tribal College Tobacco and Behavioral Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won S; Nazir, Niaman; Pacheco, Christina M; Filippi, Melissa K; Pacheco, Joseph; White Bull, Julia; Nance, Christi; Faseru, Babalola; Greiner, K Allen; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2016-06-01

    American Indians (AIs) have the highest cigarette smoking rates of any racial/ethnic group in the United States. Although the overall smoking prevalence in the United States for nonminority populations has decreased over the past several decades, the same pattern is not observed among AIs. The purpose of this observational study was to collect cigarette smoking and related information from American Indian tribal college students to inform tailored interventions. We conducted a repeated cross-sectional survey of American Indian tribal college students, Tribal College Tobacco and Behavior Survey (TCTABS), with a focus on recruiting all incoming freshman at three participating tribal colleges in the Midwest and Northern Plains regions. A total of 1256 students participated in the baseline surveys between April 2011 and October 2014. The overall smoking prevalence of this sample was 34.7%, with differences by region (Northern Plains-44.0% and Midwest-28%). The majority, 87.5% of current smokers reported smoking 10 or less cigarettes per day, 41% reported smoking menthol cigarettes, 52% smoked Marlboro brand, and the mean age of their first cigarette was 14 years. The majority, 62% had made at least one quit attempt in the past year. The overwhelming majority of respondents, regardless of their smoking status, thought that the current smoking prevalence on campus was greater than 41% and approximately one-third believed that it was as high as 61%. Very few studies of smoking have been conducted in this population and results from our study confirm the need for effective interventions. AIs have the highest cigarette smoking rates compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Furthermore, limited studies have examined the epidemiology of cigarette smoking among tribal college students. This study addresses health disparities related to smoking among college students by examining the demographic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of smoking and

  2. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to: create a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU); involve and create relationships among individuals and departments at CSU; empower Native communities to run their own affairs; establish programs for the benefit of Tribes; and create Native American Program Development Office at CSU. The intern lists the following as the project results: revised a Native American Program Development document; confirmation from 45 departments across campus for Summit attendance [Tribal Human Resource Development Summit]; created initial invitee list from CSU departments and colleges; and informed CERT and CSU staff of results. Much of the response from the campus community has been positive and enthusiastic. They are ready to develop new Native American programs on campus, but need the awareness of what they can do to be respectful of Tribal needs.

  3. An Asset-Based Approach to Tribal Community Energy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Rachael A. [Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, NY (United States). City and Regional Planning; Martino, Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies; Begay, Sandra K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies

    2016-08-01

    Community energy planning is a vital component of successful energy resource development and project implementation. Planning can help tribes develop a shared vision and strategies to accomplish their energy goals. This paper explores the benefits of an asset-based approach to tribal community energy planning. While a framework for community energy planning and federal funding already exists, some areas of difficulty in the planning cycle have been identified. This paper focuses on developing a planning framework that offsets those challenges. The asset-based framework described here takes inventory of a tribe’s capital assets, such as: land capital, human capital, financial capital, and political capital. Such an analysis evaluates how being rich in a specific type of capital can offer a tribe unique advantages in implementing their energy vision. Finally, a tribal case study demonstrates the practical application of an asset-based framework.

  4. Morphological anomalies in two Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) specimens collected from Fort Rucker, Alabama, and Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, David A; Lawyer, Phillip; Rowton, Edgar; Schultz, George; Wilkerson, Richard; Davies, Stephen J; Lipnick, Robert; Keep, Lisa

    2010-09-01

    This report describes two male specimens of the sand fly species Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar) (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) collected at Fort Rucker, AL, and Fort Campbell, KY, in dry ice-baited light traps during September 2005. The specimens were observed to have anomalies to the number of spines on the gonostyli. The taxonomic keys of Young and Perkins (Mosq. News 44: 263-285; 1984) use the number of spines on the gonostylus in the first couplet to differentiate two major groupings of North American sand flies. The two anomalous specimens were identified as L. shannoni based on the following criteria: (1) both specimens possess antennal ascoids with long, distinct proximal spurs (a near diagnostic character of L. shannoni in North America), (2) the sequences of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene from both specimens indicated L. shannoni, and (3) the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 molecular marker from both specimens indicated L. shannoni. The anomalous features are fundamentally different from each other as the Fort Rucker specimen possesses a fifth spine (basally located) on just one gonostylus, whereas the Fort Campbell specimen possesses five spines (extra spines subterminally located) on both gonostyli. Because the gonostyli are part of the external male genitalia, anomalies in the number of spines on the gonostyli may have serious biological consequences, such as reduced reproductive success, for the possessors. These anomalies are of taxonomic interest as the specimens could easily have been misidentified using available morphological keys.

  5. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Melinda Jacquez, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the intern project was to write a comprehensive booklet on all state legislation proposed in 1995 on Native American issues. A second purpose was to contact tribal governments and request an ordinance, law or resolution on hazardous and nuclear waste transportation. This intern report contains a summary of bills proposed in 37 state legislatures pertaining to Native American issues. Time ran out before the second project objective could be met.

  6. Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

  7. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program: Draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe's culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle

  8. Nutritional status and dietary intake in tribal children of Bihar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R J; Singh, P

    1999-01-01

    To assess the dietary intake and nutritional status in children of the tribal areas of Bihar. Cross sectional survey with two stage probability proportional to size sampling. Study covered 396 villages from 17 tribal districts of Bihar. 1847 preschool children (0-6 Years) were studied. 24 hours recall method was used to assess the nutrition intake and anthropometric measurements included height and weight. Nutritional intake was compared with Indian Council of Medical Research recommended dietary allowances (RDA) and nutritional status assessed by SD classification. The intake of protein was broadly in line with the recommended dietary allowances (RDA) in all age groups among children. However, the average intake of energy and other nutrients was lower in allage groups as compared to RDA. Calorie deficiency was 38% whereas protein deficiency was about 19%. More than half of the children were caloric deficient in Katihar, Bokaro, Godda and Singhbhum (east and west). The overall prevalence of stunting was about 60% and underweight about 55% and was comparable in boys and girls. However, wasting was more frequent in girls (urban - 34.5% vs. 16.3% and rural - 34.9% vs 18%). The level of malnutrition was not very different in rural and urban areas. The nutritional status and dietary intakes of tribal children in Bihar is very poor. Urgent remedial measures are required in this context, particularly on a war footing in especially vulnerable districts identified by this survey.

  9. Against Schooling: Viewpoints of Tribal Students of Kanavu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena AUGUSTINE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Achieving what we believe to be the true purpose of education is a challenge in any society, particularly so in a society as diverse as contemporary India. Most attempts in this field are focussed on improving the access of children to education, but substantive questions such as: What is a school to a child? Does he/she enjoy learning? are seldom addressed prior to drafting any curriculum or policy. Even where they are, the exploration tends to be qualitatively poor and devoid of stake holders views. Alternative educational organisations might offer a perspective on the crisis education seems to be in today, with children lacking lifeskills, governments grappling with retention, disparities across gender and caste and declining standards of education. Kanavu is an educational organisation managed by tribal youth in Cheengode village of Wayanad, a hilly district in the southern state of Kerala, India. These are children who dropped out of mainstream schooling. In the light of efforts to mainstream tribal students into government schools and to control escalating dropout rates, this paper tries to understand the perspectives of the tribal students of Kanavu on schooling and their reasons for resisting mainstream schooling. This paper is a result of a 4 day visit and extensive correspondence the authors have had with this alternative learning organisation.

  10. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

  11. Parents’ Attitude toward Daughters’ Education in Tribal Area of Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan)

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Ayub Buzdar; Akhtar Ali

    2011-01-01

    The paper aimed to investigate the parents’ attitudes toward their daughters’ education in tribal areas of district Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan). To achieve the objectives four research questions were established. Focus of the questions was to examine the significance of girls’ education for tribal parents. Existing and expected role of tribal parents as well as contribution from government and community for girls’ education was also aimed to explore in research questions. Sample comprised thir...

  12. Common state mechanisms regulating tribal tobacco taxation and sales, the USA, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Hillary; Chriqui, Jamie; Leider, Julien; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2016-10-01

    Native American tribes, as sovereign nations, are exempt from state tobacco excise taxation, and self-govern on-reservation activity in the USA. Under Federal law, state excise taxes are owed by non-members purchasing tobacco on tribal land, but states are limited in how they enforce or collect these taxes. This study highlights the various policy approaches that states have taken to regulate tobacco sales on tribal lands given jurisdictional challenges. State laws (statutes, regulations and case law), Attorney General opinions, and revenue notices and rulings effective as of 1 January 2015 for all 50 states and the District of Columbia were compiled using Boolean searches in Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw. Laws were limited to those addressing taxation compacts or tobacco sales involving tribal entities. Master Settlement Agreement laws and non-codified tribal codes/compacts were excluded. Twenty of the 34 states with tribal lands address tribal tobacco sales. Fourteen states address intergovernmental compacts: 11 are tobacco specific, and suggest or require specific provisions. Fifteen states address tribal tax stamps: 2 explicitly prohibit stamping tribally sold products, 9 stamp all products, and 4 stamp some. Prepayment of excise tax is required in 12 states: 6 on all products, 4 on products in excess of quota, and 2 on products sold by non-tribal retailers. 6 states use quotas to limit tax-free tobacco available to tribes. Many states with a tribal presence have no formal strategies for non-members purchasing tobacco on tribal lands. Formalising policies and harmonising tax rates may assist states in collecting tax revenue from non-tribal consumers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Ethnomedicinal plants of the Bauri tribal community of Moulvibazar District, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Protiva Rani; Islam, Md. Tabibul; Mostafa, Mohd. Nabil; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Context: Bangladesh reportedly has more than 100 tribal communities; however, documentation of their medicinal practices is markedly absent. Aim: The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey among the little known Bauri tribe of Bangladesh, whose tribal medicinal practices are yet to be documented. Settings and Design: The survey was carried out among the Bauri tribal community of Purbo Tila village in Moulvibazar District. The community is believed to be the o...

  14. 78 FR 37541 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... understanding and comprehension. CDC believes that consultation is integral to a deliberative process that... Tribal Consultation include the following: A listening session with CDC's director, roundtable...

  15. Master Environmental Plan: Fort Wingate Depot Activity, Gallup, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biang, C.A.; Yuen, C.R.; Biang, R.P.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    The master environmental plan is based on an environmental assessment of the areas requiring environmental evaluation (AREEs) at Fort Wingate Depot Activity near Gallup, New Mexico. The Fort Wingate Depot Activity is slated for closure under the Base Closure and Realignment Act, Public Law 100--526. The MEP assesses the current status, describes additional data requirements, recommends actions for the sites, and establishes a priority order for actions. The plan was developed so that actions comply with hazardous waste and water quality regulations of the State of New Mexico and applicable federal regulations. It contains a brief history of the site, relevant geological and hydrological information, and a description of the current status for each AREE along with a discussion of the available site-specific data that pertain to existing or potential contamination and the impact on the environment. 35 refs., 27 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Fort St. Vrain improvement program plan. Draft final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    The restraints are described which inhibit the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Power Station, a high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) plant, from achieving full power operation with high availability. The actions necessary to overcome these restraints are outlined. The restraints originated from problems in both hardware related and institutional areas. The report summarizes what has been accomplished, what is currently being done, and what should be done to resolve the problems

  17. Bastion on the Border: Fort Bliss, 1854-1943

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Journals , Record Group (RG) 165, Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, National Archives, Washington, D.C. "’Richard Estrada, Border...it was the Fort Bliss garrison and the other troops deployed by Steever in the El Paso Patrol District that would have to provide the figurative glue ...little military value. For example, on March 30 three carloads of oats, flour , corn, and hay were dispatched; on April 7 fourteen carloads of hay, gasoline

  18. Basewide Energy Study, Fort Wainwright Alaska: Volume 1-Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    more accurate condensate wiett?Ing. 2.2 ENERGY OSAGE ANALISIS 4 top~down anay2ts was mad" of FY’•0 ener;’ uxage’ t Fort wrtsvrigFnt. The spporiIonments...vice, at each receptacle cluster . It should be thermally sensitlve. rtdtcing through-put from 600 watts at -SOOT to0soer power at 100? outside air

  19. Die opleiding van bedryfsielkundiges aan die universiteit van Fort Hare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Botha

    1977-11-01

    Full Text Available Die Departement Bedryfsielkunde aan die Universiteit van Fort Hare is 'n relatiewe jong departement en het eers in 1965 tot stand gekom. Voor hierdie datum is Bedryfsielkunde as 'n kort kursus deur die departement van suiwer Sielkunde aangebied en een van die destydse dosente, Dr. W. Backer, het die inisiatief geneem om 'n selfstandige departement van Bedryfsielkunde in die Fakulteit van Ekonomiese Wetenskappe op die been te bring.

  20. Assessment of DOD Wounded Warrior Matters -- Fort Drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    their relation to military duties. The six factors that are evaluated are: physical capacity or stamina , upper extremities, lower extremities...Health Net Federal Services contractor. The Fort Drum MEDDAC Referral Management Office created a “Reports Cell ” which was responsible for obtaining...Care Division had created a CLR/Reports Cell group that focused specifically on obtaining CLRs, inputting them into patients’ AHLTA records and

  1. Leaktightness in HTGRs - experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Barker, R.A.; Deardorff, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel is the first utilized to contain the helium coolant of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. Because the helium coolant contains fission products, leakage from the vessel is limited to 15 percent of vessel inventory per year. This paper describes the fabrication methods and development tests used to assure this leaktightness and the leakage test conducted to verify it. (author)

  2. Neutron flux distribution measurement in the Fort St. Vrain initial core (results of Fort St. Vrain start-up test A-7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Brown, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a test to measure the axial flux distribution at several radial locations in the Fort St. Vrain core representing unrodded, rodded, and partially rodded regions. The measurements were intended to verify the calculational accuracy of the three-dimensional calculational model used to compute axial power distributions for the Fort St. Vrain core. (U.S.)

  3. Neodymium and strontium isotopic stratigraphy of the neo-archean Rio Jacare Sill-Bahia, Brazil and its relation to PGE mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Reinaldo S.C de; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Nilson, Ariplinio A.; Gioia, Simone M

    2001-01-01

    Platinum-Group Elements (PGE) deposition in magma chambers is generally accepted as being triggered by sulphur immiscibility via sulfidasation and/or felsification of magmas. These processes can be related to fractional crystallization, and mixing of batches of magmas, crustal contamination or by the combination of these process. Important isotopic studies have been carried out by many authors such as Lambert (1989) and Marcantonio (1995) in the Stillwater Complex, Kruger and Marsh (1989) and Cawthorn (1996) in the Bushveld Complex. Those works set out to understand the role of isotopic changes in the genesis of PGE deposits from JM and Merensky Reefs, respectively. They attributed those PGE mineralizations to isotopically constrained mixing/contamination episodes associated to subtle changes in steady vertical fractionation trends. This work presents stratigraphycally-plotted Nd and Sr isotopic data together with evidence of mineral and whole rock geochemistry disturbance in smooth fractionations trends of the Rio Jacare Sill. Data interpretation suggest the sill was formed via fractional crystallisation and mixing of at least three magma batches, combined with some degree of host rocks assimilation. Isotopic changes were also related to PGE anomalies associated with transitional facies formed during such mixing episodes (au)

  4. Liquid radwaste processing history at Fort Calhoun Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilau, A.; Rutar, F.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a historical perspective of liquid radwaste processing at the Fort Calhoun Unit 1 Nuclear Power Station, located in east central Nebraska. Of particular interest is the textual and graphical comparison of the operational implications of the various waste processing methods employed in the last ten years at the Fort Calhoun Station. Fort Calhoun's waste collection and processing systems are described in detail. These process systems include evaporation and solidification employing an in-plant drum solidification system. This solidification system was later replaced with vendor solidification services which solidified wastes in large liners. Ultimately, the plant converted its processing operation to ion exchange cleanup using ion selective media. The operational and economic impact of each of these process systems is discussed including overall costs, personnel exposure, capital expenditure requirements, burial volumes generated, maintenance and reliability assessments. Operational goals and performance criteria employed in the decision-making process for selection of the optimal technology are discussed, including the impact of various influent and effluent requirements

  5. BRAND EQUITY OF LAHORE FORT AS A TOURISM DESTINATION BRAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies that measure the brand equity of destination brands by using the Customer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE model in a developing country context are scarce. The present study investigates the destination brand equity of the Lahore Fort by employing the CBBE model in a developing country context of Pakistan. Following the positivist tradition, we adopted a survey-based approach to collect data from 237 tourists visiting the Lahore Fort. Data were collected through a questionnaire developed to explain the relationship of brand awareness, brand image, brand association, and brand loyalty with Lahore Fort’s overall brand equity. We used various robust statistical techniques such as correlation, regression and confirmatory factor analysis (using PLS method to reach meaningful conclusions and found that brand image and brand associations positively contribute to brand loyalty. Furthermore, brand loyalty significantly contributes towards overall brand equity. Pragmatically, this study measures the customer based brand equity of the Lahore Fort, a destination brand. The results are useful as they suggest a few strategies that can help policy makers to enhance Lahore Fort’s brand performance.

  6. National Training Center Fort Irwin expansion area aquatic resources survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.

    1996-02-01

    Biologists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were requested by personnel from Fort Irwin to conduct a biological reconnaissance of the Avawatz Mountains northeast of Fort Irwin, an area for proposed expansion of the Fort. Surveys of vegetation, small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and aquatic resources were conducted during 1995 to characterize the populations and habitats present with emphasis on determining the presence of any species of special concern. This report presents a description of the sites sampled, a list of the organisms found and identified, and a discussion of relative abundance. Taxonomic identifications were done to the lowest level possible commensurate with determining the status of the taxa relative to its possible listing as a threatened, endangered, or candidate species. Consultation with taxonomic experts was undertaken for the Coleoptera ahd Hemiptera. In addition to listing the macroinvertebrates found, the authors also present a discussion related to the possible presence of any threatened or endangered species or species of concern found in Sheep Creek Springs, Tin Cabin Springs, and the Amargosa River.

  7. High-Efficiency Housing at the Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Opportunities and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisell, Lars J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Desai, Jal D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dean, Jesse D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rehder, Tim [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8

    2018-03-13

    This project was initiated to provide design assistance in an effort to maximize energy performance for affordable housing at the Fort Peck Indian Reservation near Poplar, Montana. The Make It Right Foundation (MIRF) built 20 high performing homes (LEED Platinum) in 2015 and 2016 with three (3) different design options. NREL and EPA set out to provide energy analysis along with measurement and verification (M and V) of the homes to characterize energy use and provide clarity for future decision making with regard to tribal housing options. The results included herein summarize the energy end uses and documents projected energy impacts from various aspects of the MIRF home designs and construction. This report includes an analysis of energy use in 5 MIRF homes, comparing energy use across the different styles and configurations. Energy models were created for the 2 styles of MIRF homes, including renewable energy assessment for photovoltaic (PV) systems. Existing tribal housing has also been analyzed, with 5 housing units being analyzed for energy use and an energy model being created for 1 housing unit. The findings of this study highlight many of the challenges that arise when attempting to construct high performance housing in a region where such construction practices are still relatively rare. Homes in Poplar are well designed and, for the most part, and include climate specific design considerations appropriate for northeastern Montana. The most significant issues identified in MIRF homes were related to the work done to put the homes on the foundation, insulate the crawlspaces, and do final connection with the utilities. The Taxed II Credit homes are well designed and well suited to northeastern Montana, and with slight modifications to the design and construction could be very efficient. All occupant comfort and energy usage issues that were identified during the site visits can be remedied through retrofit measures that are relatively inexpensive. Energy

  8. Responding to Public Health Emergencies on Tribal Lands: Jurisdictional Challenges and Practical Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Justin B

    2015-01-01

    Response to public health emergencies on tribal lands poses a unique challenge for state and tribal public health officials. The complexity and intensely situation-specific nature of federal Indian jurisprudence leaves considerable question as to which government entity, state or tribal, has jurisdiction on tribal lands to undertake basic emergency measures such as closure of public spaces, quarantine, compulsory medical examination, and investigation. That jurisdictional uncertainty, coupled with cultural differences and an often troubled history of tribal-state relations, threatens to significantly impede response to infectious disease outbreaks or other public health emergencies on tribal lands. Given that tribal communities may be disproportionately impacted by public health emergencies, it is critical that tribal, state, and local governments engage with each other in coordinated planning for public health threats. This Article is offered as a catalyst for such planning efforts. The Article identifies some of the most pressing jurisdictional issues that may confront governments responding to a public health emergency on tribal lands, with the aim of highlighting the nature of the problem and the need for action. The Article goes on to examine the most promising means of addressing jurisdictional uncertainty: intergovernmental agreements. Already utilized in many areas of shared interest between tribe and state, intergovernmental agreements offer neighboring state, local, and tribal governments a vehicle for delineating roles and authorities in an emergency, and may lay the groundwork for sharing resources. The Article surveys various representative tribal public health intergovernmental agreements, and concludes with suggestions for tribes and state or local governments looking to craft their own agreements.

  9. Formation of D- and I-shaped geochemical profiles in saucer-shaped sills due to post- emplacement magma flow induced by thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnes, I.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Neumann, E.

    2007-12-01

    There are still unresolved problems in the processes of emplacement and crystallization of saucer shaped sill intrusions. We use geochemistry and numerical modelling in order to constrain identify processes in mafic sill intrusions. Profiles sampled through through a saucer-shaped sill complex in the Karoo igneous province, South Africa show a variety of geochemical variations. Some variations are observed repeatedly, i.e. the D- and I-shaped profiles. D-shaped profiles are recognized by having the least evolved composition in the center (high Mg#) with more evolved composition at the upper and lower margins (low Mg#), resulting in a D-shaped Mg# profile. I- shaped profiles are recognized by having no variation in the Mg# through the profile. The formation mechanism of D-shaped profiles is enigmatic, as classical fractional crystallization theory predicts C-shapes to occur. The least evolved composition will be at the margins where crystallization initiates, and with continued cooling and crystallization the center will be progressively more evolved. Hence, we need another formation mechanism. The most common explanation for D-shaped profiles is a movement of early formed phenocrysts towards the center due to flow segregation. However, petrographical evidences from a D-shaped profile in this study show no phenocryst assemblage in the center, and the modal composition is homogeneous through the profile. We propose that differentiation is caused by a melt flow from the central parts of the sill towards the margins driven by underpressure anomalies at the margins. The underpressures develop because of strong cooling gradients at the margins, assuming no volume change due to a rigid crystal network. The less compatible elements associated with the melt phase will be transported into the margins by advection, resulting in a more evolved total system composition from a higher total melt percentage. The central parts will progressively be depleted in the less compatible

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Fort Calhoun, Nebraska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, during the period June 19 through June 28, 1993. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) over a 25-square-mile (65-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 6 and 12 microroentgens per hour and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and potassium. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system. A previous survey was conducted on August 9 and 10, 1972, before the plant began operation. Exposure rates measured in both surveys were consistent with normal terrestrial background

  11. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Manuel Steele, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this internship was to facilitate transfer of advancements in renewable energy to Native American lands for economic and educational benefits and to assist in evaluation of proposals submitted for government funding under Title 26 Indian Energy Resources Program. Specific objectives were to examine specific cost factors stated by each Tribe for economic assessment of each proposal; assess environmental impacts of proposed scope of work presented by each Tribe; monitor existing grants for disbursement of requested funds; and provide Tribal governments with a fair and impartial review of grant proposals for funding by the Department of Energy.

  12. Yakima tribal perspectives on high level selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jim, R.; Wittman, J.; Tousley, D.R.; Hovis, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    When Congress went through the arduous process of fashioning a comprehensive plan for resolution of the nation's long-standing nuclear waste problem, it explicitly recognized that past federal efforts in this area had been inadequate. Congress also recognized that the primary reasons for the failure of earlier federal efforts was failure on the part of the federal government to seriously deal with very real technical questions about the geologic adequacy of prospective repository sites, and failure to address the concerns of state, tribal, and local governments in the repository selection and development process

  13. 77 FR 43353 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Tribal Self- Governance Program AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request for... collection of information for Tribal Self-Governance Program authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0143. This... Self-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB, Washington, DC 20240; telephone...

  14. 77 FR 71016 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Tribal Self- Governance Program AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of submission... collection of information for Tribal Self-Governance Program. The information collection is currently... send a copy of your comments to Ken Reinfeld, Office of Self-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW...

  15. 76 FR 75899 - Announcement of Vacancy on the Osage Tribal Education Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Announcement of Vacancy on the Osage Tribal Education Committee AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Education, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Indian Education is announcing that a vacancy has occurred on the Osage Tribal Education Committee. This...

  16. 25 CFR 170.913 - Do tribal-specific employment rights and contract preference laws apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Indian Preference § 170.913 Do tribal-specific employment rights and contract preference laws apply? Yes... tribe within the consortium, the benefitting tribe's employment rights and contracting preference laws... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do tribal-specific employment rights and contract...

  17. 78 FR 27341 - Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... over criminal proceedings; affording the defendant the right to effective assistance of counsel and, if... Criminal Proceedings in Tribal Courts AGENCY: Legal Services Corporation. ACTION: Request for information... funds to be used by grantees to represent eligible persons in any and all criminal proceedings in tribal...

  18. 77 FR 48167 - Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming compact between...

  19. 25 CFR 1200.3 - What is the Department's policy on tribal management of trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Department's policy on tribal management of..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT General Provisions § 1200.3 What is the Department's policy on tribal management of trust funds? (a) We will give tribes as much...

  20. Governmentality and Social Capital in Tribal/Federal Relations Regarding Heritage Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    for improved tribal/federal heritage consultation; this will be accomplished by working collaboratively with tribal heritage specialists toward...during this period and will receive scholarships or fellowships for further studies in science, mathematics , engineering or technology fields...graduated during this period with a degree in science, mathematics , engineering, or technology fields: The number of undergraduates funded by your

  1. 76 FR 41826 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  2. 25 CFR 122.6 - Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. 122.6 Section 122.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.6 Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. (a) For...

  3. 25 CFR 122.4 - Establishment of the Osage Tribal Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Establishment of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. 122.4 Section 122.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES... Committee. (a) The Osage Tribe, to maintain its right of Tribal autonomy, shall, at the direction of the...

  4. No Security Without Us: Tribes and Tribalism in Al Anbar Province, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    applies as payments for rights to safe passage through tribal territory. Payment of diyya does not necessarily signify an admission of guilt . Eqrar...honor, pride , dignity, and respect—and the converse (avoidance of shame, disgrace, and humiliation)—are key to the ethos of Iraqi tribal society.25

  5. 75 FR 4836 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... ``Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs)'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for renewal... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...

  6. 77 FR 67666 - Notice of Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Application To Withdraw Tribal Funds From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Renewal of Information Collection: Application To Withdraw Tribal Funds From Trust Status AGENCY: Office... request renewal approval for the collection of information for Application to Withdraw Tribal Funds from... nature of the information collection and the expected burden and cost. DATES: OMB has up to 60 days to...

  7. 25 CFR 170.402 - What is the tribal role in transportation planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the tribal role in transportation planning? 170... RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads Program Facilities Transportation Planning § 170.402 What is the tribal role in transportation planning? (a) All tribes must prepare...

  8. 25 CFR 170.410 - What is the purpose of tribal long-range transportation planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Program Facilities Long-Range Transportation Planning § 170.410 What is the purpose of tribal long-range... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the purpose of tribal long-range transportation planning? 170.410 Section 170.410 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND...

  9. 28 CFR 90.51 - Program criteria for Indian tribal government discretionary grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... government discretionary grants. 90.51 Section 90.51 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED... tribal government discretionary grants. (a) The Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs is authorized to make grants to Indian tribal governments for the purpose of developing and...

  10. The geology and mechanics of formation of the Fort Rock Dome, Yavapai County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuis, Gary S.

    1996-01-01

    The Fort Rock Dome, a craterlike structure in northern Arizona, is the erosional product of a circular domal uplift associated with a Precambrian shear zone exposed within the crater and with Tertiary volcanism. A section of Precambrian to Quaternary rocks is described, and two Tertiary units, the Crater Pasture Formation and the Fort Rock Creek Rhyodacite, are named. A mathematical model of the doming process is developed that is consistent with the history of the Fort Rock Dome.

  11. Analysis of Delayed Sea Breeze Onset for Fort Ord Prescribed Burning Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    DELAYED SEA BREEZE ONSET FOR FORT ORD PRESCRIBED BURNING OPERATIONS by Dustin D. Hocking December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Wendell Nuss Second...AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANALYSIS OF DELAYED SEA BREEZE ONSET FOR FORT ORD PRESCRIBED BURNING OPERATIONS 5...release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The U.S. Army conducts prescribed burns at Fort Ord

  12. 78 FR 61350 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-1986, DA 13-1978] Tribal Mobility... Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions: Patricia Robbins at (202) 418-0660. To... to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support, will now open at 12 noon Eastern...

  13. 43 CFR 30.267 - What if I disagree with the probate decision regarding tribal purchase option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... decision regarding tribal purchase option? 30.267 Section 30.267 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INDIAN PROBATE HEARINGS PROCEDURES Tribal Purchase of Interests Under Special Statutes § 30.267 What if I disagree with the probate decision regarding tribal purchase option? If you are...

  14. 78 FR 41959 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC); Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ...] State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC); Notice of Meeting AGENCY... Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. FOR..., announcement is made for the following committee meeting. Name of Committee: State, Local, Tribal, and Private...

  15. 25 CFR 170.915 - May tribal employment taxes or fees be included in an IRR project budget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Preference § 170.915 May tribal employment taxes or fees be included in an IRR project budget? Yes. The cost of tribal employment taxes or fees may be included in the budget for an IRR program or project... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May tribal employment taxes or fees be included in an IRR...

  16. Ethics Review for a Multi-Site Project Involving Tribal Nations in the Northern Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Jyoti; Petersen, Julie M; Tobacco, Deborah; Elliott, Amy J

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, Tribal Nations are forming ethics review panels, which function separately from institutional review boards (IRBs). The emergence of strong community representation coincides with a widespread effort supported by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and other federal agencies to establish a single IRB for all multi-site research. This article underscores the value of a tribal ethics review board and describes the tribal oversight for the Safe Passage Study-a multi-site, community-based project in the Northern Plains. Our experience demonstrates the benefits of tribal ethics review and makes a strong argument for including tribal oversight in future regulatory guidance for multi-site, community-based research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Jeffrey W. [Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Marie, MI (United States)

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  18. Automated Environmental Data Collection at Fort Benning, Georgia, from May 1999 to July 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Defense, Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Ecosystem Management Project, Ecosystem Characterization and Monitoring initiative Program at Fort Benning, Georgia...

  19. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamayun Shaheen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%, hair growth (11%, bad breath (12%, facial spots (9%, allergy, (9%, fairness (8%, wrinkles (8%, eye and lip care (9%. Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%, Leaves (25.2%, seeds (13.4% and roots (8.9%. Women of older (>30 years age group showed greater (67% response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area.

  20. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Hamayun; Nazir, Jaweria; Firdous, Syeda Sadiqa; Khalid, Abd-Ur-Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%), hair growth (11%), bad breath (12%), facial spots (9%), allergy, (9%), fairness (8%), wrinkles (8%), eye and lip care (9%). Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%), Leaves (25.2%), seeds (13.4%) and roots (8.9%). Women of older (>30 years) age group showed greater (67%) response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area. PMID:25068138

  1. Firewood consumption pattern of different tribal communities in Northeast India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, B.P.; Sachan, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Excessive use of firewood, as a primary source of energy for domestic purposes, is leading to severe deforestation in the northeastern Himalayan region. Firewood consumption pattern of three tribal communities of Meghalaya, India- Garo, Khasi and Jaintia was studied under varying ecological, socio-economic and socio-cultural conditions. Fuelwood consumption was highest to Khasi community (5.81 kg/capita/day), followed by the Garo (5.32 kg/capita/day) and Jaintia (3.90 kg/capita/day), respectively, irrespective of their socio-economic status. The labour energy expenditure for fuelwood collection was highest for the Jaintia (88.56 MJ/capita/yr) and minimum to Garo (70.64 MJ/capita/yr). The fuelwood is burnt for various activities such as cooking, water heating, space heating, lighting and livestock rearing, etc. Among various activities, cooking required maximum energy. Commercial fuel is beyond the reach of the tribal communities due to their poor socio-economic conditions. The estimated growing stock is unable to sustain the rate of fuel consumption. This information could be utilized for developing appropriate technology for afforestation programmes in this region since 90% of the total population use biomass as an important source of energy

  2. Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

    2009-03-31

    The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

  3. Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

    2008-03-17

    The Ft. Mojave tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada near the point where all three states meet, has a need for increased energy supplies. This need is a direct result of the aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources it was the desire of the tribal power company, AHA MACAV Power Service (AMPS) to investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable sources as an alternative to increased purchase of fossil fuel generated power and as a possible enterprise to export green power. Renewable energy generated on the reservation would serve to reduce the energy dependence of the tribal enterprises on off reservation sources of energy and if produced in excess of reservation needs, add a new enterprise to the current mix of economic activities on the reservation. Renewable energy development would also demonstrate the tribe’s support for improving environmental quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

  4. ALARA and decommissioning: The Fort St. Vrain experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borst, T.; Niehoff, M. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Platteville, CO (United States); Zachary, M. [Scientific Ecology Group, Platteville, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, the first and only commercial High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to operate in the United States, completed initial fuel loading in late 1973 and initial startup in early 1974. Due to a series of non-nuclear technical problems, Fort St. Vrain never operated consistently, attaining a lifetime capacity factor of slightly less than 15%. In August of 1989, the decision was made to permanently shut down the plant due to control rod drive and steam generator ring header failures. Public Service Company of Colorado elected to proceed with early dismantlement (DECON) as opposed to SAFSTOR on the bases of perceived societal benefits, rad waste, and exposure considerations, regulatory uncertainties associated with SAFSTOR, and cost. The decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain began in August of 1992, and is scheduled to be completed in early 1996. Decommissioning is being conducted by a team consisting of Westinghouse, MK-Ferguson, and Scientific Ecology Group. Public Service Company of Colorado as the licensee provides contract management and oversight of contractor functions. An aggressive program to maintain project radiation exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been established, with the following program elements: temporary and permanent shielding contamination control; mockup training; engineering controls; worker awareness; integrated work package reviews communication; special instrumentation; video camera usage; robotics application; and project committees. To date, worker exposures have been less than project estimates. from the start of the project through Februrary of 1994, total exposure has been 98.666 person-rem, compared to the project estimate of 433 person-rem and goal of 347 person-rem. The presentation will discuss the site characterization efforts, the radiological performance indicator program, and the final site release survey plans.

  5. Study of neutral composition of lower thermosphere at Fort Churchill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Hickman, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    On Feb. 4 and 6, 1969, and May 11, 1970, Aerobee rockets carrying neutral mass spectrometers were flown at Fort Churchill, Canada during conditions of low geomagnetic activity. As in earlier flights at White Sands, New Mexico, each rocket carried both 'open' and 'closed' ion source instruments. Vertical profiles of N2, O2, O, Ar, and He were measured. Results obtained were essentially the same as those observed at White Sands except that for the winter flights helium appeared to be in diffusive equilibrium.

  6. Archeological Testing Fort Hood: 1994-1995. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    ASSOCI TES, INC. (662-22) Archeological Testing at Fort Hood. 1994-199.5 569 -48-1941.1080-134 1935 -058 Figure 7.17 Selected Perforator Types: Awl and...Department of Anthropology, University of Arkansas. Huskey, V. 1935 An Archeological Survey of the Nueces Canyon of Texas, Bulletin of the Texas... epr 064lL.Tan I lms expected 08-FH1 Yellow 4 expected expedctd cd .9 15.Q W n• I less M 0 ~ *~Tax~on Total Total Inmr 53 nac na Vertebra.es 1. FcAuifnm

  7. A reactivity accidents simulation of the Fort Saint Vrain HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson

    1980-01-01

    A reactivity accidents analysis of the Fort Saint Vrain HTGR was made. The following accidents were analysed 1) A rod pair withdrawal accident during normal operation, 2) A rod pair ejection accident, 3) A rod pair withdrawal accident during startup operations at source levels and 4) Multiple rod pair withdrawal accident. All the simulations were performed by using the BLOOST-6 nuclear code The steady state reactor operation results obtained with the code were consistent with the design reactor data. The numerical analysis showed that all accidents - except the first one - cause particle failure. (author)

  8. Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement

  9. Construction, testing, and initial operation of Fort St. Vrain PCRV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ople, F.S. Jr.; Neylan, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Generating Station is the first station in the USA to use a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). The PCRV was designed and constructed by General Atomic. Construction of the PCRV was completed in 1970; the pressure and leak tests were completed in 1971. The structural behavior of the PCRV has been monitored by installed instrumentation since start of construction. The highlights of the actual construction, testing, and initial operation of the PCRV, including a comparison of structural behavior, where possible, between observed data and analytical predictions. (U.S.)

  10. Fort Carson Building 1860 Biomass Heating Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsberger, Randolph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tomberlin, Gregg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gaul, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    As part of the Army Net-Zero Energy Installation program, the Fort Carson Army Base requested that NREL evaluate the feasibility of adding a biomass boiler to the district heating system served by Building 1860. We have also developed an Excel-spreadsheet-based decision support tool--specific to the historic loads served by Building 1860--with which users can perform what-if analysis on gas costs, biomass costs, and other parameters. For economic reasons, we do not recommend adding a biomass system at this time.

  11. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  12. MR 201104: Evaluation of Discrimination Technologies and Classification Results and MR 201157: Demonstration of MetalMapper Static Data Acquisition and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    favorable at this site and included a single TOI (4.2-inch mortar) and benign topography and geology. All of the demonstrated classification approaches...Stokes mortars (PMTMA) • 3.5-inch rockets (Fort Sill, MMR) • Antitank land mines (Fort Sill, WMA) • Hand grenades (Fort Sill, WMA) 4.4 SITE

  13. The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy Initiative: Findings From a Collaborative, Participatory Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sheryl; D'Silva, Joanne; Hernandez, Carol; Villaluz, Nicole Toves; Martinez, Jaime; Matter, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While the reduction in the overall U.S. smoking prevalence has been declared one of the top 10 public health achievements of the past century, the growing disparity in smoking between American Indians and the general population is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Minnesota in particular has very high smoking rates among American Indians (59%). Tribal Nations in Minnesota share a past of attempted cultural genocide and a present of restoring the strength of their cultural teachings, including the prominence of traditional tobacco as a sacred "first medicine." The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy initiative works to address this complex and challenging context. This article describes results of a participatory evaluation from 2010 to 2013 in four Minnesota Tribal Nations-three Ojibwe and one Dakota. Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy coordinators used their cultural knowledge to develop community-level strategies, identifying appropriate strategies from best practices on tobacco advocacy, while drawing on the strengths of their own sovereignty and sacred tobacco traditions. Tribal coordinators generated support for policy change by conducting culturally relevant education, engaging tribal members, and nurturing relationships. This approach resulted in norm changes, practices toward restoring traditional tobacco, informal policies, and tribal resolutions to advance smoke-free policies.

  14. CULTURAL ADAPTATIONS OF EVIDENCE-BASED HOME-VISITATION MODELS IN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Parker, Myra E; Sanchez, Jenae; Riley, Rebecca; Heath, Debra; Chomo, Julianna C; Beltangady, Moushumi; Sarche, Michelle

    2018-05-01

    The Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) Program provides federal grants to tribes, tribal consortia, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations to implement evidence-based home-visiting services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) families. To date, only one evidence-based home-visiting program has been developed for use in AI/AN communities. The purpose of this article is to describe the steps that four Tribal MIECHV Programs took to assess community needs, select a home-visiting model, and culturally adapt the model for use in AI/AN communities. In these four unique Tribal MIECHV Program settings, each program employed a rigorous needs-assessment process and developed cultural modifications in accordance with community strengths and needs. Adaptations occurred in consultation with model developers, with consideration of the conceptual rationale for the program, while grounding new content in indigenous cultures. Research is needed to improve measurement of home-visiting outcomes in tribal and urban AI/AN settings, develop culturally grounded home-visiting interventions, and assess the effectiveness of home visiting in AI/AN communities. © 2018 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for

  16. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support &apos

  17. Stakeholder engagement: a model for tobacco policy planning in Oklahoma Tribal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Jessica W; Petherick, J T; Basara, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Oklahoma law pre-empts local governments from enacting smoking restrictions inside public places that are stricter than state law, but the sovereign status of Oklahoma's 38 Tribal nations means they are uniquely positioned to stand apart as leaders in the area of tobacco policy. To provide recommendations for employing university-Tribal partnerships as an effective strategy for tobacco policy planning in tribal communities. Using a community-based participatory research approach, researchers facilitated a series of meetings with key Tribal stakeholders in order to develop a comprehensive tobacco policy plan. Ongoing engagement activities held between January 2011 and May 2012, including interdepartmental visits, facility site tours, interviews, and attendance at tribal activities, were critical for fostering constructive and trusting relationships between all partners involved in the policy planning process. The 17-month collaborative engagement produced a plan designed to regulate the use of commercial tobacco in all Tribally owned properties. The extended period of collaboration between the researchers and Tribal stakeholders facilitated: (1) levels of trust between partners; and (2) a steadfast commitment to the planning process, ensuring completion of the plan amid uncertain political climates and economic concerns about tobacco bans. Extended engagement produced an effective foundation for policy planning that promoted collaboration between otherwise dispersed Tribal departments, and facilitated communication of diverse stakeholder interests related to the goal of tobacco policies. The findings of this study provide useful strategies and best practices for those looking to employ Tribal-university partnerships as strategies for tobacco control planning and policy-based research. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Excise tax differences at Oklahoma smoke shops: an opportunity for inter-tribal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Fritz L; Chaloupka, Frank J; Beebe, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Oklahoma's tribal tobacco shops are distributed throughout the state, including in urban areas. During the time frame of this study, state excise tax rates for cigarettes varied by tribe and region, and took five distinct levels, ranging from 5.75 cents to $1.03 per pack. To describe the pricing behavior of these smoke shops in a way that could support potential increases in the tribal taxation of cigarettes within the state. Two waves (2010 and 2011) of site visits were conducted, covering nearly all tribal smoke shops in the northeastern quarter of the state, an area containing the city of Tulsa and 60% of all tribal outlets. Researchers recorded representative prices and verified the tax rate paid (via tax stamp) for each shop. Data were analyzed in 2013. Lower-taxed tribal cigarettes tended to be priced at discounts that were even greater than the differential in tax rates. For example, across waves, the average pack of Marlboros from a shop with a 5.75-cent tax stamp sold for 52 cents less than the same pack from a 25.75-cent shop and 60 cents less than from a 51.5-cent shop. The minimal inter-tribal price response to the discontinuation of large quantities of contraband cigarette sales suggests that inter-tribal price competition in the Tulsa area is not as intense as expected. Ample scope exists for either unilateral or coordinated cross-tribal tax and price increases that will increase tribal cigarette tax revenue collections and improve public health. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

    2001-10-31

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

  20. Neurosensory changes of palatal mucousa following Le Fort I osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Movahedian Attar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the sensation of palatal ucosa before and after Le Fort I osteotomy and compared it based on whether greater palatine nerve has been dissected or not.
    • METHODS: Sixteen patients were studied within one week before  urgery and then one week, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Four tests including sharp-blunt discrimination, cold perception, pin prick sensation and electrical stimulation were performed.
    • RESULTS: Mean values of electrical stimulation were significantly higher 6 months after surgery (p < 0.05, on the other hand mean values of pin-prick sensation were significantly lower (p < 0.05. All patients regardless of the condition of greater palatine nerve were responsive to cold perception and sharp-blunt discrimination 6 months after surgery.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Following Le Fort I osteotomy, palatal  esponsiveness to electrical stimulation decreases and mechanical hyper sensitization occurs. Dissection of greater palatine nerve was shown to have no effect on the results.
    • KEYWORDS: Lefort I Osteotomy, Palatal Mocousa, Nerve Recovery.

  1. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  2. Information management needs for Fort Calhoun's design basis reconstitution project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beach, D.R.; Erickson, E.A.; Gambhir, S.K.; Parsons, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    While the need for information management is not new to the nuclear industry or Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), the interrelationship among design information, multiple systems, and design basis issues has necessitated the management of this information in new ways. The project team involved in the reconstitution of the design basis for OPPD's Fort Calhoun nuclear station has experienced the need for the developed effective methods for managing the vast amount of interrelated information associated with this effort. This management of information has been necessary to ensure that design basis documents (DBDs) adequately reflect the interrelated nature of component, system, and plant design; are complete and accurate; and are produced and maintained in a cost-effective manner. Fort Calhoun's aggressive design basis reconstitution project began in early 1987. The present scope of the project includes the production of 52 system and plant level DBDs; currently the project is ∼50% complete with DBDs in various stages of completion, from pilot DBDs through DBDs with approved formats, which have been issued for use. The experience in producing these documents has lead to a growing understanding of the special need for information management in each stage of the project. The development of the information tracking and management processes for the various stages of DBD development has proven to be cost-effective and gives a level of assurance that information has been included in the DBDs consistently and accurately

  3. Von Braun Rocket Team at Fort Bliss, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1940-01-01

    The German Rocket Team, also known as the Von Braun Rocket Team, poses for a group photograph at Fort Bliss, Texas. After World War II ended in 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun led some 120 of his Peenemuende Colleagues, who developed the V-2 rocket for the German military during the War, to the United Sttes under a contract to the U.S. Army Corps as part of Operation Paperclip. During the following five years the team worked on high altitude firings of the captured V-2 rockets at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, and a guided missile development unit at Fort Bliss, Texas. In April 1950, the group was transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, and continued to work on the development of the guided missiles for the U.S. Army until transferring to a newly established field center of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. Comprehensive Inventory and Determinations of Eligibility for Fort Riley Buildings: 1857-1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    become fashionable . Stone residences built at Fort Riley after the 1850s all have rock-faced walls and most have contrasting smooth-faced lintels...507 is significant as a wood-framed Folk Victorian cottage. While Building 507 is one of four Folk Victorian buildings at Fort Riley, it possesses a

  5. A visual progression of the Fort Valley Restoration Project treatments using remotely sensed imagery (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Crouse; Peter Z. Fule

    2008-01-01

    The landscape surrounding the Fort Valley Experimental Forest in northern Arizona has changed dramatically in the past decade due to the Fort Valley Restoration Project, a collaboration between the Greater Flagstaff Forest Partnership, Coconino National Forest, and Rocky Mountain Research Station. Severe wildfires in 1996 sparked community concern to start restoration...

  6. 75 FR 39051 - Desoto Mills LLC, Fort Payne, AL; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,416] Desoto Mills LLC, Fort... applicable to workers and former workers at Desoto Mills, LLC, a Subsidiary of Fruit of the Loom, Fort Payne... * * * locations outside the Desoto Mills Plant.'' The petitioner compares the situation at this location with...

  7. 77 FR 71636 - Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, AR; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Smith, AR; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration On August 8, 2012, the Department of Labor... workers and former workers of Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, Arkansas (subject firm). The workers are... reconsideration investigation, I determine that workers of Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, Arkansas, who were...

  8. Deficiency and sources of nutrition among an Indian tribal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudipta

    2014-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to explore the relationship between protein consumption and BMI for the adult Santhals, a tribal community of West Bengal, India. For this purpose, a cross sectional sample of 1262 adult Santhals were mea- sured. A high incidence (46.9%) of chronic energy deficiency (CED) is observed. A low production of protein rich food items such as pulses, poultry and fishing within their own economy reveal that the barter system fails to provide enough protein rich food items for the community. Along with this, low income earning opportunities lead to a low consumption of protein rich food and hence a high incidence of undernutrition. The occupational pattern reveals that the Santhals who derive livelihood by the means of hard physical activities are more prone to develop CED. The study suggests that the overdependence on forests and their own economy for consumption needs may not be helping this community in attaining a better health status.

  9. 77 FR 9960 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Extension of F-Line Streetcar Service to Fort Mason...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for Extension of F-Line Streetcar Service to Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, CA... Environmental Impact Statement for the Extension of F-Line Streetcar Service to Fort Mason Center, San Francisco... the extension of the historic streetcar F-line from Fisherman's Wharf to the Fort Mason Center, in San...

  10. 78 FR 28622 - Notice of Approval of Record of Decision for Extending F-Line Streetcar Service to Fort Mason...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ...] Notice of Approval of Record of Decision for Extending F-Line Streetcar Service to Fort Mason Center... Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) for extending the F-Line historic streetcar service to Fort Mason... turnaround terminus at the Fort Mason Center; and installing appurtenant features such as signals, crossings...

  11. 77 FR 58354 - Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ...-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental Impact... Administration, USDOT. ACTION: Notice of withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District and FHWA are..., Project Leader, Bend- Fort Rock Ranger District, 63095 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, OR 97701, phone 541...

  12. Revisiting "Narrow Bipolar Event" intracloud lightning using the FORTE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Light, T. E. L.

    2012-02-01

    The lightning stroke called a "Narrow Bipolar Event", or NBE, is an intracloud discharge responsible for significant charge redistribution. The NBE occurs within 10-20 μs, and some associated process emits irregular bursts of intense radio noise, fading at shorter timescales, sporadically during the charge transfer. In previous reports, the NBE has been inferred to be quite different from other forms of lightning strokes, in two ways: First, the NBE has been inferred to be relatively dark (non-luminous) compared to other lightning strokes. Second, the NBE has been inferred to be isolated within the storm, usually not participating in flashes, but when it is in a flash, the NBE has been inferred to be the flash initiator. These two inferences have sufficiently stark implications for NBE physics that they should be subjected to further independent test, with improved statistics. We attempt such a test with both optical and radio data from the FORTE satellite, and with lightning-stroke data from the Los Alamos Sferic Array. We show rigorously that by the metric of triggering the PDD optical photometer aboard the FORTE satellite, NBE discharges are indeed less luminous than ordinary lightning. Referred to an effective isotropic emitter at the cloud top, NBE light output is inferred to be less than ~3 × 108 W. To address isolation of NBEs, we first expand the pool of geolocated intracloud radio recordings, by borrowing geolocations from either the same flash's or the same storm's other recordings. In this manner we generate a pool of ~2 × 105 unique and independent FORTE intracloud radio recordings, whose slant range from the satellite can be inferred. We then use this slant range to calculate the Effective Radiated Power (ERP) at the radio source, in the passband 26-49 MHz. Stratifying the radio recordings by ERP into eight bins, from a lowest bin (140 kW), we document a trend for the radio recordings to become more isolated in time as the ERP increases. The highest

  13. 76 FR 44394 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian... the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program) (TTP). This program... of the Census and may be used for public transportation capital projects, operating costs of...

  14. 78 FR 27284 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian... Federal Register Notice (77 FR 67439) Fiscal Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservation Program... formula apportionment to eligible Indian tribes providing public transportation on tribal lands. FTA...

  15. Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department, Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation by Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department showing how they established the building department, developed a code adoption and enforcement process, and hired staff to carry out the work.

  16. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  17. 76 FR 12273 - 8(a) Business Development Program Regulation Changes; Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... utilizing the data. SBA expects that two Participants owned by the same tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC will submit identical data describing the benefits provided by the tribe, ANC, NHO or CDC. II. Tribal Consultation...

  18. Report: EPA Needs an Agency-Wide Plan to Provide Tribal Solid Waste Management Capacity Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0171, March 21, 2011. EPA cannot determine whether its efforts are assisting tribal governments in developing the capacity to manage solid waste or reduce the risks of open dumps in Indian country.

  19. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  20. CCR Certification Form for Wyoming or EPA R8 Tribal Community Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CCR Certification Form can be used to certify that community water systems in Wyoming or on Tribal Lands in EPA Region 8 have completed and distributed their annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) or water quality report.

  1. Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Ian; Robson, Bridget; Connolly, Michele

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populat...

  2. 77 FR 39244 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... collaboration and informed decision making. The purpose of the CDC/ ATSDR Tribal Advisory Committee or TAC is to... prevention, the Strategic National Stockpile (strategically placed medicine and supplies for use in national...

  3. Nutritional and health status of adult women of the Lodha tribal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional and health status of adult women of the Lodha tribal population of Paschim Midnapore, West Bengal, India: Compared with nontribal women. ... Results: The results indicated that the Lodha women belong to poor socioeconomic ...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTER ASSISTED PERSONAL INTERVIEW SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR COLLECTION OF TRIBAL FISH CONSUMPTION DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Native Americans who consume seafood often have higher seafood consumption rates and consequently greater exposures to contaminants in seafood than the general U.S. population. Defensible and quantifiable tribal seafood consumption rates are needed for development of ...

  5. OPP Guidance for Submission of State and Tribal Water Quality Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance describes the process to submit state and tribal surface and groundwater monitoring data for consideration in exposure characterizations for ecological and and human health risk assessments and in risk management decisions for pesticides.

  6. Barriers and Strategies for Healthy Food Choices among American Indian Tribal College Students: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jill F; Stastny, Sherri; Brunt, Ardith; Agnew, Wanda

    2018-06-01

    American Indian and Alaskan Native individuals experience disproportionate levels of chronic health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and overweight and obesity that are influenced by dietary patterns and food choices. Understanding factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students can enrich education and programs that target dietary intake. To build an understanding of factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students at increased risk for college attrition. A nonexperimental cohort design was used for qualitative descriptive analysis. Participants (N=20) were purposively sampled, newly enrolled, academically underprepared tribal college students enrolled in a culturally relevant life skills course at an upper Midwest tribal college between September 2013 and May 2015. Participant demographic characteristics included various tribal affiliations, ages, and number of dependents. Participant responses to qualitative research questions about dietary intake, food choices, self-efficacy for healthy food choices, psychosocial determinants, and barriers to healthy food choices during telephone interviews were used as measures. Qualitative analysis included prestudy identification of researcher bias/assumptions, audiorecording and transcription, initial analysis (coding), secondary analysis (sorting and identifying meaning), and verification (comparative pattern analysis). Qualitative analysis revealed a variety of themes and subthemes about healthy food choices. Main themes related to barriers included taste, food gathering and preparation, and difficulty clarifying healthy food choices. Main themes related to strategies included taste, cultural traditions and practices, and personal motivation factors. Qualitative analysis identified barrier and strategy themes that may assist nutrition and dietetics practitioners working with tribal/indigenous communities, tribal college educators and health specialists, and tribal

  7. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  8. Preplaced aggregate concrete application on Fort St. Vrain PCRV construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ople, F.S. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Two distinct concreting methods were employed in the construction of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Generating Station, a 330 MW(e) High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor installation near Denver, Colorado. Preplaced aggregate concrete (PAC) techniques were employed in the PCRV bottom head and the core support floor; conventional job-mixed concrete was used in the PCRV sidewall and top head regions. This paper describes the successful application of PAC techniques utilized primarily in solving construction difficulties associated with confined and heavily congested regions of the PCRV. The PAC technique consists of placing coarse aggregate inside the forms, followed by injection of grout under pressure through embedded pipes to fill the interstices in the aggregate mass. Details of the PAC construction method including grout mix development, grouting equipment, grout pipe layout, grouting sequence, grout level monitoring, concrete temperature control, and pre-construction mockups are described. (author)

  9. Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

    1992-07-01

    This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events

  10. Depressurization accident analyses for the Fort St. Vrain Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, D.D.

    1976-01-01

    Design-basis depressurization accident analyses for the Fort St. Vrain reactor were performed using the FLODIS (Ref. 4) code. The FLODIS code models the active core, side reflector, gas annulus between the core barrel and the PCRV liner, and the PCRV cooling system. Results are presented for the Pelton circulators operating at 10,550, 8800, and 7000 rpm. Maximum temperatures of selected components are plotted as a function of time during the transient. None of the components studied exceeded the temperature at which failure or damage may occur. However, there must be sufficient mixing of the outlet gas in the lower plenum to insure the integrity of the steel liners of the steam generator inlet ducts

  11. Fort St. Vrain reactor performance and operation to full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, W.A.; Bramblett, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), has now been tested to full thermal power. Testing was conducted for the dual purposes of demonstrating component and system capability as a part of the rise-to-power program and determining core fluctuation/redistribution behavior under full power conditions. Both objectives were met. Full power performance of all major components and the achievement of nearly all design objectives has been verified. In addition, the tests showed that the fluctuation phenomenon has been corrected. Core region outlet temperature redistributions have been characterized, related to a physical mechanism, and shown to be inconsequential for overall plant operation

  12. Fort St. Vrain graphite site mechanical separation concept selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the alternatives to the disposal of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor spent nuclear fuel involves the separation of the fuel rods composed of compacts from the graphite fuel block assembly. After the separation of these two components, the empty graphite fuel blocks would be disposed of as a low level waste (provided the appropriate requirements are met) and the fuel compacts would be treated as high level waste material. This report deals with the mechanical separation aspects concerning physical disassembly of the FSV graphite fuel element into the empty graphite fuel blocks and fuel compacts. This report recommends that a drilling technique is the preferred choice for accessing the, fuel channel holes and that each hole is drilled separately. This report does not cover any techniques or methods to separate the triso fuel particles from the graphite matrix of the fuel compacts

  13. Exploration Drilling and Technology Demonstration At Fort Bliss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ben; Moore, Joe [EGI; Segall, Marylin; Nash, Greg; Simmons, Stuart; Jones, Clay; Lear, Jon; Bennett, Carlon

    2014-02-26

    The Tularosa-Hueco basin in south-central New Mexico has long been known as an extensional area of high heat flow. Much of the basin is within the Fort Bliss military reservation, which is an exceptionally high value customer for power independent of the regional electric grid and for direct use energy in building climate control. A series of slim holes drilled in the 1990s established the existence of a thermal anomaly but not its practical value. This study began in 2009 with a demonstration of new exploration drilling technology. The subsequent phases reported here delivered a useful well, comparative exploration data sets and encouragement for further development. A production-size well, RMI56-5, was sited after extensive study of archival and newly collected data in 2010-2011. Most of 2012 was taken up with getting state and Federal authorities to agree on a lead agency for permitting purposes, getting a drilling permit and redesigning the drilling program to suit available equipment. In 2013 we drilled, logged and tested a 924 m well on the McGregor Range at Fort Bliss using a reverse circulation rig. Rig tests demonstrated commercial permeability and the well has a 7-inch slotted liner for use either in production or injection. An August 2013 survey of the completed well showed a temperature of 90 C with no reversal, the highest such temperature in the vicinity. The well’s proximity to demand suggests a potentially valuable resource for direct use heat and emergency power generation. The drilling produced cuttings of excellent size and quality. These were subjected to traditional analyses (thin sections, XRD) and to the QEMScan™ for comparison. QEMScan™ technology includes algorithms for determining such properties of rocks as density, mineralogy, heavy/light atoms, and porosity to be compared with direct measurements of the cuttings. In addition to a complete cuttings set, conventional and resistivity image logs were obtained in the open hole before

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management's Tribal Interactions - 12513

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, April; Shafer, David [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 (United States); Elmer, John [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Effective government-to-government interactions with tribal nations and maintaining stakeholder relations with members of tribes are increasingly important to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). As of October 2011, LM was responsible for long-term surveillance and maintenance of 87 sites and facilities in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, including some sites on tribal lands. The sites on tribal lands can affect natural resources that are managed or used by tribes, or the sites can potentially affect areas of cultural significance to tribal nations in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Tribes are separate sovereign governments recognized in the U.S. Constitution and are significant stakeholders for LM sites. The tribes are individual nations with diverse histories, cultures, customs, religions, and laws. LM has regular communication with the affected tribes to inform members of issues, to allow the tribe to participate in decision making, to provide technical reviews, and to ensure tribal concerns are addressed. Four LM sites are in the Navajo Nation. Three of those sites contain uranium mill tailings disposal cells regulated under long-term surveillance and maintenance programs that require monitoring and annual inspections. The fourth site was remediated but still has a groundwater plume that LM is responsible for. DOE and LM have worked with the Navajo Nation for almost 30 years on technical issues and to ensure tribal concerns are addressed. (authors)

  15. A study of acceptors and non-acceptors of family planning methods among three tribal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutharayappa, R

    1995-03-01

    Primary data were collected from 399 currently married women of the Marati, Malekudiya, and Koraga tribes in the Dakshina Kannada district of Karnataka State in this study of the implementation of family planning programs in tribal areas. The Marati, Malekudiya, and Koraga tribes are three different endogamous tribal populations living in similar ecological conditions. Higher levels of literacy and a high rate of acceptance of family planning methods, however, have been observed among these tribes compared to the rest of the tribal population in the state. 46.4% of currently married women aged 15-49 years in the tribes were acceptors of family planning methods, having a mean 3.7 children. The majority of acceptors opted for tubectomy and vasectomy. The adoption of spacing methods is less common among tribal people. Most acceptors received their operations through government health facilities. They were motivated mainly by female health workers and received both cash and other incentives to accept family planning. The main reason for non-acceptance of family planning among non-acceptors was the desire to conceive and bear more children. The data indicate that most of the tribal households are nuclear families with household size more or less similar to that of the general population. They have a higher literacy rate than the rest of the tribal population in the state, with literacy levels between males and females and between the three tribes being quite different; the school enrollment ratio is relatively higher for both boys and girls.

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  17. Effect of tribal language use on colorectal cancer screening among American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Angela A; Garroutte, Eva; Ton, Thanh G N; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2012-12-01

    American Indians have one of the lowest colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates for any racial/ethnic group in the U.S., yet reasons for their low screening participation are poorly understood. We examine whether tribal language use is associated with knowledge and use of CRC screening in a community-based sample of American Indians. Using logistic regression to estimate the association between tribal language use and CRC test knowledge and receipt we found participants speaking primarily English were no more aware of CRC screening tests than those speaking primarily a tribal language (OR = 1.16 [0.29, 4.63]). Participants who spoke only a tribal language at home (OR = 1.09 [0.30, 4.00]) and those who spoke both a tribal language and English (OR = 1.74 [0.62, 4.88]) also showed comparable odds of receipt of CRC screening. Study findings failed to support the concept that use of a tribal language is a barrier to CRC screening among American Indians.

  18. Constraints on timescales and mechanics of magmatic underplating from InSAR observations of large active magma sills in the Earth's crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Theoretical models of the granitoid magma generation due to magmatic underplating predict that anatectic melts are produced on quite short timescales of the order of the crystallization time of typical mafic underplates (e.g., 102-10^3 years for sill intrusions that are a few tens to a few hundred meters thick). If so, the intrusion of mafic underplates, the volume changes associated with in situ melting, and the subsequent evacuation of the resulting granitoid magmas can each generate geodetically observable deformation. Geodetic measurements in areas of contemporaneous large active magma bodies may therefore provide critical constraints on the timescales and dynamics of crustal anatexis. We use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations in regions of the ongoing crustal magmatism to constrain typical rates of the large-scale melt generation and/or migration, and to test the proposed models of the granitic melt production. Our primary targets include large mid-crustal magma bodies imaged by seismic studies, in particular, the Socorro (New Mexico, USA), the Altiplano-Puna (south America), and the south Tibet (Asia) magma bodies. All these magma bodies are located at depth of 19-20 km, suggesting a strong rheological or buoyancy control on the transition from a vertical to a horizontal magma flow. Stacked interferometric data from the Socorro magma body indicate a quasi-steady uplift with a maximum rate of 3-4 mm/yr over the last 10 years covered by the InSAR observations. The uplift morphology can be well described by an elastic inflation of the Socorro sill. We show that deformation models that allow for the viscous-like rheology of the mid-to-lower crust cannot be easily reconciled with the geodetic data. However, thermodynamic modeling, in conjunction with inferences of the nearly constant uplift rates, suggest that the deformations associated with the intrusion emplacement must involve a significant inelastic component. Such inelastic

  19. Anatomy of the Le Fort I segment: Are arterial variations a potential risk factor for avascular bone necrosis in Le Fort I osteotomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneder, Simon; Wallner, Jürgen; Weiglein, Andreas; Kmečová, Ĺudmila; Egger, Jan; Pilsl, Ulrike; Zemann, Wolfgang

    2018-05-02

    Osteotomies of the Le Fort I segment are routine operations with low complication rates. Ischemic complications are rare, but can have severe consequences that may lead to avascular bone necrosis of the Le Fort I segment. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the blood supply and special arterial variants of the Le Fort I segment responsible for arterial hypoperfusion or ischemic avascular necrosis after surgery. The arterial anatomy of the Le Fort I segment's blood supply using 30 halved human cadaver head specimens was analyzed after complete dissection until the submicroscopic level. In all specimens the arterial variants of the Le Fort I segment and also the arterial diameters measured at two points were evaluated. The typical known vascularization pattern was apparent in 90% of all specimens, in which the ascending palatine (D1: 1,2 mm ± 0,34 mm; D2: 0,8 mm ± 0,34 mm) and ascending pharyngeal artery (D1: 1,3 mm ± 0,58 mm; D2: avascular segment necrosis after surgery. An individualized operation plan may prevent ischemic complications in at-risk patients. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Research on tuberculosis in tribal areas in India: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V G; Muniyandi, M; Bhat, J; Yadav, R; Sharma, R

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem in resource-poor countries including India. Scientific knowledge is used to guide policy and practice. There is however, a limited, systematically collected data required for guiding the scale-up of interventions particularly amongst vulnerable populations including tribal groups in the country. In view of this, a systematic review of the TB research studies carried out in tribal areas of different parts of the country was undertaken. To undertake a systematic review of the TB research studies carried out in tribal areas of India between 1996 and 2016. A systematic review of English articles published between 1996 and 2016 on any aspect of TB was done through internet searches using Literature search EndNote programme. The words used for searching were tuberculosis, India, tribal, indigenous, disadvantaged, adivasi. The most common topics classified as annual risk of tuberculosis infection (ARTI), prevalence of TB, laboratory studies, clinical symptoms of TB, risk factors for TB, knowledge attitude practice, community Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) providers, performance of Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP), and drug resistant TB. Classification was also done on the basis of the type of tribe studied and place of study conducted. A total of 47 studies identified through the search were included in the review. Of the 47 studies reviewed, 12 were on TB prevalence, 7 were laboratory studies, four on ARTI and 5 on performance of RNTCP in tribal areas. Among these, majority (23 studies) of the tribal studies did not mention the type of tribe. Ten studies were conducted among Saharia, a particularly vulnerable tribal group in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh mainly by the National Institute for Research on Tribal Health, five were among the mixed tribes and very few on other tribes. The systematic review indicates that the research studies on TB among tribal population are very few. There

  1. 25 CFR 115.815 - How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account? 115.815 Section 115.815 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Withdrawing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.815 How does a tribe request trust...

  2. Mobile platform for fish migration upstream from the discharge sill situated near Dacia bridge on Crișul Repede River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan VOICU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal connectivity represent the way in which organisms move the energy and material exchanges located throughout the water. Fragmentation the longitudinal connectivity of watercourses caused by dams or other hydrotechnical constructions represent a major impact on sediment transport, hydrological regime, downstream moving and biota migration. The hydromorphological elements (river continuity, as well as chemical, biological, physicochemical elements characterize the ecological status of rivers. Migratory fish species: nase (Chondrostoma nasus - protected by Bern Convention - Appendix III, barbel (Barbus barbus - rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V, annex 4A of Low nr.462 and Red List of RBDD and Freshwater bream (Abramis brama - protected by Bern Convention (Appendix III are blocked by the hydrotechnical constructions (discharge sills, dams located across the watercourse Crișul Repede River. One of the important think of this system is the gravitational fall of water. This solution will lead to the restoration of the longitudinal connection of the Crișul Repede River in the Oradea City, near Dacia Bridge. Romania is part of the European Union and it has the obligation to implement the provisions of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC, transposed into Romanian legislation by the Water Law 107/1996 as supplemented and amended (Act 310/2004.

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of a novel Sillén - Aurivillius bismuth oxyhalide, PbBi3VO7.5Cl, and its derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Plokhikh, Igor V.; Kazakov, Sergey M.; Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Akinfiev, Victor S.; Gorbachev, Anatoly V.; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M.; Teterin, Yury A.; Maslakov, Konstantin I.; Teterin, Anton Yu; Ivanov, Kirill E.

    2018-01-01

    A new Sillén - Aurivillius family of layered bismuth oxyhalides has been designed and successfully constructed on the basis of PbBiO2X (X = halogen) synthetic perites and γ-form of Bi2VO5.5 solid electrolyte. This demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the latter to serve as a building block in construction of mixed-layer structures. The parent compound PbBi3VO7.5-δCl (δ ≤ 0.05) has been investigated by powder XRD, TEM, XPS methods and magnetic susceptibility measurements. An unexpected but important condition for the formation of the mixed-layer structure is partial (ca. 5%) reduction of VV into VIV which probably suppresses competitive formation of apatite-like Pb - Bi vanadates. This reduction also stabilizes the γ polymorphic form of Bi2VO5.5 not only in the intergrowth structure, but in Bi2V1-xMxO5.5-y (M = Nb, Sb) solid solutions.

  4. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  5. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2004-04-01

    The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

  6. Tribal casinos in California: the last vestige of indoor smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background High levels of airborne particles from secondhand smoke have been reported in California Indian casinos. Yet, little is known regarding the smoking status of casino patrons, their avoidance of secondhand smoke while visiting, and their views on a hypothetical smoking ban. Methods Predictors of visiting an Indian casino were assessed among participants of the 2008 California Tobacco Survey (n = 10, 397). Exposure to and avoidance of secondhand smoke were subsequently analyzed among a subset of participants who had visited a casino in the year prior to the survey (n = 3, 361). Results Ethnic minorities, older individuals, current smokers and residents of sparsely populated regions of California were more likely than other demographic groups to visit a tribal casino. Avoidance of secondhand smoke was more frequent among the never smokers than former and current smokers, particularly those who last visited a casino lacking physical separation between non-smoking and smoking sections. The never smokers versus current smokers disproportionately expressed a willingness to extend their stay and visit again if smoking were prohibited. Conclusions If casinos became smoke free, then it is anticipated that they would be visited by a significantly larger number of Californians, including both patrons and those who otherwise would not have visited a casino. PMID:22364487

  7. Tribal casinos in California: the last vestige of indoor smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timberlake David S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of airborne particles from secondhand smoke have been reported in California Indian casinos. Yet, little is known regarding the smoking status of casino patrons, their avoidance of secondhand smoke while visiting, and their views on a hypothetical smoking ban. Methods Predictors of visiting an Indian casino were assessed among participants of the 2008 California Tobacco Survey (n = 10, 397. Exposure to and avoidance of secondhand smoke were subsequently analyzed among a subset of participants who had visited a casino in the year prior to the survey (n = 3, 361. Results Ethnic minorities, older individuals, current smokers and residents of sparsely populated regions of California were more likely than other demographic groups to visit a tribal casino. Avoidance of secondhand smoke was more frequent among the never smokers than former and current smokers, particularly those who last visited a casino lacking physical separation between non-smoking and smoking sections. The never smokers versus current smokers disproportionately expressed a willingness to extend their stay and visit again if smoking were prohibited. Conclusions If casinos became smoke free, then it is anticipated that they would be visited by a significantly larger number of Californians, including both patrons and those who otherwise would not have visited a casino.

  8. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program. Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia river juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increased competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management. Impacts to cultural resources can be avoided so impacts would be low. Soil impacts would be localized and their effects would be local and temporary during construction. Impacts to water quality would be low. Mitigation would be used if impacts to groundwater or surface water are greater than anticipated. No impacts to floodplains are expected. Impacts to all categories of fish range from no to high impacts

  9. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program: Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management

  10. 78 FR 14352 - Notice of Approved Class III Tribal Gaming Ordinances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Rancheria of California 20. Bois Forte Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe 21. Buena Vista Rancheria of Me... Chippewa Indians 116. LaJolla Band of Luiseno Indians 117. La Posta Band of Mission Indians 118. Las Vegas...

  11. Building a sustainable GIS framework for supporting a tribal transportation problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Due to the recent oil boom, the Fort Berthold Reservation has experienced a dramatic increase in highway and local traffic. To support energy transportation and provide safe roads, the reservation needs cost-efficient and effective transportation pla...

  12. Tribal communities and coal in Northeast India: The politics of imposing and resisting mining bans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDuie-Ra, Duncan; Kikon, Dolly

    2016-01-01

    Bans on coal mining have been implemented in two tribal majority states in India's north-east frontier; Nagaland and Meghalaya. In Nagaland the state government imposed the ban in an attempt to capture control of coal extraction and trade, while in Meghalaya India's National Green Commission imposed the ban over concern for the environment and labour conditions. In both cases local communities have opposed the bans, and in some areas resumed mining under the authority of tribal councils and powerful civil society actors. In this paper we explore the politics of coal extraction that resulted in these bans and the response of communities and authorities. In doing so we made three main arguments that contribute to understanding of coal and communities in frontier regions where state control is partial and the legacy of armed conflict is powerful. First, in both locations the majority of the coal mining activity has been initiated and managed by members of tribal communities rather than profit-driven outsiders. Second, in contrast to other contexts in India (notably Orissa and Jharkhand) where large state or private enterprises seek to modify the law to enable coal extraction, in Nagaland and Meghalaya it has been communities that resent and challenge state and national laws being applied to their lands. Third, the right to extract coal is connected to the right of tribal communities to determine what happens on their lands. - Highlights: • Tribal communities initiate and manage coal mining in Nagaland and Meghalaya. • Laws banning coal extraction have been challenged and resisted by local communities. • The right to extract coal is tied to protecting tribal land rights. • Tribal autonomy in coal policy is progressive, yet enables capture by local elites. • Where there has been regulation of coal mining it has come from unexpected sources.

  13. 2009 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Fort Kent, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Camp Dresser McKee Inc. contracted with Sanborn Map Company to provide LiDAR mapping services for Fort Kent, Maine. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light Detection...

  14. Design Schematics for a Sustainable Parking Lot: Building 2-2332, ENRD Classroom, Fort Bragg, NC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stumpf, Annette

    2003-01-01

    ...) was tasked with planning a sustainable design "charrette" to explore and develop alternative parking lot designs that would meet Fort Bragg's parking needs, as well as its need to meet sustainable...

  15. Vendor Payments-Operation Mongoose, Fort Belvoir Defense Accounting Office and Rome Operating Location

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1996-01-01

    .... Due to the impending closure of the Defense Accounting Office at Fort Belvoir and the anticipated consolidation to the Rome Operating Location, New York, we did not perform a review of the management...

  16. Final Sampling and Analysis Plan for Background Sampling, Fort Sheridan, Illinois

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    .... This Background Sampling and Analysis Plan (BSAP) is designed to address this issue through the collection of additional background samples at Fort Sheridan to support the statistical analysis and the Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA...

  17. Freight Advanced Traveler Information System (FRATIS) - Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) prototype : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the Final Report for the FRATIS Dallas-Fort Worth DFW prototype system. The FRATIS prototype in : DFW consisted of the following components: optimization algorithm, terminal wait time, route specific : navigation/traffic/weather, and advanced...

  18. Notification: Hotline Complaint – Drinking Water Treatment Plant at the Fort Belknap Indian Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY13-0076, November 13, 2012. On March 22, 2012, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) received a hotline complaint on the construction of the Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) at the Fort Belknap Indian Community.

  19. Biological Assessment of Streams Associated with the Northern Training Complex at Fort knox, Kentucky, August 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Payne, Berry

    2001-01-01

    .... The benthic macroinvertebrate aspect of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Rapid Bioassessment Protocol was applied in August 2000 to selected streams likely to be affected by proposed improvements of training facilities on Fort Knox...

  20. 75 FR 24930 - Fort Bliss (Texas) Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment Final Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ...-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: [email protected] . FOR... Regional Branch Library, 551 Redd Road. In Las Cruces (NM), the New Mexico State University Zuhl Library...

  1. Feasibility Study for an Off-Post, Primary Care Clinic at Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kvalevog, Kristen J

    2005-01-01

    .... Over 90,679 beneficiaries currently live in -the-Fort Campbell-catchment area and receive primary care at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital through the Red, White, Blue, Gold, and Young Eagle Clinics...

  2. Site Investigations with the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrator System at Fort Dix, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    rod system or through a tremie tube ; both procedures were used interchangeably at Fort Dix to demon- strate the efficiency and effectiveness of each...allows delivery through either a l/4-in.-diam grout tube or a 3/8-in.-diam rout tube . The grout used at Fort Dix consisted of a mixture of water and... microfine , blended Portland cement (Lehigh Geocem’, Leeds, Alabama). The grout is a suspension of a uniformly produced cement clinker interground with

  3. Cannon Fire Soon to Accompany Bugle Call at Fort Detrick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning June 14, the familiar bugle calls at Fort Detrick will be joined by a special percussion instrument: a cannon. A single cannon shot will be fired on the first note of “Reveille,” which signals the start of each day and is accompanied by the raising of the American flag. “Reveille” sounds at 6:30 a.m. At 5 p.m., Fort Detrick plays “Retreat,” which alerts the post that

  4. Inpatient Behavioral Health Recapture A Busiess Case Analysis at Evans Army Community Hospital Fort Carson, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-20

    and Obstetrics /Gynecology. Inpatient care includes Obstetrics , Intensive Care, and Post Anesthesia Care/Same Day Surgery. EACH Mission: Delivering...charged with murder in Iraq shooting deaths, 2009). EACH Inpt Psych 13 Fort Carson has not been immune to the increase in suicides and violence among...to identify Soldiers with PTSD symptoms. In 2008, however, attention returned to Fort Carson as a number of local homicides and other violence tied

  5. How Do Le Fort-Type Fractures Present in a Pediatric Cohort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, Alexandra; Lopez, Joseph; Luck, J D; Faateh, Muhammad; Manson, Paul; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2018-05-01

    Le Fort-type fractures are very rare in children, and there is a paucity of literature presenting their frequency and characteristics. The purpose of this study was to determine the etiology, frequency, and fracture patterns of children with severe facial trauma associated with pterygoid plate fractures in a pediatric cohort. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all children aged younger than 16 years with pterygoid plate and facial fractures who presented to our institute between 1990 and 2010. Patient charts and radiologic records were reviewed for demographic and fracture characteristics. Patients were categorized into 2 groups as per facial fracture pattern: non-Le Fort-type fractures (group A) and Le Fort-type fractures (group B). Other variables including dentition age, frontal sinus development, mechanism of injury, injury severity, and concomitant injuries were recorded. Univariate methods were used to compare groups. We identified 24 children; 25% were girls, and 20.8% were of nonwhite race. Most presented with Le Fort-type fracture patterns (group B, 66.7%). Age was significantly different between group A and group B (mean, 5.9 years and 9.9 years, respectively; P = .009). No significant differences in Injury Severity Score, rate of operative repair, and length of stay were found between groups. Most children with severe facial fractures and pterygoid plate fractures presented with Le Fort-type fracture patterns in our cohort. The mean age of children with Le Fort-type fractures was greater than in those with non-Le Fort-type patterns. However, Le Fort-type fractures did occur in younger children with deciduous and mixed dentition. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rumlige fortællinger fra mobilt og web-baseret GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    Denne artikel handler om begrebet rumlige fortællinger med anvendelse af fortællingshenvisninger, og disses potentielle rolle ved implementation af fleksible og tematiske turistinformationssystemer. Artiklen fokuserer på brugen af mobile, positionsbekendte enheder, såsom visse PDA'er og smartphon......, samt på web-gis. Der præsenteres to anvendelseseksempler: et fra det centrale København og et fra et område nær Accra, Ghana....

  7. MEASUREMENT ISSUES IN HOME-VISITING RESEARCH WITHIN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES: CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Bolan, Marc; Chomos, Julianna C; Heath, Debra; Miles, Jon; Salvador, Melina; Whitmore, Corrie; Barlow, Allison

    2018-05-04

    In this article, Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grantees share strategies they have developed and adopted to address the most common barriers to effective measurement (and thus to effective evaluation) encountered in the course of implementation and evaluation of their home-visiting programs. We identify key challenges in measuring outcomes in Tribal MIECHV Programs and provide practical examples of various strategies used to address these challenges within diverse American Indian and Alaska Native cultural and contextual settings. Notably, high-quality community engagement is a consistent thread throughout these strategies and fundamental to successful measurement in these communities. These strategies and practices reflect the experiences and innovative solutions of practitioners working on the ground to deliver and evaluate intervention programs to tribal communities. They may serve as models for getting high-quality data to inform intervention while working within the constraints and requirements of program funding. The utility of these practical solutions extends beyond the Tribal MIECHV grantees and offers the potential to inform a broad array of intervention evaluation efforts in tribal and other community contexts. © 2018 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  8. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    MURALIDHARAN, SHRIKANTH; GOWDA, SRINIVASA; AMBEKAR, RUTUJA; RATHORE, BHUPENDRA S.; CHABRA, SAKSHI; LALANI, AFSHEEN; HARANI, HARSH

    2018-01-01

    Introduction India is home to many tribes which have an interesting and varied history of origins, customs and social practices. Oral health care in tribal areas is limited due to shortage of dental manpower, financial constraints and the lack of perceived need for dental care among tribal masses. Objective To assess orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India. Methods A cross-sectional house to house survey was carried out among 800 tribal children aged 5 to 15 years old in two major tribal districts of Indore division. Permissions and consent were obtained from local administrative authorities, ethical committee and parents respectively. A structured proforma was used to record demographic data. Examination for dentofacial anomalies was conducted according to WHO 1997 survey methods. Descriptive tables and analytical tests like ANOVA, post-hoc and chi-square test were employed. Results The mean age was 9.75(±2.43) years. The mean DAI score among 12 to 15 years old children was 23.19±5.22. Female exhibited higher (24.51±5.34) mean DAI score compared to males (22.12±4.87) (pdental services. PMID:29440959

  9. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-23

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  10. Fate of TCE in heated Fort Lewis soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Jed; Fletcher, Kelly E; Löffler, Frank E; Pennell, Kurt D

    2009-02-01

    This study explores the transformation of trichloroethene (TCE) caused by heating contaminated soil and groundwater samples obtained from the East Gate Disposal Yard (EGDY) located in Fort Lewis, WA. After field samples transferring into glass ampules and introducing 1.5 micromol of TCE, the sealed ampules were incubated at temperatures of 25, 50, and 95 degrees C for periods of up to 95.5 days. Although TCE was completely transformed into cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) after 42 days at 25 degrees C by microbial activity, this transformation was not observed at 50 or 95 degrees C. Chloride levels increased after 42 days at 25 degrees C corresponding to the mass of TCE transformed to cis-DCE, were constant at 50 degrees C, and increased at 95 degrees C yielding a TCE degradation half-life of 1.6-1.9 years. These findings indicate that indigenous microbes contribute to the partial dechlorination of TCE to cis-DCE at temperatures of less than 50 degrees C, whereas interphase mass transfer and physical recovery of TCE will predominate over in situ degradation processes at temperatures of greater than 50 degrees C during thermal treatment at the EGDY site.

  11. Fort St. Vrain fuel-handling system RAM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizi, S.M.; Berg, G.E.; Burton, J.H.; Durand, R.E.; Larson, E.M.; Pepe, D.J.; Rutherford, P.D.; Novachek, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    Public Service of Company of Colorado (PSC) is planning to decommission its Fort St. Vrain plant in 1990. This requires removal of 1,500 separate assemblies from the core. With the low historical availability of the fuel-handling system (FHS), defueling time was estimated at 36 months. With plant expenses of approximately $1.6 million per month during defueling, this would mean a schedule cost of $58 million. With their contractor, Rockwell International, PSC embarked on a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analysis to reduce projected defueling time. Key elements included (a) estimating availability of the FHS using a limited historical record, (b) assessing the defueling critical path, and (c) proposing and evaluating design/operational improvements. The most cost-effective improvements are being implemented and are expected to provide a reduction of >18 months in schedule and a net savings of $20 to 25 million. The paper describes the FHS design and operation, major problems associated with fuel-handling operations, and results and recommendations

  12. An overview of the 2009 Fort Hood Robotics Rodeo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth

    2010-04-01

    The Robotics Rodeo held from 31 August to 3 September 2009 at Fort Hood, Texas, had three stated goals: educate key decision makers and align the robotics industry; educate Soldiers and developers; and perform a live market survey of the current state of technologies to encourage the development of robotic systems to support operational needs. Both events that comprised the Robotics Rodeo, the Extravaganza and the robotic technology observation, demonstration and discussion (RTOD2) addressed these stated goals. The Extravaganza was designed to foster interaction between the vendors and the visitors who included the media, Soldiers, others in the robotics industry and key decision makers. The RTOD2 allowed the vendors a more private and focused interaction with the subject matter experts teams, this was the forum for the vendors to demonstrate their robotic systems that supported the III Corps operational needs statements that are focused on route clearance, convoy operations, persistent stare, and robotic wingman. While the goals of the Rodeo were achieved, the underlying success from the event is the development of a new business model that is focused on collapsing the current model to get technologies into the hands of our warfighters quicker. This new model takes the real time data collection from the Rodeo, the Warfighter Needs from TRADOC, the emerging requirements from our current engagements, and assistance from industry partners to develop a future Army strategy for the rapid fielding of unmanned systems technologies.

  13. Soil classification using CPTu in Fort McMurray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbanna, M. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Nanaimo, BC (Canada); El Sabbagh, M. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Sharp, J. [ConeTec Investigations Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper evaluated 4 piezocone penetration testing (CPTu) classification methods using data from 3 different sites near Fort McMurray in northern Alberta. For comparative purposes, other in-situ tests, field observations, and laboratory tests were performed at all sites in close proximity to the CPTu soundings. The study evaluated pleistocene sand and sand till deposits with low fines content. Profiling these deposits is necessary because they are often used as filler material for earth retaining structures in many oilsands projects. The study also evaluated pleistocene clay and clay tills that are often used as low permeability material for seepage control. In thick layers, pleistocene clay is known to cause foundation problems. CPTu with dissipation data was shown to be a useful tool in geotechnical engineering practice to provide near continuous soil profiling and material properties. CPTu tip resistance and sleeve friction combined with pore pressure measurement provided useful evaluation of subsurface soil types. It was concluded that although all of the CPTu classification charts provided reasonable soil classification in typical soil conditions, local experience and understanding of soil behaviour is needed to make an appropriate selection of the most applicable charts in a given geological condition. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Permafrost delineation for remediation planning : Fort Wainwright, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, B. [Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Anchorage, AK (United States); Snyder, C. [YEC Inc., Valley Cottage, NJ (United States); Delaney, A. [Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Arcone, S.; Lawson, D. [Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2003-07-01

    In the summer of 1999, geophysical and hydrogeological surveys were conducted at the Birch Hill Tank Farm and Truck Fill Stand in Fort Wainwright, Alaska to assess the distribution of benzene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,2-dibromoethane. The Birch Hill site consists of a silt, sand and gravel fluvial deposit that overlies bedrock. Permafrost occurs discontinuously throughout the alluvium and underlying bedrock, resulting in a complex aquifer distribution. The bedrock beneath the Tank Farm is highly fractured and faulted with a weathered horizon that is 30 meters thick. The goal of this study was to map the discontinuous permafrost and aquifers in the alluvial deposits and weathered bedrock zone for the purpose of delineating bedrock depth and structural features that influence ground water flow. Several methods were used to define subsurface conditions, including borehole logs, DC resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar. A 3-D hydrogeologic model was used to develop a ground water flow model used to determine contaminant migration pathways and rates. The permafrost configuration was found to be the most important boundary condition in this model. 7 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  15. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-03-01

    The following activities were completed by the end of the quarter: (1) The CERT Executive Director invited a cross section of CERT member Tribes to participate in the project. By the end of the quarter, three Tribes had the invitation under active consideration, four Tribes expressed interest but wanted to see the detailed workplan prior to making a final decision and one Tribe, the Navajo Nation has accepted the invitation. (2) The CERT Board of Directors Executive Committee has endorsed two significant environmental policy priorities for consideration in the project. First, how does the federal Indian trust responsibility to land and natural resources as well as for the health, safety and political integrity of Indian Tribes affect the federal responsibility for facility cleanup and other statutory mandates under federal environmental statutes? And second, What are the protocols of government-to-government relations within a federal system of shared sovereignty and shared governmental responsibilities? And the corollaries to that question, What is the federal obligation for consultation with Tribes and how is that different and similar to consultation with states? And, What is the federal obligation to work cooperatively with Tribes and states in recognition of the three sovereigns of the American federal system? (3) The CERT consulted with political leaders and environmental staff of member and non-member Tribes. This consultation centered on three environmental policy priorities: issues concerning the intergovernmental interface between states, Tribes and federal government agencies and programs; Issues with the cleanup of federal facilities and activities that have damaged Tribal environmental resources; and issues concerning the DOE cleanup of federal facilities used in the production of nuclear weapons.

  16. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Arctic Research, One Health and the Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network: Ongoing Activities and Expansion to Lower 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities Seminar Series presents the Tribal Science Webinar Series that will look to develop a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities.

  17. Understanding Malnutrition of Tribal Children in India: The Role of Women's Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Avijit; Bhattacharjee, Nairita

    2016-01-01

    Child malnutrition is considered to be the key risk factor for illness during adolescence and is responsible for about one-third of child deaths globally. Historically tribal communities have lagged behind the general population in terms of most socioeconomic aspects, and one such aspect is the nutritional status of children. The present study analyzes regional variations in child malnutrition and its association with women's empowerment in the tribal communities of India. The investigation is based on secondary data compiled from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS). Both bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to analyze data. We found a conditional inverse association between child malnutrition and women's empowerment in tribal communities. It is conditional in the sense that women's empowerment is effective when other factors supposed to influence nutritional status are proactive. Policy prescriptions are discussed.

  18. “Jordan First”: Tribalism, Nationalism and Legitimacy of Power in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ali Al Oudat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The significance of tribal identity in Jordan can be seen in the special relationship of traditional institutions with the state, which shows both the fluctuation in the concept of tribalism and how tribalism can be better understood by viewing it through the perspective of “Jordanian nationalism”. This relationship has created confusion on the local and national levels about how the state system should work through its institutions. Furthermore, the process of democratization is only a façade; Jordan is supposedly a constitutional monarchy, but in fact the king holds absolute power. The parliament’s autonomy has been minimal, in other words, the parliament is a symbol of democracy but is widely perceived as non-representative. This paper examines the regime security strategy “Jordan First” and the particularity of Jordanian identity through its relationship to the concept of a Jordanian national consensus.

  19. A socioecological approach to improving mammography rates in a tribal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kevin C; Fairbanks, Jo; Finster, Carolyn E; Rafelito, Alvin; Luna, Jolene; Kennedy, Marianna

    2008-06-01

    This article highlights the processes and intermediate outcomes of a pilot project to increase mammography rates of women in an American Indian tribe in New Mexico. Using a socioecological framework and principles of community-based participatory research, a community coalition was able to (a) bolster local infrastructure to increase access to mammography services; (b) build public health knowledge and skills among tribal health providers; (c) identify community-specific knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs related to breast cancer; (d) establish interdependent partnerships among community health programs and between the tribe and outside organizations; and (e) adopt local policy initiatives to bolster tribal cancer control. These findings demonstrate the value of targeting a combination of individual, community, and environmental factors, which affect community breast cancer screening rates and incorporating cultural strengths and resources into all facets of a tribal health promotion intervention.

  20. Comparison of maxillary stability after Le Fort I osteotomy for occlusal cant correction surgery and maxillary advanced surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Hashiba, Yukari; Marukawa, Kohei; Yoshida, Kan; Shimizu, Chika; Nakagawa, Kiyomasa; Yamamoto, Etsuhide

    2007-07-01

    To compare postoperative maxillary stability following Le Fort I osteotomy for the correction of occlusal cant as compared with conventional Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement. The subjects were 40 Japanese adults with jaw deformities. Of these, 20 underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) to correct asymmetric skeletal morphology and inclined occlusal cant. The other 20 patients underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy and sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) to advance the maxilla. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms were taken postoperatively and assessed statistically. Thereafter, the 2 groups were followed for time-course changes. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups with regard to time-course changes during the immediate postoperative period. This suggests that maxillary stability after Le Fort I osteotomy for cant correction does not differ from that after Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement.

  1. 78 FR 68839 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for February 25, 2014; Notice of Changes to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [AU Docket No. 13-53; DA 13-2057] Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for February 25, 2014; Notice of Changes to Auction 902 Schedule Following Resumption... up to $50 million in one-time Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I support, will be conducted on February 25...

  2. A Special Issue of the Journal of Forestry—Tribal Forest Management: Innovations for Sustainable Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Serra J. Hoagland

    2017-01-01

    Native American forests and tribal forest management practices have sustained indigenous communities, economies, and resources for millennia. These systems provide a wealth of knowledge and successful applications of long-term environmental stewardship and integrated, sustainable forest management. Tribal forestry has received an increasing amount of attention from...

  3. 45 CFR 309.170 - What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What statistical and narrative reporting... (IV-D) PROGRAM Statistical and Narrative Reporting Requirements § 309.170 What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs? (a) Tribes and Tribal organizations...

  4. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized support...

  5. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for...

  6. 45 CFR 310.35 - Under what circumstances would emergency FFP be available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Under what circumstances would emergency FFP be... AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.35 Under what circumstances would emergency FFP be available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems? (a...

  7. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply to... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What conditions apply to acquisitions of...

  8. 45 CFR 310.30 - Under what circumstances would FFP be suspended or disallowed in the costs of Computerized Tribal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Under what circumstances would FFP be suspended or... SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.30 Under what circumstances would FFP be suspended or disallowed in the costs of Computerized Tribal IV-D...

  9. 25 CFR 900.51 - What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Systems Property Management System Standards § 900.51 What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do? 900.51 Section 900.51 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  10. 42 CFR 137.401 - What role does Tribal consultation play in the IHS annual budget request process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What role does Tribal consultation play in the IHS annual budget request process? 137.401 Section 137.401 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...-GOVERNANCE Secretarial Responsibilities Budget Request § 137.401 What role does Tribal consultation play in...

  11. 25 CFR 900.48 - If the Indian tribe or tribal organization does not propose different standards, what basic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Procurement... procurement supported by Federal funds if a conflict of interest, real or apparent, would be involved. (2) An... that is not substantial or a gift that is an unsolicited item of nominal value. (3) These standards...

  12. 25 CFR 170.412 - How is the tribal IRR long-range transportation plan developed and approved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-range transportation plan developed and approved? (a) The tribal IRR long-range transportation plan is... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the tribal IRR long-range transportation plan developed and approved? 170.412 Section 170.412 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3402(r)-1 - Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... profits to tribal members. 31.3402(r)-1 Section 31.3402(r)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(r)-1 Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members. (a) (1) General rule. Section 3402(r...

  14. Escaping social-ecological traps through tribal stewardship on national forest lands in the Pacific Northwest, United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan W. Long; Frank K. Lake

    2018-01-01

    Tribal communities in the Pacific Northwest of the United States of America (USA) have long-standing relationships to ancestral lands now managed by federal land management agencies. In recent decades, federal and state governments have increasingly recognized tribal rights to resources on public lands and to participate in their management. In support of a new...

  15. 25 CFR 166.100 - What special tribal policies will we apply to permitting on Indian agricultural lands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... preferences in permits advertised for bid under § 166.221 of this part, by allowing prospective Indian operators to match the highest responsible bid (unless the tribal law or leasing policy specifies some other... THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Tribal Policies and Laws Pertaining to Permits § 166.100...

  16. 45 CFR 309.75 - What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What administrative and management procedures must... ENFORCEMENT (IV-D) PROGRAM Tribal IV-D Plan Requirements § 309.75 What administrative and management... must include in its Tribal IV-D plan the administrative and management provisions contained in this...

  17. Interfaces in Social Innovation: an Action Research Story on a Tribal Women's Collective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Banu Soletti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the nature of social interfaces that has emerged in the context of social innovations with vulnerable and marginalised tribal communities along the Tansa Reservoir in Maharashtra, India. This paper is part of a larger action research project that strives towards improving the livelihoods of tribal women through collectives such as self-help groups. The analysis presented in this paper pertains to the experiences of 13 tribal women who have come forward to form a self-help group to supplement their livelihoods. According to the tribal women, the collective spaces that the self-help group provide has itself been termed as innovation. In the above-mentioned context, this paper specifically examines the nature of diverse values and beliefs, interests, knowledge and power among different actors involved in promoting livelihood-based women’s collectives. It also explores the nature of response among tribal women to the intervention of outside experts in the day-to-day activities of their collective. The findings of this paper illustrate the discontinuities associated with the collective and specifically on the nature of frictions, disagreements and conflicts between actors, which are mediated and transformed at critical junctures. This signifies an underlying asymmetry between the knowledge systems of tribal women and outside experts respectively. Furthermore, this paper argues that if not properly nurtured, such innovative collective spaces can become sites of domination and agents for the perpetuation of mere socio-technical interest. Instead, the discourse of social innovation needs to be socially embedded within the issues of rights, recognition, representation and empowerment of those people who are vulnerable and marginalised in the society.

  18. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Shrikanth; Chauhan, Astha; Gowda, Srinivasa; Ambekar, Rutuja; Rathore, Bhupendra S; Chabra, Sakshi; Lalani, Afsheen; Harani, Harsh

    2018-01-01

    India is home to many tribes which have an interesting and varied history of origins, customs and social practices. Oral health care in tribal areas is limited due to shortage of dental manpower, financial constraints and the lack of perceived need for dental care among tribal masses. To assess orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India. A cross-sectional house to house survey was carried out among 800 tribal children aged 5 to 15 years old in two major tribal districts of Indore division. Permissions and consent were obtained from local administrative authorities, ethical committee and parents respectively. A structured proforma was used to record demographic data. Examination for dentofacial anomalies was conducted according to WHO 1997 survey methods. Descriptive tables and analytical tests like ANOVA, post-hoc and chi-square test were employed. The mean age was 9.75(±2.43) years. The mean DAI score among 12 to 15 years old children was 23.19±5.22. Female exhibited higher (24.51±5.34) mean DAI score compared to males (22.12±4.87) (p<0.05). The Patelia tribes (24.38±5.13) reported higher mean DAI score than Bhilala (23.02±5.69) and Bhil tribe (22.73±4.79) (p<0.005). The tribal children had minor malocclusion with no or slight treatment need. Categorization of orthodontic treatment need according to malocclusion severity is particularly important for the planning of corresponding public policies. The isolation of the villages, lack of transportation options imposes limitations on the availability of health professionals to provide dental services.

  19. The Fall of Fort Eben Emael: The Effects of Emerging Technologies on the Successful Completion of Military Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-18

    of Sickle,” World War II Magazine, November 2003, 59. 11Ibid., 60. 12Abbeville is 100 miles north of Paris near the English Channel. 13T. N. Mout... catacombs of Fort Eben Emael. A further understanding of the dynamics of the fort and her defenders can be gained by the knowledge that that fort was...Green Devils German Paratroopers 1939-45 ( Paris , France: Histories & Collections, 1997), 27. Helmut Wenzl (Left in photo) Born - 10 March

  20. Low footwall accelerations and variable surface rupture behavior on the Fort Sage Mountains fault, northeast California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Richard W.; Wesnousky, Steven G.; Brune, James N.; Purvance, Matthew D.; Mahan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The Fort Sage Mountains fault zone is a normal fault in the Walker Lane of the western Basin and Range that produced a small surface rupture (L 5.6 earthquake in 1950. We investigate the paleoseismic history of the Fort Sage fault and find evidence for two paleoearthquakes with surface displacements much larger than those observed in 1950. Rupture of the Fort Sage fault ∼5.6  ka resulted in surface displacements of at least 0.8–1.5 m, implying earthquake moment magnitudes (Mw) of 6.7–7.1. An older rupture at ∼20.5  ka displaced the ground at least 1.5 m, implying an earthquake of Mw 6.8–7.1. A field of precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) is located less than 1 km from the surface‐rupture trace of this Holocene‐active normal fault. Ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs) predict peak ground accelerations (PGAs) of 0.2–0.3g for the 1950 rupture and 0.3–0.5g for the ∼5.6  ka paleoearthquake one kilometer from the fault‐surface trace, yet field tests indicate that the Fort Sage PBRs will be toppled by PGAs between 0.1–0.3g. We discuss the paleoseismic history of the Fort Sage fault in the context of the nearby PBRs, GMPEs, and probabilistic seismic hazard maps for extensional regimes. If the Fort Sage PBRs are older than the mid‐Holocene rupture on the Fort Sage fault zone, this implies that current GMPEs may overestimate near‐fault footwall ground motions at this site.

  1. 45 CFR 309.145 - What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs... ENFORCEMENT (IV-D) PROGRAM Tribal IV-D Program Funding § 309.145 What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D... maintenance of essential Office Automation capability; (4) Establishment of Intergovernmental Service...

  2. Pattern of Decision Making of Irula Tribal Farm Women in Nilgiris District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeetha Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to find out the pattern of decision making of the Irula  tribal farm women of Nilgiris district in farm and home. The study revealed that Irula tribal farm women took self decision in the case of irrigating fields (85.00 followed by using plant protection measures (83.33 in case of farm management and took self decision in cases like selection and preparation of food (100.00, decorating the house (70.00 They had least participation in decisions like construction of new house (63.33 followed by borrowing and giving loans (38.33.

  3. Tribal Colleges Initiative project. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiative (TCI) grant is in the second year of funding from the US Department of Energy Environmental Management program. This quarterly report includes activities for the first three months (April 1--June 30, 1998) of the Year 2 funding period. The TCI program office requested each Tribal College to write a quarterly report of activities at their respective institutions. These reports are attached. These institutions are Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Dine` College (DC, formerly Navajo Community College). The purpose of this program is to offer educational opportunities to Native Americans in the environmental field.

  4. The Circle of Prosperity: Tribal Colleges, Tradition, and Technology -- Building Synergistic Cross-Community Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billy, C. L.

    2003-12-01

    For more than three decades, American Indian Tribal Colleges and Universities have been working to sustain what is ours: our land, our language, our communities, and our culture. Tribal Colleges have achieved success by helping our communities, located in some of the poorest and most geographically remote areas of the country, develop systems for higher education, research, and economic development that are accessible, culturally responsive, and place-based. American Indian higher education is holistic, focused on the mind, body, spirit, and family. Research is respectful of culture, mindful of community values, and essential to community well-being. Economic development strategies are based on national and international trends, but focused on relationships between local people and their land. In this environment, applied research flourishes and new knowledge, integrating traditional ways of knowing with western science, is created and used. In the 1990s, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, which is composed of 35 Tribal Colleges and Universities in the U.S. and Canada, launched a major initiative to expand and enhance this capacity through new collaborations and state-of-the-art information and communications technologies. Through a multi-phase effort, the Tribal Colleges developed and are currently implementing a dynamic and broad-based strategic plan. The goal: to reach a "Circle of Prosperity," a place where tribal traditions and new technologies are woven together to build stronger and more sustainable communities through enhanced STEM education and research programs. Our plan, the "Tribal College Framework for Community Technology," is a framework of strategic partnerships, resources, and tools that is helping us create locally based economic and social opportunities through information and communications technology and use of the Internet. During this presentation, we will: (a) discuss the innovative collaborative process we are using to build

  5. Lip-nasal aesthetics following Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H M

    1988-02-01

    Forty-one patients undergoing Le Fort I osteotomy for superior and/or anterior repositioning of the maxilla were prospectively studied for changes in soft-tissue morphology of the nasomaxillary region. Nasal parameters studied were changes in interalar rim width and nasal tip projection. It was observed that alar rim width increases with anterior and/or superior repositioning of the maxilla, but increases in nasal tip projection occur only when there is an anterior vector of maxillary movement. These nasal changes could not be quantitatively correlated to magnitude of maxillary movement. Lip changes studied were the horizontal displacement at the vermilion border and subnasale versus that of the incisal edge and point A, respectively, when the maxilla is sagittally advanced and the vertical shortening of the lip versus that of the incisal edge when the maxilla is shortened. Using linear regression analysis, horizontal displacement of the upper lip at the vermilion border was 0.82 +/- 0.13 mm for every 1 mm of maxillary advancement at the incisal edge (p less than 0.001) and 0.51 +/- 0.13 at the subnasale for every 1 mm of maxillary advancement at point A (p less than 0.001). Eighty percent of patients undergoing maxillary intrusive procedures had lip shortening ranging from 20 to 50 percent of the vertical maxillary reduction. Surprisingly, no statistically significant correlation could be demonstrated for lip shortening versus extent of vertical maxillary reduction. Previous literature in disagreement with these findings is discussed. Guidelines for treatment planning utilizing these data are suggested.

  6. Slip Potential of Faults in the Fort Worth Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, P.; Osmond, J.; Lund Snee, J. E.; Zoback, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Similar to other areas of the southcentral United States, the Fort Worth Basin of NE Texas has experienced an increase in the rate of seismicity which has been attributed to injection of waste water in deep saline aquifers. To assess the hazard of induced seismicity in the basin we have integrated new data on location and character of previously known and unknown faults, stress state, and pore pressure to produce an assessment of fault slip potential which can be used to investigate prior and ongoing earthquake sequences and for development of mitigation strategies. We have assembled data on faults in the basin from published sources, 2D and 3D seismic data, and interpretations provided from petroleum operators to yield a 3D fault model with 292 faults ranging in strike-length from 116 to 0.4 km. The faults have mostly normal geometries, all cut the disposal intervals, and most are presumed to cut into the underlying crystalline and metamorphic basement. Analysis of outcrops along the SW flank of the basin assist with geometric characterization of the fault systems. The interpretation of stress state comes from integration of wellbore image and sonic data, reservoir stimulation data, and earthquake focal mechanisms. The orientation of SHmax is generally uniform across the basin but stress style changes from being more strike-slip in the NE part of the basin to normal faulting in the SW part. Estimates of pore pressure come from a basin-scale hydrogeologic model as history-matched to injection test data. With these deterministic inputs and appropriate ranges of uncertainty we assess the conditional probability that faults in our 3D model might slip via Mohr-Coulomb reactivation in response to increases in injected-related pore pressure. A key component of the analysis is constraining the uncertainties associated with each of the principal parameters. Many of the faults in the model are interpreted to be critically-stressed within reasonable ranges of uncertainty.

  7. The Penobscot River and environmental contaminants: Assessment of tribal exposure through sustenance lifeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Valerie; Kusnierz, Daniel; Hillger, Robert; Ferrario, Joseph; Hughes, Thomas; Diliberto, Janet; Orazio, Carl E.; Dudley, Robert W.; Byrne, Christian; Sugatt, Richard; Warren, Sarah; DeMarini, David; Elskus, Adria; Stodola, Steve; Mierzykowski, Steve; Pugh, Katie; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    EPA in collaboration with the Penobscot Indian Nation, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) collectively embarked on a four year research study to evaluate the environmental health of the riverine system by targeting specific cultural practices and using traditional science to conduct a preliminary contaminant screening of the flora and fauna of the Penobscot River ecosystem. This study was designed as a preliminary screening to determine if contaminant concentrations in fish, eel, snapping turtle, wood ducks, and plants in Regions of the Penobscot River relevant to where PIN tribal members hunt, fish and gather plants were high enough to be a health concern. This study was not designed to be a statistically validated assessment of contaminant differences among study sites or among species. The traditional methodology for health risk assessment used by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is based on the use of exposure assumptions (e.g. exposure duration, food ingestion rate, body weight, etc.) that represent the entire American population, either as a central tendency exposure (e.g. average, median) or as a reasonable maximum exposure (e.g. 95% upper confidence limit). Unfortunately, EPA lacked exposure information for assessing health risks for New England regional tribes sustaining a tribal subsistence way of life. As a riverine tribe, the Penobscot culture and traditions are inextricably tied to the Penobscot River watershed. It is through hunting, fishing, trapping, gathering and making baskets, pottery, moccasins, birch-bark canoes and other traditional practices that the Penobscot culture and people are sustained. The Penobscot River receives a variety of pollutant discharges leaving the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN) questioning the ecological health and water quality of the river and how this may affect the practices that sustain their way of life

  8. Technical evaluation report of the Fort St. Vrain final draft upgraded technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1989-01-01

    This report is a technical evaluation of the final draft of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Upgraded Technical Specifications (UT/S) as issued by Public Service of Colorado (PSC) on May 27, 1988 with subsequent supplemental updates issued on June 15, 1988 and August 5, 1988. It has been compared for consistency, and safety conservatism with the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Updated Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), the FSV Safety Evaluation Report (SER), the Facility Operating License, DPR-34, and all amendments to the Facility Operating License issued as of June 1, 1988, and Appendix A to the Operating License DPR-34, Technical Specifications. Because of the age of the plant, no supplements to the Fort St. Vrain SER have been issued since the original SER was not issued as a WASH or a NUREG report. This made it necessary to review all amendments to the Facility Operating License since they would contain the safety evaluations done to support changes to the Facility Operating License. The upgraded Fort St. Vrain Technical Specifications were also broadly compared with the latest Westinghouse Standard Technical Specifications (WSTS) to assure that what was proposed for Fort St. Vrain was consistent with the latest NRC staff practices for standard technical specifications

  9. The Tribal Odisha Eye Disease Study (TOES) 1: prevalence and causes of visual impairment among tribal children in an urban school in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkad, Vivekanand U; Panda, Lapam; Behera, Pradeep; Das, Taraprasad; Mohanta, Bikash C; Khanna, Rohit

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence and causes of visual impairment and other ocular comorbidities among tribal children in an urban school population in eastern India. In this cross-sectional study, vision screening tests were administered to tribal school children. Demographic data, including name, age, sex, home district, height, and weight of each child, and examination data, including unaided and pinhole visual acuity, external eye examination with a flashlight, slit-lamp examination, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and undilated fundus photography, were collected. Children with visual acuity of less than 20/20, abnormal anterior or posterior segment findings, and IOP of >21 mm Hg were referred for further evaluation. Of 10,038 children (5,840 males [58.2%]) screened, 335 (median age, 9 years; range, 6-17 years) were referred. Refractive error was the most common cause of visual impairment (59.52%; 95% CI, 51.97-66.65) followed by amblyopia (17.2%; 95% CI, 12.3-23.6) and posterior segment anomaly (14.88%; 95% CI, 10.2-21.0). The prevalence of best-corrected visual acuity of 20/40 was 0.13%. The prevalence of blindness was 0.03%. Visual impairment among tribal children in this residential school is an uncommon but important disability. Copyright © 2018 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intrusive hyaloclastite and peperitic breccias associated to sill and cryptodome emplacement on an Early Paleocene polymagmatic compound cone-dome volcanic complex from El Guanaco mine, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, G. N.; Permuy Vidal, C.; Galina, M.; López, L.; Jovic, S. M.; Guido, D. M.

    2018-04-01

    This work explores the textural characteristics, morphology and facies architecture of well-preserved Paleocene hyaloclastic and peperitic breccias associated with subvolcanic intrusions at El Guanaco gold mine (Northern Chile). The El Guanaco mine volcanic sequence is part of a polymagmatic compound cone-dome volcanic complex grouping several dacitic domes and maar-diatremes, and subordinated subvolcanic intrusions of basaltic, andesitic and dacitic compositions. The Soledad-Peñafiel Fault System is a first order regional structure controlling the location and style of the volcanism in the region. Three different intrusive bodies (Basaltic sills, Dacitic cryptodomes and Andesitic cryptodomes) were found to intrude into a wet and poorly consolidated pyroclastic sequence representing the upper portions of a maar-diatreme. Consequently, extensive quench fragmentation and fluidization along their contacts occurred, leading to the formation of widespread breccia bodies enclosing a coherent nucleus. Differences in matrix composition allows to define two main breccias types: 1) poorly-sorted monomictic breccias (intrusive hyaloclastites) and 2) poorly-sorted tuff-matrix breccias (peperites). The observed facies architecture is interpreted as the result of the interplay of several factors, including: 1) magma viscosity, 2) the geometry of the intrusives, and 3) variations on the consolidation degree of the host rocks. Additionally, the overall geometry of each intrusive is interpreted to be controlled by the effective viscosity of the magmas along with the available magma volume at the time of the intrusions. The presence of three compositionally different subvolcanic bodies with intrusive hyaloclastite and peperite envelopes indicate, not only that all these intrusions occurred in a short period of time (probably less than 2-3 Ma), but also that the volcaniciclastic pile suffer little or none compaction nor consolidation during that time. The presence of three

  11. Geology and hydrology of the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Douglas C.

    1965-01-01

    The Fort Belknap Indian Reservation includes an area of 970 square miles in north-central Montana. At its north edge is the Milk River valley, which is underlain by Recent alluvium of the Milk River, glacial deposits, and alluvial deposits of the preglacial Missouri River, which carved and occupied this valley before the Pleistocene Epoch. Rising gently to the south is an undulating glaciated plain broken only by three small syenite porphyry intrusions. Underlying the glacial till of the plain are Upper Cretaceous shale and sandstone of the Bearpaw and Judith River Formations. At the south end of the reservation, 40 miles from the Milk River, an intrusion of syenite porphyry in Tertiary time uplifted, tilted, and exposed the succession of sedimentary rocks overlying the Precambrian metamorphic basement. The sedimentary rocks include 1,000 feet of sandstone and shale of Cambrian age; 2,000 feet of limestone and dolomite of Ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian age; 400 feet of shale and limestone of Jurassic age; and 3,500 feet of sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Cretaceous age. Extensive gravel terraces of Tertiary and Quaternary age bevel the upturned bedrock formations exposed around the Little Rocky Mountains. Ground water under water-table conditions is obtained at present from alluvium, glaciofluvial deposits, and the Judith River Formation. The water table ranges in depth from a few feet beneath the surface in the Milk River valley alluvium to more than 100 feet deep in the Judith River Formation. Yields to wells are generally low but adequate for domestic and stock-watering use. Quality of the water ranges from highly mineralized and unusable to excellent; many wells in the Milk River valley have been abandoned because of the alkalinity of their water. Potential sources of additional ground-water supplies are the alluvial gravel of creeks issuing from the Little Rocky Mountains and some extensive areas of terrace gravel. The uplift and tilting of the

  12. Habitat restoration/enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2001 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, David C.

    2003-01-01

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2001. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting willows at sites on Diggie Creek, Clear Creek and Spring Creek. In addition, many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). In 2001, exclosure fences were erected on Diggie Creek (250 m barbed wire; (70 m jack), Wood Creek (500 m jack), Clear Creek (20 m jack), Ross Fork Creek (200 m jack), West Fork Creek (200 m jack)) and the Portneuf River (1 km barbed wire; 100 m jack). Jack and rail exclosure fences that had deteriorated over the past ten years were repaired at numerous areas throughout the Reservation. Physical sampling during 2001 included sediment and depth surveys (SADMS) in Big Jimmy Creek and Diggie Creek. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for eight and nine strata in the Big Jimmy and Diggie Creek, respectively. Baseline SADM data was collected in Diggie Creek to monitor the effects of bank sloping and revegetation on channel morphology and sediment levels through time. Water temperature was monitored (hourly) in Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Ross Fork Creek and Big Jimmy Creek. Biotic sampling included invertebrate sampling in the 200 and 300 series of Clear Creek. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in Clear Creek 200 and 300 series. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Clear Creek 300 series remained similar to 2000 while numbers of fish in Clear Creek 200 series dropped to near pre project levels. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were significantly higher than 2000. A mark-recapture study was initiated in spring 2001 to estimate numbers of spawning adults using the Head End of Spring Creek

  13. Role of Airpower for Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan and FATA (Federally Administered Tribal Areas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Malaysia , Greece, Philippine and Vietnam. The last part briefly analyzes the methods used to separate the population from insurgents and the role of...the Senate. These members were elected by the tribal maliks until 1997, when universal franchise was introduced in FATA. Under the Pakistan Political

  14. Report: Incurred Cost Audit of Three EPA Cooperative Agreements Awarded to National Tribal Environmental Council, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #10-4-0067, February 17, 2010. The recipient’s work plans do not include a description of the recipient’s goals or objectives for its participation in the Western Regional Air Partnership and National Tribal Air Association.

  15. 40 CFR 745.325 - Lead-based paint activities: State and Tribal program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate infrastructure or government capacity to effectively carry out a State or Tribal program. (b... documents the results of the inspection. (v) Records are retained by the certified inspector or the firm. (2... elimination of all identified hazards. (vi) The certified risk assessor or the firm retains the appropriate...

  16. Tribal Formulations for Treatment of Pain: A Study of the Bede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Bedes form one of the largest tribal or indigenous communities in Bangladesh and are popularly known as the boat people or water gypsies because of their preference for living in boats. They travel almost throughout the whole year by boats on the numerous waterways of Bangladesh and earn their livelihood by ...

  17. Perception of the Effect of Leadership Styles on Organizational Commitment at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if a relationship exists between the perceived leadership style of supervisors and the organizational commitment level of the subordinate employees within Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). Additionally, the study examined whether a difference exists in the organizational commitment levels of TCU…

  18. 249 The Effect of Inter-tribal Post Election Violence Conflict Trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Indexed African Journals Online: www.ajol.info. An International Multidisciplinary Journal, ... system. Key words: trauma, academic performance, gender and violence. Introduction. Inter-tribal conflict has ... During the 2008 post election violence, education was largely disrupted as insecurity intensified. Teachers and pupils ...

  19. Working Together: Wellness and Academic Achievement at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Bonnie; Magarati, Maya; Parker, Myra; Egashira, Leo; Kipp, Billie Jo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the activities of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI) at the University of Washington, Washington State, in collaborating with tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to examine alcohol, drug, and mental health issues among Native students. The authors provide first steps for the development of culturally…

  20. Mumps outbreak in a tribal population from the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilavat, Siddharth M; Vaidya, Sunil R; Hamde, Venkat S

    2017-12-01

    A cluster of parotitis cases (n = 13) were observed in a tribal population of Vansda village from the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, India between 20th and 22nd week of 2016. Primary information was received by the local Infectious Disease Surveillance Program team, and subsequently field investigations were carried out in the affected area. Active surveillance was conducted till twice the incubation period from onset of the last surveyed case. For the laboratory investigations, 19 serum samples were collected from 11-suspected cases and their close contacts (n = 8). All samples were transported within 12 h on icepacks to the main laboratory at Pune. Majority of the suspected mumps cases were children except four adults. Mumps infection was confirmed in 8 of 11 suspected cases with post-onset ranging from 28 to 43 days and none from the close contacts. Both mumps specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in nine cases (including one equivocal) and single contact (equivocal result). Overall, ten cases and eight contacts (including one equivocal) showed mumps specific IgG antibodies. Present investigation provides information about the characteristics of mumps outbreak in a tribal community that resides in the remote areas. In addition, introduction of mumps containing vaccine in the tribal population may have added advantages in the tribal health program. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Beyond Standing Rock: Seeking Solutions and Building Awareness at Tribal Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskus, Laura

    2017-01-01

    People around the world watched scenes unfold at Standing Rock as Indigenous people and their allies protested against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). One of the men at the center of all of this has been Standing Rock tribal chairman Dave Archambault II. Interviewed time and again on radio and television, Archambault called for prayer and…

  2. 75 FR 53269 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Tribal Consultation; Justification and Approval of Sole-Source 8...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... and approval of sole-source contracts over $20 million under the 8(a) small business development... valuable component of its deliberations in preparing to implement this law, which includes contracting with... Regulation; Tribal Consultation; Justification and Approval of Sole-Source 8(a) Contracts AGENCIES...

  3. 77 FR 62269 - Draft Tribal Protocol Manual and Scoping for Proposed Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... publicly-available documents online in the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . To...,'' and emphasized the importance of strengthening government-to-government relationships with Native... communication with tribal governments, the Commission, by Staff Requirements Memorandum (COMWDM-12-0001...

  4. Road Safety Peer Exchange for Tribal Governments : an RSPCB Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the proceedings of the Road Safety Peer Exchange for Tribal : Governments held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on December 9th and 10th, 2014. The peer exchange : brought together safety practitioners from across the Unit...

  5. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  6. Self-Determination in Health Research: An Alaska Native Example of Tribal Ownership and Research Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alaska Native (AN and American Indian (AI people are underrepresented in health research, yet many decline to participate in studies due to past researcher misconduct. Southcentral Foundation (SCF, an Alaska Native-owned and operated health care organization, is transforming the relationship between researchers and the tribal community by making trust and accountability required features of health research in AN/AI communities. In 1998, SCF assumed ownership from the federal government of health services for AN/AI people in south central Alaska and transformed the health system into a relationship-based model of care. This change reimagines how researchers interact with tribal communities and established community oversight of all health research conducted with AN/AI people in the region. We describe the SCF research review process, which requires tribal approval of the research concept, full proposal, and dissemination products, as well as local institutional review board approval, and a researcher-signed contract. This review evaluates research through the lens of tribal principles, practices, and priorities. The SCF example provides a framework for other tribes and organizations seeking to reshape the future of health research in AN/AI communities.

  7. 75 FR 78709 - Public Comment on the Draft Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... future. ACF solicited membership for an ACF Tribal/Federal Workgroup to develop the initial draft policy... disparities of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) and ensuring that access to critical health and... consult with American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ ANs). 3. Background Since the formation of the Union...

  8. A Legacy of Sacrifice and Honor: Celebrating Tribal Resilience and Military Service at Haskell Nations University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Haskell Indian Nations University opened 133 years ago, on September 17, 1884, as the U.S. Training and Industrial School--one of three original tribal boarding schools funded by the United States Congress. Three years later the school changed its name to Haskell Institute in honor of Chase Dudley Haskell, a U.S. representative from the Second…

  9. 76 FR 30437 - Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ...-mail: [email protected] Agdaagux Tribe of King Cove, Arthur Newman, Tribal Administrator, P.O. Box 249, King Cove, AK 99612; Phone: (907) 497-2648; Fax: (907) 497- 2803; E-mail: [email protected] and Grace...: graces@apiai.org . Akhiok, Native Village of, Rachelle Joy, KANA Foster Parent Support Specialist, 3449...

  10. 77 FR 55860 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on... conduct a listening session with Indian tribes to obtain oral and written comments concerning sacred sites located on Federal lands. This session in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the sixth in a series of listening sessions...

  11. 75 FR 8508 - Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... operating comprehensive Tribal Child Support Enforcement programs under Title IV-D of the Social Security... security and privacy safeguarding requirements reflects our position that security and privacy of child... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families 45 CFR Parts 309...

  12. 26 CFR 305.7871-1 - Indian tribal governments treated as States for certain purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for taxes); (3) Section 511(a)(2)(B) (relating to the taxation of colleges and universities which are... scholarships and fellowship grants); (7) Section 403(b)(1)(A)(ii) (relating to the taxation of contributions of... transaction involves the exercise of an essential governmental function of the Indian tribal government, as...

  13. 78 FR 33331 - Tribal Consultation and Coordination Policy for the U.S. Department of Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    .... Comment 4: Clarify the Department's role in coordinating with other federal agencies, and increase....'' Comments to Section 5: Roles and Responsibilities Comment 24: The tribal consultation official should.... Additionally, the policy should acknowledge that Tribes are more familiar with their local environment and...

  14. 77 FR 47399 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... first and then access the CCR online registration through the CCR home page at https://www.bpn.gov/ccr... Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 93.444. Announcement Type: New--Limited Competition. Key...-Governance Program (TSGP). This program is authorized under Public Law (Pub. L.) 106-260, the Tribal Self...

  15. Receptive Congress, Resistant Executive: The Legislative Fight for Tribal Colleges in the '80s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Gregory G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the legislative difficulties encountered in the struggle for tribal college funding in the 1980s, including executive classification of Native American higher education as nontrust, decreasing funds despite increased enrollment, and opposition from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. (18 citations) (YKH)

  16. An Array of Opportunities: Building a Sustainable Future at Leech Lake Tribal College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    With support from Leech Lake Tribal College (LLTC) in Cass Lake, Minnesota, solar energy infrastructure--as well as specialized training and well-paying jobs--are coming to the Leech Lake Nation. Rather than power LLTC's facilities, a 40- kilowatt solar garden installed on the college's campus during the 2017 fall semester, along with four similar…

  17. 78 FR 19005 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...--Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for...

  18. 78 FR 37567 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs [DR.5B811.IA000913] Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior... Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget...

  19. 33 CFR 137.60 - Reviews of Federal, State, tribal, and local government records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL... available lists of engineering controls; and (7) Registries or publicly available lists of institutional... tribal-permitted or -registered waste management activities. The records or databases that may contain...

  20. 25 CFR 1200.14 - What must the Tribal Management Plan contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the following: (a) Tribal investment goals and the strategy for achieving them. (b) A description... the tribe. The tribe must instruct us to proceed with the sale and must agree not to hold us responsible for the loss before we will make the sale. (4) If the tribe asks us to transfer marketable...