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Sample records for formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor coupled

  1. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Bar-Shavit; Myriam Maoz; Arun Kancharla; Jeetendra Kumar Nag; Daniel Agranovich; Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky; Beatrice Uziely

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances ...

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bar-Shavit

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics.

  3. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P;

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L...

  4. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja;

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes...... anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells....

  5. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Burzynska-Pedziwiatr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP. Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05 and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05. Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D-glucose (PGG, the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans.

  6. Dynamic phospholipid signaling by G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Han, Li; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control a variety of fundamental cellular processes by regulating phospholipid signaling pathways. Essential for signaling by a large number of receptors is the hydrolysis of the membrane phosphoinositide PIP2 by phospholipase C (PLC) into the second messengers IP

  7. Construction of covalently coupled, concatameric dimers of 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager, Marie; Scholl, D Jason; Kubale, Valentina;

    2009-01-01

    -Ala repeats flanked by flexible spacers and positively charged residues to ensure correct inside-out orientation plus an extracellular HA-tag to construct covalently coupled dimers of 7TM receptors. Such 15 TM concatameric homo- and heterodimers of the beta(2)-adrenergic and the NK(1) receptors, which...

  8. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  9. Serial femtosecond crystallography datasets from G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Zhang, Haitao; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Basu, Shibom; Oberthür, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Yoon, Chun Hong; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Messerschmidt, Marc; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Weierstall, Uwe; Cherezov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    We describe the deposition of four datasets consisting of X-ray diffraction images acquired using serial femtosecond crystallography experiments on microcrystals of human G protein-coupled receptors, grown and delivered in lipidic cubic phase, at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The receptors are: the human serotonin receptor 2B in complex with an agonist ergotamine, the human δ-opioid receptor in complex with a bi-functional peptide ligand DIPP-NH2, the human smoothened receptor in complex with an antagonist cyclopamine, and finally the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in complex with the selective antagonist ZD7155. All four datasets have been deposited, with minimal processing, in an HDF5-based file format, which can be used directly for crystallographic processing with CrystFEL or other software. We have provided processing scripts and supporting files for recent versions of CrystFEL, which can be used to validate the data.

  10. Real-Time G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Imaging to Understand and Quantify Receptor Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Aymerich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the trafficking of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and their regulation by agonists and antagonists is fundamental to develop more effective drugs. Optical methods using fluorescent-tagged receptors and spinning disk confocal microscopy are useful tools to investigate membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. The aim of this study was to develop a method to characterize receptor dynamics using this system which offers the advantage of very fast image acquisition with minimal cell perturbation. However, in short-term assays photobleaching was still a problem. Thus, we developed a procedure to perform a photobleaching-corrected image analysis. A study of short-term dynamics of the long isoform of the dopamine type 2 receptor revealed an agonist-induced increase in the mobile fraction of receptors with a rate of movement of 0.08 μm/s For long-term assays, the ratio between the relative fluorescence intensity at the cell surface versus that in the intracellular compartment indicated that receptor internalization only occurred in cells co-expressing G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. These results indicate that the lateral movement of receptors and receptor internalization are not directly coupled. Thus, we believe that live imaging of GPCRs using spinning disk confocal image analysis constitutes a powerful tool to study of receptor dynamics.

  11. Multiple switches in G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Shivani; Smith, Steven O

    2009-09-01

    The activation mechanism of G protein-coupled receptors has presented a puzzle that finally may be close to solution. These receptors have a relatively simple architecture consisting of seven transmembrane helices that contain just a handful of highly conserved amino acids, yet they respond to light and a range of chemically diverse ligands. Recent NMR structural studies on the active metarhodopsin II intermediate of the visual receptor rhodopsin, along with the recent crystal structure of the apoprotein opsin, have revealed multiple structural elements or 'switches' that must be simultaneously triggered to achieve full activation. The confluence of several required structural changes is an example of "coincidence counting", which is often used by nature to regulate biological processes. In ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors, the presence of multiple switches may provide an explanation for the differences between full, partial and inverse agonists.

  12. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  13. Molecular pharmacology of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R J

    2016-10-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the eighth in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G protein coupled receptors (MPGPCR) held as part of a joint meeting with the Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists (ASCEPT) in Melbourne Australia from 7 to 11 December 2014. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  14. G protein-coupled receptor modulation with pepducins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimond, Patricia; Carlson, Kenneth; Bouvier, Michel;

    2011-01-01

    At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge of the stru......At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge...

  15. The repertoire of trace amine G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Yan, Yi-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Trace amines, such as tyramine, beta-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine, are present in trace levels in nervous systems and bind a specific family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), but the function or origin of this system is not well understood. We searched the genomes of several...... ancestor of vertebrate TA-receptors arose before the split of the ray-finned and lobe-finned fishes. The evolutionary history of the TA-receptors is more complex than for most other GPCR families and here we suggest a mechanism by which they may have arisen....

  16. [G-protein-coupled receptors targeting: the allosteric approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, Julien A; Pantel, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are a major family of drug targets. Essentially all drugs targeting these receptors on the market compete with the endogenous ligand (agonists or antagonists) for binding the receptor. Recently, non-competitive compounds binding to distinct sites from the cognate ligand were documented in various classes of these receptors. These compounds, called allosteric modulators, generally endowed of a better selectivity are able to modulate specifically the endogenous signaling of the receptor. To better understand the promising potential of this class of GPCRs targeting compounds, this review highlights the properties of allosteric modulators, the strategies used to identify them and the challenges associated with the development of these compounds.

  17. A G protein-coupled receptor for UDP-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J K; Macdonald, L E; Sarau, H M; Ames, R S; Freeman, K; Foley, J J; Zhu, Y; McLaughlin, M M; Murdock, P; McMillan, L; Trill, J; Swift, A; Aiyar, N; Taylor, P; Vawter, L; Naheed, S; Szekeres, P; Hervieu, G; Scott, C; Watson, J M; Murphy, A J; Duzic, E; Klein, C; Bergsma, D J; Wilson, S; Livi, G P

    2000-04-14

    Uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose) has a well established biochemical role as a glycosyl donor in the enzymatic biosynthesis of carbohydrates. It is less well known that UDP-glucose may possess pharmacological activity, suggesting that a receptor for this molecule may exist. Here, we show that UDP-glucose, and some closely related molecules, potently activate the orphan G protein-coupled receptor KIAA0001 heterologously expressed in yeast or mammalian cells. Nucleotides known to activate P2Y receptors were inactive, indicating the distinctly novel pharmacology of this receptor. The receptor is expressed in a wide variety of human tissues, including many regions of the brain. These data suggest that some sugar-nucleotides may serve important physiological roles as extracellular signaling molecules in addition to their familiar role in intermediary metabolism.

  18. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  19. Biased signaling of G protein-coupled receptors - From a chemokine receptor CCR7 perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Astrid Sissel; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hjortø, Gertrud M

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) and their associated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) work in a concerted manner to govern immune cell positioning in time and space. Promiscuity of both ligands and receptors, but also biased signaling within the chemokine system, adds to the complexity of how...

  20. Monitoring of receptor dimerization using plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew J; Seekell, Kevin; Ostrander, Julie H; Wax, Adam

    2011-11-22

    The dimerization of receptors on the cell membrane is an important step in the activation of cell signaling pathways. Several methods exist for observing receptor dimerization, including coimmunoprecipitation, chemical cross-linking, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These techniques are limited in that only FRET is appropriate for live cells, but even that method suffers from photobleaching and bleed-through effects. In this study, we implement an alternative method for the targeting of HER-2 homodimer formation based on the plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles functionalized with HER-2 Ab. In the presented studies, SK-BR-3 cells, known to overexpress HER-2, are labeled with these nanoparticles and receptor colocalization is observed using plasmonic coupling. HER-2 targeted nanoparticles bound to these cells exhibit a peak resonance that is significantly red-shifted relative to those bound to similar receptors on A549 cells, which have significantly lower levels of HER-2 expression. This significant red shift indicates plasmonic coupling is occurring and points to a new avenue for assessing dimerization by monitoring their colocalization. To determine that dimerization is occurring, the refractive index of the nanoenvironment of the labels is assessed using a theoretical analysis based on the Mie coated sphere model. The results indicate scattering by single, isolated nanoparticles for the low HER-2 expressing A549 cell line, but the scattering observed for the HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 cell line may only be explained by plasmonic-coupling of proximal nanoparticle pairs. To validate the conformation of nanoparticles bound to HER-2 receptors undergoing dimerization, discrete dipole approximation (DDA) models are used to assess spectra of scattering by coupled nanoparticles. Comparison of the experimental results with theoretical models indicates that NP dimers are formed for the labeling of SK-BR-3 cells, suggesting that receptor

  1. G Protein - Coupled Receptors [Receptores Acoplados à Proteína G

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas V. B. Hoelz; Guilherme B. L. de Freitas; Pedro Henrique M. Torres; Tácio Vinício A. Fernandes; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Joaquim Fernando M. da Silva; Pedro G Pascutti; Ricardo B. de Alencastro

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of proteins encoded by the human genome. These receptors are membrane proteins which share a common structure of seven transmembrane helices and are involved in the cellular signal transduction through activation of heterotrimeric protein (G protein) in intracellular environment. This activation signal, mediated by the agonist binding to the extracellular domain of the receptor, is transmitted into the cell and activat...

  2. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...

  3. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Parnot, Charles

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural...

  4. G-protein-coupled receptors for free fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond; Murdoch, Hannah;

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming evident that nutrients and metabolic intermediates derived from such nutrients regulate cellular function by activating a number of cell-surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Until now, members of the GPCR family have largely been considered as the molecular targets that com...

  5. The use of receptor-specific antibodies to study G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Achla; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2006-07-01

    The identification of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) cDNAs has facilitated a number of studies characterizing the biochemical properties of the receptor protein. Most of these studies have used antibodies directed against the epitope-tagged receptor expressed in heterologous cells, because of the lack of sensitive and selective antibodies capable of recognizing endogenous receptors in their native state. In order to facilitate studies with endogenous receptors, efforts have been made to generate receptor-type selective, sensitive antibodies that are able to recognize endogenous receptors. In this review, we discuss the strategies as well as the details of the techniques used for the generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with a focus on family A GPCRs.

  6. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Martín, Mairena; Selent, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is a key component of cell membranes with a proven modulatory role on the function and ligand-binding properties of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Crystal structures of prototypical GPCRs such as the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) have confirmed that cholesterol finds stable binding sites at the receptor surface suggesting an allosteric role of this lipid. Here we combine experimental and computational approaches to show that cholesterol can spontaneously enter the A2AR-binding pocket from the membrane milieu using the same portal gate previously suggested for opsin ligands. We confirm the presence of cholesterol inside the receptor by chemical modification of the A2AR interior in a biotinylation assay. Overall, we show that cholesterol's impact on A2AR-binding affinity goes beyond pure allosteric modulation and unveils a new interaction mode between cholesterol and the A2AR that could potentially apply to other GPCRs.

  7. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Martín, Mairena; Selent, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is a key component of cell membranes with a proven modulatory role on the function and ligand-binding properties of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Crystal structures of prototypical GPCRs such as the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) have confirmed that cholesterol finds stable binding sites at the receptor surface suggesting an allosteric role of this lipid. Here we combine experimental and computational approaches to show that cholesterol can spontaneously enter the A2AR-binding pocket from the membrane milieu using the same portal gate previously suggested for opsin ligands. We confirm the presence of cholesterol inside the receptor by chemical modification of the A2AR interior in a biotinylation assay. Overall, we show that cholesterol's impact on A2AR-binding affinity goes beyond pure allosteric modulation and unveils a new interaction mode between cholesterol and the A2AR that could potentially apply to other GPCRs. PMID:28220900

  8. Applications of molecular replacement to G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Kobilka, Brian K., E-mail: kobilka@stanford.edu [Stanford University, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Weis, William I., E-mail: kobilka@stanford.edu [Stanford University, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Fairchild Building, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The use of molecular replacement in solving the structures of G protein-coupled receptors is discussed, with specific examples being described in detail. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large class of integral membrane proteins involved in regulating virtually every aspect of human physiology. Despite their profound importance in human health and disease, structural information regarding GPCRs has been extremely limited until recently. With the advent of a variety of new biochemical and crystallographic techniques, the structural biology of GPCRs has advanced rapidly, offering key molecular insights into GPCR activation and signal transduction. To date, almost all GPCR structures have been solved using molecular-replacement techniques. Here, the unique aspects of molecular replacement as applied to individual GPCRs and to signaling complexes of these important proteins are discussed.

  9. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Rosero, Rebecca A.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors ...

  10. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    OpenAIRE

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G pro...

  11. Multiple functions of G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Kenji; Nakaya, Michio; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2014-03-06

    Desensitization is a physiological feedback mechanism that blocks detrimental effects of persistent stimulation. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was originally identified as the kinase that mediates G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization. Subsequent studies revealed that GRK is a family composed of seven isoforms (GRK1-GRK7). Each GRK shows a differential expression pattern. GRK1, GRK4, and GRK7 are expressed in limited tissues. In contrast, GRK2, GRK3, GRK5, and GRK6 are ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. The roles of GRKs in GPCR desensitization are well established. When GPCRs are activated by their agonists, GRKs phosphorylate serine/threonine residues in the intracellular loops and the carboxyl-termini of GPCRs. Phosphorylation promotes translocation of β-arrestins to the receptors and inhibits further G protein activation by interrupting receptor-G protein coupling. The binding of β-arrestins to the receptors also helps to promote receptor internalization by clathrin-coated pits. Thus, the GRK-catalyzed phosphorylation and subsequent binding of β-arrestin to GPCRs are believed to be the common mechanism of GPCR desensitization and internalization. Recent studies have revealed that GRKs are also involved in the β-arrestin-mediated signaling pathway. The GRK-mediated phosphorylation of the receptors plays opposite roles in conventional G protein- and β-arrestin-mediated signaling. The GRK-catalyzed phosphorylation of the receptors results in decreased G protein-mediated signaling, but it is necessary for β-arrestin-mediated signaling. Agonists that selectively activate GRK/β-arrestin-dependent signaling without affecting G protein signaling are known as β-arrestin-biased agonists. Biased agonists are expected to have potential therapeutic benefits for various diseases due to their selective activation of favorable physiological responses or avoidance of the side effects of drugs. Furthermore, GRKs are recognized as

  12. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs.

  13. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs, which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity.

  14. G protein coupled receptors as targets for next generation pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Neil; Down, Rachel E

    2015-12-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new pesticides due to the loss of existing products through the continuing development of resistance, the desire for products with more favourable environmental and toxicological profiles and the need to implement the principles of integrated pest management. Insect G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in modulating biology, physiology and behaviour, including reproduction, osmoregulation, growth and development. Modifying normal receptor function by blocking or over stimulating its actions may either result in the death of a pest or disrupt its normal fitness or reproductive capacity to reduce pest populations. Hence GPCRs offer potential targets for the development of next generation pesticides providing opportunities to discover new chemistries for invertebrate pest control. Such receptors are important targets for pharmaceutical drugs, but are under-exploited by the agro-chemical industry. The octopamine receptor agonists are the only pesticides with a recognized mode of action, as described in the classification scheme developed by the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee, that act via a GPCR. The availability of sequenced insect genomes has facilitated the characterization of insect GPCRs, but the development and utilization of screening assays to identify lead compounds has been slow. Various studies using knock-down technologies or applying the native ligands and/or neuropeptide analogues to pest insects in vivo, have however demonstrated that modifying normal receptor function can have an insecticidal effect. This review presents examples of potential insect neuropeptide receptors that are potential targets for lead compound development, using case studies from three representative pest species, Tribolium castaneum, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Drosophila suzukii. Functional analysis studies on T. castaneum suggest that GPCRs involved in growth and development (eclosion

  15. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  16. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Skieterska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs comprise the largest family of membrane receptors that control many cellular processes and consequently often serve as drug targets. These receptors undergo a strict regulation by mechanisms such as internalization and desensitization, which are strongly influenced by posttranslational modifications. Ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification with a broad range of functions that is currently gaining increased appreciation as a regulator of GPCR activity. The role of ubiquitination in directing GPCRs for lysosomal degradation has already been well-established. Furthermore, this modification can also play a role in targeting membrane and endoplasmic reticulum-associated receptors to the proteasome. Most recently, ubiquitination was also shown to be involved in GPCR signaling. In this review, we present current knowledge on the molecular basis of GPCR regulation by ubiquitination, and highlight the importance of E3 ubiquitin ligases, deubiquitinating enzymes and β-arrestins. Finally, we discuss classical and newly-discovered functions of ubiquitination in controlling GPCR activity.

  17. Role of G protein-coupled receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SUN; Richard DYE

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in inflammation.Inflammatory cells such as polymorphonuclear leuko-cytes (PMN),monocytes and macrophages express a large number of GPCRs for classic chemoattractants and chemokines.These receptors are critical to the migration of phagocytes and their accumulation at sites of inflammation,where these cells can exacer-bate inflammation but also contribute to its resolution.Besides chemoattractant GPCRs,protease activated receptors (PARs) such as PAR1 are involved in the regulation of vascular endothelial permeability.Prostaglandin receptors play different roles in inflam-matory cell activation,and can mediate both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions.Many GPCRs present in inflammatory cells also mediate transcription factor activation,resulting in the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory factors and,in some cases,molecules that suppress inflammation.An understanding of the signaling paradigms of GPCRs in inflammatory cells is likely to facilitate translational research and development of improved anti-inflammatory therapies.

  18. Mechanisms of regulation and function of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Yang; Shi-Hai Xia

    2006-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) interact with the agonist-activated form of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) to affect receptor phosphorylation and to initiate profound impairment of receptor signaling,or desensitization. GPCR forms the largest family of cell surface receptors, and defects in GRK function have the potential consequence to affect GPCR-stimulated biological responses in many pathological situations.

  19. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide;

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matrix...

  20. Stabilization of G protein-coupled receptors by point mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eHeydenreich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are flexible integral membrane proteins involved in transmembrane signaling. Their involvement in many physiological processes makes them interesting targets for drug development. Determination of the structure of these receptors will help to design more specific drugs, however, their structural characterization has so far been hampered by the low expression and their inherent instability in detergents which made protein engineering indispensable for structural and biophysical characterization.Several approaches to stabilize the receptors in a particular conformation have led to breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination. These include truncations of the flexible regions, stabilization by antibodies and nanobodies, fusion partners, high affinity and covalently bound ligands as well as conformational stabilization by mutagenesis. In this review we focus on stabilization of GPCRs by insertion of point mutations, which lead to increased conformational and thermal stability as well as improved expression levels. We summarize existing mutagenesis strategies with different coverage of GPCR sequence space and depth of information, design and transferability of mutations and the molecular basis for stabilization. We also discuss whether mutations alter the structure and pharmacological properties of GPCRs.

  1. G protein-coupled receptor regulation: The role of protein interactions and receptor trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Sandén, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) is the largest gene family in the human genome. GPCR-mediated signaling operates in every human cell, and about 50% of existing clinically useful drugs act through GPCR. Kinins are proinflammatory peptides that are rapidly produced extracellularly following pathological insults and tissue damage. These peptides act through two GPCR subtypes, B1 (B1R) and B2 (B2R), to elicit numerous inflammatory responses including vasodilatiation, increas...

  2. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) Is an Endogenous Ligand for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Mas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robson A. S. Santos; Ana C. Simoes e Silva; Christine Maric; Denise M. R. Silva; Raquel Pillar Machado; Insa de Buhr; Silvia Heringer-Walther; Sergio Veloso B. Pinheiro; Myriam Teresa Lopes; Michael Bader; Elizabeth P. Mendes; Virgina Soares Lemos; Maria Jose Campagnole-Santos; Heinz-Peter Schultheiss; Robert Speth; Thomas Walther

    2003-01-01

    ...) antagonist indicated the existence of a distinct Ang-(1-7) receptor. We demonstrate that genetic deletion of the G protein-coupled receptor encoded by the Mas protooncogene abolishes the binding of Ang-(1-7) to mouse kidneys...

  4. Production of a bioengineered G-protein coupled receptor of human formyl peptide receptor 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Wang

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs participate in a wide range of vital regulations of our physiological actions. They are also of pharmaceutical importance and have become many therapeutic targets for a number of disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based approaches including structural study and novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses are increasingly being used in GPCR-directed drug discovery. Before these approaches become routine, however, several hurdles need to be overcome; they include overexpression, solubilization, and purification of large quantities of functional and stable receptors on a regular basis. Here we report milligram production of a human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3. FPR3 comprises a functionally distinct GPCR subfamily that is involved in leukocyte chemotaxis and activation. The bioengineered FPR3 was overexpressed in stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell lines (HEK293S. After a systematic detergent screening, fos-choline-14 (FC-14 was selected for subsequent solubilization and purification processes. A two-step purification method, immunoaffinity using anti-rho-tag monoclonal antibody 1D4 and gel filtration, was used to purify the receptors to near homogeneity. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that expressed FPR3 was predominantly displayed on cellular membrane. Secondary structural analysis using circular dichroism showed that the purified FPR3 receptor was correctly folded with >50% α-helix, which is similar to other known GPCR secondary structures. Our method can readily produce milligram quantities of human FPR3, which would facilitate in developing human FPR as therapeutic drug targets.

  5. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G protein-independent effectors upon ligand binding suggesting the existence of multiple ligand-specific active states. These active-state conformations are unstable in the absence of specific cytosolic signaling partners representing new challenges for structural biology. Camelid single chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) show promise for stabilizing active GPCR conformations and as chaperones for crystallogenesis. PMID:21782416

  6. Molecular dynamics techniques for modeling G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobb, Fiona M; Negri, Ana; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2016-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a major class of drug targets and modulating their signaling can produce a wide range of pharmacological outcomes. With the growing number of high-resolution GPCR crystal structures, we have the unprecedented opportunity to leverage structure-based drug design techniques. Here, we discuss a number of advanced molecular dynamics (MD) techniques that have been applied to GPCRs, including long time scale simulations, enhanced sampling techniques, water network analyses, and free energy approaches to determine relative binding free energies. On the basis of the many success stories, including those highlighted here, we expect that MD techniques will be increasingly applied to aid in structure-based drug design and lead optimization for GPCRs.

  7. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-02-05

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution.

  8. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    -alpha;-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABA(B1......-2) and T1R2-3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity...

  9. Scotopic vision in the monkey is modulated by the G protein-coupled receptor 55

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors in the mon......The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors...

  10. A modeling strategy for G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell responses can be triggered via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs that interact with small molecules, peptides or proteins and transmit the signal over the membrane via structural changes to activate intracellular pathways. GPCRs are characterized by a rather low sequence similarity and exhibit structural differences even for functionally closely related GPCRs. An accurate structure prediction for GPCRs is therefore not straightforward. We propose a computational approach that relies on the generation of several independent models based on different template structures, which are subsequently refined by molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of their conformational stability and the agreement with GPCR-typical structural features is then used to select a favorable model. This strategy was applied to predict the structure of the herpesviral chemokine receptor US28 by generating three independent models based on the known structures of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5. Model refinement and evaluation suggested that the model based on CCR5 exhibits the most favorable structural properties. In particular, the GPCR-typical structural features, such as a conserved water cluster or conserved non-covalent contacts, are present to a larger extent in the model based on CCR5 compared to the other models. A final model validation based on the recently published US28 crystal structure confirms that the CCR5-based model is the most accurate and exhibits 80.8% correctly modeled residues within the transmembrane helices. The structural agreement between the selected model and the crystal structure suggests that our modeling strategy may also be more generally applicable to other GPCRs of unknown structure.

  11. Ancestral reconstruction of the ligand-binding pocket of Family C G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Kuang, Donghui; Yao, Yi; MacLean, David; Wang, Minghua; Hampson, David R.; Chang, Belinda S. W.

    2006-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) within the Family C subclass of G protein-coupled receptors are crucial modulators of synaptic transmission. However, their closest relatives include a diverse group of sensory receptors whose biological functions are not associated with neurotransmission, raising the question of the evolutionary origin of amino acid-binding Family C receptors. A common feature of most, if not all, functional Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid-bin...

  12. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 positively regulates epithelial cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penela, Petronila; Ribas, Catalina; Aymerich, Ivette; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Barreiro, Olga; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Mayor, Federico

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration requires integration of signals arising from both the extracellular matrix and messengers acting through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We find that increased levels of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), a key player in GPCR regulation, poteniate migration of epithelial

  13. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor and estrogen receptor ligands regulate colonic motility and visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, M; Fichna, J; Bashashati, M; Habibi, S; Sibaev, A; Timmermans, J-P; Storr, M

    2017-07-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, which occurs more frequently in women than men. The aim of our study was to determine the role of activation of classical estrogen receptors (ER) and novel membrane receptor, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in human and mouse tissue and to assess the possible cross talk between these receptors in the GI tract. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of GPER in human and mouse intestines. The effect of G-1, a GPER selective agonist, and estradiol, a non-selective ER agonist, on muscle contractility was characterized in isolated preparations of the human and mouse colon. To characterize the effect of G-1 and estradiol in vivo, colonic bead expulsion test was performed. G-1 and estradiol activity on the visceral pain signaling was assessed in the mustard oil-induced abdominal pain model. GPER is expressed in the human colon and in the mouse colon and ileum. G-1 and estradiol inhibited muscle contractility in vitro in human and mouse colon. G-1 or estradiol administered intravenously at the dose of 20 mg/kg significantly prolonged the time to bead expulsion in females. Moreover, G-1 prolonged the time to bead expulsion and inhibited GI hypermotility in both genders. The injection of G-1 or estradiol resulted in a significant reduction in the number of pain-induced behaviors in mice. GPER and ER receptors are involved in the regulation of GI motility and visceral pain. Both may thus constitute an important pharmacological target in the IBS-D therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Deletion of G-protein-coupled receptor 55 promotes obesity by reducing physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the best-characterized cannabinoid receptor, and CB1 antagonists are used in clinical trials to treat obesity. Because of the wide range of CB1 functions, the side effects of CB1 antagonists pose serious concerns. G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is an atypical c...

  15. Alpha-Bulges in G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob van der Kant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agonist binding is related to a series of motions in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that result in the separation of transmembrane helices III and VI at their cytosolic ends and subsequent G protein binding. A large number of smaller motions also seem to be associated with activation. Most helices in GPCRs are highly irregular and often contain kinks, with extensive literature already available about the role of prolines in kink formation and the precise function of these kinks. GPCR transmembrane helices also contain many α-bulges. In this article we aim to draw attention to the role of these α-bulges in ligand and G-protein binding, as well as their role in several aspects of the mobility associated with GPCR activation. This mobility includes regularization and translation of helix III in the extracellular direction, a rotation of the entire helix VI, an inward movement of the helices near the extracellular side, and a concerted motion of the cytosolic ends of the helices that makes their orientation appear more circular and that opens up space for the G protein to bind. In several cases, α-bulges either appear or disappear as part of the activation process.

  16. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5 enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis.

  17. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  18. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression,

  19. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases control expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Juliane; Lerche Hansen, Jakob; Haunsø, Stig;

    2002-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates G protein-coupled receptors resulting in uncoupling from G proteins. Receptors modulate GRK2 expression, however the mechanistic basis for this effect is largely unknown. Here we report a novel mechanism by which receptors use...

  20. β2-Adrenergic ion-channel coupled receptors as conformational motion detectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia N Caro

    Full Text Available Ion Channel-Coupled Receptors (ICCRs are artificial proteins comprised of a G protein-coupled receptor and a fused ion channel, engineered to couple channel gating to ligand binding. These novel biological objects have potential use in drug screening and functional characterization, in addition to providing new tools in the synthetic biology repertoire as synthetic K(+-selective ligand-gated channels. The ICCR concept was previously validated with fusion proteins between the K(+ channel Kir6.2 and muscarinic M(2 or dopaminergic D(2 receptors. Here, we extend the concept to the distinct, longer β(2-adrenergic receptor which, unlike M(2 and D(2 receptors, displayed barely detectable surface expression in our Xenopus oocyte expression system and did not couple to Kir6.2 when unmodified. Here, we show that a Kir6.2-binding protein, the N-terminal transmembrane domain of the sulfonylurea receptor, can greatly increase plasma membrane expression of β(2 constructs. We then demonstrate how engineering of both receptor and channel can produce β(2-Kir6.2 ICCRs. Specifically, removal of 62-72 residues from the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the receptor was required to enable coupling, suggesting that ligand-dependent conformational changes do not efficiently propagate to the distal C-terminus. Characterization of the β(2 ICCRs demonstrated that full and partial agonists had the same coupling efficacy, that an inverse agonist had no effect and that the stabilizing mutation E122 W reduced agonist-induced coupling efficacy without affecting affinity. Because the ICCRs are expected to report motions of the receptor C-terminus, these results provide novel insights into the conformational dynamics of the β(2 receptor.

  1. Chronic regulation of colonic epithelial secretory function by activation of G protein-coupled receptors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toumi, F

    2011-02-01

    Enteric neurotransmitters that act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well known to acutely promote epithelial Cl(-) and fluid secretion. Here we examined if acute GPCR activation might have more long-term consequences for epithelial secretory function.

  2. Regulation of G protein-coupled receptors by palmitoylation and cholesterol

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Due to their membrane location, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to regulation by soluble and integral membrane proteins as well as membrane components, including lipids and sterols. GPCRs also undergo a variety of post-translational modifications, including palmitoylation. A recent article by Zheng et al. in BMC Cell Biology demonstrates cooperative roles for receptor palmitoylation and cholesterol binding in GPCR dimerization and G protein coupling, underlining the c...

  3. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Jennifer R.; Jenny Yingzi Wang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in ...

  4. Structural basis for activation of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Asmar, Fazila; Meinild, Anne Kristine

    2002-01-01

    -type and mutant beta2-adrenergic receptors purified from Sf-9 insect cells. Our studies have also raised important questions regarding kinetics of receptors activation. These questions should be addressed in the future by application of techniques that will allow for simultaneous measurement of conformational...

  5. Role of antibodies in developing drugs that target G-protein-coupled receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipser, Chris; Bushlin, Ittai; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2010-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are important molecular targets in drug discovery. These receptors play a pivotal role in physiological signaling pathways and are targeted by nearly 50% of currently available drugs. Mounting evidence suggests that G-protein-coupled receptors form dimers, and various studies have shown that dimerization is necessary for receptor maturation, signaling, and trafficking. However, the physiological implications of dimerization in vivo have not been well explored because detection of GPCR dimers in endogenous systems has been a challenging task. One exciting new approach to this challenge is the generation of antibodies against specific G-protein-coupled receptor dimers. Such antibodies could be used as tools for characterization of heteromer-specific function; as reagents for their purification, tissue localization, and regulation in vivo; and as probes for mapping their functional domains. In addition, such antibodies could serve as alternative ligands for G-protein-coupled receptor heteromers. Thus, heteromer-specific antibodies represent novel tools for the exploration and manipulation of G-protein-coupled receptor-dimer pharmacology.

  6. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we...

  7. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae,...

  8. A Molecular Mechanism for Sequential Activation of a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grundmann, Manuel; Tikhonova, Irina G; Hudson, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Ligands targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are currently classified as either orthosteric, allosteric, or dualsteric/bitopic. Here, we introduce a new pharmacological concept for GPCR functional modulation: sequential receptor activation. A hallmark feature of this is a stepwise ligand...

  9. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala;

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  10. Adipokinetic hormones and their G protein-coupled receptors emerged in Lophotrochozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Hauser, Frank; Skadborg, Signe K.;

    2016-01-01

    and in Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, we have cloned and deorphanized two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca) that are activated by low nanomolar concentrations of oyster AKH (pQVSFSTNWGSamide). Our discovery of functional AKH receptors in molluscs is especially significant...

  11. G protein-coupled receptor 39 deficiency is associated with pancreatic islet dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jin, Chunyu;

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4...

  12. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L;

    2015-01-01

    characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly...

  13. Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling in Yeast Mating Pheromone Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Christopher G; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-04-08

    The DNAs encoding the receptors that respond to the peptide mating pheromones of the budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiaewere isolated in 1985, and were the very first genes for agonist-binding heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to be cloned in any organism. Now, over 30 years later, this yeast and its receptors continue to provide a pathfinding experimental paradigm for investigating GPCR-initiated signaling and its regulation, as described in this retrospective overview.

  14. An allosteric modulator to control endogenous G protein-coupled receptors with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittolo, Silvia; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Eckelt, Kay; Rovira, Xavier; Dalton, James; Goudet, Cyril; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Llobet, Artur; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu; Gorostiza, Pau

    2014-10-01

    Controlling drug activity with light offers the possibility of enhancing pharmacological selectivity with spatial and temporal regulation, thus enabling highly localized therapeutic effects and precise dosing patterns. Here we report on the development and characterization of what is to our knowledge the first photoswitchable allosteric modulator of a G protein-coupled receptor. Alloswitch-1 is selective for the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 and enables the optical control of endogenous mGlu5 receptors.

  15. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Wang; Yi Liu; Ji-Min Cao

    2014-01-01

    Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G prot...

  16. G-protein coupled receptors of the renin-angiotensin system: new targets against breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Nahmias, Clara

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors, with high potential for drug discovery. These receptors can be activated by a panel of different ligands including ions, hormones, small molecules, and vasoactive peptides. Among those, angiotensins [angiotensin II (AngII) and angiotensin 1–7] are the major biologically active products of the classical and alternative renin-angiotensin system (RAS). These peptides bind and activate three different subtype...

  17. Molecular identification of a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor specific for crustacean cardioactive peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Hauser, Frank; Kobberup, Sune

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website (www.flybase.org) contains the sequence of an annotated gene (CG6111) expected to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We have cloned this receptor and found that its gene was not correctly predicted, because an annotated neighbouring gene (CG14547) was als....... Furthermore, we identified a gene sequence in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that very likely codes for a crustacean cardioactive peptide receptor....

  18. Predicting the Coupling Specificity of G-protein Coupled Receptors to G-proteins by Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Ping Guan; Zhen-Ran Jiang; Yan-Hong Zhou

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important classes of drug targets for pharmaceutical industry and play important roles in cellular signal transduction. Predicting the coupling specificity of GPCRs to G-proteins is vital for further understanding the mechanism of signal transduction and the function of the receptors within a cell, which can provide new clues for pharmaceutical research and development. In this study, the features of amino acid compositions and physiochemical properties of the full-length GPCR sequences have been analyzed and extracted. Based on these features, classifiers have been developed to predict the coupling specificity of GPCRs to G-proteins using support vector machines. The testing results show that this method could obtain better prediction accuracy.

  19. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  20. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30 for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9 for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid, the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs’ interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs.

  1. The G protein Gi1 exhibits basal coupling but not preassembly with G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef

    2017-06-09

    The Gi/o protein family transduces signals from a diverse group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The observed specificity of Gi/o-GPCR coupling and the high rate of Gi/o signal transduction have been hypothesized to be enabled by the existence of stable associates between Gi/o proteins and their cognate GPCRs in the inactive state (Gi/o-GPCR preassembly). To test this hypothesis, we applied the recently developed technique of two-photon polarization microscopy (2PPM) to Gαi1 subunits labeled with fluorescent proteins and four GPCRs: the α2A-adrenergic receptor, GABAB, cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R), and dopamine receptor type 2. Our experiments with non-dissociating mutants of fluorescently labeled Gαi1 subunits (exhibiting impaired dissociation from activated GPCRs) showed that 2PPM is capable of detecting GPCR-G protein interactions. 2PPM experiments with non-mutated fluorescently labeled Gαi1 subunits and α2A-adrenergic receptor, GABAB, or dopamine receptor type 2 receptors did not reveal any interaction between the Gi1 protein and the non-stimulated GPCRs. In contrast, non-stimulated CB1R exhibited an interaction with the Gi1 protein. Further experiments revealed that this interaction is caused solely by CB1R basal activity; no preassembly between CB1R and the Gi1 protein could be observed. Our results demonstrate that four diverse GPCRs do not preassemble with non-active Gi1 However, we also show that basal GPCR activity allows interactions between non-stimulated GPCRs and Gi1 (basal coupling). These findings suggest that Gi1 interacts only with active GPCRs and that the well known high speed of GPCR signal transduction does not require preassembly between G proteins and GPCRs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. S-Nitrosothiols modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mönkkönen Kati S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling machinery can serve as a direct target of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide (NO and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs. To gain a broader view into the way that receptor-dependent G protein activation – an early step in signal transduction – might be affected by RSNOs, we have studied several receptors coupling to the Gi family of G proteins in their native cellular environment using the powerful functional approach of [35S]GTPγS autoradiography with brain cryostat sections in combination with classical G protein activation assays. Results We demonstrate that RSNOs, like S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO, can modulate GPCR signaling via reversible, thiol-sensitive mechanisms probably involving S-nitrosylation. RSNOs are capable of very targeted regulation, as they potentiate the signaling of some receptors (exemplified by the M2/M4 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, inhibit others (P2Y12 purinergic, LPA1lysophosphatidic acid, and cannabinoid CB1 receptors, but may only marginally affect signaling of others, such as adenosine A1, μ-opioid, and opiate related receptors. Amplification of M2/M4 muscarinic responses is explained by an accelerated rate of guanine nucleotide exchange, as well as an increased number of high-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding sites available for the agonist-activated receptor. GSNO amplified human M4 receptor signaling also under heterologous expression in CHO cells, but the effect diminished with increasing constitutive receptor activity. RSNOs markedly inhibited P2Y12 receptor signaling in native tissues (rat brain and human platelets, but failed to affect human P2Y12 receptor signaling under heterologous expression in CHO cells, indicating that the native cellular signaling partners, rather than the P2Y12 receptor protein, act as a molecular target for this action. Conclusion These in vitro studies

  3. ERK5 activation by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors is independent of receptor internalization and β-arrestin recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Sánchez-Fernández

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are known to activate both G protein- and β-arrestin-dependent signalling cascades. The initiation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways is a key downstream event in the control of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Both G proteins and β-arrestins have been reported to mediate context-specific activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPKs. Recently, the activation of ERK5 MAPK by Gq-coupled receptors has been described to involve a direct interaction between Gαq and two novel effectors, PKCζ and MEK5. However, the possible contribution of β-arrestin towards this pathway has not yet been addressed. In the present work we sought to investigate the role of receptor internalization processes and β-arrestin recruitment in the activation of ERK5 by Gq-coupled GPCRs. Our results show that ERK5 activation is independent of M1 or M3 muscarinic receptor internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-deficient muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors are still able to fully activate the ERK5 pathway, despite their reported inability to recruit β-arrestins. Indeed, the overexpression of Gαq, but not that of β-arrestin1 or β-arrestin2, was found to potently enhance ERK5 activation by GPCRs, whereas silencing of β-arrestin2 expression did not affect the activation of this pathway. Finally, we show that a β-arrestin-biased mutant form of angiotensin II (SII; Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 AngII failed to promote ERK5 phosphorylation in primary cardiac fibroblasts, as compared to the natural ligand. Overall, this study shows that the activation of ERK5 MAPK by model Gq-coupled GPCRs does not depend on receptor internalization, β-arrestin recruitment or receptor phosphorylation but rather is dependent on Gαq-signalling.

  4. Dimers of G-Protein Coupled Receptors as Versatile Storage and Response Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Parker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The status and use of transmembrane, extracellular and intracellular domains in oligomerization of heptahelical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are reviewed and for transmembrane assemblies also supplemented by new experimental evidence. The transmembrane-linked GPCR oligomers typically have as the minimal unit an asymmetric ~180 kDa pentamer consisting of receptor homodimer or heterodimer and a G-protein αβγ subunit heterotrimer. With neuropeptide Y (NPY receptors, this assembly is converted to ~90 kDa receptor monomer-Gα complex by receptor and Gα agonists, and dimers/heteropentamers are depleted by neutralization of Gαi subunits by pertussis toxin. Employing gradient centrifugation, quantification and other characterization of GPCR dimers at the level of physically isolated and identified heteropentamers is feasible with labeled agonists that do not dissociate upon solubilization. This is demonstrated with three neuropeptide Y (NPY receptors and could apply to many receptors that use large peptidic agonists.

  5. Antibodies to probe endogenous G protein-coupled receptor heteromer expression, regulation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone eGomes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade an increasing number of studies have focused on the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to form heteromers and explored how receptor heteromerization modulates the binding, signaling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Most of these studies were carried out in heterologous cells expressing epitope tagged receptors. Very little information is available about the in vivo physiological role of G protein-coupled receptor heteromers due to a lack of tools to detect their presence in endogenous tissue. Recent advances such as the generation of mouse models expressing fluorescently labeled receptors, of TAT based peptides that can disrupt a given heteromer pair, or of heteromer-selective antibodies that recognize the heteromer in endogenous tissue have begun to elucidate the physiological and pathological roles of receptor heteromers. In this review we have focused on heteromer-selective antibodies and describe how a subtractive immunization strategy can be successfully used to generate antibodies that selectively recognize a desired heteromer pair. We also describe the uses of these antibodies to detect the presence of heteromers, to study their properties in endogenous tissues, and to monitor changes in heteromer levels under pathological conditions. Together, these findings suggest that G protein-coupled receptor heteromers represent unique targets for the development of drugs with reduced side-effects.

  6. Definition of the G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane bundle binding pocket and calculation of receptor similarities for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Foord, Steven M; Blaney, Frank E

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in structural biology for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have provided new opportunities to improve the definition of the transmembrane binding pocket. Here a reference set of 44 residue positions accessible for ligand binding was defined through detailed analysis of all curr...

  7. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  8. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this...

  9. Computational methods for studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Bartuzi, Damian; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The functioning of GPCRs is classically described by the ternary complex model as the interplay of three basic components: a receptor, an agonist, and a G protein. According to this model, receptor activation results from an interaction with an agonist, which translates into the activation of a particular G protein in the intracellular compartment that, in turn, is able to initiate particular signaling cascades. Extensive studies on GPCRs have led to new findings which open unexplored and exciting possibilities for drug design and safer and more effective treatments with GPCR targeting drugs. These include discovery of novel signaling mechanisms such as ligand promiscuity resulting in multitarget ligands and signaling cross-talks, allosteric modulation, biased agonism, and formation of receptor homo- and heterodimers and oligomers which can be efficiently studied with computational methods. Computer-aided drug design techniques can reduce the cost of drug development by up to 50%. In particular structure- and ligand-based virtual screening techniques are a valuable tool for identifying new leads and have been shown to be especially efficient for GPCRs in comparison to water-soluble proteins. Modern computer-aided approaches can be helpful for the discovery of compounds with designed affinity profiles. Furthermore, homology modeling facilitated by a growing number of available templates as well as molecular docking supported by sophisticated techniques of molecular dynamics and quantitative structure-activity relationship models are an excellent source of information about drug-receptor interactions at the molecular level.

  10. Using green fluorescent protein to understand the mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptor regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.G. Ferguson

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR activation is followed rapidly by adaptive changes that serve to diminish the responsiveness of a cell to further stimulation. This process, termed desensitization, is the consequence of receptor phosphorylation, arrestin binding, sequestration and down-regulation. GPCR phosphorylation is initiated within seconds to minutes of receptor activation and is mediated by both second messenger-dependent protein kinases and receptor-specific G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs. Desensitization in response to GRK-mediated phosphorylation involves the binding of arrestin proteins that serve to sterically uncouple the receptor from its G protein. GPCR sequestration, the endocytosis of receptors to endosomes, not only contributes to the temporal desensitization of GPCRs, but plays a critical role in GPCR resensitization. GPCR down-regulation, a loss of the total cellular complement of receptors, is the consequence of both increased lysosomal degradation and decreased mRNA synthesis of GPCRs. While each of these agonist-mediated desensitization processes are initiated within a temporally dissociable time frame, recent data suggest that they are intimately related to one another. The use of green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aqueora victoria as an epitope tag with intrinsic fluorescence has facilitated our understanding of the relative relationship between GRK phosphorylation, arrestin binding, receptor sequestration and down-regulation.

  11. Photomodulation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors by a novel light-switchable ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde, María Isabel; Taura, Jaume; Paoletta, Silvia; Gakh, Andrei A; Chakraborty, Saibal; Hernando, Jordi; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gorostiza, Pau; Ciruela, Francisco

    2014-10-15

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N(6) substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities.

  12. Small Molecule Receptor Ligands for PET Studies of the Central Nervous System-Focus on G Protein Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Robert H

    2017-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPRCs) are a class of proteins that are expressed in high abundance and are responsible for numerous signal transduction pathways in the central nervous system. Consequently, alterations in GPRC function have been associated with a wide variety of neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. The development of PET probes for imaging GPRCs has served as a major emphasis of PET radiotracer development and PET imaging studies over the past 30 years. In this review, a basic description of the biology of G proteins and GPRCs is provided. This includes recent evidence of the existence of dimeric and multimeric species of GPRCs that have been termed "receptor mosaics," with an emphasis on the different GPRCs that form complexes with the dopamine D2 receptor. An overview of the different PET radiotracers for imaging the component GPRC within these different multimeric complexes of the D2 receptor is also provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Basic evidence for class A G-protein-coupled receptor heteromerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eFranco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs seem an exception to the general rule of receptor-receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backwards instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery.

  14. Coupling of the p75 neurotrophin receptor to sphingolipid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, R T; Carter, B D

    1998-06-19

    The neurotrophins are a family of growth factors involved in the survival and differentiation of specific populations of neurons and glial cells. Many of the trophic signals elicited by neurotrophins are initiated by the binding of these molecules to various Trk tyrosine kinase receptors. In contrast, recent data suggest that neurotrophin-mediated death signals are generated through the interaction of nerve growth factor with the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor, p75NTR, Neurotrophins may signal through p75NTR by stimulating sphingomyelin hydrolysis and generating ceramide in primary cultures of neurons and glial cells as well as in fibroblasts heterologously expressing p75NTR. The biochemical characteristics of p75NTR-dependent ceramide generation are discussed relative to the role of ceramide in p75NTR-dependent apoptosis and the activation of NF-kappa B.

  15. Optimization of wind speed on dispersion of pollutants using coupled receptor and dispersion model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Anu; S Rangabhashiyam; Rahul Antony; N Selvaraju

    2015-08-01

    Air pollutants emission from various source categories can be quantified through mass balance (receptor model) techniques, multivariate data analysis and dispersion model. The composition of particulate matter from various emission points (emission inventory) and the massive analysis of the composition in the collected samples from various locations (receptor) are used to estimate quantitative source contribution through receptor models. In dispersion model, on the other hand the emission rates (g/m3) from various sources together with particle size, stack height, topography, meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity, wind speed and directions, etc.) will affect the pollutant concentration at a point or in a region. The parameters used in dispersion model are not considering in receptor models but have been affecting indirectly as difference concentration at various receptor locations. These differences are attributed and possible erroneous results can be viewed through coupled receptor-dispersion model analysis. The current research work proposed a coupled receptor-dispersion model to reduce the difference between predicted concentrations through optimized wind velocity used in dispersion model. The converged wind velocities for various error percentages (10%, 40%, 60% and 80%) in receptor concentration have been obtained with corresponding increase in the error. The proposed combined approaches help to reconcile the differences arise when the two models used in an individual mode.

  16. Structure-based drug design for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congreve, Miles; Dias, João M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the structural biology of G protein-coupled receptors has undergone a transformation over the past 5 years. New protein-ligand complexes are described almost monthly in high profile journals. Appreciation of how small molecules and natural ligands bind to their receptors has the potential to impact enormously how medicinal chemists approach this major class of receptor targets. An outline of the key topics in this field and some recent examples of structure- and fragment-based drug design are described. A table is presented with example views of each G protein-coupled receptor for which there is a published X-ray structure, including interactions with small molecule antagonists, partial and full agonists. The possible implications of these new data for drug design are discussed.

  17. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....

  18. G-Protein–Coupled Receptors Signaling Pathways in New Antiplatelet Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Gurbel, Paul A.; Kuliopulos, Athan; Tantry, Udaya S.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet G-protein–coupled receptors influence platelet function by mediating the response to various agonists, including ADP, thromboxane A2, and thrombin. Blockade of the ADP receptor, P2Y12, in combination with cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition by aspirin has been among the most widely used pharmacological strategies to reduce cardiovascular event occurrence in high-risk patients. The latter dual pathway blockade strategy is one of the greatest advances in the field of cardiovascular medicine. I...

  19. G-protein-coupled receptors for free fatty acids: nutritional and therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond; Murdoch, Hannah; Hudson, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming evident that nutrients and metabolic intermediates derived from such nutrients regulate cellular function by activating a number of cell-surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Until now, members of the GPCR family have largely been considered as the molecular targets that communicate cellular signals initiated by hormones and neurotransmitters. Recently, based on tissue expression patterns of these receptors and the concept that they may elicit the production of a range o...

  20. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ushkaryov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a lett...

  1. Muscarinic receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction is coupled to caveolae in murine airways

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenz, Heike; Kummer, Wolfgang; Jositsch, Gitte; Wess, Jürgen; Krasteva, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Cholinergic bronchoconstriction is mediated by M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors (MR). In heart and urinary bladder, MR are linked to caveolin-1 or -3, the structural proteins of caveolae. Caveolae are cholesterol-rich, omega-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. They provide a scaffold for multiple G protein receptors and membrane-bound enzymes, thereby orchestrating signaling into the cell interior. Hence, we hypothesized that airway MR signaling pathways are coupled to caveolae as well...

  2. Lactate Receptor Sites Link Neurotransmission, Neurovascular Coupling, and Brain Energy Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Morland, Cecilie; Puchades, Maja;

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated by physiolog......The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated...

  3. Molecular evolution of a chordate specific family of G protein-coupled receptors

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    Leese Florian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chordate evolution is a history of innovations that is marked by physical and behavioral specializations, which led to the development of a variety of forms from a single ancestral group. Among other important characteristics, vertebrates obtained a well developed brain, anterior sensory structures, a closed circulatory system and gills or lungs as blood oxygenation systems. The duplication of pre-existing genes had profound evolutionary implications for the developmental complexity in vertebrates, since mutations modifying the function of a duplicated protein can lead to novel functions, improving the evolutionary success. Results We analyzed here the evolution of the GPRC5 family of G protein-coupled receptors by comprehensive similarity searches and found that the receptors are only present in chordates and that the size of the receptor family expanded, likely due to genome duplication events in the early history of vertebrate evolution. We propose that a single GPRC5 receptor coding gene originated in a stem chordate ancestor and gave rise by duplication events to a gene family comprising three receptor types (GPRC5A-C in vertebrates, and a fourth homologue present only in mammals (GPRC5D. Additional duplications of GPRC5B and GPRC5C sequences occurred in teleost fishes. The finding that the expression patterns of the receptors are evolutionarily conserved indicates an important biological function of these receptors. Moreover, we found that expression of GPRC5B is regulated by vitamin A in vivo, confirming previous findings that linked receptor expression to retinoic acid levels in tumor cell lines and strengthening the link between the receptor expression and the development of a complex nervous system in chordates, known to be dependent on retinoic acid signaling. Conclusions GPRC5 receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptors with unique sequence characteristics, may represent a molecular novelty that helped non

  4. N-terminal T4 lysozyme fusion facilitates crystallization of a G protein coupled receptor.

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    Yaozhong Zou

    Full Text Available A highly crystallizable T4 lysozyme (T4L was fused to the N-terminus of the β(2 adrenergic receptor (β(2AR, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR for catecholamines. We demonstrate that the N-terminal fused T4L is sufficiently rigid relative to the receptor to facilitate crystallogenesis without thermostabilizing mutations or the use of a stabilizing antibody, G protein, or protein fused to the 3rd intracellular loop. This approach adds to the protein engineering strategies that enable crystallographic studies of GPCRs alone or in complex with a signaling partner.

  5. Assessment and Challenges of Ligand Docking into Comparative Models of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, E.D.; Meiler, J.; Norn, C.;

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of high-resolution X-ray structures of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) creates a unique opportunity to employ comparative modeling and docking to provide valuable insight into the function and ligand binding determinants of novel receptors, to assist in virtual...... screening and to design and optimize drug candidates. However, low sequence identity between receptors, conformational flexibility, and chemical diversity of ligands present an enormous challenge to molecular modeling approaches. It is our hypothesis that rapid Monte-Carlo sampling of protein backbone...

  6. Basic Pharmacological and Structural Evidence for Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization

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    Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Lanciego, José L.; Navarro, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem an exception to the general rule of receptor–receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backward instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery. PMID:27065866

  7. Amphipols in G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology: what are they good for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Sophie; Damian, Marjorie; Rahmeh, Rita; Mouillac, Bernard; Marie, Jacky; Granier, Sébastien; Banères, Jean-Louis

    2014-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are at a central node of all cell communications. Investigating their molecular functioning is therefore crucial for both academic purposes and drug design. However, getting the receptors as isolated, stable and purified proteins for such studies still stumbles over their instability out of the membrane environment. Different membrane-mimicking environments have been developed so far to increase the stability of purified receptors. Among them are amphipols. These polymers not only preserve the native fold of receptors purified from membrane fractions but they also allow specific applications such as folding receptors purified from inclusion bodies back to their native state. Of importance, amphipol-trapped G protein-coupled receptors essentially maintain their pharmacological properties so that they are perfectly adapted to further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling processes. We review here how amphipols have been used to refold and stabilize detergent-solubilized purified receptors and what are the main subsequent molecular pharmacology analyses that were performed using this strategy.

  8. Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs regulate large signaling networks, control multiple cell functions and are implicated in many diseases including various cancers. Both of them are also the top therapeutic targets for disease treatment. The discovery of the cross-talk between GPCRs and RTKs connects these two vast signaling networks and complicates the already complicated signaling networks that regulate cell signaling and function. In this review, we focus on the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a subfamily of RTKs, by GPCRs. Since the first report of EGFR transactivation by GPCR, significant progress has been made including the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transactivation. Here, we first provide a basic picture for GPCR, EGFR and EGFR transactivation by GPCR. We then discuss the progress made in the last five years and finally provided our view of the future challenge and future researches needed to overcome these challenges.

  9. Structural–Functional Features of the Thyrotropin Receptor: A Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor at Work

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    Gerd Krause

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR is a member of the glycoprotein hormone receptors, a sub-group of class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. TSHR and its endogenous ligand thyrotropin (TSH are of essential importance for growth and function of the thyroid gland and proper function of the TSH/TSHR system is pivotal for production and release of thyroid hormones. This receptor is also important with respect to pathophysiology, such as autoimmune (including ophthalmopathy or non-autoimmune thyroid dysfunctions and cancer development. Pharmacological interventions directly targeting the TSHR should provide benefits to disease treatment compared to currently available therapies of dysfunctions associated with the TSHR or the thyroid gland. Upon TSHR activation, the molecular events conveying conformational changes from the extra- to the intracellular side of the cell across the membrane comprise reception, conversion, and amplification of the signal. These steps are highly dependent on structural features of this receptor and its intermolecular interaction partners, e.g., TSH, antibodies, small molecules, G-proteins, or arrestin. For better understanding of signal transduction, pathogenic mechanisms such as autoantibody action and mutational modifications or for developing new pharmacological strategies, it is essential to combine available structural data with functional information to generate homology models of the entire receptor. Although so far these insights are fragmental, in the past few decades essential contributions have been made to investigate in-depth the involved determinants, such as by structure determination via X-ray crystallography. This review summarizes available knowledge (as of December 2016 concerning the TSHR protein structure, associated functional aspects, and based on these insights we suggest several receptor complex models. Moreover, distinct TSHR properties will be highlighted in comparison to other

  10. Zinc Is Involved in Depression by Modulating G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heterodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena-Campos, Mercè; Ramon, Eva; Lupala, Cecylia S; Pérez, Juan J; Koch, Karl-W; Garriga, Pere

    2016-04-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor and galanin receptor 1 belong to the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily, and they have been described to heterodimerize triggering an anomalous physiological state that would underlie depression. Zinc supplementation has been widely reported to improve treatment against major depressive disorder. Our work has focused on the study and characterization of these receptors and its relationships with zinc both under purified conditions and in cell culture. To this aim, we have designed a strategy to purify the receptors in a conformationally active state. We have used receptors tagged with the monoclonal Rho-1D4 antibody and employed ligand-assisted purification in order to successfully purify both receptors in a properly folded and active state. The interaction between both purified receptors has been analyzed by surface plasmon resonance in order to determine the kinetics of dimerization. Zinc effect on heteromer has also been tested using the same methodology but exposing the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor to zinc before the binding experiment. These results, combined with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, in the absence and presence of zinc, suggest that this ion is capable of disrupting this interaction. Moreover, molecular modeling suggests that there is a coincidence between zinc-binding sites and heterodimerization interfaces for the serotonin receptor. Our results establish a rational explanation for the role of zinc in the molecular processes associated with receptor-receptor interactions and its relationship with depression, in agreement with previously reported evidence for the positive effects of zinc in depression treatment, and the involvement of our target dimer in the same disease.

  11. Delta receptors are required for full inhibitory coupling of mu-receptors to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy; John, Scott; Maga, Matthew; Evans, Christopher J; Hales, Tim G

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant micro and delta opioid receptors expressed in cell lines can form heterodimers with distinctive properties and trafficking. However, a role for opioid receptor heterodimerization in neurons has yet to be identified. The inhibitory coupling of opioid receptors to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) is a relatively inefficient process and therefore provides a sensitive assay of altered opioid receptor function and expression. We examined micro-receptor coupling to VDCCs in dorsal root ganglion neurons of delta(+/+), delta(+/-), and delta(-/-) mice. Neurons deficient in delta receptors exhibited reduced inhibition of VDCCs by morphine and [D-Ala(2),Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO). An absence of delta receptors caused reduced efficacy of DAMGO without affecting potency. An absence of delta receptors reduced neither the density of VDCCs nor their inhibition by either the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen or intracellular guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate. Flow cytometry revealed a reduction in micro-receptor surface expression in delta(-/-) neurons without altered DAMGO-induced internalization. There was no change in micro-receptor mRNA levels. D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2)-sensitive mu-receptor-coupling efficacy was fully restored to delta(+/+) levels in delta(-/-) neurons by expression of recombinant delta receptors. However, the dimerization-deficient delta-15 construct expressed in delta(-/-) neurons failed to fully restore the inhibitory coupling of micro-receptors compared with that seen in delta(+/+) neurons, suggesting that, although not essential for micro-receptor function, micro-delta receptor dimerization contributes to full micro-agonist efficacy. Because DAMGO exhibited a similar potency in delta(+/+) and delta(-/-) neurons and caused similar levels of internalization, the role for heterodimerization is probably at the level of receptor biosynthesis.

  12. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region...

  13. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...

  14. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S

    2017-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed primarily in the brain. Not much is known regarding the function of GPR139. Recently we have shown that GPR139 is activated by the amino acids l-tryptophan and l-phenylalanine (EC50 values of 220 μM and 320 μM, respectively), as wel...

  15. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud;

    2003-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large class of seven transmembrane proteins, which bind selectively agonists or antagonists with important consequences for cellular signaling and function. Comprehension of the molecular details of ligand binding is important for the understanding...

  16. Crystal structure of the human beta2 adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Rosenbaum, Daniel M;

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for hormones and neurotransmitters has been hindered by their low natural abundance, inherent structural flexibility, and instability in detergent solutions. Here we report a structure of the human beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2AR), which...

  17. Opioid tolerance and the emergence of new opioid receptor-coupled signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintzler, A R; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-01-01

    Multiple cellular adaptations are elicited by chronic exposure to opioids. These include diminution of spare opioid receptors, decreased opioid receptor density, and G-protein content and coupling thereof. All imply that opioid tolefance is a manifestation of a loss of opioid function, i.e., desensitization. Recent observations challenge the exclusiveness of this formulation and indicate that opioid tolerance also results from qualitative changes in opioid signaling. In this article, Gintzler and Chakrabarti discuss the evidence that suggests that opioid tolerance results not only from impaired opioid receptor functionality, but also from altered consequences of coupling. Underlying the latter are fundamental changes in the nature of effectors that are coupled to the opioid receptor/G-protein signaling pathway. These molecular changes include the upregulation of adenylyl cyclase isoforms of the type II family as well as a substantial increase in their phosphorylation state. As a result, there is a shift in opioid receptor/G-protein signaling from predominantly Gialpha inhibitory to Gbetagamma stimulatory following chronic in vivo morphine exposure. These adaptations to chronic morphine indicate the plasticity of opioid-signal transduction mechanisms and the ability of chronic morphine to augment new signaling strategies.

  18. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian;

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new method for the building of pharmacophores for G protein-coupled receptors, a major drug target family. The method is a combination of the ligand- and target-based pharmacophore methods and founded on the extraction of structural fragments, interacting ligand moiety...... for new targets. A validating retrospective virtual screening of histamine H1 and H3 receptor pharmacophores yielded area-under-the-curves of 0.88 and 0.82, respectively. The fragment-based method has the unique advantage that it can be applied to targets for which no (homologous) crystal structures...... or ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...

  19. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24517644

  20. On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

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    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The modulatory role of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in the pain pathways of the Central Nervous System and the peripheral nociceptors has become of increasing interest. As integrators of nociceptive and antinociceptive wiring and volume transmission signals, with a major role for the opioid receptor heteromers, they likely have an important role in the pain circuits and may be involved in acupuncture. The delta opioid receptor (DOR exerts an antagonistic allosteric influence on the mu opioid receptor (MOR function in a MOR-DOR heteromer. This heteromer contributes to morphine-induced tolerance and dependence, since it becomes abundant and develops a reduced G-protein-coupling with reduced signaling mainly operating via β-arrestin2 upon chronic morphine treatment. A DOR antagonist causes a return of the Gi/o binding and coupling to the heteromer and the biological actions of morphine. The gender- and ovarian steroid-dependent recruitment of spinal cord MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR heterodimers enhances antinociceptive functions and if impaired could contribute to chronic pain states in women. MOR1D heterodimerizes with gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in the spinal cord, mediating morphine induced itch. Other mechanism for the antinociceptive actions of acupuncture along meridians may be that it enhances the cross-desensitization of the TRPA1 (chemical nociceptor-TRPV1 (capsaicin receptor heteromeric channel complexes within the nociceptor terminals located along these meridians. Selective ionotropic cannabinoids may also produce cross-desensitization of the TRPA1-TRPV1 heteromeric nociceptor channels by being negative allosteric modulators of these channels leading to antinociception and antihyperalgesia.

  1. GPR99, a new G protein-coupled receptor with homology to a new subgroup of nucleotide receptors

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    Chica Schaller H

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on sequence similarity, the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs can be subdivided into several subfamilies, the members of which often share similar ligands. The sequence data provided by the human genome project allows us to identify new GPRs by in silico homology screening, and to predict their ligands. Results By searching the human genomic database with known nucleotide receptors we discovered the gene for GPR99, a new orphan GPR. The mRNA of GPR99 was found in kidney and placenta. Phylogenetic analysis groups GPR99 into the P2Y subfamily of GPRs. Based on the phylogenetic tree we propose a new classification of P2Y nucleotide receptors into two subgroups predicting a nucleotide ligand for GPR99. By assaying known nucleotide ligands on heterologously expressed GPR99, we could not identify specifically activating substances, indicating that either they are not agonists of GPR99 or that GPR99 was not expressed at the cell surface. Analysis of the chromosomal localization of all genes of the P2Y subfamily revealed that all members of subgroup "a" are encoded by less than 370 kb on chromosome 3q24, and that the genes of subgroup "b" are clustered on one hand to chromosome 11q13.5 and on the other on chromosome 3q24-25.1 close to the subgroup "a" position. Therefore, the P2Y subfamily is a striking example for local gene amplification. Conclusions We identified a new orphan receptor, GPR99, with homology to the family of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors. Phylogenetic analysis separates this family into different subgroups predicting a nucleotide ligand for GPR99.

  2. Non-CB1, non-CB2 receptors for endocannabinoids, plant cannabinoids, and synthetic cannabimimetics: focus on G-protein-coupled receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2010-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychotropic constituent of Cannabis, has been a puzzle during the three decades separating its characterization, in 1964, and the cloning, in the 1990s, of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. However, while these latter proteins do mediate most of the pharmacological actions of THC, they do not seem to act as receptors for other plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), nor are they the unique targets of the endogenous lipids that were originally identified in animals as agonists of CB1 and CB2 receptors, and named endocannabinoids. Over the last decade, several potential alternative receptors for phytocannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and even synthetic cannabimimetics, have been proposed, often based uniquely on pharmacological evidence obtained in vitro. In particular, the endocannabinoid anandamide, and the other most abundant Cannabis constituent, cannabidiol, seem to be the most "promiscuous" of these compounds. In this article, we review the latest data on the non-CB1, non-CB2 receptors suggested so far for endocannabinoids and plant or synthetic cannabinoids, and lay special emphasis on uncharacterized or orphan G-protein-coupled receptors as well as on transient receptor potential channels.

  3. Characteristics of receptor- and transducer-coupled activation of the intracellular signalling in sensory neuron revealed by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalisov, M. M.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Esikova, N. A.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Krylov, B. V.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of sensory neurons upon activation of intracellular cascade processes by comenic acid binding to a membrane opioid-like receptor (receptor-coupled), as well as a very low (endogenous) concentration of ouabain (transducer-coupled), have been investigated. Using atomic force microscopy, it is established that exposure to ouabain, in contrast to the impact of comenic acid, leads to a hardening of the neuron soma. This suggests that the receptor-coupled signal transmission to the cell genome is carried out through mechanisms that are different from the transducer-coupled signal pathways.

  4. A prospective cross-screening study on G-protein-coupled receptors: lessons learned in virtual compound library design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, M.P.A.; Roumen, L.; Horst, E. van der; Lane, J.R.; Vischer, H.F.; Offenbeek, J. van; Vries, H. de; Verhoeven, S.; Chow, K.Y.; Verkaar, F.; Beukers, M.W.; McGuire, R.; Leurs, R.; IJzerman, A.P.; Vlieg, J. de; Esch, I.J. de; Zaman, G.J.; Klomp, J.P.G.; Bender, A.; Graaf, C. de

    2012-01-01

    We present the systematic prospective evaluation of a protein-based and a ligand-based virtual screening platform against a set of three G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): the beta-2 adrenoreceptor (ADRB2), the adenosine A(2A) receptor (AA2AR), and the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR1). Nov

  5. A robust and rapid method of producing soluble, stable, and functional G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Corin

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, are notoriously difficult to express. Using commercial E. coli cell-free systems with the detergent Brij-35, we could rapidly produce milligram quantities of 13 unique GPCRs. Immunoaffinity purification yielded receptors at >90% purity. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism indicated that the purified receptors were properly folded. Microscale thermophoresis, a novel label-free and surface-free detection technique that uses thermal gradients, showed that these receptors bound their ligands. The secondary structure and ligand-binding results from cell-free produced proteins were comparable to those expressed and purified from HEK293 cells. Our study demonstrates that cell-free protein production using commercially available kits and optimal detergents is a robust technology that can be used to produce sufficient GPCRs for biochemical, structural, and functional analyses. This robust and simple method may further stimulate others to study the structure and function of membrane proteins.

  6. Insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors impacts drug design for central nervous system neurodegenerative processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalet, Farfán-García Eunice; Guadalupe, Trujillo-Ferrara José; María del Carmen, Castillo-Hernández; Humberto, Guerra-Araiza Christian; Antonio, Soriano-Ursúa Marvin

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there have been important new insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors. It is now known that allosteric binding sites are involved in the affinity and selectivity of ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, and that signaling by these receptors involves both G-protein dependent and independent pathways. The present review outlines the physiological and pharmacological implications of this perspective for the design of new drugs to treat disord...

  7. Agonistic autoantibodies directed against G-protein-coupled receptors and their relationship to cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallukat, Gerd; Schimke, Ingolf

    2014-05-01

    Agonistic autoantibodies (AABs) against G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) are present mainly in diseases of the cardiovascular system or in diseases associated with cardiovascular disturbances. The increasing knowledge about the role of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR-AABs) as pathogenic drivers, the resulting development of strategies aimed at their removal or neutralization, and the evidenced patient benefit associated with such therapies have created the need for a summary of GPCR-AAB-associated diseases. Here, we summarize the present knowledge about GPCR-AABs in cardiovascular diseases. The identity of the GPCR-AABs and their prevalence in each of several specific cardiovascular diseases are documented. The structure of GPCR is also briefly discussed. Using this information, differences between classic agonists and GPCR-AABs in their GPCR binding and activation are presented and the resulting pathogenic consequences are discussed. Furthermore, treatment strategies that are currently under study, most of which are aimed at the removal and in vivo neutralization of GPCR-AABs, are indicated and their patient benefits discussed. In this context, immunoadsorption using peptides/proteins or aptamers as binders are introduced. The use of peptides or aptamers for in vivo neutralization of GPCR-AABs is also described. Particular attention is given to the GPCR-AABs directed against the adrenergic beta1-, beta2-, and α1-receptor as well as the muscarinic receptor M2, angiotensin II-angiotensin receptor type I, endothelin1 receptor type A, angiotensin (1-7) Mas-receptor, and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4. Among the diseases associated with GPCR-AABs, special focus is given to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, Chagas' cardiomyopathy, malignant and pulmonary hypertension, and kidney diseases. Relationships of GPCR-AABs are indicated to glaucoma, peripartum cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, pericarditis, preeclampsia, Alzheimer's disease, Sj

  8. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Kwon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jung, Kyung-Sik [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Son, Cagdas D [ORNL; Kim, Heejung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Arshava, Boris [College of Staten Island; Naider, Fred [College of Staten Island; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  9. Allosteric regulation of G protein-coupled receptor activity by phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Masureel, Matthieu; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kobilka, Brian K; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are emerging as key regulators of membrane protein structure and activity. These effects can be attributed either to the modification of bilayer properties (thickness, curvature and surface tension) or to the binding of specific lipids to the protein surface. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the effects of phospholipids on receptor structure and activity remain poorly understood. Here we reconstituted purified β2-adrenergic receptor (β2R) in high-density lipoparticles to systematically characterize the effect of biologically relevant phospholipids on receptor activity. We observed that the lipid headgroup type affected ligand binding (agonist and antagonist) and receptor activation. Specifically, phosphatidylgycerol markedly favored agonist binding and facilitated receptor activation, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine favored antagonist binding and stabilized the inactive state of the receptor. We then showed that these effects could be recapitulated with detergent-solubilized lipids, demonstrating that the functional modulation occurred in the absence of a bilayer. Our data suggest that phospholipids act as direct allosteric modulators of GPCR activity.

  10. G protein coupled receptors of the renin-angiotensin system: new targets against breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara eNAHMIAS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute the largest family of membrane receptors, with high potential for drug discovery. These receptors can be activated by a panel of different ligands including ions, hormones, small molecules and vasoactive peptides. Among those, angiotensins (angiotensin II and angiotensin 1-7 are the major biologically active products of the classical and alternative Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS. These peptides bind and activate three different subtypes of GPCRs, namely AT1, AT2 and Mas receptors, to regulate cardiovascular functions. Over the past decade, the contribution of several RAS components in tumorigenesis has emerged as a novel important concept, Angiotensin II being considered as harmful and Angiotensin 1-7 as protective against cancer. Development of selective ligands targeting each RAS receptor may provide novel and efficient targeted therapeutic strategies against cancer. In this review, we focus on breast cancer to summarize current knowledge on angiotensin receptors (AT1, AT2, and Mas, and discuss the potential use of angiotensin receptor agonists and antagonists in clinics.

  11. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  12. Structure and mechanism for recognition of peptidehormones by Class B G-protein-coupled receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuntal PAL; Karsten MELCHER; H Eric XU

    2012-01-01

    Class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are receptors for peptide hormones that include glucagon,parathyroid hormone,and calcitonin.These receptors are involved in a wide spectrum of physiological activities,from metabolic regulation and stress control to development and maintenance of the skeletal system.As such,they are important drug targets for the treatment of diabetes,osteo-porosis,and stress related disorders.Class B GPCRs are organized into two modular domains:an extracellular domain (ECD) and ahelical bundle that contains seven transmembrane helices (TM domain).The ECD is responsible for the high affinity and specificity of hormone binding,and the TM domain is required for receptor activation and signal coupling to downstream G-proteins.Although the structure of the full-length receptor remains unknown,the ECD structures have been well characterized for a number of Class BGPCRs,revealing a common fold for ligand recognition.This review summarizes the general structural principles that guide hormone binding by Class B ECDs and their implications in the design of peptide hormone analogs for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Characterization of rabbit ileal receptors for Clostridium difficile toxin A. Evidence for a receptor-coupled G protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pothoulakis, C.; LaMont, J.T.; Eglow, R.; Gao, N.; Rubins, J.B.; Theoharides, T.C.; Dickey, B.F. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the surface receptor for toxin A, the enterotoxin from Clostridium difficile, on rabbit intestinal brush borders (BB) and on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells. Purified toxin A was radiolabeled using a modified Bolton-Hunter method to sp act 2 microCi/micrograms, with retention of full biologic activity. 3H-Toxin A bound specifically to a single class of receptors on rabbit BB and on RBL cells with dissociation constants of 5.4 x 10(-8) and 3.5 x 10(-8) M, respectively. RBL cells were highly sensitive to toxin A (cell rounding) and had 180,000 specific binding sites per cell, whereas IMR-90 fibroblasts were far less sensitive to toxin A and lacked detectable specific binding sites. Exposure of BB to trypsin or chymotrypsin significantly reduced 3H-toxin A specific binding. Preincubation of BB with Bandeirea simplicifolia (BS-1) lectin also reduced specific binding, and CHAPS-solubilized receptors could be immobilized with WGA-agarose. The addition of 100 nM toxin A accelerated the association of 35S-GTP gamma S with rabbit ileal BB, and preincubation of BB with the GTP analogues GTP gamma S or Gpp(NH)p, significantly reduced 3H-toxin A specific binding. Our data indicate that the membrane receptor for toxin A is a galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine-containing glycoprotein which appears to be coupled to a G protein.

  14. Receptor-mediated gene delivery using polyethylenimine (PEI)coupled with polypeptides targeting FGF receptors on cells surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Da; WANG Qing-qing; TANG Gu-ping; HUANG Hong-liang; SHEN Fen-ping; LI Jing-zhong; YU Hai

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To construct a novel kind ofnonviral gene delivery vector based on polyethylenimine (PEI) conjugated with polypeptides derived from ligand FGF with high transfection efficiency and according to tumor targeting ability. Methods:The synthetic polypeptides CR16 for binding FGF receptors was conjugated to PEI and the characters of the polypeptides including DNA condensing and particle size were determined. Enhanced efficiency and the targeting specificity of the synthesized vector were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results: The polypeptides were successfully coupled to PEI. The new vectors PEI-CR16 could efficiently condense pDNA into particles with around 200 nm diameter. The PEI-CR16/pDNA polyplexes showed significantly greater transgene activity than PEI/pDNA in FGF receptors positive tumor cells in vitro and in vivo gene transfer, while no difference was observed in FGF receptors negative tumor cells. The enhanced transfection efficiency of PEI-CR16 could be blocked by excess free polypeptides. Conclusion: The synthesized vector could improve the efficiency of gene transfer and targeting specificity in FGF receptors positive cells. The vector had good prospect for use in cancer gene therapy.

  15. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...... with colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...

  16. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, M.L.; Norman, J E; Morgan, N. V.; Mundell, S J; Lordkipanidze, M.; Lowe, G. C.; Daly, M E; Simpson, M.A.; Drake, S.; Watson, S P; Mumford, A D; UKGAPPS,

    2016-01-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common\\ud population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)\\ud genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR\\ud gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants\\ud (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in\\ud 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing\\ud Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders\\ud (I...

  17. Plasma Membrane and Nuclear Localization of G Protein–coupled Receptor Kinase 6A

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaoshan; Benovic, Jeffrey L.; Wedegaertner, Philip B.

    2007-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) specifically phosphorylate agonist-occupied GPCRs at the inner surface of the plasma membrane (PM), leading to receptor desensitization. Here we show that the C-terminal 30 amino acids of GRK6A contain multiple elements that either promote or inhibit PM localization. Disruption of palmitoylation by individual mutation of cysteine 561, 562, or 565 or treatment of cells with 2-bromopalmitate shifts GRK6A from the PM to both the cytoplasm and nucl...

  18. Understanding the Added Value of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Franco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute the most populated family of proteins within the human genome. Since the early sixties work on GPCRs and on GPCR-mediated signaling has led to a number of awards, the most recent being the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2012. The future of GPCRs research is surely based on their capacity for heteromerization. Receptor heteromers offer a series of challenges that will help in providing success in academic/basic research and translation into more effective and safer drugs.

  19. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  20. GABA(B2) is essential for g-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Filippov, A K; Hirst, W D; Russell, R B; Wood, M D; Nasir, S; Couve, A; Brown, D A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in their requirement for heterodimerization between two homologous subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), for functional expression. Whereas GABA(B1) is capable of binding receptor agonists and antagonists, the role of each GABA(B) subunit in receptor signaling is unknown. Here we identified amino acid residues within the second intracellular domain of GABA(B2) that are critical for the coupling of GABA(B) receptor heterodimers to their downstream effector systems. Our results provide strong evidence for a functional role of the GABA(B2) subunit in G-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer. In addition, they provide evidence for a novel "sequential" GPCR signaling mechanism in which ligand binding to one heterodimer subunit can induce signal transduction through the second partner of a heteromeric complex.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel GABAB-related G-protein coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Michalovich, D; Testa, T T; Robbins, M J; Jaillard, C; Hill, J; Szekeres, P G; Charles, K J; Jourdain, S; Holbrook, J D; Boyfield, I; Patel, N; Medhurst, A D; Pangalos, M N

    2003-02-20

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have analysed human genomic sequence and identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) was a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. The C-terminal sequence of GABA(BL) contained a putative coiled-coil domain, di-leucine and several RXR(R) ER retention motifs, all of which have been shown to be critical in GABA(B) receptor subunit function. In addition, the distribution of GABA(BL) in the central nervous system was reminiscent of that of the other known GABA(B) subunits. However, we were unable to detect receptor function in response to any GABA(B) ligands when GABA(BL) was expressed in isolation or in the presence of either GABA(B1) or GABA(B2). Therefore, if GABA(BL) is indeed a GABA(B) receptor subunit, its partner is a potentially novel receptor subunit or chaperone protein which has yet to be identified.

  2. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Complete Reversible Refolding of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor on a Solid Support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Di Bartolo

    Full Text Available The factors defining the correct folding and stability of integral membrane proteins are poorly understood. Folding of only a few select membrane proteins has been scrutinised, leaving considerable deficiencies in knowledge for large protein families, such as G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Complete reversible folding, which is problematic for any membrane protein, has eluded this dominant receptor family. Moreover, attempts to recover receptors from denatured states are inefficient, yielding at best 40-70% functional protein. We present a method for the reversible unfolding of an archetypal family member, the β1-adrenergic receptor, and attain 100% recovery of the folded, functional state, in terms of ligand binding, compared to receptor which has not been subject to any unfolding and retains its original, folded structure. We exploit refolding on a solid support, which could avoid unwanted interactions and aggregation that occur in bulk solution. We determine the changes in structure and function upon unfolding and refolding. Additionally, we employ a method that is relatively new to membrane protein folding; pulse proteolysis. Complete refolding of β1-adrenergic receptor occurs in n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (DM micelles from a urea-denatured state, as shown by regain of its original helical structure, ligand binding and protein fluorescence. The successful refolding strategy on a solid support offers a defined method for the controlled refolding and recovery of functional GPCRs and other membrane proteins that suffer from instability and irreversible denaturation once isolated from their native membranes.

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Lynch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84 and G protein subunit Gαq in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia. This review will discuss how GPCRs and G proteins regulate stem cells with a focus on cancer stem cells, as well as their implications for the development of novel targeted cancer therapies.

  5. A Coupled Phase-Temperature Model for Dynamics of Transient Neuronal Signal in Mammals Cold Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirana, Firman Ahmad; Husein, Irzaman Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical model consisting of coupled differential equation of membrane potential phase and temperature for describing the neuronal signal in mammals cold receptor. Based on the results from previous work by Roper et al., we modified a nonstochastic phase model for cold receptor neuronal signaling dynamics in mammals. We introduce a new set of temperature adjusted functional parameters which allow saturation characteristic at high and low steady temperatures. The modified model also accommodates the transient neuronal signaling process from high to low temperature by introducing a nonlinear differential equation for the “effective temperature” changes which is coupled to the phase differential equation. This simple model can be considered as a candidate for describing qualitatively the physical mechanism of the corresponding transient process. PMID:27774102

  6. A Coupled Phase-Temperature Model for Dynamics of Transient Neuronal Signal in Mammals Cold Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firman Ahmad Kirana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a theoretical model consisting of coupled differential equation of membrane potential phase and temperature for describing the neuronal signal in mammals cold receptor. Based on the results from previous work by Roper et al., we modified a nonstochastic phase model for cold receptor neuronal signaling dynamics in mammals. We introduce a new set of temperature adjusted functional parameters which allow saturation characteristic at high and low steady temperatures. The modified model also accommodates the transient neuronal signaling process from high to low temperature by introducing a nonlinear differential equation for the “effective temperature” changes which is coupled to the phase differential equation. This simple model can be considered as a candidate for describing qualitatively the physical mechanism of the corresponding transient process.

  7. Origin of an ancient hormone/receptor couple revealed by resurrection of an ancestral estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Gabriel V; Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Pitrat, Delphine; Billas, Isabelle M L; Bonneton, François; Moras, Dino; Hasserodt, Jens; Lecointre, Guillaume; Laudet, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    The origin of ancient ligand/receptor couples is often analyzed via reconstruction of ancient receptors and, when ligands are products of metabolic pathways, they are not supposed to evolve. However, because metabolic pathways are inherited by descent with modification, their structure can be compared using cladistic analysis. Using this approach, we studied the evolution of steroid hormones. We show that side-chain cleavage is common to most vertebrate steroids, whereas aromatization was co-opted for estrogen synthesis from a more ancient pathway. The ancestral products of aromatic activity were aromatized steroids with a side chain, which we named "paraestrols." We synthesized paraestrol A and show that it effectively binds and activates the ancestral steroid receptor. Our study opens the way to comparative studies of biologically active small molecules.

  8. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  9. Signal Transduction of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate G Protein—Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Young

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive lipid capable of eliciting dramatic effects in a variety of cell types. Signaling by this molecule is by a family of five G protein—coupled receptors named S1P1–5 that signal through a variety of pathways to regulate cell proliferation, migration, cytoskeletal organization, and differentiation. These receptors are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cell types, and their cellular effects contribute to important biological and pathological functions of S1P in many processes, including angiogenesis, vascular development, lymphocyte trafficking, and cancer. This review will focus on the current progress in the field of S1P receptor signaling and biology.

  10. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sophie J; Wiegman, Coen H; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-19

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR-biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery.

  12. Opioid and GABAB receptors differentially couple to an adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A downstream effector after chronic morphine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Elizabeth Bagley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are intensely addictive, and cessation of their chronic use is associated with a highly aversive withdrawal syndrome. A cellular hallmark of withdrawal is an opioid sensitive protein kinase A-dependent increase in GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1 currents in periaqueductal gray (PAG neurons. Elevated GAT-1 activity directly increases GABAergic neuronal excitability and synaptic GABA release, which will enhance GABAergic inhibition of PAG output neurons. This reduced activity of PAG output neurons to several brain regions, including the hypothalamus and medulla, contributes to many of the PAG-mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces some of the PAG mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. Like the opioid receptors the GABAB receptor is a Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptor. This suggests it could be modulating GAT-1 activity in PAG neurons through its inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway. Opioid modulation of the GAT-1 activity can be detected by changes in the reversal potential of opioid membrane currents. We found that when opioids are reducing the GAT-1 cation conductance and increasing the GIRK conductance the opioid agonist reversal potential is much more negative than Ek. Using this approach for GABAB receptors we show that the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, does not couple to inhibition of GAT-1 currents during opioid withdrawal. It is possible this differential signaling of the two Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptors is due to the strong compartmentalization of the GABAB receptor that does not favor signaling to the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/GAT-1 pathway. This highlights the importance of studying the effects of G-protein coupled receptors in native tissue with endogenous G-protein coupled receptors and the full complement of relevant proteins and signaling molecules. This study suggests that baclofen reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms through a non-GAT-1

  13. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Allosteric nanobodies reveal the dynamic range and diverse mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staus, Dean P; Strachan, Ryan T; Manglik, Aashish; Pani, Biswaranjan; Kahsai, Alem W; Kim, Tae Hun; Wingler, Laura M; Ahn, Seungkirl; Chatterjee, Arnab; Masoudi, Ali; Kruse, Andrew C; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Weis, William I; Prosser, R Scott; Kobilka, Brian K; Costa, Tommaso; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2016-07-21

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate many physiological processes by transducing a variety of extracellular cues into intracellular responses. Ligand binding to an extracellular orthosteric pocket propagates conformational change to the receptor cytosolic region to promote binding and activation of downstream signalling effectors such as G proteins and β-arrestins. It is well known that different agonists can share the same binding pocket but evoke unique receptor conformations leading to a wide range of downstream responses (‘efficacy’). Furthermore, increasing biophysical evidence, primarily using the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) as a model system, supports the existence of multiple active and inactive conformational states. However, how agonists with varying efficacy modulate these receptor states to initiate cellular responses is not well understood. Here we report stabilization of two distinct β2AR conformations using single domain camelid antibodies (nanobodies)—a previously described positive allosteric nanobody (Nb80) and a newly identified negative allosteric nanobody (Nb60). We show that Nb60 stabilizes a previously unappreciated low-affinity receptor state which corresponds to one of two inactive receptor conformations as delineated by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We find that the agonist isoprenaline has a 15,000-fold higher affinity for β2AR in the presence of Nb80 compared to the affinity of isoprenaline for β2AR in the presence of Nb60, highlighting the full allosteric range of a GPCR. Assessing the binding of 17 ligands of varying efficacy to the β2AR in the absence and presence of Nb60 or Nb80 reveals large ligand-specific effects that can only be explained using an allosteric model which assumes equilibrium amongst at least three receptor states. Agonists generally exert efficacy by stabilizing the active Nb80-stabilized receptor state (R80). In contrast, for a number of partial agonists, both stabilization of

  15. G protein coupled receptor 18: A potential role for endocannabinoid signaling in metabolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Gayathri; Simcocks, Anna; Hryciw, Deanne H; Hutchinson, Dana S; McAinch, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are products of dietary fatty acids that are modulated by an alteration in food intake levels. Overweight and obese individuals have substantially higher circulating levels of the arachidonic acid derived endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, and show an altered pattern of cannabinoid receptor expression. These cannabinoid receptors are part of a large family of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs are major therapeutic targets for various diseases within the cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems, as well as metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity is considered a state of chronic low-grade inflammation elicited by an immunological response. Interestingly, the newly deorphanized GPCR (GPR18), which is considered to be a putative cannabinoid receptor, is proposed to have an immunological function. In this review, the current scientific knowledge on GPR18 is explored including its localization, signaling pathways, and pharmacology. Importantly, the involvement of nutritional factors and potential dietary regulation of GPR18 and its (patho)physiological roles are described. Further research on this receptor and its regulation will enable a better understanding of the complex mechanisms of GPR18 and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for treating metabolic disorders.

  16. Functional and Structural Overview of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Comprehensively Obtained from Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Suwa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the functional mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is very important for GPCR-related drug design. We have developed an integrated GPCR database (SEVENS http://sevens.cbrc.jp/ that includes 64,090 reliable GPCR genes comprehensively identified from 56 eukaryote genome sequences, and overviewed the sequences and structure spaces of the GPCRs. In vertebrates, the number of receptors for biological amines, peptides, etc. is conserved in most species, whereas the number of chemosensory receptors for odorant, pheromone, etc. significantly differs among species. The latter receptors tend to be single exon type or a few exon type and show a high ratio in the numbers of GPCRs, whereas some families, such as Class B and Class C receptors, have long lengths due to the presence of many exons. Statistical analyses of amino acid residues reveal that most of the conserved residues in Class A GPCRs are found in the cytoplasmic half regions of transmembrane (TM helices, while residues characteristic to each subfamily found on the extracellular half regions. The 69 of Protein Data Bank (PDB entries of complete or fragmentary structures could be mapped on the TM/loop regions of Class A GPCRs covering 14 subfamilies.

  17. The repertoire of G-protein-coupled receptors in Xenopus tropicalis

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    Hu Yinghe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily represents the largest protein family in the human genome. These proteins have a variety of physiological functions that give them well recognized roles in clinical medicine. In Xenopus tropicalis, a widely used animal model for physiology research, the repertoire of GPCRs may help link the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates from teleost fish to mammals. Results We have identified 1452 GPCRs in the X. tropicalis genome. Phylogenetic analyses classified these receptors into the following seven families: Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, Secretin, Taste 2 and Vomeronasal 1. Nearly 70% of X. tropicalis GPCRs are represented by the following three types of receptors thought to receive chemosensory information from the outside world: olfactory, vomeronasal 1 and vomeronasal 2 receptors. Conclusion X. tropicalis shares a more similar repertoire of GPCRs with mammals than it does with fish. An examination of the three major groups of receptors related to olfactory/pheromone detection shows that in X. tropicalis, these groups have undergone lineage specific expansion. A comparison of GPCRs in X. tropicalis, teleost fish and mammals reveals the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates.

  18. Competing G protein-coupled receptor kinases balance G protein and β-arrestin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Domitille; Durand, Guillaume; Gallay, Nathalie; Rizk, Aurélien; Ahn, Seungkirl; Kim, Jihee; Violin, Jonathan D; Dupuy, Laurence; Gauthier, Christophe; Piketty, Vincent; Crépieux, Pascale; Poupon, Anne; Clément, Frédérique; Fages, François; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Reiter, Eric

    2012-06-26

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are involved in nearly all aspects of chemical communications and represent major drug targets. 7TMRs transmit their signals not only via heterotrimeric G proteins but also through β-arrestins, whose recruitment to the activated receptor is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this paper, we combined experimental approaches with computational modeling to decipher the molecular mechanisms as well as the hidden dynamics governing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT(1A)R) in human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. We built an abstracted ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based model that captured the available knowledge and experimental data. We inferred the unknown parameters by simultaneously fitting experimental data generated in both control and perturbed conditions. We demonstrate that, in addition to its well-established function in the desensitization of G-protein activation, GRK2 exerts a strong negative effect on β-arrestin-dependent signaling through its competition with GRK5 and 6 for receptor phosphorylation. Importantly, we experimentally confirmed the validity of this novel GRK2-dependent mechanism in both primary vascular smooth muscle cells naturally expressing the AT(1A)R, and HEK293 cells expressing other 7TMRs.

  19. The human and mouse repertoire of the adhesion family of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Fredriksson, Robert; Höglund, Pär J; Gloriam, David E; Lagerström, Malin C; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2004-07-01

    The adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (also termed LN-7TM or EGF-7TM receptors) are membrane-bound proteins with long N-termini containing multiple domains. Here, 2 new human adhesion-GPCRs, termed GPR133 and GPR144, have been found by searches done in the human genome databases. Both GPR133 and GPR144 have a GPS domain in their N-termini, while GPR144 also has a pentraxin domain. The phylogenetic analyses of the 2 new human receptors show that they group together without close relationship to the other adhesion-GPCRs. In addition to the human genes, mouse orthologues to those 2 and 15 other mouse orthologues to human were identified (GPR110, GPR111, GPR112, GPR113, GPR114, GPR115, GPR116, GPR123, GPR124, GPR125, GPR126, GPR128, LEC1, LEC2, and LEC3). Currently the total number of human adhesion-GPCRs is 33. The mouse and human sequences show a clear one-to-one relationship, with the exception of EMR2 and EMR3, which do not seem to have orthologues in mouse. EST expression charts for the entire repertoire of adhesion-GPCRs in human and mouse were established. Over 1600 ESTs were found for these receptors, showing widespread distribution in both central and peripheral tissues. The expression patterns are highly variable between different receptors, indicating that they participate in a number of physiological processes. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Active-state models of ternary GPCR complexes: determinants of selective receptor-G-protein coupling.

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    Ralf C Kling

    Full Text Available Based on the recently described crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor--Gs-protein complex, we report the first molecular-dynamics simulations of ternary GPCR complexes designed to identify the selectivity determinants for receptor-G-protein binding. Long-term molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-bound β2AR-Gαs and D2R-Gαi complexes embedded in a hydrated bilayer environment and computational alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified distinct residues of the N-terminal region of intracellular loop 3 to be crucial for coupling selectivity. Within the G-protein, specific amino acids of the α5-helix, the C-terminus of the Gα-subunit and the regions around αN-β1 and α4-β6 were found to determine receptor recognition. Knowledge of these determinants of receptor-G-protein binding selectivity is essential for designing drugs that target specific receptor/G-protein combinations.

  1. Novel antigen design for the generation of antibodies to G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, K; Hofström, C; Lindskog, C; Hansson, M; Angelidou, P; Hökfelt, T; Uhlén, M; Wernérus, H; Gräslund, T; Hober, S

    2011-07-29

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors, key proteins in cellular signaling. Due to their large hydrophobic membrane spanning regions and often very short loops exposed on the surface of the cells, generation of antibodies able to recognize the receptors in the endogenous environment has been difficult. Here, we describe an antigen-design method where the extracellular loops and N-terminus are combined to a single antigen for generation of antibodies specific to three selected GPCRs: NPY5R, B2ARN and GLP1R. The design strategy enabled straightforward antigen production and antibody generation. Binding of the antibodies to intact receptors was analyzed using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence based confocal microscopy on A-431 cells overexpressing the respective GPCR. The antibody-antigen interactions were characterized using epitope mapping, and the antibodies were applied in immunohistochemical staining of human tissues. Most of the antibodies showed specific binding to their respective overexpressing cell line but not to the non-transfected cells, thus indicating binding to their respective target receptor. The epitope mapping showed that sub-populations within the purified antibody pool recognized different regions of the antigen. Hence, the genetic combination of several different epitopes enables efficient generation of specific antibodies with potential use in several applications for the study of endogenous receptors.

  2. Molecular recognition of ketamine by a subset of olfactory G protein–coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saven, Jeffery G.; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine elicits various neuropharmacological effects, including sedation, analgesia, general anesthesia, and antidepressant activity. Through an in vitro screen, we identified four mouse olfactory receptors (ORs) that responded to ketamine. In addition to their presence in the olfactory epithelium, these G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are distributed throughout the central nervous system. To better understand the molecular basis of the interactions between ketamine and ORs, we used sequence comparison and molecular modeling to design mutations that (i) increased, reduced, or abolished ketamine responsiveness in responding receptors, and (ii) rendered non-responding receptors responsive to ketamine. We showed that olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that expressed distinct ORs responded to ketamine in vivo, suggesting that ORs may serve as functional targets for ketamine. The ability to both abolish and introduce responsiveness to ketamine in GPCRs enabled us to identify and confirm distinct interaction loci in the binding site, which suggested a signature ketamine-binding pocket that may guide exploration of additional receptors for this general anesthetic drug. PMID:25829447

  3. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ligand Binding to a Muscarinic G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Kalli; Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the detailed process of ligand binding to a receptor is pharmaceutically important for identifying druggable binding sites. With the ability to provide atomistic detail, computational methods are well poised to study these processes. Here, accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is proposed to simulate processes of ligand binding to a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), in this case the M3 muscarinic receptor, which is a target for treating many human diseases, including cancer, diabetes and obesity. Long-timescale aMD simulations were performed to observe the binding of three chemically diverse ligand molecules: antagonist tiotropium (TTP), partial agonist arecoline (ARc), and full agonist acetylcholine (ACh). In comparison with earlier microsecond-timescale conventional MD simulations, aMD greatly accelerated the binding of ACh to the receptor orthosteric ligand-binding site and the binding of TTP to an extracellular vestibule. Further aMD simulations also captured binding of ARc to the receptor orthosteric site. Additionally, all three ligands were observed to bind in the extracellular vestibule during their binding pathways, suggesting that it is a metastable binding site. This study demonstrates the applicability of aMD to protein-ligand binding, especially the drug recognition of GPCRs. PMID:26537408

  4. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  5. Autoantibodies against G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Modulate Heart Mast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Okruhlicova; Rosemarie Morwinski; Wolfgang Schulze; Sabine Bartel; Peter Weismann; Narcisa Tribulova; Gerd Wallukat

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells are believed to be involved in myocardial tissue remodelling under pathophysiological conditions. We examined the effects of autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors in sera of patients with heart diseases on myocardial mast cells in the cultured neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat heart cells. Cells collected at day 3 and 10 of the culture were preincubated with autoantibodies against α1-adrenoceptor and angiotensin Ⅱ AT1-receptor,agonist phenylephrine and angiotensin Ⅱ, and control IgG. The pretreated cultured cells were stained for selected mast cell markers tryptase, chymase and TNF-α. The cultured cells were also processed for observation with electron microscopy. The autoantibodies-treatment of the 3-day cultured cells caused both increased intensity of immunofluorescence (p<0.05) and their enlarged diameters of the mast cells when compared to age-matched ones.In contrast, the fluorescence of preincubated 10-day-old mast cells was decreased compared with controls (p<0.01).In control samples, the fluorescence of 10-day-old mast cells was significantly higher than that of 3-day-old ones (p<0.001). Results of electron microscopy examination demonstrated there was an increased granulation of treated 3-day-old mast cells, while a degranulation of mast cells at day 10 of application. The results suggest the modulation effect of the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors on mast cells, indicating a potential functional link between the autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors and the mast cells in progression of heart disease.

  6. No more pain upon Gq-protein-coupled receptor activation: role of endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Ho, Yu-Cheng; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana has been used to relieve pain for centuries. The analgesic mechanism of its constituents, the cannabinoids, was only revealed after the discovery of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) two decades ago. The subsequent identification of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and their biosynthetic and degradation enzymes discloses the therapeutic potential of compounds targeting the endocannabinoid system for pain control. Inhibitors of the anandamide and 2-AG degradation enzymes, fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase, respectively, may be superior to direct cannabinoid receptor ligands as endocannabinoids are synthesized on demand and rapidly degraded, focusing action at generating sites. Recently, a promising strategy for pain relief was revealed in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). It is initiated by Gq-protein-coupled receptor (Gq PCR) activation of the phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase enzymatic cascade, generating 2-AG that produces inhibition of GABAergic transmission (disinhibition) in the PAG, thereby leading to analgesia. Here, we introduce the antinociceptive properties of exogenous cannabinoids and endocannabinoids, involving their biosynthesis and degradation processes, particularly in the PAG. We also review recent studies disclosing the Gq PCR-phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase-2-AG retrograde disinhibition mechanism in the PAG, induced by activating several Gq PCRs, including metabotropic glutamatergic (type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor), muscarinic acetylcholine (M1/M3), and orexin 1 receptors. Disinhibition mediated by type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor can be initiated by glutamate transporter inhibitors or indirectly by substance P, neurotensin, cholecystokinin and capsaicin. Finally, the putative role of 2-AG generated after activating the above neurotransmitter receptors in stress-induced analgesia is discussed.

  7. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  8. Caveolin-1 interacts with 5-HT2A serotonin receptors and profoundly modulates the signaling of selected Galphaq-coupled protein receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Anushree; Sheffler, Douglas J; Kroeze, Wesley K; Compton-Toth, BethAnn; Roth, Bryan L

    2004-08-13

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A)) serotonin receptors are important for a variety of functions including vascular smooth muscle contraction, platelet aggregation, and the modulation of perception, cognition, and emotion. In a search for 5-HT(2A) receptor-interacting proteins, we discovered that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a scaffolding protein enriched in caveolae, complexes with 5-HT(2A) receptors in a number of cell types including C6 glioma cells, transfected HEK-293 cells, and rat brain synaptic membrane preparations. To address the functional significance of this interaction, we performed RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Cav-1 in C6 glioma cells, a cell type that endogenously expresses both 5-HT(2A) receptors and Cav-1. We discovered that the in vitro knockdown of Cav-1 in C6 glioma cells nearly abolished 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated signal transduction as measured by calcium flux assays. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Cav-1 also greatly attenuated endogenous Galpha(q)-coupled P2Y purinergic receptor-mediated signaling without altering the signaling of PAR-1 thrombin receptors. Cav-1 appeared to modulate 5-HT(2A) signaling by facilitating the interaction of 5-HT(2A) receptors with Galpha(q). These studies provide compelling evidence for a prominent role of Cav-1 in regulating the functional activity of not only 5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors but also selected Galpha(q)-coupled receptors.

  9. Principles and determinants of G-protein coupling by the rhodopsin-like thyrotropin receptor.

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    Gunnar Kleinau

    Full Text Available In this study we wanted to gain insights into selectivity mechanisms between G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR and different subtypes of G-proteins. The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR binds G-proteins promiscuously and activates both Gs (cAMP and Gq (IP. Our goal was to dissect selectivity patterns for both pathways in the intracellular region of this receptor. We were particularly interested in the participation of poorly investigated receptor parts.We systematically investigated the amino acids of intracellular loop (ICL 1 and helix 8 using site-directed mutagenesis alongside characterization of cAMP and IP accumulation. This approach was guided by a homology model of activated TSHR in complex with heterotrimeric Gq, using the X-ray structure of opsin with a bound G-protein peptide as a structural template.We provide evidence that ICL1 is significantly involved in G-protein activation and our model suggests potential interactions with subunits G alpha as well as G betagamma. Several amino acid substitutions impaired both IP and cAMP accumulation. Moreover, we found a few residues in ICL1 (L440, T441, H443 and helix 8 (R687 that are sensitive for Gq but not for Gs activation. Conversely, not even one residue was found that selectively affects cAMP accumulation only. Together with our previous mutagenesis data on ICL2 and ICL3 we provide here the first systematically completed map of potential interfaces between TSHR and heterotrimeric G-protein. The TSHR/Gq-heterotrimer complex is characterized by more selective interactions than the TSHR/Gs complex. In fact the receptor interface for binding Gs is a subset of that for Gq and we postulate that this may be true for other GPCRs coupling these G-proteins. Our findings support that G-protein coupling and preference is dominated by specific structural features at the intracellular region of the activated GPCR but is completed by additional complementary recognition patterns between receptor and G

  10. Induction of RAGE Shedding by Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Verena V.; Kojro, Elzbieta; Rat, Dorothea; Postina, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The multiligand Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is involved in various pathophysiological processes, including diabetic inflammatory conditions and Alzheimes disease. Full-length RAGE, a cell surface-located type I membrane protein, can proteolytically be converted by metalloproteinases ADAM10 and MMP9 into a soluble RAGE form. Moreover, administration of recombinant soluble RAGE suppresses activation of cell surface-located RAGE by trapping RAGE ligands. Therefore stimulation of RAGE shedding might have a therapeutic value regarding inflammatory diseases. We aimed to investigate whether RAGE shedding is inducible via ligand-induced activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We chose three different GPCRs coupled to distinct signaling cascades: the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) activating adenylyl cyclase, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) linked to phospholipase Cβ, and the PACAP receptor (subtype PAC1) coupled to adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase Cβ, calcium signaling and MAP kinases. We generated HEK cell lines stably coexpressing an individual GPCR and full-length RAGE and then investigated GPCR ligand-induced activation of RAGE shedding. We found metalloproteinase-mediated RAGE shedding on the cell surface to be inducible via ligand-specific activation of all analyzed GPCRs. By using specific inhibitors we have identified Ca2+ signaling, PKCα/PKCβI, CaMKII, PI3 kinases and MAP kinases to be involved in PAC1 receptor-induced RAGE shedding. We detected an induction of calcium signaling in all our cell lines coexpressing RAGE and different GPCRs after agonist treatment. However, we did not disclose a contribution of adenylyl cyclase in RAGE shedding induction. Furthermore, by using a selective metalloproteinase inhibitor and siRNA-mediated knock-down approaches, we show that ADAM10 and/or MMP9 are playing important roles in constitutive and PACAP-induced RAGE shedding. We also found that treatment of mice with PACAP increases the amount of

  11. Vibrational resonance, allostery, and activation in rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kristina N.; Pfeffer, Jürgen; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2016-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are a large family of membrane proteins activated by a variety of structurally diverse ligands making them highly adaptable signaling molecules. Despite recent advances in the structural biology of this protein family, the mechanism by which ligands induce allosteric changes in protein structure and dynamics for its signaling function remains a mystery. Here, we propose the use of terahertz spectroscopy combined with molecular dynamics simulation and protein evolutionary network modeling to address the mechanism of activation by directly probing the concerted fluctuations of retinal ligand and transmembrane helices in rhodopsin. This approach allows us to examine the role of conformational heterogeneity in the selection and stabilization of specific signaling pathways in the photo-activation of the receptor. We demonstrate that ligand-induced shifts in the conformational equilibrium prompt vibrational resonances in the protein structure that link the dynamics of conserved interactions with fluctuations of the active-state ligand. The connection of vibrational modes creates an allosteric association of coupled fluctuations that forms a coherent signaling pathway from the receptor ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein activation region. Our evolutionary analysis of rhodopsin-like GPCRs suggest that specific allosteric sites play a pivotal role in activating structural fluctuations that allosterically modulate functional signals.

  12. Dynamic Cholesterol-Conditioned Dimerization of the G Protein Coupled Chemokine Receptor Type 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristyna Pluhackova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs allow for the transmission of signals across biological membranes. For a number of GPCRs, this signaling was shown to be coupled to prior dimerization of the receptor. The chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 was reported before to form dimers and their functionality was shown to depend on membrane cholesterol. Here, we address the dimerization pattern of CXCR4 in pure phospholipid bilayers and in cholesterol-rich membranes. Using ensembles of molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CXCR4 dimerizes promiscuously in phospholipid membranes. Addition of cholesterol dramatically affects the dimerization pattern: cholesterol binding largely abolishes the preferred dimer motif observed for pure phospholipid bilayers formed mainly by transmembrane helices 1 and 7 (TM1/TM5-7 at the dimer interface. In turn, the symmetric TM3,4/TM3,4 interface is enabled first by intercalating cholesterol molecules. These data provide a molecular basis for the modulation of GPCR activity by its lipid environment.

  13. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors as markers of adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular markers are used to characterize and track adult stem cells. Colon cancer research has led to the identification of 2 related receptors, leucine-rich repeat-containing, G-protein-coupled receptors (Lgr)5 and Lgr6, that are expressed by small populations of cells in a variety of adult organ

  14. G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 Is Anatomically Positioned to Modulate Synaptic Plasticity in the Mouse Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth M. Waters; Thompson, Louisa I.; Patel, Parth; Gonzales, Andreina D.; Ye, Hector (Zhiyu); Filardo, Edward J.; Clegg, Deborah J.; Gorecka, Jolanta; Akama, Keith T.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Both estrous cycle and sex affect the numbers and types of neuronal and glial profiles containing the classical estrogen receptors α and β, and synaptic levels in the rodent dorsal hippocampus. Here, we examined whether the membrane estrogen receptor, G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), is anatomically positioned in the dorsal hippocampus of mice to regulate synaptic plasticity. By light microscopy, GPER1-immunoreactivity (IR) was most noticeable in the pyramidal cell layer and int...

  15. Importance of the extracellular loops in G protein-coupled receptors for ligand recognition and receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, M C; van Westen, G J P; Li, Q; IJzerman, A P

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the major drug target of medicines on the market today. Therefore, much research is and has been devoted to the elucidation of the function and three-dimensional structure of this large family of membrane proteins, which includes multiple conserved transmembrane domains connected by intra- and extracellular loops. In the last few years, the less conserved extracellular loops have garnered increasing interest, particularly after the publication of several GPCR crystal structures that clearly show the extracellular loops to be involved in ligand binding. This review will summarize the recent progress made in the clarification of the ligand binding and activation mechanism of class-A GPCRs and the role of extracellular loops in this process.

  16. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  17. Multiplex detection of homo- and heterodimerization of g protein-coupled receptors by proximity biotinylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Steel

    Full Text Available Dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs represents a potential mechanism by which GPCR functions are regulated. Several resonance energy transfer (RET-based methods have revealed GPCR homo- and heterodimerization. However, interpretation of an increase in FRET efficiency could be attributed to either dimerization/oligomerization events or conformational changes within an already dimerized/oligomerized receptor complex. Furthermore, RET-based methods can only measure pairwise dimerization, and cannot easily achieve multiplex detection. In this study, we applied proximity-based biotinylation for detecting receptor dimerization by utilizing a specific enzyme-substrate pair that are fused to GPCRs. The biotin ligase BirA is fused to CXCR4 and site-specifically biotinylates an acceptor peptide (AP in the presence of biotin. As a test case for our newly developed assay, we have characterized the homo-dimerization of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and heterodimerization of CXCR4 with CCR2 or CCR5. The degree of biotinylation varies with the amount of GPCR-AP as well as biotinylation time. Using enzyme/substrate receptor pairs and measuring receptor biotinylation, we demonstrate that CXCR4 can homo-dimerize and hetero-dimerize with CCR2 and CCR5. The effect of CXCL12, agonist for CXCR4, was found to decrease surface biotinylation of CXCR4-AP. This effect is due to a combination of CXCR4 endocytosis and stabilization of CXCR4 homodimers. Finally, when CXCR4-AP, CCR2-AP, and CCR5-AP were expressed together, we observed CXCR4-CXCR4 homodimers and CXCR4-CCR2 and CXCR4-CCR5 heterodimers. The newly developed assay opens new opportunity for multiplex detection for GPCR homo- and heterodimerization within the same cellular context.

  18. Drug discovery opportunities and challenges at G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Holliday

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids (FFAs, FFA1 (GPR40 and GPR120, has expanded our understanding of these nutrients as signalling molecules. These receptors have emerged as important sensors for FFA levels in the circulation or the gut lumen, based on evidence from in vitro and rodent models, and an increasing number of human studies. Here we consider their promise as therapeutic targets for metabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. FFA1 directly mediates acute FFA-induced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells, while GPR120 and FFA1 trigger release of incretins from intestinal endocrine cells, and so indirectly enhance insulin secretion and promote satiety. GPR120 signalling in adipocytes and macrophages also results in insulin sensitizing and beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. Drug discovery has focussed on agonists to replicate acute benefits of FFA receptor signalling, with promising early results for FFA1 agonists in man. Controversy surrounding chronic effects of FFA1 on beta-cells illustrates that long term benefits of antagonists also need exploring. It has proved challenging to generate highly selective potent ligands for FFA1 or GPR120 subtypes, given that both receptors have hydrophobic orthosteric binding sites, which are not completely defined and have modest ligand affinity. Structure activity relationships are also reliant on functional read outs, in the absence of robust binding assays to provide direct affinity estimates. Nevertheless synthetic ligands have already helped dissect specific contributions of FFA1 and GPR120 signalling from the many possible cellular effects of FFAs. Approaches including use of fluorescent ligand binding assays, and targeting allosteric receptor sites, may improve further preclinical ligand development at these receptors, to exploit their unique potential to target multiple facets of diabetes.

  19. Mapping functional group free energy patterns at protein occluded sites: nuclear receptors and G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Yu, Wenbo; Raman, E Prabhu; Hershfeld, Alena V; Fang, Lei; Deshpande, Deepak A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-03-23

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPARγ) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and β2-adreneric (β2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the β2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting β2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents.

  20. Structural modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: An overview on automatic web-servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, Mirko; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant efforts and discoveries during the last few years in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression and crystallization, the receptors with known structures to date are limited only to a small fraction of human GPCRs. The lack of experimental three-dimensional structures of the receptors represents a strong limitation that hampers a deep understanding of their function. Computational techniques are thus a valid alternative strategy to model three-dimensional structures. Indeed, recent advances in the field, together with extraordinary developments in crystallography, in particular due to its ability to capture GPCRs in different activation states, have led to encouraging results in the generation of accurate models. This, prompted the community of modelers to render their methods publicly available through dedicated databases and web-servers. Here, we present an extensive overview on these services, focusing on their advantages, drawbacks and their role in successful applications. Future challenges in the field of GPCR modeling, such as the predictions of long loop regions and the modeling of receptor activation states are presented as well.

  1. G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: Next Generation Therapeutic Targets in Head and Neck Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Kanazawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is poor in most advanced cases. To improve therapeutic efficiency, novel therapeutic targets and prognostic factors must be discovered. Our studies have identified several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as promising candidates. Significant epigenetic silencing of GPCR expression occurs in HNSCC compared with normal tissue, and is significantly correlated with clinical behavior. Together with the finding that GPCR activity can suppress tumor cell growth, this indicates that GPCR expression has potential utility as a prognostic factor. In this review, we discuss the roles that galanin receptor type 1 (GALR1 and type 2 (GALR2, tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1, and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SST1 play in HNSCC. GALR1 inhibits proliferation of HNSCC cells though ERK1/2-mediated effects on cell cycle control proteins such as p27, p57, and cyclin D1, whereas GALR2 inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HNSCC cells. Hypermethylation of GALR1, GALR2, TACR1, and SST1 is associated with significantly reduced disease-free survival and a higher recurrence rate. Although their overall activities varies, each of these GPCRs has value as both a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target. These data indicate that further study of GPCRs is a promising strategy that will enrich pharmacogenomics and prognostic research in HNSCC.

  2. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  3. Identification of four evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four evolutio......The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four...... evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from this mosquito and expressed them in Chinese hamster ovary cells. After screening of a library of thirty-three insect or other invertebrate neuropeptides and eight biogenic amines, we could identify (de-orphanize) three of these GPCRs as...... relationship to the A. gambiae and other insect AKH receptors suggested that it is a receptor for an AKH-like peptide. This is the first published report on evolutionarily related AKH, corazonin, and CCAP receptors in mosquitoes....

  4. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  5. G-protein-coupled receptors and their (Bio) chemical significance win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio) chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  6. G-protein-Coupled Receptors and Their (Bio Chemical Significance Win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Hsien Lin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  7. Diversity and Impact of Rare Variants in Genes Encoding the Platelet G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  8. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  9. Denatured G-protein coupled receptors as immunogens to generate highly specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmont, Franck; Moulédous, Lionel; Boué, Jérôme; Mollereau, Catherine; Dietrich, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a major role in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, GPCRs have become the most frequent targets for development of new therapeutic drugs. In this context, the availability of highly specific antibodies may be decisive to obtain reliable findings on localization, function and medical relevance of GPCRs. However, the rapid and easy generation of highly selective anti-GPCR antibodies is still a challenge. Herein, we report that highly specific antibodies suitable for detection of GPCRs in native and unfolded forms can be elicited by immunizing animals against purified full length denatured recombinant GPCRs. Contrasting with the currently admitted postulate, our study shows that an active and well-folded GPCR is not required for the production of specific anti-GPCR antibodies. This new immunizing strategy validated with three different human GPCR (μ-opioid, κ-opioid, neuropeptide FF2 receptors) might be generalized to other members of the GPCR family.

  10. The Role of Endocrine G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Ovarian Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyu; Madden, Nadine Ellen; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Chow, Billy Kwok Chong; Lee, Leo Tsz On

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women and the most lethal gynecological cancer, causing over 151,000 deaths worldwide each year. Dysregulated production of endocrine hormones, known to have pluripotent effects on cell function through the activation of receptor signaling pathways, is believed to be a high-risk factor for ovarian cancer. An increasing body of evidence suggests that endocrine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the progression and metastasis of ovarian neoplasms. GPCRs are attractive drug targets because their activities are regulated by more than 25% of all drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Therefore, understanding the role of endocrine GPCRs during ovarian cancer progression and metastasis will allow for the development of novel strategies to design effective chemotherapeutic drugs against malignant ovarian tumors. In this review, we address the signaling pathways and functional roles of several key endocrine GPCRs that are related to the cause, progression, and metastasis of ovarian cancer.

  11. From G Protein-coupled Receptor Structure Resolution to Rational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Ali; Dias, Joao M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2015-08-07

    A number of recent technical solutions have led to significant advances in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology. Apart from a detailed mechanistic view of receptor activation, the new structures have revealed novel ligand binding sites. Together, these insights provide avenues for rational drug design to modulate the activities of these important drug targets. The application of structural data to GPCR drug discovery ushers in an exciting era with the potential to improve existing drugs and discover new ones. In this review, we focus on technical solutions that have accelerated GPCR crystallography as well as some of the salient findings from structures that are relevant to drug discovery. Finally, we outline some of the approaches used in GPCR structure based drug design.

  12. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been one of the most productive classes of drug targets for several decades, and new technologies for GPCR-based discovery promise to keep this field active for years to come. While molecular screens for GPCR receptor agonist- and antagonist-based drugs...... as valuable discovery tools for several years. The application of high content cell-based screening to GPCR discovery has opened up additional possibilities, such as direct tracking of GPCRs, G proteins and other signaling pathway components using intracellular translocation assays. These assays provide...... the capability to probe GPCR function at the cellular level with better resolution than has previously been possible, and offer practical strategies for more definitive selectivity evaluation and counter-screening in the early stages of drug discovery. The potential of cell-based translocation assays for GPCR...

  13. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A;

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound...... to the partial inverse agonist carazolol at 2.4 angstrom resolution. The structure provides a high-resolution view of a human G protein-coupled receptor bound to a diffusible ligand. Ligand-binding site accessibility is enabled by the second extracellular loop, which is held out of the binding cavity by a pair...

  14. Signaling and regulation of G protein-coupled receptors in airway smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penn Raymond B

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs mediates numerous airway smooth muscle (ASM functions including contraction, growth, and "synthetic" functions that orchestrate airway inflammation and promote remodeling of airway architecture. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the GPCRs that have been identified in ASM cells, and discuss the extent to which signaling via these GPCRs has been characterized and linked to distinct ASM functions. In addition, we examine the role of GPCR signaling and its regulation in asthma and asthma treatment, and suggest an integrative model whereby an imbalance of GPCR-derived signals in ASM cells contributes to the asthmatic state.

  15. Prediction and Classification of Human G-protein Coupled Receptors Based on Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Fei Wang; Huan Chen; Yan-Hong Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A computational system for the prediction and classification of human G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been developed based on the support vector machine (SVM) method and protein sequence information. The feature vectors used to develop the SVM prediction models consist of statistically significant features selected from single amino acid, dipeptide, and tripeptide compositions of protein sequences. Furthermore, the length distribution difference between GPCRsand non-GPCRs has also been exploited to improve the prediction performance.The testing results with annotated human protein sequences demonstrate that this system can get good performance for both prediction and classification of human GPCRs.

  16. The Emerging Mutational Landscape of G-proteins and G-protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Vázquez-Prado, José; Kufareva, Irina; Stawiski, Eric W.; Handel, Tracy M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression and activity of G proteins and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently associated with tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing studies show that 4.2% of tumors carry activating mutations in GNAS (encoding Gαs), and that oncogenic activating mutants in genes encoding Gαq family members (GNAQ or GNA11) are present in ~66% and ~6% of melanomas arising in the eye and skin, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 20% of human tumors harbor mutations in GPCRs. Many human cancer-asso...

  17. Characterization of new G protein-coupled adenine receptors in mouse and hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimm, Dominik; Knospe, Melanie; Abdelrahman, Aliaa; Moutinho, Miguel; Alsdorf, Bernt B A; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2013-09-01

    The nucleobase adenine has previously been reported to activate G protein-coupled receptors in rat and mouse. Adenine receptors (AdeR) thus constitute a new family of purine receptors, for which the designation "P0-receptors" has been suggested. We now describe the cloning and characterization of two new members of the AdeR family from mouse (MrgA10, termed mAde1R) and hamster (cAdeR). Both receptors were expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and radioligand binding studies were performed using [(3)H]adenine. Specific binding of the radioligand was detected in transfected, but not in untransfected cells, and K D values of 286 nM (mAde1R, B max 1.18 pmol/mg protein) and 301 nM (cAdeR, B max 17.7 pmol/mg protein), respectively, were determined. A series of adenine derivatives was investigated in competition binding assays. Minor structural modifications generally led to a reduction or loss of affinity, with one exception: 2-fluoroadenine was at least as potent as adenine itself at the cAdeR. Structure-activity relationships at all AdeR orthologs and subtypes investigated so far were similar, but not identical. For functional analyses, the cAdeR was homologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, while the mAde1R was heterologously expressed in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Like the previously described AdeRs from rat (rAdeR) and mouse (mAde2R), the mAde1R (EC50 9.77 nM) and the cAdeR (EC50 51.6 nM) were coupled to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. In addition, the cAdeR from hamster expressed in CHO cells produced an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations (EC50 6.24 nM) and was found to be additionally coupled to Gq proteins.

  18. The G protein-coupled receptor GPRC5B contributes to neurogenesis in the developing mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Sanada, Kamon

    2013-11-01

    Neural progenitor cells in the developing brain give rise to neurons and glia. Multiple extrinsic signalling molecules and their cognate membrane receptors have been identified to control neural progenitor fate. However, a role for G protein-coupled receptors in cell fate decisions in the brain remains largely putative. Here we show that GPRC5B, which encodes an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, is present in the ventricular surface of cortical progenitors in the mouse developing neocortex and is required for their neuronal differentiation. GPRC5B-depleted progenitors fail to adopt a neuronal fate and ultimately become astrocytes. Furthermore, GPRC5B-mediated signalling is associated with the proper regulation of β-catenin signalling, a pathway crucial for progenitor fate decision. Our study uncovers G protein-coupled receptor signalling in the neuronal fate determination of cortical progenitors.

  19. Lipid modulation of early G protein-coupled receptor signalling events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Patricia M; Watts, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Upon binding of extracellular ligands, G protein coupled-receptors (GPCRs) initiate signalling cascades by activating heterotrimeric G proteins through direct interactions with the α subunit. While the lipid dependence of ligand binding has previously been studied for one class A GPCR, the neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1), the role the lipid environment plays in the interaction of activated GPCRs with G proteins is less well understood. It is therefore of interest to understand the balance of lipid interactions required to support both ligand binding and G protein activation, not least since some receptors have multiple locations, and may experience different membrane environments when signalling in the plasma membrane or during endocytosis. Here, using the sensitive biophysical technique of microscale thermophoresis in conjunction with nanodisc lipid bilayer reconstitution, we show that in more native lipid environments rich in phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE), the Gαi1 subunit has a ~4-fold higher affinity for NTS1 than in the absence of native lipids. The G protein-receptor affinity was further shown to be dependent on the ligand-binding state of the receptor, with potential indication of biased signalling for the known antagonist SR142948A. Gαi1 also showed preferential interaction with empty nanodiscs of native lipid mixtures rich in PE by around 2- to 4-fold over phosphatidyl choline (PC)/phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) lipid mixtures. The lipid environment may therefore play a role in creating favourable micro-environments for efficient GPCR signalling. Our approach combining nanodiscs with microscale thermophoresis will be useful in future studies to elucidate further the complexity of the GPCR interactome.

  20. Identification of novel splice variants of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Geirardsdóttir, Kristín; Ingemansson, Malena; Mirza, Majd A I; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2007-01-31

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism to generate proteome diversity in higher eukaryotic organisms. We searched for splice variants of the human Adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using mRNA sequences and expressed sequence tags. The results presented here describe 53 human splice variants among the 33 Adhesion GPCRs. Many of these variants appear to be coding for "functional" proteins (29) while the others are seemingly "non-functional" (24). Novel functional splice variants were found for: CD97, CELR3, EMR2, EMR3, GPR56, GPR110, GPR112-GPR114, GPR116, GPR123-GPR126, GPR133, HE6, and LEC1-LEC3. Splice variants for GPR116, GPR125, GPR126, and HE6 were found conserved in other species. Several of the functional splice variants lack one or more of the functional domains that are found in the N-termini of these receptors. These functional domains are likely to affect ligand binding or interaction with other proteins and these novel splice variants may have important roles for the specificity of interactions between these receptors and extracellular molecules. Another type of splice variants found here lacks a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS). The GPS domain has been shown to be essential for the proteolytic cleavage of the receptors N-termini and for cellular surface expression. We suggest that these alternative splice variants may be crucial for the function of the receptors while the seemingly non-functional splice variants may be a part of a regulative mechanism.

  1. Insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors impacts drug design for central nervous system neurodegenerative processes**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farfán-García Eunice Dalet; Soriano-Ursúa Marvin Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there have been important new insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors. It is now known that al osteric binding sites are involved in the affinity and selec-tivity of ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, and that signaling by these receptors involves both G-protein dependent and independent pathways. The present review outlines the physiological and pharmacological implications of this perspective for the design of new drugs to treat disorders of the central nervous system. Specifical y, new possibilities are explored in relation to al osteric and orthosteric binding sites on dopamine receptors for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, and on muscarinic receptors for Alzheimer’s disease. Future research can seek to identify ligands that can bind to more than one site on the same receptor, or simultaneously bind to two receptors and form a dimer. For example, the design of bivalent drugs that can reach homo/hetero-dimers of D2 dopa-mine receptor holds promise as a relevant therapeutic strategy for Parkinson’s disease. Regarding the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, the design of dualsteric ligands for mono-oligomeric musca-rinic receptors could increase therapeutic effectiveness by generating potent compounds that could activate more than one signaling pathway.

  2. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Selective Ligands Modulate Endometrial Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney K. Petrie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial carcinoma is the most common cancer of the female reproductive tract. GPER/GPR30 is a 7-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled receptor that has been identified as the third estrogen receptor, in addition to ERα and ERβ. High GPER expression is predictive of poor survival in endometrial and ovarian cancer, but despite this, the estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and specific estrogen receptors involved in endometrial cancer remain unclear. Here, employing ERα-negative Hec50 endometrial cancer cells, we demonstrate that GPER mediates estrogen-stimulated activation of ERK and PI3K via matrix metalloproteinase activation and subsequent transactivation of the EGFR and that ER-targeted therapeutic agents (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI182,780/fulvestrant, and Raloxifene, the phytoestrogen genistein, and the “ERα-selective” agonist propylpyrazole triol also function as GPER agonists. Furthermore, xenograft tumors of Hec50 cells yield enhanced growth with G-1 and estrogen, the latter being inhibited by GPER-selective pharmacologic antagonism with G36. These results have important implications with respect to the use of putatively ER-selective ligands and particularly for the widespread long-term use of “ER-targeted” therapeutics. Moreover, our findings shed light on the potential mechanisms of SERM/SERD side effects reported in many clinical studies. Finally, our results provide the first demonstration that pharmacological inhibition of GPER activity in vivo prevents estrogen-mediated tumor growth.

  3. The G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heterodimer Network (GPCR-HetNet and Its Hub Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs oligomerization has emerged as a vital characteristic of receptor structure. Substantial experimental evidence supports the existence of GPCR-GPCR interactions in a coordinated and cooperative manner. However, despite the current development of experimental techniques for large-scale detection of GPCR heteromers, in order to understand their connectivity it is necessary to develop novel tools to study the global heteroreceptor networks. To provide insight into the overall topology of the GPCR heteromers and identify key players, a collective interaction network was constructed. Experimental interaction data for each of the individual human GPCR protomers was obtained manually from the STRING and SCOPUS databases. The interaction data were used to build and analyze the network using Cytoscape software. The network was treated as undirected throughout the study. It is comprised of 156 nodes, 260 edges and has a scale-free topology. Connectivity analysis reveals a significant dominance of intrafamily versus interfamily connections. Most of the receptors within the network are linked to each other by a small number of edges. DRD2, OPRM, ADRB2, AA2AR, AA1R, OPRK, OPRD and GHSR are identified as hubs. In a network representation 10 modules/clusters also appear as a highly interconnected group of nodes. Information on this GPCR network can improve our understanding of molecular integration. GPCR-HetNet has been implemented in Java and is freely available at http://www.iiia.csic.es/~ismel/GPCR-Nets/index.html.

  4. The G protein-coupled receptor heterodimer network (GPCR-HetNet) and its hub components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Brito, Ismel; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Di Palma, Michael; Oflijan, Julia; Skieterska, Kamila; Duchou, Jolien; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Rivera, Alicia; Guidolin, Diego; Agnati, Luigi F; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-05-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization has emerged as a vital characteristic of receptor structure. Substantial experimental evidence supports the existence of GPCR-GPCR interactions in a coordinated and cooperative manner. However, despite the current development of experimental techniques for large-scale detection of GPCR heteromers, in order to understand their connectivity it is necessary to develop novel tools to study the global heteroreceptor networks. To provide insight into the overall topology of the GPCR heteromers and identify key players, a collective interaction network was constructed. Experimental interaction data for each of the individual human GPCR protomers was obtained manually from the STRING and SCOPUS databases. The interaction data were used to build and analyze the network using Cytoscape software. The network was treated as undirected throughout the study. It is comprised of 156 nodes, 260 edges and has a scale-free topology. Connectivity analysis reveals a significant dominance of intrafamily versus interfamily connections. Most of the receptors within the network are linked to each other by a small number of edges. DRD2, OPRM, ADRB2, AA2AR, AA1R, OPRK, OPRD and GHSR are identified as hubs. In a network representation 10 modules/clusters also appear as a highly interconnected group of nodes. Information on this GPCR network can improve our understanding of molecular integration. GPCR-HetNet has been implemented in Java and is freely available at http://www.iiia.csic.es/~ismel/GPCR-Nets/index.html.

  5. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor coupling events initiated by methoxy-substituted tolazoline partial agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, P.; Keung, A.; Deth, R.

    1986-03-01

    A series of mono- and dimethyoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives, known to be partial agonists at the alpha/sub 1/ receptor, were compared with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/ selective full agonist phenylephrine (PE) on isolated strips of rabbit aorta Agonist activity was evaluated in contraction, /sup 45/Ca influx, /sup 45/Ca efflux, and /sup 32/P-Phospholipid labelling studies. Maximum contractile responses for the 2-, 3-, and 3, 5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives (10/sup -5/M) were 53.8, 67.6 and 99.7% of the PE (10/sup -5/M) response respectively. These same partial agonists caused a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx to the extent of 64, 86, and 95% of the PE response respectively. In /sup 45/Ca efflux studies, (a measure of the intracellular Ca/sup +2/ release) the tolazolines caused: 30%, 63%, and 78% of the PE stimulated level. /sup 32/P-Phosphatidic acid (PA) labelling was measured as an index of PI turnover after ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptor stimulation. Compared to PE, the 2-, 3-, and 3,5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives caused 22, 46, and 72% PA labelling. The above values are all in reasonable accord with the rank order or agonist activity shown in maximum contractile responses. The results of this investigation suggest that partial agonists stimulate ..cap alpha.. receptor coupling events at a level which is quantitatively comparable to their potencies in causing contraction of arterial smooth muscle.

  6. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis.

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    Matthew J Billard

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3 is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis.

  7. Probing the function of ionotropic and G protein-coupled receptors in surface-confined membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelon, Christophe; Terrettaz, Samuel; Guenat, Olivier; Koudelka, Milena; Vogel, Horst

    2008-10-01

    This article reports on recent electrical and optical techniques for investigating cellular signaling reactions in artificial and native membranes immobilized on solid supports. The first part describes the formation of planar artificial lipid bilayers on gold electrodes, which reveal giga-ohm electrical resistance and the insertion and characterization of ionotropic receptors therein. These membranes are suited to record a few or even single ion channels by impedance spectroscopy. Such tethered membranes on planar arrays of microelectrodes offer mechanically robust, long-lasting measuring devices to probe the influence of different chemistries on biologically important ionotropic receptors and therefore will have a future impact to probe the function of channel proteins in basic science and in biosensor applications. In a second part, we present complementary approaches to form inside-out native membrane sheets that are immobilized on micrometer-sized beads or across submicrometer-sized holes machined in a planar support. Because the native membrane sheets are plasma membranes detached from live cells, these approaches offer a unique possibility to investigate cellular signaling processes, such as those mediated by ionotropic or G protein-coupled receptors, with original composition of lipids and proteins.

  8. Expression of functional G protein-coupled receptors in photoreceptors of transgenic Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Salom, David; He, Jianhua; Okun, Alex; Ballesteros, Juan; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Li, Ning

    2005-11-08

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of transmembrane signaling proteins; however, the only known GPCR crystal structure is that of rhodopsin. This disparity reflects the difficulty in generating purified GPCR samples of sufficient quantity and quality. Rhodopsin, the light receptor of retinal rod neurons, is produced in large amounts of homogeneous quality in the vertebrate retina. We used transgenic Xenopus laevis to convert these retina rod cells into bioreactors to successfully produce 20 model GPCRs. The receptors accumulated in rod outer segments and were homogeneously glycosylated. Ligand and [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assays of the 5HT(1A) and EDG(1) GPCRs confirmed that they were properly folded and functional. 5HT(1A)R was highly purified by taking advantage of the rhodopsin C-terminal immunoaffinity tag common to all GPCR constructs. We have also developed an automated system that can generate hundreds of transgenic tadpoles per day. This expression approach could be extended to other animal model systems and become a general method for the production of large numbers of GPCRs and other membrane proteins for pharmacological and structural studies.

  9. Photoactivation Intermediates of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin Investigated by a Hybrid Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Motoshi; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2017-04-20

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein coupled receptor functioning as a photoreceptor for vision through photoactivation of a covalently bound ligand of a retinal protonated Schiff base chromophore. Despite the availability of structural information on the inactivated and activated forms of the receptor, the transition processes initiated by the photoabsorption have not been well understood. Here we theoretically examined the photoactivation processes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy geometry optimizations which enabled accurate geometry determination of the ligand molecule in ample statistical conformational samples of the protein. Structures of the intermediate states of the activation process, blue-shifted intermediate and Lumi, as well as the dark state first generated by MD simulations and then refined by the QM/MM free energy geometry optimizations were characterized by large displacement of the β-ionone ring of retinal along with change in the hydrogen bond of the protonated Schiff base. The ab initio calculations of vibrational and electronic spectroscopic properties of those states well reproduced the experimental observations and successfully identified the molecular origins underlying the spectroscopic features. The structural evolution in the formation of the intermediates provides a molecular insight into the efficient activation processes of the receptor.

  10. Heteromerization of ciliary G protein-coupled receptors in the mouse brain.

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    Jill A Green

    Full Text Available Nearly every cell type in the mammalian body projects from its cell surface a primary cilium that provides important sensory and signaling functions. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human developmental disorders and diseases, collectively termed ciliopathies. Most neurons in the brain possess cilia that are enriched for signaling proteins such as G protein-coupled receptors and adenylyl cyclase type 3, suggesting neuronal cilia sense neuromodulators in the brain and contribute to non-synaptic signaling. Indeed, disruption of neuronal cilia or loss of neuronal ciliary signaling proteins is associated with obesity and learning and memory deficits. As the functions of primary cilia are defined by the signaling proteins that localize to the ciliary compartment, identifying the complement of signaling proteins in cilia can provide important insights into their physiological roles. Here we report for the first time that different GPCRs can colocalize within the same cilium. Specifically, we found the ciliary GPCRs, melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (Mchr1 and somatostatin receptor 3 (Sstr3 colocalizing within cilia in multiple mouse brain regions. In addition, we have evidence suggesting Mchr1 and Sstr3 form heteromers. As GPCR heteromerization can affect ligand binding properties as well as downstream signaling, our findings add an additional layer of complexity to neuronal ciliary signaling.

  11. Identifying G-protein Coupled Receptors Using Weighted Levenshtein Distance and Nearest Neighbor Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Xu

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of seven-helix transmembrane proteins that have been used in bioinformatics as the targets to facilitate drug discovery for human diseases. Although thousands of GPCR sequences have been collected, the ligand specificity of many GPCRs is still unknown and only one crystal structure of the rhodopsin-like family has been solved. Therefore, identifying GPCR types only from sequence data has become an important research issue. In this study, a novel technique for identifying GPCR types based on the weighted Levenshtein distance between two receptor sequences and the nearest neighbor method (NNM) is introduced, which can deal with receptor sequences with different lengths directly. In our experiments for classifying four classes(acetylcholine, adrenoceptor, dopamine, and serotonin) of the rhodopsin-like family of GPCRs, the error rates from the leave-one-out procedure and the leave-half-out procedure were 0.62% and 1.24%, respectively. These results are prior to those of the covariant discriminant algorithm, the support vector machine method, and the NNM with Euclidean distance.

  12. G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and neural tube closure defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Issei S; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2016-10-12

    Disruption of the normal mechanisms that mediate neural tube closure can result in neural tube defects (NTDs) with devastating consequences in affected patients. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, we are increasingly detecting mutations in multiple genes in NTD cases. However, our ability to determine which of these genes contribute to the malformation is limited by our understanding of the pathways controlling neural tube closure. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane receptors in humans and have been historically favored as drug targets. Recent studies implicate several GPCRs and downstream signaling pathways in neural tube development and closure. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GPCR signaling pathways in pathogenesis of NTDs. Notable examples include the orphan primary cilia-localized GPCR, Gpr161 that regulates the basal suppression machinery of sonic hedgehog pathway by means of activation of cAMP-protein kinase A signaling in the neural tube, and protease-activated receptors that are activated by a local network of membrane-tethered proteases during neural tube closure involving the surface ectoderm. Understanding the role of these GPCR-regulated pathways in neural tube development and closure is essential toward identification of underlying genetic causes to prevent NTDs. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

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    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  14. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Mediated Inhibition of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons Is Suppressed by Kisspeptin-G Protein-Coupled Receptor 54 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters that regulate the excitability of GnRH neurons. Numerous studies have shown that GABA activates Cl− currents in GnRH neurons, and these effects are antagonized by GABAA receptor antagonists. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer composed of GABAB R1 and R2, and although both subunits have been localized in GnRH neurons, nothing is known about the cellular signaling of this Gαi,o-coupled receptor in GnRH neurons. Using whole-cell recordings from mouse enhanced green fluorescent protein-GnRH neurons, we found that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen hyperpolarized GnRH neurons through activation of an inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of baclofen were antagonized by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 with a Ki (inhibitory constant) of 85 nm. Furthermore, in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin, GABA hyperpolarized GnRH neurons in a similar manner. Treatment with 17β-estradiol as compared with oil vehicle did not significantly alter either the EC50 for the baclofen-induced response (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1 μm, respectively) or the maximal outward current (10.8 ± 1.7 pA vs. 11.4 ± 0.6 pA, respectively) in GnRH neurons. However, the outward current (and membrane hyperpolarization) was abrogated by submaximal concentrations of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) agonist kisspeptin-10 in both groups, indicating that Gαq-coupled (GPR54) can desensitize the GABAB receptor-mediated response. Therefore, the activation of GABAB receptors in GnRH neurons may provide increased inhibitory tone during estrogen-negative feedback states that is attenuated by kisspeptin during positive feedback. PMID:19164470

  16. Dysfunction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in Alzheimer’'s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Z. Suo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mutations and variations of several genes have been identified to be involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD, the efforts towards understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease still have a long journey to go. One such effort is to identify the signal transduction deficits, for which previous studies have suggested that the central problems appear to be at the interface between G proteins and their coupled receptors. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs are a small family of serine/threonine protein kinases primarily acting at the “receptor-G protein interface””. Recent studies have indicated the possible involvement of GRK, primarily GRK2 and GRK5, dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD. It seems that mild, soluble, β-amyloid accumulation can lead to a reduced membrane (functional and an elevated cytosolic GRK2/5. The increased cytosolic GRK2 appears to be colocalized with damaged mitochondria and neurofibrillary tangles. Moreover, the total levels of GRK2, not only in the brain, but also in peripheral blood samples, are increased in a manner inversely correlated with the patient's cognitive levels. The deficiency of GRK5, on the other hand, impairs presynaptic M2 autoreceptor desensitization, which leads to a reduced acetylcholine release, axonal/synaptic degenerative changes, and associated amnestic, mild cognitive impairment. It also promotes an evil cycle to further increase Beta-amyloid accumulation and exaggerates brain inflammation, possibly even the basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration. Therefore, continuous efforts in this direction are necessary before translating the knowledge to any therapeutic strategies.

  17. Activation of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, but not estrogen receptor α or β, rapidly enhances social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Kelsy Sharice Jean; Mulvale, Erin; Gallagher, Nicola; Roussel, Véronique; Choleris, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Social learning is a highly adaptive process by which an animal acquires information from a conspecific. While estrogens are known to modulate learning and memory, much of this research focuses on individual learning. Estrogens have been shown to enhance social learning on a long-term time scale, likely via genomic mechanisms. Estrogens have also been shown to affect individual learning on a rapid time scale through cell-signaling cascades, rather than via genomic effects, suggesting they may also rapidly influence social learning. We therefore investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol and involvement of the estrogen receptors (ERs) using the ERα agonist propyl pyrazole triol, the ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile, and the G protein-coupled ER 1 (GPER1) agonist G1 on the social transmission of food preferences (STFP) task, within a time scale that focused on the rapid effects of estrogens. General ER activation with 17β-estradiol resulted in a modest facilitation of social learning, with mice showing a preference up to 30min of testing. Specific activation of the GPER1 also rapidly enhanced social learning, with mice showing a socially learned preference up to 2h of testing. ERα activation instead shortened the expression of a socially learned food preference, while ERβ activation had little to no effects. Thus, rapid estrogenic modulation of social learning in the STFP may be the outcome of competing action at the three main receptors. Hence, estrogens' rapid effects on social learning likely depend on the specific ERs present in brain regions recruited during social learning.

  18. Structure-activity relationships of fatty acid amide ligands in activating and desensitizing G protein-coupled receptor 119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pritesh; Kumar, Akhilesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of the current study was to apply a high throughput assay to investigate the structure-activity relationships of fatty acid amides for activating and desensitizing G protein-coupled receptor 119, a promising therapeutic target for both type 2 diabetes and obesity. A cell-based, homogenous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) method for measuring G protein-coupled receptor 119-mediated increase of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was validated and applied in this study. Using novel fatty acid amides and detailed potency and efficacy analyses, we have demonstrated that degree of saturation in acyl chain and charged head groups of fatty acid amides have profound effects on the ability of these compounds to activate G protein-coupled receptor 119. In addition, we have demonstrated for the first time that pretreatments with G protein-coupled receptor 119 agonists desensitize the receptor and the degrees of desensitization caused by fatty acid amides correlate well with their structure-activity relationships in activating the receptor.

  19. Interaction between G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 and Tyrosinase: Implications for Understanding Ocular Albinism Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Schiedel, Anke C; Manga, Prashiela

    2017-02-01

    Developmental eye defects in X-linked ocular albinism type 1 are caused by G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) mutations. Mutations result in dysfunctional melanosome biogenesis and macromelanosome formation in pigment cells, including melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. GPR143, primarily expressed in pigment cells, localizes exclusively to endolysosomal and melanosomal membranes unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, which localize to the plasma membrane. There is some debate regarding GPR143 function and elucidating the role of this receptor may be instrumental for understanding neurogenesis during eye development and for devising therapies for ocular albinism type I. Many G protein-coupled receptors require association with other proteins to function. These G protein-coupled receptor-interacting proteins also facilitate fine-tuning of receptor activity and tissue specificity. We therefore investigated potential GPR143 interaction partners, with a focus on the melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase. GPR143 coimmunoprecipitated with tyrosinase, while confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of the proteins. Furthermore, tyrosinase localized to the plasma membrane when coexpressed with a GPR143 trafficking mutant. The physical interaction between the proteins was confirmed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This interaction may be required in order for GPR143 to function as a monitor of melanosome maturation. Identifying tyrosinase as a potential GPR143 binding protein opens new avenues for investigating the mechanisms that regulate pigmentation and neurogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dual modulation of inward rectifier potassium currents in olfactory neuronal cells by promiscuous G protein coupling of the oxytocin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravati, Marta; Busnelli, Marta; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Reversi, Alessandra; Spaiardi, Paolo; Parenti, Marco; Toselli, Mauro; Chini, Bice

    2010-09-01

    Oxytocin receptor is a seven transmembrane receptor widely expressed in the CNS that triggers G(i) or G(q) protein-mediated signaling cascades leading to the regulation of a variety of neuroendocrine and cognitive functions. We decided to investigate whether and how the promiscuous receptor/G protein coupling affects neuronal excitability. As an experimental model, we used the immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone-positive GN11 cell line displaying the features of immature, migrating olfactory neurons. Using RT-PCR analysis, we detected the presence of oxytocin receptors whose stimulation by oxytocin led to the accumulation of inositol phosphates and to the inhibition of cell proliferation, and the expression of several inward rectifier (IR) K+ channel subtypes. Moreover, electrophysiological and pharmacological inspections using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings evidenced that in GN11 cells, IR channel subtypes are responsive to oxytocin. In particular, we found that: (i) peptide activation of receptor either inhibited or stimulated IR conductances, and (ii) IR current inhibition was mediated by a pertussis toxin-resistant G protein presumably of the G(q/11) subtype, and by phospholipase C, whereas IR current activation was achieved via receptor coupling to a pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i/o) protein. The findings suggest that neuronal excitability might be tuned by a single peptide receptor that mediates opposing effects on distinct K+ channels through the promiscuous coupling to different G proteins.

  1. Expression of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in irritable bowel syndrome and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bin; Dong, Lei; Guo, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Jiong; He, Yangxin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Lu; Zhao, Juhui

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen is suggested to participate in pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but expression of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in the colon of IBS patients has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of GPER and classical estrogen receptors in the colon of IBS patients and healthy controls. Colonic biopsies were obtained by endoscopy from patients with IBS (n=46) and healthy subjects (n=13). Expression of GPER, estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in mast cells were measured by double-labelling immunofluorescence. Quantification of mRNA expression was performed for GPER, ERα and ERβ by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Differential distribution of GPER, ERα and ERβ were detected in human colonic mucosa. The expression of GPER in the cytoplasm of mast cells and GPER-positive cells was significantly higher in diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) patients than that in constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS, Pcolonic mucosa and no difference of immunostaining results for ERα and ERβ was found among these three groups. A positive correlation (r=0.451, P=0.011) between GPER-positive cell counts and abdominal pain severity was observed in D-IBS group. Relative mRNA expression of GPER in D-IBS was also higher than that in C-IBS (P=0.018) and healthy subjects (P=0.011). The present study, for the first time, demonstrated the expression of GPER in human colonic mucosa and its correlation with abdominal pain severity.

  2. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor function by its binding proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, Norimichi; Saito, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane receptors with an N-terminus in the extracellular region and C-terminus in the intracellular region. When an agonist binds to a GPCR, a signal is transduced into a cell through the activation of trimeric G proteins. Recently, it has been shown that the activities of GPCRs are regulated by multiple mechanisms. One of the mechanisms is regulation through the binding proteins to the carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. In the present study, the binding partners for the C-terminus of the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) and thromboxane A(2) receptor (TP) were searched for using yeast two-hybrid screening, and the functions of these proteins were investigated. We identified t-complex testis expressed-1 (Tctex-1) and 4.1G as associated proteins for the PTHR. Tctex-1 is one of the light chains of cytoplasmic dynein, which is a motor protein across microtubles. We found that Tctex-1 was involved in agonist-induced internalization of the PTHR. 4.1G, a cytoskeletal protein, facilitated the cell surface localization of the PTHR and augmented PHTR-mediated signal transduction. TPs consists of two splicing variants, TPalpha and TPbeta. As a result of yeast two-hybrid screening, two proteasomal proteins, proteasome activator PA28gamma and proteasome subunit alpha7, were identified as direct interacting proteins for TPbeta. TPbeta has a tendency to be retained in the intracellular compartment, probably due to its binding to proteasomes. We also demonstrated that TPalpha and TPbeta formed heterodimers, and the signal transduction through TPalpha was reduced by the formation of heterodimers. In conclusion, the proteins bound to GPCRs may regulate the intracellular traffic of GPCRs.

  3. Feeding and the rhodopsin family G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in nematodes and arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Carlos dos Reis Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologues of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster, suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologues of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors.

  4. Role of receptor-attached phosphates in binding of visual and non-visual arrestins to G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Luis E; Kook, Seunghyi; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Ahmed, M Rafiuddin; Gurevich, Eugenia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2012-03-16

    Arrestins are a small family of proteins that regulate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Arrestins specifically bind to phosphorylated active receptors, terminating G protein coupling, targeting receptors to endocytic vesicles, and initiating G protein-independent signaling. The interaction of rhodopsin-attached phosphates with Lys-14 and Lys-15 in β-strand I was shown to disrupt the interaction of α-helix I, β-strand I, and the C-tail of visual arrestin-1, facilitating its transition into an active receptor-binding state. Here we tested the role of conserved lysines in homologous positions of non-visual arrestins by generating K2A mutants in which both lysines were replaced with alanines. K2A mutations in arrestin-1, -2, and -3 significantly reduced their binding to active phosphorhodopsin in vitro. The interaction of arrestins with several GPCRs in intact cells was monitored by a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assay. BRET data confirmed the role of Lys-14 and Lys-15 in arrestin-1 binding to non-cognate receptors. However, this was not the case for non-visual arrestins in which the K2A mutations had little effect on net BRET(max) values for the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine (M2R), β(2)-adrenergic (β(2)AR), or D2 dopamine receptors. Moreover, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of M2R interacted with wild type non-visual arrestins normally, whereas phosphorylation-deficient β(2)AR mutants bound arrestins at 20-50% of the level of wild type β(2)AR. Thus, the contribution of receptor-attached phosphates to arrestin binding varies depending on the receptor-arrestin pair. Although arrestin-1 always depends on receptor phosphorylation, its role in the recruitment of arrestin-2 and -3 is much greater in the case of β(2)AR than M2R and D2 dopamine receptor.

  5. Procedure for Calculation of Potency and Efficacy for Ligands Acting on G(s)- and G (i)-Coupled Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Eddi; Schousboe, Arne; Belhage, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Structure activity relationship (SAR) analyses of pharmacological data of compounds constitute an important part of the discovery process in the design of new drug candidates with improved pharmacological properties. In particular G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) associated with the cAMP second...... messenger systems G(s) and G(i) have constituted one of the most widely used basis for pharmacological in vitro assays for assessing functional receptor effects. Such assays are based on Radio Immuno Assay (RIA) analysis to measure the cellular cAMP concentration as readout of receptor activation....... It appears, however, to be a common practice to omit the use of cAMP standard curves to transform the measured signals (cpm or cps) into cAMP concentrations on which estimations of potencies (EC(50) values) and efficacies (E(MAX) values) in G(s) and G(i) coupled receptor stimulation are based. Such practice...

  6. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ca2+-Linked Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Are Essential for Endothelial/Leukocyte Adherence▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Brian J.; Solt, Laura A.; Chowdhury, Ibrul; Kazi, Altaf S.; Abid, M. Ruhul; Aird, William C.; May, Michael J.; Foskett, J. Kevin; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated signaling is commonly associated with multiple functions, including the production of reactive oxygen species. However, whether mitochondrion-derived superoxide (mROS) contributes directly to physiological signaling is controversial. Here we demonstrate a previously unknown mechanism in which physiologic Ca2+-evoked mROS production plays a pivotal role in endothelial cell (EC) activation and leukocyte firm adhesion. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and tyrosine kinase-media...

  7. Glutamate-induced depression of EPSP-spike coupling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons and modulation by adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alexandra L; Stone, Trevor W

    2010-04-01

    The presence of high concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular fluid following brain trauma or ischaemia may contribute substantially to subsequent impairments of neuronal function. In this study, glutamate was applied to hippocampal slices for several minutes, producing over-depolarization, which was reflected in an initial loss of evoked population potential size in the CA1 region. Orthodromic population spikes recovered only partially over the following 60 min, whereas antidromic spikes and excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) showed greater recovery, implying a change in EPSP-spike coupling (E-S coupling), which was confirmed by intracellular recording from CA1 pyramidal cells. The recovery of EPSPs was enhanced further by dizocilpine, suggesting that the long-lasting glutamate-induced change in E-S coupling involves NMDA receptors. This was supported by experiments showing that when isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs were studied in isolation, there was only partial recovery following glutamate, unlike the composite EPSPs. The recovery of orthodromic population spikes and NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs following glutamate was enhanced by the adenosine A1 receptor blocker DPCPX, the A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 or adenosine deaminase, associated with a loss of restoration to normal of the glutamate-induced E-S depression. The results indicate that the long-lasting depression of neuronal excitability following recovery from glutamate is associated with a depression of E-S coupling. This effect is partly dependent on activation of NMDA receptors, which modify adenosine release or the sensitivity of adenosine receptors. The results may have implications for the use of A1 and A2A receptor ligands as cognitive enhancers or neuroprotectants.

  8. Type-1, but Not Type-5, Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors are Coupled to Polyphosphoinositide Hydrolysis in the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Di Menna, Luisa; Scarselli, Pamela; Mascio, Giada; Madonna, Michele; Notartomaso, Serena; Puliti, Aldamaria; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-04-01

    mGlu1 and mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors are expressed in the vertebrate retina, and are co-localized in some retinal neurons. It is believed that both receptors are coupled to polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in the retina and their function may diverge in some cells because of a differential engagement of downstream signaling molecules. Here, we show that it is only the mGlu1 receptor that is coupled to PI hydrolysis in the retina. We used either bovine retinal slices or intact mouse retinas challenged with the mixed mGlu1/5 receptor agonist, DHPG. In both models, DHPG-stimulated PI hydrolysis was abrogated by the selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685, but was insensitive to the mGlu5 receptor antagonist, MPEP. In addition, the PI response to DHPG was unchanged in the retina of mGlu5(-/-) mice but was abolished in the retina of crv4 mice lacking mGlu1 receptors. Stimulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by DHPG in intact mouse retinas were also entirely mediated by mGlu1 receptors. Our data provide the first example of a tissue in which a biochemically detectable PI response is mediated by mGlu1, but not mGlu5, receptors. Hence, bovine retinal slices might be used as a model for the functional screening of mGlu1 receptor ligands. In addition, the mGlu1 receptor caters the potential as a drug target in the experimental treatment of degenerative disorders of the retina.

  9. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions.

  10. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  11. Computational Modeling for the Activation Cycle of G-proteins by G-protein-coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Bao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we survey five different computational modeling methods. For comparison, we use the activation cycle of G-proteins that regulate cellular signaling events downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as a driving example. Starting from an existing Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs model, we implement the G-protein cycle in the stochastic Pi-calculus using SPiM, as Petri-nets using Cell Illustrator, in the Kappa Language using Cellucidate, and in Bio-PEPA using the Bio-PEPA eclipse plug in. We also provide a high-level notation to abstract away from communication primitives that may be unfamiliar to the average biologist, and we show how to translate high-level programs into stochastic Pi-calculus processes and chemical reactions.

  12. No more pain upon Gq-protein-coupled receptor activation: role of endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The above article from European Journal of Neuroscience, published online on 4 February 2014 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ejn.12475/full), has been retracted by agreement between the Editors-in-Chief, Paul Bolam and John Foxe, the authors and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed as the above article has been found to overlap substantially with the article 'Chiou, L.-C., Hu, S. S.-J., and Ho, Y.-C. (2013), Targeting the cannabinoid system for pain relief? Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica, Volume 51, Issue 4: 161 - 170. doi: 10.1016/j.aat.2013.10.004', which was submitted after the European Journal of Neuroscience article but was published first. Reference Hu, S.S.-J., Ho, Y.-C. & Chiou, L.-C. (2014) No more pain upon Gq-protein-coupled receptor activation: role of endocannabinoids.

  13. Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Spinal Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    in spinal nociceptive processing. Intrathecal challenging of mice with the GPER agonist G-1 results in pain-related behaviors. GPER antagonism with G15 reduces the G-1-induced response. Electrophysiological recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons indicate neuronal membrane depolarization with G-1......Human and animal studies suggest that estrogens are involved in the processing of nociceptive sensory information and analgesic responses in the central nervous system. Rapid pronociceptive estrogenic effects have been reported, some of which likely involve G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER......) activation. Membrane depolarization and increases in cytosolic calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are markers of neuronal activation, underlying pain sensitization in the spinal cord. Using behavioral, electrophysiological, and fluorescent imaging studies, we evaluated GPER involvement...

  14. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  15. G protein-coupled receptors: potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hai-Hua; Ni, Wei-Jian; Tang, Li-Qin; Wei, Wei

    2015-12-16

    Diabetic nephropathy, a lethal microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is characterized by progressive albuminuria, excessive deposition of extracellular matrix, thickened glomerular basement membrane, podocyte abnormalities, and podocyte loss. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have attracted considerable attention in diabetic nephropathy, but the specific effects have not been elucidated yet. Likewise, abnormal signaling pathways are closely interrelated to the pathologic process of diabetic nephropathy, despite the fact that the mechanisms have not been explored clearly. Therefore, GPCRs and its mediated signaling pathways are essential for priority research, so that preventative strategies and potential targets might be developed for diabetic nephropathy. This article will give us comprehensive overview of predominant GPCR types, roles, and correlative signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Antibodies against G-protein coupled receptors: novel uses in screening and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Achla; Heimann, Andrea S; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2008-07-01

    Antibodies are components of the body's humoral immune system that are generated in response to foreign pathogens. Modern biomedical research has employed these very specific and efficient molecules designed by nature in the diagnosis of diseases, localization of gene products as well as in the rapid screening of targets for drug discovery and testing. In addition, the introduction of antibodies with fluorescent or enzymatic tags has significantly contributed to advances in imaging and microarray technology, which are revolutionizing disease research and the search for effective therapeutics. More recently antibodies have been used in the isolation of dimeric G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes. In this review, we discuss antibodies as powerful research tools for studying GPCRs, and their potential to be developed as drugs themselves.

  17. In vitro expression and analysis of the 826 human G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuechen Lv

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in all human physiological systems where they are responsible for transducing extracellular signals into cells. GPCRs signal in response to a diverse array of stimuli including light, hormones, and lipids, where these signals affect downstream cascades to impact both health and disease states. Yet, despite their importance as therapeutic targets, detailed molecular structures of only 30 GPCRs have been determined to date. A key challenge to their structure determination is adequate protein expression. Here we report the quantification of protein expression in an insect cell expression system for all 826 human GPCRs using two different fusion constructs. Expression characteristics are analyzed in aggregate and among each of the five distinct subfamilies. These data can be used to identify trends related to GPCR expression between different fusion constructs and between different GPCR families, and to prioritize lead candidates for future structure determination feasibility.

  18. Adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 in regulation of sympathetic nervous system activity in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katie; A; Mc; Crink; Ava; Brill; Anastasios; Lymperopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure(HF), the number one cause of death in the western world, is caused by the insufficient performance of the heart leading to tissue underperfusion in response to an injury or insult. It comprises complex interactions between important neurohormonal mechanisms that try but ultimately fail to sustain cardiac output. The most prominent such mechanism is the sympathetic(adrenergic) nervous system(SNS), whose activity and outflow are greatly elevated in HF. SNS hyperactivity confers significant toxicity to the failing heart and markedly increases HF morbidity and mortality via excessive activation of adrenergic receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, ligand binding induces their coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins that transduce intracellular signals. G protein signaling is turned-off by the agonist-bound receptor phosphorylation courtesy of G protein-coupled receptor kinases(GRKs), followed by βarrestin binding, which prevents the GRK-phosphorylated receptor from further interaction with the G proteins and simultaneously leads it inside the cell(receptor sequestration). Recent evidence indicates that adrenal GRK2 and βarrestins can regulate adrenal catecholamine secretion, thereby modulating SNS activity in HF. The present review gives an account of all these studies on adrenal GRKs and βarrestins in HF and discusses the exciting new therapeutic possibilities for chronic HF offered by targeting these proteins pharmacologically.

  19. Novel RNAi-mediated approach to G protein-coupled receptor deorphanization: proof of principle and characterization of a planarian 5-HT receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Zamanian

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs represent the largest known superfamily of membrane proteins extending throughout the Metazoa. There exists ample motivation to elucidate the functional properties of GPCRs given their role in signal transduction and their prominence as drug targets. In many target organisms, these efforts are hampered by the unreliable nature of heterologous receptor expression platforms. We validate and describe an alternative loss-of-function approach for ascertaining the ligand and G protein coupling properties of GPCRs in their native cell membrane environment. Our efforts are focused on the phylum Platyhelminthes, given the heavy health burden exacted by pathogenic flatworms, as well as the role of free-living flatworms as model organisms for the study of developmental biology. RNA interference (RNAi was used in conjunction with a biochemical endpoint assay to monitor cAMP modulation in response to the translational suppression of individual receptors. As proof of principle, this approach was used to confirm the neuropeptide GYIRFamide as the cognate ligand for the planarian neuropeptide receptor GtNPR-1, while revealing its endogenous coupling to Gα(i/o. The method was then extended to deorphanize a novel Gα(s-coupled planarian serotonin receptor, DtSER-1. A bioinformatics protocol guided the selection of receptor candidates mediating 5-HT-evoked responses. These results provide functional data on a neurotransmitter central to flatworm biology, while establishing the great potential of an RNAi-based deorphanization protocol. Future work can help optimize and adapt this protocol for higher-throughput platforms as well as other phyla.

  20. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Plays a Relevant Role in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein–coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. RESULTS Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. CONCLUSIONS Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:20627936

  1. Type 1 ryanodine receptor in cardiac mitochondria: transducer of excitation-metabolism coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutner, Gisela; Sharma, Virendra K; Lin, Lin; Ryu, Shin-Young; Dirksen, Robert T; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2005-11-10

    Mitochondria in a variety of cell types respond to physiological Ca(2+) oscillations in the cytosol dynamically with Ca(2+) uptakes. In heart cells, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptakes occur by a ruthenium red-sensitive Ca(2+) uniporter (CaUP), a rapid mode of Ca(2+) uptake (RaM) and a ryanodine receptor (RyR) localized in the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Three subtypes of RyRs have been described and cloned, however, the subtype identity of the mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR) is unknown. Using subtype specific antibodies, we characterized the mRyR in the IMM from rat heart as RyR1. These results are substantiated by the absence of RyR protein in heart mitochondria from RyR1 knockout mice. The bell-shape Ca(2+)-dependent [(3)H]ryanodine binding curve and its modulation by caffeine and adenylylmethylenediphosphonate (AMPPCP) give further evidence that mRyR functions pharmacologically like RyR1. Ryanodine prevents mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake induced by raising extramitochondrial Ca(2+) to 10 microM. Similarly, ryanodine inhibits oxidative phosphorylation stimulated by 10 microM extramitochondrial Ca(2+). In summary, our results show that the mRyR in cardiac muscle has similar biochemical and pharmacological properties to the RyR1 in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle. These results could also suggest an efficient mechanism by which mitochondria sequesters Ca(2+) via mRyR during excitation-contraction coupling to stimulate oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production to meet metabolic demands. Thus, the mRyR functions as a transducer for excitation-metabolism coupling.

  2. G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids suppresses colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yakun; Jiang, Hongmei; Robbins, Gregory T; Nie, Daotai

    2011-02-15

    GPR43 is a G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Expression of GPR43 is detected in hematopoietic tissues and the large intestine. SCFAs are derived from bacterial fermentation and metabolism of undigested dietary fibers and have been recognized for their cancer prevention activities in the colon. The role of SCFAs, particularly butyrate, in colon cancer therapy has been extensively studied, and its tumor suppressive functions are believed to be due to their intracellular actions, notably inhibition of histone deacetylase. In our study, we show that SCFAs also exert their antitumor effects via receptor GPR43 and that GPR43 is frequently lost in colon cancer cells. Immunohistostaining revealed that GPR43 immunoreactivity was high in normal colon tissues (N = 31) but was markedly reduced or completely lost in most colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues (N = 70) and their corresponding lymph node metastatic adenocarcinomas (N = 38). RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of full length GPR43 mRNA in only one (HT-29) of nine established human colon cancer cell lines. Restoration of GPR43 expression in HCT8 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and activated caspases, leading to increased apoptotic cell death after propionate/butyrate treatment. Restored GPR43 expression, coupled with propionate treatment, induced an upregulation of p21 and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 1 and 2, while the CDK4 and CDK6 levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that GPR43 functions as a tumor suppressor by mediating SCFA-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptotic cell death in colon cancer.

  3. Differential Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 in Physiological Versus Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynham, Christopher J; Cannavo, Alessandro; Zhou, Yan; Vouga, Alexandre G; Woodall, Benjamin P; Hullmann, Jonathan; Ibetti, Jessica; Gold, Jessica I; Chuprun, J Kurt; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J

    2015-12-04

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are dynamic regulators of cellular signaling. GRK5 is highly expressed within myocardium and is upregulated in heart failure. Although GRK5 is a critical regulator of cardiac G protein-coupled receptor signaling, recent data has uncovered noncanonical activity of GRK5 within nuclei that plays a key role in pathological hypertrophy. Targeted cardiac elevation of GRK5 in mice leads to exaggerated hypertrophy and early heart failure after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) because of GRK5 nuclear accumulation. In this study, we investigated the role of GRK5 in physiological, swimming-induced hypertrophy (SIH). Cardiac-specific GRK5 transgenic mice and nontransgenic littermate control mice were subjected to a 21-day high-intensity swim protocol (or no swim sham controls). SIH and specific molecular and genetic indices of physiological hypertrophy were assessed, including nuclear localization of GRK5, and compared with TAC. Unlike after TAC, swim-trained transgenic GRK5 and nontransgenic littermate control mice exhibited similar increases in cardiac growth. Mechanistically, SIH did not lead to GRK5 nuclear accumulation, which was confirmed in vitro as insulin-like growth factor-1, a known mediator of physiological hypertrophy, was unable to induce GRK5 nuclear translocation in myocytes. We found specific patterns of altered gene expression between TAC and SIH with GRK5 overexpression. Further, SIH in post-TAC transgenic GRK5 mice was able to preserve cardiac function. These data suggest that although nuclear-localized GRK5 is a pathological mediator after stress, this noncanonical nuclear activity of GRK5 is not induced during physiological hypertrophy. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Targeting Human Mast Cells Expressing G-Protein-Coupled Receptors in Allergic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimichi Okayama

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the largest known group of integral membrane receptor proteins and are the most common targets of pharmacotherapy. Mast cells (MCs have been reported to play an important role in allergic diseases, such as urticaria and bronchial asthma. There is an increasing body of clinical evidence that MCs are recruited into allergic reactions by non-IgE-dependent mechanisms. Human MCs are activated and secrete histamine in response to neuropeptides, such as substance P and somatostatin, mediated by a GPCR, MRGX2. The microenvironment surrounding MCs in their resident tissues is likely to contain multiple factors that modify antigen-dependent MC activation. MCs express various GPCRs, and since the function of human MCs is modulated by various GPCR ligands, such as adenosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, which are present in high levels in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid of asthmatic patients, the GPCRs expressed on MCs may play an important role in human allergic diseases. The GPCRs expressed on MCs may serve as drug targets for the treatment of allergic diseases.

  5. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  6. Systematic generation of in vivo G protein-coupled receptor mutants in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, R; Vroling, B; Toonen, P; Nijman, I J; van Roekel, H; Verheul, M; Baakman, C; Guryev, V; Vriend, G; Cuppen, E

    2011-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of cell surface receptors that are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, and are targets for many therapeutic interventions. However, genetic models in the rat, one of the most widely used model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, are largely lacking. Here, we applied N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis to generate an in vivo GPCR mutant collection in the rat. A pre-selected panel of 250 human GPCR homologs was screened for mutations in 813 rats, resulting in the identification of 131 non-synonymous mutations. From these, seven novel potential rat gene knockouts were established as well as 45 lines carrying missense mutations in various genes associated with or involved in human diseases. We provide extensive in silico modeling results of the missense mutations and show experimental data, suggesting loss-of-function phenotypes for several models, including Mc4r and Lpar1. Taken together, the approach used resulted not only in a set of novel gene knockouts, but also in allelic series of more subtle amino acid variants, similar as commonly observed in human disease. The mutants presented here may greatly benefit studies to understand specific GPCR function and support the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in energy homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haifei; Kumar, Shiva Priya Dharshan Senthil; Liu, Xian

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and its related metabolic diseases have reached a pandemic level worldwide. There are sex differences in the prevalence of obesity and its related metabolic diseases, with men being more vulnerable than women; however, the prevalence of these disorders increases dramatically in women after menopause, suggesting that sex steroid hormone estrogens play key protective roles against development of obesity and metabolic diseases. Estrogens are important regulators of several aspects of metabolism, including body weight and body fat, caloric intake and energy expenditure, and glucose and lipid metabolism in both males and females. Estrogens act in complex ways on their nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ and transmembrane ERs such as G protein-coupled estrogen receptor. Genetic tools, such as different lines of knockout mouse models, and pharmacological agents, such as selective agonists and antagonists, are available to study function and signaling mechanisms of ERs. We provide an overview of the evidence for the physiological and cellular actions of ERs in estrogen-dependent processes in the context of energy homeostasis and body fat regulation and discuss its pathology that leads to obesity and related metabolic states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The G-protein-coupled receptor GPR103 regulates bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribault, Helene; Danao, Jean; Gupte, Jamila; Yang, Li; Sun, Banghua; Richards, William; Tian, Hui

    2006-01-01

    GPR103 is a G-protein-coupled receptor with reported expression in brain, heart, kidney, adrenal gland, retina, and testis. It encodes a 455-amino-acid protein homologous to neuropeptide FF2, neuropeptide Y2, and galanin GalR1 receptors. Its natural ligand was recently identified as 26RFa, a novel human RF-amide-related peptide with orexigenic activity. To identify the function of GPR103, we generated GPR103-deficient mice. Homozygous mutant mice were viable and fertile. Their body weight was undistinguishable from that of their wild-type littermates. Histological analysis revealed that GPR103-/- mice exhibited a thinned osteochondral growth plate, a thickening of trabecular branches, and a reduction in osteoclast number, suggestive of an early arrest of osteochondral bone formation. Microcomputed tomography confirmed the reduction in trabecular bone and connective tissue densities in GPR103 knockout animals. Whole-body radiography followed by morphometric analysis revealed a kyphosis in mutant animals. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that GPR103 was expressed in human skull, mouse spine, and several osteoblast cell lines. Dexamethasone, a known inhibitor of osteoblast growth and inducer of osteoblast differentiation, inhibited GPR103 expression in human osteoblast primary cultures. Altogether, these results suggest that osteopenia in GPR103-/- mice may be mediated directly by the loss of GPR103 expression in bone.

  9. Plasma membrane and nuclear localization of G protein coupled receptor kinase 6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoshan; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2007-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) specifically phosphorylate agonist-occupied GPCRs at the inner surface of the plasma membrane (PM), leading to receptor desensitization. Here we show that the C-terminal 30 amino acids of GRK6A contain multiple elements that either promote or inhibit PM localization. Disruption of palmitoylation by individual mutation of cysteine 561, 562, or 565 or treatment of cells with 2-bromopalmitate shifts GRK6A from the PM to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Likewise, disruption of the hydrophobic nature of a predicted amphipathic helix by mutation of two leucines to alanines at positions 551 and 552 causes a loss of PM localization. Moreover, acidic amino acids in the C-terminus appear to negatively regulate PM localization; mutational replacement of several acidic residues with neutral or basic residues rescues PM localization of a palmitoylation-defective GRK6A. Last, we characterize the novel nuclear localization, showing that nuclear export of nonpalmitoylated GRK6A is sensitive to leptomycin B and that GRK6A contains a potential nuclear localization signal. Our results suggest that the C-terminus of GRK6A contains a novel electrostatic palmitoyl switch in which acidic residues weaken the membrane-binding strength of the amphipathic helix, thus allowing changes in palmitoylation to regulate PM versus cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  10. Plasma Membrane and Nuclear Localization of G Protein–coupled Receptor Kinase 6A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoshan; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) specifically phosphorylate agonist-occupied GPCRs at the inner surface of the plasma membrane (PM), leading to receptor desensitization. Here we show that the C-terminal 30 amino acids of GRK6A contain multiple elements that either promote or inhibit PM localization. Disruption of palmitoylation by individual mutation of cysteine 561, 562, or 565 or treatment of cells with 2-bromopalmitate shifts GRK6A from the PM to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Likewise, disruption of the hydrophobic nature of a predicted amphipathic helix by mutation of two leucines to alanines at positions 551 and 552 causes a loss of PM localization. Moreover, acidic amino acids in the C-terminus appear to negatively regulate PM localization; mutational replacement of several acidic residues with neutral or basic residues rescues PM localization of a palmitoylation-defective GRK6A. Last, we characterize the novel nuclear localization, showing that nuclear export of nonpalmitoylated GRK6A is sensitive to leptomycin B and that GRK6A contains a potential nuclear localization signal. Our results suggest that the C-terminus of GRK6A contains a novel electrostatic palmitoyl switch in which acidic residues weaken the membrane-binding strength of the amphipathic helix, thus allowing changes in palmitoylation to regulate PM versus cytoplasmic/nuclear localization. PMID:17538017

  11. Are G-protein-coupled receptors involved in mediating larval settlement and metamorphosis of coral planulae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cawa; Hadfield, Michael G

    2012-04-01

    Larvae of the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis are induced to settle and metamorphose by the presence of marine bacterial biofilms, and the larvae of Montipora capitata respond to a combination of filamentous and crustose coralline algae. The primary goal of this study was to better understand metamorphosis of cnidarian larvae by determining what types of receptors and signal-transduction pathways are involved during stimulation of metamorphosis of P. damicornis and M. capitata. Evidence from studies on larvae of hydrozoans suggests that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are good candidates. Settlement experiments were conducted in which competent larvae were exposed to neuropharmacological agents that affect GPCRs and their associated signal-transduction pathways, AC/cAMP and PI/DAG/PKC. On the basis of the results of these experiments, we conclude that GPCRs and these pathways do not mediate settlement and metamorphosis in either coral species. Two compounds that had an effect on both species, forskolin and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA), may be acting on other cellular processes not related to GPCRs. This study strengthens our understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms that regulate metamorphosis in coral larvae.

  12. Salt Effects on the Conformational Stability of the Visual G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Membrane protein stability is a key parameter with important physiological and practical implications. Inorganic salts affect protein stability, but the mechanisms of their interactions with membrane proteins are not completely understood. We have undertaken the study of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, the α-helical membrane protein rhodopsin from vertebrate retina, and explored the effects of inorganic salts on the thermal decay properties of both its inactive and photoactivated states. Under high salt concentrations, rhodopsin significantly increased its activation enthalpy change for thermal bleaching, whereas acid denaturation affected the formation of a denatured loose-bundle state for both the active and inactive conformations. This behavior seems to correlate with changes in protonated Schiff-base hydrolysis. However, chromophore regeneration with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and MetarhodopsinII decay kinetics were slower only in the presence of sodium chloride, suggesting that in this case, the underlying phenomenon may be linked to the activation of rhodopsin and the retinal release processes. Furthermore, the melting temperature, determined by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry measurements, was increased in the presence of high salt concentrations. The observed effects on rhodopsin could indicate that salts favor electrostatic interactions in the retinal binding pocket and indirectly favor hydrophobic interactions at the membrane protein receptor core. These effects can be exploited in applications where the stability of membrane proteins in solution is highly desirable. PMID:22261069

  13. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-02-01

    New strategies for expression, purification, functional characterization, and structural determination of membrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are constantly being developed because of their importance to human health. Here, we report a Caenorhabditis elegans heterologous expression system able to produce milligram amounts of functional native and engineered GPCRs. Both bovine opsin [(b)opsin] and human adenosine A(2A) subtype receptor [(h)A(2A)R] expressed in neurons or muscles of C. elegans were localized to cell membranes. Worms expressing these GPCRs manifested changes in motor behavior in response to light and ligands, respectively. With a newly devised protocol, 0.6-1 mg of purified homogenous 9-cis-retinal-bound bovine isorhodopsin [(b)isoRho] and ligand-bound (h)A(2A)R were obtained from C. elegans from one 10-L fermentation at low cost. Purified recombinant (b)isoRho exhibited its signature absorbance spectrum and activated its cognate G-protein transducin in vitro at a rate similar to native rhodopsin (Rho) obtained from bovine retina. Generally high expression levels of 11 native and mutant GPCRs demonstrated the potential of this C. elegans system to produce milligram quantities of high-quality GPCRs and possibly other membrane proteins suitable for detailed characterization.

  14. G protein-coupled receptor 56 regulates mechanical overload-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James P; Wrann, Christiane D; Rao, Rajesh R; Nair, Sreekumaran K; Jedrychowski, Mark P; You, Jae-Sung; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Gygi, Steven P; Ruas, Jorge L; Hornberger, Troy A; Wu, Zhidan; Glass, David J; Piao, Xianhua; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2014-11-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha 4 (PGC-1α4) is a protein isoform derived by alternative splicing of the PGC1α mRNA and has been shown to promote muscle hypertrophy. We show here that G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is a transcriptional target of PGC-1α4 and is induced in humans by resistance exercise. Furthermore, the anabolic effects of PGC-1α4 in cultured murine muscle cells are dependent on GPR56 signaling, because knockdown of GPR56 attenuates PGC-1α4-induced muscle hypertrophy in vitro. Forced expression of GPR56 results in myotube hypertrophy through the expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is dependent on Gα12/13 signaling. A murine model of overload-induced muscle hypertrophy is associated with increased expression of both GPR56 and its ligand collagen type III, whereas genetic ablation of GPR56 expression attenuates overload-induced muscle hypertrophy and associated anabolic signaling. These data illustrate a signaling pathway through GPR56 which regulates muscle hypertrophy associated with resistance/loading-type exercise.

  15. Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weihai; Miao, Frederick J-P; Lin, Daniel C-H; Schwandner, Ralf T; Wang, Zhulun; Gao, Jinhai; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Ling, Lei

    2004-05-13

    The citric acid cycle is central to the regulation of energy homeostasis and cell metabolism. Mutations in enzymes that catalyse steps in the citric acid cycle result in human diseases with various clinical presentations. The intermediates of the citric acid cycle are present at micromolar concentration in blood and are regulated by respiration, metabolism and renal reabsorption/extrusion. Here we show that GPR91 (ref. 3), a previously orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), functions as a receptor for the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate. We also report that GPR99 (ref. 4), a close relative of GPR91, responds to alpha-ketoglutarate, another intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Thus by acting as ligands for GPCRs, succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate are found to have unexpected signalling functions beyond their traditional roles. Furthermore, we show that succinate increases blood pressure in animals. The succinate-induced hypertensive effect involves the renin-angiotensin system and is abolished in GPR91-deficient mice. Our results indicate a possible role for GPR91 in renovascular hypertension, a disease closely linked to atherosclerosis, diabetes and renal failure.

  16. Role of G protein-coupled orphan receptors in intestinal inflammation: novel targets in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Andrzej; Storr, Martin; Zielińska, Marta; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-03-01

    A large number of proteins were classified into the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Based on their characteristic serpentine domain, they are called 7 TM receptors. Presently, their ligands and physiological functions remain unknown. In this review, we summarize what is known on these receptors and discuss the potential use of these orphan GPCRs (GPRs) in the induction or maintenance of remission in inflammatory bowel diseases. We focus on GPRs 30, 41, 43, 55, 119, and 120, where scientific evidence supports a potential role in intestinal inflammation.

  17. Modeling structure of G protein-coupled receptors in huan genome

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (or GPCRs) are integral transmembrane proteins responsible to various cellular signal transductions. Human GPCR proteins are encoded by 5% of human genes but account for the targets of 40% of the FDA approved drugs. Due to difficulties in crystallization, experimental structure determination remains extremely difficult for human GPCRs, which have been a major barrier in modern structure-based drug discovery. We proposed a new hybrid protocol, GPCR-I-TASSER, to construct GPCR structure models by integrating experimental mutagenesis data with ab initio transmembrane-helix assembly simulations, assisted by the predicted transmembrane-helix interaction networks. The method was tested in recent community-wide GPCRDock experiments and constructed models with a root mean square deviation 1.26 Å for Dopamine-3 and 2.08 Å for Chemokine-4 receptors in the transmembrane domain regions, which were significantly closer to the native than the best templates available in the PDB. GPCR-I-TASSER has been applied to model all 1,026 putative GPCRs in the human genome, where 923 are found to have correct folds based on the confidence score analysis and mutagenesis data comparison. The successfully modeled GPCRs contain many pharmaceutically important families that do not have previously solved structures, including Trace amine, Prostanoids, Releasing hormones, Melanocortins, Vasopressin and Neuropeptide Y receptors. All the human GPCR models have been made publicly available through the GPCR-HGmod database at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/GPCR-HGmod/ The results demonstrate new progress on genome-wide structure modeling of transmembrane proteins which should bring useful impact on the effort of GPCR-targeted drug discovery.

  18. Signaling mechanisms mediated by G-protein coupled receptors in human platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheikh Arshad SAEED; Huma RASHEED; Faisal A Wahed FECTO; Mohammad Ilyas ACHAKZAI; Rahmat ALI; John Dennis CONNOR; Anwar-ul-Hassan GILANI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The present study deals with the investigation of mechanisms involved in the synergistic interaction between epinephrine and arachidonic acid (AA). METHODS: Venous blood was taken from healthy human volunteers reported to be free of medications for one week. Platelet aggregation was monitored at 37 ℃ using Dual-channel Lumi-aggregometer. The resulting aggregation was recorded for 5 min by the measurement of light transmission as a function of time. RESULTS: The data show that a synergism in platelet aggregation mediated by subthreshold concentrations of epinephrine (1μmol/L) and AA (0.2μmol/L) was inhibited by the α2-receptor antagonist (yohimbine, IC50=0.6 μmol/L) and an inhibitor of AA-cyclooxygenase (COX), indomethacin (IC50=0.25 μmol/L).In examining receptor influence on intraplatelet signalling pathways, it was found that the synergistic effect was inhibited by calcium channel blockers, verapamil (IC50=0.4 μtmol/L) and diltiazem (IC50=2.5 μmol/L), as well as by low concentrations of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) (U73122; IC50=0.2 μmol/L) and mitogens activated protein kinase (MAPK) (PD 98059; IC50=3.8 μmol/L). Herbimycin A, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine light chain kinase (TLCK), showed inhibition at IC50 value of 15 μmol/L, whereas chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC)inhibitor, had no effect up to 20 μmol/L. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that synergism between epinephrine and AA in platelet aggregation is triggered through receptors coupled to G-protein, which in turn, activate PLC,COX, and MAP kinase-signaling pathways.

  19. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jala Venkatakrishna Rao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2, tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ, the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. Methods The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels, Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC methods (at protein levels. The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues were performed. Results Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs. The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression.

  20. Effect of niflumic acid on electromechanical coupling by tachykinin NK1 receptor activation in rabbit colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patacchini, R; Santicioli, P; Maggi, C A

    1996-05-15

    We have investigated the effect of the Cl- channel blocker, niflumic acid, on the contractile response and electromechanical coupling activated by stimulation of the tachykinin NK1 receptor in the longitudinal muscle of rabbit proximal colon, in the presence of indomethacin (5 microM). The application of submaximal equieffective concentrations of the tachykinin NK1 receptor-selective agonist [Sar9]substance P sulfone (30 nM), of carbachol (300 nM) and KCl (40 mM), produced distinct phasic and tonic components of contraction. Niflumic acid (10-100 microM) preferentially and markedly inhibited the tonic component of the response to [Sar9]substance P sulfone and to carbachol, without affecting the response to KCl. Nifedipine (1 microM) abolished the response to KCl and greatly reduced the response to [Sar9]substance P sulfone and carbachol. The nifedipine-resistant response to [Sar9]substance P sulfone was attenuated by niflumic acid (100 microM), while that to carbachol was unaffected. In sucrose gap experiments, superfusion with niflumic acid (100 microM), in the presence of nifedipine (3 microM), produced membrane hyperpolarization, which was totally blocked by tetraethylammonium (10 mM). Niflumic acid inhibited both depolarization and contraction induced by [Sar9]substance P sulfone, both in the absence or in the presence of tetraethylammonium. The present findings support the idea that a niflumic acid-sensitive mechanism, probably an effect on Cl- channels, takes part in the post-receptorial events activated by tachykinin NK1 receptor stimulation in the longitudinal muscle of rabbit colon, and suggest that this mechanism would be more important for generating the sustained tonic than the phasic component of contraction.

  1. Activation of Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors: AGONIST SPECIFICITY OF STACHEL SEQUENCE-DERIVED PEPTIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demberg, Lilian M; Winkler, Jana; Wilde, Caroline; Simon, Kay-Uwe; Schön, Julia; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone; Liebscher, Ines

    2017-03-17

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family carry an agonistic sequence within their large ectodomains. Peptides derived from this region, called the Stachel sequence, can activate the respective receptor. As the conserved core region of the Stachel sequence is highly similar between aGPCRs, the agonist specificity of Stachel sequence-derived peptides was tested between family members using cell culture-based second messenger assays. Stachel peptides derived from aGPCRs of subfamily VI (GPR110/ADGRF1, GPR116/ADGRF5) and subfamily VIII (GPR64/ADGRG2, GPR126/ADGRG6) are able to activate more than one member of the respective subfamily supporting their evolutionary relationship and defining them as pharmacological receptor subtypes. Extended functional analyses of the Stachel sequences and derived peptides revealed agonist promiscuity, not only within, but also between aGPCR subfamilies. For example, the Stachel-derived peptide of GPR110 (subfamily VI) can activate GPR64 and GPR126 (both subfamily VIII). Our results indicate that key residues in the Stachel sequence are very similar between aGPCRs allowing for agonist promiscuity of several Stachel-derived peptides. Therefore, aGPCRs appear to be pharmacologically more closely related than previously thought. Our findings have direct implications for many aGPCR studies, as potential functional overlap has to be considered for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it also offers the possibility of a broader use of more potent peptides when the original Stachel sequence is less effective. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30: a novel regulator of endothelial inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhadeep Chakrabarti

    Full Text Available Estrogen, the female sex hormone, is known to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects. Traditionally, estrogen effects were believed to be largely mediated through the classical estrogen receptors (ERs. However, there is increasing evidence that G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30, a novel estrogen receptor, can mediate many estrogenic effects on the vasculature. Despite this, the localization and functional significance of GPR30 in the human vascular endothelium remains poorly understood. Given this background, we examined the subcellular location and potential anti-inflammatory roles of GPR30 using human umbilical vein endothelial cells as a model system. Inflammatory changes were induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF, a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in atherogenesis and many other inflammatory conditions. We found that GPR30 was located predominantly in the endothelial cell nuclei. Treatment with the selective GPR30 agonist G-1 partially attenuated the TNF induced upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1. This effect was completely abolished by the selective GPR30 antagonist G-15, suggesting that it was indeed mediated in a GPR30 dependent manner. Interestingly, estrogen alone had no effects on TNF-treated endothelium. Concomitant activation of the classical ERs blocked the anti-inflammatory effects of G-1, indicating opposing effects of GPR30 and the classical ERs. Our findings demonstrate that endothelial GPR30 is a novel regulator of the inflammatory response which could be a potential therapeutic target against atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  3. PEGylated dendritic unimolecular micelles as versatile carriers for ligands of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonkyung; Hechler, Béatrice; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Gachet, Christian; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2009-10-21

    Despite its widespread application in nanomedicine, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is seldom used for covalent modification of ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) due to potential steric complications. In order to study the influence of PEG chains on the biological activity of GPCR ligands bound to a common macromolecular carrier, we prepared a series of G3 polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers derivatized with Alexa Fluor 488, varying numbers of PEG(550)/PEG(750)/PEG(2000), and nucleoside moieties derived from the A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) agonist CGS21680 (2-[4-(2-carboxylethyl)phenylethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine). These dendrimer conjugates were purified by size exclusion chromatography and characterized by (1)H NMR and MALDI MS. In radioligand binding assays, some PAMAM-PEG conjugates showed enhanced subtype-selectivity at the human A(2A) AR compared to monomeric ligands of comparable affinity. The functional potency was measured in the A(2A) AR-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase and inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Interestingly, the dendrimer conjugate 10c bearing 11 PEG(750) chains (out of theoretical 32 amino end groups) and 14 nucleoside moieties was 5-fold more potent in A(2A) AR-mediated stimulation of cyclic AMP formation than 10d with 4 PEG(2000) chains and 21 nucleosides, although the binding affinities of these 2 compounds were similar. Thus, a relatively small (≤10 nm) multivalent ligand 10c modified for water solubility maintained high potency and displayed increased A(2A) AR binding selectivity over the monomeric nucleosides. The current study demonstrates the feasibility of using short PEG chains in the design of carriers that target ligand-receptor interactions.

  4. Quantum dot-based screening system for discovery of g protein-coupled receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghan; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Choi, Youngseon; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Keumhyun; Kim, JinYeop; Park, Sun; Song, Rita

    2012-07-09

    Cellular imaging has emerged as an important tool to unravel biological complexity and to accelerate the drug-discovery process, including cell-based screening, target identification, and mechanism of action studies. Recently, semiconductor nanoparticles known as quantum dots (QDs) have attracted great interest in cellular imaging applications due to their unique photophysical properties such as size, tunable optical property, multiplexing capability, and photostability. Herein, we show that QDs can also be applied to assay development and eventually to high-throughput/content screening (HTS/HCS) for drug discovery. We have synthesized QDs modified with PEG and primary antibodies to be used as fluorescent probes for a cell-based HTS system. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family is known to be involved in most major diseases. We therefore constructed human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells that specifically overexpress two types of differently tagged GPCRs: influenza hemagglutinin (HA) peptide-tagged κ-opioid receptors (κ-ORs) and GFP-tagged A3 adenosine receptors (A3AR). In this study, we have demonstrated that 1) anti-HA antibody-conjugated QDs could specifically label HA-tagged κ-ORs, 2) subsequent treatment of QD-tagged GPCR agonists allowed agonist-induced translocation to be monitored in real time, 3) excellent emission spectral properties of QD permitted the simultaneous detection of two GPCRs in one cell, and 4) the robust imaging capabilities of the QD-antibody conjugates could lead to reproducible quantitative data from high-content cellular images. These results suggest that the present QD-based GPCR inhibitor screening system can be a promising platform for further drug screening applications.

  5. Computing highly correlated positions using mutual information and graph theory for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarosh N Fatakia

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are a superfamily of seven transmembrane-spanning proteins involved in a wide array of physiological functions and are the most common targets of pharmaceuticals. This study aims to identify a cohort or clique of positions that share high mutual information. Using a multiple sequence alignment of the transmembrane (TM domains, we calculated the mutual information between all inter-TM pairs of aligned positions and ranked the pairs by mutual information. A mutual information graph was constructed with vertices that corresponded to TM positions and edges between vertices were drawn if the mutual information exceeded a threshold of statistical significance. Positions with high degree (i.e. had significant mutual information with a large number of other positions were found to line a well defined inter-TM ligand binding cavity for class A as well as class C GPCRs. Although the natural ligands of class C receptors bind to their extracellular N-terminal domains, the possibility of modulating their activity through ligands that bind to their helical bundle has been reported. Such positions were not found for class B GPCRs, in agreement with the observation that there are not known ligands that bind within their TM helical bundle. All identified key positions formed a clique within the MI graph of interest. For a subset of class A receptors we also considered the alignment of a portion of the second extracellular loop, and found that the two positions adjacent to the conserved Cys that bridges the loop with the TM3 qualified as key positions. Our algorithm may be useful for localizing topologically conserved regions in other protein families.

  6. Requirements and ontology for a G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization knowledge base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmentier Marc

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are a large and diverse family of membrane proteins whose members participate in the regulation of most cellular and physiological processes and therefore represent key pharmacological targets. Although several bioinformatics resources support research on GPCRs, most of these have been designed based on the traditional assumption that monomeric GPCRs constitute the functional receptor unit. The increase in the frequency and number of reports about GPCR dimerization/oligomerization and the implication of oligomerization in receptor function makes necessary the ability to store and access information about GPCR dimers/oligomers electronically. Results We present here the requirements and ontology (the information scheme to describe oligomers and associated concepts and their relationships for an information system that can manage the elements of information needed to describe comprehensively the phenomena of both homo- and hetero-oligomerization of GPCRs. The comprehensive information management scheme that we plan to use for the development of an intuitive and user-friendly GPCR-Oligomerization Knowledge Base (GPCR-OKB is the result of a community dialog involving experimental and computational colleagues working on GPCRs. Conclusion Our long term goal is to disseminate to the scientific community organized, curated, and detailed information about GPCR dimerization/oligomerization and its related structural context. This information will be reported as close to the data as possible so the user can make his own judgment on the conclusions drawn for a particular study. The requirements and ontology described here will facilitate the development of future information systems for GPCR oligomers that contain both computational and experimental information about GPCR oligomerization. This information is freely accessible at http://www.gpcr-okb.org.

  7. The role of G protein-coupled receptors in cochlear planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinpeng; Zhang, Daolai; Wang, Yanfei; Lin, Hal; Yu, Xiao; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is defined as the coordinated alignment of cell polarity across the tissue plane, which is important for the integration of cells into tissues. One of the best examples of PCP is in the cochlear epithelium. Several core PCP proteins have been identified to play important roles in PCP regulation, in which these proteins form complexes and associate with the cell membrane asymmetrically, mediating intercellular PCP signal transduction. Among the core PCP proteins are two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Celsr and Frizzled, both of which have been shown to play important roles in cochlear PCP regulation. Celsr and Frizzled genes are expressed in the cochlear sensory epithelium, and Frizzled1, 2, 3 and 6 show asymmetric localizations on the cell membrane of hair cells or supporting cells. In the animal model, Celsr1, Frizzled2 and Frizzled3/6 mutant or knockout mice have profound cochlear PCP deficits. Downstream of GPCR signaling, Gαi was shown to asymmetrically localize on the apical surface of hair cells, together with LGN and mInsc, Gαi controls cochlear PCP in a cell-autonomous way. Inactivity of Gαi, LGN or mInsc results in PCP deficits in the mouse cochlea. We hypothesize that GPCR-Gαi coupling plays a pivotal role in cochlear PCP regulation via connecting the intercellular PCP signals with cell-autonomous PCP machinery. Further investigations are needed to fully understand the mechanism of cochlear PCP regulation.

  8. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  9. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  10. The Multiple Faces of Prostaglandin E2 G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling during the Dendritic Cell Life Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Keijzer, Sandra; Meddens, Marjolein B.M.; Torensma, Ruurd; Cambi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many processes regulating immune responses are initiated by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and report biochemical changes in the microenvironment. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and crucial for the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The lipid

  11. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  12. Novel Agonist Bioisosteres and Common Structure-Activity Relationships for The Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR139

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A; Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Lissa, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor found mainly in the central nervous system. It has its highest expression levels in the hypothalamus and striatum, regions regulating metabolism and locomotion, respectively, and has therefore been suggested as a potential target for obesity...

  13. Novel Agonist Bioisosteres and Common Structure-Activity Relationships for The Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR139

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A; Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Lissa, Delphine;

    2016-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor found mainly in the central nervous system. It has its highest expression levels in the hypothalamus and striatum, regions regulating metabolism and locomotion, respectively, and has therefore been suggested as a potential target for obesity...

  14. Integration of G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways for Activation of a Transcription Factor (EGR-3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehai Tan; Pam Sanders; Jack Bolado Jr.; Mike Whitney

    2003-01-01

    We recently reported the use of a gene-trapping approach to isolate cell clones in which a reporter gene had integrated into genes modulated by T-cell activation. We have now tested a panel of clones from that report and identified the one that responds to a variety of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The βlactamase tagged EGR-3 Jurkat cell was used to dissect specific GPCR signaling in vivo. Three GPCRs were studied, including the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (Gicoupled) that was endogenously expressed, the platelet activation factor (PAF) receptor (Gq-coupled), andβ2 adrenergic receptor (Gs-coupled) that was both stably transfected. Agonists for each receptor activated transcription of theβ-lactamase tagged EGR-3 gene. Induction of EGR-3 through CXCR4 was blocked by pertussis toxin and PD58059, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase). Neither of these inhibitors blocked isoproterenol or PAF-mediated activation of EGR-3. Conversely, β2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation was blocked by the p38, specific inhibitor SB580. In addition, bothβ2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation could be synergistically activated by CXCR4 activation. This combined result indicates that EGR-3 can be activated through distinct signal transduction pathways by different GPCRs and that signals can be integrated and amplified to efficiently tune the level of activation.

  15. Regulation of EGF-induced ERK/MAPK Activation and EGFR Internalization by G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxia GAO; Jiali LI; Lan MA

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) mediate agonist-induced phosphorylation and desensitization of various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We investigate the role of GRK2 on epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling, including EGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) activation and EGFR internalization. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments show that EGF stimulates GRK2 binding to EGFR complex and GRK2 translocating from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Western blotting assay shows that EGF-induced ERK/MAPK phosphorylation increases 1.9-fold, 1.1-fold and 1.5-fold (P<0.05) at time point 30, 60 and 120 min, respectively when the cells were transfected with GRK2,suggesting the regulatory role of GRK2 on EGF-induced ERK/MAPK activation. Flow cytometry experiments show that GRK2 overexpression has no effect on EGF-induced EGFR internalization, however, it increases agonist-induced G protein-coupled δ opioid receptor internalization by approximately 40% (P<0.01). Overall,these data suggest that GRK2 has a regulatory role in EGF-induced ERK/MAPK activation, and that the mechanisms underlying the modulatory role of GRK2 in EGFR and GPCR signaling pathways are somewhat different at least in receptor internalization.

  16. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.;

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium......-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...... to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms....

  17. Histamine H1-receptors modulate somatostatin receptors coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in the rat frontoparietal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Ocaña Fuentes, Aurelio; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    1997-01-01

    Since exogenous histamine has been previously shown to increase the somatostatin (SS) receptor-effector system in the rat frontoparietal cortex and both histamine H1-receptor agonists and SS modulate higher nervous activity and have anticonvulsive properties, it was of interest to determine the participation of the H1-histaminergic system in this response. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the specific histamine H1-receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine (PEA) (10 ¿g) to rat...

  18. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  19. P2X7 receptors on osteoblasts couple to production of lysophosphatidic acid: a signaling axis promoting osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panupinthu, Nattapon; Rogers, Joseph T; Zhao, Lin; Solano-Flores, Luis Pastor; Possmayer, Fred; Sims, Stephen M; Dixon, S Jeffrey

    2008-06-02

    Nucleotides are released from cells in response to mechanical stimuli and signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner through cell surface P2 receptors. P2rx7-/- mice exhibit diminished appositional growth of long bones and impaired responses to mechanical loading. We find that calvarial sutures are wider in P2rx7-/- mice. Functional P2X7 receptors are expressed on osteoblasts in situ and in vitro. Activation of P2X7 receptors by exogenous nucleotides stimulates expression of osteoblast markers and enhances mineralization in cultures of rat calvarial cells. Moreover, osteogenesis is suppressed in calvarial cell cultures from P2rx7-/- mice compared with the wild type. P2X7 receptors couple to production of the potent lipid mediators lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and prostaglandin E2. Either an LPA receptor antagonist or cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors abolish the stimulatory effects of P2X7 receptor activation on osteogenesis. We conclude that P2X7 receptors enhance osteoblast function through a cell-autonomous mechanism. Furthermore, a novel signaling axis links P2X7 receptors to production of LPA and COX metabolites, which in turn stimulate osteogenesis.

  20. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors.

  1. Adenylyl cyclase 2 selectively couples to E prostanoid type 2 receptors, whereas adenylyl cyclase 3 is not receptor-regulated in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Adris, Piyatilake; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2012-08-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists stimulate AC activity and cAMP production. We have previously shown in a number of cell types that AC6 selectively couples to βAR and these proteins are coexpressed in lipid rafts. We overexpressed AC2, AC3, and AC6 in mouse bronchial smooth muscle cells (mBSMCs) and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells by using recombinant adenoviruses and assessed their localization and regulation by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AC3 and AC6 were expressed primarily in caveolin-rich fractions, whereas AC2 expression was excluded from these domains. AC6 expression enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol but did not increase responses to butaprost, reflecting the colocalization of AC6 with β(2)AR but not E prostanoid type 2 receptor (EP(2)R) in lipid raft fractions. AC2 expression enhanced butaprost-stimulated cAMP production but had no effect on the β(2)AR-mediated response. AC3 did not couple to any GPCR tested. Forskolin-induced arborization of mBSMCs was assessed as a functional readout of cAMP signaling. Arborization was enhanced by overexpression of AC6 and AC3, but AC2 had no effect. GPCR-stimulated arborization mirrored the selective coupling observed for cAMP production. With the addition of the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram AC2 accelerated forskolin-stimulated arborization. Thus, AC2 selectively couples to EP(2)R, but signals from this complex are limited by PDE4 activity. AC3 does not seem to couple to GPCR in either mBSMCs or HEK-293 cells, so it probably exists in a distinct signaling domain in these cells.

  2. Modeling of ligand binding to G protein coupled receptors: cannabinoid CB1, CB2 and adrenergic β 2 AR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota; Kolinski, Michal; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Debinski, Aleksander; Bombolewski, Rafal; Plazinska, Anita; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Filipek, Slawomir

    2011-09-01

    Cannabinoid and adrenergic receptors belong to the class A (similar to rhodopsin) G protein coupled receptors. Docking of agonists and antagonists to CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors revealed the importance of a centrally located rotamer toggle switch and its possible participation in the mechanism of agonist/antagonist recognition. The switch is composed of two residues, F3.36 and W6.48, located on opposite transmembrane helices TM3 and TM6 in the central part of the membranous domain of cannabinoid receptors. The CB(1) and CB(2) receptor models were constructed based on the adenosine A(2A) receptor template. The two best scored conformations of each receptor were used for the docking procedure. In all poses (ligand-receptor conformations) characterized by the lowest ligand-receptor intermolecular energy and free energy of binding the ligand type matched the state of the rotamer toggle switch: antagonists maintained an inactive state of the switch, whereas agonists changed it. In case of agonists of β(2)AR, the (R,R) and (S,S) stereoisomers of fenoterol, the molecular dynamics simulations provided evidence of different binding modes while preserving the same average position of ligands in the binding site. The (S,S) isomer was much more labile in the binding site and only one stable hydrogen bond was created. Such dynamical binding modes may also be valid for ligands of cannabinoid receptors because of the hydrophobic nature of their ligand-receptor interactions. However, only very long molecular dynamics simulations could verify the validity of such binding modes and how they affect the process of activation.

  3. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    Full Text Available Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2 receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  4. Receptor Species-dependent Desensitization Controls KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ Channels as Downstream Effectors of Gq Protein-coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienitz, Marie-Cécile; Vladimirova, Dilyana; Müller, Christian; Pott, Lutz; Rinne, Andreas

    2016-12-16

    Activation of Gq protein-coupled receptors (GqPCRs) might induce divergent cellular responses, related to receptor-specific activation of different branches of the Gq signaling pathway. Receptor-specific desensitization provides a mechanism of effector modulation by restricting the spatiotemporal activation of signaling components downstream of Gq We quantified signaling events downstream of GqPCR activation with FRET-based biosensors in CHO and HEK 293 cells. KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels (IKs) were measured as a functional readout of receptor-specific activation. Activation of muscarinic M1 receptors (M1-Rs) caused robust and reversible inhibition of IKs. In contrast, activation of α1B-adrenergic receptors (α1B-ARs) induced transient inhibition of IKs, which turned into delayed facilitation after agonist withdrawal. As a novel finding, we demonstrate that GqPCR-specific kinetics of IKs modulation are determined by receptor-specific desensitization, evident at the level of Gαq activation, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) depletion, and diacylglycerol production. Sustained IKs inhibition during M1-R stimulation is attributed to robust membrane PIP2 depletion, whereas the rapid desensitization of α1B-AR delimits PIP2 reduction and augments current activation by protein kinase C (PKC). Overexpression of Ca(2+)-independent PKCδ did not affect the time course of α1B-AR-induced diacylglycerol formation, excluding a contribution of PKCδ to α1B-AR desensitization. Pharmacological inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms abolished fast α1B receptor desensitization and augmented IKs reduction, but did not affect IKs facilitation. These data indicate a contribution of Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs to α1B-AR desensitization, whereas IKs facilitation is induced by Ca(2+)-independent PKC isoforms. In contrast, neither inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent/Ca(2+)-independent isoforms nor overexpression of PKCδ induced M1 receptor desensitization, excluding a contribution of

  5. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B;

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... into the structure-function relationship of ADGRs using the family member ADGR subfamily G member 4 (ADGRG4)/GPR112 as a model receptor. In a bioinformatics approach, we compared conserved, functional elements of the well-characterized class A and class B1 secretin-like G protein-coupled receptors with the ADGRs. We...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  6. Structure modeling of all identified G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, encoded by about 5% of human genes, comprise the largest family of integral membrane proteins and act as cell surface receptors responsible for the transduction of endogenous signal into a cellular response. Although tertiary structural information is crucial for function annotation and drug design, there are few experimentally determined GPCR structures. To address this issue, we employ the recently developed threading assembly refinement (TASSER method to generate structure predictions for all 907 putative GPCRs in the human genome. Unlike traditional homology modeling approaches, TASSER modeling does not require solved homologous template structures; moreover, it often refines the structures closer to native. These features are essential for the comprehensive modeling of all human GPCRs when close homologous templates are absent. Based on a benchmarked confidence score, approximately 820 predicted models should have the correct folds. The majority of GPCR models share the characteristic seven-transmembrane helix topology, but 45 ORFs are predicted to have different structures. This is due to GPCR fragments that are predominantly from extracellular or intracellular domains as well as database annotation errors. Our preliminary validation includes the automated modeling of bovine rhodopsin, the only solved GPCR in the Protein Data Bank. With homologous templates excluded, the final model built by TASSER has a global C(alpha root-mean-squared deviation from native of 4.6 angstroms, with a root-mean-squared deviation in the transmembrane helix region of 2.1 angstroms. Models of several representative GPCRs are compared with mutagenesis and affinity labeling data, and consistent agreement is demonstrated. Structure clustering of the predicted models shows that GPCRs with similar structures tend to belong to a similar functional class even when their sequences are diverse. These results demonstrate the usefulness

  7. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 43 Modulates Neutrophil Recruitment during Acute Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Alyce J.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Mason, Linda J.; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Wong, Connie H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibre in the gut yields large amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can impart biological responses in cells through their engagement of ‘metabolite-sensing’ G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of the main SCFA receptors, GPR43, is highly expressed by neutrophils, which suggests that the actions of GPR43 and dietary fibre intake may affect neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses in vivo. Using intravital imaging of the small intestine, we found greater intravascular neutrophil rolling and adhesion in Gpr43−/−mice in response to LPS at 1 h. After 4 h of LPS challenge, the intravascular rolling velocity of GPR43-deficient neutrophils was reduced significantly and increased numbers of neutrophils were found in the lamina propria of Gpr43−/−mice. Additionally, GPR43-deficient leukocytes demonstrated exacerbated migration into the peritoneal cavity following fMLP challenge. The fMLP-induced neutrophil migration was significantly suppressed in wildtype mice that were treated with acetate, but not in Gpr43−/−mice, strongly suggesting a role for SCFAs in modulating neutrophil migration via GPR43. Indeed, neutrophils of no fibre-fed wildtype mice exhibited elevated migratory behaviour compared to normal chow-fed wildtype mice. Interestingly, this elevated migration could also be reproduced through simple transfer of a no fibre microbiota into germ-free mice, suggesting that the composition and function of microbiota stemming from a no fibre diet mediated the changes in neutrophil migration. Therefore, GPR43 and a microbiota composition that allows for SCFA production function to modulate neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses. PMID:27658303

  8. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116 regulates pulmonary surfactant pool size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James P; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Mueller, Matthias; Kinzel, Bernd; Sato, Atsuyasu; Xu, Yan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Ikegami, Machiko

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant levels within the alveoli are tightly regulated to maintain lung volumes and promote efficient gas exchange across the air/blood barrier. Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in surfactant are associated with severe lung diseases in children and adults. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control surfactant metabolism have been studied intensively, the critical molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous surfactant levels within the alveolus have not been identified and constitute a fundamental knowledge gap in the field. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR116, in the murine lung is developmentally regulated, reaching maximal levels 1 day after birth, and is highly expressed on the apical surface of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells. To define the physiological role of GPR116 in vivo, mice with a targeted mutation of the Gpr116 locus, Gpr116(Δexon17), were generated. Gpr116(Δexon17) mice developed a profound accumulation of alveolar surfactant phospholipids at 4 weeks of age (12-fold) that was further increased at 20 weeks of age (30-fold). Surfactant accumulation in Gpr116(Δexon17) mice was associated with increased saturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis at 4 weeks and the presence of enlarged, lipid-laden macrophages, neutrophilia, and alveolar destruction at 20 weeks. mRNA microarray analyses indicated that P2RY2, a purinergic receptor known to mediate surfactant secretion, was induced in Gpr116(Δexon17) type II cells. Collectively, these data support the concept that GPR116 functions as a molecular sensor of alveolar surfactant lipid pool sizes by regulating surfactant secretion.

  10. Orphan G Protein–Coupled Receptor GPR116 Regulates Pulmonary Surfactant Pool Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Mueller, Matthias; Kinzel, Bernd; Sato, Atsuyasu; Xu, Yan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Ikegami, Machiko

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant levels within the alveoli are tightly regulated to maintain lung volumes and promote efficient gas exchange across the air/blood barrier. Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in surfactant are associated with severe lung diseases in children and adults. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control surfactant metabolism have been studied intensively, the critical molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous surfactant levels within the alveolus have not been identified and constitute a fundamental knowledge gap in the field. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of an orphan G protein–coupled receptor, GPR116, in the murine lung is developmentally regulated, reaching maximal levels 1 day after birth, and is highly expressed on the apical surface of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells. To define the physiological role of GPR116 in vivo, mice with a targeted mutation of the Gpr116 locus, Gpr116Δexon17, were generated. Gpr116Δexon17 mice developed a profound accumulation of alveolar surfactant phospholipids at 4 weeks of age (12-fold) that was further increased at 20 weeks of age (30-fold). Surfactant accumulation in Gpr116Δexon17 mice was associated with increased saturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis at 4 weeks and the presence of enlarged, lipid-laden macrophages, neutrophilia, and alveolar destruction at 20 weeks. mRNA microarray analyses indicated that P2RY2, a purinergic receptor known to mediate surfactant secretion, was induced in Gpr116Δexon17 type II cells. Collectively, these data support the concept that GPR116 functions as a molecular sensor of alveolar surfactant lipid pool sizes by regulating surfactant secretion. PMID:23590306

  11. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A.; Harty, Breanne L.; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C.; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W.; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W.; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  12. G protein-coupled receptor 120 signaling regulates ghrelin secretion in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhi; Yoshimura, Makoto; Aizawa, Sayaka; Kurotani, Reiko; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, is produced predominantly in the stomach. It has been reported that endogenous ghrelin levels are increased by fasting and decreased immediately after feeding and that fasting-induced ghrelin release is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. However, the mechanisms of plasma ghrelin decrement after feeding are poorly understood. Here, we studied the control of ghrelin secretion using ghrelin-producing cell lines and found that these cells express high levels of mRNA encoding G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR120). Addition of GW-9508 (a GPR120 chemical agonist) and α-linolenic acid (a natural ligand for GPR120) inhibited the secretion of ghrelin by ∼50 and 70%, respectively. However, the expression levels of preproghrelin and ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) mRNAs were not influenced by GW-9508. In contrast, the expression levels of prohormone convertase 1 were decreased significantly by GW-9508 incubation. Moreover, we observed that the inhibitory effect of GW-9508 on ghrelin secretion was blocked by a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the sequence of GPR120. Furthermore, pretreatment with GW-9508 blocked the effect of the norepinephrine (NE)-induced ghrelin elevation in ghrelin cell lines. In addition, we showed that GW-9508 inhibited ghrelin secretion via extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity in ghrelin cell lines. Finally, we found that GW-9508 decreased plasma ghrelin levels in mice. These results suggest that the decrease of ghrelin secretion after feeding is induced partially by long-chain fatty acids that act directly on gastric GPR120-expressing ghrelin cells.

  13. An atlas of G-protein coupled receptor expression and function in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amisten, Stefan; Neville, Matt; Hawkes, Ross; Persaud, Shanta J; Karpe, Fredrik; Salehi, Albert

    2015-02-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the regulation of adipose tissue function, but the total number of GPCRs expressed by human subcutaneous adipose tissue, as well as their function and interactions with drugs, is poorly understood. We have constructed an atlas of all GPCRs expressed by human subcutaneous adipose tissue: the 'adipose tissue GPCRome', to support the exploration of novel control nodes in metabolic and endocrine functions. This atlas describes how adipose tissue GPCRs regulate lipolysis, insulin resistance and adiponectin and leptin secretion. We also discuss how adipose tissue GPCRs interact with their endogenous ligands and with GPCR-targeting drugs, with a focus on how drug/receptor interactions may affect lipolysis, and present a model predicting how GPCRs with unknown effects on lipolysis might modulate cAMP-regulated lipolysis. Subcutaneous adipose tissue expresses 163 GPCRs, a majority of which have unknown effects on lipolysis, insulin resistance and adiponectin and leptin secretion. These GPCRs are activated by 180 different endogenous ligands, and are the targets of a large number of clinically used drugs. We identified 119 drugs, acting on 23 GPCRs, that are predicted to stimulate lipolysis and 173 drugs, acting on 25 GPCRs, that are predicted to inhibit lipolysis. This atlas highlights knowledge gaps in the current understanding of adipose tissue GPCR function, and identifies GPCR/ligand/drug interactions that might affect lipolysis, which is important for understanding and predicting metabolic side effects of drugs. This approach may aid in the design of new, safer therapeutic agents, with fewer undesired effects on lipid homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid effects of dorsal hippocampal G-protein coupled estrogen receptor on learning in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymer, Jennifer; Robinson, Alana; Winters, Boyer D; Choleris, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Through rapid mechanisms of action, estrogens affect learning and memory processes. It has been shown that 17β-estradiol and an Estrogen Receptor (ER) α agonist enhances performance in social recognition, object recognition, and object placement tasks when administered systemically or infused in the dorsal hippocampus. In contrast, systemic and dorsal hippocampal ERβ activation only promote spatial learning. In addition, 17β-estradiol, the ERα and the G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) agonists increase dendritic spine density in the CA1 hippocampus. Recently, we have shown that selective systemic activation of the GPER also rapidly facilitated social recognition, object recognition, and object placement learning in female mice. Whether activation the GPER specifically in the dorsal hippocampus can also rapidly improve learning and memory prior to acquisition is unknown. Here, we investigated the rapid effects of infusion of the GPER agonist, G-1 (dose: 50nM, 100nM, 200nM), in the dorsal hippocampus on social recognition, object recognition, and object placement learning tasks in home cage. These paradigms were completed within 40min, which is within the range of rapid estrogenic effects. Dorsal hippocampal administration of G-1 improved social (doses: 50nM, 200nM G-1) and object (dose: 200nM G-1) recognition with no effect on object placement. Additionally, when spatial cues were minimized by testing in a Y-apparatus, G-1 administration promoted social (doses: 100nM, 200nM G-1) and object (doses: 50nM, 100nM, 200nM G-1) recognition. Therefore, like ERα, the GPER in the hippocampus appears to be sufficient for the rapid facilitation of social and object recognition in female mice, but not for the rapid facilitation of object placement learning. Thus, the GPER in the dorsal hippocampus is involved in estrogenic mediation of learning and memory and these effects likely occur through rapid signalling mechanisms.

  15. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan; (Oxford)

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  16. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    It is established that long-chain free fatty acids includingω-3 fatty acids mediate an array of biologic responses through members of the free fatty acid (FFA) receptor family, which includes FFA4. However, the signaling mechanisms and modes of regulation of this receptor class remain unclear. He...

  17. Activation of nematode G protein GOA-1 by the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype. Functional coupling of G-protein-coupled receptor and G protein originated from evolutionarily distant animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaba, Masaomi; Ichiyama, Susumu; Kojima, Katsura; Ozaki, Mamiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2006-12-01

    Signal transduction mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins regulates a wide variety of physiological functions. We are interested in the manipulation of G-protein-mediating signal transduction using G-protein-coupled receptors, which are derived from evolutionarily distant organisms and recognize unique ligands. As a model, we tested the functionally coupling GOA-1, G alpha(i/o) ortholog in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2), which is one of the mammalian G alpha(i/o)-coupled receptors. GOA-1 and M2 were prepared as a fusion protein using a baculovirus expression system. The affinity of the fusion protein for GDP was decreased by addition of a muscarinic agonist, carbamylcholine and the guanosine 5'-[3-O-thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding was increased with an increase in the carbamylcholine concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These effects evoked by carbamylcholine were completely abolished by a full antagonist, atropine. In addition, the affinity for carbamylcholine decreased under the presence of GTP as reported for M2-G alpha(i/o) coupling. These results indicate that the M2 activates GOA-1 as well as G alpha(i/o).

  18. Temperature and voltage coupling to channel opening in transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-12-19

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol(-1). The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening.

  19. Expression and function of proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors in inflammatory pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Shin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Despite the availability of pharmacologic treatments, chronic inflammatory pain remains inadequately treated. Understanding the nociceptive signaling pathways of such pain is therefore important in developing long-acting treatments with limited side effects. High local proton concentrations (tissue acidosis causing direct excitation or modulation of nociceptive sensory neurons by proton-sensing receptors are responsible for pain in some inflammatory pain conditions. We previously found that all four proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are expressed in pain-relevant loci (dorsal root ganglia, DRG, which suggests their possible involvement in nociception, but their functions in pain remain unclear. Results In this study, we first demonstrated differential change in expression of proton-sensing GPCRs in peripheral inflammation induced by the inflammatory agents capsaicin, carrageenan, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. In particular, the expression of TDAG8, one proton-sensing GPCR, was increased 24 hours after CFA injection because of increased number of DRG neurons expressing TDAG8. The number of DRG neurons expressing both TDAG8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 was increased as well. Further studies revealed that TDAG8 activation sensitized the TRPV1 response to capsaicin, suggesting that TDAG8 could be involved in CFA-induced chronic inflammatory pain through regulation of TRPV1 function. Conclusion Each subtype of the OGR1 family was expressed differently, which may reflect differences between models in duration and magnitude of hyperalgesia. Given that TDAG8 and TRPV1 expression increased after CFA-induced inflammation and that TDAG8 activation can lead to TRPV1 sensitization, it suggests that high concentrations of protons after

  20. Expression of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER in endometriosis: a tissue microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samartzis Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER is thought to be involved in non-genomic estrogen responses as well as processes such as cell proliferation and migration. In this study, we analyzed GPER expression patterns from endometriosis samples and normal endometrial tissue samples and compared these expression profiles to those of the classical sex hormone receptors. Methods A tissue microarray, which included 74 samples from different types of endometriosis (27 ovarian, 19 peritoneal and 28 deep-infiltrating and 30 samples from normal endometrial tissue, was used to compare the expression levels of the GPER, estrogen receptor (ER-alpha, ER-beta and progesterone receptor (PR. The immunoreactive score (IRS was calculated separately for epithelium and stroma as the product of the staining intensity and the percentage of positive cells. The expression levels of the hormonal receptors were dichotomized into low (IRS  =6 expression groups. Results The mean epithelial IRS (+/−standard deviation, range of cytoplasmic GPER expression was 1.2 (+/−1.7, 0–4 in normal endometrium and 5.1 (+/−3.5, 0–12 in endometriosis (p p = 0.71, of ER-alpha 10.6 (+/−2.4, 3–12 and 9.8 (+/−3.0, 2–12; p = 0.26, of ER-beta 2.4 (+/−2.2; 0–8 and 5.6 (+/−2.6; 0–10; p p p p = 0.001, of ER-beta 1.8 (+/−2.0; 0–8 and 5.4 (+/−2.5; 0–10; p p���= 0.044, respectively. Cytoplasmic GPER expression was not detectable in the stroma of endometrium and endometriosis. The observed frequency of high epithelial cytoplasmic GPER expression levels was 50% (n = 30/60 in the endometriosis and none (0/30 in the normal endometrium samples (p p = 0.01, as compared to peritoneal (9/18, 50% or deep-infiltrating endometriotic lesions (7/22, 31.8%. The frequency of high stromal nuclear GPER expression levels was 100% (n = 74/74 in endometriosis and 76.7% (n = 23/30 in normal endometrium (p

  1. Confined Diffusion Without Fences of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor as Revealed by Single Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumas, Frédéric; Destainville, Nicolas; Millot, Claire; Lopez, André; Dean, David; Salomé, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool for probing the organization and dynamics of the plasma membrane constituents. We used this technique to study the μ-opioid receptor belonging to the large family of the G-protein-coupled receptors involved with other partners in a signal transduction pathway. The specific labeling of the receptor coupled to a T7-tag at its N-terminus, stably expressed in fibroblastic cells, was achieved by colloidal gold coupled to a monoclonal anti T7-tag antibody. The lateral movements of the particles were followed by nanovideomicroscopy at 40 ms time resolution during 2 min with a spatial precision of 15 nm. The receptors were found to have either a slow or directed diffusion mode (10%) or a walking confined diffusion mode (90%) composed of a long-term random diffusion and a short-term confined diffusion, and corresponding to a diffusion confined within a domain that itself diffuses. The results indicate that the confinement is due to an effective harmonic potential generated by long-range attraction between the membrane proteins. A simple model for interacting membrane proteins diffusion is proposed that explains the variations with the domain size of the short-term and long-term diffusion coefficients. PMID:12524289

  2. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  3. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  4. New insights for drug design from the X-ray crystallographic structures of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A; Costanzi, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    Methodological advances in X-ray crystallography have made possible the recent solution of X-ray structures of pharmaceutically important G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including receptors for biogenic amines, peptides, a nucleoside, and a sphingolipid. These high-resolution structures have greatly increased our understanding of ligand recognition and receptor activation. Conformational changes associated with activation common to several receptors entail outward movements of the intracellular side of transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) and movements of TM5 toward TM6. Movements associated with specific agonists or receptors have also been described [e.g., extracellular loop (EL) 3 in the A(2A) adenosine receptor]. The binding sites of different receptors partly overlap but differ significantly in ligand orientation, depth, and breadth of contact areas in TM regions and the involvement of the ELs. A current challenge is how to use this structural information for the rational design of novel potent and selective ligands. For example, new chemotypes were discovered as antagonists of various GPCRs by subjecting chemical libraries to in silico docking in the X-ray structures. The vast majority of GPCR structures and their ligand complexes are still unsolved, and no structures are known outside of family A GPCRs. Molecular modeling, informed by supporting information from site-directed mutagenesis and structure-activity relationships, has been validated as a useful tool to extend structural insights to related GPCRs and to analyze docking of other ligands in already crystallized GPCRs.

  5. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Omori

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR, neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1, and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1, localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control.

  6. G protein-coupled receptors as therapeutic targets for multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changsheng Du; Xin Xie

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate most of our physiological responses to hormones,neurotransmitters and environmental stimulants.They are considered as the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases.Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease that is characterized by immune-mediated demyelination and degeneration of the central nervous system (CNS).It is the leading cause of non-traumatic disability in young adults.Great progress has been made over the past few decades in understanding the pathogenesis of MS.Numerous data from animal and clinical studies indicate that many GPCRs are critically involved in various aspects of MS pathogenesis,including antigen presentation,cytokine production,T-cell differentiation,T-cell proliferation,T-cell invasion,etc.In this review,we summarize the recent findings regarding the expression or functional changes of GPCRs in MS patients or animal models,and the influences of GPCRs on disease severity upon genetic or pharmacological manipulations.Hopefully some of these findings will lead to the development of novel therapies for MS in the near future.

  7. Anti-inflammatory gallic Acid and wedelolactone are G protein-coupled receptor-35 agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor-35 (GPR35) has been shown to be a target of the asthma drugs cromolyn disodium and nedocromil sodium. Gallic acid and caffeic acids are reported to modulate allergic reactions via unknown mode(s) of action. Here we attempt to elucidate whether both phenolic acids share a common mode of action with the two asthma drugs. Label-free dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays showed that both phenolic acids triggered robust DMR signals in HT-29 cells, whose characteristics were similar to that of cromolyn disodium. Both phenolic acids resulted in detectable β-arrestin translocation signals in an engineered U2OS cell line stably expressing a C-terminal-modified GPR35, but with lower efficacy than cromolyn disodium. Antiallergic wedelolactone was found to be a potent β-arrestin-biased GPR35 agonist. These results suggest that certain anti-inflammatory phytochemicals including gallic acid and wedelolactone may modulate inflammatory allergic action via their agonism at GPR35. GPR35 may represent a target for the treatment of allergic disorders including asthma.

  8. GPR55, a G-protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidylinositol, plays a role in motor coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shan Wu

    Full Text Available The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior.

  9. The G protein-coupled bile acid receptor, TGR5, stimulates gallbladder filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Holmstrom, Sam R; Kir, Serkan; Umetani, Michihisa; Schmidt, Daniel R; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2011-06-01

    TGR5 is a G protein-coupled bile acid receptor present in brown adipose tissue and intestine, where its agonism increases energy expenditure and lowers blood glucose. Thus, it is an attractive drug target for treating human metabolic disease. However, TGR5 is also highly expressed in gallbladder, where its functions are less well characterized. Here, we demonstrate that TGR5 stimulates the filling of the gallbladder with bile. Gallbladder volume was increased in wild-type but not Tgr5(-/-) mice by administration of either the naturally occurring TGR5 agonist, lithocholic acid, or the synthetic TGR5 agonist, INT-777. These effects were independent of fibroblast growth factor 15, an enteric hormone previously shown to stimulate gallbladder filling. Ex vivo analyses using gallbladder tissue showed that TGR5 activation increased cAMP concentrations and caused smooth muscle relaxation in a TGR5-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel, gallbladder-intrinsic mechanism for regulating gallbladder contractility. They further suggest that TGR5 agonists should be assessed for effects on human gallbladder as they are developed for treating metabolic disease.

  10. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and endothelial dysfunction: molecular insights and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells are the major cell types in blood vessels. The principal function of vascular SMC in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through contraction and relaxation. The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity by achieving whole-organ metabolic homeostasis via the production of factors associated with vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. In this review, we have focused on the production of nitric oxide (NO), a vasorelaxation factor. The extent of NO production represents a key marker in vascular health. A decrease in NO is capable of inducing pathological conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis. Recent studies have strongly implicated the involvement of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Vasculature which is affected by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes expresses high levels of GRK2, which may induce endothelial dysfunction by reducing intracellular NO. GRK2 activation also induces changes in the subcellular localization of GRK2 itself and also of β-arrestin 2, a downstream protein. In this review, we describe the pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance and diabetes, focusing on the signal transduction for NO production via GRK2 and β-arrestin 2, providing novel insights into the potential field of translational investigation in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Amlexanox as a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Inhibitor

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    Kristoff T. Homan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs have been implicated in human diseases ranging from heart failure to diabetes. Previous studies have identified several compounds that selectively inhibit GRK2, such as paroxetine and balanol. Far fewer selective inhibitors have been reported for GRK5, a target for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy, and the mechanism of action of reported compounds is unknown. To identify novel scaffolds that selectively inhibit GRK5, a differential scanning fluorometry screen was used to probe a library of 4480 compounds. The best hit was amlexanox, an FDA-approved anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic immunomodulator. The crystal structure of amlexanox in complex with GRK1 demonstrates that its tricyclic aromatic ring system forms ATP-like interactions with the hinge of the kinase domain, which is likely similar to how this drug binds to IκB kinase ε (IKKε, another kinase known to be inhibited by this compound. Amlexanox was also able to inhibit myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcriptional activity in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes in a manner consistent with GRK5 inhibition. The GRK1 amlexanox structure thus serves as a springboard for the rational design of inhibitors with improved potency and selectivity for GRK5 and IKKε.

  12. Advances in G-protein coupled receptor research and related bioinformatics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is one of the most important protein families for drug target. GPCR agonists and antagonists occupy approximately one third of the world small molecule drug market. Much effort has been invested in GPCR study by both academic institutions and pharmaceutical industries. With seven-transmembrane domains, GPCR plays significant roles in intercellular signal transduction and is involved in a variety of biological pathways. With the availability of sequence data of human and other mammalian genomes, as well as their expressed sequence tag (EST) data, the bioinformatics and genomics approaches can be applied to identifying novel GPCR in the post genomic era. Deorphanizing GPCR or matching ligands with GPCR greatly facilitates target validation process and automatically provides a possible compound screening assay. Similarly, bioinformatics data mining approach could also be applied to the identification of GPCR peptide or protein ligands. Here we give a general review of recent advances in the study of GPCR structure, function, as well as GPCR and ligand identification with the emphasis on the bioinformatics database mining of GPCR and their peptide or protein ligands.

  13. E-cadherin couples death receptors to the cytoskeleton to regulate apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Marsters, Scot; Ye, Xiaofen; Luis, Elizabeth; Gonzalez, Lino; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2014-06-19

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process essential to the development and maintenance of solid tissues. In cancer, EMT suppresses apoptosis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. EMT selectively attenuated apoptosis signaling via the death receptors DR4 and DR5. Loss of the epithelial cell adhesion protein E-cadherin recapitulated this outcome, whereas homotypic E-cadherin engagement promoted apoptotic signaling via DR4/DR5, but not Fas. Depletion of α-catenin, which couples E-cadherin to the actin cytoskeleton, or actin polymerization inhibitors similarly attenuated DR4/DR5-induced apoptosis. E-cadherin bound specifically to ligated DR4/DR5, requiring extracellular cadherin domain 1 and calcium. E-cadherin augmented DR4/DR5 clustering and assembly of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), increasing caspase-8 activation in high molecular weight cell fractions. Conversely, EMT attenuated DR4/DR5-mediated DISC formation and caspase-8 stimulation. Consistent with these findings, epithelial cancer cell lines expressing higher E-cadherin levels displayed greater sensitivity to DR4/DR5-mediated apoptosis. These results have potential implications for tissue homeostasis as well as cancer therapy.

  14. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

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    Christina Kopp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001 and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05 and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01. Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001. The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G. (Sanofi); (Michigan)

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  16. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: What a Difference a ‘Partner’ Makes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît T. Roux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are important cell signaling mediators, involved in essential physiological processes. GPCRs respond to a wide variety of ligands from light to large macromolecules, including hormones and small peptides. Unfortunately, mutations and dysregulation of GPCRs that induce a loss of function or alter expression can lead to disorders that are sometimes lethal. Therefore, the expression, trafficking, signaling and desensitization of GPCRs must be tightly regulated by different cellular systems to prevent disease. Although there is substantial knowledge regarding the mechanisms that regulate the desensitization and down-regulation of GPCRs, less is known about the mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and cell-surface expression of newly synthesized GPCRs. More recently, there is accumulating evidence that suggests certain GPCRs are able to interact with specific proteins that can completely change their fate and function. These interactions add on another level of regulation and flexibility between different tissue/cell-types. Here, we review some of the main interacting proteins of GPCRs. A greater understanding of the mechanisms regulating their interactions may lead to the discovery of new drug targets for therapy.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 promotes flaviviridae entry and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Le Sommer

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses cause a wide range of severe diseases ranging from encephalitis to hemorrhagic fever. Discovery of host factors that regulate the fate of flaviviruses in infected cells could provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of infection and therefore facilitate the development of anti-flaviviral drugs. We performed genome-scale siRNA screens to discover human host factors required for yellow fever virus (YFV propagation. Using a 2 × 2 siRNA pool screening format and a duplicate of the screen, we identified a high confidence list of YFV host factors. To find commonalities between flaviviruses, these candidates were compared to host factors previously identified for West Nile virus (WNV and dengue virus (DENV. This comparison highlighted a potential requirement for the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family, GRKs, for flaviviral infection. The YFV host candidate GRK2 (also known as ADRBK1 was validated both in siRNA-mediated knockdown HuH-7 cells and in GRK(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, we showed that GRK2 was required for efficient propagation of DENV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV indicating that GRK2 requirement is conserved throughout the Flaviviridae. Finally, we found that GRK2 participates in multiple distinct steps of the flavivirus life cycle by promoting both entry and RNA synthesis. Together, our findings identified GRK2 as a novel regulator of flavivirus infection and suggest that inhibition of GRK2 function may constitute a new approach for treatment of flavivirus associated diseases.

  18. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 promotes flaviviridae entry and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sommer, Caroline; Barrows, Nicholas J; Bradrick, Shelton S; Pearson, James L; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses cause a wide range of severe diseases ranging from encephalitis to hemorrhagic fever. Discovery of host factors that regulate the fate of flaviviruses in infected cells could provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of infection and therefore facilitate the development of anti-flaviviral drugs. We performed genome-scale siRNA screens to discover human host factors required for yellow fever virus (YFV) propagation. Using a 2 × 2 siRNA pool screening format and a duplicate of the screen, we identified a high confidence list of YFV host factors. To find commonalities between flaviviruses, these candidates were compared to host factors previously identified for West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV). This comparison highlighted a potential requirement for the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family, GRKs, for flaviviral infection. The YFV host candidate GRK2 (also known as ADRBK1) was validated both in siRNA-mediated knockdown HuH-7 cells and in GRK(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, we showed that GRK2 was required for efficient propagation of DENV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) indicating that GRK2 requirement is conserved throughout the Flaviviridae. Finally, we found that GRK2 participates in multiple distinct steps of the flavivirus life cycle by promoting both entry and RNA synthesis. Together, our findings identified GRK2 as a novel regulator of flavivirus infection and suggest that inhibition of GRK2 function may constitute a new approach for treatment of flavivirus associated diseases.

  19. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin R. Justus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8, GPR68 (OGR1, and GPR132 (G2A, regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  20. Antibody fragments for stabilization and crystallization of G protein-coupled receptors and their signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Gupta, Charu; Srivastava, Ashish; Jaiman, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the key players in extracellular signal recognition and their subsequent communications with cellular signaling machinery. Crystallization and high-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been one of the major advances in the area of GPCR biology over the last 7-8 years. There have primarily been three approaches to GPCR crystallization till date. These are fusion protein strategy, thermostabilization, and antibody fragment-mediated crystallization. Of these, antibody fragment-mediated crystallization has not only provided the first breakthrough in structure determination of a non-rhodopsin GPCR but it has also assisted in obtaining structures of fully active conformations of GPCRs. Antibody fragment approach has also been crucial in obtaining structural information on GPCR signaling complexes. Here, we highlight the specific examples of GPCR crystal structures that have utilized antibody fragments for promoting crystallogenesis and structure solution. We also discuss emerging powerful technologies such as the nanobody technology and the synthetic phage display libraries in the context of GPCR crystallization and underline how these tools are likely to propel key GPCR structural studies in future.

  1. GPR55, a G-protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidylinositol, plays a role in motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Hao; Zhu, Jie; Jew, Chris P; Wager-Miller, James; Straiker, Alex; Spencer, Corinne; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some cannabinoids. Recent studies found prominent roles for GPR55 in neuropathic/inflammatory pain, cancer and bone physiology. However, little is known about the role of GPR55 in CNS development and function. To address this question, we performed a detailed characterization of GPR55 knockout mice using molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays. Quantitative PCR studies found that GPR55 mRNA was expressed (in order of decreasing abundance) in the striatum, hippocampus, forebrain, cortex, and cerebellum. GPR55 deficiency did not affect the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids or mRNA levels for several components of the endocannabinoid system in the hippocampus. Normal synaptic transmission and short-term as well as long-term synaptic plasticity were found in GPR55 knockout CA1 pyramidal neurons. Deleting GPR55 function did not affect behavioral assays assessing muscle strength, gross motor skills, sensory-motor integration, motor learning, anxiety or depressive behaviors. In addition, GPR55 null mutant mice exhibited normal contextual and auditory-cue conditioned fear learning and memory in a Pavlovian conditioned fear test. In contrast, when presented with tasks requiring more challenging motor responses, GPR55 knockout mice showed impaired movement coordination. Taken together, these results suggest that GPR55 plays a role in motor coordination, but does not strongly regulate CNS development, gross motor movement or several types of learned behavior.

  2. Investigation on bile acid receptor regulators. Discovery of cholanoic acid derivatives with dual G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1) antagonistic and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) modulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Valentina; Renga, Barbara; Festa, Carmen; Finamore, Claudia; Masullo, Dario; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, the end products of cholesterol metabolism, activate multiple mechanisms through the interaction with membrane G-protein coupled receptors including the bile acid receptor GPBAR1 and nuclear receptors such as the bile acid sensor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Even if dual FXR/GPBAR1 agonists are largely considered a novel opportunity in the treatment of several liver and metabolic diseases, selective targeting of one of these receptors represents an attractive therapeutic approach for a wide range of disorders in which dual modulation is associated to severe side effects. In the present study we have investigated around the structure of LCA generating a small library of cholane derivatives, endowed with dual FXR agonism/GPBAR1 antagonism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bile acid derivatives able to antagonize GPBAR1.

  3. New G-protein-coupled receptor structures provide insights into the recognition of CXCL12 and HIV-1 gp120 by CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhong; Jianping Ding

    2011-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily consists of thousands of integral membrane proteins that exert a wide variety of physiological functions and account for a large portion of the drag targets identified so far.However,structural knowledge of GPCRs is scarce, with crystal structures determined for only a few members including β1and β2 adrenergic receptors, adenosine receptor, rhodopsin,and dopamine D3 receptor [1].

  4. Serotonin signaling in Schistosoma mansoni: a serotonin-activated G protein-coupled receptor controls parasite movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Patocka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin is an important neuroactive substance in all the parasitic helminths. In Schistosoma mansoni, serotonin is strongly myoexcitatory; it potentiates contraction of the body wall muscles and stimulates motor activity. This is considered to be a critical mechanism of motor control in the parasite, but the mode of action of serotonin is poorly understood. Here we provide the first molecular evidence of a functional serotonin receptor (Sm5HTR in S. mansoni. The schistosome receptor belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily and is distantly related to serotonergic type 7 (5HT7 receptors from other species. Functional expression studies in transfected HEK 293 cells showed that Sm5HTR is a specific serotonin receptor and it signals through an increase in intracellular cAMP, consistent with a 5HT7 signaling mechanism. Immunolocalization studies with a specific anti-Sm5HTR antibody revealed that the receptor is abundantly distributed in the worm's nervous system, including the cerebral ganglia and main nerve cords of the central nervous system and the peripheral innervation of the body wall muscles and tegument. RNA interference (RNAi was performed both in schistosomulae and adult worms to test whether the receptor is required for parasite motility. The RNAi-suppressed adults and larvae were markedly hypoactive compared to the corresponding controls and they were also resistant to exogenous serotonin treatment. These results show that Sm5HTR is at least one of the receptors responsible for the motor effects of serotonin in S. mansoni. The fact that Sm5HTR is expressed in nerve tissue further suggests that serotonin stimulates movement via this receptor by modulating neuronal output to the musculature. Together, the evidence identifies Sm5HTR as an important neuronal protein and a key component of the motor control apparatus in S. mansoni.

  5. Characterisation and pharmacological analysis of a crustacean G protein-coupled receptor: the red pigment-concentrating hormone receptor of Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Heather G; Verlinden, Heleen; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Gäde, Gerd

    2017-07-31

    This is the first pharmacological characterisation of a neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in a crustacean. We cloned the ORF of the red pigment-concentrating hormone from a German strain of Daphnia pulex (Dappu-RPCH), as well as that of the cognate receptor (Dappu-RPCHR). Dappu-RPCHR has the hallmarks of the rhodopsin superfamily of GPCRs, and is more similar to insect adipokinetic hormone (AKH) receptor sequences than to receptor sequences for AKH/corazonin-like peptide or corazonin. We provide experimental evidence that Dappu-RPCH specifically activates the receptor (EC50 value of 65 pM) in a mammalian cell-based bioluminescence assay. We further characterised the properties of the ligands for the Dappu-RPCHR by investigating the activities of a variety of naturally-occurring peptides (insect AKH and crustacean RPCH peptides). The insect AKHs had lower EC50 values than the crustacean RPCHs. In addition, we tested a series of Dappu-RPCH analogues, where one residue at a time is systematically replaced by an alanine to learn about the relative importance of the termini and side chains for activation. Mainly amino acids in positions 1 to 4 and 8 of Dappu-RPCH appear responsible for effective activation of Dappu-RPCHR. The substitution of Phe4 in Dappu-RPCH had the most damaging effect on its agonistic activity.

  6. G protein-coupled receptor 30 ligand G-1 increases aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling by inhibition of tubulin assembly and cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is well established. Apart from the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, oestrogen signalling further involves an unrelated G protein-coupled receptor termed GPR30. In order to investigate potential regulatory crosstalk, this study investigated the influence of G-1 as one of the few GPR30-specific ligands on the AHR regulon in MCF-7 cells. As a well-characterised model system, these human mammary carcinoma cells co-express all three receptors (AHR, ERα and GPR30) and are thus ideally suited to study corresponding regulatory pathway interactions on transcript level. Indeed, treatment with micromolar concentrations of the GPR30-specific agonist G-1 resulted in up-regulation of AHR as well as the transcripts for cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1, two well-known targets of the AHR regulon. While this was partly attributable to G-1-mediated inhibition of tubulin assembly and subsequent cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, the effects nevertheless required functional AHR. However, G-1-induced up-regulation of CYP 1A1 was not mediated by GPR30, as G15 antagonist treatment as well as a knockdown of GPR30 and AHR failed to inhibit this effect.

  7. Chronic inflammatory injury results in increased coupling of delta opioid receptors to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Amynah; Smith, Monique; McGuire, Brenna; Evans, Christopher; Walwyn, Wendy

    2013-03-04

    Opioid receptors regulate a diverse array of physiological functions. Mu opioid receptor agonists are well-known analgesics for treating acute pain. In contrast, animal models suggest that chronic pain is more effectively relieved by delta opioid receptor agonists. A number of studies have shown that chronic pain results in increased function of delta opioid receptors. This is proposed to result from enhanced trafficking of the delta opioid receptor to the cell membrane induced by persistent tissue injury. However, recent studies have questioned this mechanism, which has resulted in some uncertainty as to whether delta opioid receptors are indeed upregulated in chronic pain states. To clarify this question, we have examined the effect of chronic inflammatory pain over time using both an ex vivo measure of delta function: receptor-Ca2+ channel coupling, and an in vivo measure; the relief of chronic pain by a delta opioid receptor agonist. In addition, as beta-arrestin 2 can regulate delta opioid receptor trafficking and signaling, we have further examined whether deleting this scaffolding and signal transduction molecule alters delta opioid receptor function. We used the Complete Freund's Adjuvant model of inflammatory pain, and examined the effectiveness of the delta agonist, SNC80, to both inhibit Ca2+ channels in primary afferent neurons and to attenuate mechanical allodynia. In naïve beta-arrestin 2 wildtype and knockout mice, SNC80 neither significantly inhibited voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents nor produced antinociception. However, following inflammatory pain, both measures showed a significant and long-lasting enhancement of delta opioid receptor function that persisted for up to 14 days post-injury regardless of genotype. Furthermore, although this pain model did not alter Ca2+ current density, the contribution of N-type Ca2+ channels to the total current appeared to be regulated by the presence of beta-arrestin 2. Our results indicate that there is an

  8. Commercially available antibodies directed against α-adrenergic receptor subtypes and other G protein-coupled receptors with acceptable selectivity in flow cytometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Abhishek; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Several previous reports suggested that many commercially available antibodies directed against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) lack sufficient selectivity. Accordingly, it has been proposed that receptor antibodies should be validated by at least one of several criteria, such as testing tissues or cells after knockout or silencing of the corresponding gene. Here, we tested whether 12 commercially available antibodies directed against α-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes (α1A/B/D, α2A/B/C), atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3), and vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) suffice these criteria. We detected in flow cytometry experiments with human vascular smooth muscle cells that the fluorescence signals from each of these antibodies were reduced by 46 ± 10 %-91 ± 2 % in cells treated with commercially available small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for each receptor, as compared with cells that were incubated with non-targeting siRNA. The tested antibodies included anti-ACKR3 (R&D Systems, mab42273), for which specificity has previously been demonstrated. Staining with this antibody resulted in 72 ± 5 % reduction of the fluorescence signal after ACKR3 siRNA treatment. Furthermore, staining with anti-α1A-AR (Santa Cruz, sc1477) and anti-ACKR3 (Abcam, ab38089), which have previously been reported to be non-specific, resulted in 70 ± 19 % and 80 ± 4 % loss of the fluorescence signal after α1A-AR and ACKR3 siRNA treatment, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that the tested antibodies show reasonable selectivity for their receptor target under our experimental conditions. Furthermore, our observations suggest that the selectivity of GPCR antibodies depends on the method for which the antibody is employed, the species from which cells/tissues are obtained, and on the type of specimens (cell, tissue/cell homogenate, or section) tested.

  9. An improved classification of G-protein-coupled receptors using sequence-derived features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhen-Ling

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play a key role in diverse physiological processes and are the targets of almost two-thirds of the marketed drugs. The 3 D structures of GPCRs are largely unavailable; however, a large number of GPCR primary sequences are known. To facilitate the identification and characterization of novel receptors, it is therefore very valuable to develop a computational method to accurately predict GPCRs from the protein primary sequences. Results We propose a new method called PCA-GPCR, to predict GPCRs using a comprehensive set of 1497 sequence-derived features. The principal component analysis is first employed to reduce the dimension of the feature space to 32. Then, the resulting 32-dimensional feature vectors are fed into a simple yet powerful classification algorithm, called intimate sorting, to predict GPCRs at five levels. The prediction at the first level determines whether a protein is a GPCR or a non-GPCR. If it is predicted to be a GPCR, then it will be further predicted into certain family, subfamily, sub-subfamily and subtype by the classifiers at the second, third, fourth, and fifth levels, respectively. To train the classifiers applied at five levels, a non-redundant dataset is carefully constructed, which contains 3178, 1589, 4772, 4924, and 2741 protein sequences at the respective levels. Jackknife tests on this training dataset show that the overall accuracies of PCA-GPCR at five levels (from the first to the fifth can achieve up to 99.5%, 88.8%, 80.47%, 80.3%, and 92.34%, respectively. We further perform predictions on a dataset of 1238 GPCRs at the second level, and on another two datasets of 167 and 566 GPCRs respectively at the fourth level. The overall prediction accuracies of our method are consistently higher than those of the existing methods to be compared. Conclusions The comprehensive set of 1497 features is believed to be capable of capturing information about amino acid

  10. Energy and metabolic sensing G protein-coupled receptors during lactation-induced changes in energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, P; Saremi, B; Winand, S; Rehage, J; Dänicke, S; Sauerwein, H; Mielenz, M

    2014-07-01

    The free fatty acid receptor FFA1, FFA2, and FFA3 and hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor (HCA2) are G protein-coupled receptors, acting as energy and metabolic sensors. Herein, we characterized the tissue-specific mRNA abundance of genes encoding for these receptors at different stages of lactation. In addition, potential effects of supplementation with or without conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) were tested. Tissues from pluriparous cows (subcutaneous adipose tissue [SAT] and liver) and from primiparous cows (3 SAT locations, 3 visceral adipose tissues, liver, mammary gland, and skeletal muscle) were used from 2 separate trials. In primiparous cows, the mRNA abundance of all receptors (FFA3 was not detectable by the applied protocol in muscle and udder) was lowest in muscle (P gene expression of the investigated receptors was higher in adipose tissue than in the non-adipose tissue. Expression of FFA1 in liver (P gene expression level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  12. Extracellular Ca2+ is a danger signal activating the NLRP3 inflammasome through G protein-coupled calcium sensing receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossol, Manuela; Pierer, Matthias; Raulien, Nora;

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome enables monocytes and macrophages to release high levels of interleukin-1ß during inflammatory responses. Concentrations of extracellular calcium can increase at sites of infection, inflammation or cell activation. Here we show that increased extracellular cal......, and this effect was inhibited in GPRC6A(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that G-protein-coupled receptors can activate the inflammasome, and indicate that increased extracellular calcium has a role as a danger signal and amplifier of inflammation....

  13. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling Analysis Using Homogenous Time-Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF®) Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Lenea Nørskov-Lauritsen; Alex Rojas Bie Thomsen; Hans Bräuner-Osborne

    2014-01-01

    Studying multidimensional signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in search of new and better treatments requires flexible, reliable and sensitive assays in high throughput screening (HTS) formats. Today, more than half of the detection techniques used in HTS are based on fluorescence, because of the high sensitivity and rich signal, but quenching, optical interferences and light scattering are serious drawbacks. In the 1990s the HTRF® (Cisbio Bioassays, Codolet, France) technology b...

  14. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  15. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Conformational analysis of g protein-coupled receptor signaling by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Su Youn; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change and protein-protein interactions are two major mechanisms of membrane protein signal transduction, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon agonist binding, GPCRs change conformation, resulting in interaction with downstream signaling molecules such as G proteins. To understand the precise signaling mechanism, studies have investigated the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or electron paramagnetic resonance. In addition to these techniques, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently been used in GPCR studies. HDX-MS measures the rate at which peptide amide hydrogens exchange with deuterium in the solvent. Exposed or flexible regions have higher exchange rates and excluded or ordered regions have lower exchange rates. Therefore, HDX-MS is a useful tool for studying protein-protein interfaces and conformational changes after protein activation or protein-protein interactions. Although HDX-MS does not give high-resolution structures, it analyzes protein conformations that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography or NMR. Furthermore, conformational information from HDX-MS can help in the crystallization of X-ray crystallography by suggesting highly flexible regions. Interactions between GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules are not easily analyzed by X-ray crystallography or NMR because of the large size of the GPCR-signaling molecule complexes, hydrophobicity, and flexibility of GPCRs. HDX-MS could be useful for analyzing the conformational mechanism of GPCR signaling. In this chapter, we discuss details of HDX-MS for analyzing GPCRs using the β2AR-G protein complex as a model system.

  17. [G-protein coupled receptors. Nobel Prize 2012 for chemistry to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockaert, Joël

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been won by Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka for their work on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Those receptors (3% of human genome) evolutionary are derived from one 1 or 2 ancestors and are able to recognize external message as different as light, odorants, gustative molecules and intercellular messages such as hormones and neurotransmitters. They are targets of 30-40% of therapeutic drugs. Robert J. Lefkowitz has been one of the leaders of the field from more than 40 years and has built several key concepts of the domain. Brian Kobilka was successful, in 2007, in producing a crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor. This paved the way for the production of a series of almost 50 GPCR crystal structures both in inactive and active forms.

  18. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human genes encoding three closely related G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao-Hui Song; Bonner, T.I. [NIMH National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Modi, W. [Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1995-07-20

    Cosmids containing human genes for orphan G protein-coupled receptors, GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3, were isolated using their rat homologs as probes. Previous studies of the mouse and rat cDNAs have shown the receptors to be expressed primarily in brain but have failed to identify their ligands. The three receptor proteins of 334, 363, and 330 amino acids, respectively, are encoded by a single exon in each gene. Excluding the divergent sequences preceding the first transmembrane domain, they have {approximately}60% amino acid identity with each other. Flurorescence in situ hybridization of GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3 localized these three genes to human chromosomal regions 13q12, 6q21, and 1p34.3-p36.1, respectively. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase and G protein coupled receptors: co-conspirators in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Sarah M; Blackburn, Jessica S; Schmucker, Adam C; Burrage, Peter S; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2009-01-01

    Similarities in the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer have been noted for at least 30 years. Inflammatory cytokines and growth factors mediate cell proliferation, and proteinases, especially the collagenase, Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), contribute to disease progression by remodeling the extracellular matrix and modulating the microenvironment. This review focuses on two cancers (melanoma and breast) and on the autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and discusses the activated stromal cells found in these diseases. MMP-1 was originally thought to function only to degrade interstitial collagens, but recent studies have revealed novel roles for MMP-1 involving the G protein-coupled receptors: the chemokine receptor, CXCR-4, and Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1). Cooperativity between MMP-1 and CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling influences the behavior of activated fibroblasts in both RA and cancer. Further, MMP-1 is a vital part of an autocrine/paracrine MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis, a function that amplifies its potential to remodel the matrix and to modify cell behavior. Finally, new therapeutic agents directed at MMP-1 and G protein-coupled receptors are emerging. Even though these agents are more specific in their targets than past therapies, these targets are often shared between RA and cancer, underscoring fundamental similarities between autoimmune disorders and some cancers.

  20. Intracellular calcium level is an important factor influencing ion channel modulations by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuto; Echigo, Ryousuke; Kashima, Kousuke; Minami, Hanae; Watanabe, Megumi; Nishikawa, Yuiko; Muranishi, Miho; Yoneda, Mitsugu; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2013-05-28

    Signaling pathways involving phospholipase C (PLC) are involved in various neural functions. Understanding how these pathways are regulated will lead to a better understanding of their roles in neural functions. Previous studies demonstrated that receptor-driven PLCβ activation depends on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), suggesting the possibility that PLCβ-dependent cellular responses are basically Ca(2+) dependent. To test this possibility, we examined whether modulations of ion channels driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are sensitive to [Ca(2+)]i using cultured hippocampal neurons. Muscarinic activation triggered an inward current at -100 mV (the equilibrium potential for K(+)) in a subpopulation of neurons. This current response was suppressed by pirenzepine (an M1-preferring antagonist), PLC inhibitor, non-selective cation channel blocker, and lowering [Ca(2+)]i. Using the neurons showing no response at -100 mV, effects of muscarinic activation on K(+) channels were examined at -40 mV. Muscarinic activation induced a transient decrease of the holding outward current. This current response was mimicked and occluded by XE991, an M-current K(+) channel blocker, suppressed by pirenzepine, PLC inhibitor and lowering [Ca(2+)]i, and enhanced by elevating [Ca(2+)]i. Similar results were obtained when group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were activated instead of muscarinic receptors. These results clearly show that ion channel modulations driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are dependent on [Ca(2+)]i, supporting the hypothesis that cellular responses induced by receptor-driven PLCβ activation are basically Ca(2+) dependent.

  1. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-04

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  2. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Zhao, Xiaojian [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton CT (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  3. The second intracellular loop of the human cannabinoid CB2 receptor governs G protein coupling in coordination with the carboxyl terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congxia Zheng

    Full Text Available The major effects of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids are mediated via two G protein-coupled receptors, CB1 and CB2, elucidation of the mechanism and structural determinants of the CB2 receptor coupling with G proteins will have a significant impact on drug discovery. In the present study, we systematically investigated the role of the intracellular loops in the interaction of the CB2 receptor with G proteins using chimeric receptors alongside the characterization of cAMP accumulation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We provided evidence that ICL2 was significantly involved in G protein coupling in coordination with the C-terminal end. Moreover, a single alanine substitution of the Pro-139 in the CB2 receptor that corresponds to Leu-222 in the CB1 receptor resulted in a moderate impairment in the inhibition of cAMP accumulation, whereas mutants P139F, P139M and P139L were able to couple to the Gs protein in a CRE-driven luciferase assay. With the ERK activation experiments, we further found that P139L has the ability to activate ERK through both Gi- and Gs-mediated pathways. Our findings defined an essential role of the second intracellular loop of the CB2 receptor in coordination with the C-terminal tail in G protein coupling and receptor activation.

  4. Differential helical orientations among related G protein-coupled receptors provide a novel mechanism for selectivity. Studies with salvinorin A and the kappa-opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vortherms, Timothy A; Mosier, Philip D; Westkaemper, Richard B; Roth, Bryan L

    2007-02-02

    Salvinorin A, the active component of the hallucinogenic sage Salvia divinorum, is an apparently selective and highly potent kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist. Salvinorin A is unique among ligands for peptidergic G protein-coupled receptors in being nonnitrogenous and lipid-like in character. To examine the molecular basis for the subtype-selective binding of salvinorin A, we utilized an integrated approach using chimeric opioid receptors, site-directed mutagenesis, the substituted cysteine accessibility method, and molecular modeling and dynamics studies. We discovered that helix 2 is required for salvinorin A binding to KOR and that two residues (Val-108(2.53) and Val-118(2.63)) confer subtype selectivity. Intriguingly, molecular modeling studies predicted that these loci exhibit an indirect effect on salvinorin A binding, presumably through rotation of helix 2. Significantly, and in agreement with our in silico predictions, substituted cysteine accessibility method analysis of helix 2 comparing KOR and the delta-opioid receptor, which has negligible affinity for salvinorin A, revealed that residues known to be important for salvinorin A binding exhibit a differential pattern of water accessibility. These findings imply that differences in the helical orientation of helix 2 are critical for the selectivity of salvinorin A binding to KOR and provide a structurally novel basis for ligand selectivity.

  5. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud

    2003-01-01

    of receptor function and in turn for the design and development of novel therapeutic compound. Here we show how ligand-receptor interaction can be investigated in situ with high sensitivity on sensor surfaces by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) measurements. A generally applicable method...... for the surface immobilization of membrane proteins was developed using the prototypic seven transmembrane neurokinin-1 receptor. The receptor was expressed as a biotinylated protein in mammalian cells. Membranes from cell homogenates were selectively immobilized on glass surfaces covered with streptavidin. TIRF...... measurements showed that a fluorescent agonist binds to the receptor on the sensor surface with similar affinity as to the receptor in live cells. This approach offers the possibility to investigate minute amounts of membrane protein in an active form and in its native environment without purification....

  6. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L

    2012-06-19

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein-coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-38.

  7. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K.; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C.; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein–coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-38. PMID:22665789

  8. Biphasic coupling of neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation to the NMDA receptor regulates AMPA receptor trafficking and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameau, Gerald A; Tukey, David S; Garcin-Hosfield, Elsa D; Titcombe, Roseann F; Misra, Charu; Khatri, Latika; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Ziff, Edward B

    2007-03-28

    Postsynaptic nitric oxide (NO) production affects synaptic plasticity and neuronal cell death. Ca2+ fluxes through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulate the production of NO by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). However, the mechanisms by which nNOS activity is regulated are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of neuronal stimulation with glutamate on the phosphorylation of nNOS. We show that, in cortical neurons, a low glutamate concentration (30 microM) induces rapid and transient NMDAR-dependent phosphorylation of S1412 by Akt, followed by sustained phosphorylation of S847 by CaMKII (calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II). We demonstrate that phosphorylation of S1412 by Akt is necessary for activation of nNOS by the NMDAR. nNOS mutagenesis confirms that these phosphorylations respectively activate and inhibit nNOS and, thus, transiently activate NO production. A constitutively active (S1412D), but not a constitutively repressed (S847D) nNOS mutant elevated surface glutamate receptor 2 levels, demonstrating that these phosphorylations can control AMPA receptor trafficking via NO. Notably, an excitotoxic stimulus (150 microM glutamate) induced S1412, but not S847 phosphorylation, leading to deregulated nNOS activation. S1412D did not kill neurons; however, it enhanced the excitotoxicity of a concomitant glutamate stimulus. We propose a swinging domain model for the regulation of nNOS: S1412 phosphorylation facilitates electron flow within the reductase module of nNOS, increasing nNOS sensitivity to Ca2+-calmodulin. These findings suggest a critical role for a kinetically complex and novel series of regulatory nNOS phosphorylations induced by the NMDA receptor for the in vivo control of nNOS.

  9. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamanian Mostafa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent availability of genomic data for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and the model planarian Schmidtea mediterranea paves the way for the first comprehensive effort to identify and analyze GPCRs in this important phylum. Results Application of a novel transmembrane-oriented approach to receptor mining led to the discovery of 117 S. mansoni GPCRs, representing all of the major families; 105 Rhodopsin, 2 Glutamate, 3 Adhesion, 2 Secretin and 5 Frizzled. Similarly, 418 Rhodopsin, 9 Glutamate, 21 Adhesion, 1 Secretin and 11 Frizzled S. mediterranea receptors were identified. Among these, we report the identification of novel receptor groupings, including a large and highly-diverged Platyhelminth-specific Rhodopsin subfamily, a planarian-specific Adhesion-like family, and atypical Glutamate-like receptors. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out following extensive gene curation. Support vector machines (SVMs were trained and used for ligand-based classification of full-length Rhodopsin GPCRs, complementing phylogenetic and homology-based classification. Conclusions Genome-wide investigation of GPCRs in two platyhelminth genomes reveals an extensive and complex receptor signaling repertoire with many unique features. This work provides important sequence and functional leads for understanding basic flatworm receptor biology, and sheds light on a lucrative set of anthelmintic drug targets.

  10. Tuning the allosteric regulation of artificial muscarinic and dopaminergic ligand-gated potassium channels by protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Christophe J.; Revilloud, Jean; Caro, Lydia N.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Trouchet, Amandine; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Nieścierowicz, Katarzyna; Sapay, Nicolas; Crouzy, Serge; Vivaudou, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels enable intercellular transmission of action potential through synapses by transducing biochemical messengers into electrical signal. We designed artificial ligand-gated ion channels by coupling G protein-coupled receptors to the Kir6.2 potassium channel. These artificial channels called ion channel-coupled receptors offer complementary properties to natural channels by extending the repertoire of ligands to those recognized by the fused receptors, by generating more sustained signals and by conferring potassium selectivity. The first artificial channels based on the muscarinic M2 and the dopaminergic D2L receptors were opened and closed by acetylcholine and dopamine, respectively. We find here that this opposite regulation of the gating is linked to the length of the receptor C-termini, and that C-terminus engineering can precisely control the extent and direction of ligand gating. These findings establish the design rules to produce customized ligand-gated channels for synthetic biology applications. PMID:28145461

  11. Neurovascular coupling to D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy using simultaneous PET/functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Christin Y; Hooker, Jacob M; Catana, Ciprian;

    2013-01-01

    responses and receptor occupancies. The distinct CBV magnitudes between putamen and caudate at matched occupancies approximately matched literature differences in basal dopamine levels, suggesting that the relative fMRI measurements reflect basal D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy. These results can provide...

  12. Intracellular calcium levels determine differential modulation of allosteric interactions within G protein-coupled receptor heteromers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro, G.; Aguinaga, D.; Hradsky, J.; Moreno, E.; Reddy, P.P.; Cortés, A.; Mallol, J.; Casadó, V.; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, M.R.; Lluís, C.; Canela, E.I.; McCormick, P.J.; Ferreira, S.; Ferré, S.

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological significance of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer is well established and it is being considered as an important target for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the physiological factors that cont

  13. Functional coupling between heterologously expressed dopamine D(2) receptors and KCNQ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungstrom, Trine; Grunnet, Morten; Jensen, Bo Skaaning

    2003-01-01

    Activation of KCNQ potassium channels by stimulation of co-expressed dopamine D(2) receptors was studied electrophysiologically in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in mammalian cells. To address the specificity of the interaction between D(2)-like receptors and KCNQ channels, combinations of KCNQ1...... activation of the KCNQ channels was confirmed by co-expression of other neuronal K(+) channels (BK, K(V)1.1, and K(V)4.3) with the D(2L) receptor in Xenopus oocytes. None of these K(+) channels responded to stimulation of the D(2L) receptor. In the mammalian brain, dopamine D(2) receptors and KCNQ channels...... co-localise postsynaptically in several brain regions, so modulation of neuronal excitability by dopamine release could in part be mediated via an effect on KCNQ channels....

  14. Comparison of MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors on the upregulation of vascular G-protein coupled receptors in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    on translational level and increased respective contractions. The prostanoid TP receptor mediated contraction curve was left-wards shifted by organ culture. Organ culture was associated with elevated pERK1/2 in the vascular smooth muscle cells: the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 attenuated the endothelin ET(B) receptor......Organ culture is an in vitro method for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in upregulation of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MEK) and/or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) specific inhibitors will attenuate the G......-protein coupled receptor expression following organ culture. Rat cerebral arteries were incubated 48h in the presence of MEK/ERK specific inhibitors U0126, PD98059, SL327, or AG126 for different time periods. Contractile responses by activation of endothelin receptor type A and type B, serotonin receptor 5-HT(1B...

  15. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  16. G Protein-coupled Receptor Gpr4 Senses Amino Acids and Activates the cAMP-PKA Pathway in Cryptococcus neoformansD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Chaoyang; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Cox, Gary M.; Heitman, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The Gα protein Gpa1 governs the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and plays a central role in virulence and differentiation in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, but the signals and receptors that trigger this pathway were unknown. We identified seven putative proteins that share identity with known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One protein, Gpr4, shares limited sequence identity with the Dictyostelium discoideum cAMP receptor cAR1 and the Aspergillus nidulans GPCR protein Gpr...

  17. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR40 is activated by medium and long chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Celia P; Tadayyon, Mohammad; Andrews, John L; Benson, William G; Chambers, Jon K; Eilert, Michelle M; Ellis, Catherine; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Goetz, Aaron S; Minnick, Dana T; Murdock, Paul R; Sauls, Howard R; Shabon, Usman; Spinage, Lisa D; Strum, Jay C; Szekeres, Philip G; Tan, Kong B; Way, James M; Ignar, Diane M; Wilson, Shelagh; Muir, Alison I

    2003-03-28

    GPR40 is a member of a subfamily of homologous G protein-coupled receptors that include GPR41 and GPR43 and that have no current function or ligand ascribed. Ligand fishing experiments in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 revealed that a range of saturated and unsaturated carboxylic acids with carbon chain lengths greater than six were able to induce an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i), measured using a fluorometric imaging plate reader. 5,8,11-Eicosatriynoic acid was the most potent fatty acid tested, with a pEC(50) of 5.7. G protein coupling of GPR40 was examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the G alpha(q/i)-responsive Gal4-Elk1 reporter system. Expression of human GPR40 led to a constitutive induction of luciferase activity, which was further increased by exposure of the cells to eicosatriynoic acid. Neither the constitutive nor ligand-mediated luciferase induction was inhibited by pertussis toxin treatment, suggesting that GPR40 was coupled to G alpha(q/11.) Expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that GPR40 was specifically expressed in brain and pancreas, with expression in rodent pancreas being localized to insulin-producing beta-cells. These data suggest that some of the physiological effects of fatty acids in pancreatic islets and brain may be mediated through a cell-surface receptor.

  18. A single mutation in the 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4-R D100(3.32)A) generates a Gs-coupled receptor activated exclusively by synthetic ligands (RASSL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeysen, Sylvie; Joubert, Lara; Sebben, Michèle; Bockaert, Joël; Dumuis, Aline

    2003-01-10

    To better understand G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs) signaling, cellular and animal physiology, as well as gene therapy, a new tool has recently been proposed. It consists of GPCR mutants that are insensitive to endogenous ligands but sensitive to synthetic ligands. These GPCRs are called receptor activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSL). Only two examples of such engineered receptors have been described so far: one G(i)-coupled (opioid receptors) and one G(s)-coupled (beta(2)-adrenergic receptors). Here, we describe the first RASSL related to serotonin receptors (D100(3.32)A G(s)-coupled 5-HT(4) receptor or 5-HT(4)-RASSL). 5-HT(4)-RASSL is generated by a single mutation, is totally insensitive to serotonin (5-HT), and still responds to synthetic ligands. These ligands have affinities in the range of nanomolar concentrations for the mutant receptor and exhibit full efficacy. More interestingly, two synthetic ligands behave as antagonists on the wild type but as agonists on the 5-HT(4)-RASSL.

  19. Ligand- and mutation-induced conformational selection in the CCR5 chemokine G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Goddard, William A; Nesterov, Alexandre; Olave, Ivan; Irons, Christopher

    2014-09-09

    We predicted the structural basis for pleiotropic signaling of the C-C chemokine type 5 (CCR5) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) by predicting the binding of several ligands to the lower-energy conformations of the CCR5 receptor and 11 mutants. For each case, we predicted the ∼ 20 most stable conformations for the receptor along with the binding sites for four anti-HIV ligands. We found that none of the ligands bind to the lowest-energy apo-receptor conformation. The three ligands with a similar pharmacophore (Maraviroc, PF-232798, and Aplaviroc) bind to a specific higher-energy receptor conformation whereas TAK-779 (with a different pharmacophore) binds to a different high-energy conformation. This result is in agreement with the very different binding-site profiles for these ligands obtained by us and others. The predicted Maraviroc binding site agrees with the recent structure of CCR5 receptor cocrystallized with Maraviroc. We performed 11 site-directed mutagenesis experiments to validate the predicted binding sites. Here, we independently predicted the lowest 10 mutant protein conformations for each of the 11 mutants and then docked the ligands to these lowest conformations. We found the predicted binding energies to be in excellent agreement with our mutagenesis experiments. These results show that, for GPCRs, each ligand can stabilize a different protein conformation, complicating the use of cocrystallized structures for ligand screening. Moreover, these results show that a single-point mutation in a GPCR can dramatically alter the available low-energy conformations, which in turn alters the binding site, potentially altering downstream signaling events. These studies validate the conformational selection paradigm for the pleiotropic function and structural plasticity of GPCRs.

  20. Targeting a G-protein-coupled receptor overexpressed in endocrine tumors by magnetic nanoparticles to induce cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Claire; El Hajj Diab, Darine; Connord, Vincent; Clerc, Pascal; Meunier, Etienne; Pipy, Bernard; Payré, Bruno; Tan, Reasmey P; Gougeon, Michel; Carrey, Julian; Gigoux, Véronique; Fourmy, Daniel

    2014-02-25

    Nanotherapy using targeted magnetic nanoparticles grafted with peptidic ligands of receptors overexpressed in cancers is a promising therapeutic strategy. However, nanoconjugation of peptides can dramatically affect their properties with respect to receptor recognition, mechanism of internalization, intracellular trafficking, and fate. Furthermore, investigations are needed to better understand the mechanism whereby application of an alternating magnetic field to cells containing targeted nanoparticles induces cell death. Here, we designed a nanoplatform (termed MG-IONP-DY647) composed of an iron oxide nanocrystal decorated with a ligand of a G-protein coupled receptor, the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) that is overexpressed in several malignant cancers. MG-IONP-DY647 did not stimulate inflammasome of Raw 264.7 macrophages. They recognized cells expressing CCK2R with a high specificity, subsequently internalized via a mechanism involving recruitment of β-arrestins, clathrin-coated pits, and dynamin and were directed to lysosomes. Binding and internalization of MG-IONP-DY647 were dependent on the density of the ligand at the nanoparticle surface and were slowed down relative to free ligand. Trafficking of CCK2R internalized with the nanoparticles was slightly modified relative to CCK2R internalized in response to free ligand. Application of an alternating magnetic field to cells containing MG-IONP-DY647 induced apoptosis and cell death through a lysosomal death pathway, demonstrating that cell death is triggered even though nanoparticles of low thermal power are internalized in minute amounts by the cells. Together with pioneer findings using iron oxide nanoparticles targeting tumoral cells expressing epidermal growth factor receptor, these data represent a solid basis for future studies aiming at establishing the proof-of-concept of nanotherapy of cancers using ligand-grafted magnetic nanoparticles specifically internalized via cell surface receptors.

  1. Coupling of two pools of P2X7 receptors to distinct intracellular signaling pathways in rat submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Pérez-Andrés, Encarnación; Tandel, Séverine; Fontanils, Unai; Kumps, Alain; Kabré, Elie; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Marino, Aida; Dehaye, Jean-Paul; Pochet, Stéphanie

    2006-04-01

    The plasma membrane of cells from rat submandibular glands was isolated and extensively sonicated. The homogenate was centrifuged at high speed in a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Light fractions contained vesicles analogous to rafts: they were rich in cholesterol, they contained GM1 and caveolin-1, and P2X7 receptors were detected in these fractions. The location of the P2X7 receptors in rafts was abolished when cellular cholesterol was removed by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD). ATP activated neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase), which provoked a decrease of the cellular content of sphingomyelin and an increase of ceramide levels in these cells and in the rafts. Treatment with MCD and filipin (but not with alpha-cyclodextrin) abolished the increase of the intracellular concentration of calcium ([Ca2+]i) in response to epinephrine but not to ATP. MCD and filipin also inhibited the activation by ATP of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Inhibition of N-SMase with glutathione or GW4869 prevented the activation of PLA2 by P2X7 agonists without affecting [Ca2+]i levels. We conclude that P2X7 receptors are present in both raft and nonraft compartments of plasma membranes; the receptors forming a nonselective cation channel are located in the nonraft fraction. P2X7 receptors in the rafts are coupled to the activation of N-SMase, which increases the content of ceramides in rafts. This may contribute to the activation of PLA2 in response to P2X7 receptor occupancy.

  2. Novel computational methodologies for structural modeling of spacious ligand binding sites of G-protein-coupled receptors: development and application to human leukotriene B4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  3. Novel Computational Methodologies for Structural Modeling of Spacious Ligand Binding Sites of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: Development and Application to Human Leukotriene B4 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Ishino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  4. Isolation of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR4) localized to chromosome 19q13.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, M.S.; Baird, S.; Bailly, J.E. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the human gene for a novel G-protein coupled receptor (GPR4), from the critical myotonic dystrophy (DM) region on chromosome 19q13.3. The homologous porcine gene was isolated and sequenced as well. The genes of both species are intronless and contain an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids. In human, two isoforms of GPR4 are expressed, differing in their 3{prime} untranslated region due to the use of alternate polyadenylation signals and measuring approximately 2.8 and 1.8 kb, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that GPR4 is widely expressed, with higher levels in kidney, heart, and especially lung, where it is at least fivefold greater than in other tissues. Sequence analysis suggests that GPR4 is a peptide receptor and shares strongest homologies with purinergic receptors and receptors for angiotensin II, platelet activating factor, thrombin, and bradykinin. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of neuropeptides and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) for neuropeptides in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    The genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors were identified in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) by transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Forty-eight candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or peptide hormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of neuropeptide-like precursor 2 (NPLP2) and trissin. The gene coding for prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) was first identified from hemimetabolous insect. A total of 57 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were identified and phylogenetic analysis showed most of them to be closely related to insect GPCRs. A notable finding was the occurrence of vertebrate hormone receptors, thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR)-like GPCR and parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR)-like GPCRs. These results suggest that N. lugens possesses the most comprehensive neuropeptide system yet found in insects. Moreover, our findings demonstrate the power of RNA-seq as a tool for analyzing the neuropeptide-related genes in the absence of whole genome sequence information.

  6. N-terminal fusion tags for effective production of g-protein-coupled receptors in bacterial cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shenkarev, Z O; Khabibullina, N F; Kulbatskiy, D S; Shulepko, M A; Petrovskaya, L E; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute one of the biggest families of membrane proteins. In spite of the fact that they are highly relevant to pharmacy, they have remained poorly explored. One of the main bottlenecks encountered in structural-functional studies of GPCRs is the difficulty to produce sufficient amounts of the proteins. Cell-free systems based on bacterial extracts fromE. colicells attract much attention as an effective tool for recombinant production of membrane proteins. GPCR production in bacterial cell-free expression systems is often inefficient because of the problems associated with the low efficiency of the translation initiation process. This problem could be resolved if GPCRs were expressed in the form of hybrid proteins with N-terminal polypeptide fusion tags. In the present work, three new N-terminal fusion tags are proposed for cell-free production of the human β2-adrenergic receptor, human M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and human somatostatin receptor type 5. It is demonstrated that the application of an N-terminal fragment (6 a.a.) of bacteriorhodopsin fromExiguobacterium sibiricum(ESR-tag), N-terminal fragment (16 а.о.) of RNAse A (S-tag), and Mistic protein fromB. subtilisallows to increase the CF synthesis of the target GPCRs by 5-38 times, resulting in yields of 0.6-3.8 mg from 1 ml of the reaction mixture, which is sufficient for structural-functional studies.

  7. The role of G-protein-coupled receptor 120 in fatty acids sensing in chicken oral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Ryo; Kawabata, Yuko; Kawabata, Fuminori; Nishimura, Shotaro; Tabata, Shoji

    2015-03-01

    Clarification of the mechanism of chickens' taste sense will provide meaningful information for creating and improving new feedstuff for chickens, because the character of taste receptors in oral tissues affects feeding behavior in animals. Although fatty acids are partly recognized via G-protein coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) for fat taste in mammalian oral tissues, the fat taste receptor of chickens has not been elucidated. Here we cloned chicken GPR120 (cGPR120) from the chicken palate, which contains taste buds. By using Ca(2+) imaging methods, we identified oleic acid and linoleic acid as cGPR120 agonists. Interestingly, in a behavioral study the chickens preferred corn oil-rich feed over mineral oil (control oil)-rich feed. Because corn oil contains high amounts of oleic acid and linoleic acid, this result was thought to be reasonable. Taken together, the present results suggest that cGPR120 is one of the functional fat taste receptors in chickens.

  8. L1CAM Binds ErbB Receptors through Ig-Like Domains Coupling Cell Adhesion and Neuregulin Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Lakomá, Jarmila; Baars, Sigrid; Garcia-Alonso, Luis; Cabedo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    During nervous system development different cell-to-cell communication mechanisms operate in parallel guiding migrating neurons and growing axons to generate complex arrays of neural circuits. How such a system works in coordination is not well understood. Cross-regulatory interactions between different signalling pathways and redundancy between them can increase precision and fidelity of guidance systems. Immunoglobulin superfamily proteins of the NCAM and L1 families couple specific substrate recognition and cell adhesion with the activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Thus it has been shown that L1CAM-mediated cell adhesion promotes the activation of the EGFR (erbB1) from Drosophila to humans. Here we explore the specificity of the molecular interaction between L1CAM and the erbB receptor family. We show that L1CAM binds physically erbB receptors in both heterologous systems and the mammalian developing brain. Different Ig-like domains located in the extracellular part of L1CAM can support this interaction. Interestingly, binding of L1CAM to erbB enhances its response to neuregulins. During development this may synergize with the activation of erbB receptors through L1CAM homophilic interactions, conferring diffusible neuregulins specificity for cells or axons that interact with the substrate through L1CAM. PMID:22815787

  9. New factors influencing G protein coupled receptors’ system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdelaziz Ghanemi

    2012-11-24

    Nov 24, 2012 ... system functions. Abdelaziz .... systems. Such factors will be added to those already known including ..... crossroad between cell biology and physics. Nat Cell ... classification of receptors for 5-hydroxytryptamine (Serotonin).

  10. Molecular Actions of Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 Caused by Extracellular Acidification in Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lai Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular acidification occurs under physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as exercise, ischemia, and inflammation. It has been shown that acidosis has various adverse effects on bone. In recent years there has been increasing evidence which indicates that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1 is a pH-sensing receptor and mediates a variety of extracellular acidification-induced actions on bone cells and other cell types. Recent studies have shown that OGR1 is involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation, survival, and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, OGR1 also regulates acid-induced apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral discs. These observations demonstrate the importance of OGR1 in skeletal development and metabolism. Here, we provide an overview of OGR1 regulation ofosteoclasts, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and the molecular actions of OGR1 induced by extracellular acidification in the maintenance of bone health.

  11. Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors: the promise and the challenges--a medicinal chemistry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Lopez, Laura; Scammells, Peter J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Capuano, Ben; Lane, J Robert

    2014-11-01

    Historically, determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand efficacy has often been restricted to identifying the ligand as an agonist or antagonist at a given signaling pathway. This classification was deemed sufficient to predict compound efficacy at all signaling endpoints, including the therapeutically relevant one(s). However, it is now apparent that ligands acting at the same GPCR can stabilize multiple, distinct, receptor conformations linked to different functional outcomes. This phenomenon, known as biased agonism, stimulus bias, or functional selectivity offers the opportunity to separate on-target therapeutic effects from side effects through the design of drugs that show pathway selectivity. However, the medicinal chemist faces numerous challenges to develop biased ligands, including the detection and quantification of biased agonism. This review summarizes the current state of the field of research into biased agonism at GPCRs, with a particular focus on efforts to relate biased agonism to ligand structure.

  12. Molecular Mechanism for Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 by a Selective RNA Aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J.G. (Bonn); (Michigan)

    2012-08-31

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic {alpha}F-{alpha}G loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high-affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase.

  13. The Multiple Faces of Prostaglandin E2 G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling during the Dendritic Cell Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cambi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many processes regulating immune responses are initiated by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and report biochemical changes in the microenvironment. Dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and crucial for the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The lipid mediator Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 via four GPCR subtypes (EP1-4 critically regulates DC generation, maturation and migration. The role of PGE2 signaling in DC biology was unraveled by the characterization of EP receptor subtype expression in DC progenitor cells and DCs, the identification of the signaling pathways initiated by these GPCR subtypes and the classification of DC responses to PGE2 at different stages of differentiation. Here, we review the advances in PGE2 signaling in DCs and describe the efforts still to be made to understand the spatio-temporal fine-tuning of PGE2 responses by DCs.

  14. CC趋化因子偶联受体信号途径%CC Chemokine Receptor-coupled Signalling Pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NEW David C.; WONG Yung H.

    2003-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of multiple CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) in a wide range of tissues and cells signifies the functional diversity of CC chemokines. The realization that multiple chemokines activate individual receptors and that some chemokines are functional at several different CCRs, indicates that interplay between a complex network of intracellular pathways is required for the full expression of the physiological function of each ligand. In different cellular environments, chemokines can regulate distinct second messengers or even positively or negatively regulate the same signal transduction pathway. The specific interactions between many signalling molecules have been discerned in an increasing number of cellular systems and this information is being used to explain the physiological actions of chemokines. This review will attempt to summarize recent research by many groups that has revealed numerous subtleties of the CC chemokine-coupled signalling pathways.

  15. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Young Yang; Mary Beth Hilton; Steven Seaman; Diana C. Haines; Kunio Nagashima; Christina M. Burks; Lino Tessarollo; Pavlina T. Ivanova; H. Alex Brown; Todd M. Umstead; Joanna Floros; Zissis C. Chroneos; Brad St. Croix

    2013-01-01

    GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 exp...

  16. Caldendrin-Jacob: a protein liaison that couples NMDA receptor signalling to the nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela C Dieterich

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and calcium can exert multiple and very divergent effects within neuronal cells, thereby impacting opposing occurrences such as synaptic plasticity and neuronal degeneration. The neuronal Ca2+ sensor Caldendrin is a postsynaptic density component with high similarity to calmodulin. Jacob, a recently identified Caldendrin binding partner, is a novel protein abundantly expressed in limbic brain and cerebral cortex. Strictly depending upon activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors, Jacob is recruited to neuronal nuclei, resulting in a rapid stripping of synaptic contacts and in a drastically altered morphology of the dendritic tree. Jacob's nuclear trafficking from distal dendrites crucially requires the classical Importin pathway. Caldendrin binds to Jacob's nuclear localization signal in a Ca2+-dependent manner, thereby controlling Jacob's extranuclear localization by competing with the binding of Importin-alpha to Jacob's nuclear localization signal. This competition requires sustained synapto-dendritic Ca2+ levels, which presumably cannot be achieved by activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, but are confined to Ca2+ microdomains such as postsynaptic spines. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, as opposed to their synaptic counterparts, trigger the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB shut-off pathway, and cell death. We found that nuclear knockdown of Jacob prevents CREB shut-off after extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activation, whereas its nuclear overexpression induces CREB shut-off without NMDA receptor stimulation. Importantly, nuclear knockdown of Jacob attenuates NMDA-induced loss of synaptic contacts, and neuronal degeneration. This defines a novel mechanism of synapse-to-nucleus communication via a synaptic Ca2+-sensor protein, which links the activity of NMDA receptors to nuclear signalling events involved in modelling synapto-dendritic input and NMDA receptor-induced cellular degeneration.

  17. Sf9 cells: a versatile model system to investigate the pharmacological properties of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland

    2010-12-01

    The Sf9 cell/baculovirus expression system is widely used for high-level protein expression, often with the purpose of purification. However, proteins may also be functionally expressed in the defined Sf9 cell environment. According to the literature, the pharmacology of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) functionally reconstituted in Sf9 cells is similar to the receptor properties in mammalian cells. Sf9 cells express both recombinant GPCRs and G-proteins at much higher levels than mammalian cells. Sf9 cells can be grown in suspension culture, providing an inexpensive way of obtaining large protein amounts. Co-infection with various baculoviruses allows free combination of GPCRs with different G-proteins. The absence of constitutively active receptors in Sf9 cells provides an excellent signal-to background ratio in functional assays, allowing the detection of agonist-independent receptor activity and of small ligand-induced signals including partial agonistic and inverse agonistic effects. Insect cell Gα(i)-like proteins mostly do not couple productively to mammalian GPCRs. Thus, unlike in mammalian cells, Sf9 cells do not require pertussis toxin treatment to obtain a Gα(i)-free environment. Co-expression of GPCRs with Gα(i1), Gα(i2), Gα(i3) or Gα(o) in Sf9 cells allows the generation of a selectivity profile for these Gα(i/o)-isoforms. Additionally, GPCR-G-protein combinations can be compared with defined 1:1 stoichiometry by expressing GPCR-Gα fusion proteins. Sf9 cells can also be employed for ligand screening in medicinal chemistry programs, using radioligand binding assays or functional assays, like the steady-state GTPase- or [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay. This review shows that Sf9 cells are a versatile model system to investigate the pharmacological properties of GPCRs.

  18. Identification of novel allosteric modulators for the G-protein coupled US28 receptor of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Ana; Wetzel, Alexander; Mahmoudian, Shohreh; Stamminger, Thomas; Tschammer, Nuska; Heinrich, Markus R

    2011-09-15

    The highly constitutively active G-protein coupled receptor US28 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an interesting pharmacological target because of its implication on viral dissemination, cardiovascular diseases and tumorigenesis. We found that dihydroisoquinolinone and tetrahydroisoquinoline scaffolds may be promising lead structures for novel US28 allosteric inverse agonists. These scaffolds were rapidly synthesized by radical carboamination reactions followed by non-radical transformations. Our novel US28 allosteric modulators provide valuable scaffolds for further ligand optimization and may be helpful chemical tools to investigate molecular mechanisms of US28 constitutive signaling and its role in pathogenesis.

  19. Application of new semisynthetic aequorins with long half-decay time of luminescence to G-protein-coupled receptor assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Satoshi; Iimori, Rie; Sahara, Yuiko; Hisada, Sunao; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2010-12-15

    Aequorin is a Ca(2+)-binding photoprotein and consists of an apoprotein (apoaequorin) and a 2-peroxide of coelenterazine. Eight new coelenterazine analogues modified at the C2-position were synthesized and incorporated into recombinant apoaequorin with O(2) to yield different semisynthetic aequorins. The luminescence properties and the sensitivity to Ca(2+) of these semisynthetic aequorins were characterized. Two semisynthetic aequorins, namely me- and cf3-aequorin, showed a slow decay of the luminescence pattern with less sensitivity to Ca(2+) and were useful for the cell-based G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) reporter assays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Live Cell Bioluminescence Imaging in Temporal Reaction of G Protein-Coupled Receptor for High-Throughput Screening and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are notable targets of basic therapeutics. Many screening methods have been established to identify novel agents for GPCR signaling in a high-throughput manner. However, information related to the temporal reaction of GPCR with specific ligands remains poor. We recently developed a bioluminescence method for the quantitative detection of the interaction between GPCR and β-arrestin using split luciferase complementation. To monitor time-course variation of the interactions, a new imaging system contributes to the accurate evaluation of drugs for GPCRs in a high-throughput manner.

  1. Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Matthew N; Gloriam, David E; Secker, Andrew;

    2011-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptors--or GPCRs--comprise simultaneously one of the largest and one of the most multi-functional protein families known to modern-day molecular bioscience. From a drug discovery and pharmaceutical industry perspective, the GPCRs constitute one of the most commercially...... and economically important groups of proteins known. The GPCRs undertake numerous vital metabolic functions and interact with a hugely diverse range of small and large ligands. Many different methodologies have been developed to efficiently and accurately classify the GPCRs. These range from motif-based techniques...

  2. Determinants Present in the Receptor Carboxy Tail Are Responsible for Differences in Subtype-Specific Coupling of β-Adrenergic Receptors to Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Simard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An agonist-occupied β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR recruits G protein receptor kinase-2 (GRK2 which is recruited to the membrane. Thus, the physical proximity of activated β2-AR and PI-3K allows the activation of the latter. In contrast, it has been observed that the β1-AR is unable to activate the PI-3K/Akt pathway. We hypothesized that the difference might be due to molecular determinants present in the carboxy termini of the two β-AR subtypes. Using transiently transfected HEK 293 cells expressing either β1- or β2-AR, we also observed that in presence of an agonist, β2-AR, but not β1-AR, is able to activate the PI-3K/Akt pathway. Switching the seventh transmembrane domain and the carboxy tail between the two receptors reverses this phenotype; that is, β1×β2-AR can activate the PI-3K/Akt pathway whereas β2×β1-AR cannot. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin abolished the activation of PI-3K by β2- or β1×β2-AR stimulation. Ligand-mediated internalization of the β2-AR induced by a 15-minute stimulation with agonist was abolished in the presence of a dominant negative of PI-3K or following pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results indicate that the subtype-specific differences in the coupling to PI-3K/Akt pathway are due to molecular determinants present in the carboxy tail of the receptor and further that β2-AR activates PI-3K via a pertussis toxin-sensitive mechanism.

  3. Role of estrogen receptors (ERs and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER in regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-testis axis and spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eChimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproductive function is under the control of both gonadotropins and androgens through a negative feedback loop that involves the hypothalamus, pituitary and testis known as hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG. Indeed, also estrogens play an important role in regulating HPG axis but the relative contribution to the inhibition of gonadotropins secretion exerted by the amount of estrogens produced within the hypothalamus and/or the pituitary or by the amount of circulating estrogens are still ongoing. Moreover, it is known that maintenance of spermatogenesis is controlled by gonadotrophins and testosterone, the effects of which are modulated by a complex network of locally produced factors, including estrogens. Physiological effects of estrogens are mediated by the classical nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1 and estrogen receptor beta (ESR2, which mediate both genomic and rapid signaling events. In addition, estrogens induce rapid non-genomic responses through a membrane-associated G protein-coupled receptor (GPER. Ours and other studies reported that, in the testis, GPER is expressed in both normal germ cells and somatic cells and it is involved in mediating the estrogen action in spermatogenesis controlling proliferative and/or apoptotic events. Interestingly, GPER expression has been revealed also in hypothalamus and in pituitary. However, its role in mediating estrogen rapid actions in this context is under investigation. Recent studies indicate that GPER is involved in modulating GnRH release as well as gonadotropins secretion. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of estrogen/estrogen receptors (ERs molecular pathways in regulating GnRH, FSH and LH release at hypothalamic and pituitary level in male as well as in controlling specific testicular functions such as spermatogenesis, focusing our attention mainly on estrogen signaling mediated by GPER.

  4. Activation of G protein-coupled receptor 30 by thiodiphenol promotes proliferation of estrogen receptor α-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingli; Peng, Wei; Xu, Gang; Wu, Minghong; Wen, Yu; Xu, Jie; Yu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yipei

    2017-02-01

    Many studies have been shown that environmental estrogen bisphenol A (BPA) can activate nuclear receptor (estrogen receptor alpha, ERα) or membrane receptor (G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30) in breast cancer cells and exerts genomic or nongenomic actions inducing cell proliferation. 4,4'-thiodiphenol (TDP) as one of BPA derivatives exhibits more potent estrogenic activity than BPA does. However, comparatively little is known about the ways in which TDP interferes with these signaling pathways and produces cell biological changes. This study evaluated the effect of TDP on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and intercellular calcium (Ca(2+)) fluctuation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The underlying molecular mechanism of cell proliferation induced by TDP was analyzed by examining the activation of ERα and GPR30-mediated phosphatidylinotidol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and extracellular-signa1regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. The results showed that exposure to 0.1-10 μM TDP for 24, 48, and 72 h significantly increased viability of MCF-7 cells. At the same concentration range, TDP exposure for 3 and 24 h markedly elevated ROS production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. In addition, 0.01-1 μM TDP significantly increased the expression of ERα, GPR30, p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 protein. Specific protein inhibitors blocked phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT and decreased TDP-induced cell proliferation. These findings show that TDP activated the GPR30-PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 pathways, and the resulting interaction with ERα stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation. Our results indicate a novel mechanism through which TDP may exert relevant estrogenic action in ERα positive cancer cells.

  5. Binding-gating coupling in a nondesensitizing alpha7 nicotinic receptor A single channel pharmacological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, José Antonio; Mulet, José; Castillo, Mar; Criado, Manuel; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    The highly conserved alphaLys145 has been suggested to play an important role in the early steps of activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) by acetylcholine. Both macroscopic and single channel currents were recorded in the slowly desensitizing mutants L248T- and K145A-L248T-alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. On ACh-evoked currents, substitution of Lys145 by alanine showed the same effects that in wild type receptors: moderately decreased gating function and a more-than-expected loss of ACh potency, thus validating the experimental model. Single channel analysis quantitatively agreed with macroscopic data and revealed that impaired gating function in the double mutant alpha7K145A/L248T is the consequence of a slower opening rate, beta. Several nicotinic agonists were also studied, showing important features. Particularly, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), acting as an antagonist in alpha7K145A, became a full agonist in alpha7K145A/L248T. Single channel analysis of DMPP-evoked currents showed effects of Lys145 removal similar to those observed with ACh. Data suggest that alpha7Lys145 facilitates the early steps of channel activation. Moreover, the slowly desensitizing mutant alpha7L248T could be an interesting tool for the study of channel activation in alpha7 receptors. Nevertheless, its extensively altered pharmacology precludes the simple extrapolation of pharmacological data obtained in singly mutated alpha7 receptors.

  6. The role of G protein coupled receptor-mediated signaling in the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Manan, Zainab; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care, the prognosis of Acanthamoeba infections remains poor, suggesting that new targets are needed that can affect parasite survival and host-pathogen interactions. G proteins and their coupled receptors are well known regulators of a variety of cellular functions. The overall aim of the present study was to study the role of G-protein coupled receptor, β adrenergic receptor on the biology and pathogenesis of keratitis isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype. Inhibition of β adrenergic receptor using antagonist, propranolol had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities A. castellanii as determined using zymographic assays. Conversely, β adrenergic receptor agonist, isoprenaline showed increased proteases. Interestingly, β adrenergic receptor inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), viability (using amoebicidal assays by measuring uptake of Trypan blue) and encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form. Pre-treatment of parasites with propranolol hampered A. castellanii-mediated human brain microvascular endothelial cell cytotoxicity, as measured by the lacatate dehydrogenase release. The aforementioned findings suggest that G-protein coupled receptor, β adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling in A. castellanii biology and pathogenesis may offer new pharmacological targets.

  7. Phosphorylation of the rat Ins(1,4,5)P₃ receptor at T930 within the coupling domain decreases its affinity to Ins(1,4,5)P₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Shirley; Sun, Lu; Hubrack, Satanay; Yule, David; Machaca, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    The Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor acts as a central hub for Ca ( 2+) signaling by integrating multiple signaling modalities into Ca ( 2+) release from intracellular stores downstream of G-protein and tyrosine kinase-coupled receptor stimulation. As such, the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor plays fundamental roles in cellular physiology. The regulation of the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor is complex and involves protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, allosteric modulation, and regulation of its sub-cellular distribution. Phosphorylation has been implicated in the sensitization of Ins(1,4,5)P 3-dependent Ca ( 2+) release observed during oocyte maturation. Here we investigate the role of phosphorylation at T-930, a residue phosphorylated specifically during meiosis. We show that a phosphomimetic mutation at T-930 of the rat Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor results in decreased Ins(1,4,5)P 3-dependent Ca ( 2+) release and lowers the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 binding affinity of the receptor. These data, coupled to the sensitization of Ins(1,4,5)P 3-dependent Ca ( 2+) release during meiosis, argue that phosphorylation within the coupling domain of the Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor acts in a combinatorial fashion to regulate Ins(1,4,5)P 3 receptor function.

  8. Differential conformational requirements for activation of G proteins and the regulatory proteins arrestin and G protein-coupled receptor kinase in the G protein-coupled receptor for parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, J P; Frank, M; Krasel, C; Dees, C; Nissenson, R A; Lohse, M J

    2001-09-07

    After stimulation with agonist, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate G proteins and become phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), and most of them translocate cytosolic arrestin proteins to the cytoplasmic membrane. Agonist-activated GPCRs are specifically phosphorylated by GRKs and are targeted for endocytosis by arrestin proteins, suggesting a connection between GPCR conformational changes and interaction with GRKs and arrestins. Previously, we showed that by substitution of histidine for residues at the cytoplasmic side of helix 3 (H3) and helix 6 (H6) of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor (PTHR), a zinc metal ion-binding site is engineered that prevents PTH-stimulated G(s) activation (Sheikh, S. P., Vilardaga, J.-P., Baranski, T. J., Lichtarge, O., Iiri, T., Meng, E. C., Nissenson, R. A., and Bourne, H. R. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 17033-17041). These data suggest that relative movements between H3 and H6 are critical for G(s) activation. Does this molecular event play a similar role in activation of GRK and arrestin and in PTHR-mediated G(q) activation? To answer this question, we utilized the two previously described mutant forms of PTHR, H401 and H402, which contain a naturally present histidine residue at position 301 in H3 and a second substituted histidine residue at positions 401 and 402 in H6, respectively. Both mutant receptors showed inhibition of PTH-stimulated inositol phosphate and cAMP generation in the presence of increasing concentrations of Zn(II). However, the mutants showed no Zn(II)-dependent impairment of phosphorylation by GRK-2. Likewise, the mutants were indistinguishable from wild-type PTHR in the ability to translocate beta-arrestins/green fluorescent protein to the cell membrane and were also not affected by sensitivity to Zn(II). These results suggest that agonist-mediated phosphorylation and internalization of PTHR require conformational switches of the receptor distinct from the cAMP and inositol

  9. Dopamine and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 in the kidney: role in blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Pedro A; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A

    2010-12-01

    Complex interactions between genes and environment result in a sodium-induced elevation in blood pressure (salt sensitivity) and/or hypertension that lead to significant morbidity and mortality affecting up to 25% of the middle-aged adult population worldwide. Determining the etiology of genetic and/or environmentally-induced high blood pressure has been difficult because of the many interacting systems involved. Two main pathways have been implicated as principal determinants of blood pressure since they are located in the kidney (the key organ responsible for blood pressure regulation), and have profound effects on sodium balance: the dopaminergic and renin-angiotensin systems. These systems counteract or modulate each other, in concert with a host of intracellular second messenger pathways to regulate sodium and water balance. In particular, the G protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4 (GRK4) appears to play a key role in regulating dopaminergic-mediated natriuresis. Constitutively activated GRK4 gene variants (R65L, A142V, and A486V), by themselves or by their interaction with other genes involved in blood pressure regulation, are associated with essential hypertension and/or salt-sensitive hypertension in several ethnic groups. GRK4γ 142Vtransgenic mice are hypertensive on normal salt intake while GRK4γ 486V transgenic mice develop hypertension only with an increase in salt intake. GRK4 gene variants have been shown to hyperphosphorylate, desensitize, and internalize two members of the dopamine receptor family, the D(1) (D(1)R) and D(3) (D(3)R) dopamine receptors, but also increase the expression of a key receptor of the renin-angiotensin system, the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT(1)R). Knowledge of the numerous blood pressure regulatory pathways involving angiotensin and dopamine may provide new therapeutic approaches to the pharmacological regulation of sodium excretion and ultimately blood pressure control.

  10. Structural basis of G protein-coupled receptor-Gi protein interaction: formation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor-Gi protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnpotra, Jagjeet S; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Cai, Jian; Lynch, Diane L; Grossfield, Alan; Leioatts, Nicholas; Hurst, Dow P; Pitman, Michael C; Song, Zhao-Hui; Reggio, Patricia H

    2014-07-18

    In this study, we applied a comprehensive G protein-coupled receptor-Gαi protein chemical cross-linking strategy to map the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2)-Gαi interface and then used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dynamics of complex formation. Three cross-link sites were identified using LC-MS/MS and electrospray ionization-MS/MS as follows: 1) a sulfhydryl cross-link between C3.53(134) in TMH3 and the Gαi C-terminal i-3 residue Cys-351; 2) a lysine cross-link between K6.35(245) in TMH6 and the Gαi C-terminal i-5 residue, Lys-349; and 3) a lysine cross-link between K5.64(215) in TMH5 and the Gαi α4β6 loop residue, Lys-317. To investigate the dynamics and nature of the conformational changes involved in CB2·Gi complex formation, we carried out microsecond-time scale molecular dynamics simulations of the CB2 R*·Gαi1β1γ2 complex embedded in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer, using cross-linking information as validation. Our results show that although molecular dynamics simulations started with the G protein orientation in the β2-AR*·Gαsβ1γ2 complex crystal structure, the Gαi1β1γ2 protein reoriented itself within 300 ns. Two major changes occurred as follows. 1) The Gαi1 α5 helix tilt changed due to the outward movement of TMH5 in CB2 R*. 2) A 25° clockwise rotation of Gαi1β1γ2 underneath CB2 R* occurred, with rotation ceasing when Pro-139 (IC-2 loop) anchors in a hydrophobic pocket on Gαi1 (Val-34, Leu-194, Phe-196, Phe-336, Thr-340, Ile-343, and Ile-344). In this complex, all three experimentally identified cross-links can occur. These findings should be relevant for other class A G protein-coupled receptors that couple to Gi proteins. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Mu opioid receptor-effector coupling and trafficking in dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, W M; Wei, W; Xie, C-W; Chiu, K; Kieffer, B L; Evans, C J; Maidment, N T

    2006-10-13

    Morphine induces profound analgesic tolerance in vivo despite inducing little internalization of the mu opioid receptor (muOR). Previously proposed explanations suggest that this lack of internalization could either lead to prolonged signaling and associated compensatory changes in downstream signaling systems, or that the receptor is unable to recycle and resensitize and so loses efficacy, either mechanism resulting in tolerance. We therefore examined, in cultured neurons, the relationship between muOR internalization and desensitization in response to two agonists, D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly5-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine. In addition, we studied the chimeric mu/delta opioid receptor (mu/ partial differentialOR) which could affect internalization and desensitization in neurons. Dorsal root ganglia neurons from muOR knockout mice were transduced with an adenovirus expressing either receptor and their respective internalization, desensitization and trafficking profiles determined. Both receptors desensitized equally, measured by Ca2+ current inhibition, during the first 5 min of agonist exposure to DAMGO or morphine treatment, although the mu/partial differentialOR desensitized more extensively. Such rapid desensitization was unrelated to internalization as DAMGO, but not morphine, internalized both receptors after 20 min. In response to DAMGO the mu/partial differentialOR internalized more rapidly than the muOR and was trafficked through Rab4-positive endosomes and lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1-labeled lysosomes whereas the muOR was trafficked through Rab4 and Rab11-positive endosomes. Chronic desensitization of the Ca2+ current response, after 24 h of morphine or DAMGO incubation, was seen in the DAMGO, but not morphine-treated, muOR-expressing cells. Such persistence of signaling after chronic morphine treatment suggests that compensation of downstream signaling systems, rather than loss of efficacy due to poor receptor recycling, is a more likely

  12. G-蛋白偶联受体和神经再生%G-Protein-Coupled Receptors in Adult Neurogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅振林; 洪浩

    2015-01-01

    We know that neurogenesis exists throughout life in mammals.Adult neurogenesis is regulated by many factors including neurotrophic factor, stress, inflammatory cytokines and G-protein-coupled receptors.Accumulating evidence indicates that adult neurogenesis deficiency is the pathogenesis of depression.Here we review recent progress on the roles of various G-protein-coupled-receptors and their mechaniams that are involved in the regulation of adult neurogenesis.Hence this review will lay the theoretical foundation for the development of antidepressants that improve adult neurogenesis.%神经再生持续于哺乳动物整个成年期。成年神经再生受多种因素调节,包括神经营养因子、应激、炎性细胞因子以及G-蛋白偶联受体等。大量研究认为,神经再生障碍是抑郁症的发病机制。本文将围绕G-蛋白偶联受体将调控神经再生机制的研究进展进行综述,为以提高神经再生为靶点的抗抑郁药的研发奠定基础。

  13. The foot structure from the type 1 ryanodine receptor is required for functional coupling to store-operated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Alicia; Diaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis

    2005-07-01

    In the present study we have explored structural determinants of the functional interaction between skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have illustrated a functional interaction between TRPC1 channels and RyR1 for the regulation of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) initiated after releasing calcium from a caffeine-sensitive intracellular calcium pool. RNA interference experiments directed to reduce the amount of TRPC1 protein indicate that RyR1 associates to at least two different types of store-operated channels (SOCs), one dependent and one independent of TRPC1. In contrast, bradykinin-induced SOCE is completely dependent on the presence of TRPC1 protein, as we have previously illustrated. Removing the foot structure from RyR1 results in normal caffeine-induced release of calcium from internal stores but abolishes the activation of SOCE, indicating that this structure is require for functional coupling to SOCs. The footless RyR1 protein shows a different cellular localization when compared with wild type RyR1. The later protein shows a higher percentage of colocalization with FM-464, a marker of plasma membrane. The implications of the foot structure for the functional and physical coupling to TRPC and SOCs is discussed.

  14. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  15. Engineering a minimal G protein to facilitate crystallisation of G protein-coupled receptors in their active conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2016-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate cytoplasmic signalling in response to extracellular stimuli, and are important therapeutic targets in a wide range of diseases. Structure determination of GPCRs in all activation states is important to elucidate the precise mechanism of signal transduction and to facilitate optimal drug design. However, due to their inherent instability, crystallisation of GPCRs in complex with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins, has proved challenging. Here, we describe the design of a minimal G protein, mini-Gs, which is composed solely of the GTPase domain from the adenylate cyclase stimulating G protein Gs Mini-Gs is a small, soluble protein, which efficiently couples GPCRs in the absence of Gβγ subunits. We engineered mini-Gs, using rational design mutagenesis, to form a stable complex with detergent-solubilised β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Mini G proteins induce similar pharmacological and structural changes in GPCRs as heterotrimeric G proteins, but eliminate many of the problems associated with crystallisation of these complexes, specifically their large size, conformational dynamics and instability in detergent. They are therefore novel tools, which will facilitate the biochemical and structural characterisation of GPCRs in their active conformation.

  16. The Cell Surface Estrogen Receptor, G Protein- Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30, is Markedly Down Regulated During Breast Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Poola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: GPR30 is a cell surface estrogen receptor that has been shown to mediate a number of non-genomic rapid effects of estrogen and appear to balance the signaling of estrogen and growth factors. In addition, progestins appear to use GPR30 for their actions. Therefore, GPR30 could play a critical role in hormonal regulation of breast epithelial cell integrity. Deregulation of the events mediated by GPR30 could contribute to tumorigenesis.Methods: To understand the role of GPR30 in the deregulation of estrogen signaling processes during breast carcinogenesis, we have undertaken this study to investigate its expression at mRNA levels in tumor tissues and their matched normal tissues. We compared its expression at mRNA levels by RT quantitative real-time PCR relative to GAPDH in ERα”—positive (n = 54 and ERα”—negative (n = 45 breast cancer tissues to their matched normal tissues.Results: We report here, for the first time, that GPR30 mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated in cancer tissues in comparison with their matched normal tissues (p 0.0001 by two sided paired t-test. The GPR30 expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues from patients (n = 29 who had lymph node metastasis in comparison with tumors from patients (n = 53 who were negative for lymph node metastasis (two sample t-test, p 0.02, but no association was found with ERα, PR and other tumor characteristics.Conclusions: Down-regulation of GPR30 could contribute to breast tumorigenesis and lymph node metastasis.

  17. Identification of the first surrogate agonists for the G protein-coupled receptor GPR132

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A.; Christensen, Hanna Belcik; Isberg, Vignir;

    2015-01-01

    -arrestin recruitment assay, and thereby identified the first disclosed surrogate GPR132 agonist 1 with a potency of 3.4 μM. This constitutes the first available pharmacological tool for the in vitro characterization of the orphan receptor GPR132. The testing of 32 analogs furthermore identified a number of compounds...

  18. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Park, Won-Mee; Sakata, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro,...

  19. Receptor-induced thiolate couples Env activation to retrovirus fusion and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G Smith

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available According to current models of retrovirus infection, receptor binding to the surface subunit (SU of the envelope glycoprotein (Env triggers a conformational change in the transmembrane subunit (TM that mediates virus fusion to cell membranes. To understand how this occurs, we investigated the role of the receptor Tva in avian leukosis virus-A (ALV-A infection. We find that Tva binding induced the formation of a reactive thiolate on Cys38 (Cys38-S- in SU. Both chemical and genetic inactivation of Cys38-S- completely abrogated ALV fusion and infection. Remarkably, Cys38-S- does not mediate isomerization of the SU-TM disulfide bond and is not required for Tva-induced activation of TM, including pre-hairpin association with membranes and low pH assembly of helical bundles. These findings indicate that, contrary to current models, receptor activation of TM is not sufficient for ALV fusion and infection and that formation of a reactive thiolate is an additional receptor-dependent step.

  20. Monitoring G protein-coupled receptor and β-arrestin trafficking in live cells using enhanced bystander BRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Yoon; Le Gouill, Christian; Lukashova, Viktoria; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Hogue, Mireille; Khoury, Etienne; Song, Mideum; Bouvier, Michel; Laporte, Stéphane A.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of receptors are pivotal to maintain physiological functions and drug action; however, robust quantitative approaches are lacking to study such processes in live cells. Here we present new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) sensors to quantitatively monitor G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and β-arrestin trafficking. These sensors are based on bystander BRET and use the naturally interacting chromophores luciferase (RLuc) and green fluorescent protein (rGFP) from Renilla. The versatility and robustness of this approach are exemplified by anchoring rGFP at the plasma membrane or in endosomes to generate high dynamic spectrometric BRET signals on ligand-promoted recruitment or sequestration of RLuc-tagged proteins to, or from, specific cell compartments, as well as sensitive subcellular BRET imaging for protein translocation visualization. These sensors are scalable to high-throughput formats and allow quantitative pharmacological studies of GPCR trafficking in real time, in live cells, revealing ligand-dependent biased trafficking of receptor/β-arrestin complexes. PMID:27397672

  1. Paradoxical gain-of-function mutant of the G-protein-coupled receptor PROKR2 promotes early puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Maki; Suzuki, Erina; Izumi, Yoko; Torii, Tomohiro; Narumi, Satoshi; Igarashi, Maki; Miyado, Mami; Katsumi, Momori; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro; Umezawa, Akihiro; Matsubara, Yoichi; Yamauchi, Junji; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2017-10-01

    The human genome encodes ~750 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2) involved in the regulation of sexual maturation. Previously reported pathogenic gain-of-function mutations of GPCR genes invariably encoded aberrant receptors with excessive signal transduction activity. Although in vitro assays demonstrated that an artificially created inactive mutant of PROKR2 exerted paradoxical gain-of-function effects when co-transfected with wild-type proteins, such a phenomenon has not been observed in vivo. Here, we report a heterozygous frameshift mutation of PROKR2 identified in a 3.5-year-old girl with central precocious puberty. The mutant mRNA escaped nonsense-mediated decay and generated a GPCR lacking two transmembrane domains and the carboxyl-terminal tail. The mutant protein had no in vitro signal transduction activity; however, cells co-expressing the mutant and wild-type PROKR2 exhibited markedly exaggerated ligand-induced Ca(2+) responses. The results indicate that certain inactive PROKR2 mutants can cause early puberty by enhancing the functional property of coexisting wild-type proteins. Considering the structural similarity among GPCRs, this paradoxical gain-of-function mechanism may underlie various human disorders. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-06-29

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors.

  3. FRPR-4 Is a G-Protein Coupled Neuropeptide Receptor That Regulates Behavioral Quiescence and Posture in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Matthew D Nelson

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides signal through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs to regulate a broad array of animal behaviors and physiological processes. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes approximately 100 predicted neuropeptide receptor GPCRs, but in vivo roles for only a few have been identified. We describe here a role for the GPCR FRPR-4 in the regulation of behavioral quiescence and locomotive posture. FRPR-4 is activated in cell culture by several neuropeptides with an amidated isoleucine-arginine-phenylalanine (IRF motif or an amidated valine-arginine-phenylalanine (VRF motif at their carboxy termini, including those encoded by the gene flp-13. Loss of frpr-4 function results in a minor feeding quiescence defect after heat-induced cellular stress. Overexpression of frpr-4 induces quiescence of locomotion and feeding as well as an exaggerated body bend posture. The exaggerated body bend posture requires the gene flp-13. While frpr-4 is expressed broadly, selective overexpression of frpr-4 in the proprioceptive DVA neurons results in exaggerated body bends that require flp-13 in the ALA neuron. Our results suggest that FLP-13 and other neuropeptides signal through FRPR-4 and other receptors to regulate locomotion posture and behavioral quiescence.

  4. Selectivity of commonly used inhibitors of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-dependent endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuohan; Zhang, Xiaohan; Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Min, Chengchun; Wang, Zengtao; Cheon, Seung Hoon; Oak, Min-Ho; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2015-10-01

    Among the multiple G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) endocytic pathways, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and caveolar endocytosis are more extensively characterized than other endocytic pathways. A number of endocytic inhibitors have been used to block CME; however, systemic studies to determine the selectivity of these inhibitors are needed. Clathrin heavy chain or caveolin1-knockdown cells have been employed to determine the specificity of various chemical and molecular biological tools for CME and caveolar endocytosis. Sucrose, concanavalin A, and dominant negative mutants of dynamin blocked other endocytic pathways, in addition to CME. In particular, concanavalin A nonspecifically interfered with the signaling of several GPCRs tested in the study. Decreased pH, monodansylcadaverine, and dominant negative mutants of epsin were more specific for CME than other treatments were. A recently introduced CME inhibitor, Pitstop2™, showed only marginal selectivity for CME and interfered with receptor expression on the cell surface. Blockade of receptor endocytosis by epsin mutants and knockdown of the clathrin heavy chain enhanced the β2AR-mediated ERK activation. Overall, our studies show that previous experimental results should be interpreted with discretion if they included the use of endocytic inhibitors that were previously thought to be CME-selective. In addition, our study shows that endocytosis of β2 adrenoceptor through clathrin-mediated pathway has negative effects on ERK activation.

  5. GPR87 Is an Overexpressed G-Protein Coupled Receptor in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

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    Mathias Gugger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The overall 5-year survival after therapy is about 16% and there is a clear need for better treatment options, such as therapies targeting specific molecular structures. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, as the largest family of cell surface receptors, represent an important group of potential targets for diagnostics and therapy. We therefore used laser capture microdissection and GPCR-focused Affymetrix microarrays to examine the expression of 929 GPCR transcripts in tissue samples of 10 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 7 with adenocarcinoma in order to identify novel targets in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. The relative gene expression levels were calculated in tumour samples compared to samples of the neighbouring alveolar tissue in every patient. Based on this unique study design, we identified 5 significantly overexpressed GPCRs in squamous cell carcinoma, in the following decreasing order of expression: GPR87 > CMKOR1 > FZD10 > LGR4 > P2RY11. All are non-olfactory and GRAFS (glutamate, rhodopsin, adhesion, frizzled/taste2, secretin family classified. GPR87, LGR4 and CMKOR1 are orphan receptors. GPR87 stands out as a candidate for further target validation due to its marked overexpression and correlation on a mutation-based level to squamous cell carcinoma.

  6. Targeted Elimination of G Proteins and Arrestins Defines Their Specific Contributions to Both Intensity and Duration of G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling.

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    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Inoue, Asuka; Jenkins, Laura; Raihan, Sheikh Zahir; Prihandoko, Rudi; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-12-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can initiate intracellular signaling cascades by coupling to an array of heterotrimeric G proteins and arrestin adaptor proteins. Understanding the contribution of each of these coupling options to GPCR signaling has been hampered by a paucity of tools to selectively perturb receptor function. Here we employ CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to eliminate selected G proteins (Gαq and Gα11) or arrestin2 and arrestin3 from HEK293 cells together with the elimination of receptor phosphorylation sites to define the relative contribution of G proteins, arrestins, and receptor phosphorylation to the signaling outcomes of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4). A lack of FFA4-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) in Gαq/Gα11-null cells and agonist-mediated receptor internalization in arrestin2/3-null cells confirmed previously reported canonical signaling features of this receptor, thereby validating the genome-edited HEK293 cells. FFA4-mediated ERK1/2 activation was totally dependent on Gq/11 but intriguingly was substantially enhanced for FFA4 receptors lacking sites of regulated phosphorylation. This was not due to a simple lack of desensitization of Gq/11 signaling because the Gq/11-dependent calcium response was desensitized by both receptor phosphorylation and arrestin-dependent mechanisms, whereas a substantially enhanced ERK1/2 response was only observed for receptors lacking phosphorylation sites and not in arrestin2/3-null cells. In conclusion, we validate CRISPR/Cas9 engineered HEK293 cells lacking Gq/11 or arrestin2/3 as systems for GPCR signaling research and employ these cells to reveal a previously unappreciated interplay of signaling pathways where receptor phosphorylation can impact on ERK1/2 signaling through a mechanism that is likely independent of arrestins.

  7. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

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    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  8. Toll-like receptor 3 signalling up-regulates expression of the HIV co-receptor G-protein coupled receptor 15 on human CD4+ T cells.

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    Miriam Kiene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4(+ T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. RESULTS: Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4(+ T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4(+ T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4(+ T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals.

  9. The M sub 1 muscarinic receptor and its second messenger coupling in human neuroblastoma cells and transfected murine fibroblast cells

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    Mei, Lin.

    1989-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that pirenzepine (PZ)-high affinity muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) are coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol lipids and not to the adenylate cyclase system in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The maximal carbachol(CCh)-stimulated ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 1} accumulation in the SH-SY5Y cells was decreased in the presence of 1{mu}g/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein may be involved in the coupling. Several cell clones which express only M{sub 1} mAChR were generated by transfecting the murine fibroblast B82 cells with the cloned rat genomic m{sub 1} gene. The transfected B82 cells (cTB10) showed specific ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding activity. The mAChRs in these cells are of the M{sub 1} type defined by their high affinity for PZ and low affinity for AF-DX 116 and coupled to hydrolysis of inositol lipids, possibly via a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein. The relationship between the M{sub 1} mAChR density and the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol lipids was studied in 7 clones. The M{sub 1} mAChR densities in these cells characterized by ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding ranged from 12 fmol/10{sup 6} cells in LK3-1 cells to 260 fmol/10{sup 6} cells in the LK3-8 cells.

  10. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and beta-arrestins are recruited to FSH receptor in stimulated rat primary Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Sébastien; Kara, Elodie; Crepieux, Pascale; Piketty, Vincent; Martinat, Nadine; Guillou, Florian; Reiter, Eric

    2006-08-01

    FSH-receptor (FSH-R) signaling is regulated by agonist-induced desensitization and internalization. It has been shown, in a variety of overexpression systems, that G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate the activated FSH-R, promote beta-arrestin recruitment and ultimately lead to internalization. The accuracy of this mechanism has not yet been demonstrated in cells expressing these different molecules at physiological levels. Using sucrose gradient fractionation, we show that FSH induces the recruitment of the endogenous GRK 2 and beta-arrestin 1/2 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane of rat primary Sertoli cells. As assessed by ligand binding, the FSH-R was found expressed in the fractions where GRK 2 and beta-arrestins were recruited upon FSH treatment. In addition, the endogenous beta-arrestin 1 was found dephosphorylated in an agonist-dependent manner. Finally, a significant FSH-binding activity was co-immunoprecipitated with the endogenous beta-arrestins from agonist-stimulated but not from untreated Sertoli cell extracts. This FSH-R interaction with beta-arrestins was sustained for up to 30 min. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that the GRK/beta-arrestin machinery plays a physiologically relevant role in the regulation of the FSH signaling.

  11. Involvement of estradiol-17β and its membrane receptor, G protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in regulation of oocyte maturation in zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yefei; Thomas, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The orphan G protein coupled receptor, GPR30, has the characteristics of a high affinity, specific estrogen membrane receptor on Atlantic croaker oocytes and mediates estrogen inhibition of oocyte maturation in this perciform fish. In order to determine the broad applicability of these findings to other teleosts, similar experiments were conducted in a cyprinid fish, zebrafish, in the present study. GPR30 mRNA expression was detected in zebrafish oocytes but not in the ovarian follicular cells. Both spontaneous and 17, 20β-dihyroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP)-induced maturation of follicle-enclosed zebrafish oocytes was significantly decreased when they were incubated with either estradiol-17β, or the GPR30 agonists, ICI 182 780 and tamoxifen, or with the GPR30 specific agonist G-1. On the other hand spontaneous oocyte maturation increased two-fold when zebrafish ovarian follicles were incubated with an aromatase inhibitor, ATD. Moreover, the stimulatory effects of ATD on germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) were partially reversed by co-treatment with 100 nM of E2 or G-1. These results suggest that endogenous estrogens acting through GPR30 are involved in maintaining meiotic arrest of zebrafish oocytes. PMID:18952087

  12. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    the receptors currently assigned to family C. However, our results strongly indicate that RAIG1 and GPRC5B form a new subgroup of family C characterized by short ATDs. GPRC5B mRNA is widely expressed in peripheral and central tissues with highest abundance in kidney, pancreas, and testis. This mRNA expression...... from an expressed sequence tag clone that contained the entire open reading frame of the transcript encoding a protein of 395 amino acids. Analysis of the protein sequence reveal that GPRC5B contains a signal peptide and seven transmembrane alpha-helices, which is a hallmark of G......-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPRC5B displays homology to retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RAIG1, 33% sequence identity) and to several family C (mGluR-like) GPCRs (20-25% sequence identity). Both RAIG1 and GPRC5B have short extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) that contrast the very long ATDs characterizing...

  13. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  14. Comparative analysis of the repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors of three species of the fungal genus Trichoderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic organisms employ cell surface receptors such as the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as sensors to connect to the environment. GPCRs react to a variety of extracellular cues and are considered to play central roles in the signal transduction in fungi. Several species of the filamentous ascomycete Trichoderma are potent mycoparasites, i.e. can attack and parasitize other fungi, which turns them into successful bio-fungicides for the protection of plants against fungal phytopathogens. The identification and characterization of GPCRs will provide insights into how Trichoderma communicates with its environment and senses the presence of host fungi. Results We mined the recently published genomes of the two mycoparasitic biocontrol agents Trichoderma atroviride and Trichoderma virens and compared the identified GPCR-like proteins to those of the saprophyte Trichoderma reesei. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in 14 classes and revealed differences not only among the three Trichoderma species but also between Trichoderma and other fungi. The class comprising proteins of the PAQR family was significantly expanded both in Trichoderma compared to other fungi as well as in the two mycoparasites compared to T. reesei. Expression analysis of the PAQR-encoding genes of the three Trichoderma species revealed that all except one were actually transcribed. Furthermore, the class of receptors with a DUF300 domain was expanded in T. atroviride, and T. virens showed an expansion of PTH11-like receptors compared to T. atroviride and T. reesei. Conclusions Comparative genome analyses of three Trichoderma species revealed a great diversity of putative GPCRs with genus- and species- specific differences. The expansion of certain classes in the mycoparasites T. atroviride and T. virens is likely to reflect the capability of these fungi to establish various ecological niches and interactions with other organisms such as fungi and plants. These

  15. REEPs are membrane shaping adapter proteins that modulate specific g protein-coupled receptor trafficking by affecting ER cargo capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Susann; Hurt, Carl M; Ho, Vincent K; Angelotti, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Receptor expression enhancing proteins (REEPs) were identified by their ability to enhance cell surface expression of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), specifically GPCRs that have proven difficult to express in heterologous cell systems. Further analysis revealed that they belong to the Yip (Ypt-interacting protein) family and that some REEP subtypes affect ER structure. Yip family comparisons have established other potential roles for REEPs, including regulation of ER-Golgi transport and processing/neuronal localization of cargo proteins. However, these other potential REEP functions and the mechanism by which they selectively enhance GPCR cell surface expression have not been clarified. By utilizing several REEP family members (REEP1, REEP2, and REEP6) and model GPCRs (α2A and α2C adrenergic receptors), we examined REEP regulation of GPCR plasma membrane expression, intracellular processing, and trafficking. Using a combination of immunolocalization and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that this REEP subset is localized primarily to ER, but not plasma membranes. Single cell analysis demonstrated that these REEPs do not specifically enhance surface expression of all GPCRs, but affect ER cargo capacity of specific GPCRs and thus their surface expression. REEP co-expression with α2 adrenergic receptors (ARs) revealed that this REEP subset interacts with and alter glycosidic processing of α2C, but not α2A ARs, demonstrating selective interaction with cargo proteins. Specifically, these REEPs enhanced expression of and interacted with minimally/non-glycosylated forms of α2C ARs. Most importantly, expression of a mutant REEP1 allele (hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG31) lacking the carboxyl terminus led to loss of this interaction. Thus specific REEP isoforms have additional intracellular functions besides altering ER structure, such as enhancing ER cargo capacity, regulating ER-Golgi processing, and interacting with select cargo proteins

  16. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  17. Lysophospholipid Growth Factors and Their G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Immunity, Coronary Artery Disease, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Goetzl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological lysophospholipids (LPLs, exemplified by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, are omnific mediators of normal cellular proliferation, survival, and functions. Although both LPA and S1P attain micromolar concentrations in many biological fluids, numerous aspects of their biosynthesis, transport, and metabolic degradation are unknown. Eight members of a new subfamily of G protein-coupled LPA/S1P receptors, originally termed Edg Rs, bind either LPA or S1P with high affinity and transduce a series of growth-related and/or cytoskeleton-based functional responses. The most critical areas of LPL biology and pathobiology are neural development and neurodegeneration, immunity, atherosclerosis and myocardial injury, and cancer. Data from analyses of T cells established two basic points: (1 the plasticity and adaptability of expression of LPA/S1P Rs by some cells as a function of activation, and (2 the role of opposing signals from two different receptors for the same ligand as a mechanism for fine control of effects of LPLs. In the heart, LPLs may promote coronary atherosclerosis, but are effectively cytoprotective for hypoxic cardiac myocytes and those exposed to oxygen free radicals. The findings of production of LPA by some types of tumor cells, overexpression of selected sets of LPA receptors by the same tumor cells, and augmentation of the effects of protein growth factors by LPA have suggested pathogenetic roles for the LPLs in cancer. The breadth of physiologic and pathologic activities of LPLs emphasizes the importance of developing bioavailable nonlipid agonists and antagonists of the LPA/S1P receptors for diverse therapeutic applications.

  18. Analysis of Drug Design for a Selection of G Protein-Coupled Neuro- Receptors Using Neural Network Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerskov, Claus; Mortensen, Rasmus M; Bohr, Henrik G

    2015-01-01

    A study is presented on how well possible drug-molecules can be predicted with respect to their function and binding to a selection of neuro-receptors by the use of artificial neural networks. The ligands investigated in this study are chosen to be corresponding to the G protein-coupled receptors µ-opioid, serotonin 2B (5-HT2B) and metabotropic glutamate D5. They are selected due to the availability of pharmacological drug-molecule binding data for these receptors. Feedback and deep belief artificial neural network architectures (NNs) were chosen to perform the task of aiding drugdesign. This is done by training on structural features, selected using a "minimum redundancy, maximum relevance"-test, and testing for successful prediction of categorized binding strength. An extensive comparison of the neural network performances was made in order to select the optimal architecture. Deep belief networks, trained with greedy learning algorithms, showed superior performance in prediction over the simple feedback NNs. The best networks obtained scores of more than 90 % accuracy in predicting the degree of binding drug molecules to the mentioned receptors and with a maximal Matthew`s coefficient of 0.925. The performance of 8 category networks (8 output classes for binding strength) obtained a prediction accuracy of above 60 %. After training the networks, tests were done on how well the systems could be used as an aid in designing candidate drug molecules. Specifically, it was shown how a selection of chemical characteristics could give the lowest observed IC50 values, meaning largest bio-effect pr. nM substance, around 0.03-0.06 nM. These ligand characteristics could be total number of atoms, their types etc. In conclusion, deep belief networks trained on drug-molecule structures were demonstrated as powerful computational tools, able to aid in drug-design in a fast and cheap fashion, compared to conventional pharmacological techniques.

  19. Identification of Novel G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 Ligands as Pharmacologic Tools for Investigating X-Linked Ocular Albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Manga, Prashiela; Schiedel, Anke C

    2017-06-01

    GPR143 regulates melanosome biogenesis and organelle size in pigment cells. The mechanisms underlying receptor function remain unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are excellent pharmacologic targets; thus, we developed and applied a screening approach to identify potential GPR143 ligands and chemical modulators. GPR143 interacts with β-arrestin; we therefore established a β-arrestin recruitment assay to screen for compounds that modulate activity. Because GPR143 is localized intracellularly, screening with the wild-type receptor would be restricted to agents absorbed by the cell. For the screen we used a mutant receptor, which shows similar basal activity as the wild type but traffics to the plasma membrane. We tested two compound libraries and investigated validated hits for their effects on melanocyte pigmentation. GPR143, which showed high constitutive activity in the β-arrestin assay, was inhibited by several compounds. The three validated inhibitors (pimozide, niclosamide, and ethacridine lactate) were assessed for impact on melanocytes. Pigmentation and expression of tyrosinase, a key melanogenic enzyme, were reduced by all compounds. Because GPR143 appears to be constitutively active, these compounds may turn off its activity. X-linked ocular albinism type I, characterized by developmental eye defects, results from GPR143 mutations. Identifying pharmacologic agents that modulate GPR143 activity will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function and provide novel tools with which to study GPCRs in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. Pimozide, one of three GPR143 inhibitors identified in this study, maybe be a good lead structure for development of more potent compounds and provide a platform for design of novel therapeutic agents.

  20. Identification of Novel G Protein–Coupled Receptor 143 Ligands as Pharmacologic Tools for Investigating X-Linked Ocular Albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Manga, Prashiela; Schiedel, Anke C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose GPR143 regulates melanosome biogenesis and organelle size in pigment cells. The mechanisms underlying receptor function remain unclear. G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are excellent pharmacologic targets; thus, we developed and applied a screening approach to identify potential GPR143 ligands and chemical modulators. Methods GPR143 interacts with β-arrestin; we therefore established a β-arrestin recruitment assay to screen for compounds that modulate activity. Because GPR143 is localized intracellularly, screening with the wild-type receptor would be restricted to agents absorbed by the cell. For the screen we used a mutant receptor, which shows similar basal activity as the wild type but traffics to the plasma membrane. We tested two compound libraries and investigated validated hits for their effects on melanocyte pigmentation. Results GPR143, which showed high constitutive activity in the β-arrestin assay, was inhibited by several compounds. The three validated inhibitors (pimozide, niclosamide, and ethacridine lactate) were assessed for impact on melanocytes. Pigmentation and expression of tyrosinase, a key melanogenic enzyme, were reduced by all compounds. Because GPR143 appears to be constitutively active, these compounds may turn off its activity. Conclusions X-linked ocular albinism type I, characterized by developmental eye defects, results from GPR143 mutations. Identifying pharmacologic agents that modulate GPR143 activity will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function and provide novel tools with which to study GPCRs in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. Pimozide, one of three GPR143 inhibitors identified in this study, maybe be a good lead structure for development of more potent compounds and provide a platform for design of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:28632878

  1. Genetic association between G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6/β-arrestin 2 and dopamine supersensitivity psychosis in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oda Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yasunori Oda,1 Nobuhisa Kanahara,2 Hiroshi Kimura,1 Hiroyuki Watanabe,2 Kenji Hashimoto,3 Masaomi Iyo1 1Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan; 2Division of Medical Treatment and Rehabilitation, 3Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan Background/aim: Dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP, clinically characterized by unstable and severe psychosis or tardive dyskinesia and often categorized as treatment-resistant schizophrenia, is promoted by long-term antipsychotic treatment. An upregulation of the dopamine D2 receptor caused by antipsychotic(s is involved in the development of DSP. The present study explored the potential roles of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6 and β-arrestin 2 (ARRB2 that are involved in the trafficking of DRD2 in patients with DSP. Methods: We conducted a genetic association study of GRK6/ARRB2 between the patients with DSP episodes [DSP(+ group: N=108] and the patients without DSP(- episodes [DSP(- group: N=169] from the total group of patients (N=333. Based on the patients’ treatment history, a DSP episode was defined as withdrawal psychosis, developed tolerance to antipsychotic effect, and tardive dyskinesia (the remaining 56 patients were excluded due to insufficient information. Results: The results revealed that none of the allelic or genotyping distributions of five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of GRK6 and three SNPs of ARRB2 showed any significant difference between the DSP(+ and DSP(- groups. Conclusion: The results suggest that the SNP analyses of these two molecules fail to classify patients into the potential clinical subtype of DSP(+ or DSP(- group. However, since GRK6 and ARRB2 are surely involved in dopamine D2 receptor metabolism, further studies based on prospective observations of the onset of DSP under specific antipsychotic treatments are needed. Keywords: antipsychotic

  2. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders.

  3. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C.; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M.; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Brown, H. Alex; Umstead, Todd M.; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C.; St. Croix, Brad

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor of previously unknown function. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. PMID:23684610

  4. Essential regulation of lung surfactant homeostasis by the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Brown, H Alex; Umstead, Todd M; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C; St Croix, Brad

    2013-05-30

    GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cloned human neuropeptide Y receptor couples to two different second messenger systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Herzog, H.; Hort, Y J; Ball, H J; Hayes, G; Shine, J; Selbie, L A

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian nervous system and exhibits a diverse range of important physiological activities, including effects on psychomotor activity, food intake, regulation of central endocrine secretion, and potent vasoactive effects on the cardiovascular system. Two major subtypes of NPY receptor (Y1 and Y2) have been defined by pharmacological criteria. We report here the molecular cloning of a cDNA sequence encoding a human NPY rece...

  6. erbB2 is required for G protein-coupled receptor signaling in the heart

    OpenAIRE

    Negro, Alejandra; Brar, Bhawanjit K.; Gu, Yusu; Peterson, Kirk L.; Vale, Wylie; Lee, Kuo-Fen

    2006-01-01

    erbB2/Her2, a ligandless receptor kinase, has pleiotropic effects on mammalian development and human disease. The absence of erbB2 signaling in cardiac myocytes results in dilated cardiomyopathy in mice, resembling the cardiotoxic effects observed in a subset of breast cancer patients treated with the anti-Her2 antibody herceptin. Emerging evidence suggests that erbB2 is pivotal for integrating signaling networks involving multiple classes of extracellular signals. However, its role in G prot...

  7. Functional importance of the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region in the calcium-sensing receptor. Constitutive activity and inverse agonism in a family C G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, T A; Burstein, E S

    2000-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. To date 14 activating mutations in CaR showing increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) have been identified in humans with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Four of these activating mutations are found...... in the Ala(116)-Pro(136) region of CaR, indicating that this part of the receptor is particularly sensitive to mutation-induced activation. This region was subjected to random saturation mutagenesis, and 219 mutant receptor clones were isolated and screened pharmacologically in a high throughput screening...... when the mutations were transferred to a chimeric receptor Ca/1a consisting of the amino-terminal domain of the CaR and the 7 transmembrane and intracellular domains of the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1a. CPCCOEt, a noncompetitive antagonist acting at the 7 transmembrane domain of mGluR1a...

  8. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guescini, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Leo, G.; Genedani, S. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Carone, C. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy); Pederzoli, F. [Department Biomedical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ciruela, F. [Departament Patologia i Terapeutica Experimental, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Guidolin, D. [Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology, University of Padua (Italy); Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino (Italy); Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K. [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Agnati, L.F., E-mail: luigiagnati@tin.it [IRCCS San Camillo Lido, Venezia (Italy)

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  9. Reactivation of Gαi-coupled formyl peptide receptors is inhibited by Gαq-selective inhibitors when induced by signals generated by the platelet-activating factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdfeldt, André; Dahlstrand Rudin, Agnes; Gabl, Michael; Rajabkhani, Zahra; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei

    2017-09-01

    Formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-desensitized neutrophils display increased production/release of superoxide (O2(-)) when activated by platelet-activating factor (PAF), a priming of the response achieved through a unique receptor crosstalk mechanism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an inhibitor selective for small, heterotrimeric G proteins belonging to the Gαq subclass on that receptor crosstalk. We show that signals generated by FPRs and the PAF receptor (PAFR) induce activation of the neutrophil O2(-), producing NADPH-oxidase, and that response was sensitive to Gαq inhibition in cells activated by PAF, but no inhibition was obtained in cells activated by FPR agonists. Signaling in naive neutrophils is terminated fairly rapidly, and the receptors become homologously desensitized. The downstream sensitivity to Gαq inhibition in desensitized cells displaying increased production/release of O2(-) through the PAFR receptor crosstalk mechanism also comprised the reactivation of the FPRs, and the activation signals were redirected from the PAFR to the desensitized/reactivated FPRs. The Gαq-dependent activation signals generated by the PAFRs activate the Gαi-coupled FPRs, a receptor crosstalk that represents a novel pathway by which G protein-coupled receptors can be regulated and signaling can be turned on and off. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. 17β-estradiol induces non-genomic effects in renal intercalated cells through the G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmeister, Marlene Vind; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Christensen, Birgitte Mønster;

    2012-01-01

    receptors. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1 or GPR30) was detected in microdissected DCT2/CNT/iCCD by RT-PCR. Stimulation with the specific GPER1 agonist G-1 induced similar [Ca(2+)](i) increases as E2, and in tubules from GPER1 knockout mice, E2, G-1, and ICI 182,780 failed to induce [Ca(2+)](i...

  11. A Hybrid Approach to Structure and Function Modeling of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota; Bajda, Marek; Filipek, Sławomir

    2016-04-25

    The recent GPCR Dock 2013 assessment of serotonin receptor 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B, and smoothened receptor SMO targets, exposed the strengths and weaknesses of the currently used computational approaches. The test cases of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B demonstrated that both the receptor structure and the ligand binding mode can be predicted with the atomic-detail accuracy, as long as the target-template sequence similarity is relatively high. On the other hand, the observation of a low target-template sequence similarity, e.g., between SMO from the frizzled GPCR family and members of the rhodopsin family, hampers the GPCR structure prediction and ligand docking. Indeed, in GPCR Dock 2013, accurate prediction of the SMO target was still beyond the capabilities of most research groups. Another bottleneck in the current GPCR research, as demonstrated by the 5-HT2B target, is the reliable prediction of global conformational changes induced by activation of GPCRs. In this work, we report details of our protocol used during GPCR Dock 2013. Our structure prediction and ligand docking protocol was especially successful in the case of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B-ergotamine complexes for which we provide one of the most accurate predictions. In addition to a description of the GPCR Dock 2013 results, we propose a novel hybrid computational methodology to improve GPCR structure and function prediction. This computational methodology employs two separate rankings for filtering GPCR models. The first ranking is ligand-based while the second is based on the scoring scheme of the recently published BCL method. In this work, we prove that the use of knowledge-based potentials implemented in BCL is an efficient way to cope with major bottlenecks in the GPCR structure prediction. Thereby, we also demonstrate that the knowledge-based potentials for membrane proteins were significantly improved, because of the recent surge in available experimental structures.

  12. Development of a universal high-throughput calcium assay for G-protein-coupled receptors with promiscuous G-protein Gα15/16

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting ZHU; Li-yan FANG; Xin XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To develop a universal high-throughput screening assay based on Gα15/16-mediated calcium mobilization for the identification of novel modulators of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Methods:In the present study, CHO-K1 or HEK293 cells were co-transfected with plasmids encoding promiscuous G-protein Cα15/16 and various receptors originally coupled to Gαs, Gαi, or Gαq pathways. Intracellular calcium change was monitored with fluorescent dye Fluo-4. Results:We found out for all the receptors tested, Gα15/16 could shift the receptors' coupling to the calcium mobilization pathway, and the EC50 values of the ligands generated with this method were comparable with reported values that were ob-tained using traditional methods. This assay was validated and optimized with the δ-opioid receptor, which originally coupled to God and was recently found to play important roles in neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. A large-scale screening of 48 000 compounds was performed based on this system. Sev-eral new modulators were identified and confirmed with the traditional GTPγS binding assay. Conclusion:This cell-based calcium assay was proved to be robust and easy to automate, and could be used as a universal method in search-ing for GPCR modulators.

  13. Sex peptides and MIPs can activate the same G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Nachman, Ronald J; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-07-01

    In many animal species, copulation elicits a number of physiological and behavioral changes in the female partner. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main molecular effector of these physiological responses has been identified as sex peptide (SP). The sex peptide receptor (SPR) has been characterized and recently, its activation by Drosophila myoinhibiting peptides (MIPs)-in addition to SP-has been demonstrated. The myoinhibiting peptides are members of a conserved peptide family, also known as B-type allatostatins, which generally feature the C-terminal motif -WX6Wamide.

  14. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling.

  15. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  16. The Role of Syk/CARD9-Coupled C-Type Lectin Receptors in Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohlopheni Jackson Marakalala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in understanding the mechanisms underlying the interactions that occur between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host innate immune cells. These cells express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs which recognise mycobacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and which can influence the host immune response to the infection. Although many of the PRRs appear to be redundant in the control of M. tuberculosis infection in vivo, recent discoveries have revealed a key, nonredundant, role of the Syk/CARD9 signalling pathway in antimycobacterial immunity. Here we review these discoveries, as well as recent data investigating the role of the Syk/CARD9-coupled PRRs that have been implicated in mycobacterial recognition, including Dectin-1 and Mincle.

  17. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  18. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...... to classical antagonists such as atropine. Here, we find that the D. melanogaster A-type mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 and D. melanogaster B-type mAChR to Gi/0. Furthermore, by comparing the second and third intracellular loops of all animal mAChRs for which the G protein coupling has been established, we could...

  19. Diverse activation states of RhoA in human lung cancer cells: contribution of G protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touge, Hirokazu; Chikumi, Hiroki; Igishi, Tadashi; Kurai, Jun; Makino, Haruhiko; Tamura, Yoshisato; Takata, Miyako; Yoneda, Kazuhiko; Nakamoto, Masaki; Suyama, Hisashi; Gutkind, J Silvio; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    Rho GTPases play an essential role in the control of various cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that RhoA overexpression contributes to human cancer development. However, the activation states of RhoA are poorly defined in cancer cells. In this study, we examined both the expression levels and the activation states of RhoA in various lung cancer cells by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in vivo Rho guanine nucleotide exchange assay, respectively. Moreover, we dissected the signaling pathway from the cell surface receptors to RhoA using a broad-spectrum G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonist, [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]Substance P (SP), and a recently reported Galphaq/11-selective inhibitor, YM-254890. We found that RhoA was expressed highly in large cell carcinoma cells but only weakly in adenocarcinoma cells. The activation states of RhoA are considerably different from its expression profiles. We found that four of six small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines exhibited a moderate to high activation rate of RhoA. The addition of [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]SP reduced RhoA activity by almost 60% in H69 SCLC cells. The addition of YM-254890 had no effect on RhoA activity in H69 cells. Our results suggest that RhoA is activated in various lung cancer cells independent of its expression levels, and the high activation state of RhoA in SCLC cells mainly depends on a neuroendocrine peptide autocrine system which signals through Galpha12 coupled GPCR to RhoA. This study provides new insights into RhoA signaling in lung cancer cells and may help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against lung cancer.

  20. A fluorescence anisotropy assay for the muscarinic M1 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwiler, Kristin G; De Rosier, Therese; Hanson, Bonnie; Vogel, Kurt W

    2010-06-01

    In the search for new chemical entities that interact with G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs), assays that quantify efficacy and affinity are employed. Traditional methods for measuring affinity involve radiolabeled ligands. To address the need for homogeneous biochemical fluorescent assays to characterize orthosteric ligand affinity and dissociation rates, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay for the muscarinic M1 receptor that can be conducted in a 384-well plate. We used membranes from a muscarinic M1 cell line optimized for high-throughput functional assays and the previously characterized fluorescent antagonist BODIPY FL pirenzepine. The affinities of reference compounds were determined in the competitive FA assay and compared with those obtained with a competitive filter-based radioligand-binding assay using [(3)H] N-methylscopolamine. The IC(50) values produced from the FA assay were well-correlated with the radioligand-binding K(i) values (R(2) = 0.98). The dissociation of the BODIPY FL pirenzepine was readily monitored in real time using the FA assay and was sensitive to the presence of the allosteric modulator gallamine. This M1 FA assay offers advantages over traditional radioligandbinding assays as it eliminates radioactivity while allowing investigation of orthosteric or allosteric muscarinic M1 ligands in a homogeneous format.

  1. Nanoparticle-based, organic receptor coupled fluorescent chemosensors for the determination of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Navneet, E-mail: navneetkaur@pu.ac.in [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (UIEAST), Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kaur, Simanpreet; Kaur, Amanpreet [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (UIEAST), Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Saluja, Preeti; Sharma, Hemant [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India); Saini, Anu; Dhariwal, Nisha [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (UIEAST), Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Singh, Ajnesh; Singh, Narinder [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India)

    2014-01-15

    The sensors have been developed using silver nanoparticles coated with organic ligands and are fully characterized with spectroscopic methods. The energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed the presence of organic receptors on the surface of metal nanoparticles. These chemosensors were tested against a range of biological and environmentally relevant cations in the HEPES buffered DMSO/H{sub 2}O (8:2, v/v) solvent system. The fluorescence intensity of these chemosensors was quenched upon coordination with open shell metal ions such as Cu{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+}. Anion recognition properties of the corresponding metal complexes have been studied and the original fluorescence intensity of sensors was restored upon addition of phosphate (0–20 µM). Thus, a highly selective chemosensor has been devised for the micromolar estimation of phosphate in semi-aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • The silver nanoparticles have been decorated with organic receptors for chemosensor applications. • The sensor properties are developed for the estimation of phosphate anion. • Thus the sensor relies on the cation displacement assay. • The phosphate sensing event displays the “ON–OFF–ON” mode of switching in sensor.

  2. A closer look into G protein coupled receptor activation: X-ray crystallography and long-scale molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, S; Rothlisberger, U

    2012-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large eukaryotic protein family of transmembrane receptors that react to a signal coming from the extracellular environment to generate an intracellular response through the activation of a signal transduction pathway mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein. Their diversity, dictated by the multiplicity of stimuli to which they respond and by the variety of intracellular signalling pathways they activate, make them one of the most prominent families of validated pharmacological targets in biomedicine. In recent years, major breakthroughs in structure determination of GPCRs have given new stimuli to the exploration of the biology of these proteins, providing a structural basis to understand the molecular origin of GPCR mechanisms of action. Based on the information coming from these structural studies, a number of recent in silico investigations used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to contribute to our knowledge of GPCRs. In this review, we will focus on investigations that, taking advantage of the tremendous progress in both hardware and software, made testable hypotheses that have been validated by subsequent structural studies. These stateof- the-art molecular simulations highlight the potential of microsecond MD simulations as a valuable tool in GPCR structural biology and biophysics.

  3. Human μ—opioid receptor overexpressed in Sf9 insect cells functionally coupled to endogenous Gi/0 proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEIQIANG; QINGXIANGSHEN; 等

    2000-01-01

    Human μ-opioid receptor(HμOR) with a tag of six consecutive histidines at its carboxyl terminus has been expressed in recombinant baculovirus infected Sf9 insect cells.The maximal binding capacity for the [3H] diprenorphine and [3H] ohmefentanyl (Ohm) were 9.1±0.7 and 6.52±0.23 nmol/g protein,respectively.The [3H] diprenorphine or [3H] Ohm binding to the receptor expressed in Sf9 cells was strongly inhibited by μ-selective agonists [D-Ala2,N-methyl-Phe4,glyol5] enkephalin(DAGO),Ohm,and morphine,but neither by δ nor by κ selective agonist.Na+ (100mM) and GTP(50μM) could reduce HμOR agonists etorphine and Ohm affinity binding to the overexpressed HμOR.μ-selective agonists DAGO and Ohm effectively stimulated [35S]GTP γS binding (EC50=2.7nM and 6.9 nM)and inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation(IC50=0.9 nM and 0.3 nM).The agonist-dependent effects could be blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone or by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (PTX).These results demonstrated that HμOR overexpressed in Sf9 insect cells functionally coupled to endogenous Ci/o proteins.

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling Analysis Using Homogenous Time-Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF® Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenea Nørskov-Lauritsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Studying multidimensional signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in search of new and better treatments requires flexible, reliable and sensitive assays in high throughput screening (HTS formats. Today, more than half of the detection techniques used in HTS are based on fluorescence, because of the high sensitivity and rich signal, but quenching, optical interferences and light scattering are serious drawbacks. In the 1990s the HTRF® (Cisbio Bioassays, Codolet, France technology based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET in a time-resolved homogeneous format was developed. This improved technology diminished the traditional drawbacks. The optimized protocol described here based on HTRF® technology was used to study the activation and signaling pathways of the calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, a GPCR responsible for maintaining calcium homeostasis. Stimulation of the CaSR by agonists activated several pathways, which were detected by measuring accumulation of the second messengers D-myo-inositol 1-phosphate (IP1 and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP, and by measuring the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2. Here we show how an optimized HTRF® platform with numerous advantages compared to previous assays provides a substantial and robust mode of investigating GPCR signaling. It is furthermore discussed how these assays can be optimized and miniaturized to meet HTS requirements and for screening compound libraries.

  5. G protein-coupled receptor signaling analysis using homogenous time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (HTRF®) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-02-13

    Studying multidimensional signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in search of new and better treatments requires flexible, reliable and sensitive assays in high throughput screening (HTS) formats. Today, more than half of the detection techniques used in HTS are based on fluorescence, because of the high sensitivity and rich signal, but quenching, optical interferences and light scattering are serious drawbacks. In the 1990s the HTRF® (Cisbio Bioassays, Codolet, France) technology based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in a time-resolved homogeneous format was developed. This improved technology diminished the traditional drawbacks. The optimized protocol described here based on HTRF® technology was used to study the activation and signaling pathways of the calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, a GPCR responsible for maintaining calcium homeostasis. Stimulation of the CaSR by agonists activated several pathways, which were detected by measuring accumulation of the second messengers D-myo-inositol 1-phosphate (IP1) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), and by measuring the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Here we show how an optimized HTRF® platform with numerous advantages compared to previous assays provides a substantial and robust mode of investigating GPCR signaling. It is furthermore discussed how these assays can be optimized and miniaturized to meet HTS requirements and for screening compound libraries.

  6. Activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor induces endothelium-independent relaxation of coronary artery smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuan; Ma, Handong; Barman, Scott A.; Liu, Alexander T.; Sellers, Minga; Stallone, John N.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; White, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens can either relax or contract arteries via rapid, nongenomic mechanisms involving classic estrogen receptors (ER). In addition to ERα and ERβ, estrogen may also stimulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in nonvascular tissue; however, a potential role for GPER in coronary arteries is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how GPER activity influenced coronary artery reactivity. In vitro isometric force recordings were performed on endothelium-denuded porcine arteries. These studies were augmented by RT-PCR and single-cell patch-clamp experiments. RT-PCR and immunoblot studies confirmed expression of GPER mRNA and protein, respectively, in smooth muscle from either porcine or human coronary arteries. G-1, a selective GPER agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation of endothelium-denuded porcine coronary arteries in vitro. This response was attenuated by G15, a GPER-selective antagonist, or by inhibiting large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels with iberiotoxin, but not by inhibiting NO signaling. Last, single-channel patch-clamp studies demonstrated that G-1 stimulates BKCa channel activity in intact smooth muscle cells from either porcine or human coronary arteries but had no effect on channels isolated in excised membrane patches. In summary, GPER activation relaxes coronary artery smooth muscle by increasing potassium efflux via BKCa channels and requires an intact cellular signaling mechanism. This novel action of estrogen-like compounds may help clarify some of the controversy surrounding the vascular effects of estrogens. PMID:21791623

  7. Using adaptive K-nearest neighbor algorithm and cellular automata images to predicting G-Protein-Coupled Receptor classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Qiu, Wang-Ren

    2010-06-01

    G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are the largest of cell surface receptor, accounting for >1% of the human genome. They play a key role in cellular signaling networks that regulate various physiological processes. The functions of many of GPCRs are unknown, because they are difficult to crystallize and most of them will not dissolve in normal solvents. This difficulty has motivated and challenged the development of a computational method which can predict the classification of the families and subfamilies of GPCRs based on their primary sequence so as to help us classify drugs. In this paper the adaptive K-nearest neighbor algorithm and protein cellular automata image (CAI) is introduced. Based on the CAI, the complexity measure factors derived from each of the protein sequences concerned are adopted for its Pseudo amino acid composition. GPCRs were categorized into nine subtypes. The overall success rate in identifying GPCRs among their nine family classes was about 83.5%. The high success rate suggests that the adaptive K-nearest neighbor algorithm and protein CAI holds very high potential to become a useful tool for understanding the actions of drugs that target GPCRs and designing new medications with fewer side effects and greater efficacy.

  8. Synapse-associated protein 102/dlgh3 couples the NMDA receptor to specific plasticity pathways and learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Peter C; Stanford, Lianne E; Coba, Marcelo P; Ainge, James A; Fink, Ann E; Opazo, Patricio; Delgado, Jary Y; Komiyama, Noboru H; O'Dell, Thomas J; Grant, Seth G N

    2007-03-07

    Understanding the mechanisms whereby information encoded within patterns of action potentials is deciphered by neurons is central to cognitive psychology. The multiprotein complexes formed by NMDA receptors linked to synaptic membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins including synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102) and other associated proteins are instrumental in these processes. Although humans with mutations in SAP102 show mental retardation, the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved are unknown. Using SAP102 knock-out mice, we found specific impairments in synaptic plasticity induced by selective frequencies of stimulation that also required extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. This was paralleled by inflexibility and impairment in spatial learning. Improvement in spatial learning performance occurred with extra training despite continued use of a suboptimal search strategy, and, in a separate nonspatial task, the mutants again deployed a different strategy. Double-mutant analysis of postsynaptic density-95 and SAP102 mutants indicate overlapping and specific functions of the two MAGUKs. These in vivo data support the model that specific MAGUK proteins couple the NMDA receptor to distinct downstream signaling pathways. This provides a mechanism for discriminating patterns of synaptic activity that lead to long-lasting changes in synaptic strength as well as distinct aspects of cognition in the mammalian nervous system.

  9. Biophysical and structural investigation of bacterially expressed and engineered CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Maciej; Morin, Sébastien; Sass, Hans-Jürgen; Kebbel, Fabian; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 belongs to the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Besides its role in leukocyte trafficking, it is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor and hence a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Here, we report Escherichia coli expression and a broad range of biophysical studies on E. coli-produced CCR5. After systematic screening and optimization, we obtained 10 mg of purified, detergent-solubilized, folded CCR5 from 1L culture in a triply isotope-labeled ((2)H/(15)N/(13)C) minimal medium. Thus the material is suitable for NMR spectroscopic studies. The expected α-helical secondary structure content is confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The solubilized CCR5 is monodisperse and homogeneous as judged by transmission electron microscopy. Interactions of CCR5 with its ligands, RANTES and MIP-1β were assessed by surface plasmon resonance yielding K(D) values in the nanomolar range. Using size exclusion chromatography, stable monomeric CCR5 could be isolated. We show that cysteine residues affect both the yield and oligomer distribution of CCR5. HSQC spectra suggest that the transmembrane domains of CCR5 are in equilibrium between several conformations. In addition we present a model of CCR5 based on the crystal structure of CXCR4 as a starting point for protein engineering.

  10. Biophysical and structural investigation of bacterially expressed and engineered CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktor, Maciej; Morin, Sebastien; Sass, Hans-Juergen [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland); Kebbel, Fabian [University of Basel, Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum (Switzerland); Grzesiek, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.grzesiek@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 belongs to the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Besides its role in leukocyte trafficking, it is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor and hence a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Here, we report Escherichia coli expression and a broad range of biophysical studies on E. coli-produced CCR5. After systematic screening and optimization, we obtained 10 mg of purified, detergent-solubilized, folded CCR5 from 1L culture in a triply isotope-labeled ({sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C) minimal medium. Thus the material is suitable for NMR spectroscopic studies. The expected {alpha}-helical secondary structure content is confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The solubilized CCR5 is monodisperse and homogeneous as judged by transmission electron microscopy. Interactions of CCR5 with its ligands, RANTES and MIP-1{beta} were assessed by surface plasmon resonance yielding K{sub D} values in the nanomolar range. Using size exclusion chromatography, stable monomeric CCR5 could be isolated. We show that cysteine residues affect both the yield and oligomer distribution of CCR5. HSQC spectra suggest that the transmembrane domains of CCR5 are in equilibrium between several conformations. In addition we present a model of CCR5 based on the crystal structure of CXCR4 as a starting point for protein engineering.

  11. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPRC5A modulates integrin β1-mediated epithelial cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Daria R; Akimov, Yevhen A; Rokka, Anne; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Kouvonen, Petri; Pellinen, Teijo; Kuznetsov, Sergey G

    2016-10-07

    G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR), Class C, Group 5, Member A (GPRC5A) has been implicated in several malignancies. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Using a panel of human cell lines, we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout and RNAi-mediated depletion of GPRC5A impairs cell adhesion to integrin substrates: collagens I and IV, fibronectin, as well as to extracellular matrix proteins derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) mouse sarcoma (Matrigel). Consistent with the phenotype, knock-out of GPRC5A correlated with a reduced integrin β1 (ITGB1) protein expression, impaired phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and lower activity of small GTPases RhoA and Rac1. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between GPRC5A and a receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2, an upstream regulator of FAK, although its contribution to the observed adhesion phenotype is unclear. Our findings reveal an unprecedented role for GPRC5A in regulation of the ITGB1-mediated cell adhesion and it's downstream signaling, thus indicating a potential novel role for GPRC5A in human epithelial cancers.

  12. Type IV collagen is an activating ligand for the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Kevin J; Sidik, Harwin; Zuchero, J Bradley; Eckart, Michael; Talbot, William S

    2014-08-12

    GPR126 is an orphan heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is essential for the development of diverse organs. We found that type IV collagen, a major constituent of the basement membrane, binds to Gpr126 and activates its signaling function. Type IV collagen stimulated the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in rodent Schwann cells, which require Gpr126 activity to differentiate, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing exogenous Gpr126. Type IV collagen specifically bound to the extracellular amino-terminal region of Gpr126 containing the CUB (complement, Uegf, Bmp1) and pentraxin domains. Gpr126 derivatives lacking the entire amino-terminal region were constitutively active, suggesting that this region inhibits signaling and that ligand binding relieves this inhibition to stimulate receptor activity. A new zebrafish mutation that truncates Gpr126 after the CUB and pentraxin domains disrupted development of peripheral nerves and the inner ear. Thus, our findings identify type IV collagen as an activating ligand for GPR126, define its mechanism of activation, and highlight a previously unrecognized signaling function of type IV collagen in basement membranes.

  13. Expression of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus G protein-coupled receptor monocistronic and bicistronic transcripts in primary effusion lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, R G; Milligan, L L; Flore, O; Wang, X; Arvanitakis, L; Knowles, D M; Cesarman, E

    2001-08-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) encodes a G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) in open reading frame (ORF) 74, which is homologous to human chemokine receptors. KSHV vGPCR is constitutively active and induces VEGF-mediated angiogenesis. Previous studies have shown that ORF 74 is transcribed as part of a bicistronic message containing ORF K14 upstream of ORF 74, with an early lytic pattern of expression. We have now extended these studies by analyzing three different KSHV-positive primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines and three PEL clinical samples. In addition, we have identified another less abundant monocistronic transcript containing only ORF 74. Both transcripts were identified at low but similar levels in two PEL clinical samples. We evaluated the degree of sequence and functional conservation of ORF74 in three additional PELs and two KS clinical specimens, demonstrating complete identity at the amino acid level among all isolates. While it is expressed as an early lytic transcript in PEL cell lines, in primary clinical PEL samples transcription of KSHV vGPCR can be readily detected.

  14. Cannabinoid receptors in submandibular acinar cells: functional coupling between saliva fluid and electrolytes secretion and Ca2+ signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopach, Olga; Vats, Juliana; Netsyk, Olga; Voitenko, Nana; Irving, Andrew; Fedirko, Nataliya

    2012-04-15

    Cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, and activation of CBRs in salivary cells inhibits agonist-stimulated salivation and modifies saliva content. However, the role of different CBR subtypes in acinar cell physiology and in intracellular signalling remains unclear. Here, we uncover functional CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in acinar cells of rat submandibular gland and their essential role in saliva secretion. Pharmacological activation of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in the submandibular gland suppressed saliva outflow and modified saliva content produced by the submandibular gland in vivo. Using Na(+)-selective microelectrodes to record secretory Na(+) responses in the lumen of acini, we observed a reduction in Na(+) transport following the activation of CBRs, which was counteracted by the selective CB(1)R antagonist AM251. In addition, activation of CB(1)Rs or CB Rs caused inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) 2 -ATPase activity in microsomes derived from the gland tissue as well as in isolated acinar cells. Using a Ca(2+) imaging technique, we showed that activation of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs alters [Ca(2+)](cyt) signalling in acinar cells by distinct pathways, involving Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), respectively. Our data demonstrate the expression of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in acinar cells, and their involvement in the regulation of salivary gland functioning.

  15. Potential use of G protein-coupled receptor-blocking monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic agents for cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Deron R

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is the fastest growing area of pharmaceutical development and has enjoyed significant clinical success since approval of the first mAb drug in1984. However, despite significant effort, there are still no approved therapeutic mAbs directed against the largest and most attractive family of drug targets: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs regulate essentially all cellular processes, including those that are fundamental to cancer pathology, such as proliferation, survival/drug resistance, migration, differentiation, tissue invasion, and angiogenesis. Many different GPCR isoforms are enhanced or dysregulated in multiple tumor types, and several GPCRs have known oncogenic activity. With approximately 350 distinct GPCRs in the genome, these receptors provide a rich landscape for the design of effective, targeted therapies for cancer, a uniquely heterogeneous disease family. While the generation of selective, efficacious mAbs has been problematic for these structurally complex integral membrane proteins, progress in the development of immunotherapeutics has been made by several independent groups. This chapter provides an overview of the roles of GPCRs in cancer and describes the current state of the art of GPCR-targeted mAb drugs.

  16. Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebendal Ted

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions. Results In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique. Conclusion Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  17. The role of G protein-coupled receptors in the early evolution of neurotransmission and the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-02-15

    The origin and evolution of the nervous system is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic events in biology. The recent sequencing of complete genomes from early metazoan organisms provides a new platform to study the origins of neuronal gene families. This review explores the early metazoan expansion of the largest integral transmembrane protein family, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which serve as molecular targets for a large subset of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in higher animals. GPCR repertories from four pre-bilaterian metazoan genomes were compared. This includes the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, which have primitive nervous systems (nerve nets), the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, which lack nerve and muscle cells. Comparative genomics demonstrate that the rhodopsin and glutamate receptor families, known to be involved in neurotransmission in higher animals are also widely found in pre-bilaterian metazoans and possess substantial expansions of rhodopsin-family-like GPCRs. Furthermore, the emerging knowledge on the functions of adhesion GPCRs in the vertebrate nervous system provides a platform to examine possible analogous roles of their closest homologues in pre-bilaterians. Intriguingly, the presence of molecular components required for GPCR-mediated neurotransmission in pre-bilaterians reveals that they exist in both primitive nervous systems and nerve-cell-free environments, providing essential comparative models to better understand the origins of the nervous system and neurotransmission. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Advances in the Development and Application of Computational Methodologies for Structural Modeling of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarec, Juan Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the large amount of experimental data accumulated in the past decade on G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structure and function, understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GPCR signaling is still far from being complete, thus impairing the design of effective and selective pharmaceuticals. Objective Understanding of GPCR function has been challenged even further by more recent experimental evidence that several of these receptors are organized in the cell membrane as homo- or hetero-oligomers, and that they may exhibit unique pharmacological properties. Given the complexity of these new signaling systems, researcher’s efforts are turning increasingly to molecular modeling, bioinformatics and computational simulations for mechanistic insights of GPCR functional plasticity. Methods We review here current advances in the development and application of computational approaches to improve prediction of GPCR structure and dynamics, thus enhancing current understanding of GPCR signaling. Results/Conclusions Models resulting from use of these computational approaches further supported by experiments are expected to help elucidate the complex allosterism that propagates through GPCR complexes, ultimately aiming at successful structure-based rational drug design. PMID:19672320

  19. Deriving structural and functional insights from a ligand-based hierarchical classification of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, T K; Croning, M D R; Gaulton, A

    2002-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest known family of cell-surface receptors. With hundreds of members populating the rhodopsin-like GPCR superfamily and many more awaiting discovery in the human genome, they are of interest to the pharmaceutical industry because of the opportunities they afford for yielding potentially lucrative drug targets. Typical sequence analysis strategies for identifying novel GPCRs tend to involve similarity searches using standard primary database search tools. This will reveal the most similar sequence, generally without offering any insight into its family or superfamily relationships. Conversely, searches of most 'pattern' or family databases are likely to identify the superfamily, but not the closest matching subtype. Here we describe a diagnostic resource that allows identification of GPCRs in a hierarchical fashion, based principally upon their ligand preference. This resource forms part of the PRINTS database, which now houses approximately 250 GPCR-specific fingerprints (http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/dbbrowser/gpcrPRINTS/). This collection of fingerprints is able to provide more sensitive diagnostic opportunities than have been realized by related approaches and is currently the only diagnostic tool for assigning GPCR subtypes. Mapping such fingerprints on to three-dimensional GPCR models offers powerful insights into the structural and functional determinants of subtype specificity.

  20. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...... changes upon receptor activation. Computational analysis using x-ray structures of the β(2)-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that PheVI:09 (6.44), which in the inactive state is locked between the backbone and two hydrophobic residues in transmembrane (TM)-III, upon activation slides ∼2 Å toward TM...

  1. Human μ-opioid receptor overexpressed in Sf9 insect cells functionally coupled to endogenous Gi/o proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Human μ-opioid receptor (HμOR) with a tag of six consecutive histidines at its carboxyl terminus had been expressed in recombinant baculovirus infected Sf9 insect cells.The maximal binding capacity for the [3H] diprenorphine and [3H]ohmefentanyl (Ohm) were 9.1 ± 0.7 and 6.52 ±0.23 nmol/g protein, respectively. The [3H] diprenorphine or [3H] Ohm binding to the receptor expressed in Sf9 cells was strongly inhibited by μ-selective agonists [D-Ala2, N-methyl-Phe4, glyol5]enkephalin (DAGO), Ohm, and morphine, but neither by δ nor by κ selective agonist. Na+ (100 mM) and GTP (50μM) could reduce HμOR agonists etorphine and Ohm affinity binding to the overexpressed HμOR.μ-selective agonists DAGO and Ohm effectively stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding (EC50 = 2.7nM and 6.9 nM) and inhibited forskolin- stimulated cAMP accumulation (IC50 = 0.9 nM and 0.3 nM). The agonist-dependent effects could be blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone or by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (PTX). These results demonstrated that HμOR overexpressed in Sf9 insect cells functionally coupled to endogenous Gi/o proteins.Key words: Human μ-opioid receptor (Hμ OR), Sf9 insect cells, pertussis toxin (PTX), endogenous Gi/o proteins.

  2. Abnormalities in osteoclastogenesis and decreased tumorigenesis in mice deficient for ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1 has been shown to be a proton sensing receptor in vitro. We have shown that OGR1 functions as a tumor metastasis suppressor gene when it is over-expressed in human prostate cancer cells in vivo. To examine the physiological functions of OGR1, we generated conditional OGR1 deficient mice by homologous recombination. OGR1 deficient mice were viable and upon gross-inspection appeared normal. Consistent with in vitro studies showing that OGR1 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, reduced osteoclasts were detected in OGR1 deficient mice. A pH-dependent osteoclasts survival effect was also observed. However, overall abnormality in the bones of these animals was not observed. In addition, melanoma cell tumorigenesis was significantly inhibited in OGR1 deficient mice. OGR1 deficient mice in the mixed background produced significantly less peritoneal macrophages when stimulated with thioglycolate. These macrophages also showed altered extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK activation and nitric oxide (NO production in response to lipopolysaccharide. OGR1-dependent pH responses assessed by cAMP production and cell survival in macrophages or brown fat cells were not observed, presumably due to the presence of other proton sensing receptors in these cells. Our results indicate that OGR1's role in osteoclastogenesis is not strong enough to affect overall bone development and its role in tumorigenesis warrants further investigation. The mice generated can be potentially used for several disease models, including cancers or osteoclast-related diseases.

  3. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is anatomically positioned to modulate synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Elizabeth M; Thompson, Louisa I; Patel, Parth; Gonzales, Andreina D; Ye, Hector Zhiyu; Filardo, Edward J; Clegg, Deborah J; Gorecka, Jolanta; Akama, Keith T; McEwen, Bruce S; Milner, Teresa A

    2015-02-11

    Both estrous cycle and sex affect the numbers and types of neuronal and glial profiles containing the classical estrogen receptors α and β, and synaptic levels in the rodent dorsal hippocampus. Here, we examined whether the membrane estrogen receptor, G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), is anatomically positioned in the dorsal hippocampus of mice to regulate synaptic plasticity. By light microscopy, GPER1-immunoreactivity (IR) was most noticeable in the pyramidal cell layer and interspersed interneurons, especially those in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Diffuse GPER1-IR was found in all lamina but was most dense in stratum lucidum of CA3. Ultrastructural analysis revealed discrete extranuclear GPER1-IR affiliated with the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum of neuronal perikarya and dendritic shafts, synaptic specializations in dendritic spines, and clusters of vesicles in axon terminals. Moreover, GPER1-IR was found in unmyelinated axons and glial profiles. Overall, the types and amounts of GPER1-labeled profiles were similar between males and females; however, in females elevated estrogen levels generally increased axonal labeling. Some estradiol-induced changes observed in previous studies were replicated by the GPER agonist G1: G1 increased PSD95-IR in strata oriens, lucidum, and radiatum of CA3 in ovariectomized mice 6 h after administration. In contrast, estradiol but not G1 increased Akt phosphorylation levels. Instead, GPER1 actions in the synapse may be due to interactions with synaptic scaffolding proteins, such as SAP97. These results suggest that although estrogen's actions via GPER1 may converge on the same synaptic elements, different pathways are used to achieve these actions.

  4. Gi-protein-coupled 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist sumatriptan induces type I hyperalgesic priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-08-01

    We have recently described a novel form of hyperalgesic priming (type II) induced by agonists at two clinically important Gi-protein-coupled receptors (Gi-GPCRs), mu-opioid and A1-adenosine. Like mu-opioids, the antimigraine triptans, which act at 5-HT1B/D Gi-GPCRs, have been implicated in pain chronification. We determined whether sumatriptan, a prototypical 5-HT1B/D agonist, produces type II priming. Characteristic of hyperalgesic priming, intradermal injection of sumatriptan (10 ng) induced a change in nociceptor function such that a subsequent injection of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) induces prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia. However, onset to priming was delayed 3 days, characteristic of type I priming. Also characteristic of type I priming, a protein kinase Cε, but not a protein kinase A inhibitor attenuated the prolongation phase of PGE2 hyperalgesia. The prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia was also permanently reversed by intradermal injection of cordycepin, a protein translation inhibitor. Also, hyperalgesic priming did not occur in animals pretreated with pertussis toxin or isolectin B4-positive nociceptor toxin, IB4-saporin. Finally, as observed for other agonists that induce type I priming, sumatriptan did not induce priming in female rats. The prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by sumatriptan was partially prevented by coinjection of antagonists for the 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D, but not 5-HT7, serotonin receptors and completely prevented by coadministration of a combination of the 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D antagonists. Moreover, the injection of selective agonists, for 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors, also induced hyperalgesic priming. Our results suggest that sumatriptan, which signals through Gi-GPCRs, induces type I hyperalgesic priming, unlike agonists at other Gi-GPCRs, which induce type II priming.

  5. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  6. VAMP-associated Proteins (VAP) as Receptors That Couple Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Proteostasis with Lipid Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Wayne L; Shome, Kuntala; Wu, Christine C; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Aridor, Meir

    2016-03-04

    Unesterified cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes in cells expressing the misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or general activation of ER stress led to dynein-mediated clustering of cholesterol-loaded late endosomes at the Golgi region, a process regulated by ER-localized VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs). We hypothesized that VAPs serve as intracellular receptors that couple lipid homeostasis through interactions with two phenylalanines in an acidic track (FFAT) binding signals (found in lipid sorting and sensing proteins, LSS) with proteostasis regulation. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR. The activity was mapped to the ligand-binding major sperm protein (MSP) domain, which was sufficient in regulating CFTR biogenesis. We identified mutations in an unstructured loop within the MSP that uncoupled VAPB-regulated CFTR biogenesis from basic interactions with FFAT. Using this information, we defined functional and physical interactions between VAPB and proteostasis regulators (ligands), including the unfolded protein response sensor ATF6 and the ER degradation cluster that included FAF1, VCP, BAP31, and Derlin-1. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR in the ER through interactions with the RMA1-Derlin-BAP31-VCP pathway. Analysis of pseudoligands containing tandem FFAT signals supports a competitive model for VAP interactions that direct CFTR biogenesis. The results suggest a model in which VAP-ligand binding couples proteostasis and lipid homeostasis leading to observed phenotypes of lipid abnormalities in protein folding diseases.

  7. D-GPCR: a novel putative G protein-coupled receptor overexpressed in prostate cancer and prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigle, Bernd; Fuessel, Susanne; Ebner, Reinhard; Temme, Achim; Schmitz, Marc; Schwind, Sandra; Kiessling, Andrea; Rieger, Michael A; Meye, Axel; Bachmann, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P; Rieber, E Peter

    2004-09-10

    The use of molecular targets in novel strategies of tumor treatment largely depends on the identification of proteins with a tumor- or tissue-restricted expression. We identified the novel protein D-GPCR that is selectively overexpressed in human prostate cancer and prostate and belongs to the subfamily of odorant-like orphan G protein-coupled receptors. Quantification of D-GPCR transcripts in different human tissues by real-time PCR demonstrated 27-fold overexpression in prostate compared to skeletal muscle, the organ with second highest transcript numbers in males. Investigation of tumor/normal cDNA pairs obtained from 241 cancer patients including four prostate tumors confirmed the preferential expression in prostate. When comparing the mean transcript level of 15 prostate cancer tissues to their non-tumorous counterparts, D-GPCR was almost 6-fold upregulated. Coupled in vitro transcription and translation of D-GPCR cDNA produced a protein band of approximately 28 kDa. Recombinant, His-tagged protein was expressed in transfected HEK293 cells and gave rise to a 30 kDa band specifically detected by anti-His antibody. These data provide the basis for future studies evaluating the diagnostic potential of D-GPCR and its utility as a novel target in immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  8. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S;

    2017-01-01

    peptides, as well as their conserved core motif HFRW, were found to activate GPR139 in the low μM range. Moreover, we found that peptides consisting of nine or ten N-terminal residues of α-MSH activate GPR139 in the submicromolar range. α-MSH1-9 was found to correspond to the product of a predicted...... cleavage site in the pre-pro-protein pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Our results demonstrate that GPR139 is a peptide receptor, activated by ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, the conserved core motif HFRW as well as a potential endogenous peptide α-MSH1-9. Further studies are needed to determine the functional relevance...

  9. Adipokinetic hormones and their G protein-coupled receptors emerged in Lophotrochozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Hauser, Frank; Skadborg, Signe K.

    2016-01-01

    Most multicellular animals belong to two evolutionary lineages, the Proto- and Deuterostomia, which diverged 640-760 million years (MYR) ago. Neuropeptide signaling is abundant in animals belonging to both lineages, but it is often unclear whether there exist evolutionary relationships between...... the neuropeptide systems used by proto- or deuterostomes. An exception, however, are members of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor superfamily, which occur in both evolutionary lineages, where GnRHs are the ligands in Deuterostomia and GnRH-like peptides, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), corazonin......, and AKH/corazonin-related peptide (ACP) are the ligands in Protostomia. AKH is a well-studied insect neuropeptide that mobilizes lipids and carbohydrates from the insect fat body during flight. In our present paper, we show that AKH is not only widespread in insects, but also in other Ecdysozoa...

  10. Allspice and Clove As Source of Triterpene Acids Activating the G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptor TGR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ladurner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions. A major regulator of metabolic processes that gained interest in recent years is the bile acid receptor TGR5 (Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5. This G protein-coupled membrane receptor can be found predominantly in the intestine, where it is mainly responsible for the secretion of the incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY. The aim of this study was (i to identify plant extracts with TGR5-activating potential, (ii to narrow down their activity to the responsible constituents, and (iii to assess whether the intestinal microbiota produces transformed metabolites with a different activity profile. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA served as positive control for both, the applied cell-based luciferase reporter gene assay for TGR5 activity and the biotransformation assay using mouse fecal slurry. The suitability of the workflow was demonstrated by the biotransformation of CDCA to lithocholic acid resulting in a distinct increase in TGR5 activity. Based on a traditional Tibetan formula, 19 plant extracts were selected and investigated for TGR5 activation. Extracts from the commonly used spices Syzygium aromaticum (SaroE, clove, Pimenta dioica (PdioE, allspice, and Kaempferia galanga (KgalE, aromatic ginger significantly increased TGR5 activity. After biotransformation, only KgalE showed significant differences in its metabolite profile, which, however, did not alter its TGR5 activity compared to non-transformed KgalE. UHPLC-HRMS (high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis revealed triterpene acids (TTAs as the main constituents of the extracts SaroE and PdioE. Identification and quantification of TTAs in these two extracts as well as comparison of their TGR5 activity with reconstituted TTA mixtures allowed the attribution of the TGR5 activity to TTAs. EC50s were determined for the main TTAs, i.e., oleanolic acid (2.2 ± 1.6

  11. Allspice and Clove As Source of Triterpene Acids Activating the G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptor TGR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladurner, Angela; Zehl, Martin; Grienke, Ulrike; Hofstadler, Christoph; Faur, Nadina; Pereira, Fátima C; Berry, David; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions. A major regulator of metabolic processes that gained interest in recent years is the bile acid receptor TGR5 (Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5). This G protein-coupled membrane receptor can be found predominantly in the intestine, where it is mainly responsible for the secretion of the incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY). The aim of this study was (i) to identify plant extracts with TGR5-activating potential, (ii) to narrow down their activity to the responsible constituents, and (iii) to assess whether the intestinal microbiota produces transformed metabolites with a different activity profile. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) served as positive control for both, the applied cell-based luciferase reporter gene assay for TGR5 activity and the biotransformation assay using mouse fecal slurry. The suitability of the workflow was demonstrated by the biotransformation of CDCA to lithocholic acid resulting in a distinct increase in TGR5 activity. Based on a traditional Tibetan formula, 19 plant extracts were selected and investigated for TGR5 activation. Extracts from the commonly used spices Syzygium aromaticum (SaroE, clove), Pimenta dioica (PdioE, allspice), and Kaempferia galanga (KgalE, aromatic ginger) significantly increased TGR5 activity. After biotransformation, only KgalE showed significant differences in its metabolite profile, which, however, did not alter its TGR5 activity compared to non-transformed KgalE. UHPLC-HRMS (high-resolution mass spectrometry) analysis revealed triterpene acids (TTAs) as the main constituents of the extracts SaroE and PdioE. Identification and quantification of TTAs in these two extracts as well as comparison of their TGR5 activity with reconstituted TTA mixtures allowed the attribution of the TGR5 activity to TTAs. EC50s were determined for the main TTAs, i.e., oleanolic acid (2.2 ± 1.6 μM), ursolic

  12. Activation of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors enhances morphine-induced analgesia through modulation of coupling of μ-opioid receptor to Gi-protein in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Chen, T; Zhou, X; Couture, R; Hong, Y

    2013-12-03

    Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) G protein-coupled receptors are exclusively expressed in small-sized neurons in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in mammals. The present study investigated the effect of MrgC receptor activation on morphine analgesic potency and addressed its possible mechanisms. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the specific MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22, 3 nmol) increased morphine-induced analgesia and shifted the morphine dose-response curve to the left in rats. Acute morphine (5 μg) reduced the coupling of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) to Gi-, but not Gs-, protein in the spinal dorsal horn. The i.t. BAM8-22 (3 nmol) prevented this change of G-protein repertoire while the inactive MrgC receptor agonist BAM8-18 (3 nmol, i.t.) failed to do so. A double labeling study showed the co-localization of MrgC and MORs in DRG neurons. The i.t. BAM8-22 also increased the coupling of MORs to Gi-protein and recruited Gi-protein from cytoplasm to the cell membrane in the spinal dorsal horn. Application of BAM8-22 (10nM) in the cultured ganglion explants for 30 min increased Gi-protein mRNA, but not Gs-protein mRNA. The present study demonstrated that acute administration of morphine inhibited the repertoire of MOR/Gi-protein coupling in the spinal dorsal horn in vivo. The findings highlight a novel mechanism by which the activation of MrgC receptors can modulate the coupling of MORs with Gi-protein to enhance morphine-induced analgesia. Hence, adjunct treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 may be of therapeutic value to relieve pain.

  13. An elevation in physical coupling of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors to transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels constricts mesenteric arteries in genetic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale; Thomas-Gatewood, Candice M; Leo, M Dennis; Kidd, Michael W; Neeb, Zachary P; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension is associated with an elevation in agonist-induced vasoconstriction, but mechanisms involved require further investigation. Many vasoconstrictors bind to phospholipase C-coupled receptors, leading to an elevation in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) that activates sarcoplasmic reticulum IP(3) receptors. In cerebral artery myocytes, IP(3) receptors release sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and can physically couple to canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels in a caveolin-1-containing macromolecular complex, leading to cation current activation that stimulates vasoconstriction. Here, we investigated mechanisms by which IP(3) receptors control vascular contractility in systemic arteries and IP(3)R involvement in elevated agonist-induced vasoconstriction during hypertension. Total and plasma membrane-localized TRPC3 protein was ≈2.7- and 2-fold higher in mesenteric arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) than in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat controls, respectively. In contrast, IP(3)R1, TRPC1, TRPC6, and caveolin-1 expression was similar. TRPC3 expression was also similar in arteries of pre-SHRs and WKY rats. Control, IP(3)-induced and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer between IP3R1 and TRPC3 was higher in SHR than WKY myocytes. IP3-induced cation current was ≈3-fold larger in SHR myocytes. Pyr3, a selective TRPC3 channel blocker, and calmodulin and IP(3) receptor binding domain peptide, an IP(3)R-TRP physical coupling inhibitor, reduced IP(3)-induced cation current and ET-1-induced vasoconstriction more in SHR than WKY myocytes and arteries. Thapsigargin, a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase blocker, did not alter ET-1-stimulated vasoconstriction in SHR or WKY arteries. These data indicate that ET-1 stimulates physical coupling of IP(3)R1 to TRPC3 channels in mesenteric artery myocytes, leading to vasoconstriction. Furthermore, an elevation in IP(3)R1 to TRPC3 channel molecular coupling augments

  14. An Adaptive Strategy for the Classification of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, S; Marwala, T

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems in computational biology is the inability of existing classification models to incorporate expanding and new domain knowledge. This problem of static classification models is addressed in this paper by the introduction of incremental learning for problems in bioinformatics. Many machine learning tools have been applied to this problem using static machine learning structures such as neural networks or support vector machines that are unable to accommodate new information into their existing models. We utilize the fuzzy ARTMAP as an alternate machine learning system that has the ability of incrementally learning new data as it becomes available. The fuzzy ARTMAP is found to be comparable to many of the widespread machine learning systems. The use of an evolutionary strategy in the selection and combination of individual classifiers into an ensemble system, coupled with the incremental learning ability of the fuzzy ARTMAP is proven to be suitable as a pattern classifier. The algorithm ...

  15. The G-protein coupled receptor associated sorting protein GASP-1 regulates the signalling and trafficking of the viral chemokine receptor US28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschische, Pia; Moser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Dawn; Vischer, Henry F; Parzmair, Gerald P; Pommer, Veronika; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Schaider, Helmut; Smit, Martine J; Martini, Lene; Whistler, Jennifer L; Waldhoer, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes the seven transmembrane(7TM)/G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) US28, which signals and endocytoses in a constitutive, ligand-independent manner. Here we show that, following endocytosis, US28 is targeted to the lysosomes for degradation as a consequence of its interaction with the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We find that GASP-1 binds to US28 in vitro and that disruption of the GASP-1/US28 interaction by either (i) overexpression of dominant negative cGASP-1 or by (ii) shRNA knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 is sufficient to inhibit the lysosomal targeting of US28 and slow its post-endocytic degradation. Furthermore, we found that GASP-1 affects US28-mediated signalling. The knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 impairs the US28-mediated Galphaq/PLC/inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation as well as the activation of the transcription factors Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Overexpression of GASP-1 enhances both IP accumulation and transcription factor activity. Thus, GASP-1 is an important cellular determinant that not only regulates the post-endocytic trafficking of US28, but also regulates the signalling capacities of US28.

  16. Computer-aided discovery of aromatic L-α-amino acids as agonists of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ísberg, Vignir; Andersen, Kirsten Bayer; Bisig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly in the central nervous system. We developed a pharmacophore model based on known GPR139 surrogate agonists which led us to propose aromatic-containing dipeptides as potential ligands. Upon testing, the dipeptides demonstrated agonism...

  17. Obestatin induction of early-response gene expression in gastrointestinal and adipose tissues and the mediatory role of G protein-coupled receptor, GPR39

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jian V.; Jahr, Holger; Luo, Chin-Wei; Klein, Cynthia; Van Kolen, Kristof; Donck, Luc Ver; De, Ananya; Baart, Esther; Li, Jing; Moechars, Dieder; Hsueh, Aaron J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Obestatin was identified as a brain/gut peptide hormone encoded by the ghrelin gene and found to interact with the G protein-coupled receptor, GPR39. We investigated target cells for obestatin based on induction of an early-response gene c-fos in different tissues. After ip injection of obestatin, c

  18. G-protein coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) in channel catfish: Expression analysis and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to determine the transcriptional profiles of G-protein coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) in channel catfish after infection with A. hydrophila compared to that in healthy catfish; 2) to determine whether over-expression of GPR18 in catfish gill cells will offer protec...

  19. Cell transformation mediated by the Epstein-Barr virus G protein-coupled receptor BILF1 is dependent on constitutive signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte; Nørregaard, K.; Kristensen, Martin;

    2010-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) open reading frame BILF1 encodes a seven trans-membrane (TM) G protein-coupled receptor that signals with high constitutive activity through G alpha(i) (Beisser et al., 2005; Paulsen et al., 2005). In this paper, the transforming potential of BILF1 is investigated in vitro...

  20. Select G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Modulate Agonist-Induced Signaling via a ROCK, LIMK, and β-Arrestin 1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish Mittal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are typically present in a basal, inactive state but, when bound to an agonist, activate downstream signaling cascades. In studying arrestin regulation of opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons, we find that agonists of delta opioid receptors (δORs activate cofilin through Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK, LIM domain kinase (LIMK, and β-arrestin 1 (β-arr1 to regulate actin polymerization. This controls receptor function, as assessed by agonist-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in DRGs. Agonists of opioid-receptor-like receptors (ORL1 similarly influence the function of this receptor through ROCK, LIMK, and β-arr1. Functional evidence of this cascade was demonstrated in vivo, where the behavioral effects of δOR or ORL1 agonists were enhanced in the absence of β-arr1 or prevented by inhibiting ROCK. This pathway allows δOR and ORL1 agonists to rapidly regulate receptor function.

  1. Select G-protein-coupled receptors modulate agonist-induced signaling via a ROCK, LIMK, and β-arrestin 1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Nitish; Roberts, Kristofer; Pal, Katsuri; Bentolila, Laurent A; Fultz, Elissa; Minasyan, Ani; Cahill, Catherine; Pradhan, Amynah; Conner, David; DeFea, Kathryn; Evans, Christopher; Walwyn, Wendy

    2013-11-27

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are typically present in a basal, inactive state but, when bound to an agonist, activate downstream signaling cascades. In studying arrestin regulation of opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, we find that agonists of delta opioid receptors (δORs) activate cofilin through Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), LIM domain kinase (LIMK), and β-arrestin 1 (β-arr1) to regulate actin polymerization. This controls receptor function, as assessed by agonist-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in DRGs. Agonists of opioid-receptor-like receptors (ORL1) similarly influence the function of this receptor through ROCK, LIMK, and β-arr1. Functional evidence of this cascade was demonstrated in vivo, where the behavioral effects of δOR or ORL1 agonists were enhanced in the absence of β-arr1 or prevented by inhibiting ROCK. This pathway allows δOR and ORL1 agonists to rapidly regulate receptor function. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Select G-protein coupled receptors modulate agonist-induced signaling via a ROCK, LIMK and β-arrestin 1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Nitish; Roberts, Kristofer; Pal, Katsuri; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Fultz, Elissa; Minasyan, Ani; Cahill, Catherine; Pradhan, Amynah; Conner, David; DeFea, Kathryn; Evans, Christopher; Walwyn, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are typically present in a basal, inactive state, but when bound to agonist they activate downstream signaling cascades. In studying arrestin regulation of opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, we find that agonists of delta opioid receptors (δORs) activate cofilin through Rho-associated coiled-coiled containing protein kinase (ROCK), LIM domain kinase (LIMK) and β- arrestin 1 (β-arr1), to regulate actin polymerization. This controls receptor function, as assessed by agonist-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in DRGs. Agonists of opioid-receptor like receptors (ORL1) similarly influence the function of this receptor through ROCK, LIMK and β-arr1. Functional evidence of this cascade was demonstrated in vivo where the behavioral effects of δOR or ORL1 agonists were enhanced in the absence of β-arr1 or prevented by inhibiting ROCK. This pathway allows δOR and ORL1 agonists to rapidly regulate receptor function. PMID:24239352

  3. Metalloprotease cleavage of the N terminus of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR37L1 reduces its constitutive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James L J; Ngo, Tony; Schmidt, Johannes; Mrad, Nadine; Liew, Chu Kong; Jones, Nicole M; Graham, Robert M; Smith, Nicola J

    2016-04-12

    Little is known about the pharmacology or physiology of GPR37L1, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor that is abundant in the cerebellum. Mice deficient in this receptor exhibit precocious cerebellar development and hypertension. We showed that GPR37L1 coupled to the G protein Gα(s) when heterologously expressed in cultured cells in the absence of any added ligand, whereas a mutant receptor that lacked the amino terminus was inactive. Conversely, inhibition of ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteases) enhanced receptor activity, indicating that the presence of the amino terminus is necessary for GPR37L1 signaling. Metalloprotease-dependent processing of GPR37L1 was evident in rodent cerebellum, where we detected predominantly the cleaved, inactive form. However, comparison of the accumulation of cAMP (adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate) in response to pho