WorldWideScience

Sample records for formic acid fuel cells

  1. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; Zhu, Yimin [Urbana, IL; Kahn, Zakia [Palatine, IL; Man, Malcolm [Vancouver, CA

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  2. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo

    2017-08-08

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  3. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo; Ferná ndez-Salas, José A.; Nahra, Fady; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  4. Impact of anode catalyst layer porosity on the performance of a direct formic acid fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauskar, Akshay S.; Rice, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lithium carbonate is used as a pore-former to increase porosity of anode catalyst layer. ► Maximum power density increased by 25%. ► Onset potential for formic acid electro-oxidation reduced by 30 mV for anode catalyst layer with 17.5 wt% pore-former. ► Electrochemical impedance spectra confirm increased formic acid concentration inside the anode catalyst layer pores. - Abstract: Direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs) have attracted much attention in the last few years for portable electronic devices, due to their potential of being high efficiency power sources. They have the potential to replace the state-of-the-art batteries in cell phones, PDAs, and laptop computers if their power density and durability can be improved. In the present investigation, the influence of increased anode catalyst layer porosity on DFAFC power density performance is studied. Lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) was used as a pore-former in this study because of its facile and complete removal after catalyst layer fabrication. The anode catalyst layers presented herein contained unsupported Pt/Ru catalyst and Li 2 CO 3 (in the range of 0–50 wt%) bound with proton conducting ionomer. Higher DFAFC performance is obtained because of the increased porosity within the anode catalyst layer through enhanced reactant and product mass transport. The maximum power density of DFAFC increased by 25% when pore-former was added to the anode catalyst ink. The formic acid onset potential for the anode catalyst layer with 17.5 wt% pore-former was reduced by 30 mV. A constant phase element based equivalent-circuit model was used to investigate anode impedance spectra. Fitted values for the anode impedance spectra confirm the improvement in performance due to an increase in formic acid concentration inside the anode catalyst layer pores along with efficient transport of reactants and products.

  5. Pd and polyaniline nanocomposite on carbon fiber paper as an efficient direct formic acid fuel cell anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rakesh K.

    2018-03-01

    Direct formic acid fuel cells are advantageous as portable power generating devices. In the present work, an anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) is presented which has good catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation. The catalyst is composed of Pd and conducting polymer polyaniline (Pd-PANI) nanocomposite. The catalyst was prepared by using a single step galvanostatic electrochemical deposition method. The Pd-PANI catalyst was electrodeposited at different time durations and a comparison of the catalytic activity at each deposition time was carried out and optimized.

  6. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  7. Electrochemical oxidation of methanol and formic acid in fuel cell processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seland, Frode

    2005-07-01

    The main objectives of the thesis work were: (1), to study the oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum electrodes by employing conventional and advanced electrochemical methods, and (2), to develop membrane electrode assemblies based on polybenzimidazole membranes that can be used in fuel cells up to 200 C. D.c. voltammetry and a.c. voltammetry studies of methanol and formic acid on polycrystalline platinum in sulphuric acid electrolyte were performed to determine the mechanism and kinetics of the oxidation reactions. A combined potential step and fast cyclic voltammetry experiment was employed to investigate the time dependence primarily of methanol oxidation on platinum. Charge measurements clearly demonstrated the existence of a parallel path at low potentials and short times without formation of adsorbed CO. Furthermore, experimental results showed that only the serial path, via adsorbed CO, exists during continuous cycling, with the first step being diffusion controlled dissociative adsorption of methanol directly from the bulk electrolyte. The saturation charge of adsorbed CO derived from methanol was found to be significantly lower than CO derived from formic acid or dissolved CO. This was attributed to the site requirements of the dehydrogenation steps, and possibly different compositions of linear, bridged or multiply bonded CO. The coverage of adsorbed CO from formic acid decreased significantly at potentials just outside of the hydrogen region (0.35 V vs. RHE), while it did not start to decrease significantly until about 0.6 V vs. RHE for methanol. Adsorbed CO from dissolved CO rapidly oxidized at potentials above about 0.75 V due to formation of platinum oxide. Data from a.c. voltammograms from 0.5 Hz up to 30 kHz were assembled into electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and analyzed using equivalent circuits. The main advantages of collecting EIS spectra from a.c. voltammetry experiments are the ability to directly correlate the impedance

  8. Anode modification with formic acid: A simple and effective method to improve the power generation of microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan, E-mail: shaoancheng@zju.edu.cn; Guo, Jian

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Carbon cloth anode is modified with formic acid by a simple and reliable approach. • The modification significantly enhances the power output of microbial fuel cells. • The modified anode surface favors the bacterial attachment and growth on anode. • The electron transfer rate of anode is promoted. - Abstract: The physicochemical properties of anode material directly affect the anodic biofilm formation and electron transfer, thus are critical for the power generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, carbon cloth anode was modified with formic acid to enhance the power production of MFCs. Formic acid modification of anode increased the maximum power density of a single-chamber air-cathode MFC by 38.1% (from 611.5 ± 6 mW/m{sup 2} to 877.9 ± 5 mW/m{sup 2}). The modification generated a cleaner electrode surface and a reduced content of oxygen and nitrogen groups on the anode. The surface changes facilitated bacterial growth on the anode and resulted in an optimized microbial community. Thus, the electron transfer rate on the modified anodes was enhanced remarkably, contributing to a higher power output of MFCs. Anode modification with formic acid could be an effective and simple method for improving the power generation of MFCs. The modification method holds a huge potential for large scale applications and is valuable for the scale-up and commercialization of microbial fuel cells.

  9. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A., E-mail: amikolajczuk@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Ciecierska, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Palladium catalyst used on the cathode DFAFC is comparable to commercial platinum catalyst. • The treatment of carbon supports in nitric acid(V) increases the electrochemically available metal surface area and the catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction of catalysts. - Abstract: One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  10. Hydrogen production from formic acid in pH-stat fed-batch operation for direct supply to fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Tai Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 harvested after cultivation was used as a whole cell biocatalyst, for the production of hydrogen. Formic acid was efficiently converted to hydrogen using the harvested cells with an initial hydrogen production rate and total hydrogen production of 491 ml/l/h and 6668 ml/l, respectively, when 1 g/l of whole cell enzyme was used. Moreover, new pH-stat fed-batch operation was conducted, and total hydrogen production was 1.4 times higher than that of batch operation. For practical application, bio-hydrogen produced from formic acid using harvested cells was directly applied to PEMFC for power generation.

  11. Evaluation of Pd Nanoparticle-Decorated CeO2-MWCNT Nanocomposite as an Electrocatalyst for Formic Acid Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Junaid; Safdar Hossain, SK.; Al-Ahmed, Amir; Rahman, Ateequr; McKay, Gordon; Hossain, Mohammed M.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, CeO2-modified Pd/CeO2-carbon nanotube (CNT) electrocatalyst for the electro-oxidation of formic acid has been investigated. The support CNT was first modified with different amounts (5-30 wt.%) of CeO2 using a precipitation-deposition method. The electrocatalysts were developed by dispersing Pd on the CeO2-CNT supports using the borohydride reduction method. The synthesized electrocatalysts were analyzed for composition, morphology and electronic structure using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. The formation of Pd nanoparticles on the CeO2-CNT support was confirmed using TEM. The activity of Pd/CeO2-CNT and of Pd-CNT samples upon oxidation of formic acid was evaluated by using carbon monoxide stripping voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry. The addition of moderate amounts of cerium oxide (up to 10 wt.%) significantly improved the activity of Pd/CeO2-CNT compared to the unmodified Pd-CNT. Pd/10 wt.% CeO2-CNT showed a current density of 2 A mg-1, which is ten times higher than that of the unmodified Pd-CNT (0.2 A mg-1). Similarly, the power density obtained for Pd/10 wt.% CeO2-CNT in an air-breathing formic acid fuel cell was 6.8 mW/cm2 which is two times higher than Pd-CNT (3.2 mW/cm2), thus exhibiting the promotional effects of CeO2 to Pd/CeO2-CNT. A plausible justification for the improved catalytic performance and stability is provided in the light of the physical characterization results.

  12. High stability and high activity Pd/ITO-CNTs electrocatalyst for direct formic acid fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Wei-Li; Gu, Da-Ming; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Zhang, Jing-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The addition of ITO in Pd/CNTs catalyst significantly improves the activity and stability of catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation due to excellent stability and high electrical conductivity of ITO, and metal-support interaction between Pd nanoparticles and ITO. - Highlights: • Pd catalyst with ITO and CNTs as a mixture support for DFAFC was first prepared by microwave-assisted polyol process. • The activity and stability of Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst is significantly higher than those of Pd/CNTs. • When ITO content is 50% of ITO/CNTs support mass, Pd/ITO-CNTs exhibits the best performance. - Abstract: Indium tin oxide (ITO) and carbon nanotube hybrid has been explored as a support for Pd catalyst. Pd/ITO-CNTs catalysts with different ITO contents were prepared by the microwave-assisted polyol process. The as-prepared Pd/ITO-CNTs catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electrochemical measurements in this work. The TEM results show that Pd particle size distribution in the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst is more uniform than that in Pd/CNTs, indicating that the ITO can promote the dispersion of Pd nanoparticles. It is found that there is metal-support interaction between Pd nanoparticles and ITO in the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst through XPS test. The results of electrochemical tests prove that the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalysts exhibit higher electro-catalytic activity and stability than Pd/CNTs toward formic acid electrooxidation. When the ITO content is 50% of ITO-CNTs support mass, the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst has the best catalytic performance for formic acid electrooxidation. The peak current density of formic acid electrooxidation on the Pd/ITO-CNTs50% electrode is 1.53 times as high as that on Pd/CNTs, 2.31 times higher than that on Pd/ITO. The results of aging

  13. Morphological features of electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles and its application as anode catalysts in polymer electrolyte formic acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hongrae; Joo, Jiyong; Kwon, Youngkook [Electrochemical Reaction and Technology Laboratory (ERTL), Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea); Uhm, Sunghyun [Ertl Center for Electrochemistry and Catalysis, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea); Lee, Jaeyoung [Electrochemical Reaction and Technology Laboratory (ERTL), Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea); Ertl Center for Electrochemistry and Catalysis, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    Electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles on carbon substrate show various morphologies depending on the applied potentials. Dendritic, pyramidal, cauliflower-like, and hemi-spherical morphologies of Pt are formed at potential ranges between -0.2 and 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and its particle sizes are distributed from 8 to 26 nm. Dendritic bulky particles over 20 nm are formed at an applied potential of -0.2 V, while low deposition potential of 0.2 V causes dense hemi-spherical structure of Pt less than 10 nm. The influence of different Pt shapes on an electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid is represented. Consequently, homogeneous distribution of Pt nanoparticles with average particle of ca. 14 nm on carbon paper results in a high surface to volume ratio and the better power performance in a fuel cell application. (author)

  14. Formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H; Laing, B

    1921-12-03

    The production of formic acid by the oxidation of methane with a metallic oxide or by the interaction of carbon monoxide and water vapor in the presence of a catalyst, preferably a metallic oxide, is described along with the destructive distillation of carbonaceous material in the preesnce of formic acid vapor for the purpose of increasing the yield of condensible hydrocarbons.

  15. EFFECT OF TEFLON AND NAFION LOADING AT ANODE IN DIRECT FORMIC ACID FUEL CELL (DFAFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. MASDAR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DFAFC has extensive hydrophilic nature and will cause problems in a limited mass transport in the anode side of electrode. Thus, the microporous layer (MPL of DFAFC needs a different in structure and morphology compared with that of PEMFC and DMFC because it will directly affect the performance. Therefore, in this study, the formulation of anode’s MPL has been investigated by varying the amount of Teflon and Nafion. Different loading of Teflon in MPL and Nafion in catalyst layer, i.e., 0 to 40% in weight, were used to fabricate the anode’s DFAFC. The characteristic of MPLs and anode (MPL with catalyst layer such as surface morphologies and resistivity, i.e., electrical impedance, have been analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and contact angle measurements as well as electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS. Meanwhile, the performance of fabricated anode was measured using cyclic voltammetry (CV technique with a half cell of DFAFC. From the result, it was obtained that the optimum content for both Teflon and Nafion on anode’s DFAFC was 20 wt% as shown in a highest electro-activity in electrode. The single cell DFAFC with optimum MEA formulation showed a good performance and hence, it is possible to apply the electricity power for electronic devices.

  16. Effect of the Pd/MWCNTs anode catalysts preparation methods on their morphology and activity in a direct formic acid fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiak, B.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Mierzwa, B.; Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Juchniewicz, K.; Borodzinski, A.; Zemek, J.; Jiricek, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Catalysts properties studied by XRD, STEM, XPS methods. • Differences in Pd particle size, content of Pd, functional groups, PdC x. . • Catalytic activity studied in a Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell. • Highest activity–catalyst prepared using a strong reducing agent (NaBH 4 ). - Abstract: Impact of Pd/MWCNTs catalysts preparation method on the catalysts morphology and activity in a formic acid electrooxidation reaction was investigated. Three reduction methods of Pd precursor involving reduction in a high pressure microwave reactor (Pd1), reduction with NaBH 4 (Pd2) and microwave-assisted polyol method (Pd3) were used in this paper. Crystallites size and morphology were studied using the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), whereas elemental composition, Pd chemical state and functional groups content by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The prepared catalysts were tested in a direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) as an anode material. The catalytic activity was correlated with a mean fraction of the total Pd atoms exposed at the surface (FE). The value of FE was calculated from the crystallites size distribution determined by the STEM measurements. Non-linear dependence of a current density versus FE, approaching the maximum at FE≈0.25 suggests that the catalytic process proceeded at Pd nanocrystallites faces, with inactive edges and corners. Pd2 catalyst exhibited highest activity due to its smallest Pd crystallites (3.2 nm), however the absence of Pd crystallites aggregation and low content of carbon in PdC x phase, i.e. x = 4 at.% may also affect the observed.

  17. Effect of the Pd/MWCNTs anode catalysts preparation methods on their morphology and activity in a direct formic acid fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesiak, B., E-mail: blesiak-orlowska@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, M.; Malolepszy, A. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Waryńskiego 1, 00-645 Warszawa (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Waryńskiego 1, 00-645 Warszawa (Poland); Mierzwa, B.; Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Juchniewicz, K.; Borodzinski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Zemek, J.; Jiricek, P. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162-53 Prague 6, Cukrovarnicka 10 (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Catalysts properties studied by XRD, STEM, XPS methods. • Differences in Pd particle size, content of Pd, functional groups, PdC{sub x.}. • Catalytic activity studied in a Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell. • Highest activity–catalyst prepared using a strong reducing agent (NaBH{sub 4}). - Abstract: Impact of Pd/MWCNTs catalysts preparation method on the catalysts morphology and activity in a formic acid electrooxidation reaction was investigated. Three reduction methods of Pd precursor involving reduction in a high pressure microwave reactor (Pd1), reduction with NaBH{sub 4} (Pd2) and microwave-assisted polyol method (Pd3) were used in this paper. Crystallites size and morphology were studied using the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), whereas elemental composition, Pd chemical state and functional groups content by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The prepared catalysts were tested in a direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) as an anode material. The catalytic activity was correlated with a mean fraction of the total Pd atoms exposed at the surface (FE). The value of FE was calculated from the crystallites size distribution determined by the STEM measurements. Non-linear dependence of a current density versus FE, approaching the maximum at FE≈0.25 suggests that the catalytic process proceeded at Pd nanocrystallites faces, with inactive edges and corners. Pd2 catalyst exhibited highest activity due to its smallest Pd crystallites (3.2 nm), however the absence of Pd crystallites aggregation and low content of carbon in PdC{sub x} phase, i.e. x = 4 at.% may also affect the observed.

  18. Electricity generation devices using formic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-06-22

    The present disclosure relates generally to new forms of portable energy generation devices and methods. The devices are designed to covert formic acid into released hydrogen, alleviating the need for a hydrogen tank as a hydrogen source for fuel cell power.

  19. Structural and electrochemical characterization of carbon supported Pt-Pr catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells prepared using a modified formic acid method in a CO atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Patricia Gon; Antolini, Ermete; Perez, Joelma

    2013-07-28

    Pt-Pr/C electrocatalysts were prepared using a modified formic acid method, and their activity for carbon monoxide and ethanol oxidation was compared to Pt/C. No appreciable alloy formation was detected by XRD analysis. By TEM measurements it was found that Pt particle size increases with an increasing Pr content in the catalysts and with decreasing metal precursor addition time. XPS measurements indicated Pt segregation on the catalyst surface and the presence of Pr2O3 and PrO2 oxides. The addition of Pr increased the electro-catalytic activity of Pt for both CO and CH3CH2OH oxidation. The enhanced activity of Pt-Pr/C catalysts was ascribed to both an electronic effect, caused by the presence of Pr2O3, and the bi-functional mechanism, caused by the presence of PrO2.

  20. Electricity generation devices using formic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Zheng, Junrong

    2017-01-01

    The present disclosure relates generally to new forms of portable energy generation devices and methods. The devices are designed to covert formic acid into released hydrogen, alleviating the need for a hydrogen tank as a hydrogen source for fuel

  1. Towards Sustainable Production of Formic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Ross, Julian R H

    2018-03-09

    Formic acid is a widely used commodity chemical. It can be used as a safe, easily handled, and transported source of hydrogen or carbon monoxide for different reactions, including those producing fuels. The review includes historical aspects of formic acid production. It briefly analyzes production based on traditional sources, such as carbon monoxide, methanol, and methane. However, the main emphasis is on the sustainable production of formic acid from biomass and biomass-derived products through hydrolysis and oxidation processes. New strategies of low-temperature synthesis from biomass may lead to the utilization of formic acid for the production of fuel additives, such as methanol; upgraded bio-oil; γ-valerolactone and its derivatives; and synthesis gas used for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons. Some technological aspects are also considered. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. 21 CFR 573.480 - Formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Formic acid. 573.480 Section 573.480 Food and... Listing § 573.480 Formic acid. Formic acid may be safely used as a preservative in hay crop silage in an.... The top foot of silage stored should not contain formic acid and silage should not be fed to livestock...

  3. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  4. 21 CFR 186.1316 - Formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Formic acid. 186.1316 Section 186.1316 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1316 Formic acid. (a) Formic acid (CH2O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-18-6) is also referred to as methanoic acid or hydrogen carboxylic acid. It occurs naturally in some insects and is...

  5. Study of Pd-Au/MWCNTs formic acid electrooxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk, Anna; Borodzinski, Andrzej; Kedzierzawski, Piotr; Lesiak, Beata [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Stobinski, Leszek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Koever, Laszlo; Toth, Jozsef [Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P. O. Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lin, Hong-Ming [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, 40, Chungshan N. Rd., 3rd Sec, 104, Taipei (China)

    2010-12-15

    The Pd-Au multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) supported catalyst exhibits higher power density in direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) than similar Pd/MWCNTs catalyst. The Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst also exhibits higher activity and is more stable in electrooxidation reaction of formic acid during cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. After preparation by polyol method, the catalyst was subjected to two type of treatments: (I) annealing at 250 C in 100% of Ar, (II) reducing in 5% of H{sub 2} in Ar atmosphere at 200 C. It was observed that the catalyst after treatment I was completely inactive, whereas after treatment II exhibited high activity. In order to explain this effect the catalysts were characterized by electron spectroscopy methods. The higher initial catalytic activity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst than Pd/MWCNTs catalyst in reaction of formic acid electrooxidation was attributed to electronic effect of gold in Pd-Au solution, and larger content of small Au nanoparticles of 1 nm size. The catalytic inactivity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalysts annealed in argon is attributed to carbon amorphous overlayer covering of Pd oxide shell on the metallic nanoparticles. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Investigation of Influential Parameters in Deep Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene with Hydrogen Peroxide and Formic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighat Mamaghani, Alireza; Fatemi, Shohreh; Asgari, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    An effective oxidative system consisting of hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, and sulfuric acid followed by an extractive stage were implemented to remove dibenzothiophene in the simulated fuel oil. The results revealed such a great performance in the case of H2O2 in the presence of formic and sulfuric acids that led to the removal of sulfur compounds. Sulfuric acid was employed to increase the acidity of media as well as catalytic activity together with formic acid. The oxidation reaction was ...

  7. Formic Acid as a Hydrogen Energy Carrier

    KAUST Repository

    Eppinger, Jö rg; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The high volumetric capacity (S3 g H-2/L) and its low toxicity and flammability under ambient conditions make formic acid a promising hydrogen energy carrier. Particularly, in the past decade, significant advancements have been achieved in catalyst development for selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. This Perspective highlights the advantages of this approach with discussions focused on potential applications in the transportation sector together with analysis of technical requirements, limitations, and costs.

  8. Formic Acid as a Hydrogen Energy Carrier

    KAUST Repository

    Eppinger, Jorg

    2016-12-15

    The high volumetric capacity (S3 g H-2/L) and its low toxicity and flammability under ambient conditions make formic acid a promising hydrogen energy carrier. Particularly, in the past decade, significant advancements have been achieved in catalyst development for selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. This Perspective highlights the advantages of this approach with discussions focused on potential applications in the transportation sector together with analysis of technical requirements, limitations, and costs.

  9. Formic Acid Manufacture: Carbon Dioxide Utilization Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rumayor

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 utilization alternatives for manufacturing formic acid (FA such as electrochemical reduction (ER or homogeneous catalysis of CO2 and H2 could be efficient options for developing more environmentally-friendly production alternatives to FA fossil-dependant production. However, these alternatives are currently found at different technological readiness levels (TRLs, and some remaining technical challenges need to be overcome to achieve at least carbon-even FA compared to the commercial process, especially ER of CO2, which is still farther from its industrial application. The main technical limitations inherited by FA production by ER are the low FA concentration achieved and the high overpotentials required, which involve high consumptions of energy (ER cell and steam (distillation. In this study, a comparison in terms of carbon footprints (CF using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA tool was done to evaluate the potential technological challenges assuring the environmental competitiveness of the FA production by ER of CO2. The CF of the FA conventional production were used as a benchmark, as well as the CF of a simulated plant based on homogeneous catalysts of CO2 and H2 (found closer to be commercial. Renewable energy utilization as PV solar for the reaction is essential to achieve a carbon-even product; however, the CF benefits are still negligible due to the enormous contribution of the steam produced by natural gas (purification stage. Some ER reactor configurations, plus a recirculation mode, could achieve an even CF versus commercial process. It was demonstrated that the ER alternatives could lead to lower natural resources consumption (mainly, natural gas and heavy fuel oil compared to the commercial process, which is a noticeable advantage in environmental sustainability terms.

  10. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  11. Formic acid dimers in a nitrogen matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Susy; Fausto, Rui; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) dimers are studied by infrared spectroscopy in a nitrogen matrix and by ab initio calculations. We benefit from the use of a nitrogen matrix where the lifetime of the higher-energy (cis) conformer is very long (˜11 h vs. 7 min in an argon matrix). As a result, in a nitrogen matrix, a large proportion of the cis conformer can be produced by vibrational excitation of the lower-energy (trans) conformer. Three trans-trans, four trans-cis, and three cis-cis dimers are found in the experiments. The spectroscopic information on most of these dimers is enriched compared to the previous studies in an argon matrix. The cis-cis dimers of ordinary formic acid (without deuteration) are reported here for the first time. Several conformational processes are obtained using selective excitation by infrared light, some of them also for the first time. In particular, we report on the formation of cis-cis dimers upon vibrational excitation of trans-cis dimers. Tunneling decays of several dimers have been detected in the dark. The tunneling decay of cis-cis dimers of formic acid as well as the stabilization of cis units in cis-cis dimers is also observed for the first time.

  12. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  13. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  14. Uracil in formic acid hydrolysates of deoxyribonucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Arnold H.

    1966-01-01

    1. When DNA is hydrolysed with formic acid for 30min. at 175° and the hydrolysate is chromatographed on paper with propan-2-ol–2n-hydrochloric acid, in addition to expected ultraviolet-absorbing spots corresponding to guanine, adenine, cytosine and thymine, an ultraviolet-absorbing region with RF similar to that of uracil can be detected. Uracil was separated from this region and identified by its spectra in acid and alkali, and by its RF in several solvent systems. 2. Cytosine, deoxyribocytidine and deoxyribocytidylic acid similarly treated with formic acid all yielded uracil, as did a mixture of deoxyribonucleotides. 3. Approx. 4% of deoxyribonucleotide cytosine was converted into uracil by the formic acid treatment. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5949371

  15. High catalytic activity of ultrafine nanoporous palladium for electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Weimin; Qi, Zhen; Zhao, Changchun; Ji, Hong; Zhang, Zhonghua [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (MOE), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2009-10-15

    Nanoporous palladium (NPPd) with ultrafine ligament size of 3-6 nm was fabricated by dealloying of an Al-Pd alloy in an alkaline solution. Electrochemical measurements indicate that NPPd exhibits significantly high electrochemical active specific surface area (23 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and high catalytic activity for electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid. Mass activities can reach 149, 148, 262 mA mg{sup -1} for the oxidation of methanol, ethanol and formic acid, respectively. Moreover, superior steady-state activities can be observed for all the electro-oxidation processes. NPPd will be a promising candidate for the anode catalyst for direct alcohol or formic acid fuel cells. (author)

  16. Studies of catalyst material for the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol, formaldehyde and formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, S.Z.; Ahmed, R.

    2007-01-01

    Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts the chemical energy of reaction directly into the electrical energy. It is highly efficient and environment friendly device. Normally used fuel in fuel cells is hydrogen, but due to the convenience in handling some other liquid fuels are also used and now direct methanol fuel cells are available in the market. Rapid electro-oxidation of the fuel at the fuel cell electrode is necessary for its optimum use. In addition to the methanol, other liquid fuels can also be used in the fuel cell. In this work, cyclic voltammetric studies have been done for the electro-oxidation of the methanol, ethanol, formic acid and formaldehyde on fuel cell catalyst. Platinum electrode is characterized by the measurement of active surface area and roughness factor. Classical electrochemical equations have been employed to find out rate constants for electro-oxidation of methanol fuel and calculations have been carried out to find out thermodynamic parameters. Exchange current density has been evaluated with reference to catalyst by drawing polarization curves. (author)

  17. Electrolyte Additives for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Hjuler, H.A.; Olsen, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    , as a fuel-cell performance with the modified electrolytes. Specific conductivity measurements of some of the modified phosphoric acid electrolytes are reported. At a given temperature, the conductivity of the C4F9SO3K-modified electrolyte decreases with an increasing amount of the additive; the conductivity...... of the remains at the same value as the conductivity of the pure phosphoric acid. At a given composition, the conductivity of any modified electrolyte increases with temperature. We conclude that the improved cell performance for modified electrolytes is not due to any increase in conductivity.......Electrochemical characteristics of a series of modified phosphoric acid electrolytes containing fluorinated car on compounds and silicone fluids as additives are presented. When used in phosphoric acid fuel cells, the modified electrolytes improve the performance due to the enhanced oxygen...

  18. Pretreatment on Corn Stover with Low Concentration of Formic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    the cellulose easily degraded into sugars and further fermented to ethanol. In this work, hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover at 195 degrees for 15 min with and without lower concentration of formic acid was compared in terms of sugar recoveries and ethanol fermentation. For pretreatment with formic acid...... pretreatment without formic acid. Toxicity tests of liquor parts showed that there were no inhibitions found for both pretreatment conditions. After simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated corn stover with Baker's yeast, the highest ethanol yield of 76.5% of the theoretical...

  19. Reductive de-polymerization of kraft lignin for chemicals and fuels using formic acid as an in-situ hydrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanhua; Mahmood, Nubla; Tymchyshyn, Matthew; Yuan, Zhongshun; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2014-11-01

    In this study, formic acid (FA) was employed as an in-situ hydrogen donor for the reductive de-polymerization of kraft lignin (KL). Under the optimum operating conditions, i.e., 300 °C, 1 h, 18.6 wt.% substrate concentration, 50/50 (v/v) water-ethanol medium with FA at a FA-to-lignin mass ratio of 0.7, KL (Mw∼10,000 g/mol) was effectively de-polymerized, producing de-polymerized lignin (DL, Mw 1270 g/mol) at a yield of ∼90 wt.% and polymerization of KL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Using Different Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    major types of fuel cells in practice are listed below: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell ( PEMFC ) Alkaline Fuel cell (AFC) Phosphoric Acid...Material Operating Temperature (oC) Efficiency (%) PEMFC H2, Methanol, Formic Acid Hydrated Organic Polymer < 90 40-50 AFC Pure H2 Aqueous

  1. Investigation of Influential Parameters in Deep Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene with Hydrogen Peroxide and Formic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Haghighat Mamaghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective oxidative system consisting of hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, and sulfuric acid followed by an extractive stage were implemented to remove dibenzothiophene in the simulated fuel oil. The results revealed such a great performance in the case of H2O2 in the presence of formic and sulfuric acids that led to the removal of sulfur compounds. Sulfuric acid was employed to increase the acidity of media as well as catalytic activity together with formic acid. The oxidation reaction was followed by a liquid-liquid extraction stage using acetonitrile as a polar solvent to remove produced sulfones from the model fuel. The impact of operating parameters including the molar ratio of formic acid to sulfur (, hydrogen peroxide to sulfur (, and the time of reaction was investigated using Box-Behnken experimental design for oxidation of the model fuel. A significant quadratic model was introduced for the sulfur removal as a function of effective parameters by the statistic analysis.

  2. Kinetic modeling of formic acid pulping of bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qiliang; Fu, Shiyu; Zhan, Huaiyu; Chai, Xinsheng; Lucia, Lucian A

    2008-05-14

    Organic solvent or organosolv pulping processes are alternatives to soda or kraft pulping to delignify lignocellulosic materials for the production of paper pulp. Formic acid, a typical organosolv system, has been presently examined under atmospheric pressure to pulp bagasse fibers. It was shown that efficient bagasse pulping was achieved when the formic acid concentration was limited to 90% (v/v). A statistical kinetic model based on the experimental results for the delignification of bagasse during formic acid pulping was developed that can be described as follows: D (delignification) = 0.747 x C(formicacid) (1.688) x (1 - e(-0.05171t)), an equation that can be used to predict the lignin content in formic acid during the pulping process. The delignification of bagasse by 90% formic acid was almost completed after approximately 80 min, while extended pulping did not improve the delignification but tended to degrade the carbohydrates in bagasse, especially the hemicelluloses, which were rapidly hydrolyzed at the onset of pulping.

  3. Acid formic effect in zinc coatings obtained by galvanostatic deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, C.; David, M.; Souza, E.C.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deposits obtained from electrodeposition is widely used for the purpose of protecting steel substrates from corrosion. They are generally added to Zn deposition bath many additives for improving certain characteristics of the deposit. As far as is known there is no information in literature about the effect of formic acid in corrosion resistance of a Zn deposit. Because it is an acid additive, it has the use of cyclohexylamine, in order for the electrolytic bath continue with a pH equal to the one used commercially, around 5. The main goal of this study is analyze the effect of the formic acid addition in the corrosion resistance of an Zn electrodeposition obtained by galvanostatic deposition. The results obtained by performance tests, cyclic voltammetry and X-ray diffraction showed that the formic acid addition may be promising in combating the corrosion of materials. (author)

  4. Effect of cell immobilization on the treatment of olive mill wastewater by a total phenols, acetic acid and formic acid degrading bacterium strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errami, Mohamed

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill wastewater (OMW is a pure vegetative by-product, containing a high organic and polyphenol content and is resistant to biodegradation. Its disposal lead to major environmental pollution problems in the Mediterranean basin. An aerobic bacterium was isolated from OMW. During three consecutive diluted and supplemented OMW treatment cycles, significant abatement of its phytotoxic substances was observed. In fact, total phenols, acetic and formic acids were reduced between 33 and 64 % when cells of the isolated bacterium were grown free; and between 62 and 78 % when cells of the same isolated bacterium were grown immobilized in a polyurethane sponge. These results suggest that the bacterium culture of the new isolate would decrease the OMW phytotoxicity. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA showed that all the related sequences are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and revealed that the isolated bacterium was characterized as a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.El alpechín (OMW es un residuo puro de la extracción del aceite de oliva, que contiene una elevada carga orgánica y de polifenoles por lo que es resistente a la degradación. Su descarga produce graves problemas de contaminación medioambiental en toda el área mediterránea. Se ha aislado una bacteria anaerobia del OMW, que , durante tres ciclos consecutivos de tratamiento del OMW diluido y suplementado, produjo una disminución significativa de las sustancias fitotóxicas del residuo. De hecho, la concentración en fenoles totales, ácido acético y ácido fórmico se redujeron entre 33 y 64 % cuando las células no estaban inmovilizadas y entre el 62 y 78 % cuando las células bacterianas se inmovilizaron en una esponja de poliuretano. Estos resultados indican que el cultivo de la nueva bacteria aislada puede disminuir la fototoxicidad del alpechín. Análisis filogenético del ribosoma 16S de DNA demostró que todas las secuencias eran miembros de la familia

  5. N-doped carbon dots derived from bovine serum albumin and formic acid with one- and two-photon fluorescence for live cell nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingqian; Li, Xintong; Wu, Hao; Wang, Beibei; Wu, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dots with both one- and two-photon fluorescence have drawn great attention for biomedical imaging. Herein, nitrogen-doped carbon dots were facilely developed by one-pot hydrothermal method using bovine serum albumin and formic acid as carbon sources. They are highly water-soluble with strong fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet or near infrared light. The carbon dots have a diameter of ~8.32 nm and can emit strong two-photon induced fluorescence upon excitation at 750 nm with a femtosecond laser. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis revealed that the carbon dots contained three components, C, N and O, corresponding to the peak at 285, 398 and 532 eV, respectively. The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed that there are carboxyl and carboxylic groups on the surface, which allowed further linking of functional molecules. pH stability study demonstrated that the carbon dots are able to be used in a wide range of pH values. The fluorescence mechanism is also discussed in this study. Importantly, these carbon dots are biocompatible and highly photostable, which can be directly applied for both one- and two-photon living cell imaging. After proper surface functionalization with TAT peptide, they can be used as fluorescent probes for live cell nuclear-targeted imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...

  7. Thermal decomposition of dilute aqueous formic acid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Sørensen, E.

    1992-01-01

    or a decarboxylation. In particular the second one is dependent on the reactor vessel used. It is shown to be catalyzed by a mixture of oxides of stainless steel components. The presence of CH3COOH or CH3CHO promotes the decomposition of HCOOH by way of both decarboxylation and oxidation. In any case formic acid...

  8. PdRu alloy nanoparticles of solid solution in atomic scale: outperformance towards formic acid electro-oxidation in acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Kanghua; Luo, Yun; Zou, Jiasui; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Fengqi; Huang, Lin; Huang, Jie; Kang, Xiongwu; Chen, Shaowei

    2017-01-01

    Developing catalyst of high performance and low cost toward the electro-oxidation of formic acid on the anode of fuel cell is critical for the commercialization of direct formic acid fuel cells. Here we reported the synthesis of Pd x Ru 10-x (x = 1,3,5,7,9) nanoparticles (NPs) by concurrent reduction of Pd 2+ and Ru 2+ in polyol solution at 200 °C. The particle size of the obtained NPs was confined at 5–15 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure for Pd x Ru 10-x (x = 3,5,7,9), with the lattice parameter proportional to the Pd content. The formation of the solid solution in atomic scale was confirmed for the alloy nanoparticles by XRD and the elemental mapping. Williamson-Hall method revealed that the stacking fault was dependent on the alloying extent of the alloy nanoparticles and reached the minimum for Pd 5 Ru 5 , which exhibited the highest activity towards formic acid oxidation among all these prepared samples, with mass activity of 12.6 times higher than that of commercial Pd/C. It was observed that the highest catalytic activity was in agreement with the minimum of the stacking fault of the alloy nanoparticles.

  9. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  10. EFFICACY OF 15% FORMIC ACID ON VARROA MITES IN DIFFERENT FORMS OF APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M MUŽA

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, responsible for reduced honey and brood production, higher bee mortality in winter. Because the resistance to the acaricides and they residues to bee products, alternative products and methods have been used against Varroa. One of this methods is treatment with formic acid. Formic acid induce to Varroa mite in brood and do not leave any residues in products. Concentric formic acid (60-85% is very effective, but at higher air temperature, it has influence on bee. In the last few years, except concentric formic acid, 15 % formic acid was recommended as control of varroosis. Diluted formic acid (15% reduced the bee response to treatment. In treatment with 15% formic acid, higher air temperature and different forms of application have positive influence to they function (65 – 95%.

  11. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  12. Ultrafast synthesis of flower-like ordered Pd3Pb nanocrystals with superior electrocatalytic activities towards oxidation of formic acid and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Rajkumar; Subbarao, Udumula; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic nanocrystals with high surface area are highly promising as efficient catalysts for fuel cell applications because of their unique electrocatalytic properties. The present work discusses about the controlled synthesis of ordered intermetallic Pd3Pb nanocrystals in different morphologies at relatively low temperature for the first time by polyol and hydrothermal methods both in presence and absence of surfactant. Here for the first time we report surfactant free synthesis of ordered flower-like intermetallic Pd3Pb nanocrystals in 10 s. The structural characteristics of the nanocrystals are confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The as synthesized ordered Pd3Pb nanocrystals exhibit far superior electrocatalytic activity and durability towards formic acid and ethanol oxidation over commercially available Pd black (Pd/C). The morphological variation of nanocrystals plays a crucial role in the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid and ethanol. Among the catalysts, the flower-like Pd3Pb shows enhanced activity and stability in electrocatalytic formic acid and ethanol oxidation. The current density and mass activity of flower-like Pd3Pb catalyst are higher by 2.5 and 2.4 times than that of Pd/C for the formic acid oxidation and 1.5 times each for ethanol oxidation.

  13. Syntrophic interactions improve power production in formic acid fed MFCs operated with set anode potentials or fixed resistances

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas F.; Kiely, Patrick D.; Wang, Aijie; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Formic acid is a highly energetic electron donor but it has previously resulted in low power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different set anode potentials (-0.30, -0.15, and +0.15V; vs. a standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) were used to evaluate syntrophic interactions in bacterial communities for formic acid degradation relative to a non-controlled, high resistance system (1,000Ω external resistance). No current was generated at -0.30V, suggesting a lack of direct formic acid oxidation (standard reduction potential: -0.40V). More positive potentials that allowed for acetic acid utilization all produced current, with the best performance at -0.15V. The anode community in the -0.15V reactor, based on 16S rDNA clone libraries, was 58% Geobacter sulfurreducens and 17% Acetobacterium, with lower proportions of these genera found in the other two MFCs. Acetic acid was detected in all MFCs suggesting that current generation by G. sulfurreducens was dependent on acetic acid production by Acetobacterium. When all MFCs were subsequently operated at an external resistance for maximum power production (100Ω for MFCs originally set at -0.15 and +0.15V; 150Ω for the control), they produced similar power densities and exhibited the same midpoint potential of -0.15V in first derivative cyclic voltammetry scans. All of the mixed communities converged to similar proportions of the two predominant genera (ca. 52% G. sulfurreducens and 22% Acetobacterium). These results show that syntrophic interactions can be enhanced through setting certain anode potentials, and that long-term performance produces stable and convergent communities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Syntrophic interactions improve power production in formic acid fed MFCs operated with set anode potentials or fixed resistances

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2011-10-24

    Formic acid is a highly energetic electron donor but it has previously resulted in low power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different set anode potentials (-0.30, -0.15, and +0.15V; vs. a standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) were used to evaluate syntrophic interactions in bacterial communities for formic acid degradation relative to a non-controlled, high resistance system (1,000Ω external resistance). No current was generated at -0.30V, suggesting a lack of direct formic acid oxidation (standard reduction potential: -0.40V). More positive potentials that allowed for acetic acid utilization all produced current, with the best performance at -0.15V. The anode community in the -0.15V reactor, based on 16S rDNA clone libraries, was 58% Geobacter sulfurreducens and 17% Acetobacterium, with lower proportions of these genera found in the other two MFCs. Acetic acid was detected in all MFCs suggesting that current generation by G. sulfurreducens was dependent on acetic acid production by Acetobacterium. When all MFCs were subsequently operated at an external resistance for maximum power production (100Ω for MFCs originally set at -0.15 and +0.15V; 150Ω for the control), they produced similar power densities and exhibited the same midpoint potential of -0.15V in first derivative cyclic voltammetry scans. All of the mixed communities converged to similar proportions of the two predominant genera (ca. 52% G. sulfurreducens and 22% Acetobacterium). These results show that syntrophic interactions can be enhanced through setting certain anode potentials, and that long-term performance produces stable and convergent communities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Decomposition mechanism of formic acid on Cu (111) surface: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhao, E-mail: jiangzhao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Qin, Pei; Fang, Tao

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Adsorption and decomposition mechanism of HCOOH on Cu (111) were investigated using DFT calculations. • The stable co-adsorption configurations of related intermediates were identified. • Five dissociation pathways of HCOOH via initial H−O, C−H and C−O bond scissions were considered and analyzed. - Abstract: The study of formic acid decomposition on transition metal surfaces is important to obtain useful information for vapor phase catalysis involving HCOOH and for the development of direct formic acid fuel cells. In this study, periodic density functional theory calculations have been employed to investigate the dissociation pathways of HCOOH on Cu (111) surface. About adsorption, it is found that the adsorption of HCOO, COOH, HCO, CO, OH and H on Cu (111) are considered chemisorption, whereas HCOOH, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} have the weak interaction with Cu (111) surface. Furthermore, the minimum energy pathways are analyzed for the decomposition of HCOOH to CO{sub 2} and CO through the scission of H−O, C−H and C−O bonds. It is found that HCOOH, HCOO and COOH prefer to dissociate in the related reactions rather than desorb. For the decomposition, it is indicated that HCO and COOH are the main dissociated intermediates of trans-HCOOH, CO{sub 2} is the main dissociated intermediates of bidentate-HCOO, and CO is the main dissociated product of cis-COOH. The co-adsorbed H atom is beneficial for the formation of CO{sub 2} from cis-COOH. Besides, it is found that the most favorable path for HCOOH decomposition on Cu (111) surface is HCOOH-HCO-CO (Path 5), where the step of CO formation from HCO dehydrogenation is considered to be the rate-determining step. The results also show that CO is preferentially formed as the dominant product of HCOOH on Cu (111) surface.

  16. Phosphoric acid fuel cell R and D activities at KACST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghouse, M.; Aba-Oud, H.; Ba-Junaid, M.; Al-Garni, M.; Quadri, M.I.

    1993-01-01

    The PAFC (Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell) activities are directed towards the development of components of single cell and experimental stacks at KACST. The main aim of the present task is to design and construct a 1 kW PAFC Stack and demonstrate it by integrating with an electrolyser using a DC current generated by a photovoltaic power source. This paper describes the preparation of porous teflon bonded gas diffusion carbon electrodes and their evaluation as single phosphoric acid fuel cells using hydrogen as a fuel and oxygen/air as an oxidant. 6 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  17. Formic acid assisted hydrogenation of levulinic acid to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muppala Ashokraju

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... to γ-valerolactone over ordered mesoporous Cu/Fe2O3 catalyst ... Compared to the direct use of biomass as fuel, its con- ... still room for the design and development of an efficient. 1 ... advantages no necessity of separation of levulinic acid ... of catalyst was placed in a quartz reactor and pre-treated in.

  18. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    of Pt, were characterized by AFM spectroscopy which indicated that Pt crystallizes preferentially onto previously formed Bi particles. The issue of Bi leaching (dissolution) from PtBi catalysts, and their catalytic effect alongside the HCOOH oxidation is rather unresolved. In order to control Bi....... Catalysts prepared in this way exhibit about 10 times higher activity for formic acid oxidation in comparison to pure Pt, as revealed both by potentiodynamic and quasy-potentiostatic measurements. This high activity is the result of well-balanced ensemble effect induced by Bi-oxide species interrupting Pt...

  19. Heterogeneous catalysis contribution for the denitration of aqueous nuclear radioactive waste with formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenais, S.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical denitration aims to reduce the nitric acid concentration in nuclear fuel reprocessing aqueous wastes by adding formic acid as a reducing agent. The denitration reaction exhibits an induction period, which duration is related to the time needed by the key intermediate of the reaction, i.e. nitrous acid, to reach a threshold concentration in the reaction medium. The addition of a Pt/SiO 2 catalyst in the reaction mixture suppresses the induction period of the chemical denitration. The aim of the present work is to identify the role of Pt/SiO 2 in the catalytic denitration mechanism. The experimental work is based on the comparison of catalytic tests performed with various catalysts, in order to identify the intrinsic characteristics of Pt/SiO 2 that might influence its activity for the reaction. Catalytic denitration results show that Pt/SiO 2 acts only by speeding up the nitrous acid generation in the solution until its concentration reaches the threshold level of 0,01 mol L -1 in the experimental conditions. Catalysts activity is evaluated by quantifying the nitrous acid generated on the platinum surface during the induction period of the homogeneous denitration reaction. The large platinum aggregates reactivity is greater than the one of nano-sized particles. The study of the key step of the catalytic denitration reaction, the catalytic generation of nitrous acid, clarifies the role of Pt/SiO 2 . The homogeneous denitration is initiated thanks to a redox cycle on the catalyst surface: an initial oxidation of Pt 0 by nitric acid, which is reduced into nitrous acid, followed by the reduction of the passivated 'Pt ox ' by formic acid. Furthermore, a platinum reduction by formic acid prior to the catalytic test prevents any platinum leaching from the catalyst into the nitric solution, being all the more significant as platinum dispersion is high. (author)

  20. Depolymerization and hydrodeoxygenation of switchgrass lignin with formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiyin; Miller, Stephen J; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2012-04-01

    Organosolv switchgrass lignin is depolymerized and hydrodeoxygenated with a formic acid hydrogen source, 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and ethanol solvent. The combination of formic acid and Pt/C is found to promote production of higher fractions of lower molecular weight compounds in the liquid products. After 4 h of reaction, all of the switchgrass lignin is solubilized and 21 wt % of the biomass is shown to be converted into seven prominent molecular species that are identified and quantified. Reaction time is shown to be an important variable in affecting changes in product distributions and bulk liquid product properties. At 20 h of reaction, the lignin is significantly depolymerized to form liquid products with a 76 % reduction in the weighted average molecular weight. Elemental analysis also shows that the resultant liquid products have a 50 % reduction in O/C and 10 % increase in H/C molar ratios compared to the switchgrass lignin after 20 h. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Formic Acid Electrooxidation by a Platinum Nanotubule Array Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broaddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional metallic nanostructures such as nanowires, rods, and tubes have drawn much attention for electrocatalytic applications due to potential advantages that include fewer diffusion impeding interfaces with polymeric binders, more facile pathways for electron transfer, and more effective exposure of active surface sites. 1D nanostructured electrodes have been fabricated using a variety of methods, typically showing improved current response which has been attributed to improved CO tolerance, enhanced surface activity, and/or improved transport characteristics. A template wetting approach was used to fabricate an array of platinum nanotubules which were examined electrochemically with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid. Arrays of 100 and 200 nm nanotubules were compared to a traditional platinum black catalyst, all of which were found to have similar surface areas. Peak formic acid oxidation current was observed to be highest for the 100 nm nanotubule array, followed by the 200 nm array and the Pt black; however, CO tolerance of all electrodes was similar, as were the onset potentials of the oxidation and reduction peaks. The higher current response was attributed to enhanced mass transfer in the nanotubule electrodes, likely due to a combination of both the more open nanostructure as well as the lack of a polymeric binder in the catalyst layer.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate (BTMACI), in the presence of zinc chloride, leads to the formation of carbon dioxide. The reaction is first order with respect to BTMACI, zinc chloride and organic acid. Oxidation of deuteriated formic acid indicates the presence of a kinetic ...

  3. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  4. Titanium dioxide nanotubes/polyhydroxyfullerene composites for formic acid photodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamandi, Marwa [Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux et Catalyse, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Berhault, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.berhault@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement de Lyon, IRCELYON, CNRS, University of Lyon I, Villeurbanne 69100 (France); Dappozze, Frederic; Guillard, Chantal [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement de Lyon, IRCELYON, CNRS, University of Lyon I, Villeurbanne 69100 (France); Kochkar, Hafedh, E-mail: h_kochkar@yahoo.fr [Université de Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux et Catalyse, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Valorisation des Matériaux Utiles, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux (CNRSM), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, 8027 Soliman (Tunisia)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) decorating TiO{sub 2} nanostructured materials. • PHF helps to maintain surface oxygen vacancies at the TiO{sub 2} surface. • PHF improves the faradic current across the semiconductor interface. • Higher photocatalytic activity is achieved for monolayer PHF onto TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. - Abstract: The influence of polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) on the photocatalytic properties of calcined hydrogenotitanate nanotubes (HNT) were evaluated in the present study. PHF-HNT nanocomposites were first characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, electron paramagnetic resonance and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and photocurrent experiments. Correlation was then established with the photocatalytic properties of PHF-HNT nanocomposites during the photodegradation of formic acid.

  5. Enhanced catalytic performance of Pd catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation in ionic liquid aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Qian-Ying; Lu, Guo-Ping; Yang, Hai-Fang; Zhu, Xiao; Kong, De-Sheng; You, Jin-Mao

    2014-12-01

    A protic ionic liquid (IL), n-butylammonium nitrate (N4NO3), is prepared and employed as the electrolyte for formic acid electrooxidation reaction (FAOR) on Pd catalysts. The oxidation peak potential of FAOR in the IL solution shows about a 200 mV negative shift as compared with those in traditional H2SO4/HClO4 electrolytes, suggesting that FAOR can be more easily carried out on Pd catalysts in IL media. The catalytic properties of Pd toward FAOR are not only dependent on the concentration of IL, as a consequence of the varied electronic conductivity of the IL solution, but also on the high potential limit of the cyclic voltammograms. When the Pd catalyst is cycled up to 1.0 V (vs. SCE), which induces a significant oxidation of Pd, it shows ca. 4.0 times higher activity than that not subjected to the Pd oxidation (up to 0.6 V). The Pd oxides, which are more easily formed in IL solution than in traditional H2SO4/HClO4 electrolytes, may play a crucial role in increasing the catalytic activities of Pd toward FAOR. Our work would shed new light on the mechanism of FAOR and highlight the potential applications of IL as green and environment-friendly electrolytes in fuel cells and other technologies.

  6. Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes: Physiochemical characterization and fuel cell applications [PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Bjerrum, Niels

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operational at temperatures around 150-200 degrees C is desirable for fast electrode kinetics and high tolerance to fuel impurities. For this purpose polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes have been prepared and H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/-doped in a doping range from 300...... doping level. At 160 degrees C a conductivity as high as 0.13 S cm/sup -1/ is obtained for membranes of high doping levels. Mechanical strength measurements show, however, that a high acid doping level results in poor mechanical properties. At operational temperatures up to 190 degrees C, fuel cells...... based on this polymer membrane have been tested with both hydrogen and hydrogen containing carbon monoxide....

  7. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid.

  8. Efficient fermentation of xylose to ethanol at high formic acid concentrations by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Matsuda, Fumio [Kobe Univ., Hyogo (Japan). Organization of Advanced Science and Technology; Sung, Kyung-mo; Sanda, Tomoya; Kondo, Akihiko [Kobe Univ., Hyogo (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering

    2011-05-15

    Recombinant yeast strains highly tolerant to formic acid during xylose fermentation were constructed. Microarray analysis of xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain overexpressing endogenous xylulokinase in addition to xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from Pichia stipitis revealed that upregulation of formate dehydrogenase genes (FDH1 and FDH2) was one of the most prominent transcriptional events against excess formic acid. The quantification of formic acid in medium indicated that the innate activity of FDH was too weak to detoxify formic acid. To reinforce the capability for formic acid breakdown, the FDH1 gene was additionally overexpressed in the xylose-metabolizing recombinant yeast. This modification allowed the yeast to rapidly decompose excess formic acid. The yield and final ethanol concentration in the presence of 20 mM formic acid is as essentially same as that of control. The fermentation profile also indicated that the production of xylitol and glycerol, major by-products in xylose fermentation, was not affected by the upregulation of FDH activity. (orig.)

  9. Airborne observations of formic acid using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne measurements of formic acid mixing ratios over the United Kingdom were measured on the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft on 16 March 2010 with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer using I reagent ions. The I ionization scheme was able to measure formic acid mixing ratios at 1 Hz in the boundary layer.

    In-flight standard addition calibrations from a formic acid source were used to determine the instrument sensitivity of 35 ± 6 ion counts pptv−1 s−1 and a limit of detection of 25 pptv. Routine measurements were made through a scrubbed inlet to determine the instrumental background. Three plumes of formic acid were observed over the UK, originating from London, Humberside and Tyneside. The London plume had the highest formic acid mixing ratio throughout the flight, peaking at 358 pptv. No significant correlations of formic acid with NOx and ozone were found, but a positive correlation was observed between CO and HCOOH within the two plumes where coincident data were recorded.

    A trajectory model was employed to determine the sources of the plumes and compare modelled mixing ratios with measured values. The model underestimated formic acid concentrations by up to a factor of 2. This is explained by missing sources in the model, which were considered to be both primary emissions of formic acid of mainly anthropogenic origin and a lack of precursor emissions, such as isoprene, from biogenic sources, whose oxidation in situ would lead to formic acid formation.

  10. Effect of Formic Acid on In Vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Methane Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanber Kara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of formic acid on the in vitro methane production and in vitro ruminal fermentation of alfalfa hay. Effect of 0.0 (control group: YF0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 ml/L (experimental groups: YF1, YF2, YF3, YF4, and YF5 respectively formic acid (Amasil85-liquid addition to rumen fluid on ruminal fermentation parameters of alfalfa hay were determined by using in vitro gas production techniques. Methane production of in vitro incubation increased (to about 20% with addition of linearly increased formic acid. Linearly increased levels of formic acid addition to rumen fluid has significantly changed the production of in vitro total gas production, metabolic energy (ME and organic matter digestibility (OMD at linear, quadratic and cubic. The addition of 0.1 ml/L and 0.2 ml/L formic acid to rumen fluid significantly decreased in vitro total gas production, ME and OMD however addition of 0.3 ml/L and 0.4 ml/L formic acid was not changed in vitro gas production, ME and OMD levels and 0.5 ml/L formic acid was significantly increased all these parameters. Ruminal pH was not changed by addition of formic acid. Formic acid is a safe feed additive because of its properties antibacterial and flavorings and also is used as a fermentation promoter in silage. In this study it has been observed that all doses of formic acid increased in vitro enteric methane production and low doses decreased in vitro total gas production, ME and OMD and high doses have increased all these parameters. High doses have a positive effect on ME and OMD; however formic acid should be used at limited levels in diets due to the negative effect of increasing greenhouse gases. The effect of formic acid addition to the feed raw matter and rations of all livestock would be beneficial to investigate in terms of digestive system parameters and global warming, further in vitro and in vivo studies.

  11. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Reactive extraction and recovery of levulinic acid, formic acid and furfural from aqueous solutions containing sulphuric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Thomas; Blahusiak, Marek; Babic, Katarina; Schuur, Boelo

    2017-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced from lignocellulosic materials via hydroxylation followed by an acid-catalyzed conversion of hexoses. Inorganic homogeneous catalysts are mostly used, in particular sulphuric acid, yielding a mixture of LA with sulphuric acid, formic acid (FA) and furfural.

  13. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  14. Interaction of Cucurbit(5)uril with U(VI) in formic acid water medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, Neetika; Kar, Aishwarya; Tomar, B.S.; Nayak, S.K.; Mohapatra, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbit(n)urils (CBn) are a new class of macrocyclic cage compounds capable of binding organic and inorganic species, owing to their unique pumpkin like structure comprising of both hydrophobic cavity and hydrophilic portal. Complexation of U(VI) with Cucurbit(5)uril (CB5) in 50 wt% formic acid medium has been studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. In order to understand the species formed, the interaction of formic acid with CB5 was studied by monitoring fluorescence of CB5. Formic was found to form 1:1 species with interaction constant (K) 17.4 M -1 . (author)

  15. Characteristics of a continuous denitration by formic acid - electrolytic trimming of residual acid with accompanying the precipitation of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G. W.; Kim, S. H.; Lim, J. G.; Lee, I. H.

    2003-01-01

    This work has studied the characteristics of destruction of nitric acid and precipitation of several metal ions in a continuous denitration process combining a denitration by formic acid and a residual acid-electrolytic trimming system. The metal ions of Zr, Mo, Fe, and Nd did not affect the electrodes at the step of electrolytic trimming of the residual acid after denitration by formic acid. The Mo ion in electrolytic solution enhanced the generation of nitrite ion during the electrolytic reaction. The mole ratio of formic acid to nitric acid fed into the continuous denitration reactor using formic acid affected much the final acidity, the precipitation yields of metal ions, the precipitate morphology. At the ratio of 1.65, the process had the lowest final acidity of less than 0.1 M, and the precipitation yields of Zr and Mo reached 95% and 83%, respectively as the highest values

  16. The Genealogical Tree of Ethanol: Gas-phase Formation of Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Formic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouteris, Dimitrios; Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Vazart, Fanny; Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2018-02-01

    Despite the harsh conditions of the interstellar medium, chemistry thrives in it, especially in star-forming regions where several interstellar complex organic molecules (iCOMs) have been detected. Yet, how these species are synthesized is a mystery. The majority of current models claim that this happens on interstellar grain surfaces. Nevertheless, evidence is mounting that neutral gas-phase chemistry plays an important role. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for the gas-phase synthesis of glycolaldehyde, a species with a prebiotic potential and for which no gas-phase formation route was previously known. In the proposed scheme, the ancestor is ethanol and the glycolaldehyde sister species are acetic acid (another iCOM with unknown gas-phase formation routes) and formic acid. For the reactions of the new scheme with no available data, we have performed electronic structure and kinetics calculations deriving rate coefficients and branching ratios. Furthermore, after a careful review of the chemistry literature, we revised the available chemical networks, adding and correcting several reactions related to glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The new chemical network has been used in an astrochemical model to predict the abundance of glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The predicted abundance of glycolaldehyde depends on the ethanol abundance in the gas phase and is in excellent agreement with the measured one in hot corinos and shock sites. Our new model overpredicts the abundance of acetic acid and formic acid by about a factor of 10, which might imply a yet incomplete reaction network.

  17. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  18. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  19. Hydrogen generation during treatment of simulated high-level radioactive waste with formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, J.A.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Hsu, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter System (IDMS), operated by the Savannah River Laboratory, is a one-fifth scale pilot facility used in support of the start-up and operation of the Department of Energy's DWPF. Five IDMS runs determined the effect of the presence of noble metals in HLW sludge on the H 2 generation rate during the preparation of melter feed with formic acid. Overall, the results clearly showed that H 2 generation in the DWPF SRAT could, at times, exceed the lower flammable limit of H 2 in air (4 vol%), depending on such factors as offgas generation and air inleakage of the DWPF vessels. Therefore, the installation of a forced air purge system and H 2 monitors were recommended to the DWPF to control the generation of H 2 during melter feed preparation by fuel dilution

  20. Woking Park phosphoric acid fuel cell CHP monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-09-15

    A phosphoric acid fuel (PC25) delivering up to 200kw of electrical power and commensurate heat was installed in Woking Park UK in late 2006 and has been monitored over a period of one year. The system supplies electric power to a leisure centre and swimming pool via a private wires network. This report gives details of the monitoring and shows a schematic of the system, data on electrical and thermal efficiencies, stack voltage variations and gaseous emissions. Extended monitoring is now taking place to provide a complete picture of the economics and operation of the fuel cell in the developing combined heat and power unit and private wires system. The contractor is Advantica of Loughborough and detailed results of the monitoring are available on the DTI website.

  1. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  2. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Javaid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm was coated with a palladium (Pd-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd–Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2 was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid.

  3. [Discovery of the target genes inhibited by formic acid in Candida shehatae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Peng; Xiong, Xujie; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Zhu, Junjun; Shiyuan, Yu

    2014-01-04

    At transcriptional level, the inhibitory effects of formic acid was investigated on Candida shehatae, a model yeast strain capable of fermenting xylose to ethanol. Thereby, the target genes were regulated by formic acid and the transcript profiles were discovered. On the basis of the transcriptome data of C. shehatae metabolizing glucose and xylose, the genes responsible for ethanol fermentation were chosen as candidates by the combined method of yeast metabolic pathway analysis and manual gene BLAST search. These candidates were then quantitatively detected by RQ-PCR technique to find the regulating genes under gradient doses of formic acid. By quantitative analysis of 42 candidate genes, we finally identified 10 and 5 genes as markedly down-regulated and up-regulated targets by formic acid, respectively. With regard to gene transcripts regulated by formic acid in C. shehatae, the markedly down-regulated genes ranking declines as follows: xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2), acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RKI), transaldolase (TAL), phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (GND1), transketolase (TKL), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (ZWF1), xylose reductase (XYL1), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC); and a declining rank for up-regulated gens as follows: fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD), glucokinase (GLK), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH).

  4. Formic Acid Modified Co3O4-CeO2 Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruishu Shang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A formic acid modified catalyst, Co3O4-CeO2, was prepared via facile urea-hydrothermal method and applied in CO oxidation. The Co3O4-CeO2-0.5 catalyst, treated by formic acid at 0.5 mol/L, performed better in CO oxidation with T50 obtained at 69.5 °C and T100 obtained at 150 °C, respectively. The characterization results indicate that after treating with formic acid, there is a more porous structure within the Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst; meanwhile, despite of the slightly decreased content of Co, there are more adsorption sites exposed by acid treatment, as suggested by CO-TPD and H2-TPD, which explains the improvement of catalytic performance.

  5. Synthesis of novel acid electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, James L.

    1988-11-01

    A 40 millimole per hour scale aerosol direct fluorination reactor was constructed. F-Methyl F-4-methoxybutanoate and F-4-methoxybutanoyl fluoride were synthesized by aerosol direct fluorination of methyl 4-methoxybutanoate. Basic hydrolysis of the perfluorinated derivatives produce sodium F-4 methoxybutanoate which was pyrolyzed to F-3-methoxy-1-propene. Purification and shipment of 33 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-propene followed. Syntheses by analogous methods allowed production and shipment of 5 grams of F-3-ethoxy 1-propene, 18 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-propene, and 37 grams of F-3,3-dimethyl 1-butene. Eighteen grams of F-2,2-dimethyl 1-chloropropane was produced directly and shipped. As suggested by other contractors, 5 grams of F-3-methoxy 1-iodopropane, and 5 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-iodopropane were produced by converting the respective precursor acid sodium salts produced for olefin synthesis to the silver salts and pyrolyzing them with iodine. Each of these compounds was prepared for the first time by the aerosol fluorination process during the course of the contract. These samples were provided to other Gas Research Institute (GRI) contractors for synthesis of perfluorinated sulfur (VI) and phosphorous (V) acids.

  6. Homogeneous Catalysis for Sustainable Hydrogen Storage in Formic Acid and Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordakis, Katerina; Tang, Conghui; Vogt, Lydia K; Junge, Henrik; Dyson, Paul J; Beller, Matthias; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2018-01-24

    Hydrogen gas is a storable form of chemical energy that could complement intermittent renewable energy conversion. One of the main disadvantages of hydrogen gas arises from its low density, and therefore, efficient handling and storage methods are key factors that need to be addressed to realize a hydrogen-based economy. Storage systems based on liquids, in particular, formic acid and alcohols, are highly attractive hydrogen carriers as they can be made from CO 2 or other renewable materials, they can be used in stationary power storage units such as hydrogen filling stations, and they can be used directly as transportation fuels. However, to bring about a paradigm change in our energy infrastructure, efficient catalytic processes that release the hydrogen from these molecules, as well as catalysts that regenerate these molecules from CO 2 and hydrogen, are required. In this review, we describe the considerable progress that has been made in homogeneous catalysis for these critical reactions, namely, the hydrogenation of CO 2 to formic acid and methanol and the reverse dehydrogenation reactions. The dehydrogenation of higher alcohols available from renewable feedstocks is also described. Key structural features of the catalysts are analyzed, as is the role of additives, which are required in many systems. Particular attention is paid to advances in sustainable catalytic processes, especially to additive-free processes and catalysts based on Earth-abundant metal ions. Mechanistic information is also presented, and it is hoped that this review not only provides an account of the state of the art in the field but also offers insights into how superior catalytic systems can be obtained in the future.

  7. Electrocatalytic behavior of a nanocomposite of Ni/Pd supported by carbonized PVA nanofibers towards formic acid, ethanol and urea oxidation: A physicochemical and electro-analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ibrahim M. A.; Yasin, Ahmed S.; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Song, Seung A.; Lee, Ha Eun; Kim, Seong Su

    2018-03-01

    A nanocomposite of Ni/Pd supported by carbonized poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers (NFs) was synthesized via electrospinning followed by calcination under an argon atmosphere. The as-synthesized NFs were studied using physicochemical analyses, such as field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTsbnd IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), to investigate the morphology, crystallinity, effect of carbonization and surface chemistry of the NFs, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) were utilized to study the performance of the NFs towards electrooxidation reactions. The designed NFs present superior electrocatalytic behavior in an acid medium towards formic acid oxidation, as well as urea and ethanol oxidation in an alkaline medium. The electrocatalytic performance of the bimetallic NFs appears to arise from the assembly of bimetallic Ni/Pd@NFs based on PVA, which has hydroxyl groups. These hydroxyl groups can decrease the negative processes that occur as a result of metal-metal interactions, such as the aggregation process. This study introduces a novel non-precious electrocatalyst to facilitate the commercialization of fuel cells based on formic acid, urea and ethanol.

  8. Mechanistic studies of formic acid oxidation at polycarbazole supported Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Reza B.; Pickup, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A polycarbazole support decreases the accumulation of adsorbed intermediates on Pt during formic acid oxidation. •Polycarbazole causes a bilayer of Cu to form on Pt nanoparticles during Cu underpotential deposition. •XPS suggests that both of these effects are due to electron donation from the metal (Pt or Cu) into the polymer π-system. -- Abstract: Mechanistic aspects of the promotion of formic acid oxidation at Pt nanoparticles supported on a thin layer of polycarbazole (PCZ) have been investigated by voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Pt nanoparticles were drop coated onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode coated with a ca. 9 nm layer of electrochemically deposited polycarbazole. After 500 s of formic acid oxidation at 0 V vs. SCE, the current at a GC/PCZ/Pt electrode was 25 times higher than at a GC/Pt electrode. Voltammetry in formic acid free H 2 SO 4 following potentiostatic oxidation of formic acid revealed that there was less accumulation of adsorbed intermediates for the polycarbazole supported Pt nanoparticles than for those deposited directly onto the glassy carbon with, 50% more Pt sites remaining available for the GC/PCZ/Pt electrode relative to the GC/Pt electrode. Independent CO stripping experiments revealed only slight differences, while Cu underpotential deposition surprisingly resulted in the deposition of a ca. two-fold excess of Cu on the polycarbazole supported particles. This observation was supported by XPS which also revealed a second Cu signal at a higher binding energy, suggesting electron donation into the conjugated π system of the polymer. Such an interaction of Pt with the polycarbazole may be responsible for its higher activity for formic acid oxidation

  9. Ultra-low Pt decorated PdFe Alloy Nanoparticles for Formic Acid Electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yawei; Du, Chunyu; Han, Guokang; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A cost-efficient way is used to prepare transition-noble metal alloy nanoparticles. • The Pd 50 Fe 50 /C catalyst shows excellent activity for formic acid oxidation (FAO). • Much activity enhancement of FAO is acquired by ultra-low Pt decorated Pd 50 Fe 50 . • A synergistic mechanism between Pt clusters and PdFe is proposed during the FAO. - Abstract: Palladium (Pd), has demonstrated promising electro-catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation, but suffers from extremely low abundance. Recently alloying with a transition metal has been considered as an effective approach to reducing the loading of Pd and enhancing the activity of Pd-based catalysts simultaneously. Herein, carbon supported PdFe nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized at room temperature by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and potassium ferrocyanide as Fe precursor. The Pd 50 Fe 50 alloy sample annealed at 900 °C for 1 h shows the best catalytic activity among Pd x Fe 1-x (x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.8) towards formic acid oxidation. To further improve both catalytic activity and stability, the ultra-low Pt (0.09 wt %) decorated Pd 50 Fe 50 NPs (PtPd/PdFe) are prepared via the galvanic replacement reaction. Compared with Pd 50 Fe 50 /C, the PtPd/PdFe/C Exhibits 1.52 times higher catalytic activity and lower onset potential (−0.12 V). The significant enhancements of formic acid oxidation can be attributed to the accelerated dehydrogenation reaction of formic acid by Pt atomic clusters. Moreover, the PtPd/PdFe/C also demonstrates better tolerance to poisons during formic acid oxidation.

  10. Effect of Formic Acid on Exopolysaccharide Production in Skim Milk Fermentation by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Junko; Kawai, Yasushi; Aritomo, Ryota; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Makino, Seiya; Ikegami, Shuji; Isogai, Emiko; Saito, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    In yogurt, the formation of formate by Streptococcus thermophilus stimulates the activity of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus). However, there have been no reports how formic acid acts on the exopolysaccharide (EPS) production of L. bulgaricus. Here, the effect of formate on the EPS production in skim milk by L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 was investigated. After incubation for 24 hr with 100 mg/l formate, cell proliferation and lactic acid production were accelerated. The viable and total cell numbers were increased about ten- and four-fold, respectively. The amount of EPS in culture with formate (~116 µg/ml) was also four-fold greater than that of the control (~27 µg/ml). Although elongation of cells was observed at 6 hr of cultivation in both cultures, cells cultivated with formate returned to a normal shape after incubation for 24 hr. The sensitivity to cell wall hydrolase and composition of surface layer proteins, as well as the cell membrane fatty acid composition of L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1, were not influenced by formate. However, differences were observed in intracellular fatty acid compositions and sensitivity to antibiotics. Cell length and surface damage returned to normal in cultures with formate. These observations suggest that formic acid is necessary for normal cell growth of L. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 and higher EPS production.

  11. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid in nitrite-containing simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1994-08-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 -, and NO 2 - were used as media to evaluate the stability of formic acid towards hydrogen evolution by the reaction HCO 2 H → H 2 + CO 2 catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Small scale experiments using 40-50 mL of feed simulant in closed glass reactors (250-550 mL total volume) at 80-100 degree C were used to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate ion on the catalytic activities of the noble metals for formic acid decomposition. Reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase as a function of time. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl 3 ·3H 2 O, was found to be the most active catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid above ∼80 degree C in the presence of nitrite ion in accord with earlier observations. The inherent homogeneous nature of the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed formic acid decomposition is suggested by the approximate pseudo first-order dependence of the hydrogen production rate on Rh concentration. Titration of the typical feed simulants containing carbonate and nitrite with formic acid in the presence of rhodium at the reaction temperature (∼90 degree C) indicates that the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid occurs only after formic acid has reacted with all of the carbonate and nitrite present to form CO 2 and NO/N 2 O, respectively. The catalytic activities of Ru and Pd towards hydrogen generation from formic acid are quite different than those of Rh in that they are inhibited rather than promoted by the presence of nitrite ion

  12. Pd nanoparticles supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and electrooxidation for formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sudong; Mi, Hongyu; Ye, Xiangguo [Institute of Applied Chemistry, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Zhang, Xiaogang [College of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2008-01-03

    To improve the utilization and activity of anodic catalysts for formic acid electrooxidation, palladium (Pd) particles were loaded on the MWCNTs, which were functionalized in a mixture of 96% sulfuric acid and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, using sodium nitrite to produce intermediate diazonium salts from substituted anilines. The composition, particle size, and crystallinity of the Pd/f-MWCNTs catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements. The electrocatalytic properties of the Pd/f-MWCNTs catalysts for formic acid oxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) in 0.5 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. The results demonstrated that the catalytic activity was greatly enhanced due to the improved water-solubility and dispersion of the f-MWCNTs, which were facile to make the small particle size (3.8 nm) and uniform dispersion of Pd particles loading on the surface of the MWCNTs. In addition, the functionalized MWCNTs with benzenesulfonic group can provide benzenesulfonic anions in aqueous solution, which may combine with hydrogen cation and then promote the oxidation of formic acid reactive intermediates. So the Pd/f-MWCNTs composites showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation. (author)

  13. Hanford waste vitrification plant hydrogen generation study: Preliminary evaluation of alternatives to formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Kumar, V.

    1996-02-01

    Oxalic, glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids as well as glycine have been evaluated as possible substitutes for formic acid in the preparation of feed for the Hanford waste vitrification plant using a non-radioactive feed stimulant UGA-12M1 containing substantial amounts of aluminum and iron oxides as well as nitrate and nitrite at 90C in the presence of hydrated rhodium trichloride. Unlike formic acid none of these carboxylic acids liberate hydrogen under these conditions and only malonic and citric acids form ammonia. Glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids all appear to have significant reducing properties under the reaction conditions of interest as indicated by the observation of appreciable amounts of N 2 O as a reduction product of,nitrite or, less likely, nitrate at 90C. Glyoxylic, pyruvic, and malonic acids all appear to be unstable towards decarboxylation at 90C in the presence of Al(OH) 3 . Among the carboxylic acids investigated in this study the α-hydroxycarboxylic acids glycolic and lactic acids appear to be the most interesting potential substitutes for formic acid in the feed preparation for the vitrification plant because of their failure to produce hydrogen or ammonia or to undergo decarboxylation under the reaction conditions although they exhibit some reducing properties in feed stimulant experiments

  14. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  15. Fabrication of Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous-Carbon-Coated Palladium Nanoparticles: An Intriguing Electrocatalyst for Methanol and Formic Acid Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chaiti; Dutta, Soumen; Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Roy, Anindita; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-05-20

    Inspired by the attractive catalytic properties of palladium and the inert nature of carbon supports in catalysis, a concise and simple methodology for in situ nitrogen-doped mesoporous-carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/N-C) has been developed by carbonizing a palladium dimethylglyoximate complex. The as-synthesized Pd/N-C has been exfoliated as a fuel cell catalyst by studying the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The material synthesized at 400 °C,namely, Pd/N-C-400,exhibitssuperior mass activity and stability among catalysts synthesized under different carbonization temperaturesbetween300 and 500 °C. The unique 1D porous structure in Pd/N-C-400 helps better electron transport at the electrode surface, which eventually leads to about five times better catalytic activity and about two times higher stability than that of commercial Pd/C. Thus, our designed sacrificial metal-organic templatedirected pathway becomes a promising technique for Pd/N-C synthesis with superior catalytic performances. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Preparation and electrochemistry of graphene nanosheets–multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrid nanomaterials as Pd electrocatalyst support for formic acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Sudong; Shen Chengmin; Lu Xiangjun; Tong Hao; Zhu Jiajia; Zhang Xiaogang; Gao Hongjun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Graphene nanosheets–MWCNTs (GNS–CNTs) composites as Pd electrocatalysts support were synthesized by in situ reduction method. ► The direct electrooxidation of HCOOH is improved on the GNS–CNTs based catalyst. ► Both activity and durability of GNS–CNTs based catalyst are improved greatly. ► Pd/GNS–CNTs catalysts exhibit excellent performance when the mass ratio of GO to CNTs is 5:1. - Abstract: Graphene nanosheets–MWCNTs (GNS–CNTs) composites were synthesized by in situ reduction method, and then palladium nanoparticles (NPs) were supported on the GNS–CNTs by a microwave-assisted polyol process. Microstructure measurements showed that the graphene nanosheets and the CNTs formed a uniform nanocomposite with CNTs absorbed on the graphene nanosheets surface and/or filled between the graphene nanosheets. Compared to Pd/Vulcan XC-72R carbon, Pd/GNS, or Pd/CNTs catalysts, the Pd/GNS–CNTs catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability for formic acid electro-oxidation when the mass ratio of GO to CNTs is 5:1. The superior performance of Pd/GNS–CNTs catalysts may arise from large surface area utilization for NPs and enhanced electronic conductivity of the supports. Therefore, the GNS–CNTs composite should be a promising carbon material for application as electrocatalyst support in fuel cells.

  17. Equilibrium thermodynamics of the ternary membrane-forming system nylon, formic acid and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, A.M.W.; Bulte, A.M.W.; Naafs, E.M.; van Eeten, F.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.; Strathmann, H.

    1996-01-01

    The binary Flory-Huggins interaction parameters for the ternary membrane-forming system nylon, formic acid and water have been obtained from literature data, swelling values and melting point depression. Nylon 4,6 nylon 6 and a copolymer of nylon 4,6 and 6 were examined. The isothermal

  18. Localized Pd Overgrowth on Cubic Pt Nanocrystals for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.; Habas, S.E.; Somorjai, G.A.; Yang, P.

    2008-03-20

    Binary Pt/Pd nanoparticles were synthesized by localized overgrowth of Pd on cubic Pt seeds for the investigation of electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation. The binary particles exhibited much less self-poisoning and a lower activation energy relative to Pt nanocubes, consistent with the single crystal study.

  19. Formic acid demineralization does not affect the morphometry of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Scott F; Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Cornwall, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Demineralization can facilitate the dissection of soft tissue structures in inaccessible locations by softening surrounding bone so that it can be easily removed without risking damage to the structure of interest. However, it is unclear whether demineralization alters the morphometry of soft tissues if used for this purpose. We have therefore examined the effect of extended-immersion formic acid demineralization on the size and shape of cervical zygapophyseal joint meniscoids to evaluate its usefulness as a means of facilitating dissection and examination of soft tissue structures from bony regions. Four cadaveric cervical spines were dissected, and three randomly selected zygapophyseal joints from each spine (12 in total) were removed, disarticulated and immersed in 5% formic acid for 32 days. Each joint was examined using a surgical microscope and photographed, and meniscoid length and surface area measured at days 0, 4, 18, and 32. Measurements were made on magnified digital photographs, and each measurement was repeated three times to determine intra-rater reliability. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Significance was set at p reliability was high (intra-class correlation > 0.9). These results support the use of formic acid demineralization to facilitate the study of cervical spine meniscoids by dissection, as even after a period of extended immersion in the solution, the morphometry of the structures was not significantly altered. Findings may have implications for dissection studies of other meniscoid-like soft tissue structures that use formic acid demineralization.

  20. 76 FR 7106 - Food Additives Permitted in Feed and Drinking Water of Animals; Formic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 [Docket No. FDA-2009-F-0525] Food Additives Permitted in Feed and Drinking Water of Animals; Formic Acid AGENCY...) is amending the regulations for food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals to...

  1. Glycerol-plasticised silk membranes made using formic acid are ductile, transparent and degradation-resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Redmond, Sharon L; Atlas, Marcus D; Wang, Xungai

    2017-11-01

    Regenerated silk fibroin membranes tend to be brittle when dry. The use of plasticisers such as glycerol improve membrane ductility, but, when combined with aqueous processing, can lead to a higher degradation rate than solvent-annealed membranes. This study investigated the use of formic acid as the solvent with glycerol to make deformable yet degradation-resistant silk membranes. Here we show that membranes cast using formic acid had low light scattering, with a diffuse transmittance of less than 5% over the visible wavelengths, significantly lower than the 20% transmittance of aqueous derived silk/glycerol membranes. They had 64% β-sheet content and lost just 30% of the initial silk weight over 6h when tested with an accelerated enzymatic degradation assay, in comparison the aqueous membranes completely degraded within this timeframe. The addition of glycerol also improved the maximum elongation of formic acid derived membranes from under 3% to over 100%. They also showed good cytocompatibility and supported the adhesion and migration of human tympanic membrane keratinocytes. Formic acid based, silk/glycerol membranes may be of great use in medical applications such as repair of tympanic membrane perforation or ocular applications where transparency and resistance to enzymatic degradation are important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Theoretical Insight into the Trends that Guide the Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, J.S.; Christensen, Rune; Vegge, Tejs

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction (electroreduction) of CO2 to formic acid (HCOOH) and its competing reactions, that is, the electroreduction of CO2 to CO and the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), on twenty-seven different metal surfaces have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) c...

  3. Mixed fuel strategy for carbon deposition mitigation in solid oxide fuel cells at intermediate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chao; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Wei; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping; Diniz da Costa, João C; Liu, Shaomin

    2014-06-17

    In this study, we propose and experimentally verified that methane and formic acid mixed fuel can be employed to sustain solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to deliver high power outputs at intermediate temperatures and simultaneously reduce the coke formation over the anode catalyst. In this SOFC system, methane itself was one part of the fuel, but it also played as the carrier gas to deliver the formic acid to reach the anode chamber. On the other hand, the products from the thermal decomposition of formic acid helped to reduce the carbon deposition from methane cracking. In order to clarify the reaction pathways for carbon formation and elimination occurring in the anode chamber during the SOFC operation, O2-TPO and SEM analysis were carried out together with the theoretical calculation. Electrochemical tests demonstrated that stable and high power output at an intermediate temperature range was well-maintained with a peak power density of 1061 mW cm(-2) at 750 °C. With the synergic functions provided by the mixed fuel, the SOFC was running for 3 days without any sign of cell performance decay. In sharp contrast, fuelled by pure methane and tested at similar conditions, the SOFC immediately failed after running for only 30 min due to significant carbon deposition. This work opens a new way for SOFC to conquer the annoying problem of carbon deposition just by properly selecting the fuel components to realize their synergic effects.

  4. Anhydrous formic acid and acetic anhydride as solvent or additive in nonaqueous titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvári-Barcza, A; Tóth, I; Barcza, L

    2005-09-01

    The use and importance of formic acid and acetic anhydride (Ac2O) is increasing in nonaqueous acid-base titrations, but their interaction with the solutes is poorly understood. This paper attempts to clarify the effect of the solvents; NMR and spectrophotometric investigations were done to reveal the interactions between some bases and the mentioned solvents. Anhydrous formic acid is a typical protogenic solvent but both the relative permittivity and acidity are higher than those of acetic acid (mostly used in assays of bases). These differences originate from the different chemical structures: liquid acetic acid contains basically cyclic dimers while formic acid forms linear associates. Ac2O is obviously not an acidic but an aprotic (very slightly protophilic) solvent, which supposedly dissociates slightly into acetyl (CH3CO+) and acetate (AcO-) ions. In fact, some bases react with Ac2O forming an associate: the Ac+ group is bound to the delta- charged atom of the reactant while AcO- is associated with the delta+ group at appropriate distance.

  5. Tunneling dynamics of double proton transfer in formic acid and benzoic acid dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedarchina, Zorka; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio; Siebrand, Willem

    2005-04-01

    Direct dynamics calculations based on instanton techniques are reported of tunneling splittings due to double proton transfer in formic and benzoic acid dimers. The results are used to assign the observed splittings to levels for which the authors of the high-resolution spectra could not provide a definitive assignment. In both cases the splitting is shown to be due mainly to the zero-point level rather than to the vibrationally or electronically excited level whose spectrum was investigated. This leads to zero-point splittings of 375MHz for (DCOOH)2 and 1107MHz for the benzoic acid dimer. Thus, contrary to earlier calculations, it is found that the splitting is considerably larger in the benzoic than in the formic acid dimer. The calculations are extended to solid benzoic acid where the asymmetry of the proton-transfer potential induced by the crystal can be overcome by suitable doping. This has allowed direct measurement of the interactions responsible for double proton transfer, which were found to be much larger than those in the isolated dimer. To account for this observation both static and dynamic effects of the crystal forces on the intradimer hydrogen bonds are included in the calculations. The same methodology, extended to higher temperatures, is used to calculate rate constants for HH, HD, and DD transfers in neat benzoic acid crystals. The results are in good agreement with reported experimental rate constants measured by NMR relaxometry and, if allowance is made for small structural changes induced by doping, with the transfer matrix elements observed in doped crystals. Hence the method used allows a unified description of tunneling splittings in the gas phase and in doped crystals as well as of transfer rates in neat crystals.

  6. Progress and prospects for phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonville, L.J.; Scheffler, G.W.; Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) has developed the fuel cell power plant as a new, on-site power generation source. IFC`s commercial fuel cell product is the 200-kW PC25{trademark} power plant. To date over 100 PC25 units have been manufactured. Fleet operating time is in excess of one million hours. Individual units of the initial power plant model, the PC25 A, have operated for more than 30,000 hours. The first model {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} power plant has over 10,000 hours of operation. The manufacturing, application and operation of this power plant fleet has established a firm base for design and technology development in terms of a clear understanding of the requirements for power plant reliability and durability. This fleet provides the benchmark against which power plant improvements must be measured.

  7. Novel Blend Membranes Based on Acid-Base Interactions for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhu Fu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells hold great promise for wide applications in portable, residential, and large-scale power supplies. For low temperature fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs, proton-exchange membranes (PEMs are a key component determining the fuel cells performance. PEMs with high proton conductivity under anhydrous conditions can allow PEMFCs to be operated above 100 °C, enabling use of hydrogen fuels with high-CO contents and improving the electrocatalytic activity. PEMs with high proton conductivity and low methanol crossover are critical for lowering catalyst loadings at the cathode and improving the performance and long-term stability of DMFCs. This review provides a summary of a number of novel acid-base blend membranes consisting of an acidic polymer and a basic compound containing N-heterocycle groups, which are promising for PEMFCs and DMFCs.

  8. Acid Distribution and Durability of HT-PEM Fuel Cells with Different Electrode Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannan, A.; Li, Q.; Cleemann, L. N.

    2018-01-01

    made from carbon black took up much more acid than materials with a more coarse apparent structure made from graphitized carbon. The same trend was evident from thermally accelerated fuel cell tests at 180 °C under constant load where degradation rates depended strongly on the choice of GDL material......, especially on the cathode side. Acid was collected from the fuel cell exhaust at rates clearly correlated to the fuel cell degradation rates, but amounted to less than 6% of the total acid content in the cell even after significant degradation. Long-term durability of more than 5,500 h with a degradation...... long-term operation. The effect of the gas diffusion layers (GDL) on acid loss was studied. Four different commercially available GDLs were subjected to passive ex situ acid uptake by capillary forces and the acid distribution mapped over the cross-section. Materials with an apparent fine structure...

  9. A photocatalyst-enzyme coupled artificial photosynthesis system for solar energy in production of formic acid from CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajesh K; Baeg, Jin-Ook; Oh, Gyu Hwan; Park, No-Joong; Kong, Ki-jeong; Kim, Jinheung; Hwang, Dong Won; Biswas, Soumya K

    2012-07-18

    The photocatalyst-enzyme coupled system for artificial photosynthesis process is one of the most promising methods of solar energy conversion for the synthesis of organic chemicals or fuel. Here we report the synthesis of a novel graphene-based visible light active photocatalyst which covalently bonded the chromophore, such as multianthraquinone substituted porphyrin with the chemically converted graphene as a photocatalyst of the artificial photosynthesis system for an efficient photosynthetic production of formic acid from CO(2). The results not only show a benchmark example of the graphene-based material used as a photocatalyst in general artificial photosynthesis but also the benchmark example of the selective production system of solar chemicals/solar fuel directly from CO(2).

  10. Hybrid systems with lead-acid battery and proton-exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossen, Andreas; Garche, Juergen; Doering, Harry; Goetz, Markus; Knaupp, Werner; Joerissen, Ludwig

    Hybrid systems, based on a lead-acid battery and a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) give the possibility to combine the advantages of both technologies. The benefits for different applications are discussed and the practical realisation of such systems is shown. Furthermore a numerical model for such a hybrid system is described and results are shown and discussed. The results show that the combination of lead-acid batteries and PEMFC shows advantages in case of applications with high peak power requirements (i.e. electric scooter) and applications where the fuel cell is used as auxiliary power supply to recharge the battery. The high efficiency of fuel cells at partial load operation results in a good fuel economy for recharging of lead-acid batteries with a fuel cell system.

  11. Efficient Production of Hydrogen from Decomposition of Formic Acid over Zeolite Incorporated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Kegnæs, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Formic acid has a great potential as a safe and convenient source of hydrogen for sustainable chemical synthesis and renewable energy storage. Here, we report a heterogeneous gold nanoparticles catalyst for efficient production of hydrogen from vapor phase decomposition of formic acid using zeolite...... incorporated gold nanoparticles. The catalyst is prepared by pressure assisted impregnation and reduction (PAIR), which results in a uniform distribution of small gold nanoparticles that are incorporated into zeolite silicalite-1 crystals. Consequently, the incorporated nanoparticles exhibit increased...... sintering stability. Based on these results, we believe that incorporation of metal nanoparticles in zeolites may find use as highly active and selective heterogeneous catalysts for the production of hydrogen in future renewable energy applications....

  12. Short-time maximum entropy method analysis of molecular dynamics simulation: Unimolecular decomposition of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Nomura, Tetsuo; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Yamasaki, Katsuyoshi

    2008-07-01

    We performed spectral analysis by using the maximum entropy method instead of the traditional Fourier transform technique to investigate the short-time behavior in molecular systems, such as the energy transfer between vibrational modes and chemical reactions. This procedure was applied to direct ab initio molecular dynamics calculations for the decomposition of formic acid. More reactive trajectories of dehydrolation than those of decarboxylation were obtained for Z-formic acid, which was consistent with the prediction of previous theoretical and experimental studies. Short-time maximum entropy method analyses were performed for typical reactive and non-reactive trajectories. Spectrograms of a reactive trajectory were obtained; these clearly showed the reactant, transient, and product regions, especially for the dehydrolation path.

  13. Preparation of highly dispersed palladium–phosphorus nanoparticles and its electrocatalytic performance for formic acid electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hanjun; Xu Jiangfeng; Fu Gengtao; Mao Xinbiao; Zhang, Lu; Chen Yu; Zhou Yiming; Lu Tianhong; Tang Yawen

    2012-01-01

    Highly dispersed and ultrafine palladium–phosphorus (Pd–P) nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared with a novel phosphorus reduction method. The structural and electronic properties of Pd–P NPs are characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrooxidation of formic acid on Pd–P NPs are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and CO-stripping measurements. The physical characterizations indicate the doped P element can enhance the content of Pd 0 species in Pd NPs, decrease the particle size and improve the dispersion of Pd–P NPs. The electrochemical measurements show the Pd–P NPs have a better catalytic performance for formic acid electrooxidation than Pd NPs.

  14. Dehydrogenation of Formic Acid Catalyzed by a Ruthenium Complex with an N,N′-Diimine Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Chao

    2016-12-17

    We report a ruthenium complex containing an N,N′-diimine ligand for the selective decomposition of formic acid to H and CO in water in the absence of any organic additives. A turnover frequency of 12000 h and a turnover number of 350 000 at 90 °C were achieved in the HCOOH/HCOONa aqueous solution. Efficient production of high-pressure H and CO (24.0 MPa (3480 psi)) was achieved through the decomposition of formic acid with no formation of CO. Mechanistic studies by NMR and DFT calculations indicate that there may be two competitive pathways for the key hydride transfer rate-determining step in the catalytic process.

  15. Global distribution of upper tropospheric formic acid from the ACE-FTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. González Abad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first near global upper tropospheric distribution of formic acid (HCOOH observed from space using solar occultation measurements from the Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS on board the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE satellite. Using a new set of spectroscopic line parameters recently published for formic acid by Vander Auwera et al. (2007 and Perrin and Vander Auwera (2007, we have retrieved the concentrations of HCOOH between 5 km and the tropopause for ACE-FTS observations from February 2004 to September 2007. We observe a significant seasonal dependence for the HCOOH concentrations related to vegetation growth and biomass burning. We estimate an emission ratio of 0.0051±0.0015 for HCOOH relative to CO for tropical South American fires using a selected set of data for September 2004. Results from the balloon-borne MkIV Fourier transform spectrometer are also presented and compared with the ACE measurements.

  16. Iodide-photocatalyzed reduction of carbon dioxide to formic acid with thiols and hydrogen sulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Berton, Mateo Otao; Mello, Rossella C. C.; González Núñez, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    The photolysis of iodide anions promotes the reaction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen sulfide or thiols to quantitatively yield formic acid and sulfur or disulfides. The reaction proceeds in acetonitrile and aqueous solutions, at atmospheric pressure and room temperature by irradiation using a low-pressure mercury lamp. This transition-metal-free photocatalytic process for CO2 capture coupled with H2S removal may have been relevant as a prebiotic carbon dioxide fixation.

  17. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped PBI Membrane Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation. Continuous tests with H2 and simulated reformate which was composed...... of H2, water steam and methanol as the fuel were performed on both single cells. 12-h-startup/12-h-shutdown dynamic tests were performed on the first single cell with pure dry H2 as the fuel and on the second single cell with simulated reformate as the fuel. Along with the tests electrochemical...... techniques such as polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the degradation mechanisms of the fuel cells. Both single cells showed an increase in the performance in the H2 continuous tests, because of a decrease in the ORR kinetic resistance probably due...

  18. Local vibrational modes of the formic acid dimer - the strength of the double hydrogen bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalescky, R.; Kraka, E.; Cremer, D.

    2013-07-01

    The 24 normal and 24 local vibrational modes of the formic acid dimer formed by two trans formic acid monomers to a ring (TT1) are analysed utilising preferentially experimental frequencies, but also CCSD(T)/CBS and ωB97X-D harmonic vibrational frequencies. The local hydrogen bond (HB) stretching frequencies are at 676 cm-1 and by this 482 and 412 cm-1 higher compared to the measured symmetric and asymmetric HB stretching frequencies at 264 and 194 cm-1. The adiabatic connection scheme between local and normal vibrational modes reveals that the lowering is due to the topology of dimer TT1, mass coupling, and avoided crossings involving the HṡṡṡOC bending modes. The HB local mode stretching force constant is related to the strength of the HB whereas the normal mode stretching force constant and frequency lead to an erroneous underestimation of the HB strength. The HB in TT1 is stabilised by electron delocalisation in the O=C-O units fostered by forming a ring via double HBs. This implies that the CO apart from the OH local stretching frequencies reflect the strength of the HB via their red or blue shifts relative to their corresponding values in trans formic acid.

  19. Hydrogen production by electrochemical decomposition of formic acid via solid polymer electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Ebru Oender [KOSGEB Bursa Business Development Center, Besevler Kucuk Sanayi Sitesi 16149 Nilufer/Bursa (Turkey); Koparal, Ali Savas; Oeguetveren, Uelker Bakir [Anadolu University, Iki Eylul Campus, Applied Research Center for Environmental Problems 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey); Anadolu University, Iki Eylul Campus, Department of Environmental Engineering, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous hydrogen production by electrochemical decomposition of formic acid via solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) in an electrochemical reactor. Titanium oxide coated with iridium oxide as anode and carbon fibre with Pt catalyst as cathode were used in the experiments. Effects of applied current density, flow rates and temperature of formic acid solution, concentration of supporting electrolyte and pH of the solution on performance of the process have been investigated. The effect of membrane thickness has also been examined. The results suggest that electrolysis using SPE is a promising method for the treatment of organic pollutants. Hydrogen with purity of 99.999% at ambient temperature by using carbon fibre cathode with Pt catalyst can be produced simultaneously and COD removal efficiency of 95% has been achieved not requiring any chemical addition and temperature increase. Also complete electrochemical oxidation of formic acid at the original pH to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O without production of intermediate has been proved by HPLC analysis. (author)

  20. DISSOCIATIVE RECOMBINATION OF PROTONATED FORMIC ACID: IMPLICATIONS FOR MOLECULAR CLOUD AND COMETARY CHEMISTRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigren, E.; Hamberg, M.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Larsson, M.; Thomas, R. D.; Af Ugglas, M.; Kashperka, I.; Geppert, W. D.; Kaminska, M.; Semaniak, J.; Millar, T. J.; Walsh, C.; Roberts, H.

    2010-01-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring CRYRING in Stockholm, Sweden, we have investigated the dissociative recombination of DCOOD + 2 at low relative kinetic energies, from ∼1 meV to 1 eV. The thermal rate coefficient has been found to follow the expression k(T) = 8.43 x 10 -7 (T/300) -0.78 cm 3 s -1 for electron temperatures, T, ranging from ∼10 to ∼1000 K. The branching fractions of the reaction have been studied at ∼2 meV relative kinetic energy. It has been found that ∼87% of the reactions involve breaking a bond between heavy atoms. In only 13% of the reactions do the heavy atoms remain in the same product fragment. This puts limits on the gas-phase production of formic acid, observed in both molecular clouds and cometary comae. Using the experimental results in chemical models of the dark cloud, TMC-1, and using the latest release of the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry improves the agreement with observations for the abundance of formic acid. Our results also strengthen the assumption that formic acid is a component of cometary ices.

  1. Formic acid-assisted synthesis of palladium nanocrystals and their electrocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinchao; Wang, Yiqian; Guo, Peizhi; Li, Qun; Ding, Ruixue; Wang, Baoyan; Li, Hongliang; Liu, Jingquan; Zhao, X S

    2014-01-14

    Palladium (Pd) nanocrystals have been synthesized by using formic acid as the reducing agent at room temperature. When the concentration of formic acid was increased continuously, the size of Pd nanocrystals first decreased to a minimum and then increased slightly again. The products have been investigated by a series of techniques, including X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-vis absorption, and electrochemical measurements. The formation of Pd nanocrystals is proposed to be closely related to the dynamical imbalance of the growth and dissolution rate of Pd nanocrystals associated with the adsorption of formate ions onto the surface of the intermediates. It is found that small Pd nanocrystals showed blue-shifted adsorption peaks compared with large ones. Pd nanocrystals with the smallest size display the highest electrocatalytic activity for the electrooxidation of formic acid and ethanol on the basis of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric data. It is suggested that both the electrochemical active surface area and the small size effect are the key roles in determining the electrocatalytic performances of Pd nanocrystals. A "dissolution-deposition-aggregation" process is proposed to explain the variation of the electrocatalytic activity during the electrocatalysis according to the HRTEM characterization.

  2. Structural characteristics and properties of the regenerated silk fibroin prepared from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, I C; Kweon, H Y; Park, Y H; Hudson, S

    2001-08-20

    Structural characteristics and thermal and solution properties of the regenerated silk fibroin (SF) prepared from formic acid (FU) were compared with those of SF from water (AU). According to the turbidity and shear viscosity measurement, SF formic acid solution was stable and transparent, no molecular aggregations occurred. The sample FU exhibited the beta-sheet structure, while AU random coil conformation using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry. The effects of methanol treatment on samples were also examined. According to the measurement of crystallinity (XRD) and crystallinity index (FTIR), the concept of long/short-range ordered structure formation was proposed. Long-range ordered crystallites are predominantly formed for methanol treated SF film while SF film cast from formic acid favors the formation of short-range ordered structure. The relaxation temperatures of SF films measured by dynamic thermomechanical analysis supported the above mechanism due to the sensitivity of relaxation temperature on the short-range order.

  3. A performance evaluation of a microchannel reactor for the production of hydrogen from formic acid for electrochemical energy applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlovu, IM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental evaluation of a microchannel reactor was completed to assess the reactor performance for the catalytic decomposition of vaporised formic acid (FA) for H2 production. Initially, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), elemental mapping using...

  4. Selective oxidation of glycerol to formic acid in highly concentrated aqueous solutions with molecular oxygen using V-substituted phosphomolybdic acids

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe; Sun, Miao; Han, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid is an important commodity chemical as well as a promising medium for hydrogen storage and hydrogen production. In this paper, we report that formic acid can be produced through selective oxidation of glycerol, a low-cost by-product

  5. Stable and highly efficient electrochemical production of formic acid from carbon dioxide using diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsui, Keisuke; Iwakawa, Hitomi; Ikemiya, Norihito [Department of Chemistry, Keio University, Yokohama (Japan); Nakata, Kazuya [Photocatalysis International Research Center, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba (Japan); Einaga, Yasuaki [Department of Chemistry, Keio University, Yokohama (Japan); JST-ACCEL, Yokohama (Japan)

    2018-03-01

    High faradaic efficiencies can be achieved in the production of formic acid (HCOOH) by metal electrodes, such as Sn or Pb, in the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). However, the stability and environmental load in using them are problematic. The electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} to HCOOH was investigated in a flow cell using boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes. BDD electrodes have superior electrochemical properties to metal electrodes, and, moreover, are highly durable. The faradaic efficiency for the production of HCOOH was as high as 94.7 %. Furthermore, the selectivity for the production of HCOOH was more than 99 %. The rate of the production was increased to 473 μmol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} at a current density of 15 mA cm{sup -2} with a faradaic efficiency of 61 %. The faradaic efficiency and the production rate are almost the same as or larger than those achieved using Sn and Pb electrodes. Furthermore, the stability of the BDD electrodes was confirmed by 24 h operation. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Stable and Highly Efficient Electrochemical Production of Formic Acid from Carbon Dioxide Using Diamond Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsui, Keisuke; Iwakawa, Hitomi; Ikemiya, Norihito; Nakata, Kazuya; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2018-03-01

    High faradaic efficiencies can be achieved in the production of formic acid (HCOOH) by metal electrodes, such as Sn or Pb, in the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). However, the stability and environmental load in using them are problematic. The electrochemical reduction of CO 2 to HCOOH was investigated in a flow cell using boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes. BDD electrodes have superior electrochemical properties to metal electrodes, and, moreover, are highly durable. The faradaic efficiency for the production of HCOOH was as high as 94.7 %. Furthermore, the selectivity for the production of HCOOH was more than 99 %. The rate of the production was increased to 473 μmol m -2  s -1 at a current density of 15 mA cm -2 with a faradaic efficiency of 61 %. The faradaic efficiency and the production rate are almost the same as or larger than those achieved using Sn and Pb electrodes. Furthermore, the stability of the BDD electrodes was confirmed by 24 h operation. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrocatalyst advances for hydrogen oxidation in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonehart, P.

    1984-01-01

    The important considerations that presently exist for achieving commercial acceptance of fuel cells are centered on cost (which translates to efficiency) and lifetime. This paper addresses the questions of electrocatalyst utilization within porous electrode structures and the preparation of low-cost noble metal electrocatalyst combinations with extreme dispersions of the metal. Now that electrocatalyst particles can be prepared with dimensions of 10 A, either singly or in alloy combinations, a very large percentage of the noble metal atoms in a crystallite are available for reaction. The cost savings for such electrocatalysts in the present commercially driven environment are considerable.

  9. Performance and selectivity of PtxSn/C electro-catalysts for ethanol oxidation prepared by reduction with different formic acid concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zignani, Sabrina C.; Baglio, Vincenzo; Linares, José J.; Monforte, Giuseppe; Gonzalez, Ernesto R.; Aricò, Antonino S.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon supported Pt–Sn catalysts were prepared by reduction of Pt and Sn precursors with formic acid and characterized in terms of structure, morphology and surface properties. The electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was studied in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 70 °C and 90 °C. Electrochemical and physico-chemical data indicated that a proper balance of Pt and Sn species in the near surface region was necessary to maximize the reaction rate. The best atomic surface composition, in terms of electrochemical performance, was Pt:Sn 65:35 corresponding to a bulk composition 75:25 namely Pt 3 Sn 1 /C. The reaction products of ethanol electro-oxidation in single cell and their distribution as a function of the nature of catalyst were determined. Essentially, acetaldehyde and acetic acid were detected as the main reaction products; whereas, a lower content of CO 2 was formed. The selectivity toward acetic acid vs. acetaldehyde increased with the increase of the Sn content and decreased by decreasing the concentration of the reducing agent used in the catalyst preparation. According to the recent literature, these results have been interpreted on the basis of ethanol adsorption characteristics and ligand effects occurring for Sn-rich electrocatalysts.

  10. Carbon components in the phosphoric acid fuel cell-an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, J.

    1983-01-01

    The single breakthrough that has made the phosphoric acid fuel cell a practical reality has been the use of carbon or graphite components for the repeat parts of the cell stack. While the thermodynamic stability of carbon is such that rapid corrosion would be expected at the cathode at fuel cell operating temperature, its kinetic stability is remarkable despite the absence of passivating layers analogous to those on, for example, the Group VA elements niobium and tantalum. This happy accident, combined with the adequate electronic conductivity of the carbon materials used, has provided the opportunity to reduce fuel cell cost to attractive levels. The development of these carbon compounds is reviewed

  11. Vibrational spectra of crystalline formic and acetic acid isotopologues by inelastic neutron scattering and numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.R.; Trommsdorff, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of crystalline powder of four isotopologues of formic acid (HCOOH, HCOOD, DCOOH, DCOOD) and of acetic acid (CH 3 COOH, CH 3 COOD, CD 3 COOH, CD 3 COOD) were recorded at 20 K by inelastic neutron scattering. These spectra are compared with computed spectra based on harmonic force fields derived from periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The assignment of all internal vibrations is obvious from the spectral changes under isotopic substitution. Discrepancies between calculation and experiment expose the over evaluation of the strength of the hydrogen bond by these standard DFT calculations

  12. Boosting the performance of Pt electro-catalysts toward formic acid electro-oxidation by depositing sub-monolayer Au clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Xuanxuan; Wang Rongyue; Ding Yi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Au decoration on Pt nanoparticles simultaneously increases the activity and stability. → Sub-monolayer Au decoration changes the reaction path and results in the activity improvement. → Increasing the Au coverage will increase the specific activity. → Proper Au coverage results in a maximum mass specific activity. - Abstract: CO poisoning is the main obstacle to the application of Pt nanoparticles as anode catalysts in direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Significant types of Pt alloys have been investigated, which often demonstrate evidently improved catalytic performance governed by difference mechanisms. By using a well-known electrochemical technique of under potential deposition and in situ redox replacement, sub-monolayer Au clusters are deposited onto Pt nanoparticle surfaces in a highly controlled manner, generating a unique surface alloy structure. Under optimum conditions, the modified Pt nanoparticles can exhibit greatly enhanced specific activity (up to 23-fold increase) at potential of -0.2 V vs. MSE toward formic acid electro-oxidation (FAEO). Interestingly, the mass specific activity can also be improved by a factor of 2.3 at potential of -0.35 V vs. MSE although significant amount of surface Pt atoms are covered by the overlayer Au clusters. The much enhanced catalytic activity can be ascribed to a Pt surface ensemble effect, which induces change of the reaction path. Moreover, the sub-monolayer Au coating on the surface also contributes to the enhanced catalyst durability by inhibiting the Pt oxidation. These results show great potential to rationally design more active and stable nanocatalysts by modifying the Pt surface with otherwise inactive materials.

  13. Stimulation of deep gas wells using HCl/formic acid system : lab studies and field application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A.; Al-Mutairi, S.; Al-Malki, B. [Saudi Aramco (Saudi Arabia); Metcalf, S.; Walters, W. [BJ Services Co USA, Houston, TX (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Well stimulation in the deep carbonate Khuff reservoirs in eastern Saudi Arabia is needed to remove drilling mud filter cakes and to enhance reservoir permeability. A non associated gas is being produced from the reservoirs. This gas is associated with the hydrogen sulfide content that varies from 0 to 10-mol per cent. The average reservoir temperature is 275 degrees F and initial reservoir pressure is 7,000 psi. A special system is needed to stimulate the carbonate reservoir because of this high bottomhole temperature and the corrosive nature of hydrochloric acid (HCl) at high temperature. A rotating disk method was used to determine the reaction rate of an HCl/formic acid system with reservoir rocks. Results from coreflood tests showed that the acid system creates deep wormholes in tight reservoir cores. Corrosion tests showed that the well tubulars could tolerate the acid system. A gelled 15-wt per cent HCl/9-wt per cent formic acid system successfully fractured 3 vertical wells in deep sour gas reservoirs without any operational problems. The treatment resulted in significant increases in gas production and flowing wellhead pressures. In addition, overflush of the treatment successfully eliminated the return of live acid after the treatment. 37 refs., 10 tabs., 17 figs.

  14. Analysis and evaluation of the possibility of introducing phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Each step in the manufacture of fuel cells is reviewed. The possibility of cost reduction in the process is investigated. Additionally, the feasibility of providing financial assistance for fuel cell buyers is investigated. Also, the present status and the future outlook of fuel cell development are discussed. In Japan, phosphoric acid fuel cells are beginning demonstration testing. A 200 kW test plant, for commercial and remote island use, has finished its demonstration test favorably. The test run of an 11 mW plant, for the production of electric power, is being conducted by a private company. The manufacture of each of the fuel cell's subsystems is semi-automated at this time. The costs are estimated to be reduced to 60 - 80 percent of the present costs in a 10 mW/year plant and TO 50 - 60 percent of the present costs in a 100 mW/year plant.

  15. Water Uptake and Acid Doping of Polybenzimidazoles as Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; He, R.; Berg, Rolf W.

    2004-01-01

    Acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes have been demonstrated for fuel cell applications with advanced features such as high operating temperatures, little humidification, excellent CO tolerance, and promising durability. The water uptake and acid doping of PBI membranes have been studied...

  16. Effects of restriction of silage fermentation with formic acid on milk production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. JAAKKOLA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of silage fermentation quality and type of supplementation on milk production. Thirty two Finnish Ayrshire dairy cows were used in a cyclic change-over experiment with four 21-day experimental periods and 4 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Silage fermentation was modified with formic acid (FA, which was applied at the rates equivalent to 0 (FA0, 2 (FA2, 4 (FA4 or 6 (FA6 litres t-1 grass of pure formic acid (as 100% FA. Dietary treatments consisted of four silages, a protein supplementation (no supplement or rapeseed meal 1.8 kg d-1 and a glucogenic substrate (no supplement or propylene glycol 225 g d-1. Increasing the application rate of FA restricted silage fermentation curvilinearly, as evidenced by higher concentrations of ammonia N and butyric acid in FA4 than FA2 silage. Similarly the use of FA resulted in curvilinear changes in the silage dry matter intake and milk yield. The highest milk and protein yields were achieved with FA6, while the milk yield with FA2 was higher than with FA4. Interactions were observed between silage type and supplementation. Rapeseed meal increased milk yield irrespective of the extent of silage fermentation, but the magnitude of response was variable. Propylene glycol was most beneficial with restrictively fermented silages FA4 and FA6. In conclusion, restriction of silage fermentation with a high rate of formic acid is beneficial in milk production. Interactions between silage composition and concentrate types suggest that the responses to supplementary feeding depend on silage fermentation characteristics.;

  17. Selective oxidation of glycerol to formic acid in highly concentrated aqueous solutions with molecular oxygen using V-substituted phosphomolybdic acids

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid is an important commodity chemical as well as a promising medium for hydrogen storage and hydrogen production. In this paper, we report that formic acid can be produced through selective oxidation of glycerol, a low-cost by-product of biodiesel, by using vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acids as catalysts and molecular oxygen as the oxidant. Significantly, this catalytic system allows for high-concentration conversions and thus leads to exceptional efficiency. Specifically, 3.64 g of formic acid was produced from 10 g of glycerol/water (50/50 in weight) solution. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  18. Voltametric study of formic and dihydroxy malonic acids on platinum for the definition of a process for the electrolytic destruction of carboxylic acids in radioactive aqueous effluents; Etude voltamperometrique des acides formiques et dihydroxymalonique sur platine en vue de la definition d`un procede de destruction electrolytique d`acides carboxyliques d`effluents aqueux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Naour, C.

    1994-05-01

    To limit the amount of nuclear glasses generated by the treatment of the degraded solvent from the PUREX process for reprocessing of nuclear fuels, by solutions of sodium carbonate and caustic soda, it is planned to exploit the complexing power of certain carboxylic acids to return the metallic cations to the aqueous phase. The concept of this new treatment of the solvent by `substitution` reagents demands a process for the decomposition of these reagents, especially to CO{sub 2}. The investigation of the electrochemical behaviour, on platinum, of a substance selected as a model for understanding the interfacial mechanisms (HCOOH), and of dihydroxy malonic acid, revealed two distinct electro-poisoning processes: one is due to the adsorption of CO on the surface sites of platinum, and the second to the formation of a passivating layer of P{dagger}O. The application of 20 kHz ultrasonic flux in the neighbourhood of the platinum / aqueous formic acid solution interface also appears to cause a change in the superficial structure of the electrode used, in a direction that favours the decomposition of this compound. To overcome problems of poisoning of the platinum surface, aqueous solutions of formic, dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids were electrolysed, in a cell without diaphragm, by applying voltage and current ranges, at levels adapted to each of the species. It is necessary to bring the working electrode to a higher potential than the oxidation potential for formic acid, and to a lower potential for dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids. The frequent modifications of the electrode potentials helped to achieve quantitative destruction of these species, to CO{sub 2} (and to water) with an electrochemical efficiency approaching 100 %. This wet oxidation process also offers the advantage of not raising the energy potential of the effluents to be treated, because it takes place in mild conditions (ambient temperature and pressure). (author). 131 refs., 90 figs., 48 tabs.

  19. Needle trap extraction for GC analysis of formic and acetic acids in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xinqing; Huang, Daikuan; Lou, Dawei; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-07-01

    Formic and acetic acids are ubiquitous in the environment, food, and most of the natural products. Extraction of the acids from aqueous solution is required for their isotope analysis by the gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To this objective, we have previously developed a purge-and-trap technique using the dynamic solid-phase microextraction technology, the NeedlEX. The extraction efficiency, however, remains unexamined. Here, we address this question using the flame ionization detector and isotope ratio mass spectrometer while comparing it with that of the CAR/PDMS fiber. The results show that the NeedlEX is applicable at a wide range of concentration through coordination of purge volume given the minimum amount 3.7 ng and 1.8 ng of formic and acetic, respectively, is extracted. The efficiency of NeedlEX was 6-7 times lower than the fiber at 1000 μg/mL depending on the analyte. It is, however, superior to the latter at 10 μg/mL or less owing to its lower detection limit. The extraction efficiency of both acids is equivalent in molar amount. This is, however, disguised by the different response of the flame ionization detector. The isotope ratio mass spectrometor overcomes this problem but is compromised by relatively large errors. These results are particularly useful for isotopic analysis of carboxylic acids. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan; Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe 3 ) and oxygen (O 2 ) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H 2 within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO 2 . The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O ads and Pt–(OH) ads ) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed

  1. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te, E-mail: cthsieh@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe{sub 3}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H{sub 2} within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO{sub 2}. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O{sub ads} and Pt–(OH){sub ads}) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed.

  2. Size effects in electronic and catalytic properties of unsupported palladium nanoparticles in electrooxidation of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei Ping; Lewera, Adam; Larsen, Robert; Masel, Rich I; Bagus, Paul S; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-07-13

    We report a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and chronoamperometry (CA) study of formic acid electrooxidation on unsupported palladium nanoparticle catalysts in the particle size range from 9 to 40 nm. The CV and CA measurements show that the most active catalyst is made of the smallest (9 and 11 nm) Pd nanoparticles. Besides the high reactivity, XPS data show that such nanoparticles display the highest core-level binding energy (BE) shift and the highest valence band (VB) center downshift with respect to the Fermi level. We believe therefore that we found a correlation between formic acid oxidation current and BE and VB center shifts, which, in turn, can directly be related to the electronic structure of palladium nanoparticles of different particle sizes. Clearly, such a trend using unsupported catalysts has never been reported. According to the density functional theory of heterogeneous catalysis, and mechanistic considerations, the observed shifts are caused by a weakening of the bond strength of the COOH intermediate adsorption on the catalyst surface. This, in turn, results in the increase in the formic acid oxidation rate to CO2 (and in the associated oxidation current). Overall, our measurements demonstrate the particle size effect on the electronic properties of palladium that yields different catalytic activity in the HCOOH oxidation reaction. Our work highlights the significance of the core-level binding energy and center of the d-band shifts in electrocatalysis and underlines the value of the theory that connects the center of the d-band shifts to catalytic reactivity.

  3. CaCO3 supplementation alleviates the inhibition of formic acid on acetone/butanol/ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaoxiang; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Chao; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the inhibiting effect of formic acid on acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation and explain the mechanism of the alleviation in the inhibiting effect under CaCO 3 supplementation condition. From the medium containing 50 g sugars l -1 and 0.5 g formic acid l -1 , only 0.75 g ABE l -1 was produced when pH was adjusted by KOH and fermentation ended prematurely before the transformation from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In contrast, 11.4 g ABE l -1 was produced when pH was adjusted by 4 g CaCO 3 l -1 . The beneficial effect can be ascribed to the buffering capacity of CaCO 3 . Comparative analysis results showed that the undissociated formic acid concentration and acid production coupled with ATP and NADH was affected by the pH buffering capacity of CaCO 3 . Four millimole undissociated formic acid was the threshold at which the transformation to solventogenesis occurred. The inhibiting effect of formic acid on ABE fermentation can be alleviated by CaCO 3 supplementation due to its buffering capacity.

  4. Iodide-Photocatalyzed Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formic Acid with Thiols and Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Mateo; Mello, Rossella; González-Núñez, María Elena

    2016-12-20

    The photolysis of iodide anions promotes the reaction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen sulfide or thiols to quantitatively yield formic acid and sulfur or disulfides. The reaction proceeds in acetonitrile and aqueous solutions, at atmospheric pressure and room temperature by irradiation using a low-pressure mercury lamp. This transition-metal-free photocatalytic process for CO 2 capture coupled with H 2 S removal may have been relevant as a prebiotic carbon dioxide fixation. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Acid Water Neutralization Using Microbial Fuel Cells: An Alternative for Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Leiva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a complex environmental problem, which has adverse effects on surface and ground waters due to low pH, high toxic metals, and dissolved salts. New bioremediation approach based on microbial fuel cells (MFC can be a novel and sustainable alternative for AMD treatment. We studied the potential of MFC for acidic synthetic water treatment through pH neutralization in batch-mode and continuous-flow operation. We observed a marked pH increase, from ~3.7 to ~7.9 under batch conditions and to ~5.8 under continuous-flow operation. Likewise, batch reactors (non-MFC inoculated with different MFC-enriched biofilms showed a very similar pH increase, suggesting that the neutralization observed for batch operation was due to a synergistic influence of these communities. These preliminary results support the idea of using MFC technologies for AMD remediation, which could help to reduce costs associated with conventional technologies. Advances in this configuration could even be extrapolated to the recovery of heavy metals by precipitation or adsorption processes due to the acid neutralization.

  6. Method for obtaining water-free or largely water-free formic acid. Verfahren zur Gewinnung von wasserfreier oder weitgehend wasserfreier Ameisensaeure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, D; Schmidt, R; Block, U; Schoenmakers, H; Bott, K; Kaibel, G

    1980-10-23

    The formic acid was prepared by hydrolysis of methyl formate, distillation of methanol and methyl formate from the hydrolyzate, extraction of the residue with a solvent, e.g., a carboxamide, distillation of the extract containing solvent, formic acid, and water to remove all or most of the water and part of the formic acid at the head of the column, and separation of the extraction solvent from the product.

  7. Hydrogen generation at ambient conditions: application in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The efficient generation of hydrogen from formic acid/amine adducts at ambient temperature is demonstrated. The highest catalytic activity (TOF up to 3630 h(-1) after 20 min) was observed in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts. Compared to the previously known methods to generate hydrogen from liquid feedstocks, the systems presented here can be operated at room temperature without the need for any high-temperature reforming processes, and the hydrogen produced can then be directly used in fuel cells. A variety of Ru precursors and phosphine ligands were investigated for the decomposition of formic acid/amine adducts. These catalytic systems are particularly interesting for the generation of H2 for new applications in portable electric devices.

  8. Gas phase hydrolysis of formaldehyde to form methanediol: impact of formic acid catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Montu K; Francisco, Joseph S; Sinha, Amitabha

    2013-11-21

    We find that formic acid (FA) is very effective at facilitating diol formation through its ability to reduce the barrier for the formaldehyde (HCHO) hydrolysis reaction. The rate limiting step in the mechanism involves the isomerization of a prereactive collision complex formed through either the HCHO···H2O + FA and/or HCHO + FA···H2O pathways. The present study finds that the effective barrier height, defined as the difference between the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected energy of the transition state (TS) and the HCHO···H2O + FA and HCHO + FA···H2O starting reagents, are respectively only ∼1 and ∼4 kcal/mol. These barriers are substantially lower than the ∼17 kcal/mol barrier associated with the corresponding step in the hydrolysis of HCHO catalyzed by a single water molecule (HCHO + H2O + H2O). The significantly lower barrier heights for the formic acid catalyzed pathway reveal a new important role that organic acids play in the gas phase hydrolysis of atmospheric carbonyl compounds.

  9. Hydrogen generation from formic acid catalyzed by a metal complex under amine-free and aqueous conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-01-04

    The present invention provides a class of catalyst compounds that can safely and effectively release hydrogen gas from a chemical substrate without producing either noxious byproducts or byproducts that will deactivate the catalyst. The present invention provides catalysts used to produce hydrogen that has a satisfactory and sufficient lifespan (measured by turnover number (TON)), that has stability in the presence of moisture, air, acid, or impurities, promote a rapid reaction rate, and remain stable under the reaction conditions required for an effective hydrogen production system. Described herein are compounds for use as catalysts, as well as methods for producing hydrogen from formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalysts. The methods include contacting formic acid and/or a formate with a catalyst as described herein, as well as methods of producing formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalyst and methods for generating electricity using the catalysts described herein.

  10. Decomposition of formic acid over silica encapsulated and amine functionalised gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Kegnæs, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Formic acid has recently attracted considerable attention as a safe and convenient source of hydrogen for sustainable chemical synthesis and renewable energy storage. Here, we show that silica encapsulated and amine functionalised gold nanoparticles are highly active catalysts for the production...... of hydrogen by vapour phase decomposition of formic acid. The core-shell catalysts are prepared in a reverse micelle system that makes it possible to control the size of the Au nanoparticles and the thickness of the SiO2 shells, which has a large impact on the catalytic activity. The smallest gold...... nanoparticles are 2.2 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and have a turnover frequency (TOF) of up to 958 h−1 at a temperature of 130 °C. Based on detailed in situ ATR-FTIR studies and results from kinetic isotope labelling experiments we propose that the active site is a low-coordinated and amine functionalised Au atom...

  11. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Carme; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Biarnes, Xevi; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested

  12. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, Carme [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: crovira@pcb.ub.es; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Biarnes, Xevi [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carpena, Xavi [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Parc Cientific de Barcelona (CSIC-PCB), Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Parc Cientific de Barcelona (CSIC-PCB), Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Loewen, Peter C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2006-03-31

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested.

  13. Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, S

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  14. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Based High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2015-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2 and meth...

  15. Survey on aging on electrodes and electrocatalysts in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonehart, P.; Hochmuth, J.

    1981-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the decay in performance of electrodes used in phosphoric acid fuel cell systems are discussed. Loss of catalytic surface area, corrosion of the carbon support, electrode structure degradation, electrolyte degradation, and impurities in the reactant streams are identified as the major areas for concern.

  16. Phosphoric acid doped imidazolium polysulfone membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    A novel acid–base polymer membrane is prepared by doping of imidazolium polysulfone with phosphoric acid for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Polysulfone is first chloromethylated, followed by functionalization of the chloromethylated polysulfone with alkyl imidazoles i.e. me...

  17. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant cost model and computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cost analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant includes two parts: a method for estimation of system capital costs, and an economic analysis which determines the levelized annual cost of operating the system used in the capital cost estimation. A FORTRAN computer has been developed for this cost analysis.

  18. Experiences from Swedish demonstration projects with phosphoric acid fuel cells; Erfarenheter fraan svenska demonstrationsprojekt med fosforsyrabraensleceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Per [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sarkoezi, Laszlo [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-10-01

    In Sweden, there are today two phosphoric acid fuel cells installed, one PC25A which have been in operation in more than 4 years, and one PC25C which have been in operation for two years. The aim with this project has been two compare operation characteristics, performance, and operation experiences for these two models.

  19. Micromachined Dense Palladium Electrodes for Thin-film Solid Acid Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unnikrishnan, S.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis paves the way towards the microfabrication of a solid acid electrolyte based fuel cell (µSAFC), which has a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) consisting of a thin-film of water soluble electrolyte encapsulated between two dense palladium electrode membranes. This project work

  20. Spontaneously Bi decorated carbon supported Pd nanoparticles for formic acid electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauskar, Akshay S.; Rice, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Selective decoration of Bi onto commercial Pd/C is carried out by a simple gas controlled surface potential modulation technique. • Bi decorated Pd/C catalyst exhibits higher and sustained formic acid oxidation activity presumably via the electronic effect. • Shielding of Pd atoms by Bi increases long term stability. • Formic acid electro-oxidation current increased by 121% at 0.2 V vs. RHE. -- Abstract: The activity and stability of carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) nanoparticles decorated with a submonolayer of bismuth (Bi) for formic acid (FA) electro-oxidation was investigated herein. The FA electro-oxidation activity enhancement of Bi decorated Pd/C was evaluated electrochemically using a rotating disk electrode configuration by linear sweep voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements. Commercial Pd/C was decorated by irreversible adsorption of Bi via a simple gas controlled surface potential modulation technique, and the coverage of Bi adatoms as measured by cyclic voltammetry was controlled in the range of 30–87%. An optimal Bi coverage was observed to be 40%, resulting in a favorable decrease in the FA onset potential by greater than 0.1 V and increase in electro-oxidation current density from 0.25 mA cm −2 SA to 0.55 mA cm −2 SA at 0.2 V vs. RHE, compared to commercial Pd/C. The results indicate that Bi decorated Pd nanoparticles have excellent properties for the electro-oxidation of FA, i.e. high electro-catalytic activity and excellent stability, due to sustained promotion of dehydrogenation pathway attributed to the electronic effect, thereby promoting FA adsorption in the CH-down orientation. Based on no significant shifting in the CO stripping peak position, minimal impact of Bi on the Pd-CO bond strength is observed. Chronoamperometry results show much better long-term electro-catalytic activity for Bi decorated Pd nanoparticles attributed to shielding of surface Pd atoms by Bi and reducing Pd dissolution

  1. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  2. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Phosphoric Acid Leakage in High-Temperature Phosphoric Acid-Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungyoon Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs utilize a phosphoric acid- (PA- doped polybenzimidazole (PBI membrane as a polymer electrolyte. The PA concentration in the membrane can affect fuel cell performance, as a significant amount of PA can leak from the membrane electrode assembly (MEA by dissolution in discharged water, which is a byproduct of cell operation. Spectrophotometric analysis of PA leakage in PA-doped polybenzimidazole membrane fuel cells is described here. This spectrophotometric analysis is based on measurement of absorption of an ion pair formed by phosphomolybdic anions and the cationoid color reagent. Different color reagents were tested based on PA detection sensitivity, stability of the formed color, and accuracy with respect to the amount of PA measured. This method allows for nondestructive analysis and monitoring of PA leakage during HT-PEMFCs operation.

  3. Unimolecular decomposition of formic and acetic acids: A shock tube/laser absorption study

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardany, A.

    2014-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), two carboxylic acids which play an important role in oxygenate combustion chemistry, were investigated behind reflected shock waves using laser absorption. The rate constants of the primary decomposition pathways of these acids:(HCOOH → CO + H2 O (R 1); HCOOH → CO2 + H2 (R 2); CH3 COOH → CH4 + CO2 (R 3); CH3 COOH → CH2 CO + H2 O (R 4)) were measured using simultaneous infrared laser absorption of CO, CO2 and H2O at wavelengths of 4.56, 4.18 and 2.93 microns, respectively. Reaction test conditions covered temperatures from 1230 to 1821 K and pressures from 1.0 to 6.5 atm for dilute mixtures of acids (0.25-0.6%) in argon. The rate constants of dehydration (R1) and decarboxylation (R2) reactions of formic acid were calculated by fitting exponential functions to the measured CO, CO2 and H2O time-history profiles. These two decomposition channels were found to be in the fall-off region and have a branching ratio, k1/k2, of approximately 20 over the range of pressures studied here. The best-fit Arrhenius expressions of the first-order rates of R1 and R2 were found to be:(k1 (1 atm) = 1.03 × 1011 exp (- 25651 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %); k1 (6.5 atm) = 9.12 × 1012 exp (- 30275 / T) s- 1 (± 32 %); k2 (1 atm) = 1.79 × 108 exp (- 21133 / T) s- 1 (± 41 %); k2 (6.5 atm) = 2.73 × 108 exp (- 20074 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %)). The rate constants for acetic acid decomposition were obtained by fitting simulated profiles, using an acetic acid pyrolysis mechanism, to the measured species time-histories. The branching ratio, k4/k3, was found to be approximately 2. The decarboxylation and dehydration reactions of acetic acid appear to be in the falloff region over the tested pressure range:(k3 (1 atm) = 3.18 × 1011 exp (- 28679 / T) s- 1 (± 30 %); k3 (6 atm) = 3.51 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s- 1 (± 26 %); k4 (1 atm) = 7.9 × 1011 exp (- 29056 / T) s- 1 (± 34 %); k4 (6 atm) = 6.34 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s

  4. Unimolecular decomposition of formic and acetic acids: A shock tube/laser absorption study

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardany, A.; Nasir, E.F.; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), two carboxylic acids which play an important role in oxygenate combustion chemistry, were investigated behind reflected shock waves using laser absorption. The rate constants of the primary decomposition pathways of these acids:(HCOOH → CO + H2 O (R 1); HCOOH → CO2 + H2 (R 2); CH3 COOH → CH4 + CO2 (R 3); CH3 COOH → CH2 CO + H2 O (R 4)) were measured using simultaneous infrared laser absorption of CO, CO2 and H2O at wavelengths of 4.56, 4.18 and 2.93 microns, respectively. Reaction test conditions covered temperatures from 1230 to 1821 K and pressures from 1.0 to 6.5 atm for dilute mixtures of acids (0.25-0.6%) in argon. The rate constants of dehydration (R1) and decarboxylation (R2) reactions of formic acid were calculated by fitting exponential functions to the measured CO, CO2 and H2O time-history profiles. These two decomposition channels were found to be in the fall-off region and have a branching ratio, k1/k2, of approximately 20 over the range of pressures studied here. The best-fit Arrhenius expressions of the first-order rates of R1 and R2 were found to be:(k1 (1 atm) = 1.03 × 1011 exp (- 25651 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %); k1 (6.5 atm) = 9.12 × 1012 exp (- 30275 / T) s- 1 (± 32 %); k2 (1 atm) = 1.79 × 108 exp (- 21133 / T) s- 1 (± 41 %); k2 (6.5 atm) = 2.73 × 108 exp (- 20074 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %)). The rate constants for acetic acid decomposition were obtained by fitting simulated profiles, using an acetic acid pyrolysis mechanism, to the measured species time-histories. The branching ratio, k4/k3, was found to be approximately 2. The decarboxylation and dehydration reactions of acetic acid appear to be in the falloff region over the tested pressure range:(k3 (1 atm) = 3.18 × 1011 exp (- 28679 / T) s- 1 (± 30 %); k3 (6 atm) = 3.51 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s- 1 (± 26 %); k4 (1 atm) = 7.9 × 1011 exp (- 29056 / T) s- 1 (± 34 %); k4 (6 atm) = 6.34 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s

  5. Deciphering visible light photoreductive conversion of CO2 to formic acid and methanol using waste prepared material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Lin, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Bor-Yann; Ouyang, Tong; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-02-17

    As gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 and depletion of fossil fuels have raised considerable public concern in recent decades, utilizing the unlimited solar energy to convert CO2 to fuels (e.g., formic acid and methanol) apparently could simultaneously resolve these issues for sustainable development. However, due to the complicated characteristics of CO2 reduction, the mechanism has yet to be disclosed. To clarify the postulated pathway as mentioned in the literature, the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR) was implemented herein to confirm the mechanism and related pathways of CO2 reduction under visible light using graphene-TiO2 as catalyst. The findings indicated that CO(-•) radicals, as the main intermediates, were first detected herein to react with several hydrogen ions and electrons for the formation of CH3OH. For example, the generation of CO(-•) radicals is possibly the vital rate-controlling step for conversion of CO2 to methanol as hypothesized elsewhere. The kinetics behind the proposed mechanism was also determined in this study. The mechanism and kinetics could provide the in-depth understanding to the pathway of CO2 reduction and disclose system optimization of maximal conversion for further application.

  6. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  7. Electrochemical studies for an acid fuel cell; Estudos eletroquimicos de uma celula a combustivel acida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.R.; Avaca, L.A.; Ticianelli, E.A.; Ferreira, A.C.; Oliveira, J.C.T. de [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1984-12-31

    This work describes the main steps for the development of the components of an one-kilowatt phosphoric acid H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell stack. The electrochemical characteristics of fundamental components-electrodes and electrolyte-matrix have been evaluated in unitary fuel cell prototype by stationary polarization curves and continuous operation curves. The results confirmed the better efficiency of the hydrogen electrode and anticipated a very fair performance for the one-kilowatt stack. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  8. Electrochemical studies for an acid fuel cell; Estudos eletroquimicos de uma celula a combustivel acida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E R; Avaca, L A; Ticianelli, E A; Ferreira, A C; Oliveira, J C.T. de [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1985-12-31

    This work describes the main steps for the development of the components of an one-kilowatt phosphoric acid H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell stack. The electrochemical characteristics of fundamental components-electrodes and electrolyte-matrix have been evaluated in unitary fuel cell prototype by stationary polarization curves and continuous operation curves. The results confirmed the better efficiency of the hydrogen electrode and anticipated a very fair performance for the one-kilowatt stack. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  9. Structural studies of formic acid using partial form-factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, G.; Dore, J.C.; Bellissent-Funel, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been made of liquid formic acid using H/D isotopic substitution. Data are recorded for samples of DCOOD, HCOOD and a (H/D)COOD mixture (α D =0.36). A first-order difference method is used to determine the intra-molecular contribution through the introduction of a partial form-factor analysis technique incorporating a hydrogen-bond term. The method improves the sensitivity of the parameters defining the molecular geometry and avoids some of the ambiguities arising from terms involving spatial overlap of inter- and intra-molecular features. The possible application to other systems is briefly reviewed. (authors). 8 figs., 2 tabs., 8 refs

  10. High Upward Fluxes of Formic Acid from a Boreal Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Lopez-Hilifiker, Felipe D.; Taipale, Ditte; Millet, Dylan B.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Rantala, Pekka; Mammarella, Ivan; Zhou, Putian; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Lee, Ben H.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Eddy covariance fluxes of formic acid, HCOOH, were measured over a boreal forest canopy in spring/summer 2014. The HCOOH fluxes were bidirectional but mostly upward during daytime, in contrast to studies elsewhere that reported mostly downward fluxes. Downward flux episodes were explained well by modeled dry deposition rates. The sum of net observed flux and modeled dry deposition yields an upward gross flux of HCOOH, which could not be quantitatively explained by literature estimates of direct vegetative soil emissions nor by efficient chemical production from other volatile organic compounds, suggesting missing or greatly underestimated HCOOH sources in the boreal ecosystem. We implemented a vegetative HCOOH source into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to match our derived gross flux and evaluated the updated model against airborne and spaceborne observations. Model biases in the boundary layer were substantially reduced based on this revised treatment, but biases in the free troposphere remain unexplained.

  11. Direct synthesis of graphene nanosheets support Pd nanodendrites for electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨苏东; 陈琳

    2015-01-01

    We report a solvothermal method preparation of dendritic Pd nanoparticles (DPNs) and spherical Pd nanoparticles (SPNs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Drastically different morphologies of Pd NPs with nanodendritic structures or spherical structures were observed on graphene by controlling the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) un-der mild conditions. In addition to being a commonplace substrate, GO plays a more important role that relies on its surface groups, which serves as a shape-directing agent to direct the dendritic growth. As a result, the obtained DPNs/RGO catalyst exhibits a significantly enhanced electro-catalytic behavior for the oxidation of formic acid compared to the SPNs/RGO catalyst.

  12. Acid-doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes as Electrolyte for Fuel Cells Operating Above 100°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Jensen, Jens Oluf; He, Ronhuan

    2003-01-01

    The technical achievement and challenges for the PEMFC technology based on perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer membranes (e.g. Nafion®) are briefly discussed. The newest development in the field is alternative polymer electrolytes for operation above 100°C. As one of the successful approaches...... to high operational temperatures, the development and evaluation of acid doped PBI membranes are reviewed, covering polymer synthesis, membrane casting, acid doping, physiochemical characterization and fuel cell tests. A high temperature PEMFC system operational at up to 200°C is demonstrated with no gas...... humidification and high CO-tolerance up to 10 vol%. This high CO tolerance allows for a direct use of reformed hydrogen without further CO removal, which opens the possibility for an integrated reformer-fuel cell system. The content of this review is to a large extent based on research performed by the authors...

  13. Novel silk fibroin films prepared by formic acid/hydroxyapatite dissolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Jinfa; Liu, Zhi; Bie, Shiyu; Zhang, Feng; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibroin from the silkworm was firstly found to be soluble in formic acid/hydroxyapatite system. The rheological behavior of silk fibroin solution was significantly influenced by HAp contents in dissolved solution. At the same time, silk fibroin nanofibers were observed in dissolved solution with 103.6 ± 20.4 nm in diameter. Moreover, the structure behavior of SF films prepared by formic acid/hydroxyapatite dissolution method was examined. The secondary structure of silk fibroin films was attributed to silk II structure (β-sheet), indicating that the hydroxyapatite contents in dissolved solution were not significantly affected by the structure of silk fibroin. The X-ray diffraction results exhibited obviously hydroxyapatite crystalline nature existing in silk fibroin films; however, when the hydroxyapatite content was 5.0 wt.% in dissolved solution, some hydroxyapatite crystals were converted to calcium hydrogen phosphate dehydrate in silk fibroin dissolution process. This result was also confirmed by Fourier transform infrared analysis and DSC measurement. In addition, silk fibroin films prepared by this dissolution method had higher breaking strength and extension at break. Based on these analyses, an understanding of novel SF dissolution method may provide an additional tool for designing and synthesizing advanced materials with more complex structures, which should be helpful in different fields, including biomaterial applications. - Highlights: • SF fibers were firstly successfully dissolved in FA/HAp solution. • The rheological behavior of SF solution was significantly influenced by HAp contents. • SF nanofibrils were observed in FA/HAp solution with 103.6 ± 20.4 nm in diameter. • SF films prepared by FA/HAp dissolution method had higher mechanical properties

  14. Novel silk fibroin films prepared by formic acid/hydroxyapatite dissolution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Jinfa, E-mail: jinfa.ming@gmail.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); Liu, Zhi; Bie, Shiyu [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); Zhang, Feng [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Research, Medical College, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Zuo, Baoqi, E-mail: bqzuo@suda.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibroin from the silkworm was firstly found to be soluble in formic acid/hydroxyapatite system. The rheological behavior of silk fibroin solution was significantly influenced by HAp contents in dissolved solution. At the same time, silk fibroin nanofibers were observed in dissolved solution with 103.6 ± 20.4 nm in diameter. Moreover, the structure behavior of SF films prepared by formic acid/hydroxyapatite dissolution method was examined. The secondary structure of silk fibroin films was attributed to silk II structure (β-sheet), indicating that the hydroxyapatite contents in dissolved solution were not significantly affected by the structure of silk fibroin. The X-ray diffraction results exhibited obviously hydroxyapatite crystalline nature existing in silk fibroin films; however, when the hydroxyapatite content was 5.0 wt.% in dissolved solution, some hydroxyapatite crystals were converted to calcium hydrogen phosphate dehydrate in silk fibroin dissolution process. This result was also confirmed by Fourier transform infrared analysis and DSC measurement. In addition, silk fibroin films prepared by this dissolution method had higher breaking strength and extension at break. Based on these analyses, an understanding of novel SF dissolution method may provide an additional tool for designing and synthesizing advanced materials with more complex structures, which should be helpful in different fields, including biomaterial applications. - Highlights: • SF fibers were firstly successfully dissolved in FA/HAp solution. • The rheological behavior of SF solution was significantly influenced by HAp contents. • SF nanofibrils were observed in FA/HAp solution with 103.6 ± 20.4 nm in diameter. • SF films prepared by FA/HAp dissolution method had higher mechanical properties.

  15. Sequential flow membraneless microfluidic fuel cell with porous electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Kamil S.; Posner, Jonathan D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106 (United States); Hayes, Joel R.; Friesen, Cody A. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-8706 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    A novel convective flow membraneless microfluidic fuel cell with porous disk electrodes is described. In this fuel cell design, the fuel flows radially outward through a thin disk shaped anode and across a gap to a ring shaped cathode. An oxidant is introduced into the gap between anode and cathode and advects radially outward to the cathode. This fuel cell differs from previous membraneless designs in that the fuel and the oxidant flow in series, rather than in parallel, enabling independent control over the fuel and oxidant flow rate and the electrode areas. The cell uses formic acid as a fuel and potassium permanganate as the oxidant, both contained in a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The flow velocity field is examined using microscale particle image velocimetry and shown to be nearly axisymmetric and steady. The results show that increasing the electrolyte concentration reduces the cell Ohmic resistance, resulting in larger maximum currents and peak power densities. Increasing the flow rate delays the onset of mass transport and reduces Ohmic losses resulting in larger maximum currents and peak power densities. An average open circuit potential of 1.2 V is obtained with maximum current and power densities of 5.35 mA cm{sup -2} and 2.8 mW cm{sup -2}, respectively (cell electrode area of 4.3 cm{sup 2}). At a flow rate of 100 {mu}L min{sup -1} a fuel utilization of 58% is obtained. (author)

  16. A Large Underestimate of Formic Acid from Tropical Fires: Constraints from Space-Borne Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliyakunnel, S; Millet, D B; Wells, K C; Cady-Pereira, K E; Shephard, M W

    2016-06-07

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids and a dominant source of atmospheric acidity. Recent work indicates a major gap in the HCOOH budget, with atmospheric concentrations much larger than expected from known sources. Here, we employ recent space-based observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer with the GEOS-Chem atmospheric model to better quantify the HCOOH source from biomass burning, and assess whether fire emissions can help close the large budget gap for this species. The space-based data reveal a severe model HCOOH underestimate most prominent over tropical burning regions, suggesting a major missing source of organic acids from fires. We develop an approach for inferring the fractional fire contribution to ambient HCOOH and find, based on measurements over Africa, that pyrogenic HCOOH:CO enhancement ratios are much higher than expected from direct emissions alone, revealing substantial secondary organic acid production in fire plumes. Current models strongly underestimate (by 10 ± 5 times) the total primary and secondary HCOOH source from African fires. If a 10-fold bias were to extend to fires in other regions, biomass burning could produce 14 Tg/a of HCOOH in the tropics or 16 Tg/a worldwide. However, even such an increase would only represent 15-20% of the total required HCOOH source, implying the existence of other larger missing sources.

  17. The coadsorption of hydrogen and carbon dioxide versus adsorption of formic acid on Cs-dosed Cu(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godowski, P. J.; Onsgaard, Jens; Hoffmann, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    , represent "fingerprints" of adsorbed species which were used for determination of their chemical identity. The photoelectron spectra of formic acid and formate are discussed and compared with the results from molecules formed during surface reactions. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Potential Energy and Free Energy Surfaces of the Formic Acid Dimer: Correlared ab initio Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chocholoušová, Jana; Vacek, Jaroslav; Hobza, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2002), s. 2119-2122 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : formic acid dimer * ab initio calculations * molecular dynamics simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2002

  19. Insight into the Effect of Sn on CO and Formic Acid Oxidation at PtSn Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanović, S.; Tripković, D.; Tripkovic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The role of Sn on the catalytic activity for CO and formic acid oxidation is studied by comparing the activities of differently treated PtSn/C and Pt/C catalysts. The catalysts are prepared by a microwave-assisted polyol synthesis method. As revealed by scanning tunneling and transmission electron...

  20. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation and hydrocracking of Alcell (R) lignin in alcohol/formic acid mixtures using a Ru/C catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloekhorst, Arjan; Shen, Yu; Yie, Yao; Fang, Ma; Heeres, Hero Jan

    The catalytic conversion of Alcell (R) lignin in iso-propanol/formic acid mixtures (1: 1 mass ratio) was explored in a batch set-up using Ru/C as the catalyst (673 K, 4 h, 28% mass lignin intake on solvent). Lignin oils were obtained in good yields (71% mass yields on lignin input) and shown to

  1. Formic acid as additive for the preparation of high-performance FePO4 materials by spray drying method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yanga, F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available International, vol. 43(18): 16652-16658 Formic acid as additive for the preparation of high-performance FePO4 materials by spray drying method Yanga F Zhang H Shao Y Song H Liao S Ren J ABSTRACT: High-performance ferric phosphate (FePO4...

  2. Hydrolysis of glyoxal in water-restricted environments: formation of organic aerosol precursors through formic acid catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Montu K; Francisco, Joseph S; Sinha, Amitabha

    2014-06-12

    The hydrolysis of glyoxal involving one to three water molecules and also in the presence of a water molecule and formic acid has been investigated. Our results show that glyoxal-diol is the major product of the hydrolysis and that formic acid, through its ability to facilitate intermolecular hydrogen atom transfer, is considerably more efficient than water as a catalyst in the hydrolysis process. Additionally, once the glyoxal-diol is formed, the barrier for further hydrolysis to form the glyoxal-tetrol is effectively reduced to zero in the presence of a single water and formic acid molecule. There are two important implications arising from these findings. First, the results suggest that under the catalytic influence of formic acid, glyoxal hydrolysis can impact the growth of atmospheric aerosols. As a result of enhanced hydrogen bonding, mediated through their polar OH functional groups, the diol and tetrol products are expected to have significantly lower vapor pressure than the parent glyoxal molecule; hence they can more readily partition into the particle phase and contribute to the growth of secondary organic aerosols. In addition, our findings provide insight into how glyoxal-diol and glyoxal-tetrol might be formed under atmospheric conditions associated with water-restricted environments and strongly suggest that the formation of these precursors for secondary organic aerosol growth is not likely restricted solely to the bulk aqueous phase as is currently assumed.

  3. Treatment of simulated high-level radioactive waste with formic acid: Bench-scale study on hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.L.W.; Ritter, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was constructed to vitrify high-level radioactive liquid waste in borosilicate glass for permanent storage. Formic acid, which serves as both an acid and a reducing agent, is used to treat the washed alkaline sludge during melter feed preparation primarily to improve the processability of the feed and to reduce mercury to its zero state for steam stripping. The high-level sludge is composed of many transition metal hydroxides. Among them, there are small quantities of platinum group metals. During the treatment of simulated sludge with formic acid, significant amounts of hydrogen were generated when the platinum group metals were included in the sludge. Apparently the noble metals in the sludge were reduced to their zero states and caused formic acid to decompose catalytically into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, usually with an induction period. The production of hydrogen gas presented the DWPF with a safety issue. Therefore, the objective of this research was to gain a fundamental understanding of what controlled the hydrogen evolution so that a practical solution to the safety issue could be obtained. A bench-scale parametric study revealed the following: increasing the amount of formic acid added to the sludge increased the hydrogen generation rate dramatically; once the catalysts were activated, the hydrogen generation rate decreased significantly with a lowering of the temperature of the sludge; the relative catalytic activities of the noble metals in the sludge decreased in the following order: rhodium > ruthenium much-gt palladium; ammonium ions were generated catalytically from the reaction between formic acid and nitrate; and when present, the noble metals caused higher upward drifts of the sludge pH

  4. Trial operation of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PC25) for CHP applications in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhrig, M.; Droste, W.; Wolf, D. [Ruhrgas AG, Dorsten (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In Europe, ten 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) produced by ONSI (PC25) are currently in operation. Their operators collaborate closely in the European Fuel Cell Users Group (EFCUG). The experience gained from trial operation by the four German operators - HEAG, HGW/HEW, Thyssengas and Ruhrgas - coincides with that of the other European operators. This experience can generally be regarded as favourable. With a view to using fuel cells in combined heat and power generation (CHP), the project described in this report, which was carried out in cooperation with the municipal utility of Bochum and Gasunie of the Netherlands, aimed at gaining experience with the PC 25 in field operation under the specific operating conditions prevailing in Europe. The work packages included heat-controlled operation, examination of plant behavior with varying gas properties and measurement of emissions under dynamic load conditions. The project received EU funding under the JOULE programme.

  5. Fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van J.A.R.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles and present-day embodiments of fuel cells are discussed. Nearly all cells are hydrogen/oxygen ones, where the hydrogen fuel is usually obtained on-site from the reforming of methane or methanol. There exists a tension between the promise of high efficiency in the conversion of

  6. Facile synthesis of octahedral Pt-Pd nanoparticles stabilized by silsesquioxane for the electrooxidation of formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yusong; Hao, Furui; Wang, Yihong; Zhang, Yihong; Ge, Cunwang; Lu, Tianhong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The octahedral Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles (octahedral Pt-Pd NPs) with dominant {111} facets were successfully synthesized through a facile route in the presence of octa(3-aminopropyl) silsesquioxane as the capping agent and complexing agent, methanol as the reductant and solvent. The octahedral Pt-Pd NPs display the significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity, increased CO tolerance and favourable stability for the electrooxidation of formic acid. - Highlights: • Octa Pt-Pd nanoparticles were synthesized with silsesquioxane as capping agent. • Octa Pt-Pd nanoparticles display uniform morphology and favorable dispersibility. • Octa Pt-Pd nanoparticles have high catalytic activity for formic acid by direct process. - Abstract: The octahedral Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles (octahedral Pt-Pd NPs) with dominant {111} facets were successfully synthesized through a facile route in the presence of octa(3-aminopropyl) silsesquioxane as the capping agent and complexing agent, methanol as the reductant and solvent. Their morphology, composition and structure were charactered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrocatalytic activity, CO tolerance and stability of the octahedral Pt-Pd NPs for the electrooxidation of formic acid were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping voltammetry and chronoamperometry, respectively. Compared with the Pt nanoparticles and commercial Pt black, the octahedral Pt-Pd NPs display a significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity, increased CO tolerance and favourable stability for the electrooxidation of formic acid. Therefore, the octahedral Pt-Pd NPs might be an alternative candidate for the anode catalyst for the electrooxidation of formic acid in future

  7. Noble metal-catalyzed homogeneous and heterogeneous processes in treating simulated nuclear waste media with formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-09-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2 -, NO 3 -, and NO 2 - were used to study reactions of formic acid at 90 degrees C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase and a microammonia electrode to analyze the NH 4 +/NH 3 in the liquid phase as a function of time. The following reactions have been studied in these systems since they are undesirable side reactions in nuclear waste processing: (1) Decomposition of formic acid to CO 2 + H 2 is undesirable because of the potential fire and explosion hazard of H 2 . Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl 3 -3H 2 O, was found to be the most active catalyst for H 2 generation from formic acid above ∼ 80 degrees C in the presence of nitrite ion. The H 2 production rate has an approximate pseudo first-order dependence on the Rh concentration, (2) Generation of NH 3 from the formic acid reduction of nitrate and/or nitrite is undesirable because of a possible explosion hazard from NH 4 NO 3 accumulation in a waste processing plant off-gas system. The Rh-catalyzed reduction of nitrogen-oxygen compounds to ammonia by formic acid was found to exhibit the following features: (a) Nitrate rather than nitrite is the principal source of NH 3 . (b) Ammonia production occurs at the expense of hydrogen production. (c) Supported rhodium metal catalysts are more active than rhodium in any other form, suggesting that ammonia production involves heterogeneous rather than homogeneous catalysis

  8. Biogas biological desulphurisation under extremely acidic conditions for energetic valorisation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Arespacochaga, N.; Valderrama Angel, César Alberto; Mesa, C.; Bouchy, Lynne; Cortina Pallás, José Luís

    2014-01-01

    The most harmful biogas contaminant for energy conversion equipment such as fuel cells is hydrogen sulphide (H2S); thus efficient and cost-effective treatment systems for this compound should be designed and developed. A pilot-scale biotrickling filter (BTF) working in acidic media (pH = 1.5-2) was operated for raw sewage biogas desulphurisation. Its operational performance as a function of two key important process parameters (temperature and retention time) was evaluated through short-term ...

  9. Evaluation of Hanford high level waste vitrification chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- FY 1994: Potential exothermic reactions in the presence of formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sills, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    A potential for an uncontrollable exothermic reaction between nitrate and organic salts during preparation of a high level waste melter feed has been identified. In order to examine this potential more closely, the thermal behavior of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) treated with various organic reductants was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were collected on simulated waste samples and their supernates treated with organics. Organic reductants used were formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid. For comparison, samples of untreated simulant and untreated simulant with added noble metals were tested. When heated, untreated simulant samples both with and without noble metals showed no exothermic behavior. All of the treated waste simulant samples showed exothermic behavior. Onset temperatures of exothermic reactions were 120 C to 210 C. Many onset temperatures, particularly those for formic acid treated samples, are well below 181 C, the estimated maximum steam coil temperature (considered to be a worst case maximum temperature for chemical process tank contents). The enthalpies of the reactions were {minus}180 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} J/Kg supernate ({minus}181 J/g) for the oxalic acid treated simulant supernate to {minus}1,150 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} J/Kg supernate ({minus}1,153 J/g) for the formic acid treated simulant supernate.

  10. Evaluation of Hanford high level waste vitrification chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- FY 1994: Potential exothermic reactions in the presence of formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    A potential for an uncontrollable exothermic reaction between nitrate and organic salts during preparation of a high level waste melter feed has been identified. In order to examine this potential more closely, the thermal behavior of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) treated with various organic reductants was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were collected on simulated waste samples and their supernates treated with organics. Organic reductants used were formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid. For comparison, samples of untreated simulant and untreated simulant with added noble metals were tested. When heated, untreated simulant samples both with and without noble metals showed no exothermic behavior. All of the treated waste simulant samples showed exothermic behavior. Onset temperatures of exothermic reactions were 120 C to 210 C. Many onset temperatures, particularly those for formic acid treated samples, are well below 181 C, the estimated maximum steam coil temperature (considered to be a worst case maximum temperature for chemical process tank contents). The enthalpies of the reactions were -180 x 10 -3 J/Kg supernate (-181 J/g) for the oxalic acid treated simulant supernate to -1,150 x 10 -3 J/Kg supernate (-1,153 J/g) for the formic acid treated simulant supernate

  11. Fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederdoeckl, J.

    2001-01-01

    Europe has at present big hopes on the fuel cells technology, in comparison with other energy conversion technologies, this technology has important advantages, for example: high efficiency, very low pollution and parallel use of electric and thermal energy. Preliminary works for fuel cells developing and its commercial exploitation are at full speed; until now the European Union has invested approx. 1.7 billion Schillings, 60 relevant projects are being executed. The Austrian industry is interested in applying this technique to drives, thermal power stations and the miniature fuel cells as replacement of batteries in electronic products (Notebooks, mobile telephones, etc.). A general description of the historic development of fuel cells including the main types is given as well as what is the situation in Austria. (nevyjel)

  12. Effect of ultrasonic frequency on the mechanism of formic acid sono-lysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chave, T.; Nikitenko, S.I.; Navarro, N.M.; Pochon, P.; Bisel, I.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of formic acid sono-chemical degradation were studied at ultrasonic frequencies of 20, 200, and 607 kHz under argon atmosphere. Total yield of HCOOH sono-chemical degradation increases approximately 6-8-fold when the frequency increased from 20 to 200 or to 607 kHz. At low ultrasonic frequencies, HCOOH degradation has been attributed to oxidation with OH . radicals from water sono-lysis and to the HCOOH decarboxylation occurring at the cavitation bubble-liquid interface. With high-frequency ultrasound, the sono-chemical reaction is also influenced by HCOOH dehydration. Whatever the ultrasonic frequency, the sono-lysis of HCOOH yielded H 2 and CO 2 in the gas phase as well as trace, amounts of oxalic acid and formaldehyde in the liquid phase. However, CO and CH 4 formations were only detected under high frequency ultrasound. The most striking difference between low frequency and high frequency ultrasound is that the sono-lysis of HCOOH at high ultrasonic frequencies initiates Fischer-Tropsch hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. (authors)

  13. Durability Issues of High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . As a critical concern, issues of long term durability of PBI based fuel cells are addressed in this talk, including oxidative degradation of the polymer, mechanical failures of the membrane, acid leaching out, corrosion of carbon support and sintering of catalysts particles. Excellent polymer durability has...... or ionically cross-linking and structure modification With load, thermal or startup-shutdown cycling, the performance loss was found to be much bigger, about 300 µV per cycle or 40 µV per operating hour, due to the increased acid loss and catalyst support corrosion, particularly under open circuit voltage...... operation. Further efforts are outlined to the future work....

  14. Fuel cells 101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, B.

    2003-06-01

    A capsule history of fuel cells is given, beginning with the first discovery in 1839 by William Grove, a Welsh judge who, when experimenting with electrolysis discovered that by re-combining the two components of electrolysis (water and oxygen) an electric charge was produced. A century later, in 1958, Francis Thomas Bacon, a British scientist demonstrated the first working fuel cell stack, a technology which was licensed and used in the Apollo spacecraft. In Canada, early research on the development of fuel cells was carried out at the University of Toronto, the Defence Research Establishment and the National Research Council. Most of the early work concentrated on alkaline and phosphoric acid fuel cells. In 1983, Ballard Research began the development of the electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which marked the beginning of Canada becoming a world leader in fuel cell technology development. The paper provides a brief account of how fuel cells work, describes the distinguishing characteristics of the various types of fuel cells (alkaline, phosphoric acid, molten-carbonate, solid oxide, and proton exchange membrane types) and their principal benefits. The emphasis is on proton exchange membrane fuel cells because they are the only fuel cell technology that is appropriate for providing primary propulsion power onboard a vehicle. Since vehicles are by far the greatest consumers of fossil fuels, it follows that proton exchange membrane fuel cells will have the greatest potential impact on both environmental matters and on our reliance on oil as our primary fuel. Various on-going and planned fuel cell demonstration projects are also described. 1 fig.

  15. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and nucl......A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  16. Electrocatalytic properties of carbon-supported Pt-Ru catalysts with the high alloying degree for formic acid electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu.; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China)

    2010-07-01

    A series of carbon-supported bimetallic Pt-Ru catalysts with high alloying degree and different Pt/Ru atomic ratio have been prepared by a chemical reduction method in the H{sub 2}O/ethanol/tetrahydrofuran (THF) mixture solvent. The structural and electronic properties of catalysts are characterized using X-ray reflection (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrooxidation of formic acid on these Pt-Ru nanoparticles are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and CO-stripping measurements. The results of electrochemical measurements illustrate that the alloying degree and Pt/Ru atomic ratio of Pt-Ru catalyst play an important role in the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt-Ru/C catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation due to the bifunctional mechanism and the electronic effect. Since formic acid is an intermediate in the methanol electrooxidation on Pt electrode in acidic electrolyte, the observation provides an additional fundamental understanding of the structure-activity relationship of Pt-Ru catalyst for methanol electrooxidation. (author)

  17. Accurate determination of the binding energy of the formic acid dimer: The importance of geometry relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    The formic acid dimer in its C2h-symmetrical cyclic form is stabilized by two equivalent H-bonds. The currently accepted interaction energy is 18.75 kcal/mol whereas the experimental binding energy D0 value is only 14.22 ±0.12 kcal/mol [F. Kollipost, R. W. Larsen, A. V. Domanskaya, M. Nörenberg, and M. A. Suhm, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 151101 (2012)]. Calculation of the binding energies De and D0 at the CCSD(T) (Coupled Cluster with Single and Double excitations and perturbative Triple excitations)/CBS (Complete Basis Set) level of theory, utilizing CCSD(T)/CBS geometries and the frequencies of the dimer and monomer, reveals that there is a 3.2 kcal/mol difference between interaction energy and binding energy De, which results from (i) not relaxing the geometry of the monomers upon dissociation of the dimer and (ii) approximating CCSD(T) correlation effects with MP2. The most accurate CCSD(T)/CBS values obtained in this work are De = 15.55 and D0 = 14.32 kcal/mol where the latter binding energy differs from the experimental value by 0.1 kcal/mol. The necessity of employing augmented VQZ and VPZ calculations and relaxing monomer geometries of H-bonded complexes upon dissociation to obtain reliable binding energies is emphasized.

  18. Formic Acid Oxidation over Hierarchical Porous Carbon Containing PtPd Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pastor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of high surface monolithic carbon as support for catalysts offers important advantage, such as elimination of the ohmic drop originated in the interparticle contact and improved mass transport by ad-hoc pore design. Moreover, the approach discussed here has the advantage that it allows the synthesis of materials having a multimodal porous size distribution, with each pore size contributing to the desired properties. On the other hand, the monolithic nature of the porous support also imposes new challenges for metal loading. In this work, the use of Hierarchical Porous Carbon (HPC as support for PtPd nanoparticles was explored. Three hierarchical porous carbon samples (denoted as HPC-300, HPC-400 and HPC-500 with main pore size around 300, 400 and 500 nm respectively, are used as porous support. PtPd nanoparticles were loaded by impregnation and subsequent chemical reduction with NaBH4. The resulting material was characterized by EDX, XRD and conventional electrochemical techniques. The catalytic activity toward formic acid and methanol electrooxidation was evaluated by electrochemical methods, and the results compared with commercial carbon supported PtPd. The Hierarchical Porous Carbon support discussed here seems to be promising for use in DFAFC anodes.

  19. Microwave measurements of the tropolone–formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kukolich, Stephen G. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Serrato, Agapito; Lin, Wei [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas 78520 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    The microwave spectrum was measured for the doubly hydrogen bonded dimer formed between tropolone and formic acid. The predicted symmetry of this dimer was C{sub 2v}(M), and it was expected that the concerted proton tunneling motion would be observed. After measuring 25 a- and b-type rotational transitions, no splittings which could be associated with a concerted double proton tunneling motion were observed. The calculated barrier to the proton tunneling motion is near 15 000 cm{sup −1}, which would likely make the tunneling frequencies too small to observe in the microwave spectra. The rotational and centrifugal distortion constants determined from the measured transitions were A = 2180.7186(98) MHz, B = 470.873 90(25) MHz, C = 387.689 84(22) MHz, D{sub J} = 0.0100(14) kHz, D{sub JK} = 0.102(28) kHz, and D{sub K} = 13.2(81) kHz. The B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ calculated rotational constants were within 1% of the experimentally determined values.

  20. Theoretical Insight into the Trends that Guide the Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong Suk; Christensen, Rune; Vegge, Tejs; Nørskov, Jens K; Studt, Felix

    2016-02-19

    The electrochemical reduction (electroreduction) of CO2 to formic acid (HCOOH) and its competing reactions, that is, the electroreduction of CO2 to CO and the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), on twenty-seven different metal surfaces have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Owing to a strong linear correlation between the free energies of COOH* and H*, it seems highly unlikely that the electroreduction of CO2 to HCOOH via the COOH* intermediate occurs without a large fraction of the current going to HER. On the other hand, the selective electroreduction of CO2 to HCOOH seems plausible if the reaction occurs via the HCOO* intermediate, as there is little correlation between the free energies of HCOO* and H*. Lead and silver surfaces are found to be the most promising monometallic catalysts showing high faradaic efficiencies for the electroreduction of CO2 to HCOOH with small overpotentials. Our methodology is widely applicable, not only to metal surfaces, but also to other classes of materials enabling the computational search for electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction to HCOOH. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Rheological Properties and Electrospinnability of High-Amylose Starch in Formic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancuški, Anica; Vasilyev, Gleb; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Zussman, Eyal

    2015-08-10

    Starch derivatives, such as starch-esters, are commonly used as alternatives to pure starch due to their enhanced mechanical properties. However, simple and efficient processing routes are still being sought out. In the present article, we report on a straightforward method for electrospinning high-amylose starch-formate nanofibers from 17 wt % aqueous formic acid (FA) dispersions. The diameter of the electrospun starch-formate fibers ranged from 80 to 300 nm. The electrospinnability window between starch gelatinization and phase separation was determined using optical microscopy and rheological studies. This window was shown to strongly depend on the water content in the FA dispersions. While pure FA rapidly gelatinized starch, yielding solutions suitable for electrospinning within a few hours at room temperature, the presence of water (80 and 90 vol % FA) significantly delayed gelatinization and dissolution, which deteriorated fiber quality. A complete destabilization of the electrospinning process was observed in 70 vol % FA dispersions. Optical micrographs showed that FA induced a disruption of starch granule with a loss of crystallinity confirmed by X-ray diffraction. As a result, starch fiber mats exhibited a higher elongation at break when compared to brittle starch films.

  2. Optimization of furfural production from D-xylose with formic acid as catalyst in a reactive extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wandian; Li, Pingli; Bo, Dechen; Chang, Heying; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Tao

    2013-04-01

    Furfural is one of the most promising platform chemicals derived from biomass. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to determine four important parameters including reaction temperature (170-210°C), formic acid concentration (5-25 g/L), o-nitrotoluene volume percentage (20-80 vt.%), and residence time (40-200 min). The maximum furfural yield of 74% and selectivity of 86% were achieved at 190°C for 20 g/L formic acid concentration and 75 vt.% o-nitrotoluene by 75 min. The high boiling solvent, o-nitrotoluene, was recommended as extraction solvent in a reactive extraction system to obtain high furfural yield and reduce furfural-solvent separation costs. Although the addition of halides to the xylose solutions enhanced the furfural yield and selectivity, the concentration of halides was not an important factor on the furfural yield and selectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Catalytic activity of laminated compounds of graphite with transitions metals in decomposition of alcohols and formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, Yu.N.; Lapkina, N.D.; Vol'pin, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic activity is studied of laminated graphite compounds with Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, W and Mn both in the reduced and oxidized forms in gas phase decomposition reactions of isopropyl, n-butyl, cyclohexyl, and 4-tret-butylcyclohexyl alcohols, and also formic acid. All the catalysts are shown to be active in the reactions where isopropyl and n-butyl alcohols undergo decomposition. The laminated compounds of graphite with Co and Ni both in the oxidized and reduction form are the most active catalysts of the selective decomposition of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones, and also formic acid to CO 2 and H 2 . The kinetics of a number of reactions is found to obey the second order equation with allowance made for the system volume

  4. Hollow Ag-Pd core–shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yuanyuan; Lu Yizhong; Han Dongxue; Zhang Qixian; Niu Li

    2012-01-01

    Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core–shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated by detailed characterizations. The Ag-Pd can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of formic acid and enhance the stability of the Pd component. It is proposed that the enhanced electrochemically active surface area and modulated electron structure of Pd by Ag are responsible for the improvement of electrocatalytic activity and durability. The results obtained in this work are different from those previous reports, in which alloy walls with hollow interiors are usually formed. This work provides a new and simple method for synthesizing novel bimetallic core–shell structure with a hollow interior, which can be applied as high-performance catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. (paper)

  5. Surface collisions of formic acid cations HCOOH+ and DCOOD+ with a hydrocarbon-covered stainless steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepnual, Thawatchai; Feketeová, Linda; Grill, Verena; Scheier, Paul; Herman, Zdenek; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2005-07-01

    Interaction of the formic acid cation HCOOH+ with a stainless steel surface covered with hydrocarbons has been studied as a function of the collision energy from a few eV up to 40 eV. Mass spectra of the product ions showed ions produced by surface-induced dissociation of the projectile and formation of HCO2H2+ in interaction with the surface material. The fragmentation of the projectile led to product ions HCOO+ and CHO+. The product ion HCO2H2+ fragmented to give only CHO+, indicating that its structure was HC(OH)2+ as suggested earlier by others. The results were confirmed by studies using the deuterated formic acid cation DCOOD+.

  6. Theoretical Kinetic Study of the Formic Acid Catalyzed Criegee Intermediate Isomerization: Multistructural Anharmonicity and Atmospheric Implications

    KAUST Repository

    Monge Palacios, Manuel

    2018-01-29

    We performed a theoretical study on the double hydrogen shift isomerization reaction of a six carbon atom Criegee intermediate (C6-CI), catalyzed by formic acid (HCOOH), to produce vinylhydroperoxide (VHP), C6-CI+HCOOH→VHP+HCOOH. This Criegee intermediate can serve as a surrogate for larger CIs derived from important volatile organic compounds like monoterpenes, whose reactivity is not well understood and are difficult to handle computationally. The reactant HCOOH exerts a pronounced catalytic effect on the studied reaction by lowering the barrier height, but the kinetic enhancement is hindered by the multistructural anharmonicity. First, the rigid ring-structure adopted by the saddle point to facilitate simultaneous transfer of two atoms does not allow formation of as many conformers as those formed by the reactant C6-CI. And second, the flexible carbon chain of C6-CI facilitates the formation of stabilizing intramolecular C–H···O hydrogen bonds; this stabilizing effect is less pronounced in the saddle point structure due to its tightness and steric effects. Thus, the contribution of the reactant C6-CI conformers to the multistructural partition function is larger than that of the saddle point conformers. The resulting low multistructural anharmonicity factor partially cancels out the catalytic effect of the carboxylic acid, yielding in a moderately large rate coefficient, k(298 K) = 4.9·10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. We show that carboxylic acids may promote the conversion of stabilized Criegee intermediates into vinylhydroperoxides in the atmosphere, which generates OH radicals and leads to secondary organic aerosol, thereby affecting the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and ultimately the climate.

  7. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little...... contribution of the membrane degradation to the performance losses during the potential cycling tests. As the major mechanism of the fuel cell performance degradation, the electrochemical active area of the cathodic catalysts showed a steady decrease in the cyclic voltammetric measurements, which was also......Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...

  8. Monodisperse gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and their composition-controlled catalysis in formic acid dehydrogenation under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Önder; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-02-07

    Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(III) hydrate and palladium(II) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h(-1)) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives.

  9. Hydrodeoxygenation of phenol over Pd catalysts by in-situ generated hydrogen from aqueous reforming of formic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Ying; Wang, Ze; Lin, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation of phenol, as model compound of bio-oil, was investigated over Pd catalysts, using formic acid as a hydrogen donor. The order of activity for deoxygenation of phenol with Pd catalysts was found to be: Pd/SiO2 > Pd/MCM-41 > Pd/CA > Pd/Al2O3 > Pd/HY approximate to Pd/ZrO2 ≈ Pd...

  10. Fuel cells for commercial energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppmann, Gerhard; Weisse, Eckart; Bischoff, Manfred

    1990-04-01

    The development of various types of fuel cells is described. Advantges and drawbacks are considered for alkaline fuel cells, phosphoric acid fuel cells, and molten carbonate fuel cells. It is shown that their modular construction is particularly adapted to power heat systems. A comparison which is largely in favor of fuel cells, is made between coal, oil, natural gas power stations, and fuel cells. Safety risks in operation are also compared with those of conventional power stations. Fuel cells are particularly suited for dwellings, shopping centers, swimming pools, other sporting installations, and research facilities, whose high current and heat requirements can be covered by power heat coupling.

  11. Formic acid hydrolysis/liquid chromatography isotope dilution mass spectrometry: An accurate method for large DNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Sachie; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Inagaki, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2016-10-14

    Liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS) with formic acid hydrolysis was established for the accurate quantification of λDNA. The over-decomposition of nucleobases in formic acid hydrolysis was restricted by optimizing the reaction temperature and the reaction time, and accurately corrected by using deoxynucleotides (dNMPs) and isotope-labeled dNMPs as the calibrator and the internal standard, respectively. The present method could quantify λDNA with an expanded uncertainty of 4.6% using 10fmol of λDNA. The analytical results obtained with the present method were validated by comparing with the results of phosphate-base quantification by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results showed good agreement with each other. We conclude that the formic acid hydrolysis/LC-IDMS method can quantify λDNA accurately and is promising as the primary method for the certification of DNA as reference material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct determination of mercury in cosmetic samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after dissolution with formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ying; Shi, Zeming; Zong, Qinxia; Wu, Peng; Su, Jing [Sichuan Provincial Key Laboratory of Nuclear Technology in Geology, College of Nuclear Technology and Automation Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liur.ray@gmail.com [Mineral Resources Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions, College of Materials and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, sensitive, and accurate method is established for mercury determination in cosmetics. •The sample preparation procedure is highly simplified. •Isotope dilution efficiently eliminates matrix effect. •First report of using formic acid based method in combination with PVG-ID-ICP MS for mercury quantitation in cosmetics. -- Abstract: A new method was proposed for the accurate determination of mercury in cosmetic samples based on isotopic dilution (ID)-photochemical vapor generation (PVG)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) measurement. Cosmetic samples were directly dissolved in formic acid solution and subsequently subjected to PVG for the reduction of mercury into vapor species following by ICP MS detection. Therefore, the risks of analyte contamination and loss were avoided. Highly enriched {sup 201}Hg isotopic spike is added to cosmetics and the isotope ratios of {sup 201}Hg/{sup 202}Hg were measured for the quantitation of mercury. With ID calibration, the influences originating from sample matrixes for the determination of mercury in cosmetic samples have been efficiently eliminated. The effects of several experimental parameters, such as the concentration of the formic acid, and the flow rates of carrier gas and sample were investigated. The method provided good reproducibility and the detection limits were found to be 0.6 pg mL{sup −1}. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the determination of mercury in six cosmetic samples and a spike test was performed to verify the accuracy of the method.

  13. Dynamics of electrocatalytic oxidation of ethylene glycol, methanol and formic acid at MWCNT platform electrochemically modified with Pt/Ru nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maxakato, NW

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Comparative electrocatalytic behavior of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (fMWCNTs) electrodecorated with Pt/Ru nanoparticles towards the oxidation of methanol (MeOH), ethylene glycol (EG) and formic acid (FA) has been investigated...

  14. Selective Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid with Well-Defined Complexes of Ruthenium and Phosphorus-Nitrogen PN3-Pincer Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yupeng

    2016-04-22

    An unsymmetrically protonated PN3-pincer complex in which ruthenium is coordinated by one nitrogen and two phosphorus atoms was employed for the selective generation of hydrogen from formic acid. Mechanistic studies suggest that the imine arm participates in the formic acid activation/deprotonation step. A long life time of 150 h with a turnover number over 1 million was achieved. Grabbing hold: A PN3-pincer complex was employed for the selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. Mechanistic studies suggest the imine arm participates in the formic acid activation/deprotonation step. A long life time of 150 h with a turnover number over 1 million was achieved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Experimental and Kinetic Study on Lignin Depolymerization in Water/Formic Acid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted depolymerization of black-liquor lignin in formic acid was studied, concentrating on the yield of liquid fractions as bio-oil 1 (mainly aromatic monomers and bio-oil 2 (mainly aromatic oligomers and the distribution of the specific compositions. Bio-oil 1 (9.69% and bio-oil 2 (54.39% achieved their maximum yields under 160 °C with the reaction time of 30 min. The chemical compositions of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2 were respectively identified by means of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Ethanone, 1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl and Ethanone, 1-(4-hydrox-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl were evidenced to be the two prominent compounds in bio-oil 1. Production of aromatic oligomers with the molecular weight of 328, 342, 358, 378, 394, 424 and 454 identified by MALDI-TOF MS was substantially tuned with the reaction temperature. A two-separate-stage kinetic model was proposed to describe the acidic solvolysis of lignin assisted by microwave heating, where the first stage is dominated by the depolyerization of lignin to monomers and oligomers with the activation energy of 40.27 kJ·mol−1, and the second stage with the activation energy of 49.18 kJ·mol−1 is mainly ascribed to the repolymerization of first-stage produced compounds.

  16. HTPEM Fuel Cell Impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg

    As part of the process to create a fossil free Denmark by 2050, there is a need for the development of new energy technologies with higher efficiencies than the current technologies. Fuel cells, that can generate electricity at higher efficiencies than conventional combustion engines, can...... potentially play an important role in the energy system of the future. One of the fuel cell technologies, that receives much attention from the Danish scientific community is high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cells based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) with phosphoric acid as proton conductor....... This type of fuel cell operates at higher temperature than comparable fuel cell types and they distinguish themselves by high CO tolerance. Platinum based catalysts have their efficiency reduced by CO and the effect is more pronounced at low temperature. This Ph.D. Thesis investigates this type of fuel...

  17. Methyl phosphate formation as a major degradation mode of direct methanol fuel cells with phosphoric acid based electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid and phosphoric acid doped polymer membranes are widely used as electrolytes in hydrogen based fuel cells operating at elevated temperatures. Such electrolytes have been explored for direct oxidation of methanol to further increase the versatility of the systems, however......, with demonstrated lifetimes of only a few days to weeks. In this work the methyl phosphate formation from the acid and methanol is identified and proposed to be a major mechanism for the cell degradation. Proton conductivity and fuel cell durability tests validate the mechanism at high methanol contents....

  18. Increased formic acid excretion and the development of kidney toxicity in rats following chronic dosing with trichloroethanol, a major metabolite of trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Trevor; Dow, Jacky; Foster, John

    2003-01-01

    The chronic toxicity of trichloroethanol, a major metabolite of trichloroethylene, has been assessed in male Fischer rats (60 per group) given trichloroethanol in drinking water at concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g/l for 52 weeks. The rats excreted large amounts of formic acid in urine reaching a maximum after 12 weeks (∼65 mg/24 h at 1 g/l) and thereafter declining to reach an apparent steady state at 40 weeks (15-20 mg/24 h). Urine from treated rats was more acidic throughout the study and urinary methylmalonic acid and plasma N-methyltetrahydrofolate concentrations were increased, indicating an acidosis, vitamin B12 deficiency and impaired folate metabolism, respectively. The rats treated with trichloroethanol developed kidney damage over the duration of the study which was characterised by increased urinary NAG activity, protein excretion (from 4 weeks), increased basophilia, protein accumulation and tubular damage (from 12 to 40 weeks), increased cell replication (at week 28) and evidence in some rats of focal proliferation of abnormal tubules at 52 weeks. It was concluded that trichloroethanol, the major metabolite of trichloroethylene, induced nephrotoxicity in rats as a result of formic acid excretion and acidosis

  19. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  20. Measurement of formic acid, acetic acid and hydroxyacetaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and methyl peroxide in air by chemical ionization mass spectrometry: airborne method development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadaway, Victoria; Heikes, Brian G.; McNeill, Ashley S.; Silwal, Indira K. C.; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.

    2018-04-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) method utilizing a reagent gas mixture of O2, CO2, and CH3I in N2 is described and optimized for quantitative gas-phase measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl peroxide (CH3OOH), formic acid (HCOOH), and the sum of acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydroxyacetaldehyde (HOCH2CHO; also known as glycolaldehyde). The instrumentation and methodology were designed for airborne in situ field measurements. The CIMS quantification of formic acid, acetic acid, and hydroxyacetaldehyde used I- cluster formation to produce and detect the ion clusters I-(HCOOH), I-(CH3COOH), and I-(HOCH2CHO), respectively. The CIMS also produced and detected I- clusters with hydrogen peroxide and methyl peroxide, I-(H2O2) and I-(CH3OOH), though the sensitivity was lower than with the O2- (CO2) and O2- ion clusters, respectively. For that reason, while the I- peroxide clusters are presented, the focus is on the organic acids. Acetic acid and hydroxyacetaldehyde were found to yield equivalent CIMS responses. They are exact isobaric compounds and indistinguishable in the CIMS used. Consequently, their combined signal is referred to as the acetic acid equivalent sum. Within the resolution of the quadrupole used in the CIMS (1 m/z), ethanol and 1- and 2-propanol were potential isobaric interferences to the measurement of formic acid and the acetic acid equivalent sum, respectively. The CIMS response to ethanol was 3.3 % that of formic acid and the response to either 1- or 2-propanol was 1 % of the acetic acid response; therefore, the alcohols were not considered to be significant interferences to formic acid or the acetic acid equivalent sum. The multi-reagent ion system was successfully deployed during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) in 2014. The combination of FRAPPÉ and laboratory calibrations allowed for the post-mission quantification of formic acid and the acetic acid equivalent sum observed during the Deep

  1. Structural and Morphological Features of Acid-Bearing Polymers for PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yunsong; Siu, Ana; Peckham, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical structure, polymer microstructure, sequence distribution, and morphology of acid-bearing polymers are important factors in the design of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) for fuel cells. The roles of ion aggregation and phase separation in vinylic- and aromatic-based polymers in proton...... conductivity and water transport are described. The formation, dimensions, and connectivity of ionic pathways are consistently found to play an important role in determining the physicochemical properties of PEMs. For polymers that possess low water content, phase separation and ionic channel formation...

  2. Formic and Acetic Acid Observations over Colorado by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Organic Acids' Role in Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Heikes, B.; Silwal, I.; McNeill, A.

    2015-12-01

    Formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc) have both natural and anthropogenic sources and a role in the atmospheric processing of carbon. These organic acids also have an increasing importance in setting the acidity of rain and snow as precipitation nitrate and sulfate concentrations have decreased. Primary emissions for both organic acids include biomass burning, agriculture, and motor vehicle emissions. Secondary production is also a substantial source for both acids especially from biogenic precursors, secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), and photochemical production from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs). Chemical transport models underestimate organic acid concentrations and recent research has sought to develop additional production mechanisms. Here we report HFo and HAc measurements during two campaigns over Colorado using the peroxide chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PCIMS). Iodide clusters of both HFo and HAc were recorded at mass-to-charge ratios of 173 and 187, respectively. The PCIMS was flown aboard the NCAR Gulfstream-V platform during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and aboard the NCAR C-130 during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE). The DC3 observations were made in May and June 2012 extending from the surface to 13 km over the central and eastern United States. FRAPPE observations were made in July and August 2014 from the surface to 7 km over Colorado. DC3 measurements reported here are focused over the Colorado Front Range and complement the FRAPPE observations. DC3 HFo altitude profiles are characterized by a decrease up to 6 km followed by an increase either back to boundary layer mixing ratio values or higher (a "C" shape). Organic acid measurements from both campaigns are interpreted with an emphasis on emission sources (both natural and anthropogenic) over Colorado and in situ photochemical production especially ozone precursors.

  3. Electrochemical fabrication of clean dendritic Au supported Pt clusters for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yue; Liu Jun; Huang Wei; Li Zelin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A smooth Au surface was rebuilt into clean dendrite via square wave potential pulses. ► It was performed in blank H 2 SO 4 solution without Au(III) species and other additives. ► Dendritic Au provided certain advantage for dispersing Pt due to its unique structure. ► Pt-decorated dendritic Au demonstrated high activity for the HCOOH electrooxidation. - Abstract: We report here the fabrication of clean dendritic gold (DG) directly on a smooth Au electrode via square wave potential pulses (SWPPs) in a blank H 2 SO 4 solution containing no Au(III) species and additives. The effects of potential range, frequency and duration time of SWPPs and H 2 SO 4 concentration on the construction of DG were systematically investigated. A possible mechanism was proposed to explain the growth of DG. The whole process was templateless and surfactantless, and therefore effectively avoided possible contaminations that occurred in other synthetic routes. Further, the prepared DG electrode functioned as a scaffold to support electrodeposited Pt clusters, producing Pt-decorated DG (Pt-DG) electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt-DG electrodes with various Pt loadings were examined for the oxidation of formic acid. The low Pt loading Pt-DG demonstrated different electrochemical behavior from that on Pt-decorated smooth gold (Pt-SG) and on Pt-decorated gold nanoparticles because there were more defect sites like steps and edges on the DG surface. Ensemble effect, as well as electronic effect, accounts for the improved electrocatalytic activity of low Pt loading Pt-DG.

  4. Species differences in methanol and formic acid pharmacokinetics in mice, rabbits and primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeting, J. Nicole; Siu, Michelle; McCallum, Gordon P.; Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is metabolized primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase in humans, but by catalase in rodents, with species variations in the pharmacokinetics of its formic acid (FA) metabolite. The teratogenic potential of MeOH in humans is unknown, and its teratogenicity in rodents may not accurately reflect human developmental risk due to differential species metabolism, as for some other teratogens. To determine if human MeOH metabolism might be better reflected in rabbits than rodents, the plasma pharmacokinetics of MeOH and FA were compared in male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys over time (24, 48 and 6 h, respectively) following a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 or 2 g/kg MeOH or its saline vehicle. Following the high dose, MeOH exhibited saturated elimination kinetics in all 3 species, with similar peak concentrations and a 2.5-fold higher clearance in mice than rabbits. FA accumulation within 6 h in primates was 5-fold and 43-fold higher than in rabbits and mice respectively, with accumulation being 10-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Over 48 h, FA accumulation was nearly 5-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Low-dose MeOH in mice and rabbits resulted in similarly saturated MeOH elimination in both species, but with approximately 2-fold higher clearance rates in mice. FA accumulation was 3.8-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Rabbits more closely than mice reflected primates for in vivo MeOH metabolism, and particularly FA accumulation, suggesting that developmental studies in rabbits may be useful for assessing potential human teratological risk.

  5. Multiple Hydrogen Bond Tethers for Grazing Formic Acid in Its Complexes with Phenylacetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karir, Ginny; Kumar, Gaurav; Kar, Bishnu Prasad; Viswanathan, K S

    2018-03-01

    Complexes of phenylacetylene (PhAc) and formic acid (FA) present an interesting picture, where the two submolecules are tethered, sometimes multiply, by hydrogen bonds. The multiple tentacles adopted by PhAc-FA complexes stem from the fact that both submolecules can, in the same complex, serve as proton acceptors and/or proton donors. The acetylenic and phenyl π systems of PhAc can serve as proton acceptors, while the ≡C-H or -C-H of the phenyl ring can act as a proton donor. Likewise, FA also is amphiprotic. Hence, more than 10 hydrogen-bonded structures, involving O-H···π, C-H···π, and C-H···O contacts, were indicated by our computations, some with multiple tentacles. Interestingly, despite the multiple contacts in the complexes, the barrier between some of the structures is small, and hence, FA grazes around PhAc, even while being tethered to it, with hydrogen bonds. We used matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy to experimentally study the PhAc-FA complexes, with which we located global and a few local minima, involving primarily an O-H···π interaction. Experiments were corroborated by ab initio computations, which were performed using MP2 and M06-2X methods, with 6-311++G (d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Single-point energy calculations were also done at MP2/CBS and CCSD(T)/CBS levels. The nature, strength, and origin of these noncovalent interactions were studied using AIM, NBO, and LMO-EDA analysis.

  6. Handbook of fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1980-05-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

  7. Power assisted fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, L P; Atwater, T B; Plichta, E J; Cygan, P J [US Army CECOM, Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States). Research Development and Engineering Center

    1998-02-01

    A hybrid fuel cell demonstrated pulse power capability at pulse power load simulations synonymous with electronics and communications equipment. The hybrid consisted of a 25.0 W Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) stack in parallel with a two-cell lead-acid battery. Performance of the hybrid PEMFC was superior to either the battery or fuel cell stack alone at the 18.0 W load. The hybrid delivered a flat discharge voltage profile of about 4.0 V over a 5 h radio continuous transmit mode of 18.0 W. (orig.)

  8. Recent development of active nanoparticle catalysts for fuel cell reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, Vismadeb; Lee, Youngmin; Sun, Shouheng [Department of Chemistry Brown University Providence, RI (United States)

    2010-04-23

    This review focuses on the recent advances in the synthesis of nanoparticle (NP) catalysts of Pt-, Pd- and Au-based NPs as well as composite NPs. First, new developments in the synthesis of single-component Pt, Pd and Au NPs are summarized. Then the chemistry used to make alloy and composite NP catalysts aiming to enhance their activity and durability for fuel cell reactions is outlined. The review next introduces the exciting new research push in developing CoN/C and FeN/C as non-Pt catalysts. Examples of size-, shape- and composition-dependent catalyses for oxygen reduction at cathode and formic acid oxidation at anode are highlighted to illustrate the potentials of the newly developed NP catalysts for fuel cell applications. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Development of PEM fuel cell technology at international fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The PEM technology has not developed to the level of phosphoric acid fuel cells. Several factors have held the technology development back such as high membrane cost, sensitivity of PEM fuel cells to low level of carbon monoxide impurities, the requirement to maintain full humidification of the cell, and the need to pressurize the fuel cell in order to achieve the performance targets. International Fuel Cells has identified a hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell concept that leverages recent research advances to overcome major economic and technical obstacles.

  10. A Flexible Ascorbic Acid Fuel Cell with a Microchannel Fabricated using MEMS Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Hiroshi; Fukushi, Yudai; Koide, Syohei; Sano, Ryohei; Sasaki, Tsubasa; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2013-12-01

    We fabricated a miniature ascorbic acid fuel cells equipped with a microchannel for the circulation of ascorbic acid (AA) solution using micro electronic mechanical system techniques. The fuel cell was fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate, and its porous carbon-coated aluminium (Al) electrodes of 2.8 mm in width and 11 mm in length were formed using photolithography and screen-printing techniques. The porous carbon was deposited by screen-printing of carbon-black ink on the Al electrode surfaces in order to increase the effective electrode surface area and to absorb more enzymes on the cathode surface. The microchannel with a depth of 200 μm was fabricated using a hot-embossing technique. A maximum power of 0.60 μW at 0.58 V that corresponds to a power density of 1.83 μW/cm2 was realized by introducing a 200 mM concentrated AA solution at room temperature.

  11. Commercialization of fuel-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O' Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

    1995-03-01

    This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  12. Coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by application of microbial fuel cell technology to vinegar fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Nara, Youhei; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-08-01

    The coproduction of a useful material and electricity via a novel application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology to oxidative fermentation was investigated. We focused on vinegar production, i.e., acetic acid fermentation, as an initial and model useful material that can be produced by oxidative fermentation in combination with MFC technology. The coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by applying MFC technology was successfully demonstrated by the simultaneous progress of acetic acid fermentation and electricity generation through a series of repeated batch fermentations. Although the production rate of acetic acid was very small, it increased with the number of repeated batch fermentations that were conducted. We obtained nearly identical (73.1%) or larger (89.9%) acetic acid yields than that typically achieved by aerated fermentation (75.8%). The open-cycle voltages measured before and after fermentation increased with the total fermentation time and reached a maximum value of 0.521 V prior to the third batch fermentation. The maximum current and power densities measured in this study (19.1 μA/cm² and 2.47 μW/cm², respectively) were obtained after the second batch fermentation. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ecosystem-scale compensation points of formic and acetic acid in the central Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jardine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids, central to terrestrial carbon metabolism and atmospheric photochemistry, are ubiquitous in the troposphere in the gas, particle, and aqueous phases. As the dominant organic acids in the atmosphere, formic acid (FA, HCOOH and acetic acid (AA, CH3COOH control precipitation acidity in remote regions and may represent a critical link between the terrestrial carbon and water cycles by acting as key intermediates in plant carbon and energy metabolism and aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. However, our understanding of the exchange of these acids between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is limited by a lack of field observations, the existence of biogenic and anthropogenic primary and secondary sources whose relative importance is unclear, and the fact that vegetation can act as both a source and a sink. Here, we first present data obtained from the tropical rainforest mesocosm at Biosphere 2 which isolates primary vegetation sources. Strong light and temperature dependent emissions enriched in FA relative to AA were simultaneously observed from individual branches (FA/AA = 3.0 ± 0.7 and mesocosm ambient air (FA/AA = 1.4 ± 0.3. We also present long-term observations of vertical concentration gradients of FA and AA within and above a primary rainforest canopy in the central Amazon during the 2010 dry and 2011 wet seasons. We observed a seasonal switch from net ecosystem-scale deposition during the dry season to net emissions during the wet season. This switch was associated with reduced ambient concentrations in the wet season (FA < 1.3 nmol mol−1, AA < 2.0 nmol mol−1 relative to the dry season (FA up to 3.3 nmol mol−1, AA up to 6.0 nmol mol−1, and a simultaneous increase in the FA/AA ambient concentration ratios from 0.3–0.8 in the dry season to 1.0–2.1 in the wet season. These observations are consistent with a switch between a biomass burning dominated

  14. The chemisorption and reactions of formic acid on Cu films on ZnO (000 overline1)-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludviksson, A.; Zhang, R.; Campbell, Charles T.; Griffiths, K.

    1994-06-01

    The adsorption and reactions of formic acid (HCOOD : HCOOH = 3:1) on the oxygen-terminated ZnO(0001¯)-O surface and on thin Cu films deposited on the ZnO(0001¯)-O surface have been studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and XPS. Small amounts of formic acid dissociate at defect sites on clean ZnO(0001¯)-O to yield surface formate (HCOO). The acid D(H) from this dissociation does not reappear in TPD, and is lost to the ZnO bulk, as confirmed by nuclear reaction analysis. The surface HCOO decomposes to yield nearly simultaneous CO 2 (37%), CO (63%) and H 2 TPD peaks at 560 K. Substantial amounts of D (˜ 20%) are incorporated in this hydrogen TPD peak resulting from formate decomposition at ZnO defects, indicating that bulk D is readily accessible. Submonolayer and multilayer Cu films that are deposited at 130 K and partially cover the ZnO surface as 2D and 3D islands adsorb formic acid and decompose it into formate and hydrogen much like the Cu(110) surface. The surface formate from the Cu film decomposes at 470-500 K to give primarily CO 2 and H 2, also much like Cu(110), although atom-thin Cu islands also give ˜ 40% CO. Annealed Cu films give formate decomposition peaks at 25-50 K lower in temperature, attributed to thickening and ordering of the Cu islands to form Cu(111)-like sites. The acid D(H) atom from the formic acid is partially lost by hydrogen spillover from the Cu islands into the ZnO substrate, especially for thin Cu films. This effect partially desorbs and is enhanced upon preannealing the Cu layers, due to increased H diffusion rates across the annealed Cu islands, and/or the decrease in island size. Bulk D(H) is slowly removed as D 2, HD and H 2 above 400 K in diffusion-limited desorption, catalyzed by Cu.

  15. Characterization of Polyamide 66 membranes prepared by phase inversion using formic acid and hydrochloric acid such as solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Poletto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The membranes properties prepared from water/formic acid (FA/ polyamide 66 (PA66 and water/hydrochloric acid (HCl/polyamide 66 (PA 66 systems has been studied. The different solvents interact distinctly with the polymer, affecting the membrane morphology. The asymmetric structure of the membranes showed a dense top layer and a porous sublayer. The membranes M-HCl prepared from HCl/PA 66 system showed a larger dense layer (around 23 μm in compared to those prepared from FA/PA 66 system (M-FA (around 10 μm. The membrane morphology was a determinant factor in results of water absorption, porosity and pure water flux. The lower thickness of dense layer in M-FA membranes resulted in a higher water absorption and, consequently, porosity, approximately 50%, compared with M-HCl membranes, approximately 15%. The same trend was observed to permeate flux, the lower thickness of dense layer higher pure water flux.

  16. Effective depolymerization of concentrated acid hydrolysis lignin using a carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst in ethanol/formic acid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianto, Ivan; Limarta, Susan Olivia; Lee, Hyunjoo; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Suh, Dong Jin; Jae, Jungho

    2017-06-01

    Lignin isolated by two-step concentrated acid hydrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB) was effectively depolymerized into a high-quality bio-oil using formic acid (FA) as an in-situ hydrogen source and Ru/C as a catalyst in supercritical ethanol. A bio-oil yield of 66.3wt% with an average molecular weight of 822g/mol and an aromatic monomer content of 6.1wt% was achieved at 350°C and a FA-to-lignin mass ratio of 3 after a reaction time of 60min. The combination of Ru/C and FA also resulted in a significant reduction in the oxygen content of the bio-oil by ∼60% and a corresponding increase in the higher heating value (HHV) to 32.7MJ/kg due to the enhanced hydrodeoxygenation activity. An examination of the FA decomposition characteristics revealed that Ru/C provides a greater increase in the rate of hydrogen production from FA, explaining the efficient depolymerization of lignin in a combined system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Online stable carbon isotope ratio measurement in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol in water by high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    A suitable analysis condition was determined for high performance liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS) while making sequential measurements of stable carbon isotope ratios of δ 13 C in formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol dissolved in water. For this online column separation method, organic reagents are not applicable due to carbon contamination; thus, water and KH 2 PO 4 at low concentrations were tested as mobile phase in combination with a HyPURITY AQUASTAR TM column. Formic acid, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol were separated when 2 mM KH 2 PO 4 aqueous solution was used. Under the determined analysis condition for HPLC-IRMS, carbon concentrations could be measured quantitatively as well as carbon isotope ratio when carbon concentration was higher than 0.4 mM L for each chemical

  18. 1000kW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant. Outline of the plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinobe, Kenji; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kaneko, Hideo

    1988-02-10

    The outline of the 1000KW phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant, developed as part of the Moonlight plan, was described. The plant was composed of 4 stacks of 260KW DC output. They were devided into two train with 680V and 765A. The generation efficiency of the plant was 40% and more. Steam reforming of natural gas was used. As the fuel, fuel cell exhaust gas was used in composition with the natural gas. The DC-AC inverter had an efficiency of 96%. The capacity of hot water generator and demineralized water plant for cell cooling were 2t/h and 1.6t/h, respectively, and air-system was incorporated. In September of 1987, the plant has succeeded in 1000KW power generation, and put in operation now. Under the 100% loaded condition, each cell had a voltage of 0.7V with little variation, and the current was 200mA/cm/sup 2/. No problems were found in cooling conditions and in the control of interpole differential pressure. The reformer has been operated for 1200h scince its commisioning, and had experiences of 100 times on start up-shut down operations, the reformer also indicated good performances in the gas compositions. The starting time of 8h and the load follow-up rate 10%/min remain as the subjects for shortening. DC-AC conversion was good. The concentration of NOx and the noise level satisfied the target values. (12 figs, 1 tab)

  19. Rapid analysis of formic acid, acetic acid, and furfural in pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and ethanol in a bioethanol fermentation using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smart Katherine A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS offers advantages as a rapid analytical technique for the quantification of three biomass degradation products (acetic acid, formic acid and furfural within pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and the analysis of ethanol during fermentation. The data we obtained using APCI-MS correlated significantly with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis whilst offering the analyst minimal sample preparation and faster sample throughput.

  20. New Polymer Electrolyte Membranes Based on Acid Doped PBI For Fuel Cells Operating above 100°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng

    2003-01-01

    The technical achievement and challenges for the PEMFC technology based on perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer membranes (e.g. Nafion®) are briefly discussed. The newest development for alternative polymer electrolytes for operation above 100°C. As one of the successful approaches to high...... operational temperatures, the development and evaluation of acid doped PBI membranes are reviewed, covering polymer synthesis, membrane casting, acid doping, physiochemical characterization and fuel cell tests....

  1. Dual hydrogen-bonding motifs in complexes formed between tropolone and formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchick, Deacon J.; Cohen, Michael K.; Vaccaro, Patrick H.

    2016-11-01

    The near-ultraviolet π*←π absorption system of weakly bound complexes formed between tropolone (TrOH) and formic acid (FA) under cryogenic free-jet expansion conditions has been interrogated by exploiting a variety of fluorescence-based laser-spectroscopic probes, with synergistic quantum-chemical calculations built upon diverse model chemistries being enlisted to unravel the structural and dynamical properties of the pertinent ground [X˜ 1A'] and excited [A˜ 1A'(" separators="π*π )] electronic states. For binary TrOH ṡ FA adducts, the presence of dual hydrogen-bond linkages gives rise to three low-lying isomers designated (in relative energy order) as INT, EXT1, and EXT2 depending on whether docking of the FA ligand to the TrOH substrate takes place internal or external to the five-membered reaction cleft of tropolone. While the symmetric double-minimum topography predicted for the INT potential surface mediates an intermolecular double proton-transfer event, the EXT1 and EXT2 structures are interconverted by an asymmetric single proton-transfer process that is TrOH-centric in nature. The A ˜ -X ˜ origin of TrOH ṡ FA at ν˜ 00=27 484 .45 cm-1 is displaced by δ ν˜ 00=+466 .76 cm-1 with respect to the analogous feature for bare tropolone and displays a hybrid type - a/b rotational contour that reflects the configuration of binding. A comprehensive analysis of vibrational landscapes supported by the optically connected X˜ 1A' and A˜ 1A'(" separators="π*π ) manifolds, including the characteristic isotopic shifts incurred by partial deuteration of the labile TrOH and FA protons, has been performed leading to the uniform assignment of numerous intermolecular (viz., modulating hydrogen-bond linkages) and intramolecular (viz., localized on monomer subunits) degrees of freedom. The holistic interpretation of all experimental and computational findings affords compelling evidence that an external-binding motif (attributed to EXT1), rather than the

  2. Carbon nanotubes-supported PtAu-alloy nanoparticles for electro-oxidation of formic acid with remarkable activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yancui; Zhang Weide; Chen Caihong; Zhang Jiaqi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Electro-oxidation of HCOOH over PtAu at lower potential, higher peak current. → The stability of the PtAu catalyst is high. → Au in the PtAu catalyst promotes utilization of Pt. - Abstract: PtAu-alloy nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully prepared by simultaneous reduction of H 2 PtCl 6 .6H 2 O and HAuCl 4 .3H 2 O with sodium borohydride as a reducing reagent and sodium citrate as a stabilizing reagent. The morphology and composition of the composite catalyst were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that the PtAu alloy nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 3.5 nm and narrow size distribution are supported on MWCNTs. Electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at the PtAu/MWCNTs nanocomposite electrode was investigated in a solution containing 0.50 M H 2 SO 4 as a supporting electrolyte and 0.50 M formic acid by cyclic voltammogram and chronoamperometry. The results demonstrate that the PtAu/MWCNTs catalyst exhibits higher activity and stability for electro-oxidation of formic acid than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, reflecting by its lower onset potential (-0.05 V), oxidation mainly occurring in low potential range of -0.05 ± 0.65 V and higher peak current density of 3.12 mA cm -2 . The result of CO stripping voltammetry discloses that gold in the PtAu/MWCNTs nanocomposite enhances the catalytic activity and stability.

  3. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe; Sun, Miao; Liu, Xin; Han, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40

  4. Communication: The highest frequency hydrogen bond vibration and an experimental value for the dissociation energy of formic acid dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollipost, F.; Larsen, René Wugt; Domanskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The highest frequency hydrogen bond fundamental of formic acid dimer, ν24 (Bu), is experimentally located at 264 cm−1. FTIR spectra of this in-plane bending mode of (HCOOH)2 and band centers of its symmetric D isotopologues (isotopomers) recorded in a supersonic slit jet expansion are presented...... thermodynamics treatment of the dimerization process up to room temperature. We obtain D0 = 59.5(5) kJ/mol as the best experimental estimate for the dimer dissociation energy at 0 K. Further improvements have to wait for a more consistent determination of the room temperature equilibrium constant....

  5. Photochemically engineering the metal-semiconductor interface for room-temperature transfer hydrogenation of nitroarenes with formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Hao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Gong, Ling-Hong; Fu, Wei; Wang, Kai-Xue; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wei, Xiao; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2014-12-08

    A mild photochemical approach was applied to construct highly coupled metal-semiconductor dyads, which were found to efficiently facilitate the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. Aniline was produced in excellent yield (>99 %, TOF: 1183) using formic acid as hydrogen source and water as solvent at room temperature. This general and green catalytic process is applicable to a wide range of nitroarenes without the involvement of high-pressure gases or sacrificial additives. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. National fuel cell seminar. Program and abstracts. [Abstracts of 40 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of 40 papers are presented. Topics include fuel cell systems, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, solid fuel and solid electrolyte fuel cells, low temperature fuel cells, and fuel utilization. (WHK)

  7. Lowering the platinum loading of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Santiago Martin; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2015-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loading electrodes were prepared for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) based on acid doped polybenzimidazole. With no electrode binders or ionomers, the triple phase boundary of the catalyst layer was establ......Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loading electrodes were prepared for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) based on acid doped polybenzimidazole. With no electrode binders or ionomers, the triple phase boundary of the catalyst layer...

  8. Physicochemical properties of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ronghuan; Li, Qingfeng; Bach, Anders

    2006-01-01

    of the polymer, a level necessary to obtain high enough proton conductivity for fuel cell uses, the polymer membrane exhibits a volume swelling by 118%, resulting in separation of the polymer backbones. The separation in turn reduces the mechanical strength of the membrane especially at high temperatures....... Another consequence is the increased H2 and O2 permeability through the membrane. In the temperature range from 120 to 180 ◦C, the hydrogen permeability was found to be 1.6–4.3×10−17 and 1.2–4.0×10−15 mol cm cm−2 s−1 Pa−1 for pristine and acid doped PBI membranes, respectively, while for oxygen it was 5...

  9. Enhanced life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts using perfluorosulfonic acid stabilized carbon support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Niancai; Mu Shichun; Chen Xiaojing; Lv Haifeng; Pan Mu; Edwards, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a new and simple solution to increase life of Pt/C catalysts using the proton-conducting polymer (perfluorosulfonic acid, PFSA) stabilized carbon support (denoted these catalysts as Pt/NFC catalysts) as compared to conventional Pt/C catalysts commonly used in PEM fuel cells. A high catalytic activity of the catalyst is observed by both CV (cyclic voltammetry) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) measurements. Especially, our own catalysts have a 60% better life as compared to Pt/C under electrochemically accelerated durability test conditions. The loss rate of electrochemical active area (ECA) for Pt/NFC catalysts is only 0.007 m 2 g -1 cycle -1 , compared to a value of 0.011 m 2 g -1 cycle -1 for Pt/C.

  10. Enhanced life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts using perfluorosulfonic acid stabilized carbon support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Niancai [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Mu Shichun, E-mail: msc@whut.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Chen Xiaojing; Lv Haifeng; Pan Mu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Edwards, Peter P. [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    We report a new and simple solution to increase life of Pt/C catalysts using the proton-conducting polymer (perfluorosulfonic acid, PFSA) stabilized carbon support (denoted these catalysts as Pt/NFC catalysts) as compared to conventional Pt/C catalysts commonly used in PEM fuel cells. A high catalytic activity of the catalyst is observed by both CV (cyclic voltammetry) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) measurements. Especially, our own catalysts have a 60% better life as compared to Pt/C under electrochemically accelerated durability test conditions. The loss rate of electrochemical active area (ECA) for Pt/NFC catalysts is only 0.007 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} cycle{sup -1}, compared to a value of 0.011 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} cycle{sup -1} for Pt/C.

  11. Phosphoric acid distribution in the membrane electrode assembly of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Park, Jung Ock; Yoo, Duck Young; Yi, Jung S.

    2009-01-01

    The ionomer content in electrode is one of the most important parameters for the high performance of fuel cells. The high temperature PEMFC based on phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polymer membrane with unhumidified reactant gases has a difficulty in controlling the liquid state PA ionomer content in electrode. To evaluate the PA content in electrode, the three techniques of cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and acid-base titration (ABT) are carried out in situ or ex situ. The properties of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) such as electrochemical surface area (ESA), ohmic resistance, charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance and the amount of PA in MEA components (anode, cathode and membrane) are extracted by each technique. Ex situ CV with the usage of dry gases has a limitation in assessing the reliable ESA of unhumidified PEMFC. While in situ EIS presents some informative values of resistance and capacitance for understanding the PA distribution in MEA, its sensitivity to the PA content in MEA components needs to be higher for detecting a subtle change in PA distribution. Ex situ ABT supplies a clear PA distribution in MEA at room temperature but does not seem to reflect the operating state well at high temperatures. However, it can be used as a detection tool for the loss of the initial acid content in membrane during a long-term MEA durability study.

  12. Phosphoric acid distribution in the membrane electrode assembly of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyungjung [Fuel Cell Group, Energy Lab, SAIT, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., San 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-712 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kfromberk@gmail.com; Park, Jung Ock; Yoo, Duck Young; Yi, Jung S. [Fuel Cell Group, Energy Lab, SAIT, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., San 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    The ionomer content in electrode is one of the most important parameters for the high performance of fuel cells. The high temperature PEMFC based on phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polymer membrane with unhumidified reactant gases has a difficulty in controlling the liquid state PA ionomer content in electrode. To evaluate the PA content in electrode, the three techniques of cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and acid-base titration (ABT) are carried out in situ or ex situ. The properties of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) such as electrochemical surface area (ESA), ohmic resistance, charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance and the amount of PA in MEA components (anode, cathode and membrane) are extracted by each technique. Ex situ CV with the usage of dry gases has a limitation in assessing the reliable ESA of unhumidified PEMFC. While in situ EIS presents some informative values of resistance and capacitance for understanding the PA distribution in MEA, its sensitivity to the PA content in MEA components needs to be higher for detecting a subtle change in PA distribution. Ex situ ABT supplies a clear PA distribution in MEA at room temperature but does not seem to reflect the operating state well at high temperatures. However, it can be used as a detection tool for the loss of the initial acid content in membrane during a long-term MEA durability study.

  13. Temperature dependent emission of formic and acetic acid from paper, and its consequences for the air quality in archives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild Smedemark, Signe; Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten; Vinther Hansen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Paper records affect the indoor environment in archives, because the paper may give off acid compounds to the air. These emission products origins from the decay of cellulose and lignin in the paper. As the off-gassing origins from chemical processes within the material (e.g., acid hydrolysis......) the reaction rate is therefore, among other things, depending on temperature. Some of the emission products from paper, e.g., acetic and formic acid, are problematic from a conservation point of view, because they will re-react with the paper and other archival materials and cause further deterioration....... The problem is amplified by an often very large loading (mass of material vs. volume) of paper in archival rooms. Furthermore, many archives have only little ventilation, so the exchange of polluted air with ambient air is low. The general trend; higher temperature accelerates material’s emission, and a high...

  14. Effect of Na2CO3 degumming concentration on LiBr-formic acid-silk fibroin solution properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salt-acid system has been proved to be of high efficiency for silk fibroin dissolution. Using salt-acid system to dissolve silk, native silk fibrils can be preserved in the regenerated solution. Increasing experiments indicate that acquirement of silk fibrils in solution is strongly associated with the degumming process. In this study, the effect of sodium carbonate degumming concentration on solution properties based on lithium bromide-formic acid dissolution system was systematically investigated. Results showed that the morphology transformation of silk fibroin in solution from nanospheres to nanofibrils is determined by sodium carbonate concentration during the degumming process. Solutions containing different silk fibroin structure exhibited different rheological behaviors and different electrospinnability, leading to different electrospun nanofibre properties. The results have guiding significance for preparation and application of silk fibroin solutions.

  15. Structural investigation of liquid formic acid by neutron diffraction. II: Isotopic substitution for DCOO[H/D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bako, Imre; Schubert, Gabor; Megyes, Tuende; Palinkas, Gabor; Swan, Geoffrey I.; Dore, John; Bellisent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2004-01-01

    New measurements of neutron diffraction data for four samples involving H/D isotopic substitution on the hydroxyl hydrogen of liquid formic acid at 20 deg C are reported. The results are combined with earlier measurements on [H/D]COOD to provide a full range of data. The determination of molecular conformation and bond-lengths has been made with a partial form-factor formalism and also using the 'Monte Carlo determination of g(r)' technique. The partial real-space correlation functions, RR, RH and HH are evaluated in each case and compared with existing computer simulations. The results confirm the strongly hydrogen-bonded nature of the liquid, but show that current molecular dynamics predictions based on transferable potentials do not give a very good representation of the structure. The observations provide a basis for a more detailed investigation and work is currently in progress. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations showed that the non-planar configuration suggested by Bertagnolli et al. [Ber. Bunsen. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 977; Ber. Bunsen. Phys. Chem. 89 (1985) 500], is very unlikely both for formic acid dimers and monomers

  16. Life cycle, techno-economic and dynamic simulation assessment of bioelectrochemical systems: A case of formic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemfe, Mobolaji; Gadkari, Siddharth; Yu, Eileen; Rasul, Shahid; Scott, Keith; Head, Ian M; Gu, Sai; Sadhukhan, Jhuma

    2018-05-01

    A novel framework, integrating dynamic simulation (DS), life cycle assessment (LCA) and techno-economic assessment (TEA) of a bioelectrochemical system (BES), has been developed to study for the first time wastewater treatment by removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) by oxidation in anode and thereby harvesting electron and proton for carbon dioxide reduction reaction or reuse to produce products in cathode. Increases in initial COD and applied potential increase COD removal and production (in this case formic acid) rates. DS correlations are used in LCA and TEA for holistic performance analyses. The cost of production of HCOOH is €0.015-0.005 g -1 for its production rate of 0.094-0.26 kg yr -1 and a COD removal rate of 0.038-0.106 kg yr -1 . The life cycle (LC) benefits by avoiding fossil-based formic acid production (93%) and electricity for wastewater treatment (12%) outweigh LC costs of operation and assemblage of BES (-5%), giving a net 61MJkg -1 HCOOH saving. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Theoretical study of formic acid: A new look at the origin of the planar Z conformation and C-O rotational barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    The E and Z rotamers of formic acid (HCOOH) and its barrier to internal rotation about the C-O bond were computationally explored at the HF/6-311 + G**, B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, and CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ levels of theory. All calculations yielded similar results consistent with experimental observations. Subsequent analysis of the interaction between formate ion (HCOO - ) and proton (H + ) within formic acid demonstrated a direct correlation between the changes in fragment interaction energy and the total energy of formic acid upon rotation. To obtain further insights into the interaction, energy decomposition analysis based on the reactive bond orbital (RBO) method was carried out using the 6-311 + G** basis set. The analysis showed the electrostatic effect constitutes a major component that gives rise to the interaction energy variation along the rotation path. Thus, the electrostatic environment of HCOO - can be viewed as the key factor determining the Z ground state and C-O rotational barrier of formic acid. The anisotropic electrostatic environment of formate that favors planar conformations of formic acid may be due to the in-plane distribution of carbonyl lone pairs, and the larger electrostatic attraction in the Z form appears to come from a secondary electrostatic interaction between the proton and the distal oxygen. At the rotational transition state, the O-H bond was not exactly perpendicular to the molecular plane, but slightly tilted toward the E side, which can also be explained by the electrostatic hypothesis. Charge-transfer stabilization was smallest in the Z conformation, but it gradually increased upon rotation to a maximum at the E conformation. Therefore, charge - transfer does not explain the geometry of formic acid. The important role of the electrostatic effect was also observed in in-plane rotation of the O-H bond

  18. Electrolytes for methanol-air fuel cells. I. The performance of methanol electro-oxidation catalysts in sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew, M.R.; McNicol, B.D.; Short, R.T.; Drury, J.S.

    1977-03-01

    Phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid have been compared as potential electrolytes for methanol-air fuel cells. The performances of typical electro-oxidation catalysts were measured in both electrolytes over a range of concentrations. With all catalysts the activity falls with increasing acid concentration. While this is to some extent due to the decrease in water activity at higher concentrations it seems that with both acids there is significant poisoning of the catalyst. The results can be explained for both electrolytes by assuming that adsorption of undissociated acid poisons the catalyst surfaces and that the reaction rate on the poisoned surfaces is proportional to the water activity.

  19. Proton Transfer in Perfluorosulfonic Acid Fuel Cell Membranes with Differing Pendant Chains and Equivalent Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Joseph E; Lawler, Christian M; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-05-04

    Proton transfer in the nanoscopic water channels of polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes was studied using a photoacid, 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt (HPTS), in the channels. The local environment of the probe was determined using 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt (MPTS), which is not a photoacid. Three fully hydrated membranes, Nafion (DuPont) and two 3M membranes, were studied to determine the impact of different pendant chains and equivalent weights on proton transfer. Fluorescence anisotropy and excited state population decay data that characterize the local environment of the fluorescent probes and proton transfer dynamics were measured. The MPTS lifetime and anisotropy results show that most of the fluorescent probes have a bulk-like water environment with a relatively small fraction interacting with the channel wall. Measurements of the HPTS protonated and deprotonated fluorescent bands' population decays provided information on the proton transport dynamics. The decay of the protonated band from ∼0.5 ns to tens of nanoseconds is in part determined by dissociation and recombination with the HPTS, providing information on the ability of protons to move in the channels. The dissociation and recombination is manifested as a power law component in the protonated band fluorescence decay. The results show that equivalent weight differences between two 3M membranes resulted in a small difference in proton transfer. However, differences in pendant chain structure did significantly influence the proton transfer ability, with the 3M membranes displaying more facile transfer than Nafion.

  20. The isolation of [Pd{OC(O)H}(H)(NHC)(PR3)] (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) and its role in alkene and alkyne reductions using formic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Broggi, Julie

    2013-03-27

    The [Pd(SIPr)(PCy3)] complex efficiently promotes a tandem process involving dehydrogenation of formic acid and hydrogenation of C-C multiple bonds using H2 formed in situ. The isolation of a key catalytic hydridoformatopalladium species, [Pd{OC(O)H}(H)(IPr)(PCy 3)], is reported. The complex plays a key role in the Pd(0)-mediated formation of hydrogen from formic acid. Mechanistic and computational studies delineate the operational role of the palladium complex in this efficient tandem sequence. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. The isolation of [Pd{OC(O)H}(H)(NHC)(PR3)] (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) and its role in alkene and alkyne reductions using formic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Broggi, Julie; Jurčí k, Vá clav; Songis, Olivier; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Cazin, Catherine S J

    2013-01-01

    The [Pd(SIPr)(PCy3)] complex efficiently promotes a tandem process involving dehydrogenation of formic acid and hydrogenation of C-C multiple bonds using H2 formed in situ. The isolation of a key catalytic hydridoformatopalladium species, [Pd{OC(O)H}(H)(IPr)(PCy 3)], is reported. The complex plays a key role in the Pd(0)-mediated formation of hydrogen from formic acid. Mechanistic and computational studies delineate the operational role of the palladium complex in this efficient tandem sequence. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Redox potential monitoring as a method to control unwanted noble metal-catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid treatment of simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major nonradioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 - , and NO 2 - were used to study redox potential changes in reactions of formic acid at 90 C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase and a redox electrode to follow redox potential changes as a function of time. In the initial phase of formic acid addition to nitrite-containing feed simulants, the redox potential of the reaction mixture rises typically to +400 mV relative to the Al/AgCl electrode because of the generation of the moderately strongly oxidizing nitrous acid. No H 2 production occurs at this stage of the reaction as long as free nitrous acid is present. After all of the nitrous acid has been destroyed by reduction to N 2 O and NO and disproportionation to NO/NO 3 - , the redox potential of the reaction mixture becomes more negative than the Ag/AgCl electrode. The experiments outlined in this paper suggest the feasibility of controlling the production of H 2 by limiting the amount of formic acid used and monitoring the redox potential during formic acid treatment

  3. Carbon nanotubes based methanol sensor for fuel cells application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D W; Lee, J S; Lee, G S; Overzet, L; Kozlov, M; Aliev, A E; Park, Y W; Yang, D J

    2006-11-01

    An electrochemical sensor is built using vertically grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) micro-array to detect methanol concentration in water. This study is done for the potential use of the array as methanol sensor for portable units of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles electro-deposited CNTs (Pt/CNTs) electrode shows high sensitivity in the measurement of methanol concentration in water with cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement at room temperature. Further investigation has also been undertaken to measure the concentration by changing the amount of the mixture of methanol and formic acid in water. We compared the performance of our micro array sensor built with Pt/CNTs electrodes versus that of Pt wire electrode using CV measurement. We found that our Pt/CNTs array sensor shows high sensitivity and detects methanol concentrations in the range of 0.04 M to 0.10 M. In addition, we found that co-use of formic acid as electrolyte enables us to measure up to 1.0 M methanol concentration.

  4. The effect of porosity on performance of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A polybenzimidazole (PBI based polymer electrolyte fuel cells, which called high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEMS, operate at higher temperatures (120-200°C than conventional PEM fuel cells. Although it is known that HT-PEMS have some of the significant advantages as non-humidification requirements for membrane and the lack of liquid water at high temperature in the fuel cell, the generated water as a result of oxygen reduction reaction causes in the degradation of these systems. The generated water absorbed into membrane side interacts with the hydrophilic PBI matrix and it can cause swelling of membrane, so water transport mechanism in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA needs to be well understood and water balance must be calculated in MEA. Therefore, the water diffusion transport across the electrolyte should be determined. In this study, various porosity values of gas diffusion layers are considered in order to investigate the effects of porosity on the water management for two phase flow in fuel cell. Two-dimensional fuel cell with interdigitated flow-field is modelled using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a software. The operating temperature and doping level is selected as 160°C and 6.75mol H3PO4/PBI, respectively.

  5. Rapid evaluation of the electrooxidation of fuel compounds with a multiple-electrode setup for direct polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Naoko; Siroma, Zyun; Ioroi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Kazuaki [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2007-02-10

    Electrochemical oxidation of fuel compounds in acidic media was examined on eight electrodes (Pt, Ru, PtRu, Rh, Ir, Pd, Au, and glassy carbon) simultaneously by multiple cyclic voltammetry (CV) with an electrochemical cell equipped with an eight-electrode configuration. Direct-type polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), in which aqueous solutions of the fuel compounds are directly supplied to the anode, were also evaluated. The performances of direct PEFCs with various anode catalysts could be roughly estimated from the results obtained with multiple CV. This multiple evaluation may be useful for identifying novel fuels or electrocatalysts. Methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol, 2-propanol, and D-glucose were oxidized selectively on Pt or PtRu, as reported previously. However, several compounds that are often used as reducing agents show electrochemical oxidation with unique characteristics. Large current was obtained for the oxidation of formic acid, hypophosphorous acid, and phosphorous acid on a Pd electrode. L-Ascorbic acid and sulfurous acid were oxidized on all of the electrodes used in the present study. (author)

  6. Fuel cells: Trends in research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, A. J.

    Various aspects of fuel cells are discussed. The subjects addressed include: fuel cells for electric power production; phosphoric acid fuel cells; long-term testing of an air-cooled 2.5 kW PAFC stack in Italy; status of fuel cell research and technology in the Netherlands, Bulgaria, PRC, UK, Sweden, India, Japan, and Brazil; fuel cells from the manufacturer's viewpoint; and fuel cells using biomass-derived fuels. Also examined are: solid oxide electrolye fuel cells; aluminum-air batteries with neutral chloride electrolyte; materials research for advanced solid-state fuel cells at the Energy Research Laboratory in Denmark; molten carbonate fuel cells; the impact of the Siemens program; fuel cells at Sorapec; impact of fuel cells on the electric power generation systems in industrial and developing countries; and application of fuel cells to large vehicles.

  7. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy and Environmental Solutions

    2000-10-31

    Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed

  8. Process for the manufacture of a fuel catalyst made of tungsten carbide for electrochemical fuel cells. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines Brennstoffkatalysators aus Wolframcarbid fuer elektrochemische Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baresel, D.; Gellert, W.; Scharner, P.

    1982-05-19

    The invention refers to a process for the manufacture of a fuel catalyst made of tungsten carbide for the direct generation of electrical energy by the oxidation of hydrogen, formaldehyde or formic acid in electrochemical fuel cells. Tungsten carbide is obtained by carburisation of tungsten or tungsten oxide by carbon monoxide. The steps of the process are as follows: dissolving the commercial-quality tungstic acid in ammonium hydroxide; precipitating the tungstic acid with concentrated hydrochloric acid; drying in a vacuum and then heating to 200/sup 0/C to remove the water of crystallisation forming tungsten trioxide; and mixing the tungsten trioxide with zinc powder and heating to 600/sup 0/C. The zinc oxide is dissolved with hydrochloric acid after cooling. The finely divided tungsten obtained in this way is converted with carbon monoxide in a quartz tube at 700/sup 0/C.

  9. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  10. Development and characterization of acid-doped polybenzimidazole/sulfonated polysulfone blend polymer electrolytes for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasiotis, C.; Li, Qingfeng; Deimede, V.

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric membranes from blends of sulfonated polysulfones (SPSF) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) doped with phosphoric acid were developed as potential high-temperature polymer electrolytes for fuel cells and other electrochemical applications. The water uptake and acid doping of these polymeric...... membranes were investigated. Ionic conductivity of the membranes was measured in relation to temperature, acid doping level, sulfonation degree of SPSF, relative humidity, and blend composition. The conductivity of SPSF was of the order of 10/sup -3/ S cm/sup -1/. In the case of blends of PBI and SPSF...

  11. Determination of trace elements in biological samples treated with formic acid by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a microconcentric nebulizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormen, Luciano; Gil, Raul A.; Frescura, Vera L.A.; Dante Martinez, Luis; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2010-01-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ga, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), after sample solubilization with formic acid and introduction by a microconcentric nebulizer, is proposed. The sample is mixed with formic acid, kept at 90 o C for one hour and then diluted with nitric acid aqueous solution to a 50% v/v formic acid and 1% v/v nitric acid final concentrations. The final sample solution flow rate for introduction into the plasma was 30 μL min -1 . The optimized and adopted nebulizer gas flow rate was 0.7 L min -1 and RF power was 800 W. These conditions are very different than those normally used when a conventional nebulizer is employed. Rodhium was used as internal standard. External calibration against aqueous standard solutions, without formic acid, could be used for quantification, except for As, Se and Zn. However, external calibration with 50% formic acid allows the determination of all analytes with high accuracy and it is recommended. The detection limits were between 0.0005 (Tl) and 0.22 mg kg -1 (Fe) and the precision expressed by the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 0.2% (Sr) and 3.5% (Ga). Accuracy was validated by the analysis of four certified reference biological materials of animal tissues, comparing the results by linear regressions and by the t-test at a 95% confidence level. The recommended procedure avoids plasma instability and carbon deposit on the cones.

  12. Hollow Ag@Pd core-shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yizhong; Han, Dongxue

    2012-01-01

    by detailed characterizations. The Ag@Pd can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of formic acid and enhance the stability of the Pd component. It is proposed that the enhanced electrochemically active surface area and modulated electron structure of Pd by Ag......Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core-shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated...... are responsible for the improvement of electrocatalytic activity and durability. The results obtained in this work are different from those previous reports, in which alloy walls with hollow interiors are usually formed. This work provides a new and simple method for synthesizing novel bimetallic core...

  13. 3-Methylindole-Based Tripodal Tetraphosphine Ruthenium Complexes in N2 Coordination and Reduction and Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenna F. van de Watering

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ruthenium(II complexes RuCl2L1H, RuCl2L1CF3, RuCl2L1OMe and RuCl2L2H were synthesized from [Ru(η6-benzeneCl(μ-Cl]2 and the corresponding tripodal tris-3-methylindolephosphine-based ligands L1H, L1CF3, L1OMe, and L2H. Stoichiometric reduction of these complexes with KC8 yielded the corresponding ruthenium(0 dinitrogen complexes. The latter complexes were studied in the N2 reduction with chlorosilanes and KC8, yielding stoichiometric amounts of the silylamines. The synthesized ruthenium(II complexes are also active catalysts for the formic acid dehydrogenation reaction.

  14. Challenges in the Greener Production of Formates/Formic Acid, Methanol, and DME by Heterogeneously Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Álvarez, Andrea

    2017-06-28

    The recent advances in the development of heterogeneous catalysts and processes for the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to formate/formic acid, methanol, and dimethyl ether are thoroughly reviewed, with special emphasis on thermodynamics and catalyst design considerations. After introducing the main motivation for the development of such processes, we first summarize the most important aspects of CO2 capture and green routes to produce H2. Once the scene in terms of feedstocks is introduced, we carefully summarize the state of the art in the development of heterogeneous catalysts for these important hydrogenation reactions. Finally, in an attempt to give an order of magnitude regarding CO2 valorization, we critically assess economical aspects of the production of methanol and DME and outline future research and development directions.

  15. Simultaneous assay of multiple antibiotics in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: importance of optimizing formic acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Laizure, S Casey; Hudson, Joanna Q

    2017-03-01

    Optimal dosing of antibiotics in critically ill patients is complicated by the development of resistant organisms requiring treatment with multiple antibiotics and alterations in systemic exposure due to diseases and extracorporeal drug removal. Developing guidelines for optimal antibiotic dosing is an important therapeutic goal requiring robust analytical methods to simultaneously measure multiple antibiotics. An LC-MS/MS assay using protein precipitation for cleanup followed by a 6-min gradient separation was developed to simultaneously determine five antibiotics in human plasma. The precision and accuracy were within the 15% acceptance range. The formic acid concentration was an important determinant of signal intensity, peak shape and matrix effects. The method was designed to be simple and successfully applied to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

  16. Hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} to formic acid over a Cu-embedded graphene: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirijaraensre, J., E-mail: fscijkp@ku.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Center for Advanced Studies in Nanotechnology and Its Applications in Chemical, Food and Agricultural Industries and NANOTEC Center for Nanoscale Materials Design for Green Nanotechnology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Limtrakul, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Vidyasirimedhi Institute of Science and Technology, Rayong 21210 (Thailand)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The H{sub 2} molecule binds much more strongly on the Cu/dG than the CO{sub 2} molecule. • H{sub 2} dissociation occurs readily on the supported Cu atom. • The CO{sub 2} conversion is significantly promoted by the Cu-H on the graphene. - Abstract: DFT calculations were used to investigate the properties of the atomic copper embedded in the surface of graphene (Cu/dG) and the catalytic reaction pathway for the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation to formic acid (FA). The Cu/dG was active for the adsorption of the hydrogen molecule (H{sub 2}), and provided a reaction site for the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2}, leading to the formation of Cu-H deposited on a singly hydrogenated vacancy graphene (Cu-H/H-dG). The protonation of CO{sub 2} takes place facilely over the generated metal-hydride species (Cu-H). Under the dilution of H{sub 2}, the catalytic process would be hampered by the formation of copper-formate deposited on the H-dG due mainly to the very high energy demand for the transformation of the copper-formate to FA through the protonation from the H-dG. It was further found that the presence of H{sub 2} in the system plays a significant role in producing the FA on the Cu/dG catalyst. The copper-formate species can be converted into formic acid via the heterolytic cleavage of the second hydrogen molecule, yielding the FA and Cu-H species.

  17. Heterogeneous nanocomposites composed of silver sulfide and hollow structured Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Core–shell Ag-Ag/Pd nanoparticles with an Ag core and an Ag/Pd alloy shell are prepared via galvanic replacement reaction. • Heterogeneous Ag2S-hollow Pd nanocomposites are fabricated by converting the Ag component into Ag2S using element sulfur. • The heterogeneous Ag2S-hollow Pd nanocomposites display enhanced activity for formic acid oxidation due to electronic coupling effect. • The methodology may find applications to produce the semiconductor-metal nanocomposites with interesting architectures and tailored functionalities. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting semiconductor and noble metal domains are of great interest for their synergistic effect-based enhanced properties in a given application. Herein, we demonstrate a facile approach for the synthesis of heterogeneous nanocomposites consisting of silver sulfide (Ag 2 S) and hollow structured Pd nanoparticles (hPd). It begins with the preparation of core–shell nanoparticles with an Ag core and an alloy Ag/Pd shell in an organic solvent via galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) between Ag seed particles pre-synthesized and Pd 2+ ion precursors. The Ag component is then removed from the core and shell regions of core–shell Ag-Ag/Pd nanoparticles, and converted into Ag 2 S by elemental sulfur (S). The Ag 2 S forms the semiconductor domain in the nanocomposite and shares the solid-state interface with the resultant hollow structured Pd nanoparticle. As demonstrated, the Ag 2 S-hPd nanocomposites exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability for formic acid oxidation, compared to the pure Pd nanoparticles prepared by oleylamine reduction of Pd ion precursors and commercial Pd/C catalyst, due to the electronic coupling between semiconductor and noble metal domains in the nanocomposites. In addition, the structural transformation from core–shell to heterogeneous nanocomposites may provide new opportunities to design and fabricate hybrid nanostructures with interesting

  18. Effects of Formic or Acetic Acid on the Storage Quality of Mixed Air-Dried Corn Stover and Cabbage Waste, and Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of air-dried corn stover and cabbage waste was ensiled to preserve lignocellulosic biomass for use as biofuel. Furthermore, the effects of different fresh mass fractions (0.3 and 0.6 % of formic or acetic acid on the mixed silage quality were evaluated to guarantee its quality. The application of formic or acetic acid prior to mixing the silage led to higher water-soluble carbohydrate fractions than the negative control, indicating that both acids contributed to preservation of water-soluble carbohydrates during storage for 170 days. The dry matter content was also increased after storage from 90 to 170 days. It was found that the content of neutral and acid detergent fibre, cellulose and holocellulose (the sum of cellulose and hemicellulose in mixed silage treated with formic or acetic acid was significantly lower than that obtained in the negative control. The pH and the ratio of ammoniacal nitrogen to total nitrogen in mixed silage treated with acetic acid also significantly decreased. Furthermore, the addition of formic or acetic acid significantly weakened the fermentation intensity of lactic acid, depending on the ratio of lactic to acetic acid, as well as the ratio of lactic acid to total organic acids. The number of bacterial species and their relative abundance shifted during silage mixing, wherein microbial communities at phylum level mainly consisted of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The dominant bacteria were also observed to shift from Lactobacillus and Enterobacter in presilage biomass to Lactobacillus and Paralactobacillus. Specifically, Enterobacter disappeared after 130 days of storage. In conclusion, the addition of a low dose of acetic acid to fresh mass (0.3 % could effectively improve the fermentation quality and is conducive to the preservation of the organic components.

  19. Fuel Cell Demonstration Project - 200 kW - Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Power Plant Located at the National Transportation Research Center: FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, JB

    2005-05-06

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researches and develops distributed generation technology for the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Distributed Energy Program. This report describes installation and operation of one such distributed generation system, a United Technology Corporation fuel cell located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee. Data collected from June 2003 to June of 2004, provides valuable insight regarding fuel cell-grid compatibility and the cost-benefit of the fuel cell operation. The NTRC fuel cell included a high-heat recovery option so that use of thermal energy improves project economics and improves system efficiency to 59% year round. During the year the fuel cell supplied a total of 834MWh to the NTRC and provided 300MBtu of hot water. Installation of the NTRC fuel cell was funded by the Distributed Energy Program with partial funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy Down Program, administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. On-going operational expenses are funded by ORNL's utility budget and are paid from operational cost savings. Technical information and the benefit-cost of the fuel cell are both evaluated in this report and sister reports.

  20. Why do proton conducting polybenzimidazole phosphoric acid membranes perform well in high-temperature PEM fuel cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Majer, Günter; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-21

    Transport properties and hydration behavior of phosphoric acid/(benz)imidazole mixtures are investigated by diverse NMR techniques, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity measurements. The monomeric systems can serve as models for phosphoric acid/poly-benzimidazole membranes which are known for their exceptional performance in high temperature PEM fuel cells. 1 H- and 31 P-NMR data show benzimidazole acting as a strong Brønsted base with respect to neat phosphoric acid. Since benzimidazole's nitrogens are fully protonated with a low rate for proton exchange with phosphate species, proton diffusion and conduction processes must take place within the hydrogen bond network of phosphoric acid only. The proton exchange dynamics between phosphate and benzimidazole species pass through the intermediate exchange regime (with respect to NMR line separations) with exchange times being close to typical diffusion times chosen in PFG-NMR diffusion measurements (ms regime). The resulting effects, as described by the Kärger equation, are included into the evaluation of PFG-NMR data for obtaining precise proton diffusion coefficients. The highly reduced proton diffusion coefficient within the phosphoric acid part of the model systems compared to neat phosphoric acid is suggested to be the immediate consequence of proton subtraction from phosphoric acid. This reduces hydrogen bond network frustration (imbalance of the number of proton donors and acceptors) and therefore also the rate of structural proton diffusion, phosphoric acid's acidity and hygroscopicity. Reduced water uptake, shown by TGA, goes along with reduced electroosmotic water drag which is suggested to be the reason for PBI-phosphoric acid membranes performing better in fuel cells than other phosphoric-acid-containing electrolytes with higher protonic conductivity.

  1. Oxidative degradation of acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes and fuel cell durability in the presence of ferrous ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Jianhui; Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes have been explored as proton exchange membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Long-term durability of the membrane is of critical concern and has been evaluated by accelerated degradation tests under Fenton conditions...... of the polymer. Fuel cell durability tests with contaminations of ferrous ions did show considerable performance degradation, however, primarily due to the catalyst deterioration rather than the membrane degradation........ In this study effects of phosphoric acid and ferrous ions were investigated by measurements of the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the polymer membranes. Ferrous ions resulted in, as expected, catalytic formation of peroxide radicals and hence the accelerated polymer...

  2. Decontamination of the equipment in the acids recovery cell in the fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Akira; Kusano, Toshitsugu

    1985-01-01

    In the cell where an acids recovery evaporator tank is set, there are also installed its associated components such as the solution feed system and a receiving tank. When maintenance etc. are to be conducted within the cell, the equipment etc. must be decontaminated to eliminate the personnel exposure. In the acid recovery process, there is involved ruthenium-106, for which the decontamination reagents must be selected. As such, the decontamination proceeded first with nitric acid + sodium hydroxide solution and then alkaline potassium permanganate solution + nitric acid + EDTA.2Na. Decontamination was made twice in 1979 and 1983. Described are the selection of decontamination reagents and decontamination works performed in the acids recovery cell. (Mori, K.)

  3. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  4. Effect of the Pd/MWCNTs anode catalysts preparation methods on their morphology and activity in a direct formic acid fuel cell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesiak, B.; Mazurkiewicz, M.; Malolepszy, A.; Stobinski, L.; Mierzwa, B.; Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Juchniewicz, K.; Borodzinski, A.; Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 387, Nov (2016), s. 929-937 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electro-oxidation * dfafc * Pd/MWCNTs * preparation conditions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  5. Multimetallic nanosheets: synthesis and applications in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb Gul Sial, Muhammad Aurang; Ud Din, Muhammad Aizaz; Wang, Xun

    2018-04-03

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, particularly multimetallic nanosheets with single or few atoms thickness, are attracting extensive research attention because they display remarkable advantages over their bulk counterparts, including high electron mobility, unsaturated surface coordination, a high aspect ratio, and distinctive physical, chemical, and electronic properties. In particular, their ultrathin thickness endows them with ultrahigh specific surface areas and a relatively high surface energy, making them highly favorable for surface active applications; for example, they have great potential for a broad range of fuel cell applications. First, the state-of-the-art research on the synthesis of nanosheets with a controlled size, thickness, shape, and composition is described and special emphasis is placed on the rational design of multimetallic nanosheets. Then, a correlation is performed with the performance of multimetallic nanosheets with modified and improved electrochemical properties and high stability, including for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), formic acid oxidation (FAO), methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), and methanol tolerance are outlined. Finally, some perspectives and advantages offered by this class of materials are highlighted for the development of highly efficient fuel cell electrocatalysts, featuring low cost, enhanced performance, and high stability, which are the key factors for accelerating the commercialization of future promising fuel cells.

  6. Structural and morphological changes in supramolecular-structured polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell on addition of phosphoric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrana, S.; Pryliana, R. F.; Natanael, C. L.; Rahayu, I.

    2018-03-01

    Phosphoric acid is one agents used in membrane fuel cell to modify ionic conductivity. Therefore, its distribution in membrane is a key parameter to gain expected conductivity. Efforts have been made to distribute phosphoric acid in a supramolecular-structured membrane prepared with a matrix. To achieve even distribution across bulk of the membrane, the inclusion of the polyacid is carried out under pressurized chamber. Image of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows better phosphoric acid distribution for one prepared in pressurized state. It also leads in better performing in ionic conductivity. Moreover, data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicate that the addition of phosphoric acid is prominent in the change of membrane structure, while morphological changes are captured in SEM images.

  7. Biosorption of formic and acetic acids from aqueous solution using activated carbon from shea butter seed shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekola, Folahan A.; Oba, Ismaila A.

    2017-10-01

    The efficiency of prepared activated carbon from shea butter seed shells (SB-AC) for the adsorption of formic acid (FA) and acetic acid (AA) from aqueous solution was investigated. The effect of optimization parameters including initial concentration, agitation time, adsorbent dosage and temperature of adsorbate solution on the sorption capacity were studied. The SB-AC was characterized for the following parameters: bulk density, moisture content, ash content, pH, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optimal conditions for the adsorption were established and the adsorption data for AA fitted Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm well, whereas FA followed Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data were examined. It was found that pseudo-second-order kinetic model was found to adequately explain the sorption kinetic of AA and FA from aqueous solution. It was again found that intraparticle diffusion was found to explain the adsorption mechanism. Adsorption thermodynamic parameters were estimated and the negative values of Δ G showed that the adsorption process was feasible and spontaneous in nature, while the negative values of Δ H indicate that the adsorption process was exothermic. It is therefore established that SB-AC has good potential for the removal of AA and FA from aqueous solution. Hence, it should find application in the regular treatment of polluted water in aquaculture and fish breeding system.

  8. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-30

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  9. Effects of formic acid hydrolysis on the quantitative analysis of radiation-induced DNA base damage products assayed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, S.G.; Smith, G.S.; Miao, L.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/ MS-SIM) is an excellent technique for performing both qualitative and quantitative analysis of DNA base damage products that are formed by exposure to ionizing radiation or by the interaction of intracellular DNA with activated oxygen species. This technique commonly uses a hot formic acid hydrolysis step to degrade the DNA to individual free bases. However, due to the harsh nature of this degradation procedure, the quantitation of DNA base damage products may be adversely affected. Consequently, we examined the effects of various formic acid hydrolysis procedures on the quantitation of a number of DNA base damage products and identified several factors that can influence this quantitation. These factors included (1) the inherent acid stabilities of both the lesions and the internal standards; (2) the hydrolysis temperature; (3) the source and grade of the formic acid; and (4) the sample mass during hydrolysis. Our data also suggested that the N, O-bis (trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) derivatization efficiency can be adversely affected, presumably by trace contaminants either in the formic acid or from the acid-activated surface of the glass derivatization vials. Where adverse effects were noted, modifications were explored in an attempt to improve the quantitation of these DNA lesions. Although experimental steps could be taken to minimize the influence of these factors on the quantitation of some base damage products, no single procedure solved the quantitation problem for all base lesions. However, a significant improvement in the quantitation was achieved if the relative molecular response factor (RMRF) values for these lesions were generated with authentic DNA base damage products that had been treated exactly like the experimental samples. (orig.)

  10. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... to controls where HAs were not added, addition of commercial HA resulted in increase of power density and coulombic efficiency, which ranged from 7.5% to 67.4% and 24% to 92.6%, respectively. Digested manure wastewater (DMW) was tested as potential mediator for power generation due to its content of natural...

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The organic acids were commercial products of the highest degree of purity .... reaction is not complete even at high concentration of ZnCl2, and that only the ... activation in the oxidation of oxalic acid suggests the involvement of both the ...

  12. Materials for fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Sossina M

    2003-01-01

    Because of their potential to reduce the environmental impact and geopolitical consequences of the use of fossil fuels, fuel cells have emerged as tantalizing alternatives to combustion engines. Like a combustion engine, a fuel cell uses some sort of chemical fuel as its energy source but, like a battery, the chemical energy is directly converted to electrical energy, without an often messy and relatively inefficient combustion step. In addition to high efficiency and low emissions, fuel cell...

  13. Novel proton conducting polymer electrolytes based on polyparabanic acid doped with H 3PO 4 for high temperature fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Yuichi; Sonai, Atsuo

    Three novel proton conducting polymer electrolytes based on polyparabanic acid doped with H 3PO 4 were synthesized and their use in high temperature fuel cells characterized. The precursor polymers, PMD-Im, POD-Im and PDMDP-Im, were synthesized by cyclization polymerization of diisocynanates. After doping with H 3PO 4, the ionic conductivity and the thermal degradation were studied by using the AC impedance method and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. These membranes showed high ionic conductivity of the order of 10 -2 S cm -1 at 423 K with good thermal stability. Their application to fuel cells was demonstrated and polarization curves were obtained at 423 K were obtained without humidification.

  14. Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    In proposed fuel-cell system, methanol converted to hydrogen in two places. External fuel processor converts only part of methanol. Remaining methanol converted in fuel cell itself, in reaction at anode. As result, size of fuel processor reduced, system efficiency increased, and cost lowered.

  15. Fuel cells: Project Volta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vellone, R.; Di Mario, F.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses research and development in the field of fuel cell power plants. Reference is made to the Italian research Project Volta. Problems related to research program financing and fuel cell power plant marketing are discussed.

  16. Sacrificial Template-Based Synthesis of Unified Hollow Porous Palladium Nanospheres for Formic Acid Electro-Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Qiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Large scale syntheses of uniform metal nanoparticles with hollow porous structure have attracted much attention owning to their high surface area, abundant active sites and relatively efficient catalytic activity. Herein, we report a general method to synthesize hollow porous Pd nanospheres (Pd HPNSs by templating sacrificial SiO2 nanoparticles with the assistance of polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH through layer-by-layer self-assembly. The chemically inert PAH is acting as an efficient stabilizer and complex agent to control the synthesis of Pd HPNSs, probably accounting for its long aliphatic alkyl chains, excellent coordination capability and good hydrophilic property. The physicochemical properties of Pd HPNSs are thoroughly characterized by various techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The growth mechanism of Pd HPNSs is studied based on the analysis of diverse experimental observations. The as-prepared Pd HPNSs exhibit clearly enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability for the formic oxidation reaction (FAOR in acid medium compared with commercial Pd black.

  17. High efficient conversion of furfural to 2-methylfuran over Ni-Cu/Al2O3 catalyst with formic acid as a hydrogen donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Zhaolin; Wang, Ze; Lin, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Conversion of furfural to 2-methylfuran over Cu/Al2O3, Ni/Al2O3 and Ni-Cu/Al2O3 catalysts were investigated with formic acid as a hydrogen donor. Ni/Al2O3 showed a high catalytic activity but a moderate selectivity to 2-methylfuran. Contrarily, Cu/Al2O3 showed a low catalytic activity but a high...... selectivity for carbonyl reduction. Over the bimetallic catalysts Ni-10%Cu/Al2O3, by increasing Ni content, more furfural was converted with the reduction of carbonyl primarily. The effect of reaction solvent and the fraction of formic acid were also studied. The result showed that isopropanol solvent could...

  18. Fuel Cell Electric Bus Evaluations | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus Evaluations Fuel Cell Electric Bus Evaluations NREL's technology validation team evaluates fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs) to provide comprehensive, unbiased evaluation results of fuel cell bus early transportation applications for fuel cell technology. Buses operate in congested areas where

  19. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  20. One-pot synthesis of Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with a Pd-Pt alloy core and a conformal Pd shell of ~2-3 nm were directly synthesized through a one-pot, aqueous solution approach without any preformed Pd or Pt seeds. These Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals show an enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation compared with commercial Pd black. This journal is © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Progress in inorganic cathode catalysts for electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide into formate or formic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Dongwei; Lan, Rong; Humphreys, John; Tao, Shanwen

    2017-01-01

    As a greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is one of the key contributors to climate change. Many strategies have been proposed to address this issue, such as CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) and CO2 utilization (CCU). Electroreduction of CO2 into useful fuels is proving to be a promising technology as it not only consumes CO2 but can also store the redundant electrical energy generated from renewable energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, geothermal, wave, etc.) as chemical energy ...

  2. Effect of Ducks Yolk and Formic Acid in Fat Liquoring Process on the Physical Quality of Broiler Chicken Shank Chrome Tanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustakim Mustakim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of ducks yolk and formic acid in fat liquoring process of the tanned skin.  The materials used in this study were 30 pieces of 7 weeks of broiler chicken shank. The study was carried out using completely randomized design. The variables measured were softness, tensile strength and stretch of the tanned skin. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. The research results showed that the addition of ducks yolk and formic acid didn’t gave significantly affect on the softness (p>0.05, while gave highly significant affect on tensile strength and stretch (p0.05 on the softness and stretch, and have significantly (p<0.05 on the tensile strength of leather. The conclusion of this research the addition of 11% duck yolk and 1% formic acid in fat liquoring is the best treatment for broiler chicken shank chrome tanning on the skin softness (2,667, tensile strength (135,707 kg/cm2, and stretch (37,34%, respectively.

  3. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Formic acid decomposition on Pt1/Cu (111) single platinum atom catalyst: Insights from DFT calculations and energetic span model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Fan; Li, Kun; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2018-04-01

    Inspired by the recent surface experimental results that the monatomic Pt catalysts has more excellent hydrogen production that Cu(111) surface, the mechanism of decomposition of formic acid on Cu(111) and single atom Pt1/Cu(111) surface was studied by periodic density functional theory calculations in the present work. The results show that the formic acid tends to undergo dehydrogenation on both surfaces to obtain the hydrogen product of the target product, and the selectivity and catalytic activity of Pt1/Cu (111) surface for formic acid dehydrogenation are better. The reason is that the single atom Pt1/Cu(111) catalyst reduces the reaction energy barrier (i.e., HCOO → CO2 + H) of the critical step of the dehydrogenation reaction due to the fact that the single atom Pt1/Cu(111) catalyst binds formate weakly compared to that of Cu (111) one. Moreover, it was found that the Pt1/Cu (111) binds CO more strongly than that of Cu (111) one and thus leading to the difficult for the formation of CO. These two factors would make the single Pt atom catalyst had the high selectivity for the H2 production. It is hoped that the present work may help people to design the efficient H2 production from HCOOH decomposition by reduce the surface binding strength of HCOO species, for example, using the low coordination number active site like single atom or other related catalytic system.

  5. Global distributions of methanol and formic acid retrieved for the first time from the IASI/MetOp thermal infrared sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Razavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH are among the most abundant volatile organic compounds present in the atmosphere. In this work, we derive the global distributions of these two organic species using for the first time the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI launched onboard the MetOp-A satellite in 2006. This paper describes the method used and provides a first critical analysis of the retrieved products. The retrieval process follows a two-step approach in which global distributions are first obtained on the basis of a simple radiance indexing (transformed into brightness temperatures, and then mapped onto column abundances using suitable conversion factors. For methanol, the factors were calculated using a complete retrieval approach in selected regions. In the case of formic acid, a different approach, which uses a set of forward simulations for representative atmospheres, has been used. In both cases, the main error sources are carefully determined: the average relative error on the column for both species is estimated to be about 50%, increasing to about 100% for the least favorable conditions. The distributions for the year 2009 are discussed in terms of seasonality and source identification. Time series comparing methanol, formic acid and carbon monoxide in different regions are also presented.

  6. Oxidation of formic acid by oxyanions of chlorine and its implications to the Viking Labeled Release experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, P.; Navarro-gonzalez, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Viking Landers that arrived on Mars in 1976 carried out three biological experiments designed to investigate if there was microbial life. These were the Gas-Exchange, Pyrolitic Release and Labeled Release experiments. The three experiments yielded positive responses but the Labeled Release experiment had a kinetic response indicative of microbial activity. The experiment consisted of adding a broth of nutrients (formic acid, glycolic acid, glycine, D- and L-alanine and D- and L-lactic acid uniformly marked with 14C) to martian soil samples. The results were surprising; the nutrients were consumed releasing radioactive gases in a manner that is compatible by terrestrial microorganisms. The existence of Martian life was contradicted by soil chemical analysis that indicated the absence of organic compounds above the detection limits of parts per billion (ppb). Instead the positive response of the Labeled Release Experiment was attributed to the existence of peroxides and/or superoxides in the Martian soils that destroyed the nutrients upon contact. Recently, the Phoenix mission that landed in the Martian Arctic in 2008 revealed the presence of a highly oxidized form of the element chlorine in the soil: perchlorate. Perchlorate is thought to have formed in the Martian atmosphere by the oxidation of chloride from volcanic sources with ozone. Therefore perchlorate is formed by the stepwise oxidation of hypochlorite, chlorite and chlorate. These oxyanions of chlorine are powerful oxidizers that may exist in the Martian soil and may have reacted with the nutrients of the Labeled Release Experiment. This paper aims to better understand these results by designing experiments to determine the kinetics of decomposition of formic acid to carbon dioxide with different oxidized forms of chlorine by headspace technique in gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC / MS). Previous studies done in the laboratory showed that only hypochlorite quantitatively reacted with

  7. Optimal design and experimental validation of a simulated moving bed chromatography for continuous recovery of formic acid in a model mixture of three organic acids from Actinobacillus bacteria fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chanhun; Nam, Hee-Geun; Lee, Ki Bong; Mun, Sungyong

    2014-10-24

    The economically-efficient separation of formic acid from acetic acid and succinic acid has been a key issue in the production of formic acid with the Actinobacillus bacteria fermentation. To address this issue, an optimal three-zone simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography for continuous separation of formic acid from acetic acid and succinic acid was developed in this study. As a first step for this task, the adsorption isotherm and mass-transfer parameters of each organic acid on the qualified adsorbent (Amberchrom-CG300C) were determined through a series of multiple frontal experiments. The determined parameters were then used in optimizing the SMB process for the considered separation. During such optimization, the additional investigation for selecting a proper SMB port configuration, which could be more advantageous for attaining better process performances, was carried out between two possible configurations. It was found that if the properly selected port configuration was adopted in the SMB of interest, the throughout and the formic-acid product concentration could be increased by 82% and 181% respectively. Finally, the optimized SMB process based on the properly selected port configuration was tested experimentally using a self-assembled SMB unit with three zones. The SMB experimental results and the relevant computer simulation verified that the developed process in this study was successful in continuous recovery of formic acid from a ternary organic-acid mixture of interest with high throughput, high purity, high yield, and high product concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, C Austen [Mesa, AZ; Xu, Wu [Broadview Heights, OH; Belieres, Jean-Philippe [Chandler, AZ; Yoshizawa, Masahiro [Tokyo, JP

    2011-01-11

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  9. Fuel cell opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, K. [Hydrogenics Corporation, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The opportunities for fuel cell development are discussed. Fuel cells are highly efficient, reliable and require little maintenance. They also produce virtually zero emissions. The author stated that there are some complicated issues to resolve before fuel cells can be widely used. These include hydrogen availability and infrastructure. While the cost of fuel cells is currently very high, these costs are constantly coming down. The industry is still in the early stages of development. The driving forces for the development of fuel cells are: deregulation of energy markets, growing expectations for distributed power generation, discontinuity between energy supply and demand, and environmental concerns. 12 figs.

  10. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  11. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  12. Limitations of Commercializing Fuel Cell Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Normayati

    2010-06-01

    Fuel cell is the technology that, nowadays, is deemed having a great potential to be used in supplying energy. Basically, fuel cells can be categorized particularly by the kind of employed electrolyte. Several fuel cells types which are currently identified having huge potential to be utilized, namely, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC), Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFC), Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells (PAFC), Polymer Electron Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC), Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) and Regenerative Fuel Cells (RFC). In general, each of these fuel cells types has their own characteristics and specifications which assign the capability and suitability of them to be utilized for any particular applications. Stationary power generations and transport applications are the two most significant applications currently aimed for the fuel cell market. It is generally accepted that there are lots of advantages if fuel cells can be excessively commercialized primarily in context of environmental concerns and energy security. Nevertheless, this is a demanding task to be accomplished, as there is some gap in fuel cells technology itself which needs a major enhancement. It can be concluded, from the previous study, cost, durability and performance are identified as the main limitations to be firstly overcome in enabling fuel cells technology become viable for the market.

  13. Photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose at a ruthenium complex modified titanium dioxide electrode promoted by uric acid and ascorbic acid for photoelectrochemical fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuo-Jian; Ji, Shi-Bo; Liu, Jun-Chen; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) is first found to largely promote the photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose (GLU) at an indium-tin oxide (ITO) or TiO2 nanoparticles/ITO electrode modified with [Ru(tatp)3]2+ (tatp = 1,4,8,9-tetra-aza-triphenylene) possessing good redox activity and nanoparticle size distribution. A well-defined electrocatalytic peak for GLU oxidation is shown at 0.265 V (vs. SCE) under approximate physiological conditions upon incorporation of UA and AA. The [Ru(tatp)3]2+/ITO electrode exhibits attractive amperometric oxidation responses towards GLU, UA and AA, while controlled potentiostatically at 0.3 V, 0.7 V and 1.0 V, respectively, indicating high sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. On basis of the photoelectrocatalysis of [Ru(tatp)3]2+/TiO2/ITO anode, a GLU concentration-dependent photoelectrochemical fuel cell vs. SCE is elaborately assembled. The proposed free-enzyme photoelectrochemical fuel cell employing 0.1 M GLU associated with 0.01 M UA and 0.01 M AA as fuel shows open-circuit photovoltage of 0.608 V, short-circuit photocurrent density of 124.5 μA cm-2 and maximum power density of 21.75 μW cm-2 at 0.455 V, fill factor of 0.32 and photoenergy conversion efficiency of 36.65%, respectively.

  14. Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the hydrogen and fuel cells. It presents the hydrogen technology from the production to the distribution and storage, the issues as motor fuel and fuel cells, the challenge for vehicles applications and the Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  15. Status and promise of fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy

    2001-09-01

    The niche or early entry market penetration by ONSI and its phosphoric acid fuel cell technology has proven that fuel cells are reliable and suitable for premium power and other opportunity fuel niche market applications. Now, new fuel cell technologies - solid oxide fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and polymer electrolyte fuel cells - are being developed for near-term distributed generation shortly after 2003. Some of the evolving fuel cell systems are incorporating gas turbines in hybrid configurations. The combination of the gas turbine with the fuel cell promises to lower system costs and increase efficiency to enhance market penetration. Market estimates indicate that significant early entry markets exist to sustain the initially high cost of some distributed generation technologies. However, distributed generation technologies must have low introductory first cost, low installation cost, and high system reliability to be viable options in competitive commercial and industrial markets. In the long-term, solid state fuel cell technology with stack costs under $100/kilowatt (kW) promises deeper and wider market penetration in a range of applications including a residential, auxillary power, and the mature distributed generation markets. The solid state energy conversion alliance (SECA) with its vision for fuel cells in 2010 was recently formed to commercialize solid state fuel cells and realize the full potential of the fuel cell technology. Ultimately, the SECA concept could lead to megawatt-size fuel-cell systems for commercial and industrial applications and Vision 21 fuel cell turbine hybrid energy plants in 2015. (orig.)

  16. Behavior of mercury in the formic acid vent condenser. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    (This report relates to the Defense Waste Processing Facility.) The concentrations of mercury at the FAFC inlet and exit were measured during the BL1 and PX6 runs of the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) with the HEME bypassed and without the ammonia scrubber. The results show that mercury concentrations of approximately 2.6-12.7 (mean = 6.2) times saturation occur at the FAFC exit. The concentration of mercury at the SRAT condenser exit was found to be 10 times the saturation value. FAVC exit mercury concentrations of 6.2 times saturation would result in DWPF emitting up to 438 lb/yr of mercury at 100 percent attainments, which is in excess of the permit limit of 175 lb/yr. However, operation of the FAVC with the HEME should reduce the mercury emissions. The addition of the ammonia scrubbers should also reduce the mercury emissions since the nitric acid used to scrub ammonia should also scrub mercury

  17. Bioelectrochemical fuel cell and sensor based on quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G; Hill, H A.O.; Aston, W J; Higgins, I J; Turner, A P.F.

    1983-09-01

    A biofuel cell, yielding a stable and continuous low-power output, based on the enzymatic oxidation of methanol to formic acid has been designed and investigated. The homogeneous kinetics of the electrochemically-coupled enzymatic oxidation reaction were investigated and optimized. The biofuel cell also functioned as a sensitive method for the detection of primary alcohols. A method for medium-scale preparation of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol: (acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.99.8) is described. (Refs. 14).

  18. Long-term cathode performance and the microbial communities that develop in microbial fuel cells fed different fermentation endproducts

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand how cathode performance and substrates affected communities that evolved in these reactors over long periods of time, microbial fuel cells were operated for more than 1year with individual endproducts of lignocellulose fermentation (acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, or ethanol). Large variations in reactor performance were primarily due to the specific substrates, with power densities ranging from 835±21 to 62±1mW/m3. Cathodes performance degraded over time, as shown by an increase in power of up to 26% when the cathode biofilm was removed, and 118% using new cathodes. Communities that developed on the anodes included exoelectrogenic families, such as Rhodobacteraceae, Geobacteraceae, and Peptococcaceae, with the Deltaproteobacteria dominating most reactors. Pelobacter propionicus was the predominant member in reactors fed acetic acid, and it was abundant in several other MFCs. These results provide valuable insights into the effects of long-term MFC operation on reactor performance. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  20. Interconnection between tricarboxylic acid cycle and energy generation in microbial fuel cell performed by desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Maslovska, Olga D.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2015-05-01

    Desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384 is exoelectrogenic obligate anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacterium. Its one of the first described electrogenic bacterium that performs complete oxidation of an organic substrate with electron transfer directly to the electrode in microbial fuel cell (MFC). This bacterium is very promising for MFC development because of inexpensive cultivation medium, high survival rate and selective resistance to various heavy metal ions. The size of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 cells is comparatively small (0.4-0.8×1-2 μm) that is highly beneficial while application of porous anode material because of complete bacterial cover of an electrode area with further significant improvement of the effectiveness of its usage. The interconnection between functioning of reductive stage of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle under anaerobic conditions, and MFC performance was established. Malic, pyruvic, fumaric and succinic acids in concentration 42 mM were separately added into the anode chamber of MFC as the redox agents. Application of malic acid caused the most stabile and the highest power generation in comparison with other investigated organic acids. Its maximum equaled 10.07±0.17mW/m2 on 136 hour of bacterial cultivation. Under addition of pyruvic, succinic and fumaric acids into the anode chamber of MFC the maximal power values equaled 5.80±0.25 mW/m2; 3.2±0.11 mW/m2, and 2.14±0.19 mW/m2 respectively on 40, 56 and 32 hour of bacterial cultivation. Hence the malic acid conversion via reductive stage of TCA cycle is shown to be the most efficient process in terms of electricity generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 in MFC under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Alkaline-Acid Zn-H2 O Fuel Cell for the Simultaneous Generation of Hydrogen and Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Pingwei; Li, Yan; Wang, Genxiang; Wen, Zhenhai

    2018-04-03

    An alkaline-acid Zn-H 2 O fuel cell is proposed for the simultaneous generation of electricity with an open circuit voltage of about 1.25 V and production of H 2 with almost 100 % Faradic efficiency. We demonstrate that, as a result of harvesting energy from both electrochemical neutralization and electrochemical Zn oxidation, the as-developed hybrid cell can deliver a power density of up to 80 mW cm -2 and an energy density of 934 Wh kg -1 and maintain long-term stability for H 2 production with an output voltage of 1.16 V at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 . © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  3. Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

    Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

  4. Porous polybenzimidazole membranes doped with phosphoric acid: Preparation and application in high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jin; Li, Xiaojin; Yu, Shuchun; Hao, Jinkai; Lu, Wangting; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Porous polybenzimidazole membrane was prepared with glucose as porogen. • Phosphoric acid content was as high as 15.7 mol H 3 PO 4 per PBI repeat unit. • 200 h Constant current density test was carried out at 150 °C. • Degradation was due to the gap between membrane and catalyst layer. - Abstract: In this paper, the preparation and characterization of porous polybenzimidazole membranes doped with phosphoric acid were reported. For the preparation of porous polybenzimidazole membranes, glucose and saccharose were selected as porogen and added into PBI resin solution before solvent casting. The prepared porous PBI membranes had high proton conductivity and high content of acid doping at room temperature with 15.7 mol H 3 PO 4 per PBI repeat unit, much higher than pure PBI membrane at the same condition. Further, the performance and stability of the porous PBI membrane in high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells was tested. It was found that the cell performance remained stable during 200 h stability test under a constant current discharge of 0.5 A cm −2 except for the last fifty hours. The decay in the last fifty hours was ascribed to the delamination between the catalyst layer and membrane increasing the charge-transfer resistance

  5. Fuel cells - a perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biegler, T.

    2005-01-01

    Unfortunately, fuel cell publicity conveys expectations and hopes that are often based on uncritical interpretations of the underlying science. The aim here is to use that science to analyse how the technology has developed and what can realistically be delivered by fuel cells. There have been great achievements in fuel cell technology over the past decade, with most types reaching an advanced stage of engineering development. But there has been some muddled thinking about one critical aspect, fuel cell energy efficiency. The 'Carnot cycle' argument, that fuel cells must be much more efficient than heat engines, is a red herring, of no help in predicting real efficiencies. In practice, fuel cells are not always particularly efficient and there are good scientific reasons for this. Cost reduction is a big issue for fuel cells. They are not in principle especially simple devices. Better engineering and mass production will presumably bring costs down, but because of their inherent complexity there is no reason to expect them to be cheap. It is fair to conclude that predictions of fuel cells as commonplace components of energy systems (including a hydrogen economy) need to be treated with caution, at least until major improvements eventuate. However, one type, the direct methanol fuel cell, is aimed at a clear existing market in consumer electronics

  6. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance

  7. Pt.3. Carbon-13 fractionation in the decomposition of formic acid initiated by phosphoric anhydride. 13C fractionation in the decomposition of HCOOH initiated by P2O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Zielinska, A.

    1998-01-01

    13 C isotope effects in the decarbonylation of formic acid of natural isotopic composition initiated by phosphorus pentoxide have been studied in a large temperature range (-5 o C) - (+90 o C). The 13 C fractionation in the carbon monooxide production at -5 o C increased from a low value of 1.2% characteristic of the first fractions of consecutively controlled portions of carbon monooxide to higher values of 13 C KIE observed in the decarbonylation of pure formic acid at corresponding temperatures. The temperature and time dependences of the measured 13 C fractionation are functions of the relative number of milimoles of formic acid and the dehydrating phosphoric anhydride, P 2 O 5 . The addition of metaphosphoric acid reagent to unreacted formic acid containing H 3 PO 4 significantly increased the 13 C fractionation in subsequent decarbonylations at 70.4 o C but to a slightly less degree than expected ( 13 C KIE = 1.0503 instead 1.0535). The addition of metaphosphoric acid reagent to formic acid saturated with NaCl results in the experimental 13 C fractionation of the value of 1.0534 very close to the theoretical one. An explanation of the low values of 13 C KIE in the initial stages of HCOOH/P 2 O 5 decarbonylations has been presented. (author)

  8. Nanofluidic fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-11-01

    Fuel cells are gaining momentum as a critical component in the renewable energy mix for stationary, transportation, and portable power applications. State-of-the-art fuel cell technology benefits greatly from nanotechnology applied to nanostructured membranes, catalysts, and electrodes. However, the potential of utilizing nanofluidics for fuel cells has not yet been explored, despite the significant opportunity of harnessing rapid nanoscale reactant transport in close proximity to the reactive sites. In the present article, a nanofluidic fuel cell that utilizes fluid flow through nanoporous media is conceptualized and demonstrated for the first time. This transformative concept captures the advantages of recently developed membraneless and catalyst-free fuel cell architectures paired with the enhanced interfacial contact area enabled by nanofluidics. When compared to previously reported microfluidic fuel cells, the prototype nanofluidic fuel cell demonstrates increased surface area, reduced activation overpotential, superior kinetic characteristics, and moderately enhanced fuel cell performance in the high cell voltage regime with up to 14% higher power density. However, the expected mass transport benefits in the high current density regime were constrained by high ohmic cell resistance, which could likely be resolved through future optimization studies.

  9. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Francesch, Judit

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  10. Formic acid enhanced effective degradation of methyl orange dye in aqueous solutions under UV-Vis irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Bai, Renbi

    2016-09-15

    Developing efficient technologies to treat recalcitrant organic dye wastewater has long been of great research and practical interest. In this study, a small molecule, formic acid (FA), was applied as a process enhancer for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye as a model recalcitrant organic pollutant in aqueous solutions under the condition of UV-Vis light irradiation and air aeration at the ambient temperature of 25 °C. It was found that the decolouration of the dye solutions can be rapidly achieved, reducing the time, for example, from around 17.6 h without FA to mostly about less than 2 h with the presence of FA. The mineralization rate of MO dye reached as high as 81.8% in 1.5 h in the case of initial MO dye concentration at 25 mg L(-1), which is in contrast to nearly no mineralization of the MO dye for a similar system without the FA added. The study revealed that the generation of the H2O2 species in the system was enhanced and the produced OH radicals effectively contributed to the degradation of the MO dye. Process parameters such as the initial concentration of MO dye, FA dosage and solution pH were all found to have some effect on the degradation efficiency under the same condition of UV-Vis light irradiation and air aeration. The MO dye degradation performance was found to follow a first-order reaction rate to the MO dye concentration in most cases and there existed a positive correlation between the reaction rate constant and the initial FA concentration. Compared to the traditional H2O2/UV-Vis oxidation system, the use of FA as a process-enhancing agent can have the advantages of low cost, easy availability, and safe to use. The study hence demonstrates a promising approach to use a readily available small molecule of FA to enhance the degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants, such as MO dye, especially for their pre-treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinetic study of formic acid oxidation on Ti/IrO{sub 2} electrodes prepared using the spin coating deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, Stephane, E-mail: stephane.fierro@epfl.c [Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ISIC-EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Comninellis, Christos [Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ISIC-EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-09-30

    In the first part of this paper, IrO{sub 2} electrodes produced by thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} precursor were manufactured using the spin coating deposition technique, where centrifugal forces spread the precursor solution with simultaneous evaporation of the solvent on the rotating Ti substrate. It was found using this technique, that it is possible to obtain thin and uniform IrO{sub 2} coatings with controlled loadings. The influence of the concentration of iridium salt in the precursor solution (c{sub 0}) as well as the influence of the rotation speed at which the substrate spins ({omega}) on the IrO{sub 2} loading have been studied using voltammetric charge measurements. From these results, a simple relation has been proposed for the estimation of the IrO{sub 2} loading for a given c{sub 0} and {omega}. In the second part of this paper and from measurements performed using different IrO{sub 2} loadings and formic acid concentrations, the kinetic parameters of the oxidation of formic acid have been quantitatively determined using a model that involves the redox couple IrO{sub 3}/IrO{sub 2} as mediator of this reaction. Furthermore, using the kinetic parameters obtained together with the Nernst equation and the I-V curves of the supporting electrolyte (1 M HClO{sub 4}), theoretical I-V curves could be constructed for different concentrations of formic acid and different IrO{sub 2} loadings.

  12. Surface reaction modification: The effect of structured overlayers of sulfur on the kinetics and mechanism of the decomposition of formic acid on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, N.; Madix, R. J.

    The reaction of formic acid (DCOOH) on Pt(111), Pt(111)-(2×2)S and Pt(111)-(√3×√3)R30°S surfaces was examined by temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy. On the clean surface formic acid decomposed to yield primarily carbon dioxide and the hydrogenic species (H 2, HD and D 2) at low coverages. Although the formation of water and carbon monoxide via a dehydration reaction was observed at these coverages, the yield of these products was small when compared to the other products of reaction. The evolution of CO 2 at low temperature was ascribed to the decomposition of the formate intermediate. In the presence of sulfur the amount of molecularly adsorbed formic acid decreased up to a factor of three on the (√3×√3)R30°S surface, and a decline in the reactivity of over an order of magnitude was also observed. The only products formed were the hydrogenic species and carbon dioxide. The absence of carbon monoxide indicated that the dehydration pathway was blocked by sulfur. In addition to the low temperature CO 2 peak a high temperature CO 2-producing path was also evident. It was inferred from both the stoichiometry and the coincident evolution of D 2 and CO 2 in the high temperature states that these products also evolved due to the decomposition of the formate intermediate. On increasing the sulfur coverage to one-third monolayer this intermediate was further stabilized, and a predominance of the decomposition via the high temperature path was observed. Stability of the formate intermediate was attributed to inhibition of the decomposition reaction by sulfur atoms. The activation energy for formate decomposition increased from 15 kcal/gmole on the clean surface to 24.3 kcal/gmol on the (√3×√3)R30°S overlayer.

  13. Third International Fuel Cell Conference. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-30

    The Third International Fuel Cell Conference was held on November 30 to December 3, 1999 in City of Nagoya. A total of 139 papers, including those for plenary, sectional and poster cessions, were presented. In the plenary session, US's DOE presented fuel cell power plant development in the United States, EC fuel cells in perspective and fifth European framework programme, and Japan overview of the New Sunshine Program. In the polymer electrolyte fuel cells sessions, 23 papers were presented, including current status of commercialization and PEMFC systems developed by Toshiba. In the phosphoric acid fuel cells session, 6 papers were presented, including field test results and market developments. In the molten carbonate fuel cells session, 24 papers were presented, including development of 1,000kW MCFC power plant. In the solid oxide fuel cells session, 20 papers were presented, including 100kW SOFC field test results. The other topics include market analysis and fuel processes. (NEDO)

  14. Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Researchers are developing fuel cells that can be silver four-door sedan being driven on a roadway and containing the words "hydrogen fuel cell electric" across the front and rear doors. This prototype hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle was

  15. Fuel cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotevski, Darko

    2003-01-01

    Fuel cell systems are an entirely different approach to the production of electricity than traditional technologies. They are similar to the batteries in that both produce direct current through electrochemical process. There are six types of fuel cells each with a different type of electrolyte, but they all share certain important characteristics: high electrical efficiency, low environmental impact and fuel flexibility. Fuel cells serve a variety of applications: stationary power plants, transport vehicles and portable power. That is why world wide efforts are addressed to improvement of this technology. (Original)

  16. Liquid fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorii L. Soloveichik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  17. Picolinamide-Based Iridium Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of Formic Acid in Water: Effect of Amide N Substituent on Activity and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanega, Ryoichi; Onishi, Naoya; Wang, Lin; Murata, Kazuhisa; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2018-03-01

    To develop highly efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water, we investigated several Cp*Ir catalysts with various amide ligands. The catalyst with an N-phenylpicolinamide ligand exhibited a TOF of 118 000 h -1 at 60 °C. A constant rate (TOF>35 000 h -1 ) was maintained for six hours, and a TON of 1 000 000 was achieved at 50 °C. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Toward sustainable fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan; Rossmeisl, Jan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2016-01-01

    to a regular gasoline car. However, current fuel cells require 0.25 g of platinum (Pt) per kilowatt of power (2) as catalysts to drive the electrode reactions. If the entire global annual production of Pt were devoted to fuel cell vehicles, fewer than 10 million vehicles could be produced each year, a mere 10...

  19. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  20. Self assembled 12-tungstophosphoric acid-silica mesoporous nanocomposites as proton exchange membranes for direct alcohol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haolin; Pan, Mu; Jiang, San Ping

    2011-05-21

    A highly ordered inorganic electrolyte based on 12-tungstophosphoric acid (H(3)PW(12)O(40), abbreviated as HPW or PWA)-silica mesoporous nanocomposite was synthesized through a facile one-step self-assembly between the positively charged silica precursor and negatively charged PW(12)O(40)(3-) species. The self-assembled HPW-silica nanocomposites were characterized by small-angle XRD, TEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity and solid-state (31)P NMR. The results show that highly ordered and uniform nanoarrays with long-range order are formed when the HPW content in the nanocomposites is equal to or lower than 25 wt%. The mesoporous structures/textures were clearly presented, with nanochannels of 3.2-3.5 nm in diameter. The (31)P NMR results indicates that there are (≡SiOH(2)(+))(H(2)PW(12)O(40)(-)) species in the HPW-silica nanocomposites. A HPW-silica (25/75 w/o) nanocomposite gave an activation energy of 13.0 kJ mol(-1) and proton conductivity of 0.076 S cm(-1) at 100 °C and 100 RH%, and an activation energy of 26.1 kJ mol(-1) and proton conductivity of 0.05 S cm(-1) at 200 °C with no external humidification. A fuel cell based on a 165 μm thick HPW-silica nanocomposite membrane achieved a maximum power output of 128.5 and 112.0 mW cm(-2) for methanol and ethanol fuels, respectively, at 200 °C. The high proton conductivity and good performance demonstrate the excellent water retention capability and great potential of the highly ordered HPW-silica mesoporous nanocomposites as high-temperature proton exchange membranes for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs).

  1. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation The NREL technology validation team works on validating hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles; hydrogen fueling infrastructure; hydrogen system components; and fuel cell use in early market applications such as

  2. Composite electrolytes composed of Cs-substituted phosphotungstic acid and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Song-Yul, E-mail: ms089203@tutms.tut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Go [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Muto, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kurume National College of Technology, 1-1-1 Komorino, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-8555 (Japan); Sakai, Mototsugu [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Matsuda, Atsunori, E-mail: matsuda@tutms.tut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Composite electrolytes composed of cesium hydrogen sulfate containing phosphotungstic acids (CsHSO{sub 4}-H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}) and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) (SPEEK) were prepared by casting the corresponding precursor for application in fuel cells. Partially Cs-substituted phosphotungstic acids (Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}) were formed in the CsHSO{sub 4}-H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} system by mechanochemical treatment. SPEEK was prepared from PEEK by sulfonation using concentrated sulfuric acid. Flexible composite electrolytes were obtained and their electrochemical properties were markedly improved with the addition of Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, into the SPEEK matrix. A maximum power density of 213 mW cm{sup -2} was obtained from the single cell test for 50H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}-50CsHSO{sub 4} in SPEEK (1/5 by weight) composite electrolyte at 80 deg. C and at 80 RH%. Electrochemical properties and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggest that three-dimensional cluster particles were formed and homogeneously distributed in the SPEEK matrix. The mechanochemically synthesized Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} incorporated into the SPEEK matrix increased the number of protonate sites in the electrolyte. The composite electrolytes were successfully formed with Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, which consist of hydrogen bonding between surface of inorganic solid acids and not only -HSO{sub 4}{sup -} dissociated from CsHSO{sub 4} but also -SO{sub 3}H groups in the SPEEK.

  3. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  4. Electrocatalysts for fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M. A.; Fernandez V, S. M.; Vargas G, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    It was investigated the oxygen reduction reaction (fundamental reaction in fuel cells) on electrocatalysts of Pt, Co, Ni and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi, PtCoNi in H 2 SO 4 0.5 M and KOH 0.5 M as electrolyte. The electrocatalysts were synthesized using mechanical alloying processes and chemical vapor deposition. The electrocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The evaluation was performed using electrocatalytic technique of rotating disk electrode and kinetic parameters were determined for each electro catalyst. We report the performance of all synthesized electrocatalysts in acid and alkaline means. (Author)

  5. Metabolic pathway engineering based on metabolomics confers acetic and formic acid tolerance to a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of novel yeast strains with increased tolerance toward inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is highly desirable for the production of bio-ethanol. Weak organic acids such as acetic and formic acids are necessarily released during the pretreatment (i.e. solubilization and hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, which negatively affect microbial growth and ethanol production. However, since the mode of toxicity is complicated, genetic engineering strategies addressing yeast tolerance to weak organic acids have been rare. Thus, enhanced basic research is expected to identify target genes for improved weak acid tolerance. Results In this study, the effect of acetic acid on xylose fermentation was analyzed by examining metabolite profiles in a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites involved in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP [e.g. sedoheptulose-7-phosphate, ribulose-5-phosphate, ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate] were significantly accumulated by the addition of acetate, indicating the possibility that acetic acid slows down the flux of the pathway. Accordingly, a gene encoding a PPP-related enzyme, transaldolase or transketolase, was overexpressed in the xylose-fermenting yeast, which successfully conferred increased ethanol productivity in the presence of acetic and formic acid. Conclusions Our metabolomic approach revealed one of the molecular events underlying the response to acetic acid and focuses attention on the non-oxidative PPP as a target for metabolic engineering. An important challenge for metabolic engineering is identification of gene targets that have material importance. This study has demonstrated that metabolomics is a powerful tool to develop rational strategies to confer tolerance to stress through genetic engineering.

  6. Doping phosphoric acid in polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ronghuan; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2007-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes were doped in phosphoric acid solutions of different concentrations at room temperature. The doping chemistry was studied using the Scatchard method. The energy distribution of the acid complexation in polymer membranes is heterogeneous, that is, there are two...... different types of sites in PBI for the acid doping. The protonation constants of PBI by phosphoric acid are found to be 12.7 L mol(-1) (K-1) for acid complexing sites with higher affinity, and 0.19 L mol(-1) (K-2) for the sites with lower affinity. The dissociation constants for the complexing acid onto...... these two types of PBI sites are found to be 5.4 X 10(-4) and 3.6 X 10(-2), respectively, that is, about 10 times smaller than that of aqueous phosphoric acid in the first case but 5 times higher in the second. The proton conducting mechanism is also discussed....

  7. Fuel cell water transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Hedstrom, James C.

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  8. Fuel cells for electricity generation from carbonaceous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K; Formanski, V; Roes, J [Gerhard-Mercator- Universitaet - Gesamthochschule Duisburg, Fachbereich Maschinenbau/Fachgebiet Energietechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Heinzel, A [Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Fuel cells, which are electrochemical systems converting chemical energy directly into electrical energy with water and heat as by-products, are of interest as a means of generating electricity which is environmentally friendly, clean and highly efficient. They are classified according to the electrolyte used. The main types of cell in order of operating temperature are described. These are: alkaline fuel cells, the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC); the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC); the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC); the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Applications depend on the type of cell and may range from power generation on a large scale to mobile application in cars or portable systems. One of the most promising options is the PEM-fuel cell stack where there has been significant improvement in power density in recent years. The production from carbonaceous fuels and purification of the cell fuel, hydrogen, is considered. Of the purification methods available, hydrogen separation by means of palladium alloy membranes seems particular effective in reducing CO concentrations to the low levels required for PEM cells. (UK)

  9. Investigation of a Pt3Sn/C Electro-Catalyst in a Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell Operating at Low Temperatures for Portable Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zignani, S. C.; Gonzalez, E. R.; Baglio, V.; Siracusano, S.; Arico, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A 20% Pt3Sn/C catalyst was prepared by reduction with formic acid and used in a direct ethanol fuel cell at low temperatures. The electro-catalytic activity of this bimetallic catalyst was compared to that of a commercial 20% Pt/C catalyst. The PtSn catalyst showed better results in the investigated temperature range (30 degrees-70 degrees C). Generally, Sn promotes ethanol oxidation by adsorption of OH species at considerably lower potentials compared to Pt, allowing the occurrence of a bifu...

  10. Cross-linked polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells with dichloromethyl phosphinic acid as a cross-linker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noye, Pernille; Li, Qingfeng; Pan, Chao

    2008-01-01

    Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes have been covalently cross-linked with dichloromethyl phosphinic acid (DCMP). FT-IR measurements showed new bands originating from bonds between the hydrogen bearing nitrogen in the imidazole group of PBI and the CH2 group in DCMP. The produ......Phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes have been covalently cross-linked with dichloromethyl phosphinic acid (DCMP). FT-IR measurements showed new bands originating from bonds between the hydrogen bearing nitrogen in the imidazole group of PBI and the CH2 group in DCMP.......e. within the temperature range of operation of PBI-based fuel cells....

  11. On the origin of red and blue shifts of X-H and C-H stretching vibrations in formic acid (formate ion) and proton donor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tâme Parreira, Renato Luis; Galembeck, Sérgio Emanuel; Hobza, Pavel

    2007-01-08

    Complexes between formic acid or formate anion and various proton donors (HF, H(2)O, NH(3), and CH(4)) are studied by the MP2 and B3LYP methods with the 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis set. Formation of a complex is characterized by electron-density transfer from electron donor to ligands. This transfer is much larger with the formate anion, for which it exceeds 0.1 e. Electron-density transfer from electron lone pairs of the electron donor is directed into sigma* antibonding orbitals of X--H bonds of the electron acceptor and leads to elongation of the bond and a red shift of the X--H stretching frequency (standard H-bonding). However, pronounced electron-density transfer from electron lone pairs of the electron donor also leads to reorganization of the electron density in the electron donor, which results in changes in geometry and vibrational frequency. These changes are largest for the C--H bonds of formic acid and formate anion, which do not participate in H-bonding. The resulting blue shift of this stretching frequency is substantial and amounts to almost 35 and 170 cm(-1), respectively.

  12. Hydrogen Production and Storage on a Formic Acid/Bicarbonate Platform using Water-Soluble N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Late Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantke, Dominik; Pardatscher, Lorenz; Drees, Markus; Cokoja, Mirza; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-10-06

    The synthesis and characterization of two water-soluble bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes of rhodium and iridium is presented. Both compounds are active in H 2 generation from formic acid and in hydrogenation of bicarbonate to formate. The rhodium derivative is most active in both reactions, reaching a TOF of 39 000 h -1 and a TON of 449 000 for H 2 production. The catalytic hydrogenation reactions were carried out in an autoclave system and analyzed using the integrated peak areas in the 1 H NMR spectra. Decomposition of formic acid was investigated using a Fisher-Porter bottle equipped with a pressure transducer. Long-term stability for hydrogen evolution was tested by surveillance of the gas flow rate. The procedure does not require any additives like amines or inert gas conditions. Density functional theory calculations in agreement with experimental results suggest a bicarbonate reduction mechanism involving a second catalyst molecule, which provides an external hydride acting as reducing agent. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The electroplated Pd–Co alloy film on 316 L stainless steel and the corrosion resistance in boiling acetic acid and formic acid mixture with stirring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Sirui; Zuo, Yu, E-mail: zuoy@mail.buct.edu.cn; Tang, Yuming; Zhao, Xuhui

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Pd–Co alloy films were deposited on 316 L stainless steel by electroplating. • The Pd–Co films show fine grain size, low porosity and obviously high hardness. • In strong acids with Br{sup −} and stirring, Pd–Co films show good corrosion resistance. • The high hardness of Pd–Co film retards the development of micro-pores in the film. - Abstract: Pd–Co alloy films were deposited on 316 L stainless steel by electroplating. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, weight loss test and polarization test were used to determine the properties of the Pd–Co alloy films. The Pd–Co films show fine grain size, low porosity and obviously high micro-hardness. The Co content in the film can be controlled in a large range from 21.9 at.% to 57.42 at.%. Pd is rich on the Pd–Co film surface, which is benefit to increase the corrosion resistance. In boiling 90% acetic acid plus 10% formic acid mixture with 0.005 M Br{sup −} under stirring, the Pd–Co plated stainless steel samples exhibit evidently better corrosion resistance in contrast to Pd plated samples. The good corrosion resistance of the Pd–Co alloy film is explained by the better compactness, the lower porosity, and the obviously higher micro-hardness of the alloy films, which increases the resistance to erosion and retards the development of micro-pores in the film.

  14. Fuel cell research: Towards efficient energy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rohwer, MB

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available fuel cells by optimising the loading of catalyst (being expensive noble metals) and ionomer; 2) Improving conventional acidic direct alcohol fuel cells by developing more efficient catalysts and by investigating other fuels than methanol; 3... these components add significantly to the overall cost of a PEMFC. 1 We focused our research activities on: 1) The effect of the loading of catalytic ink on cell performance; 2) The effect of the ionomer content in the catalytic ink; 3) Testing...

  15. Effect of sulphuric acid concentration on electroosmotic flow through polymer electrolyte membranes in PEM fuel cells. Paper no. IGEC-1-061

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, G.; Li, X.

    2005-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are highly efficient and environmentally clean, and hence one of the most promising power sources for both stationary and mobile applications. The operations of PEM fuel cells are complicated by the electroosmotic flow of water from anode to cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane leading to the membrane dehydration and fuel cell performance degradations. In this study, electro osmotic flow in polymer electrolyte membranes is modeled by incorporating the electro kinetic effects in the presence of euphoric acid. The governing Poisson-Boatman and the Nervier-Stokes equations were solved numerically for a single membrane pore to determine the electro osmotic flow distributions through the membrane over a wide range of acid concentrations. The presence of euphoric acid modifies the protons distribution in the membrane and hence alters the driving force for electroosmotic drag. Numerical results indicate that the electro osmotic flow increases steadily with acid concentration. The water transport due to electro osmosis is almost doubled at 2 M acid concentration compared with that of non-doped membrane. The value of electroosmotic drag coefficient however falls steadily with acid concentration due to the presence of a larger number of protons in the electrolyte. (author)

  16. Tailored Electron Transfer Pathways in Aucore /Ptshell -Graphene Nanocatalysts for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Ding, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Aucore/Ptshell–graphene catalysts (G-Cys-Au@Pt) are prepared through chemical and surface chemical reactions. Au–Pt core–shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) covalently immobilized on graphene (G) are efficient electrocatalysts in low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The 9.5 ± 2 nm......–Pt. Functional tests in direct fomic acid, methanol and ethanol fuel cells exhibit 95%, 53%, and 107% increased power densities for G-Cys-Au@Pt over C–Pt, respectively.......Aucore/Ptshell–graphene catalysts (G-Cys-Au@Pt) are prepared through chemical and surface chemical reactions. Au–Pt core–shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) covalently immobilized on graphene (G) are efficient electrocatalysts in low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The 9.5 ± 2 nm...... of formic acid, methanol, and ethanol is observed as higher specific currents and increased stability of G-Cys-Au@Pt compared to G-Au@Pt and C–Pt. Oxygen reduction on G-Cys-Au@Pt occurs at 25 mV lower potential and 43 A gPt−1 higher current (at 0.9 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode) than for C...

  17. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  18. Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Status Analysis Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Get Involved Fuel cell developers interested in collaborating with NREL on fuel cell technology status analysis should send an email to NREL's Technology Validation Team at techval@nrel.gov. NREL's analysis of fuel cell technology provides objective

  19. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development NREL's fuel cell manufacturing R&D focuses on improving quality-inspection practices for high costs. A researcher monitoring web-line equipment in the Manufacturing Laboratory Many fuel cell

  20. Development of portable fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatou, K.; Sumi, S.; Nishizawa, N. [Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Sanyo Electric has been concentrating on developing a marketable portable fuel cell using phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC). Due to the fact that this power source uses PAFC that operate at low temperature around 100{degrees} C, they are easier to handle compared to conventional fuel cells that operate at around 200{degrees} C , they can also be expected to provide extended reliable operation because corrosion of the electrode material and deterioration of the electrode catalyst are almost completely nonexistent. This power source is meant to be used independently and stored at room temperature. When it is started up, it generates electricity itself using its internal load to raise the temperature. As a result, the phosphoric acid (the electolyte) absorbs the reaction water when the temperature starts to be raised (around room temperature). At the same time the concentration and volume of the phosphoric acid changes, which may adversely affect the life time of the cell. We have studied means for starting, operating PAFC stack using methods that can simply evaluate changes in the concentration of the electrolyte in the stack with the aim of improving and extending cell life and report on them in this paper.

  1. Highly water-dispersible, mixed ionic-electronic conducting, polymer acid-doped polyanilines as ionomers for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Arun; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2011-06-28

    Highly water-dispersible polymer acid-doped polyanilines have been synthesized and evaluated as an alternative for expensive Nafion ionomers in the anode of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). These polymers as ionomers lead to higher performance in single cell DMFC compared to Nafion ionomers due to mixed ionic-electronic conduction, water dispersibility, and co-catalytic activity. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  2. Solid electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, H. S.

    Progress in the development of functioning solid electrolyte fuel cells is summarized. The solid electrolyte cells perform at 1000 C, a temperature elevated enough to indicate high efficiencies are available, especially if the cell is combined with a steam generator/turbine system. The system is noted to be sulfur tolerant, so coal containing significant amounts of sulfur is expected to yield satisfactory performances with low parasitic losses for gasification and purification. Solid oxide systems are electrically reversible, and are usable in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Employing zirconium and yttrium in the electrolyte provides component stability with time, a feature not present with other fuel cells. The chemical reactions producing the cell current are reviewed, along with materials choices for the cathodes, anodes, and interconnections.

  3. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  4. Limiting Current of Oxygen Reduction on Gas-Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Gang, Xiao; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1994-01-01

    on polytetrafluorine-ethyl bonded gas-diffusion electordes in phosphoric acid with and without fluorinated additives. This provides an alternative to estimate the film thickness by combining it with the acid-adsorption measurements and the porosity analysis of the catalyst layer. It was noticed that the limiting......Various models have been devoted to the operation mechanism of porous diffusion electrodes. They are, however, suffering from the lack of accuracy concerning the acid-film thickness on which they are based. In the present paper the limiting current density has been measured for oxygen reduction...... current density can be accomplished either by gas-phase diffusion or liquid-phase diffusion, and it is the latter that can be used in the film-thickness estimation. It is also important to mention that at such a limiting condition, both the thin-film model and the filmed agglomerate model reach the same...

  5. Synthesis and characterization of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) for proton exchange membranes in fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, Bahar

    2007-07-01

    Vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) was polymerized at 80 C by free radical polymerization to give polymers (PVPA) of different molecular weight depending on the initiator concentration. The highest molecular weight, Mw, achieved was 6.2 x 10{sup 4} g/mol as determined by static light scattering. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to gain microstructure information about the polymer chain. Information based on tetrad probabilities was utilized to deduce an almost atactic configuration. In addition, {sup 13}CNMR gave evidence for the presence of head-head and tail-tail links. Refined analysis of the {sup 1}H NMR spectra allowed for the quantitative determination of the fraction of these links (23.5 percent of all links). Experimental evidence suggested that the polymerization proceeded via cyclopolymerization of the vinylphosphonic acid anhydride as an intermediate. Titration curves indicated that high molecular weight poly(vinylphosphonic acid) PVPA behaved as a monoprotic acid. Proton conductors with phosphonic acid moieties as protogenic groups are promising due to their high charge carrier concentration, thermal stability, and oxidation resistivity. Blends and copolymers of PVPA have already been reported, but PVPA has not been characterized sufficiently with respect to its polymer properties. Therefore, we also studied the proton conductivity behaviour of a well-characterized PVPA. PVPA is a conductor; however, the conductivity depends strongly on the water content of the material. The phosphonic acid functionality in the resulting polymer, PVPA, undergoes condensation leading to the formation of phosphonic anhydride groups at elevated temperature. Anhydride formation was found to be temperature dependent by solid state NMR. Anhydride formation affects the proton conductivity to a large extent because not only the number of charge carriers but also the mobility of the charge carriers seems to change. (orig.)

  6. Ion exchange membranes based on vinylphosphonic acid-co-acrylonitrile copolymers for fuel cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žitka, Jan; Bleha, Miroslav; Schauer, Jan; Galajdová, Barbora; Paidar, M.; Hnát, J.; Bouzek, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 12 (2015), s. 3167-3173 ISSN 1944-3994. [International Conference on Membrane and Electromembrane Processes - MELPRO 2014. Prague, 18.05.2014-21.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP106/12/P643 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 608931 - MAT4BAT Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : vinylphosphonic acid * poly(vinylphosphonic acid-co-acrylonitrile) * ionic conductivity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.272, year: 2015

  7. Amino-Functional Polybenzimidazole Blends with Enhanced Phosphoric Acid Mediated Proton Conductivity as Fuel Cell Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Han, Junyoung

    2016-01-01

    A new amino-functional polybenzimidazole copolymer is synthesized by homogeneous solution condensation polymerization from a novel monomer, N,N′-bis (2,4-diaminophenyl)-1,3-diaminopropane. The copolymer readily dissolves in organic solvents and shows good film forming characteristics. To balance...... the phosphoric acid uptake and to obtain mechanically robust membranes, the amino-functional polybenzimidazole derivative is blended with high molecular weight poly [2,2′-(m-phenylene)-5,5′-bisbenzimidazole] at different ratios. Due to the high acid uptake, the homogenous blend membranes show enhanced proton...

  8. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, Bill [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Gangi, Jennifer [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Curtin, Sandra [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Delmont, Elizabeth [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  9. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NETL

    2004-11-01

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  10. Contact Resistance of Tantalum Coatings in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers using Acidic Electrolytes at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik; Barner, Jens H. Von

    2014-01-01

    stainless steel were found to be far below the US Department of Energy target value of 10mcm2. The good contact resistance of tantalum was demonstrated by simulating high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis conditions by anodization performed in 85% phosphoric acid at 130◦C, followed...

  11. CERDEC Fuel Cell Team: Military Transitions for Soldier Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-27

    Fuel Cell (DMFC) (PEO Soldier) Samsung: 20W DMFC (CRADA) General Atomics & Jadoo: 50W Ammonia Borane Fueled PEMFC Current Fuel Cell Team Efforts...Continued Ardica: 20W Wearable PEMFC operating on Chemical Hydrides Spectrum Brands w/ Rayovac: Hydrogen Generators and Alkaline Fuel Cells for AA...100W Ammonia Borane fueled PEMFC Ultralife: 150W sodium borohydride fueled PEMFC Protonex: 250W RMFC and Power Manager (ARO) NanoDynamics: 250W SOFC

  12. Fuel Cell and Battery Powered Forklifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Mortensen, Henrik H.; Jensen, Jes Vestervang

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogen-powered materials handling vehicle with a fuel cell combines the advantages of diesel/LPG and battery powered vehicles. Hydrogen provides the same consistent power and fast refueling capability as diesel and LPG, whilst fuel cells provide energy efficient and zero emission Electric...... propulsion similar to batteries. In this paper, the performance of a forklift powered by PEM fuel cells and lead acid batteries as auxiliary energy source is introduced and investigated. In this electromechanical propulsion system with hybrid energy/power sources, fuel cells will deliver average power...

  13. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  14. Improvements of electrocatalytic activity of PtRu nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by a H2 plasma treatment in methanol and formic acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhongqing; Jiang Zhongjie

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A H 2 plasma, that aims at reducing the fraction of the oxidized species at the outermost perimeter of metal particles, has been used to treat the PtRu nanoparticles supported on the plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PtRu/PS-MWCNTs). The plasma treated PtRu/PS-MWCNTs exhibit increased electrochemically active surface area, reduced charge transfer resistance, improved electrocatalytic activity and long term stability toward methanol and formic acid oxidation, and enhanced tolerance to carbonaceous species relative to the sample untreated with the H 2 plasma. Highlights: → A H 2 plasma technique is used to treat the PtRu nanoparticles. → The H 2 plasma treated PtRu/PS-MWCNTs exhibit improved electrocatalytic activity. → The H 2 plasma treated PtRu/PS-MWCNTs have significantly reduced charge transfer resistance. → The H 2 plasma treated PtRu/PS-MWCNTs show the increased stability. → The Pt:Ru atomic ratio of PtRu nanoparticles has a significant effect on the electrochemical activity. - Abstract: A H 2 plasma has been used to treat the PtRu nanoparticles supported on the plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PtRu/PS-MWCNTs). The plasma treatment does not change the size and crystalline structure of PtRu nanoparticles, but reduces the fraction of the oxidized species at the outermost perimeter of particles. The electrochemical results show that these plasma treated PtRu/PS-MWCNTs exhibit increased electrochemically active surface area, improved electrocatalytic activity and long term stability toward methanol and formic acid oxidation, and enhanced tolerance to carbonaceous species relative to the sample untreated with the H 2 plasma. The electrocatalytic activities of the plasma treated PtRu/PS-MWCNTs are found to be dependent upon the Pt:Ru atomic ratios of PtRu nanoparticles. The catalysts with a Pt:Ru atomic ratio close to 1:1 show superior properties in the electrooxidation of methanol and formic acid

  15. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various...... thermoplastic polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells have also been developed. Miscible blends are used for solution casting of polymer membranes (solid electrolytes). High conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength were obtained for the blend polymer solid electrolytes....... With the thermally resistant polymer, e.g., polybenzimidazole or a mixture of polybenzimidazole and other thermoplastics as binder, the carbon-supported noble metal catalyst is tape-cast onto a hydrophobic supporting substrate. When doped with an acid mixture, electrodes are assembled with an acid doped solid...

  16. Trichloroethylene-induced formic aciduria in the male C57 Bl/6 mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, Edward A.; Keane, Paul; Rowe, Philip H.; Foster, John R.; Antoine, Daniel; Morris, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    /kg TCE for 56 days, as anticipated there was a marked and sustained formic aciduria over the duration of the study. This was associated with acidification of the urine, mild diuresis and a marked fall in urinary ammonia. Six biomarkers of renal injury KIM-1, NGAL, NAG, Cystatin-c, Albumin and IL-18 were measured in urine over time and they all showed a small increase at the later time points indicative of early markers of renal injury. However, there was no histological evidence of renal damage or renal tubule cell proliferation after 8 weeks’ exposure to TCE. The concentration of formic acid in plasma at the end of the study was 1.05 ± 0.61 mM compared to control, 0.39 ± 0.17 mM. In the liver, formic acid was present at a concentration of 1 mM in both control and treated mice while in the kidney it was higher at 2 mM in both treated and controls. We also report that trichloroacetic acid (TCA) a metabolite of TCE also causes formic aciduria, at doses likely to arise in vivo after 1000 mg/kg TCE namely 16 and 32 mg/kg. Urinary formic acid peaked 24 h after dosing at 4 mg formic acid excreted/mouse. Thus, as in male and female rats () male mice show a marked formic aciduria following TCE which after 8 weeks’ exposure did not produce renal injury, but the small rise in renal biomarkers suggest renal damage may occur following longer exposure. Thus, TCE-induced formic aciduria may be a contributor factor in the chronic renal injury seen in male and female rats and mice.

  17. Sulfonation of PEEK-WC polymer via chloro-sulfonic acid for potential PEM fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iulianelli, A.; Clarizia, G.; Gugliuzza, A.; Ebrasu, D.; Basile, A. [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, c/o University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Bevilacqua, A. [Research Centre Italsistemi S.r.l., Via Avogadro, 88900 Crotone (KR) (Italy); Trotta, F. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Torino, C.So M. D' Azeglio 48, 10125 Torino (TO) (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    The preparation and characterization of thin dense sulfonated poly-ether-ether-ketone with cardo group (PEEK-WC) membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications are described. The sulfonation of PEEK-WC polymer was realized via chloro-sulfonic acid and different kinds of membrane samples were prepared with a sulfonation degree ranging from 67 to 99%. The degree of sulfonation, homogeneity and thickness significantly affect both the membrane transport properties and the electrochemical performances. The dense character of the membranes was confirmed by SEM analysis. Proton conductivity measurements were carried out in a temperature range from 30 to 80 C and at 100% of relative humidity, reaching 5.40 x 10{sup -3} S/cm{sup -1} as best value at 80 C and with a sulfonation degree (DS) of 99%. At the same conditions, a water uptake of 17% was achieved. DSC and TGA characterizations were used in order to determine the thermal stability of the membranes, confirming a T{sub g} ranging between 206 and 216 C depending on the DS, whereas FT-IR yielded indication about intermolecular interactions and water uptake at various sulfonation degrees. (author)

  18. Maximum power output and load matching of a phosphoric acid fuel cell-thermoelectric generator hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohang; Wang, Yuan; Cai, Ling; Zhou, Yinghui

    2015-10-01

    Based on the current models of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) and thermoelectric generators (TGs), a new hybrid system is proposed, in which the effects of multi-irreversibilities resulting from the activation, concentration, and ohmic overpotentials in the PAFC, Joule heat and heat leak in the TG, finite-rate heat transfer between the TG and the heat reservoirs, and heat leak from the PAFC to the environment are taken into account. Expressions for the power output and efficiency of the PAFC, TG, and hybrid system are analytically derived and directly used to discuss the performance characteristics of the hybrid system. The optimal relationship between the electric currents in the PAFC and TG is obtained. The maximum power output is numerically calculated. It is found that the maximum power output density of the hybrid system will increase about 150 Wm-2, compared with that of a single PAFC. The problem how to optimally match the load resistances of two subsystems is discussed. Some significant results for practical hybrid systems are obtained.

  19. A phenyl-sulfonic acid anchored carbon-supported platinum catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvarani, G.; Sahu, A.K.; Choudhury, N.A.; Sridhar, P.; Pitchumani, S.; Shukla, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    A method, to anchor phenyl-sulfonic acid functional groups with the platinum catalyst supported onto a high surface-area carbon substrate, is reported. The use of the catalyst in the electrodes of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) helps enhancing its performance. Characterization of the catalyst by Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and point-of-zero-charge (PZC) studies suggests that the improvement in performance of the PEFC is facilitated not only by enlarging the three-phase boundary in the catalyst layer but also by providing ionic-conduction paths as well as by imparting negative charge to platinum sites with concomitant oxidation of sulfur present in the carbon support. It is argued that the negatively charged platinum sites help repel water facilitating oxygen to access the catalyst sites. The PEFC with modified carbon-supported platinum catalyst electrodes exhibits 40% enhancement in its power density as compared to the one with unmodified carbon-supported platinum catalyst electrodes

  20. Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air–Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Xue

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m2, which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m 2) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m2). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Claudia; Vargas, Ignacio T.; Bruns, Mary Ann; Regan, John M.

    2017-01-01

    The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

  2. Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Claudia

    2017-08-03

    The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

  3. Fiscal 1994 survey report. Survey of factors causing degradation of phosphoric acid fuel cells; 1994 nendo rinsangata nenryo denchi no cell rekka yoin chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This survey aims to effectively promote studies for evaluating phosphoric acid fuel cell degradation. Data of time-dependent changes in voltage are collected from 58 plants now in operation (for 17,500 hours at the maximum). Half of them exhibit a degradation rate of 0.25-1%/1000 hours while degradation is abruptly accelerated midway in the other half. Causes for voltage drop are not known clearly. Since but a little systematically collected test data are available concerning the mechanism of cell degradation, it is decided that tests be conducted using small test model cells sharing the same specifications. Primary test conditions (combination of temperature, current, and pressure with test reference levels), performance evaluating methods (conditions of data collection), and methods of investigation by dismantling (items and frequency of investigations) are determined, and guidelines are provided for element tests for complementing the said test items and for studying their relations with the degradation mechanism. Based on acceleration-related factors to be obtained by common specification test cells, corporations involved will develop their own accelerated test methods. Small cells are fabricated for testing parameters, and model cells are specified. (NEDO)

  4. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  5. The battle of the fuel cell. De slag om de brandstofcel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijkum, P H [Nederlandse Organisatie voor Energie en Milieu BV (NOVEM), Sittard (Netherlands)

    1992-03-01

    An overview is given of several types of fuel cells and for each type the international state of the art in the development and technology. The fuel cells discussed are: the alkaline fuel cell (AFC), the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), the external reforming molten carbonate fuel cell (ER-MCFC), the internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell (IR-MCFC) and the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). 1 figs., 3 ills., 5 tabs., 7 refs.

  6. The use of electrothermal vaporizer coupled to the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of arsenic, selenium and transition metals in biological samples treated with formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormen, Luciano, E-mail: lucianotormen@hotmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto. Quimica, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul - UFFS, Campus Laranjeiras do Sul, 85303-775 Laranjeiras do Sul, PR (Brazil); Gil, Raul A. [Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (UNSL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, D5700BWQ San Luis (Argentina); Frescura, Vera L.A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto. Quimica, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Martinez, Luis Dante [Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (UNSL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, D5700BWQ San Luis (Argentina); Curtius, Adilson J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto. Quimica, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple sample treatment of biologic samples with formic acid is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The treatment with formic acid is easy, rapid, less expensive and environmental friendly allowing a high sample throughput. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer External calibration with aqueous standard allows the simultaneous determination of As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se and V. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of ETV avoids plasma instability, carbon deposit on the cones and does not require sample digestion. - Abstract: A fast method for the determination of As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se and V in biological samples by ETV-ICP-MS, after a simple sample treatment with formic acid, is proposed. Approximately 75 mg of each sample is mixed with 5 mL of formic acid, kept at 90 Degree-Sign C for 1 h and then diluted with nitric acid aqueous solution to a 5% (v/v) formic acid and 1% (v/v) nitric acid final concentrations. A palladium solution was used as a chemical modifier. The instrumental conditions, such as carrier gas flow rate, RF power, pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures and argon internal flow rate during vaporization were optimized. The formic acid causes a slight decrease of the analytes signal intensities, but does not increase the signal of the mainly polyatomic ions ({sup 14}N{sup 35}Cl{sup +}, {sup 14}N{sup 12}C{sup +}, {sup 40}Ar{sup 12}C{sup +}, {sup 13}C{sup 37}Cl{sup +}, {sup 40}Ar{sup 36}Ar{sup +}, {sup 40}Ar{sup 35}Cl{sup +}, {sup 35}Cl{sup 16}O{sup +}, {sup 40}Ar{sup 18}O{sup +}) that affect the analytes signals. The effect of charge transfer reactions, that could increase the ionization efficiency of some elements with high ionization potentials was not observed due to the elimination of most of the organic compounds during the pyrolysis step. External calibration with aqueous standard solutions containing 5% (v/v) formic acid allows the simultaneous determination of all analytes with high accuracy. The

  7. The quadrupoles and its formation constant in an electrolytic solution of lithium perchlorate in tetrahydrofuran plus formic acid, at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inocencio, A.A.; Almeida, E.T. de

    1985-01-01

    The condutance data for the electrolytic solutions of LiclO 4 in a mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) plus formic acid, indicate the existence of pairs, triple ions and quadrupoles. The association constantes K sub(a) and K sub(t) for the ion pairs and triple ions, respectively, have been included in a previous paper, where those experimental results have been published. Now, through an analysis accounting simultaneously for the pairs, triple ions and quadrupoles in the solution, the quadrupole formation constant K sub(q) has been calculated, together with K sub(a) and K sub(t). The activity coefficients have been obtained by means of the Debye-Huckel's theory, Stockes radii and solvation numbers have been estimated and the structure of the ionic aggregates discussed. (Author) [pt

  8. FTIR study of formic acid interaction with TiO2 and TiO2 doped with Pd and Cu in photocatalytic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, J.; Garriga i Cabo, C.; Dona-Rodriguez, J.M.; Gonzalez-Diaz, O.; Herrera-Melian, J.A.; Perez-Pena, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this study the different processes occurring on the TiO 2 and Pd and Cu doped TiO 2 surfaces during the photocatalytic formic acid degradation in the presence or absence of S 2 O 8 2- or H 2 O 2 have been investigated. FTIR studies have shown the relevance of the H-bounded hydroxyl groups. It has been observed that formate molecules interact simultaneously with the dopants and surfacial Ti atoms yielding an intermediate species which plays an important role in the phototacatalytic degradation mechanism. Also, it has been determined that Pd or Cu oxides may act as receptors or transmitters of the TiO 2 photogenerated electrons and thus modify the degradation mechanism. Different redox reactions have been proposed according to the obtained results

  9. On the structure of [W6O19]2- anion in the structure of product from W(CO)6 reaction with dimethylformamide and formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillova, N.I.; Kolomnikov, I.S.; Zolotarev, Yu.A.; Lysyak, T.V.; Struchkov, Yu.T.

    1977-01-01

    A complete X-ray structural investigation has been performed for the product of interacting W(CO) 6 with formic acid and DMPhA. It has been established that the crystals of the compound are triclinic: a=7.122; b=9.202; c=8.690 A; a=109.0; β=96.9; ν=93.2 deg; Z=1; right group P1. Centrally symmetrical anion [W 6 O 19 ] 2- is present in the structure with six W atoms located octahedrically around the central oxygen atom and united by 12 edge-bridge oxygen atoms; besides each W atom has one end oxoligand which ensures octahedral coordination for metal atoms

  10. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  11. Fuel cells in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, G [Technische Univ., Berlin (Germany); Hoehlein, B [Research Center Juelich (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    A promising new power source for electric drive systems is the fuel cell technology with hydrogen as energy input. The worldwide fuel cell development concentrates on basic research efforts aiming at improving this new technology and at developing applications that might reach market maturity in the very near future. Due to the progress achieved, the interest is now steadily turning to the development of overall systems such as demonstration plants for different purposes: electricity generation, drive systems for road vehicles, ships and railroads. This paper does not present results concerning the market potential of fuel cells in transportation but rather addresses some questions and reflections that are subject to further research of both engineers and economists. Some joint effort of this research will be conducted under the umbrella of the IEA Implementing Agreement 026 - Annex X, but there is a lot more to be done in this challenging but also promising fields. (EG) 18 refs.

  12. Spontaneous modification of graphite anode by anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid for microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinhua; Li, Haoran; Du, Zhuwei; Ng, How Yong

    2014-07-01

    In this study, anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS), an electron transfer mediator, was immobilized onto graphite felt surface via spontaneous reduction of the in situ generated AQS diazonium cations. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) characterizations of AQS modified graphite demonstrated that AQS was covalently grafted onto the graphite surface. The modified graphite, with a surface AQS concentration of 5.37 ± 1.15 × 10(-9)mol/cm(2), exhibited good electrochemical activity and high stability. The midpoint potential of the modified graphite was about -0.248 V (vs. normal hydrogen electrode, NHE), indicating that electrons could be easily transferred from NADH in bacteria to the electrode. AQS modified anode in MFCs increased the maximum power density from 967 ± 33 mW/m(2) to 1872 ± 42 mW/m(2). These results demonstrated that covalently modified AQS functioned as an electron transfer mediator to facilitate extracellular electron transfer from bacteria to electrode and significantly enhanced the power production in MFCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In Situ Formed Phosphoric Acid/Phosphosilicate Nanoclusters in the Exceptional Enhancement of Durability of Polybenzimidazole Membrane Fuel Cells at Elevated High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin; Aili, David; Bradley, John

    2017-01-01

    -meso-silica. The results indicate that the optimum limit of PWA-meso-silica loading in the PA/PBI membranes is 15 wt%. Detaled analysis indicates that the mesoporous structure of the PWA-meso-silica framework disintegrates, forming phosphosilicate phases within the PBI polymeric matrix during fuel cell operation at 200°C......Most recently, we developed a phosphotungstic acid impregnated mesoporous silica (PWA-meso-silica) and phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PA/PBI) composite membrane for use in high temperature fuel cells and achieved exceptional durability under a constant current load of 200 mA cm−2 at 200°C...... for over 2700 h. In this work, the fundamental role of PWA-meso-silica in enhancing the stability of the PA/PBI membrane has been investigated. The microstructure, the PA uptake, swelling ratio, mechanical property and conductivity of PA/PBI/PWA-meso-silica composite membranes depend on the loading of PWA...

  14. Fuel cells (part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanari, S.; Macchi, E.

    1999-01-01

    The article, following and completing the issues dealt with in part 1 (CH4 Energia Metano, 1/99, p. 7), describe the operating characteristic and construction features of molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells (MCFC and SOFC). For the latter type, construction cost are evaluated by various authors and research institutes. The article ends by presenting some tables showing the classification and the main characteristics of various fuel cells, and well as the effect of some gases on the behaviour of some of them [it

  15. Effect of the structural characteristics of binary Pt-Ru and ternary Pt-Ru-M fuel cell catalysts on the activity of ethanol electrooxidation in acid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolini, Ermete

    2013-06-01

    In view of their possible use as anode materials in acid direct ethanol fuel cells, the electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Ru and Pt-Ru-M catalysts for ethanol oxidation has been investigated. This minireview examines the effects of the structural characteristics of Pt-Ru, such as the degree of alloying and Ru oxidation state, on the electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Thematic outlook: the technical survey for the fuel cell research network PACO. May 18, 2004 update no. 24; Veille thematique. La veille technique pour le reseau PACO. Actualisation du 18 mai 2004, no. 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Summaries of several recent articles are gathered here. They deal with fuel cells, means of transport, hydrogen production and storage. Their different titles are given below: 1)comparison of the costs between the electric-powered vehicles and the fuel cell vehicles 2)fuel savings of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles 3)direct formic acid fuel cells producing high current density 4)use of biogas in a SOFC 5)test unit for the determination of the seasonal performance of fuel cell residential systems 6)new management technique of fuel cells for optimizing the output power and the fuel use yield 7)SOFC/micro-turbines systems: current progress achieved and future development 8)advances in the field of the PEMFC 9)advances in the field of new materials for PEMFC 10)hybridization of fuel cell vehicles: an accessible solution for efficient traction systems 11)exergy life cycle analysis of systems of production and storage of hydrogen for mobile application 12)hydrogen and electric power production from coal with CO{sub 2} sequestration 13)H{sub 2}S low temperature removal with ZnO in gas mixtures containing vapor for applications in fuel cells 1-ZnO particles and extruded compounds 14)catalytic nano-composite membranes for CO abatement in fuel cell applications 15)activity and stability of Cu-CeO catalysts in the water-gas conversion for fuel cell applications 16)hydrogen production for fuel cell by ethanol partial oxidation on a nickel based catalyst 17)micro-reactor for hydrogen production in micro-fuel cell applications 18)hydrogen storage capacity and electrochemical properties of the electrode material La{sub 0.7}Mg{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 3.825}Co{sub 0.675}Mn{sub x}(A) 19)hydrogen storage and desorption capacity of carbon nano-tubes. The references of these articles are detailed. (O.M.)

  17. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  18. Pt-Ni and Pt-M-Ni (M = Ru, Sn Anode Catalysts for Low-Temperature Acidic Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermete Antolini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of a possible use as anode materials in acidic direct alcohol fuel cells, the electro-catalytic activity of Pt-Ni and Pt-M-Ni (M = Ru, Sn catalysts for methanol and ethanol oxidation has been widely investigated. An overview of literature data regarding the effect of the addition of Ni to Pt and Pt-M on the methanol and ethanol oxidation activity in acid environment of the resulting binary and ternary Ni-containing Pt-based catalysts is presented, highlighting the effect of alloyed and non-alloyed nickel on the catalytic activity of these materials.

  19. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluations | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electric Vehicle Evaluations Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluations NREL's technology validation team analyzes hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) operating in a real-world setting to include commercial FCEVs for the first time. Current fuel cell electric vehicle evaluations build on the

  20. Proceedings of the fourth annual fuel cells contractors review meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, W.J.

    1992-07-01

    Objective of the program was to develop the essential technology for private sector commercialization of various fuel cell electrical generation systems, which promise high fuel efficiencies (40--60%), possibilities for cogeneration, modularity, possible urban siting, and low emissions. Purpose of this meeting was to provide the R and D participants in the DOE/Fossil Energy-sponsored Fuel Cells Program with a forum. With the near commercialization of phosphoric acid fuel cells, major emphasis was on molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells. 22 papers were given in 3 formal sessions: molten carbonate fuel cells; solid oxide fuel cells; and systems and phosphoric acid. In addition, the proceedings also include a welcome to METC address and comments on the Fuel Cells program from the viewpoint of EPRI and DOE's vehicular fuel cell program. Separate abstracts have been prepared

  1. Implantable biochemical fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G; Rao, J R

    1978-01-05

    Implantable biochemical fuel cells for the operation of heart pacemakers or artificial hearts convert oxidisable body substances such as glucose on the anode side and reduce the oxygen contained in body fluids at the cathode. The anode and cathode are separated by membranes which are impermeable to albumen and blood corpuscles in body fluids. A chemical shortcircuit cannot occur in practice if, according to the invention, one or more selective oxygen electrodes with carbon as catalyst are arranged so that the mixture which diffuses into the cell from body fluids during operation reaches the fuel cell electrode through the porous oxygen electrode. The membranes used must be permeable to water. Cellulose, polymerised polyvinyl alcohol or an ion exchanger with a buffering capacity between pH5 and 8 act as permeable materials.

  2. Fuel cell membrane humidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1999-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

  3. Fuel cell report to congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-02-28

    This report describes the status of fuel cells for Congressional committees. It focuses on the technical and economic barriers to the use of fuel cells in transportation, portable power, stationary, and distributed power generation applications, and describes the need for public-private cooperative programs to demonstrate the use of fuel cells in commercial-scale applications by 2012. (Department of Energy, February 2003).

  4. Fuel cell sub-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang V.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

  5. Fuel cells : a viable fossil fuel alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduada, M.

    2007-02-15

    This article presented a program initiated by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) to develop proof-of-concept of underground mining vehicles powered by fuel cells in order to eliminate emissions. Recent studies on American and Canadian underground mines provided the basis for estimating the operational cost savings of switching from diesel to fuel cells. For the Canadian mines evaluated, the estimated ventilation system operating cost reductions ranged from 29 per cent to 75 per cent. In order to demonstrate the viability of a fuel cell-powered vehicle, NRCan has designed a modified Caterpillar R1300 loader with a 160 kW hybrid power plant in which 3 stacks of fuel cells deliver up to 90 kW continuously, and a nickel-metal hydride battery provides up to 70 kW. The battery subsystem transiently boosts output to meet peak power requirements and also accommodates regenerative braking. Traction for the loader is provided by a brushless permanent magnet traction motor. The hydraulic pump motor is capable of a 55 kW load continuously. The loader's hydraulic and traction systems are operated independently. Future fuel cell-powered vehicles designed by the program may include a locomotive and a utility vehicle. Future mines running their operations with hydrogen-fueled equipment may also gain advantages by employing fuel cells in the operation of handheld equipment such as radios, flashlights, and headlamps. However, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells used in the project are prohibitively expensive. The catalytic content of a fuel cell can add hundreds of dollars per kW of electric output. Production of catalytic precious metals will be strongly connected to the scale of use and acceptance of fuel cells in vehicles. In addition, the efficiency of hydrogen production and delivery is significantly lower than the well-to-tank efficiency of many conventional fuels. It was concluded that an adequate hydrogen infrastructure will be required for the mining industry

  6. An Overview of Stationary Fuel Cell Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR Brown; R Jones

    1999-03-23

    Technology developments occurring in the past few years have resulted in the initial commercialization of phosphoric acid (PA) fuel cells. Ongoing research and development (R and D) promises further improvement in PA fuel cell technology, as well as the development of proton exchange membrane (PEM), molten carbonate (MC), and solid oxide (SO) fuel cell technologies. In the long run, this collection of fuel cell options will be able to serve a wide range of electric power and cogeneration applications. A fuel cell converts the chemical energy of a fuel into electrical energy without the use of a thermal cycle or rotating equipment. In contrast, most electrical generating devices (e.g., steam and gas turbine cycles, reciprocating engines) first convert chemical energy into thermal energy and then mechanical energy before finally generating electricity. Like a battery, a fuel cell is an electrochemical device, but there are important differences. Batteries store chemical energy and convert it into electrical energy on demand, until the chemical energy has been depleted. Depleted secondary batteries may be recharged by applying an external power source, while depleted primary batteries must be replaced. Fuel cells, on the other hand, will operate continuously, as long as they are externally supplied with a fuel and an oxidant.

  7. Non-noble metal fuel cell catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-01-01

    Written and edited by a group of top scientists and engineers in the field of fuel cell catalysts from both industry and academia, this book provides a complete overview of this hot topic. It covers the synthesis, characterization, activity validation and modeling of different non-noble metal and metalfree electrocatalysts for the reduction of oxygen, as well as their integration into acid or alkaline polymer exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and their performance validation, while also discussing those factors that will drive fuel cell commercialization. With its well-structured app

  8. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  9. Stationary power fuel cell commercialization status worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technologies for stationary power are set to play a role in power generation applications worldwide. The worldwide fuel cell vision is to provide powerplants for the emerging distributed generation and on-site markets. Progress towards commercialization has occurred in all fuel cell development areas. Around 100 ONSI phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) units have been sold, with significant foreign sales in Europe and Japan. Fuji has apparently overcome its PAFC decay problems. Industry-driven molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) programs in Japan and the U.S. are conducting megawatt (MW)-class demonstrations, which are bringing the MCFC to the verge of commercialization. Westinghouse Electric, the acknowledged world leader in tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, continues to set performance records and has completed construction of a 4-MW/year manufacturing facility in the U.S. Fuel cells have also taken a major step forward with the conceptual development of ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine plants. Many SOFC developers in Japan, Europe, and North America continue to make significant advances.

  10. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Roswell J [Pittsburgh, PA; Basel, Richard A [Pittsburgh, PA; Zhang, Gong [Murrysville, PA

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  11. Porous or roughened electrode with an assigned matrix for electrochemical cells with acid electrolytes, especially fuel cell batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, H; Fleischmann, R

    1975-10-16

    According to the invention an electrolyte matrix is to be used, which experiences a definite increase in volume by swelling, and fits on to the electrode in such a way that it is closely meshed with it. Matrix materials treated with sulphuric acid are claimed, such as 1) polystyrol, polyethelyne, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl acetate, methyl cellulose or polyester, which are used alone or compounded with silica gel, aluminium oxide or sea sand, and 2) zeolite, silica, aluminium dioxide, titanium dioxide or zirconium dioxide using binding materials.

  12. Effect of dietary formic acid and astaxanthin on the survival and growth of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) and their resistance to Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchird, Niti; Rorkwiree, Phitsanu; Rairat, Tirawat

    2015-01-01

    A 90-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of formic acid (FA) and astaxanthin (AX) on growth, survival, immune parameters, and tolerance to Vibrio infection in Pacific white shrimp. The study was divided into two experiments. In experiment 1, postlarvae-12 were randomly distributed into six groups and then fed four times daily with six experimental diets contained 0.3 % FA, 0.6 % FA, 50 ppm AX, 0.3 % FA + 50 ppm AX, 0.6 % FA + 50 ppm AX, or none of these supplements (control diet). After 60 days of the feeding trials, the body weight of all treatment groups was not significantly different from the control group, although shrimp fed formic acid had significantly lower body weight than shrimp fed 50 ppm AX. However, the 0.6 % FA + 50 ppm AX group had a significantly higher survival rate (82.33 ± 8.32 %) than the control group (64.33 ± 10.12 %). In experiment 2, Vibrio parahaemolyticus was added to each tank to obtain a final concentration of 10(4) colony-forming units/mL. Each treatment group received the aforementioned diets for another 30 days. At the end of this experiment, there was no difference in the weight gain among all experimental groups. However, the survival rate of shrimps whose diet included FA, AX, and their combination (in the range of 45.83-67.50 %) was significantly higher than the control group (20.00 ± 17.32 %). FA-fed shrimps also had significantly lower total intestinal bacteria and Vibrio spp. counts, while immune parameters [total hemocyte count (THC), phagocytosis activity, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity] of AX-fed groups were significantly improved compared with the other groups. In conclusion, FA, AX, and their combination are useful in shrimp aquaculture.

  13. Third International Fuel Cell Conference. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-30

    The Third International Fuel Cell Conference was held on November 30 to December 3, 1999 in City of Nagoya. A total of 139 papers, including those for plenary, sectional and poster cessions, were presented. In the plenary session, US's DOE presented fuel cell power plant development in the United States, EC fuel cells in perspective and fifth European framework programme, and Japan overview of the New Sunshine Program. In the polymer electrolyte fuel cells sessions, 23 papers were presented, including current status of commercialization and PEMFC systems developed by Toshiba. In the phosphoric acid fuel cells session, 6 papers were presented, including field test results and market developments. In the molten carbonate fuel cells session, 24 papers were presented, including development of 1,000kW MCFC power plant. In the solid oxide fuel cells session, 20 papers were presented, including 100kW SOFC field test results. The other topics include market analysis and fuel processes. (NEDO)

  14. Hydrogen generation from formic acid catalyzed by a metal complex under amine-free and aqueous conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Guan, Chao; Pan, Yupeng; Hu, Jinsong; Li, Huaifeng

    2018-01-01

    invention provides catalysts used to produce hydrogen that has a satisfactory and sufficient lifespan (measured by turnover number (TON)), that has stability in the presence of moisture, air, acid, or impurities, promote a rapid reaction rate, and remain

  15. Fuel cells - An option for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vielstich, W.

    1984-01-01

    The direct conversion of the energy of a fuel into electrical energy in fuel cells avoids the losses inseparable from the indirect conversion via heat and mechanical energy. The idea to use this concept of energy conversion for the application in power stations would offer the following advantages: a slightly better total energy efficiency; no environmental problems; and flexibility in size according to the construction in the battery stacks. The use of acid and alkaline H 2 /O 2 fuel cells in the U.S. space program has demonstrated the high energy per weight data possible with a fuel cell device including tankage. Therefore, the application of fuel cells in electric vehicles seems to be suitable at least from the technical point of view. Kordesch has converted an Austin A-40 to electric propulsion by replacing the gasoline engine by an 8-kW truck motor powered by a 6-kW alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell/4-kW lead-acid hybrid system. Two severe handicaps that occurred were the use of gas cylinders for the storage of the hydrogen and the voluminous CO 2 scrubber to prevent carbonization of the alkaline electrolyte. The direct conversion of a liquid fuel like methanol would be advantageous

  16. Atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering of platinum-gold alloy nanocrystals with high electrocatalytic performance for the formic acid oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Min; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Min; Zhai, Ya-Nan; Hu, Man-Cheng; Chen, Yu

    2018-03-15

    Bimetallic noble metal nanocrystals have been widely applied in many fields, which generally are synthesized by the wet-chemistry reduction method. This work presents a purposely designed atoms diffusion induced phase engineering of PtAu alloy nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (PtAu-on-Au nanostructures) through simple hydrothermal treatment. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of component and structure, PtAu-on-Au nanostructures remarkably enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and thus exhibit much higher FAOR activity and durability compared with Pt nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (Pt-on-Au nanostructures) and commercial Pd black due to an excellent stability of platy Au substrate and a high oxidation resistance of PtAu alloy nanocrystals. The atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering demonstrated in this work builds a bridge between the traditional metallurgy and modern nanotechnologies, which also provides some useful insights in developing noble metals based alloyed nanostructures for the energy and environmental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Emission Ratios for Ammonia and Formic Acid and Observations of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN and Ethylene in Biomass Burning Smoke as Seen by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivienne H. Payne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES aboard the NASA Aura satellite to determine the concentrations of the trace gases ammonia (NH3 and formic acid (HCOOH within boreal biomass burning plumes, and present the first detection of peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN and ethylene (C2H4 by TES. We focus on two fresh Canadian plumes observed by TES in the summer of 2008 as part of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS-B campaign. We use TES retrievals of NH3 and HCOOH within the smoke plumes to calculate their emission ratios (1.0% ± 0.5% and 0.31% ± 0.21%, respectively relative to CO for these Canadian fires. The TES derived emission ratios for these gases agree well with previous aircraft and satellite estimates, and can complement ground-based studies that have greater surface sensitivity. We find that TES observes PAN mixing ratios of ~2 ppb within these mid-tropospheric boreal biomass burning plumes when the average cloud optical depth is low ( < 0.1 and that TES can detect C2H4 mixing ratios of ~2 ppb in fresh biomass burning smoke plumes.

  18. Alkanediyl-α, ω-bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide gemini surfactants as novel corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in formic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mobin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gemini surfactants, butanediyl 1,4-bis(dimethyl cetylammonium bromide, pentanediyl 1,5 - bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide and hexanediyl 1,6 - bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide from Alkanediyl-α, ω-bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide series were synthesized in laboratory and were characterized by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The surfactants were tested as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 20% formic acid. The influence of surfactants on mild steel corrosion inhibition was investigated by measuring the corrosion rate of mild steel in their absence and presence by weight loss measurements, solvent analysis of iron ions into the test solution and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The surface morphology of the corroded steel samples in presence and absence of surfactants was evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The synthesized gemini surfactants performed as excellent corrosion inhibitor, the inhibition efficiency (IE being in the range of 76.66-97.41%. The IE of surfactants is slightly affected by the spacer length. The IE increased with increase in surfactant concentration and temperature. The adsorption of gemini surfactants on the steel surface was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The results of the potentiodynamic polarization studies are consistent with the results of weight loss studies.

  19. Electrocatalytical activity of Pt, SnO2 and RuO2 mixed electrodes for the electrooxidation of formic acid and formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profeti, L.P.R.; Profeti, D.; Olivi, P.

    2005-01-01

    The electrocatalytical activity of binary electrodes of Pt and SnO 2 and ternary electrodes of Pt and SnO 2 and RuO 2 for the electrooxidation of formic acid and formaldehyde was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. The electrode materials were prepared by the thermal decomposition of polymeric precursors at 400 deg C. The cyclic voltammetry results showed that the methanol electrooxidation process presents peak potentials for those electrodes approximately 100 mV lower than the values obtained for metallic platinum electrodes. The Pt 0.6 Ru 0.2 Sn 0.2 O y electrodes presented the highest current density values for potentials lower than the peak potential values. The chronoamperometric experiments also showed that the addition of SnO 2 and RuO 2 contributed for the enhancement of the electrode activity in low potential values. The preparation method was found to be useful to obtain high active materials. (author)

  20. Effect of glycerin and formic acid in the efficiency of deposit on Zn-Ni, obtained by electrodeposition; Efeito da glicerina e do acido formico na eficiencia de deposito da liga Zn-Ni, obtido atraves de eletrodeposicao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroza, G.A.G.; Souza, C.A.C.; Lima, L.R.P.A.; Ferreira, D.M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia - Escola Politecnica, BA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Additives are added to the electrodeposition of metal coatings to improve the characteristics of the deposit. However, the objective was to investigate the effect of adding glycerin and formic acid in the deposition efficiency and deposit structure of zinc-nickel alloy obtained by electrodeposition. The depositions were made at a galvanostatic current density of 10 mA/cm{sup 2} to obtain a deposit of about 5 mm in thickness. The deposition efficiency was determined through measures of mass, chemical composition of the deposit in the presence and absence of additives was examined by X-ray Spectrometer Fluorescence (XRF) and surface characterization of coatings was performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The high levels of glycerin (0,07 M) and formic acid (0,26 M) in bath deposition increased the deposition efficiency of around 10% to 12% by mass, respectively. (author)

  1. Fuel cells for telephone networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.D.; Scott, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Critical telephone network systems are currently protected from electric utility power failures by a backup system consisting of lead-acid batteries and an engine-alternator. It is considered here an alternate power system where less expensive off-peak commercial electricity electrolyses water, while fuel cells draw continuously on the stored gas products to provide direct current for the protected equipment. The lead acid batteries are eliminated. The benefits and costs of the existing and alternate systems in scenarios with various system efficiencies, capital costs, and electric utility rates and incentives, are compared. In today's conditions, the alternate system is not economical; however, cost and performance feasibility domains are identified. 2 figs., 4 tabs., 12 refs

  2. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped porous carbon – is an efficient electrocatalyst as platinum or a hoax for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic environment PEM fuel cell?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Madhumita; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2017-01-01

    Non-precious, heteroatom doped carbon is reported to replace commercial Pt/C in both alkaline and acidic half-cell rotating disc electrode study; however the real world full cell measurements with the metal-free electrocatalysts overcoming the practical troubles in acidic environment proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are almost negligible to confirm the claim. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped porous carbon (DPC) was synthesized in a one step, high yield process from single source ionic liquid precursor using eutectic salt as porogens to achieve porosity. Structural characterization confirms 7.03% nitrogen and 1.68% sulfur doping into the high surface area, porous carbon structure. As the cathode oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst, metal-free DPC and Pt nanoparticles decorated DPC (Pt/DPC) shows stable and high exchange current density by four electron transfer pathway in acidic half–cell liquid environment due to the synergistic effect of nitrogen and sulfur doping and porous nature of DPC. In an actual solid state full cell measurement, Pt/DPC shows higher performance comparable to commercial Pt/C; however DPC failed to reciprocate the half-cell performance due to blockage of active sites in the membrane electrode assembly fabrication process. - Highlights: • Synthesis of N and S co-doped porous carbon (DPC) in simple one-pot technique. • High surface area DPC shows comparable activity for ORR in half-cell acidic PEMFC study. • Real-world performance of DPC gives 20 mW/cm 2 peak power density at 60 °C. • Homogeneous Pt nanoparticles decorated DPC (Pt/DPC) outperforms commercial Pt/C. • Pt/DPC shows maximum power density of 718 mW/cm 2 with lower 0.3 mg/cm 2 total Pt loading.

  3. Aircraft Fuel Cell Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, fuel cells have been explored for use in aircraft. While the weight and size of fuel cells allows only the smallest of aircraft to use fuel cells for their primary engines, fuel cells have showed promise for use as auxiliary power units (APUs), which power aircraft accessories and serve as an electrical backup in case of an engine failure. Fuel cell MUS are both more efficient and emit fewer pollutants. However, sea-level fuel cells need modifications to be properly used in aircraft applications. At high altitudes, the ambient air has a much lower pressure than at sea level, which makes it much more difficult to get air into the fuel cell to react and produce electricity. Compressors can be used to pressurize the air, but this leads to added weight, volume, and power usage, all of which are undesirable things. Another problem is that fuel cells require hydrogen to create electricity, and ever since the Hindenburg burst into flames, aircraft carrying large quantities of hydrogen have not been in high demand. However, jet fuel is a hydrocarbon, so it is possible to reform it into hydrogen. Since jet fuel is already used to power conventional APUs, it is very convenient to use this to generate the hydrogen for fuel-cell-based APUs. Fuel cells also tend to get large and heavy when used for applications that require a large amount of power. Reducing the size and weight becomes especially beneficial when it comes to fuel cells for aircraft. My goal this summer is to work on several aspects of Aircraft Fuel Cell Power System project. My first goal is to perform checks on a newly built injector rig designed to test different catalysts to determine the best setup for reforming Jet-A fuel into hydrogen. These checks include testing various thermocouples, transmitters, and transducers, as well making sure that the rig was actually built to the design specifications. These checks will help to ensure that the rig will operate properly and give correct results

  4. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado, Rafael A.; Hrdina, Kenneth E.; Remick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  5. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None available

    2001-05-31

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  6. Operating a fuel cell using landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippel, C.E.; Preston, J.L. Jr.; Trocciola, J.; Spiegel, R.

    1996-12-31

    An ONSI PC25{trademark}, 200 kW (nominal capacity) phosphoric acid fuel cell operating on landfill gas is installed at the Town of Groton Flanders Road landfill in Groton, Connecticut. This joint project by the Connecticut Light & Power Company (CL&P) which is an operating company of Northeast Utilities, the Town of Groton, International Fuel Cells (IFC), and the US EPA is intended to demonstrate the viability of installing, operating and maintaining a fuel cell operating on landfill gas at a landfill site. The goals of the project are to evaluate the fuel cell and gas pretreatment unit operation, test modifications to simplify the GPU design and demonstrate reliability of the entire system.

  7. Fuel cell cassette with compliant seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Haltiner, Jr. J.; Anthony, Derose J.; Klotzbach, Darasack C.; Schneider, Jonathan R.

    2017-11-07

    A fuel cell cassette for forming a fuel cell stack along a fuel cell axis includes a cell retainer, a plate positioned axially to the cell retainer and defining a space axially with the cell retainer, and a fuel cell having an anode layer and a cathode layer separated by an electrolyte layer. The outer perimeter of the fuel cell is positioned in the space between the plate and the cell retainer, thereby retaining the fuel cell and defining a cavity between the cell retainer, the fuel cell, and the plate. The fuel cell cassette also includes a seal disposed within the cavity for sealing the edge of the fuel cell. The seal is compliant at operational temperatures of the fuel cell, thereby allowing lateral expansion and contraction of the fuel cell within the cavity while maintaining sealing at the edge of the fuel cell.

  8. Orbiter fuel cell improvement assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1981-08-01

    The history of fuel cells and the theory of fuel cells is given. Expressions for thermodynamic and electrical efficiencies are developed. The voltage losses due to electrode activation, ohmic resistance and ionic diffusion are discussed. Present limitations of the Orbiter Fuel Cell, as well as proposed enhancements, are given. These enhancements are then evaluated and recommendations are given for fuel cell enhancement both for short-range as well as long-range performance improvement. Estimates of reliability and cost savings are given for enhancements where possible

  9. High-performance oxygen reduction catalysts in both alkaline and acidic fuel cells based on pre-treating carbon material and iron precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ping; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Wang, Ying; Xu, Weilin; Liu, Dijia; Zhuang, Lin

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate a new and simple method for pre-treating the carbon material and iron precursor to prepare oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, which can produce super-high performance and stability in alkaline solution, with high performance in acid solution. This strategy using cheap materials is simply controllable. Moreover, it has achieved smaller uniform nanoparticles to exhibit high stability, and the synergetic effect of Fe and N offered much higher performance in ORR than commercial Pt/C, with high maximum power density in alkaline and acid fuel cell test. So it can make this kind of catalysts be the most promising alternatives of Pt-based catalysts with best performance/price.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and fuel cell performance tests of boric acid and boron phosphate doped, sulphonated and phosphonated poly(vinyl alcohol) based composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Alpay; Ar, İrfan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to synthesize a composite membrane having high proton conductivity, ion exchange capacity and chemical stability. In order to achieve this aim, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based composite membranes are synthesized by using classic sol-gel method. Boric acid (H3BO3) and boron phosphate (BPO4) are added to the membrane matrix in different ratios in order to enhance the membrane properties. Characterization tests, i.e; FT-IR analysis, mechanical strength tests, water hold-up capacities, swelling properties, ion exchange capacities, proton conductivities and fuel cell performance tests of synthesized membranes are carried out. As a result of performance experiments highest performance values are obtained for the membrane containing 15% boron phosphate at 0.6 V and 750 mA/cm2. Water hold-up capacity, swelling ratio, ion exchange capacity and proton conductivity of this membrane are found as 56%, 8%, 1.36 meq/g and 0.37 S/cm, respectively. These values are close to the values obtained ones for perfluorosulphonic acid membranes. Therefore this membrane can be regarded as a promising candidate for usage in fuel cells.

  11. Fuel Cell Powered Lift Truck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulden, Steve [Sysco Food Service, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-20

    This project, entitled “Recovery Act: Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Sysco (Houston) Fleet Deployment”, was in response to DOE funding opportunity announcement DE-PS36-08GO98009, Topic 7B, which promotes the deployment of fuel cell powered material handling equipment in large, multi-shift distribution centers. This project promoted large-volume commercialdeployments and helped to create a market pull for material handling equipment (MHE) powered fuel cell systems. Specific outcomes and benefits involved the proliferation of fuel cell systems in 5-to 20-kW lift trucks at a high-profile, real-world site that demonstrated the benefits of fuel cell technology and served as a focal point for other nascent customers. The project allowed for the creation of expertise in providing service and support for MHE fuel cell powered systems, growth of existing product manufacturing expertise, and promoted existing fuel cell system and component companies. The project also stimulated other MHE fleet conversions helping to speed the adoption of fuel cell systems and hydrogen fueling technology. This document also contains the lessons learned during the project in order to communicate the successes and difficulties experienced, which could potentially assist others planning similar projects.

  12. Fuel cells for naval aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satzberg, S.; Field, S.; Abu-Ali, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in fuel cell technology have occurred which make fuel cells increasingly attractive for electric power generation on future naval and commercial aircraft applications. These advances include significant increases in power density, the development of compact fuel reformers, and cost reductions due to commercialization efforts. The Navy's interest in aircraft fuel cells stems from their high energy efficiency (up to 40-60% for simple cycle; 60-70% for combined gas turbine/fuel cell hybrid cycles), and their negligible NOx and hydrocarbon emissions compared to conventional generators. While the U.S. Navy has been involved with fuel cell research and development as early as the 1960s, many of the early programs were for special warfare or undersea applications. In 1997, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) initiated a program to marinize commercial fuel cell technology for future Navy shipboard applications. The power density of fuel cell power systems is approaching the levels necessary for serious consideration for aircraft suitability. ONR and Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) are initiating a program to develop a fuel cell power system suitable for future Navy aircraft applications, utilizing as much commercially-available technology as possible. (author)

  13. A Development of Ethanol/Percarbonate Membraneless Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Priya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol on membraneless sodium percarbonate fuel cell using platinum electrodes in alkaline-acidic media is investigated. In this cell, ethanol is used as the fuel and sodium percarbonate is used as an oxidant for the first time in an alkaline-acidic media. Sodium percarbonate generates hydrogen peroxide in aqueous medium. At room temperature, the laminar-flow-based microfluidic membraneless fuel cell can reach a maximum power density of 18.96 mW cm−2 with a fuel mixture flow rate of 0.3 mL min−2. The developed fuel cell features no proton exchange membrane. The simple planar structured membraneless ethanol fuel cell presents with high design flexibility and enables easy integration of the microscale fuel cell into actual microfluidic systems and portable power applications.

  14. Materials for high-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, San Ping; Lu, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in High-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in high-temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the most important solid oxide fuel cells. A related book will cover key mater

  15. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  16. Investigation of electrolyte leaching in the performance degradation of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membrane-based high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon Hun; Oh, Kyeongmin; Ahn, Sungha; Kim, Na Young; Byeon, Ayeong; Park, Hee-Young; Lee, So Young; Park, Hyun S.; Yoo, Sung Jong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ju, Hyunchul; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-09-01

    Precise monitoring of electrolyte leaching in high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) devices during lifetime tests is helpful in making a diagnosis of their quality changes and analyzing their electrochemical performance degradation. Here, we investigate electrolyte leaching in the performance degradation of phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane-based HT-PEMFCs. We first perform quantitative analyses to measure PA leakage during cell operation by spectrophotometric means, and a higher PA leakage rate is detected when the current density is elevated in the cell. Second, long-term degradation tests under various current densities of the cells and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis are performed to examine the influence of PA loss on the membrane and electrodes during cell performance degradation. The combined results indicate that PA leakage affect cell performance durability, mostly due to an increase in charge transfer resistance and a decrease in the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) of the electrodes. Additionally, a three-dimensional (3-D) HT-PEMFC model is applied to a real-scale experimental cell, and is successfully validated against the polarization curves measured during various long-term experiments. The simulation results highlight that the PA loss from the cathode catalyst layer (CL) is a significant contributor to overall performance degradation.

  17. Design and Control of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    E-cient fuel cell systems have started to appear in many dierent commercial applications and large scale production facilities are already operating to supply fuel cells to support an ever growing market. Fuel cells are typically considered to replace leadacid batteries in applications where...... to conventional PEM fuel cells, that use liquid water as a proton conductor and thus operate at temperatures below 100oC. The HTPEM fuel cell membrane in focus in this work is the BASF Celtec-P polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane that uses phosphoric acid as a proton conductor. The absence of water in the fuel cells...... enables the use of designing cathode air cooled stacks greatly simplifying the fuel cell system and lowering the parasitic losses. Furthermore, the fuel impurity tolerance is signicantly improved because of the higher temperatures, and much higher concentrations of CO can be endured without performance...

  18. Commercializing fuel cells: managing risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Peter B.

    Commercialization of fuel cells, like any other product, entails both financial and technical risks. Most of the fuel cell literature has focussed upon technical risks, however, the most significant risks during commercialization may well be associated with the financial funding requirements of this process. Successful commercialization requires an integrated management of these risks. Like any developing technology, fuel cells face the typical 'Catch-22' of commercialization: "to enter the market, the production costs must come down, however, to lower these costs, the cumulative production must be greatly increased, i.e. significant market penetration must occur". Unless explicit steps are taken to address this dilemma, fuel cell commercialization will remain slow and require large subsidies for market entry. To successfully address this commercialization dilemma, it is necessary to follow a market-driven commercialization strategy that identifies high-value entry markets while minimizing the financial and technical risks of market entry. The financial and technical risks of fuel cell commercialization are minimized, both for vendors and end-users, with the initial market entry of small-scale systems into high-value stationary applications. Small-scale systems, in the order of 1-40 kW, benefit from economies of production — as opposed to economies to scale — to attain rapid cost reductions from production learning and continuous technological innovation. These capital costs reductions will accelerate their commercialization through market pull as the fuel cell systems become progressively more viable, starting with various high-value stationary and, eventually, for high-volume mobile applications. To facilitate market penetration via market pull, fuel cell systems must meet market-derived economic and technical specifications and be compatible with existing market and fuels infrastructures. Compatibility with the fuels infrastructure is facilitated by a

  19. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2017-12-12

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  20. Fuel cells fuelled by Saccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechner, P.; Mor, L.; Sabag, N.; Rubin, Z.; Bubis, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:Saccharides, like glucose, fructose and lactose, are ideal renewable fuels. They have high energy content, are safe, transportable, easy to store, non-flammable, non poisonous, non-volatile, odorless, easy to produce anywhere and abundant. Fuel Cells are electro-chemical devices capable to convert chemical energy into electrical energy from fuels, with theoretical efficiencies higher than 0.8 at room temperatures and with low pollutant emissions. Fuel Cells that can produce electricity form saccharides will be able to replace batteries, power electrical plants from biomass wastes, and serve as engines for transportation. In spite of these advantages, saccharide fuelled fuel cells are no available yet. Two obstacles hinder the feasibility of this potentially revolutionary device. The first is the high stability of the saccharides, which requires a good catalyst to extract the electrons from the saccharide fuel. The second is related to the nature of the Fuel Cells: the physical process takes place at the interface surface between the fuel and the electrode. In order to obtain high densities, materials with high surface to volume ratio are needed. Efforts to overcome these obstacles will be described. The use of saccharides as a fuel was treated from the thermodynamic point of view and compared with other common fuels currently used in fuel cells. We summarize measurements performed in a membrane less Alkaline Fuel Cell, using glucose as a fuel and KOH as electrolyte. The anode has incorporated platinum particles and operated at room temperature. Measurements were done, at different concentrations of glucose, of the Open Circuit Voltage, Polarization Curves and Power Density as function of the Current Density. The maximum Power Density reached was 0.61 mW/cm 2 when the Current density was 2.13 mA/cm 2 and the measured Open Circuit Voltage was 0.771 V

  1. Biological fuel cells and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, AK; Suresh, P; Berchmans, S; Rajendran, A

    2004-01-01

    One type of genuine fuel cell that does hold promise in the long-term is the biological fuel cell. Unlike conventional fuel cells, which employ hydrogen, ethanol and methanol as fuel, biological fuel cells use organic products produced by metabolic processes or use organic electron donors utilized in the growth processes as fuels for current generation. A distinctive feature of biological fuel cells is that the electrode reactions are controlled by biocatalysts, i.e. the biological redox-reac...

  2. Proton conductivity and fuel cell property of composite electrolyte consisting of Cs-substituted heteropoly acids and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kawamura, G.; Sakai, M.; Matsuda, A. [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Muto, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kurume National College of Technology, 1-1-1 Komorino, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Inorganic-organic composite electrolytes were fabricated from partially Cs{sup +}-substituted heteropoly acids (Cs-HPAs) and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) (SPEEK) for application in fuel cells. Heteropoly acids, such as phosphotungstic acid (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}:WPA), and silicotungstic acid (H{sub 4}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}:WSiA), were mechanochemically treated with cesium hydrogen sulfate (CsHSO{sub 4}) to obtain the form of Cs-HPAs. SPEEK was prepared from PEEK by sulfonation using concentrated sulfuric acid. Water durability and surface structure of HPAs were modified by introducing Cs{sup +} into HPAs. Flexible and hot water stable composite electrolytes were obtained, and their electrochemical properties were markedly improved with the addition of Cs-HPAs into the SPEEK matrix. Maximum power densities of 245 and 247 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained for 50WPA.50CsHSO{sub 4} and 50WSiA.50CsHSO{sub 4} in SPEEK (1/5 by weight) composite electrolytes, respectively, from single cell tests at 80 C and 80 RH%. These results suggest that a three-dimensional proton-conductive path was formed among homogeneously distributed Cs-HPAs particles in the SPEEK matrix. The Cs-HPAs incorporated into the SPEEK matrix increased the number of protonate sites in the electrolyte. These observations imply that the mechanochemically synthesized Cs-HPAs, which consist of hydrogen bondings between Cs-HPAs and -HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, dissociated from CsHSO{sub 4}, are promising materials as inorganic fillers in inorganic-organic composite. (author)

  3. Hydrogen fuel cell engines and related technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The manual documents the first training course developed on the use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. The manual contains eleven modules covering hydrogen properties, use and safety; fuel cell technology and its systems, fuel cell engine desi...

  4. Preparation and physical properties of (PVA0.7(NaBr0.3(H3PO4xM solid acid membrane for phosphoric acidFuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ahmad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A solid acid membranes based on poly (vinyl alcohol (PVA, sodium bromide (NaBr and phosphoric acid (H3PO4 were prepared by a solution casting method. The morphological, IR, electrical and optical properties of the (PVA0.7(NaBr0.3(H3PO4xM solid acid membranes where x = 0.00, 0.85, 1.7, 3.4, 5.1 M were investigated. The variation of film morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies. FTIR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structure of polymer and confirms the complexation of phosphoric acid with host polymeric matrix. The temperature dependent nature of ionic conductivity and the impedance of the polymer electrolytes were determined along with the associated activation energy. The ionic conductivity at room temperature was found to be strongly depends on the H3PO4 concentration which it has been achieved to be of the order 4.3 × 10−3 S/cm at ambient temperature. Optical measurements showed a decrease in optical band gap and an increase in band tail width with the increase of phosphoric acid. The data shows that the (PVA0.7(NaBr0.3(H3PO4xM solid acid membrane is promising for intermediate temperature phosphoric acid fuel cell applications.

  5. Navy fuel cell demonstration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2008-08-01

    This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

  6. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Composite Data Products | Hydrogen and Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cells | NREL Vehicle Composite Data Products Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Composite Data Products The following composite data products (CDPs) focus on current fuel cell electric vehicle evaluations Cell Operation Hour Groups CDP FCEV 39, 2/19/16 Comparison of Fuel Cell Stack Operation Hours and Miles

  7. Long-term cathode performance and the microbial communities that develop in microbial fuel cells fed different fermentation endproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Patrick D; Rader, Geoffrey; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    To better understand how cathode performance and substrates affected communities that evolved in these reactors over long periods of time, microbial fuel cells were operated for more than 1 year with individual endproducts of lignocellulose fermentation (acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, or ethanol). Large variations in reactor performance were primarily due to the specific substrates, with power densities ranging from 835 ± 21 to 62 ± 1mW/m(3). Cathodes performance degraded over time, as shown by an increase in power of up to 26% when the cathode biofilm was removed, and 118% using new cathodes. Communities that developed on the anodes included exoelectrogenic families, such as Rhodobacteraceae, Geobacteraceae, and Peptococcaceae, with the Deltaproteobacteria dominating most reactors. Pelobacter propionicus was the predominant member in reactors fed acetic acid, and it was abundant in several other MFCs. These results provide valuable insights into the effects of long-term MFC operation on reactor performance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  9. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  10. Modeling fuel cell stack systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J H [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lalk, T R [Dept. of Mech. Eng., Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-06-15

    A technique for modeling fuel cell stacks is presented along with the results from an investigation designed to test the validity of the technique. The technique was specifically designed so that models developed using it can be used to determine the fundamental thermal-physical behavior of a fuel cell stack for any operating and design configuration. Such models would be useful tools for investigating fuel cell power system parameters. The modeling technique can be applied to any type of fuel cell stack for which performance data is available for a laboratory scale single cell. Use of the technique is demonstrated by generating sample results for a model of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) stack consisting of 125 cells each with an active area of 150 cm{sup 2}. A PEMFC stack was also used in the verification investigation. This stack consisted of four cells, each with an active area of 50 cm{sup 2}. Results from the verification investigation indicate that models developed using the technique are capable of accurately predicting fuel cell stack performance. (orig.)

  11. Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-30

    Executive Summary In conjunction with the Brown Energy Initiative, research Projects selected for the fuel cell research grant were selected on the following criteria: They should be fundamental research that has the potential to significantly impact the nation’s energy infrastructure. They should be scientifically exciting and sound. They should synthesize new materials, lead to greater insights, explore new phenomena, or design new devices or processes that are of relevance to solving the energy problems. They involve top-caliper senior scientists with a record of accomplishment, or junior faculty with outstanding promise of achievement. They should promise to yield at least preliminary results within the given funding period, which would warrant further research development. They should fit into the overall mission of the Brown Energy Initiative, and the investigators should contribute as partners to an intellectually stimulating environment focused on energy science. Based on these criteria, fourteen faculty across three disciplines (Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory were selected to participate in this effort.1 In total, there were 30 people supported, at some level, on these projects. This report highlights the findings and research outcomes of the participating researchers.

  12. A French fuel cell prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    A French prototype of a fuel cell based on the PEM (proton exchange membrane) technology has been designed by Helion, a branch of Technicatome, this fuel cell delivers 300 kW and will be used in naval applications and terrestrial transport. The main advantages of fuel cell are: 1) no contamination, even if the fuel used is natural gas the quantities of CO 2 and CO emitted are respectively 17 and 75 times as little as the maximal quantities allowed by European regulations, 2) efficiency, the electric yield is up to 60 % and can reach 80 % if we include the recovery of heat, 3) silent, the fuel cell itself does not make noise. The present price of fuel cell is the main reason that hampers its industrial development, this price is in fact strongly dependant on the cost of its different components: catalyzers, membranes, bipolar plates and the hydrogen supply. This article gives the technical characteristics of the Helion's fuel cell. (A.C.)

  13. Durability of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinyu; Reifsnider, Ken

    Durability is still a critical limiting factor for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, a leading energy conversion technology for powering future hydrogen fueled automobiles, backup power systems (e.g., for base transceiver station of cellular networks), portable electronic devices, etc. Ionic conducting polymer (ionomer) electrolyte membranes are the critical enabling materials for the PEM fuel cells. They are also widely used as the central functional elements in hydrogen generation (e.g., electrolyzers), membrane cell for chlor-alkali production, etc. A perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer with the trade name Nafion® developed by DuPont™ is the most widely used PEM in chlor-alkali cells and PEM fuel cells. Similar PFSA membranes have been developed by Dow Chemical, Asahi Glass, and lately Solvay Solexis. Frequently, such membranes serve the dual function of reactant separation and selective ionic conduction between two otherwise separate compartments. For some applications, the compromise of the "separation" function via the degradation and mechanical failure of the electrolyte membrane can be the life-limiting factor; this is particularly the case for PEM in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline RuS2 nanoparticles as cathodic catalysts in the methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanjuan; Li, Nan; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Xiaotian; Yan, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Highly crystalline RuS 2 nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method. • The product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS 2 with average particle size of 14.8 nm. • RuS 2 nanoparticles were used as cathodic catalysts in methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. • The catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl − . - Abstract: Highly crystalline ruthenium sulfide (RuS 2 ) nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method at 400 °C, using ruthenium chloride and thiourea as reactants. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analyze (TG-DTA), transmission electron microscopy equipped with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED). Fourier transform infrared spectra (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD result illustrates that the highly crystalline product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS 2 and the average particle size is 14.8 nm. SEM and TEM images display the products have irregular shape of 6–25 nm. XPS analyst indicates that the sulfur exists in the form of S 2 2− . Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are conducted to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the highly crystalline RuS 2 nanoparticles in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. The results illustrate that RuS 2 is active towards oxygen reduction reaction. Although the activity of RuS 2 is lower than that of Pt/C, the RuS 2 catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl −

  15. Deoxyribonucleic acid directed metallization of platinum nanoparticles on graphite nanofibers as a durable oxygen reduction catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peera, S. Gouse; Sahu, A. K.; Arunchander, A.; Nath, Krishna; Bhat, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    Effective surface functionalization to the hydrophobic graphite nanofibers (GNF) is performed with the biomolecule, namely deoxy-ribo-nucleic-acid (DNA) via π-π interactions. Pt nanoparticles are impregnated on GNF-DNA composite by ethylene glycol reduction method (Pt/GNF-DNA) and its effect on electro catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is systemically studied. Excellent dispersion of Pt nanoparticles over GNF-DNA surfaces with no evidence on particle aggregation is a remarkable achievement in this study. This result in higher electro chemical surface area of the catalyst, enhanced ORR behavior with significant enhancement in mass activity. The catalyst is validated in H2-O2 polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and a peak power density of 675 mW cm-2 is achieved at a load current density of 1320 mA cm-2 with a minimal catalyst loading of 0.1 mg cm-2 at a cell temperature of 70 °C and 2 bar absolute pressure. Repeated potential cycling up to 10000 cycles in acidic media is also performed for this catalyst and found excellent stability with only 60 mV drop in the ORR half wave potential. The superior behavior of Pt/GNF-DNA catalyst is credited to the robust fibrous structure of GNF and its effective surface functionalization process via π-π interaction.

  16. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  17. Ammonia as a suitable fuel for fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong eLan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  18. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  19. Fuel cell energy service Enron`s commerical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    Enron, the premier provider of clean fuels worldwide, has launched a unique energy service based on fuel cell technology. The goal of this program is to bring the benefits of fuel cell power to the broad commercial marketplace. Enron`s Energy Service is currently based on a 200 kilowatt phosphoric acid power plant manufactured by ONSI Corporation. This plant is fueled by natural gas or propane, and exhibits superior performance. Enron offers a `no hassle` package that provides customers with immediate benefits with no upfront capital or technical risks. This paper describes Enron`s fuel cell commercial program.

  20. Metrology for Fuel Cell Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocker, Michael [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Stanfield, Eric [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2015-02-04

    The project was divided into three subprojects. The first subproject is Fuel Cell Manufacturing Variability and Its Impact on Performance. The objective was to determine if flow field channel dimensional variability has an impact on fuel cell performance. The second subproject is Non-contact Sensor Evaluation for Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Process Control and Smart Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks. The objective was to enable cost reduction in the manufacture of fuel cell plates by providing a rapid non-contact measurement system for in-line process control. The third subproject is Optical Scatterfield Metrology for Online Catalyst Coating Inspection of PEM Soft Goods. The objective was to evaluate the suitability of Optical Scatterfield Microscopy as a viable measurement tool for in situ process control of catalyst coatings.

  1. Method of operating a direct dme fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of operating a fuel cell system comprising one or more fuel cells with a proton exchange membrane, wherein the membrane is composed of a polymeric material comprising acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI). The method comprises adjusting the operating...

  2. Preparation of anode-electrolyte structures using graphite, sodium bicarbonate or citric acid as pore forming agents for application in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Fiuza, Raigenis da; Silva, Marcos Aurelio da; Guedes, Bruna C.; Pontes, Luiz A.; Boaventura, Jaime Soares [UFBA, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil). Energy and Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    Cermets based on Ni supported on YSZ or GDC were prepared for use as anode in direct reform SOFCs. NaHCO3 (Na-Ni-YSZ and Na-Ni-GDC) or citric acid (Ac-Ni-YSZ and Ac-Ni-GDC) were used as pore forming agents (PFAs). The SOFC anode was also prepared using graphite (G-Ni-YSZ and G-Ni-GDC) as PFA for the purposes of comparison. The testing unitary SOFC, planar type, was made by pressing the anode-electrolyte assembly, followed by sintering at 1500 C. After this, LSM (lanthanum and strontium manganite) paint was used for the cathode deposition. The powdered cermets were evaluated in ethanol steam reforming at 650 C. The ethanol conversion was 84% and 32% for cermets Na-Ni-YSZ and G-Ni-YSZ, respectively and the selectivity to H{sub 2} was 32 and 20% for the two cermets, respectively. The Na-Ni-YSZ cermet was ten times more resistant to carbon deposition than the G-Ni-YSZ cermet. SEM micrographs of the anode-electrolyte assembly showed that the use of NaHCO{sub 3} as PFA created a well formed interface between layers with homogeneously distributed pores. In contrast, graphite as PFA formed a loose interface between anode and electrolyte. The performance of the unitary SOFC was evaluated using ethanol, hydrogen or methane as fuel. The cell operated well using any of these fuels; however, they exhibited different electrochemical behavior. (orig.)

  3. European opportunities for fuel cell commercialisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, C. E.; Steel, M. C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The European electricity market is changing. This paper will look at the background to power generation in Europe and highlight the recent factors which have entered the market to promote change. The 1990s seem to offer great possibilities for fuel cell commercialisation. Awareness of environmental problems has never been greater and there is growing belief that fuel cell technology can contribute to solving some of these problems. Issues which have caused the power industry in Europe to re-think its methods of generation include: concern over increasing carbon dioxide emissions and their contribution to the greenhouse effect; increasing SO x and NO x emissions and the damage cause by acid rain; the possibility of adverse effects on health caused by high voltage transmission lines; environmental restrictions to the expansion of hydroelectric schemes; public disenchantment with nuclear power following the Chernobyl accident; avoidance of dependence on imported oil following the Gulf crisis and a desire for fuel flexibility. All these factors are hastening the search for clean, efficient, modular power generators which can be easily sited close to the electricity consumer and operated using a variety of fuels. It is not only the power industry which is changing. A tightening of the legislation concerning emissions from cars is encouraging European auto companies to develop electric vehicles, some of which may be powered by fuel cells. Political changes, such as the opening up of Eastern Europe will also expand the market for low-emission, efficient power plants as attempts are made to develop and clean up that region. Many Europeans organisations are re-awakening their interest, or strengthening their activities, in the area of fuel cells because of the increasing opportunities offered by the European market. While some companies have chosen to buy, test and demonstrate Japanese or American fuel cell stacks with the aim of gaining operational experience and

  4. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  5. 14 CFR 31.45 - Fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel cells. 31.45 Section 31.45 Aeronautics... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.45 Fuel cells. If fuel cells are used, the fuel cells, their attachments, and related supporting structure must be shown by tests to be capable of...

  6. Electrocatalysis of fuel cell reactions: Investigation of alternate electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D. T.; Hsueh, K. L.; Chang, H. H.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and transport properties of the electrolyte in the phosphoric acid fuel cell are studied. The areas covered were: (1) development of a theoretical expression for the rotating ring disk electrode technique; (2) determination of the intermediate reaction rate constants for oxygen reduction on platinum in phosphoric acid electrolyte; (3) determination of oxygen reduction mechanism in trifluoreomethanesulfonic acid (TFMSA) which was considered as an alternate electrolyte for the acid fuel cells; and (4) the measurement of transport properties of the phosphoric acid electrolyte at high concentrations and temperatures.

  7. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  8. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel

  9. Porous carbon-coated ZnO nanoparticles derived from low carbon content formic acid-based Zn(II) metal-organic frameworks towards long cycle lithium-ion anode material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Song; Fan, Ruiqing; Li, Bingjiang; Qiang, Liangsheng; Yang, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The nanocomposites constructed from Zn-based MOFs exhibit low carbon content with super-high rate capability and long cycling life. - Highlights: • Novel ZnO@porous carbon matrix nanocomposites are constructed by pyrolysis of Zn-based MOFs. • The nanocomposites constructed with Zn-based MOFs show low carbon content. • The constructed nanocomposites exhibit high energy density, super-high rate capability and long cycling life. - Abstract: Single-C formic acid-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are used to construct novel ZnO@porous carbon matrix nanocomposites by controlled pyrolysis. In the constructed nanocomposites, the porous carbon matrices act as a confined support to prevent agglomeration of the ZnO nanoparticles and create a rapid electron conductive network. Meanwhile, the well-defined, continuous porous structured MOFs provide a large specific surface area, which increases the contact of electrolyte-electrode and improves the penetration of electrolyte. Especially, the reasonable choice of formic acid-based MOFs construct the low carbon content composite, which contribute to the high energy density and long cycle life. The constructed nanocomposites show stable, ultrahigh rate lithium ion storage properties of 650 mAh g −1 at charge/discharge rate of 1 C even after 200 cycles.

  10. Fuel cell catholyte regenerating apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struthers, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    A catholyte regenerating apparatus for a fuel cell having a cathode section containing a catholyte solution and wherein fuel cell reaction reduces the catholyte to gas and water. The apparatus includes means to conduct partically reduced water diluted catholyte from the fuel cell and means to conduct the gas from the fuel cell to a mixing means. An absorption tower containing a volume of gas absorbing liquid solvent receives the mixed together gas and diluted catholyte from the mixing means within the absorption column, the gas is absorbed by the solvent and the gas ladened solvent and diluted catholyte are commingled. A liquid transfer means conducts gas ladened commingled. A liquid transfer means conducts gas ladened commingled solvent and electrolyte from the absorption column to an air supply means wherein air is added and commingled therewith and a stoichiometric volume of oxygen from the air is absorbed thereby. A second liquid transfer means conducts the gas ladened commingled solvent and diluted catholyte into a catalyst column wherein the oxygen and gas react to reconstitute the catholyte from which the gas was generated wna wherein the reconstituted diluted catholyte is separated from the solvent. Recirculating means conducts the solvent from the catalyst column back into the absorption column and liquid conducting means conducts the reconstituted catholyte to a holding tank preparatory for catholyte to a holding tank preparatory for recirculation through the cathode section of the fuel cell

  11. Fuel cells. Pt. 1; Celle a combustibile. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanari, S; Macchi, E [Milan Politecnico (Italy). Dip. di Energetica

    1999-01-01

    Direct conversion of chemical energy into electricity (without intermediate heat generation) is a long-established method to improve the efficiency of power generation, as well as to reduce polluting emissions from thermal plants. The origins of fuel cells, as well as their operating principles, are dealt with. Then, various types of cells are taken into consideration, on the basis of both their characteristics and the operating principles of electrolytes. Finally, structure and operation of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFC) and Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells (PAFC) are described. [Italiano] La conversione diretta dell`energia chimica del combustibile in energia elettrica, senza passare attraverso la produzione di calore, rappresenta una via ormai ampiamente collaudata per migliorare l`efficienza della produzione di energia elettrica e per contenere le emissioni generate dagli impianti termoelettrici. L`articolo, dopo una breve presentazione della storia dello sviluppo nel tempo delle celle a combustibile, espone i principi di funzionamento delle stesse. Si esaminano quindi i vari tipi di cella a partire dalle caratteristiche e dalle modalita` di funzionamento degli elettroliti che ne definiscono la classificazione. Successivamente vengono illustrate le caratteristiche costruttive e funzionali delle celle ad elettrolita polimerico (PEMFC), delle celle alcaline (AFC) e delle celle ad acido fosforico (PAFC).

  12. DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Department of Energy...Overview of Combined Heat+Power PowerElectricity Natural Gas Heat + Cooling Natural Gas or Biogas ...Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Source: US DOE 10/2010 Biogas Benefits: Preliminary Analysis Stationary fuel

  13. Proceedings of the third annual fuel cells contractors review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, W.J. (ed.)

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop the essential technology for private sector characterization of the various fuel cell electrical generation systems. These systems promise high fuel to electricity efficiencies (40 to 60 percent), distinct possibilities for cogeneration applications, modularity of design, possibilities of urban siting, and environmentally benign emissions. The purpose of this meeting was to provide the research and development (R D) participants in the DOE/Fossil Energy-sponsored Fuel Cells Program with the opportunity to present key results of their research and to establish closer business contacts. Major emphasis was on phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide technology efforts. Research results of the coal gasification and gas stream cleanup R D activities pertinent to the Fuel Cells Program were also highlighted. Two hundred seventeen attendees from industry, utilities, academia, and Government participated in this 2-day meeting. Twenty-three papers were given in three formal sessions: molten carbonate fuel cells R D (9 papers), solid oxide fuel cells (8 papers), phosphoric acid fuel cells R D (6 papers). In addition to the papers and presentations, these proceedings also include comments on the Fuel Cells Program from the viewpoint of DOE/METC Fuel Cell Overview by Rita A. Bajura, DOE/METC Perspective by Manville J. Mayfield, Electric Power Research Institute by Daniel M. Rastler, Natural Gas by Hugh D. Guthrie, and Transportation Applications by Pandit G. Patil.

  14. The Western Canada Fuel Cell Initiative (WCFCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birss, V.; Chuang, K.

    2006-01-01

    Vision: Western Canada will become an international centre for stationary power generation technology using high temperature fuel cells that use a wide variety of fossil and biomass fuels. Current research areas of investigation: 1. Clean efficient use of hydrocarbons 2. Large-scale electricity generation 3. CO2 sequestration 4. Direct alcohol fuel cells 5. Solid oxide fuel cells. (author)

  15. Maritime Fuel Cell Generator Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Fuel costs and emissions in maritime ports are an opportunity for transportation energy efficiency improvement and emissions reduction efforts. Ocean-going vessels, harbor craft, and cargo handling equipment are still major contributors to air pollution in and around ports. Diesel engine costs continually increase as tighter criteria pollutant regulations come into effect and will continue to do so with expected introduction of carbon emission regulations. Diesel fuel costs will also continue to rise as requirements for cleaner fuels are imposed. Both aspects will increase the cost of diesel-based power generation on the vessel and on shore. Although fuel cells have been used in many successful applications, they have not been technically or commercially validated in the port environment. One opportunity to do so was identified in Honolulu Harbor at the Young Brothers Ltd. wharf. At this facility, barges sail regularly to and from neighbor islands and containerized diesel generators provide power for the reefers while on the dock and on the barge during transport, nearly always at part load. Due to inherent efficiency characteristics of fuel cells and diesel generators, switching to a hydrogen fuel cell power generator was found to have potential emissions and cost savings.

  16. Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    logo, Direct FuelCell and “DFC” are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Applications •On-site self generation of combined heat... of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Fuels Resources for DFC • Natural Gas and LNG • Propane • Biogas (by Anaerobicnaerobic Digestion) - Municipal Waste...FUEL RESOURCES z NATURAL GAS z PROPANE z DFC H2 (50-60%) z ETHANOL zWASTE METHANE z BIOGAS z COAL GAS Diversity of Fuels plus High Efficiency

  17. Proton conducting membranes prepared by incorporation of organophosphorus acids into alcohol barrier polymers for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongyi; Zheng, Xiaohong; Wu, Hong; Pan, Fusheng

    A novel type of DMFC membrane was developed via incorporation of organophosphorus acids (OPAs) into alcohol barrier materials (polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan, PVA/CS) to simultaneously acquire high proton conductivity and low methanol permeability. Three kinds of OPAs including amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP), ethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (EDTMP) and hexamethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (HDTMP), with different molecular structure and phosphonic acid groups content were added into PVA/CS blends and served the dual functions as proton conductor as well as crosslinker. The as-prepared OPA-doped PVA/CS membranes exhibited remarkably enhanced proton conducting ability, 2-4 times higher than that of the pristine PVA/CS membrane, comparable with that for Nafion ®117 membrane (5.04 × 10 -2 S cm -1). The highest proton conductivities 3.58 × 10 -2, 3.51 × 10 -2 and 2.61 × 10 -2 S cm -1 for ATMP-, EDTMP- and HDTMP-doped membranes, respectively were all achieved at highest initial OPA doping content (23.1 wt.%) at room temperature. The EDTMP-doped PVA/CS membrane with an acid content of 13.9 wt.% showed the lowest methanol permeability of 2.32 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1 which was 16 times lower than that of Nafion ®117 membrane. In addition, the thermal stability and oxidative durability were both significantly improved by the incorporation of OPAs in comparison with pristine PVA/CS membranes.

  18. Proton conducting membranes prepared by incorporation of organophosphorus acids into alcohol barrier polymers for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhongyi; Zheng, Xiaohong; Wu, Hong; Pan, Fusheng [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2008-10-15

    A novel type of DMFC membrane was developed via incorporation of organophosphorus acids (OPAs) into alcohol barrier materials (polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan, PVA/CS) to simultaneously acquire high proton conductivity and low methanol permeability. Three kinds of OPAs including amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP), ethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (EDTMP) and hexamethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (HDTMP), with different molecular structure and phosphonic acid groups content were added into PVA/CS blends and served the dual functions as proton conductor as well as crosslinker. The as-prepared OPA-doped PVA/CS membranes exhibited remarkably enhanced proton conducting ability, 2-4 times higher than that of the pristine PVA/CS membrane, comparable with that for Nafion {sup registered} 117 membrane (5.04 x 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1}). The highest proton conductivities 3.58 x 10{sup -2}, 3.51 x 10{sup -2} and 2.61 x 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1} for ATMP-, EDTMP- and HDTMP-doped membranes, respectively were all achieved at highest initial OPA doping content (23.1 wt.%) at room temperature. The EDTMP-doped PVA/CS membrane with an acid content of 13.9 wt.% showed the lowest methanol permeability of 2.32 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} which was 16 times lower than that of Nafion {sup registered} 117 membrane. In addition, the thermal stability and oxidative durability were both significantly improved by the incorporation of OPAs in comparison with pristine PVA/CS membranes. (author)

  19. Oxygen Reduction on Gas-Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells by a Potential Decay Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Gang, Xiao; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of gaseous oxygen on carbon supported platinum electrodes has been studied at 150 degrees C with polarization and potential decay measurements. The electrolyte was either 100 weight percent phosphoric acid or that acid with a fluorinated additive, potassium perfluorohexanesulfonate ......6F13SO3K). The pseudo-Tafel curves of the overpotential vs. log (ii(L)/(i(L) - i)) show a two-slope behavior, probably due to different adsorption mechanisms. The potential relaxations as functions of log (t + tau) and log (-d eta/dt) have been plotted. The variations of these slopes...

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles as cathodic catalysts in the methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanjuan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Minisry of Education Ocean University of China, Qingdao, 266100 (China); College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Nan, E-mail: lin@jlu.edu.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yanagisawa, Kazumichi [Research Laboratory of Hydrothermal Chemistry, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Li, Xiaotian [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Yan, Xiao [Key Laboratory of Physics and Technology for Advanced Batteries (Ministry of Education), College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method. • The product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS{sub 2} with average particle size of 14.8 nm. • RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles were used as cathodic catalysts in methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. • The catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl{sup −}. - Abstract: Highly crystalline ruthenium sulfide (RuS{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method at 400 °C, using ruthenium chloride and thiourea as reactants. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analyze (TG-DTA), transmission electron microscopy equipped with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED). Fourier transform infrared spectra (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD result illustrates that the highly crystalline product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS{sub 2} and the average particle size is 14.8 nm. SEM and TEM images display the products have irregular shape of 6–25 nm. XPS analyst indicates that the sulfur exists in the form of S{sub 2}{sup 2−}. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are conducted to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. The results illustrate that RuS{sub 2} is active towards oxygen reduction reaction. Although the activity of RuS{sub 2} is lower than that of Pt/C, the RuS{sub 2} catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl{sup −}.

  1. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  2. Carbon-based Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-08-31

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

  3. Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Kjeang, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries represent a special type of electrochemical power generators that can be miniaturized and integrated in a microfluidic chip. Summarizing the initial ten years of research and development in this emerging field, this SpringerBrief is the first book dedicated to microfluidic fuel cell and battery technology for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Written at a critical juncture, where strategically applied research is urgently required to seize impending technology opportunities for commercial, analytical, and educational utility, the intention is

  4. Fuel cell vehicles: technological solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Martinez, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently it takes a serious look at fuel cell vehicles, a leading candidate for next-generation vehicle propulsion systems. The green house effect and air quality are pressing to the designers of internal combustion engine vehicles, owing to the manufacturers to find out technological solutions in order to increase the efficiency and reduce emissions from the vehicles. On the other hand, energy source used by currently propulsion systems is not renewable, the well are limited and produce CO 2 as a product from the combustion process. In that situation, why fuel cell is an alternative of internal combustion engine?

  5. Trichloroethylene-induced formic aciduria in the male C57 Bl/6 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Edward A; Keane, Paul; Rowe, Philip H; Foster, John R; Antoine, Daniel; Morris, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    56days, as anticipated there was a marked and sustained formic aciduria over the duration of the study. This was associated with acidification of the urine, mild diuresis and a marked fall in urinary ammonia. Six biomarkers of renal injury KIM-1, NGAL, NAG, Cystatin-c, Albumin and IL-18 were measured in urine over time and they all showed a small increase at the later time points indicative of early markers of renal injury. However, there was no histological evidence of renal damage or renal tubule cell proliferation after 8 weeks' exposure to TCE. The concentration of formic acid in plasma at the end of the study was 1.05±0.61mM compared to control, 0.39±0.17mM. In the liver, formic acid was present at a concentration of 1mM in both control and treated mice while in the kidney it was higher at 2mM in both treated and controls. We also report that trichloroacetic acid (TCA) a metabolite of TCE also causes formic aciduria, at doses likely to arise in vivo after 1000mg/kg TCE namely 16 and 32mg/kg. Urinary formic acid peaked 24h after dosing at 4mg formic acid excreted/mouse. Thus, as in male and female rats (Yaqoob et al., 2013) male mice show a marked formic aciduria following TCE which after 8 weeks' exposure did not produce renal injury, but the small rise in renal biomarkers suggest renal damage may occur following longer exposure. Thus, TCE-induced formic aciduria may be a contributor factor in the chronic renal injury seen in male and female rats and mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Uniqueness of magnetotomography for fuel cells and fuel cell stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustfeld, H; Hirschfeld, J; Reissel, M; Steffen, B

    2009-01-01

    The criterion for the applicability of any tomographic method is its ability to construct the desired inner structure of a system from external measurements, i.e. to solve the inverse problem. Magnetotomography applied to fuel cells and fuel cell stacks aims at determining the inner current densities from measurements of the external magnetic field. This is an interesting idea since in those systems the inner electric current densities are large, several hundred mA per cm 2 and therefore relatively high external magnetic fields can be expected. Still the question remains how uniquely the inverse problem can be solved. Here we present a proof that by exploiting Maxwell's equations extensively the inverse problem of magnetotomography becomes unique under rather mild assumptions and we show that these assumptions are fulfilled in fuel cells and fuel cell stacks. Moreover, our proof holds true for any other device fulfilling the assumptions listed here. Admittedly, our proof has one caveat: it does not contain an estimate of the precision requirements the measurements need to fulfil for enabling reconstruction of the inner current densities from external magnetic fields.

  7. Achievement report for fiscal 1997 on joint research to develop fuel cell technologies for urban energy centers. Research on evaluating life of phosphoric acid fuel cells; 1997 nendo toshi energy center nado nenryo denchi gijutsu kaihatsu kyodo kenkyu seika hokokusho. Rinsangata nenryo denchi jumyo hyoka kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This paper discusses life evaluation on phosphoric acid fuel cells of urban energy center type for regional energy supply and on-site type to be installed in buildings. Operation characteristics tests and disassembly checks allow to identify factors for voltage decrease, and estimate the life therefrom particularly if the voltage decrease is caused from catalyst activity. The time before 10% decrease value is reached is now about 40,000 hours. The creep analysis method that has been developed recently can predict deformation in full-size reformers nearly exactly, and is effective in operating the reformer and evaluating the life at the design stage. Creep buckling is the critical value, which is caused by ecliptic deformation of internal tubes in the second catalyst layer. In a heat exchanger for fuel gas preheating, carbon in the reformed gas is carbonized and deposited due to catalytic action of nickel in the brazing material that bonds plates and fins in the heat exchanger. Iron also has a possibility of performing catalytic action. In the on-site type 1,000-kW class fuel cells, no structural problems have been presented even after the operation has been stopped. In order to extend time interval between phosphoric acid supply into the cells, it is necessary to reduce difference in the remaining phosphoric acid amounts in the stack lamination direction and in the cell flat surface. (NEDO)

  8. Molten carbonate fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Kinoshita, Mamoru; Murakami, Shuzo; Furukawa, Nobuhiro

    1987-09-26

    Reformed gas or coal gasification gas, etc. is used as the fuel gas for fused carbonate fuel cells, however sulfuric compounds are contained in these gases and even after these gases have been treated beforehand through a desulfurizer, a trace quantity of H/sub 2/S is sent to a fuel electrode. Sulfur oxide which is formed at the time of burning and oxidating the exhaust gas from the fuel electrode is supplied together with the air to an oxygen electrode and becomes sulfate after substituting carbonate, which is the electrolyte of the electrode, causing deterioration of the cell characteristics and durability. With regard to a system that hydrogen rich gas which was reformed from the raw fuel is supplied to a fuel electrode, and its exhaust gas is oxidated through a burner to form carbon dioxide which is supplied together with the air to an oxygen electrode, this invention proposes the prevention of the aforementioned defects by providing at the down stream of the above burner a remover to trap with fused carbonate such sulfur compounds as SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3/ in the gas after being oxidated as above. (3 figs)

  9. Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

  10. Wet deposition and related atmospheric chemistry in the São Paulo metropolis, Brazil: Part 2—contribution of formic and acetic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Adalgiza; Gutz, Ivano G. R.

    Wet-only deposition samples were collected at a site in the urban area of the São Paulo metropolis between February (end of the rainy summer) and October (beginning of spring) 2000, an atypical period due to rainfall 40% below the 30-year average. The majority ions in rainwater were measured by capillary zone electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection, CZE-CCD, applied for the first time to the organic anions acetate and formate. The volume weight mean (VWM) concentrations of the majority anions NO 3-, SO 42- and Cl - were, respectively, 15.6, 9.5 and 4.7 μmol l -1. The VWM concentration of HCOO -t, (HCOO -+HCOOH) was 17.0 μmol l -1, about twice the 8.9 μmol l -1 of CH 3COO -t. The VWM concentration of free H + was low ( 16.9 μmol l -1), corresponding to pH 4.77. This denotes the relevance of species like ammonia, analyzed as NH4+ ( VWM=27.9 μmol l -1), and calcium carbonate ( VWM=5.3 μmol l -1 Ca2+) as partial neutralizers of the acidity. By hypothetically assuming that H + is the only counterion of the non-sea-salt fraction of the dissociated anions, their contribution to the total potential acidity would decrease in the following order: sulfate (29%), formate (29%), nitrate (26%), acetate (15%) and chloride (1%). The 44% potential participation of the carboxylic acids reveals their importance to the acidity of São Paulo's rainwater during the study period. Direct vehicular emission of lower carboxylic acids and aldehydes (in particular, acetic acid and acetaldehyde) is singularly high in the metropolis due to the extensive use of ethanol and gasohol (containing ˜20% of ethanol) as fuels of the light fleet of 5.5 million cars; in addition, regional atmospheric conditions favor the photochemical formation of the acids, since concentrations of ozone and aldehydes are high and solar irradiation is intense at the 23°34'S latitude. The presence of higher concentrations of HCOOH than CH 3COOH indicates a prevalence of its photochemical production

  11. Self-assembled platinum nanoparticles on sulfonic acid-grafted graphene as effective electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinlin; Li, Yanhong; Li, Shengli; Jiang, San Ping

    2016-02-15

    In this article, sulfonic acid-grafted reduced graphene oxide (S-rGO) were synthesized using a one-pot method under mild conditions, and used as Pt catalyst supports to prepare Pt/S-rGO electrocatalysts through a self-assembly route. The structure, morphologies and physicochemical properties of S-rGO were examined in detail by techniques such as atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The S-rGO nanosheets show excellent solubility and stability in water and the average particle size of Pt nanoparticles supported on S-rGO is ~3.8 nm with symmetrical and uniform distribution. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt/S-rGO were investigated for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In comparison to Pt supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/VC) and Pt/rGO, the Pt/S-rGO electrocatalyst exhibits a much higher electrocatalytic activity, faster reaction kinetics and a better stability. The results indicate that Pt/S-rGO is a promising and effective electrocatalyst for MOR of DMFCs.

  12. Self-assembled platinum nanoparticles on sulfonic acid-grafted graphene as effective electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinlin; Li, Yanhong; Li, Shengli; Jiang, San Ping

    2016-02-01

    In this article, sulfonic acid-grafted reduced graphene oxide (S-rGO) were synthesized using a one-pot method under mild conditions, and used as Pt catalyst supports to prepare Pt/S-rGO electrocatalysts through a self-assembly route. The structure, morphologies and physicochemical properties of S-rGO were examined in detail by techniques such as atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The S-rGO nanosheets show excellent solubility and stability in water and the average particle size of Pt nanoparticles supported on S-rGO is ~3.8 nm with symmetrical and uniform distribution. The electrocatalytic properties of Pt/S-rGO were investigated for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In comparison to Pt supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/VC) and Pt/rGO, the Pt/S-rGO electrocatalyst exhibits a much higher electrocatalytic activity, faster reaction kinetics and a better stability. The results indicate that Pt/S-rGO is a promising and effective electrocatalyst for MOR of DMFCs.

  13. Hydrogen storage and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia

    2018-01-01

    Global warming and future energy supply are two major challenges facing American public today. To overcome such challenges, it is imperative to maximize the existing fuel utilization with new conversion technologies while exploring alternative energy sources with minimal environmental impact. Hydrogen fuel cell represents a next-generation energy-efficient technology in transportation and stationary power productions. In this presentation, a brief overview of the current technology status of on-board hydrogen storage and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell in transportation will be provided. The directions of the future researches in these technological fields, including a recent "big idea" of "H2@Scale" currently developed at the U. S. Department of Energy, will also be discussed.

  14. Effect of cesium salt of tungstophosphoric acid (Cs-TPA) on the properties of sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK) composite membranes for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, Hacer; Inan, Tuelay Y.; Unveren, Elif [The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUeBiTAK), Marmara Research Center, Chemistry Institute, P.K. 21, 41470 Gebze-Kocaeli (Turkey); Kaya, Metin [DEMIRDOeKUeM A.S. 4 Eyluel Mah, ismet inoenue Cad. No:245 Bozueyuek/Bilecik (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    We have prepared composite membranes for fuel cell applications. Cesium salt of tungstophosphoric acid (Cs-TPA) particles was synthesized by aqueous solutions of tungstophosphoric acid and cesium hydroxide and, Cs-TPA particles and sulfonated (polyether ether ketone) (SPEEK) with two sulfonation degrees (DS), 60 and 70%have been used. We examined both the effects of Cs-TPA in SPEEK membranes as functions of sulfonation degrees of SPEEK and the content of Cs-TPA. The performance of the composite membranes was evaluated in terms of water uptake, ion exchange capacity, proton conductivity, chemical stability, hydrolytic stability, thermal stability and methanol permeability. The morphology of the membranes was investigated with SEM micrographs. Increasing sulfonation degree of SPEEK from 60 to 70 caused agglomeration of the Cs-TPA particles. The methanol permeability was reduced to 4.7 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s for SPEEK (DS: 60%)/Cs-TPA membrane with 10 wt.% Cs-TPA concentration, and acceptable proton conductivity of 1.3 x 10{sup -1} S/cm was achieved at 80 C under 100% RH. The weight loss at 900 C increased with the addition of inorganic particles, as expected. The hydrolytic stability of the SPEEK/Cs-TPA based composite membranes was improved with the incorporation of the Cs-TPA particles into the matrix. We also noted that SPEEK60/Cs-TPA composite membranes were hydrolytically more stable than SPEEK70/Cs-TPA composite membranes. On the other hand, Methanol, water vapor, and hydrogen permeability values of SPEEK60 composite membranes were found to be lower than that of Nafion {sup registered}. (author)

  15. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddapaneni, N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  16. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology for use in fuel cell vehicles and other applications has been intensively developed in recent decades. Besides the fuel cell stack, air and fuel control and thermal and water management are major challenges in the development of the fuel cell for vehicle applications. The air supply system can have a major impact on overall system efficiency. In this paper a fuel cell system model for optimizing system operating conditions was developed wh...

  17. Nanomaterials for fuel cell catalysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, KI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Global experts provide an authoritative source of information on the use of electrochemical fuel cells, and in particular discuss the use of nanomaterials to enhance the performance of existing energy systems. The book covers the state of the art...

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...

  19. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  20. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltser, Mark Alexander; Grot, Stephen Andreas

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.