WorldWideScience

Sample records for formation rates masses

  1. Galaxy Mass, Metallicity, Radius and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Brisbin, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Working with 108,786 Sloan Digital Sky Survey low redshift galaxies, we have examined the relation between galaxy mass, metallicity, radius, and star formation rates. We subdivided the redshift range covered in our sample 0.072.8E10 Msun and exhibit high metallicities at high star formation rates, suggesting that for these galaxies star formation independent of mass infall plays a significant role. A toy model for the physics of infall accounts for the SFR Mi^(3/2) relation and permits us to estimate the mean densities and velocities of clumps of baryonic matter traversing the dark matter halos in which the SDSS galaxies may be embedded. The model also reproduces the gross features of the galaxy main sequence.

  2. Star formation rates and mass distributions in interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapferer, W; Schindler, S; Van Kampen, E

    2005-01-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the star formation rate (hereafter SFR) in interacting disk galaxies. We determine the dependence of the overall SFR on different spatial alignments and impact parameters of more than 50 different configurations in combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations. We also show mass profiles of the baryonic components. We find that galaxy-galaxy interactions can enrich the surrounding intergalatic medium with metals very efficiently up to distances of several 100 kpc. This enrichment can be explained in terms of indirect processes like thermal driven galactic winds or direct processes like 'kinetic' spreading of baryonic matter. In the case of equal mass mergers the direct -kinetic- redistribution of gaseous matter (after 5 Gyr) is less efficient than the environmental enrichment of the same isolated galaxies by a galactic wind. In the case of non-equal mass mergers however, the direct -kinetic- process dominates the redistribution of gaseous matter. Compared to the isolated sy...

  3. Evolution of galaxy stellar masses and star formation rates in the EAGLE simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Furlong, M; Theuns, T; Schaye, J; Crain, R A; Schaller, M; Vecchia, C Dalla; Frenk, C S; McCarthy, I G; Helly, J; Jenkins, A; Rosas-Guevara, Y M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of galaxy masses and star formation rates in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) simulations. These comprise a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in a $\\Lambda$CDM cosmogony with subgrid models for radiative cooling, star formation, stellar mass loss, and feedback from stars and accreting black holes. The subgrid feedback was calibrated to reproduce the observed present-day galaxy stellar mass function and galaxy sizes. Here we demonstrate that the simulations reproduce the observed growth of the stellar mass density to within 20 per cent. The simulation also tracks the observed evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function out to redshift z = 7, with differences comparable to the plausible uncertainties in the interpretation of the data. Just as with observed galaxies, the specific star formation rates of simulated galaxies are bimodal, with distinct star forming and passive sequences. The specific star formation rates of star forming galaxies ar...

  4. The sizes, masses and specific star formation rates of massive galaxies at 1.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLure, R. J.; Pearce, H. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Bruce, V. A.; Caputi, K. I.; Almaini, O.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bradshaw, E. J.; Buitrago, F.; Chuter, R.; Foucaud, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive study of the relationship between galaxy size, stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) at redshifts 1.3 mass-complete (M⋆ ≥ 6 × 1010 M⊙), spectroscopic sample from the UK Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultradeep Survey, wit

  5. The sizes, masses and specific star formation rates of massive galaxies at 1.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLure, R. J.; Pearce, H. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Bruce, V. A.; Caputi, K. I.; Almaini, O.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bradshaw, E. J.; Buitrago, F.; Chuter, R.; Foucaud, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive study of the relationship between galaxy size, stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) at redshifts 1.3 mass-complete (M⋆ ≥ 6 × 1010 M⊙), spectroscopic sample from the UK Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultradeep Survey,

  6. Conditions for circumstellar disc formation - II. Effects of initial cloud stability and mass accretion rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate on to the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brakes the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with non-uniform densities.

  7. Galaxy Evolution in Cosmological Simulations With Outflows I: Stellar Masses and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    We examine the growth of the stellar content of galaxies from z=3-0 in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations incorporating parameterised galactic outflows. Without outflows, galaxies overproduce stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) compared to observations. Winds introduce a three-tier form for the galaxy stellar mass and star formation rate functions, where the middle tier depends on differential (i.e. mass-dependent) recycling of ejected wind material back into galaxies. A tight M*-SFR relation is a generic outcome of all these simulations, and its evolution is well-described as being powered by cold accretion, although current observations at z>2 suggest that star formation in small early galaxies must be highly suppressed. Roughly one-third of z=0 galaxies at masses below M^* are satellites, and star formation in satellites is not much burstier than in centrals. All models fail to suppress star formation and stellar mass growth in massive galaxies at z<2, indicating the need for an exter...

  8. Connecting stellar mass and star-formation rate to dark matter halo mass out to z ˜ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Amblard, A.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Conley, A.; Cooray, A.; Halpern, M.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ilbert, O.; Ivison, R. J.; Marsden, G.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Smith, A. J.; Viero, M.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-05-01

    We have constructed an extended halo model (EHM) which relates the total stellar mass and star-formation rate (SFR) to halo mass (Mh). An empirical relation between the distribution functions of total stellar mass of galaxies and host halo mass, tuned to match the spatial density of galaxies over 0 EHM with the halo accretion histories from numerical simulations, we trace the stellar mass growth and star-formation history in haloes spanning a range of masses. We find that: (1) the intensity of the star-forming activity in haloes in the probed mass range has steadily decreased from z ˜ 2 to 0; (2) at a given epoch, haloes in the mass range between a few times 1011 M⊙ and a few times 1012 M⊙ are the most efficient at hosting star formation; (3) the peak of SFR density shifts to lower mass haloes over time; and (4) galaxies that are forming stars most actively at z ˜ 2 evolve into quiescent galaxies in today's group environments, strongly supporting previous claims that the most powerful starbursts at z ˜ 2 are progenitors of today's elliptical galaxies.

  9. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Telford, O Grace; Skillman, Evan D; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of S/N cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013) for ~130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these abundance ...

  10. The relation between accretion rates and the initial mass function in hydrodynamical simulations of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Maschberger, Th; Clarke, C J; Moraux, E

    2013-01-01

    We analyse a hydrodynamical simulation of star formation. Sink particles in the simulations which represent stars show episodic growth, which is presumably accretion from a core that can be regularly replenished in response to the fluctuating conditions in the local environment. The accretion rates follow $\\dot{m} \\propto m^{2/3}$, as expected from accretion in a gas-dominated potential, but with substantial variations over-laid on this. The growth times follow an exponential distribution which is tapered at long times due to the finite length of the simulation. The initial collapse masses have an approximately lognormal distribution with already an onset of a power-law at large masses. The sink particle mass function can be reproduced with a non-linear stochastic process, with fluctuating accretion rates $\\propto m^{2/3}$, a distribution of seed masses and a distribution of growth times. All three factors contribute equally to the form of the final sink mass function. We find that the upper power law tail of...

  11. Dilution in elliptical galaxies: Implications for the relation between metallicity, stellar mass and star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether gradual dilution of the gas in some elliptical galaxies is the cause of a positive correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and gas-phase metallicity (Zg) at high stellar mass (M*) in the local Universe. To do this, two classes of massive (M* >= 10^10.5 Msun) galaxy are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Munich semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, L-Galaxies. The first class is selected by high specific star formation rates (sSFR) and high Zg, and the second class by low sSFR and low Zg. These criteria roughly distinguish disc-dominant galaxies from metal-poor, elliptical galaxies. In the semi-analytic model, the second class of galaxies obtain low sSFR and low Zg due to gradual dilution of the interstellar medium by accretion of metal-poor gas via infalling clumps and low-mass satellites. This occurs after a merger-induced starburst and the associated supernova feedback have quenched most of the original gas reservoir. A number of signatures of this evol...

  12. The Star-Formation Main Sequence: The Dependence of Specific Star Formation Rate and Its Dispersion on Galaxy Stellar Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Kexin; Wang, Tao; Fu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of the star-formation main sequence (SFMS) reflects the diversity of star formation histories and variation in star formation rates (SFRs) in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with similar stellar masses ($M^\\ast$). We examine the dispersion of local SFMS using a complete sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies at 0.01$$8.8. The SFRs are estimated from H$\\alpha$ in combination with 22$\\mu m$ observation from WISE. The catalog of bulge+disk decomposition from Simard et al. (2011) is available for the sample galaxies. We measure the dispersion of specific SFR (SSFR) as a function of $M^*$. We confirm that the dispersion increases with $M^*$ from 0.37$\\pm0.01$dex at $\\log(M^\\ast/M_\\odot)$10.2. Despite star formation is mostly associated with disks, the dispersion of disk SSFR still increases with $M^*$. We conclude that the presence of bulges/bars is likely responsible for the large dispersion of SSFR in massive SFGs while low-mass SFGs are mostly disk-dominated and thus with small dispersion. Our ...

  13. On the inconsistency between cosmic stellar mass density and star formation rate up to $z\\sim8$

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density and instantaneous star formation rate in redshift range $06$), the derived star formation history is consistent with the observations. This is the first time to test the discrepancy between the observed stellar mass density and instantaneous star formation rate up to very high redshift $z\\approx8$ using the Markov chain monte carlo method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of stellar mass density, initial mass function and cosmic metallicity evolution.

  14. The Dependence of Star Formation Rates on Stellar Mass and Environment at z~0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Shannon G; Kelson, Daniel D; Illingworth, Garth D; Franx, Marijn

    2009-01-01

    We examine the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies in a redshift slice encompassing the z=0.834 cluster RX J0152.7-1357. We used a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) to identify galaxies with z2x10^{10} M_sun) of 330 galaxies that were imaged by Spitzer MIPS at 24 micron to derive SFRs and study the dependence of specific SFR (SSFR) on stellar mass and environment. We find that the SFR and SSFR show a strong decrease with increasing local density, similar to the relation at z~0. Our result contrasts with other work at z~1 that find the SFR-density trend to reverse for luminosity-limited samples. These other results appear to be driven by star-formation in lower mass systems (M~10^{10} M_sun). Our results imply that the processes that shut down star-formation are present in groups and other dense regions in the field. Our data also suggest that the lower SFRs of galaxies in higher density environments may reflect a change in the ratio of star-forming to non-s...

  15. The stellar masses and specific star-formation rates of submillimetre galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Cirasuolo, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Hayward, Christopher C; Watson, Darach

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the stellar masses (M*), and hence specific star-formation rates (sSFRs) of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) is crucial for determining their role in the cosmic history of galaxy/star formation. However, there is no consensus over the typical M* of SMGs with the widely differing results reported from studies of z~2-3 SMGs. Specifically, even for the same set of SMG, the reported average M* have ranged over an order of magnitude, from 5x10^10 Mo to 5x10^11 Mo. Here we study how different methods of analysis can lead to such widely varying results. We find that, contrary to recent claims in the literature, potential contamination of 3-8um photometry from hot dust associated with an active nucleus is not the origin of the discrepancies in derived M*. Instead, we expose in detail how inferred M* depends on assumptions of intial mass function, different evolutionary synthesis models, and different star-formation histories. We review current observational evidence for and against these alternatives as wel...

  16. Stellar Masses, Star Formation Rates and X-ray Constraints on Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrinda, Greg; Desjardins, T. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S.; Hammer, D.; Miller, N. A.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report on new measurements of star formation rates and stellar masses in the “infall” region of the nearby Coma cluster of galaxies. This region is approximately 1 Mpc from the cluster core, where relatively gas-rich galaxies are interacting with the hot intracluster medium, providing an important view of the impact of cluster processes on galaxy evolution. We have used infrared and ultraviolet data available from both ground and spaced-based observations to make these measurements. The star formation rates and stellar mass values were verified via comparison with published results in the Coma core as well as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral measurements. The infall region has also been observed by XMM-Newton to faint limits to obtain X-ray luminosities for the galaxies in this field. Specifically, we present X-ray photometry of approximately 20 galaxies with XMM-Newton coverage to constrain the X-ray - SFR correlation in a cluster environment. This project was supported by the Baltimore Excellence in STEM Teaching program via summer internship funding to Hrinda.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCES OF STAR FORMATION RATE (SFR, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE (SSFR AND STELLAR MASS AT FIXED LUMINOSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Fa Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using four volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8, we have investigated the environmental dependences of the SFR, SSFR and stellar mass at fixed luminosity. At fixed luminosity, we still observe strong environmental dependences of the SFR, SSFR and stellar mass of galaxies: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have a higher SFR or SSFR and lower stellar mass than galaxies in the densest regime. This result suggests that the limitation or fixation of luminosity does not exert substantial influence on the environmental dependences of the SFR, SSFR and stellar mass of galaxies, which further shows that luminosity is not a fundamental parameter in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment.

  18. Exploring the Role of Galaxy Morphology in the Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Anthony; Rafelski, Marc; Scarlata, Claudia; Pacifici, Camilla; Henry, Alaina L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Elmegreen, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate (M-Z-SFR) fundamental relation reveals the underlying physics behind galaxy evolution: the mechanics of gas inflow, outflow, and the formation of stars are intimately connected. At higher redshift, we observe galaxies which are believed to be more actively accreting from the cosmic web, and as a result bright star-forming clumps are expected to form due to the increased gravitational instability of the galactic medium. We investigate these “clumpy” galaxies in context of their location on the M-Z-SFR plane to search for evidence of metal-poor gas inflows as predicted by theoretical models, and to help us understand how galaxies form and change at a higher redshift (1.3 fundamental plane to investigate possible diminished metallicity and heightened star formation rate compared to the remainder of the sample. This will enable us to better understand the theoretical underpinnings of gas accretion and galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  19. The Gas Phase Mass Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies: Dependence on Star Formation Rate and HI Gas Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Jimmy,; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the VLT, we investigate the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR$_{\\text{HI}}$). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to study the FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$ and FMR$_{\\text{HI}}$ across the stellar mass range 10$^{6.6}$ to 10$^{8.8}$ M$_\\odot$, with metallicities as low as 12+log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1$\\sigma$ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1$\\sigma$ mean scatter in the FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$ (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$ is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10$^{-2.4}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, however this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR$_{\\text{HI}}$. We also find that th...

  20. An Evolutionary Model for Collapsing Molecular Clouds and Their Star Formation Activity. II. Mass Dependence of the Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we presented a semi-analytical model for the regulation of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) in which the molecular clouds (MCs) were assumed to be in gravitational collapse, and the SFR was instantaneously controlled by evaporation of the cloud material by massive-star ionization feedback. In this model, the main parameter controlling the evolution of the clouds was found to be the gas mass involved in the process and here we discuss various properties of the SFR and SFE as a function of the cloud masses, that can be compared with observations and implemented in numerical models of galactic evolution. Because the model neglects magnetic fields, supernova explosions, and radiation pressure, the results presented are upper limits. We find that $\\SFRavg$ and $\\SFEavg$ are well represented as functions of the maximum cloud mass by the fits $\\SFRavg \\approx 100 (1+\\Mmax/2 \\times 10^5 ~ \\Msun)^{2} ~ \\Msun \\Myr^{-1}$ and $\\SFEavg \\approx 0.024 (\\Mmax/10^5 ~ \\Msun)^{0.28}$, resp...

  1. The relation between star formation rate and stellar mass of galaxies at z $\\sim$ 1-4

    CERN Document Server

    Katsianis, A; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01

    The relation between the Star Formation Rate (SFR) and stellar mass (${\\rm M}_{\\star}$) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation. However, the observed amplitude of the star formation rate - stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR$-{\\rm M}_{\\star}$ relation of $z\\sim 1-4 $ galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups and compare these with a range of observations. The comparison suggests that using Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) to estimate star formation rates, dust corrections and stellar masses produces the most reliable SFR$-{\\rm M}_{\\star}$ relations. On the contrary, the combination of IR and UV luminosities (UV+IR) overpredic...

  2. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Renzini, Alvio [Department of Physics and Astronomy Galileo Galilei, Universita degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  3. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries, Millisecond Radio Pulsars, and the Cosmic Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    White, N E; White, Nicholas E.; Ghosh, Pranab

    1998-01-01

    We report on the implications of the peak in the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) at redshift z ~ 1.5 for the resulting population of low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXB) and for that of their descendants, the millisecond radio pulsars (MRP). Since the evolutionary timescales of LMXBs, their progenitors, and their descendants are thought be significant fractions of the time-interval between the SFR peak and the present epoch, there is a lag in the turn-on of the LMXB population, with the peak activity occurring at z ~ 0.5 - 1.0. The peak in the MRP population is delayed further, occurring at z < 0.5. We show that the discrepancy between the birthrate of LMXBs and MRPs, found under the assumption of a stead-state SFR, can be resolved for the population as a whole when the effects of a time-variable SFR are included. A discrepancy may persist for LMXBs with short orbital periods, although a detailed population synthesis will be required to confirm this. Further, since the integrated X-ray luminosity distribution of...

  4. THE GAS PHASE MASS METALLICITY RELATION FOR DWARF GALAXIES: DEPENDENCE ON STAR FORMATION RATE AND HI GAS MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2015-10-20

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR{sub SFR}) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR{sub HI}). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMR{sub SFR} and FMR{sub HI} across the stellar mass range 10{sup 6.6}–10{sup 8.8} M{sub ⊙}, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMR{sub SFR} (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR{sub SFR} is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10{sup −2.4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR{sub HI}. We also find that the FMR{sub HI} is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FML{sub SFR}) and HI-gas mass (FML{sub HI}). We find that the FML{sub HI} relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FML{sub HI} relation is not improved over the FMR{sub HI} scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMR{sub HI} is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation.

  5. Massive star formation in Wolf-Rayet galaxies. V: Star formation rates, masses and the importance of galaxy interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) We have performed a comprehensive analysis of a sample of 20 starburst galaxies, most of them classified as Wolf-Rayet galaxies. In this paper, the last of the series, we analyze the global properties of our galaxy sample using multiwavelength data (X-ray, FUV, optical, NIR, FIR, and radio). The agreement between our Ha-based SFR and those provided by indicators at other wavelengths is remarkable, but we consider that the new Ha-based calibration provided by Calzetti et al. (2007) should be preferred over older calibrations. The FUV-based SFR provides a powerful tool to analyze the star-formation activity in both global and local scales independently to the Ha emission. We provide empirical relationships between the ionized gas mass, neutral gas mass, dust mass, stellar mass, and dynamical mass with the B-luminosity. Although all mass estimations increase with increasing luminosity, we find important deviations to the general trend in some objects, that seem to be consequence of their particular ev...

  6. The impact of mass segregation and star-formation on the rates of gravitational-wave sources from extreme mass ratio inspirals

    CERN Document Server

    Aharon, Danor

    2016-01-01

    Compact stellar objects inspiralling into massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are some of the most promising gravitational wave (GWs) sources for next generation GW-detectors. The rates of such extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) depend on the dynamics and distribution of compact objects around the MBH. Here we study the impact of mass-segregation processes on EMRI rates. In particular, we provide the expected mass function of EMRIs, given an initial mass function of stellar BHs (SBHs), and relate it to the mass-dependent detection rate of EMRIs. We then consider the role of star formation on the distribution of compact objects and its implication on EMRI rates. We find that the existence of a wide spectrum of SBH masses lead to the overall increase of EMRI rates, and to high rates of the EMRIs from the most-massive SBHs. However, it also leads to a relative quenching of EMRI rates from lower-mass SBHs, and together produces a steep dependence of the EMRI mass function on the highest-mass SBHs. Sta...

  7. ALFALFA HI Data Stacking III. Comparison of environmental trends in HI gas mass fraction and specific star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Fabello, Silvia; Catinella, Barbara; Li, Cheng; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that both the star formation rate and the cold gas content of a galaxy depend on the local density out to distances of a few Megaparsecs. In this paper, we compare the environmental density dependence of the atomic gas mass fractions of nearby galaxies with the density dependence of their central and global specific star formation rates. We stack HI line spectra extracted from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey centered on galaxies with UV imaging from GALEX and optical imaging/spectroscopy from SDSS. We use these stacked spectra to evaluate the mean atomic gas mass fraction of galaxies in bins of stellar mass and local density. For galaxies with stellar masses less than 10^10.5 M_sun, the decline in mean atomic gas mass fraction with density is stronger than the decline in mean global and central specific star formation rate. The same conclusion does not hold for more massive galaxies. We interpret our results as evidence for ram-pressure stripping of atomic gas from the outer disks of low ...

  8. Updating of the hierarchical rock mass rating (HRMR) system and a new subsystem developed for weathered granite formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miranda Tiago; e Sousa L. Ribeiro; Tinoco Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    The RMR system is still very much applied in rock mechanics engineering context. It is based on the eval-uation of six weights to obtain a final rating. To obtain the final rating a considerable amount of informa-tion is needed concerning the rock mass which can be difficult to obtain in some projects or project stages at least with accuracy. In 2007 an alternative classification scheme based on the RMR, the Hierarchical Rock Mass Rating (HRMR) was presented. The main feature of this system was the adaptation to the level of knowledge existent about the rock mass to obtain the classification of the rock mass since it followed a decision tree approach. However, the HRMR was only valid for hard rock granites with low fracturing degrees. In this work, the database was enlarged with approximately 40%more cases considering other types of granite rock masses including weathered granites and based on this increased database the sys-tem was updated. Granite formations existent in the north of Portugal including Porto city are predom-inantly granites. Some years ago a light rail infrastructure was built in the city of Porto and surrounding municipalities which involved considerable challenges due to the high heterogeneity levels of the granite formations and the difficulties involved in their geomechanical characterization. In this work it is intended to provide also a contribution to improve the characterization of these formations with special emphasis to the weathered horizons. A specific subsystem applicable to the weathered formations was developed. The results of the validation of these systems are presented and show acceptable perfor-mances in identifying the correct class using less information than with the RMR system.

  9. ON THE INCONSISTENCY BETWEEN COSMIC STELLAR MASS DENSITY AND STAR FORMATION RATE UP TO z ∼ 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y., E-mail: fayinwang@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  10. Stellar masses and star formation rates of lensed dusty star-forming galaxies from the SPT survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Jingzhe; Spilker, J S; Strandet, M; Ashby, M L N; Aravena, M; Béthermin, M; Bothwell, M S; de Breuck, C; Brodwin, M; Chapman, S C; Fassnacht, C D; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; Saliwanchik, B R; Vieira, J D; Weiß, A; Welikala, N

    2015-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift ($2.8\\leq z \\leq 5.7$) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using {\\it HST}, {\\it Spitzer}, {\\it Herschel} and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution {\\it HST}/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in {\\it Spitzer}/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses...

  11. Luminosities, Masses and Star Formation Rates of Galaxies at High Redshift (IAU279 conference proceedings)

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    There has been great progress in recent years in discovering star forming galaxies at high redshifts (z>5), close to the epoch of reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM). The WFC3 and ACS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope have enabled Lyman break galaxies to be robustly identified, but the UV luminosity function and star formation rate density of this population at z=6-8 seems to be much lower than at z=2-4. High escape fractions and a large contribution from faint galaxies below our current detection limits would be required for star-forming galaxies to reionize the Universe. We have also found that these galaxies have blue rest-frame UV colours, which might indicate lower dust extinction at z>5. There has been some spectroscopic confirmation of these Lyman break galaxies through Lyman-alpha emission, but the fraction of galaxies where we see this line drops at z>7, perhaps due to the onset of the Gunn-Peterson effect (where the IGM is opaque to Lyman-alpha).

  12. The Mass-Metallicity relation explored with CALIFA: I. Is there a dependence on the star formation rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, S F; Jungwiert, B; Iglesias-Paramo1, J; Vilchez, J M; Marino, R A; Walcher, C J; Husemann, B; Mast, D; Monreal-Ibero, A; Fernandes, R Cid; Perez, E; Delgado, R Gonzalez; Garcia-Benito, R; Galbany, L; van de Ven, G; Jahnke, K; Flores, H; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Lopez-Sánchez, A R; Stanishev, V; Miralles-Caballero, D; Diaz, A I; Sanchez-Blazquez, P; Molla, M; Gallazzi1, A; Papaderos, P; Gomes, J M; Gruel, N; Pérez, I; Ruiz-Lara, T; Florido, E; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Kehrig, C; Roth, M M; Ziegler, B; Alves, J; Wisotzki, L; Kupko, D; Quirrenbach, A; Bomans, D

    2013-01-01

    We present the results on the study of the global and local M-Z relation based on the first data available from the CALIFA survey (150 galaxies). This survey provides integral field spectroscopy of the complete optical extent of each galaxy (up to 2-3 effective radii), with enough resolution to separate individual HII regions and/or aggregations. Nearly $\\sim$3000 individual HII regions have been detected. The spectra cover the wavelength range between [OII]3727 and [SII]6731, with a sufficient signal-to-noise to derive the oxygen abundance and star-formation rate associated with each region. In addition, we have computed the integrated and spatially resolved stellar masses (and surface densities), based on SDSS photometric data. We explore the relations between the stellar mass, oxygen abundance and star-formation rate using this dataset. We derive a tight relation between the integrated stellar mass and the gas-phase abundance, with a dispersion smaller than the one already reported in the literature ($\\sig...

  13. The mass evolution of the first galaxies: stellar mass functions and star formation rates at $4 < z < 7$ in the CANDELS GOODS-South field

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Kenneth; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G; Guo, Yicheng; Ferguson, Henry C; Davé, Romeel; Lu, Yu; Ownsworth, Jamie; Ashby, Matthew L N; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark; Faber, Sandra M; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; Somerville, Rachel S; White, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    We measure new estimates for the galaxy stellar mass function and star formation rates for samples of galaxies at $z \\sim 4,~5,~6~\\&~7$ using data in the CANDELS GOODS South field. The deep near-infrared observations allow us to construct the stellar mass function at $z \\geq 6$ directly for the first time. We estimate stellar masses for our sample by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with synthetic stellar populations, including nebular line and continuum emission. The observed UV luminosity functions for the samples are consistent with previous observations, however we find that the observed $M_{UV}$ - M$_{*}$ relation has a shallow slope more consistent with a constant mass to light ratio and a normalisation which evolves with redshift. Our stellar mass functions have steep low-mass slopes ($\\alpha \\approx -1.9$), steeper than previously observed at these redshifts and closer to that of the UV luminosity function. Integrating our new mass functions, we find the observed stellar mass den...

  14. A panchromatic study of BLAST counterparts: total star-formation rate, morphology, AGN fraction and stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Chapin, Edward L; Cortese, Luca; Devlin, Mark J; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Pascale, Enzo; Scott, Douglas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Viero, Marco; Wiebe, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates for BLAST counterparts with z 10^11 L_sun, z > 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L_FIR < 10^11 L_sun, z < 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type-1 active galactic nucleus (AGN), but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects with a median mass of 10^11 M_sun. We argue that BLAST is bridging the mass gap at 0 < z < 2 betwe...

  15. Improved Estimates of the Milky Way's Stellar Mass and Star Formation Rate from Hierarchical Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Licquia, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    We present improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by combining previous measurements from the literature using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical method that allows us to account for the possibility that any value may be incorrect or have underestimated errors. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about the nature of problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields a SFR for the Galaxy of $\\dot{\\rm M}_\\star=1.65\\pm0.19$ ${\\rm M}_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. By combining HB methods with Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate the latest estimates of the Galactocentric radius of the Sun, $R_0$, the exponential scale-length of the disk, $L_d$, and the local surface density of stellar mass, $\\Sigma_\\star(R_0)$, we show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is ${\\rm...

  16. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at 0.4 < z < 1 Revealed by Star Formation Rates Measured From Hβ and FUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yicheng; Rafelski, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Willner, S. P.; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I.; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at 0.4 models, e.g., non-universal initial mass function or stochastic star formation on star cluster scales, are unable to plausibly explain our results.

  17. Photometric determination of the mass accretion rate of pre-main sequence stars. IV. Recent star formation in NGC 602

    CERN Document Server

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the young stellar populations in NGC 602, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using a novel method that we have developed to combine Hubble Space Telescope photometry in the V, I, and Halpha bands. We have identified about 300 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, all of which are still undergoing active mass accretion, and have determined their physical parameters (effective temperature, luminosity, age, mass and mass accretion rate). Our analysis shows that star formation has been present in this field over the last 60 Myr. In addition, we can recognise at least two clear, distinct, and prominent episodes in the recent past: one about 2 Myr ago, but still ongoing in regions of higher nebulosity, and one (or more) older than 30 Myr, encompassing both stars dispersed in the field and two smaller clusters located about 100 arcsec north of the centre of NGC 602. The relative locations of younger and older PMS stars do not imply a causal effect or triggering of one generation on the other. The strength of th...

  18. The evolving relation between star-formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO Survey since $z=3$

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Russell; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the star-formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ($M_*$) relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy sample in the XMM-LSS field to $z\\sim 3.0$ using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and $M_*$ and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift PDF uncertainty. Applying a SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalisation of the SFR-$M_*$ relation out to $z\\sim 3$ and a roughly constant slope of (SFR $\\propto M_*^{\\alpha}$) $\\alpha=0.69\\pm0.02$ to $z\\sim 1.7$. We find this increases close to unity toward $z\\sim2.65$. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-$M_*$ relation between $0.7\\lesssim z\\lesssim2.0$ at the high mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR $\\prop...

  19. DA white dwarfs from the LSS-GAC survey DR1: the preliminary luminosity and mass functions and formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A; Cojocaru, R; Yuan, H -B; Torres, S; Garcia-Berro, E; Xiang, M -X; Huang, Y; Koester, D; Hou, Y; Li, G; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Modern large-scale surveys have allowed the identification of large numbers of white dwarfs. However, these surveys are subject to complicated target selection algorithms, which make it almost impossible to quantify to what extent the observational biases affect the observed populations. The LAMOST (Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic anti-center (LSS-GAC) follows a well-defined set of criteria for selecting targets for observations. This advantage over previous surveys has been fully exploited here to identify a small yet well-characterised magnitude-limited sample of hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarfs. We derive preliminary LSS-GAC DA white dwarf luminosity and mass functions. The space density and average formation rate of DA white dwarfs we derive are 0.83+/-0.16 x 10^{-3} pc^{-3} and 5.42 +/- 0.08 x 10^{-13} pc^{-3} yr^{-1}, respectively. Additionally, using an existing Monte Carlo population synthesis code we simulate the population of single DA w...

  20. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at $0.4Formation Rates Measured from FUV and H$\\beta$

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yicheng; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Krumholz, Mark R; Trump, Jonathan R; Willner, S P; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F; Gardner, Jonathan P; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P; Koekemoer, Anton M; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at $0.4formation rates (SFRs) measured from FUV (1500 \\AA) and H$\\beta$ (FUV--to--H$\\beta$ ratio). Our sample contains 164 galaxies down to stellar mass (M*) of $10^{8.5} M_\\odot$ in the CANDELS GOODS-N region, where TKRS Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and HST/WFC3 F275W images from CANDELS and HDUV are available. When the ratio of FUV- and H$\\beta$-derived SFRs is measured, dust extinction correction is negligible (except for very dusty galaxies) with the Calzetti attenuation curve. The FUV--to--H$\\beta$ ratio of our sample increases with the decrease of M* and SFR. The median ratio is $\\sim$1 at M* $\\sim 10^{10} M_\\odot$ (or SFR = 20 $M_\\odot$/yr) and increases to $\\sim$1.6 at M* $\\sim 10^{8.5} M_\\odot$ (or SFR $\\sim 0.5 M_\\odot$/yr). At M* $< 10^{9.5} M_\\odot$, our median FUV--to--H$\\beta$ ratio is higher than that of local galaxies at the same M*, implying a redshift evolution. Bursty SFH on a ...

  1. Metal-Poor, Strongly Star-Forming Galaxies in the DEEP2 Survey: The Relationship Between Stellar Mass, Temperature-Based Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Chun; Rigby, Jane R.; Cooper, Michael; Yan, Renbin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 28 redshift (z) approximately equal to 0.8 metal-poor galaxies in DEEP2. These galaxies were selected for their detection of the weak [O (sub III)] lambda 4363 emission line, which provides a "direct" measure of the gas-phase metallicity. A primary goal for identifying these rare galaxies is to examine whether the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR) holds for low stellar mass and high SFR galaxies. The FMR suggests that higher SFR galaxies have lower metallicity (at fixed stellar mass). To test this trend, we combine spectroscopic measurements of metallicity and dust-corrected SFR with stellar mass estimates from modeling the optical photometry. We find that these galaxies are 1.05 plus or minus 0.61 dex above the redshift (z) approximately 1 stellar mass-SFR relation and 0.23 plus or minus 0.23 dex below the local mass-metallicity relation. Relative to the FMR, the latter offset is reduced to 0.01 dex, but significant dispersion remains dex with 0.16 dex due to measurement uncertainties). This dispersion suggests that gas accretion, star formation, and chemical enrichment have not reached equilibrium in these galaxies. This is evident by their short stellar mass doubling timescale of approximately equal to 100 (sup plus 310) (sub minus 75) million years which suggests stochastic star formation. Combining our sample with other redshift (z) of approximately 1 metal-poor galaxies, we find a weak positive SFR-metallicity dependence (at fixed stellar mass) that is significant at 94.4 percent confidence. We interpret this positive correlation as recent star formation that has enriched the gas but has not had time to drive the metal-enriched gas out with feedback mechanisms.

  2. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  3. Evolution of the specific Star Formation Rate Function at z<1.4 - Dissecting the mass-SFR plane in COSMOS and GOODS

    CERN Document Server

    Ilbert, O; Floc'h, E Le; Aussel, H; Bethermin, H; Capak, P; Hsieh, B C; Kajisawa, M; Fevre, O Le; Lee, N; Lilly, S; McCracken, H J; Michel-Dansac, L; Moutard, T; Renzini, A; Salvato, M; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N; Sheth, K; Smolcic, V; Taniguchi, Y; Tresse, L

    2014-01-01

    The relation between the stellar mass and the star formation rate characterizes how the instantaneous star formation is determined by the galaxy past star formation history and by the growth of the dark matter structures. We deconstruct the M-SFR plane by measuring the specific SFR functions in several stellar mass bins from z=0.2 out to z=1.4. Our analysis is primary based on a MIPS 24$\\mu m$ selected catalogue combining the COSMOS and GOODS surveys. We estimate the SFR by combining mid- and far-infrared data for 20500 galaxies. The sSFR functions are derived in four stellar mass bins within the range 9.5mass-dependent evolution of the median sSFR with redshift varying as $sSFR \\propto (1+z)^{b}$, with $b$ increasing from $b=2.88$ to $b=3.78$ between $M=10^{9.75}Msun$ and $M=10^{11.1}Msun$, respectively. At low masses, this evolution is consistent with t...

  4. THE RELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS FOR GALAXIES AT 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 IN CANDELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, Brett; Papovich, Casey; Tilvi, Vithal [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Finlator, Kristian [DARK fellow, Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H. [Physics Department, Stanford University, Particle Astrophysics, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Davé, Romeel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Long, James [Department of Statistics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3143 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram; Reddy, Naveen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Somerville, Rachel S., E-mail: bsalmon@physics.tamu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Distant star-forming galaxies show a correlation between their star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, and this has deep implications for galaxy formation. Here, we present a study on the evolution of the slope and scatter of the SFR-stellar mass relation for galaxies at 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 using multi-wavelength photometry in GOODS-S from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. We describe an updated, Bayesian spectral-energy distribution fitting method that incorporates effects of nebular line emission, star formation histories that are constant or rising with time, and different dust-attenuation prescriptions (starburst and Small Magellanic Cloud). From z = 6.5 to z = 3.5 star-forming galaxies in CANDELS follow a nearly unevolving correlation between stellar mass and SFR that follows SFR ∼ M{sub ⋆}{sup a} with a =0.54 ± 0.16 at z ∼ 6 and 0.70 ± 0.21 at z ∼ 4. This evolution requires a star formation history that increases with decreasing redshift (on average, the SFRs of individual galaxies rise with time). The observed scatter in the SFR-stellar mass relation is tight, σ(log SFR/M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) < 0.3-0.4 dex, for galaxies with log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} > 9 dex. Assuming that the SFR is tied to the net gas inflow rate (SFR ∼ M-dot {sub gas}), then the scatter in the gas inflow rate is also smaller than 0.3–0.4 dex for star-forming galaxies in these stellar mass and redshift ranges, at least when averaged over the timescale of star formation. We further show that the implied star formation history of objects selected on the basis of their co-moving number densities is consistent with the evolution in the SFR-stellar mass relation.

  5. PRIMUS+DEEP2: The Dependence of Galaxy Clustering on Stellar Mass and Specific Star Formation Rate at 0.2 < z < 1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Moustakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present results on the clustering properties of galaxies as a function of both stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) using data from the PRIMUS and DEEP2 galaxy redshift surveys spanning 0.2 < z < 1.2. We use spectroscopic redshifts of over 100,000 galaxies covering an area of 7.2 deg^2 over five separate fields on the sky, from which we calculate cosmic variance errors. We find that the galaxy clustering amplitude is a stronger function of sSFR than of stellar mass, and that at a given sSFR, it does not depend on stellar mass, within the range probed here. We further find that within the star-forming population and at a given stellar mass, galaxies above the main sequence of star formation with higher sSFR are more clustered than galaxies below the main sequence with lower sSFR. We also find that within the quiescent population, galaxies with higher sSFR are less clustered than galaxies with lower sSFR, at a given stellar mass. We show that the galaxy clustering amplitude smoothly inc...

  6. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. I. The flocculent galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, M_max, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H2) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the flocculent galaxy M33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M_max is proportional to Sigma_gas^4.7, M_max is proportional Sigma_H2^1.3, and M_max is proportional to Sigma_SFR^1.0. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

  7. Stellar masses, star formation rates, metallicities and AGN properties for 200,000 galaxies in the SDSS Data Release Two (DR2)

    CERN Document Server

    Brinchmann, J; Heckman, T M; Kauffmann, G; Tremonti, C A; White, S D M; Brinchmann, Jarle; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy M.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Tremonti, Christy; White, Simon D.M.

    2004-01-01

    By providing homogeneous photometric and spectroscopic data of high quality for very large and objectively selected samples of galaxies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows statistical studies of the physical properties of galaxies and AGN to be carried out at an unprecedented level of precision and detail. Here we publicly release catalogues of derived physical properties for 211,894 galaxies, including 33,589 narrow-line AGN. These are complete samples with well understood selection criteria drawn from the normal galaxy spectroscopic sample in the second SDSS public data release (DR2). We list properties obtained from the SDSS spectroscopy and photometry using modelling techniques presented in papers already published by our group. These properties include: stellar masses; stellar mass-to-light ratios; attenuation of the starlight by dust; indicators of recent major starbursts; current total and specific star-formation rates, both for the regions with spectroscopy and for the galaxies as a whole; gas-phase ...

  8. COMBINED CO AND DUST SCALING RELATIONS OF DEPLETION TIME AND MOLECULAR GAS FRACTIONS WITH COSMIC TIME, SPECIFIC STAR-FORMATION RATE, AND STELLAR MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Burkert, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr., D-85748 Garching (Germany); Saintonge, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Magnelli, B. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Combes, F. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, CNRS, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); García-Burillo, S. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional-OAN, Observatorio de Madrid, Alfonso XII, 3, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Neri, R.; Boissier, J. [IRAM, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d' Heres, Grenoble (France); Bolatto, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Contini, T.; Boone, F.; Bouché, N. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Planétologie, Universite de Toulouse, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Lilly, S.; Carollo, M. [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, CH-8093 ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Bournaud, F. [Service d' Astrophysique, DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Colina, L. [CSIC Instituto Estructura Materia, C/Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cooper, M. C., E-mail: linda@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) between z = 0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2, and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion timescale (t {sub depl}) and gas to stellar mass ratio (M {sub mol} {sub gas}/M{sub *} ) of SFGs near the star formation ''main-sequence'' with redshift, specific star-formation rate (sSFR), and stellar mass (M{sub *} ). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO → H{sub 2} mass conversion factor varies little within ±0.6 dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms, z, M {sub *})), and less than 0.3 dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that t {sub depl} scales as (1 + z){sup –0.3} × (sSFR/sSFR(ms, z, M {sub *})){sup –0.5}, with little dependence on M {sub *}. The resulting steep redshift dependence of M {sub mol} {sub gas}/M {sub *} ≈ (1 + z){sup 3} mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M{sub *} are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M {sub *} relation. Throughout the probed redshift range a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion timescale causes a larger sSFR at constant M {sub *}. As a result, galaxy integrated samples of the M {sub mol} {sub gas}-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine M {sub mol} {sub gas} with an accuracy of ±0.1 dex in relative terms, and ±0.2 dex including systematic uncertainties.

  9. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. II. The grand-design galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H_2), neutral gas (Sigma_HI) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the grand design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. We find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M_3rd, the median of the 5 most massive clusters, is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.4. There is no correlation with Sigma_gas, Sigma_H2, or Sigma_SFR. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.6, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_gas^0.5; there is no correlation with either Sigma_H_2 or Sigma_SFR. The results could hardly be more different than those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_g...

  10. Linking galaxies to dark matter haloes at $z\\sim1$ : dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass and specific star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Edge, Alastair C; Wake, David A; Merson, Alexander I; Jeon, Yiseul

    2015-01-01

    We study the dependence of angular two-point correlation functions on stellar mass ($M_{*}$) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of $M_{*}>10^{10}M_{\\odot}$ galaxies at $z\\sim1$. The data from UKIDSS DXS and CFHTLS covering 8.2 deg$^{2}$ sample scales larger than 100 $h^{-1}$Mpc at $z\\sim1$, allowing us to investigate the correlation between clustering, $M_{*}$, and star formation through halo modeling. Based on halo occupation distributions (HODs) of $M_{*}$ threshold samples, we derive HODs for $M_{*}$ binned galaxies, and then calculate the $M_{*}/M_{\\rm halo}$ ratio. The ratio for central galaxies shows a peak at $M_{\\rm halo}\\sim10^{12}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$, and satellites predominantly contribute to the total stellar mass in cluster environments with $M_{*}/M_{\\rm halo}$ values of 0.01--0.02. Using star-forming galaxies split by sSFR, we find that main sequence galaxies ($\\rm log\\,sSFR/yr^{-1}\\sim-9$) are mainly central galaxies in $\\sim10^{12.5} h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ haloes with the lowest clustering amplitu...

  11. A Chandra Perspective On Galaxy-Wide X-ray Binary Emission And Its Correlation With Star Formation Rate And Stellar Mass: New Results From Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmer, B D; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Goulding, A D; Jenkins, L P; Ptak, A; Roberts, T P

    2010-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations that complete a sample of seventeen (17) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with D < 60 Mpc and low Galactic column densities of N_H < 5 X 10^20 cm^-2. The LIRGs in our sample have total infrared (8-1000um) luminosities in the range of L_IR ~ (1-8) X 10^11 L_sol. The high-resolution imaging and X-ray spectral information from our Chandra observations allow us to measure separately X-ray contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and normal galaxy processes (e.g., X-ray binaries and hot gas). We utilized total infrared plus UV luminosities to estimate star-formation rates (SFRs) and K-band luminosities and optical colors to estimate stellar masses (M*) for the sample. Under the assumption that the galaxy-wide 2-10 keV luminosity (LX) traces the combined emission from high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), and that the power output from these components are linearly correlated with SFR and M*, respectively, we constrain the relation ...

  12. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  13. Separate Ways: The Mass-Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Heckman, T.; Blanc, G. A.; The MaNGA Team

    2017-07-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  14. The MOSDEF Survey: Dissecting the Star Formation Rate versus Stellar Mass Relation Using Hα and Hβ Emission Lines at z ≤ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona H.; de Groot, Laura; Azadi, Mojegan

    2015-12-01

    We present results on the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M*) relation (i.e., the “main sequence”) among star-forming galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 using the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. Based on a sample of 261 galaxies with Hα and Hβ spectroscopy, we have estimated robust dust-corrected instantaneous SFRs over a large range in M* (˜109.5-1011.5 M⊙). We find a correlation between log(SFR(Hα)) and log(M*) with a slope of 0.65 ± 0.08 (0.58 ± 0.10) at 1.4 star-forming galaxies, and not accounting for Balmer absorption, can yield steeper slopes of the log(SFR)-log(M*) relation. Our sample is immune from these biases as it is rest-frame optically selected, Hα and Hβ are corrected for Balmer absorption, and the Hα luminosity is dust corrected using the nebular color excess computed from the Balmer decrement. The scatter of the log(SFR(Hα))-log(M*) relation, after accounting for the measurement uncertainties, is 0.31 dex at 2.1 relation with some intrinsic scatter, we argue that in the absence of direct measurements of galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the attenuation/extinction curves and the initial mass function, one cannot use the difference in the scatter of the SFR(Hα)- and SFR(UV)-M* relations to constrain the stochasticity of star formation in high-redshift galaxies.

  15. Photometric Determination of the Mass Accretion Rates of Pre-main-sequence Stars. V. Recent Star Formation in the 30 Dor Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino; Beccari, Giacomo

    2017-09-01

    We report on the properties of the low-mass stars that recently formed in the central ∼ 2\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 7× 2\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 7 of 30 Dor, including the R136 cluster. Using the photometric catalog of De Marchi et al., based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, and the most recent extinction law for this field, we identify 1035 bona fide pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars showing {{H}}α excess emission at the 4σ level with an {{H}}α equivalent width of 20 Å or more. We find a wide spread in age spanning the range ∼ 0.1{--}50 {Myr}. We also find that the older PMS objects are placed in front of the R136 cluster and are separated from it by a conspicuous amount of absorbing material, indicating that star formation has proceeded from the periphery into the interior of the region. We derive physical parameters for all PMS stars, including masses m, ages t, and mass accretion rates {\\dot{M}}{acc}. To identify reliable correlations between these parameters, which are intertwined, we use a multivariate linear regression fit of the type {log}{\\dot{M}}{acc}=a× {log}t+b× {log}m+c. The values of a and b for 30 Dor are compatible with those found in NGC 346 and NGC 602. We extend the fit to a uniform sample of 1307 PMS stars with 0.5contract NAS5-26555.

  16. The relationship between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate for Hα-selected galaxies at z ≈ 0.8 from the NewHα survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Mithi A. de los [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Ly, Chun; Lee, Janice C.; Peeples, Molly S.; Feddersen, Jesse [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Salim, Samir [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, TODIAS, University of Tokyo (Japan); Finn, Rose, E-mail: madelosr@ncsu.edu [Physics Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, Loudonville, NY (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Using a sample of 299 Hα-selected galaxies at z≈0.8, we study the relationship between galaxy stellar mass, gas-phase metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR), and compare to previous results. We use deep optical spectra obtained with the IMACS spectrograph at the Magellan telescope to measure strong oxygen lines. We combine these spectra and metallicities with (1) rest-frame UV-to-optical imaging, which allows us to determine stellar masses and dust attenuation corrections, and (2) Hα narrowband imaging, which provides a robust measurement of the instantaneous SFR. Our sample spans stellar masses of ∼10{sup 9}–6 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙}, SFRs of 0.4–270 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, and metal abundances of 12+log(O/H)≈8.3–9.1 (≈0.4–2.6 Z{sub ⊙}). The correlations that we find between the Hα-based SFR and stellar mass (i.e., the star-forming “main sequence”) and between the stellar mass and metallicity are both consistent with previous z∼1 studies of star-forming galaxies. We then study the relationship between the three properties using various plane-fitting techniques and a curve-fitting projection. In all cases, we exclude strong dependence of the M{sub ⋆}–Z relation on SFR, but are unable to distinguish between moderate and no dependence. Our results are consistent with previous mass–metallicity–SFR studies. We check whether data set limitations may obscure a strong dependence on the SFR by using mock samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These experiments reveal that the adopted signal-to-noise ratio cuts may have a significant effect on the measured dependence. Further work is needed to investigate these results, and to test whether a “fundamental metallicity relation” or a “fundamental plane” describes star-forming galaxies across cosmic time.

  17. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  18. GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC): Star Formation Rates, Stellar Masses and Dust Attenuations of 700,000 Low-redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Samir; Janowiecki, Steven; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickinson, Mark; Boquien, Médéric; Burgarella, Denis; Salzer, John J; Charlot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC), a catalog of physical properties (stellar masses, dust attenuations and star formation rates (SFRs)) of ~700,000 galaxies with SDSS redshifts below 0.3. GSWLC contains galaxies within the GALEX footprint, regardless of a UV detection, covering 90% of SDSS. The physical properties were obtained from UV/optical SED fitting following Bayesian methodology of Salim et al. (2007), with improvements such as blending corrections for low-resolution UV photometry, flexible dust attenuation laws, and emission line corrections. GSWLC includes mid-IR SFRs derived from IR templates based upon 22 micron WISE observations. These estimates are independent of UV/optical SED fitting, in order to separate possible systematics. The paper argues that the comparison of specific SFRs (SSFRs) is more informative and physically motivated than the comparison of SFRs. SSFRs resulting from the UV/optical SED fitting are compared to the mid-IR SSFRs, and to SSFRs from three...

  19. Star Formation Rates and Stellar Masses of H-alpha Selected Star-Forming Galaxies at z=0.84: A Quantification of the Downsizing

    CERN Document Server

    Villar, V; Pérez-González, P-G; Barro, G; Zamorano, J; Noeske, K G; Koo, D C

    2011-01-01

    In this work we analyze the physical properties of a sample of 153 star forming galaxies at z~0.84, selected by their H-alpha flux with a NB filter. B-band luminosities of the objects are higher than those of local star forming galaxies. Most of the galaxies are located in the blue cloud, though some objects are detected in the green valley and in the red sequence. After the extinction correction is applied virtually all these red galaxies move to the blue sequence, unveiling their dusty nature. A check on the extinction law reveals that the typical extinction law for local starbursts is well suited for our sample but with E(B-V)_stars=0.55 E(B-V)_gas. We compare star formation rates (SFR) measured with different tracers (H-alpha, UV and IR) finding that they agree within a factor of three after extinction correction. We find a correlation between the ratios SFR_FUV/SFR_H-alpha, SFR_IR/SFR_H-alpha and the EW(H-alpha) (i.e. weighted age) which accounts for part of the scatter. We obtain stellar mass estimation...

  20. THE MOSDEF SURVEY: DISSECTING THE STAR FORMATION RATE VERSUS STELLAR MASS RELATION USING Hα AND Hβ EMISSION LINES AT z ∼ 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Freeman, William R.; Groot, Laura de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Shapley, Alice E.; Sanders, Ryan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kriek, Mariska; Price, Sedona H. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Coil, Alison L.; Azadi, Mojegan [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    We present results on the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M{sub *}) relation (i.e., the “main sequence”) among star-forming galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 using the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. Based on a sample of 261 galaxies with Hα and Hβ spectroscopy, we have estimated robust dust-corrected instantaneous SFRs over a large range in M{sub *} (∼10{sup 9.5}–10{sup 11.5} M{sub ⊙}). We find a correlation between log(SFR(Hα)) and log(M{sub *}) with a slope of 0.65 ± 0.08 (0.58 ± 0.10) at 1.4 < z < 2.6 (2.1 < z < 2.6). We find that different assumptions for the dust correction, such as using the color excess of the stellar continuum to correct the nebular lines, sample selection biases against red star-forming galaxies, and not accounting for Balmer absorption, can yield steeper slopes of the log(SFR)–log(M{sub *}) relation. Our sample is immune from these biases as it is rest-frame optically selected, Hα and Hβ are corrected for Balmer absorption, and the Hα luminosity is dust corrected using the nebular color excess computed from the Balmer decrement. The scatter of the log(SFR(Hα))–log(M{sub *}) relation, after accounting for the measurement uncertainties, is 0.31 dex at 2.1 < z < 2.6, which is 0.05 dex larger than the scatter in log(SFR(UV))–log(M{sub *}). Based on comparisons to a simulated SFR–M{sub *} relation with some intrinsic scatter, we argue that in the absence of direct measurements of galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the attenuation/extinction curves and the initial mass function, one cannot use the difference in the scatter of the SFR(Hα)– and SFR(UV)–M{sub *} relations to constrain the stochasticity of star formation in high-redshift galaxies.

  1. New emerging results on molecular gas, stars, and dust at z~2, as revealed by low star formation rate and low stellar mass star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel; Combes, Francoise; Egami, Eiichi; Swinbank, Mark; Richard, Johan; Sklias, Panos; Rawle, Tim D.

    2015-08-01

    The large surveys of main sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z~2, made at near-IR and mm wavelengths, have revolutionized our picture of galaxies at this critical epoch, where the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density is at its peak and the stellar mass (Ms) assembly is rapid. They reveal that ~70% of SFGs are young, rotation dominated disk-like systems, yet dynamically hotter and geometrically thicker than local spirals, with larger molecular gas fractions (fgas).It is time to refine this modern picture of z~2 galaxies by extending the current studies toward the more numerous and typical SFGs, characterized by SFRstar, and dust properties in 8 such sub-SFR*, lensed SFGs at z=1.5-3.6, achieved thanks to gravitational lensing and IRAM/PdBI, Herschel, Spitzer, and HST multi-wavelength data. They extend the dynamical range in SFR and Ms of our compilation of CO-detected SFGs at z>1 from the literature, and allow us to revisit and propose new correlations between IR and CO luminosities, molecular gas, stellar and dust masses, specific SFR, molecular gas depletion timescales (tdepl), fgas, dust-to-gas ratios, and redshift, to be directly compared with galaxy evolution models.We find an increase of tdepl with Ms, as now revealed by low-Ms SFGs at z>1 and also observed at z=0, which contrasts with the acknowledged constant tdepl in "bathtub" models and refutes the linearity of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. A steady increase of fgas with redshift is predicted by cosmological models and is observed from z~0 to z~1.5, but is followed by a mild increase toward higher redshifts, which we further confirm with our highest redshift CO measurement in an SFR* galaxy at z=3.6. We provide the first fgas measure in z>1 SFGs at the low-Ms end 109.4

  2. GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC): Star Formation Rates, Stellar Masses, and Dust Attenuations of 700,000 Low-redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Samir; Lee, Janice C.; Janowiecki, Steven; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickinson, Mark; Boquien, Médéric; Burgarella, Denis; Salzer, John J.; Charlot, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present the GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC), a catalog of physical properties (stellar masses, dust attenuations, and star formation rates [SFRs]) for ˜700,000 galaxies with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) redshifts below 0.3. GSWLC contains galaxies within the Galaxy Evolution Explorer footprint, regardless of a UV detection, covering 90% of SDSS. The physical properties were obtained from UV/optical spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting following Bayesian methodology of Salim et al., with improvements such as blending corrections for low-resolution UV photometry, flexible dust attenuation laws, and emission-line corrections. GSWLC also includes mid-IR SFRs derived from IR templates based on 22 μ {{m}} Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations. These estimates are independent of UV/optical SED fitting, in order to separate possible systematics. The paper argues that the comparison of specific SFRs (sSFRs) is more informative and physically motivated than the comparison of SFRs. The sSFRs resulting from the UV/optical SED fitting are compared to the mid-IR sSFRs and to sSFRs from three published catalogs. For “main-sequence” galaxies with no active galactic nucleus (AGN) all sSFRs are in very good agreement (within 0.1 dex on average). In particular, the widely used aperture-corrected SFRs from the MPA/JHU catalog show no systematic offsets, in contrast to some integral field spectroscopy results. For galaxies below the main sequence (log sSFR \\lt -11), mid-IR (s)SFRs based on fixed luminosity-SFR conversion are severely biased (up to 2 dex) because the dust is primarily heated by old stars. Furthermore, mid-IR (s)SFRs are overestimated by up to 0.6 dex for galaxies with AGNs, presumably due to nonstellar dust heating. UV/optical (s)SFRs are thus preferred to IR-based (s)SFRs for quenched galaxies and those that host AGNs.

  3. The Merger Rate of Extremely Low Mass White Dwarf Binaries: Links to the Formation of AM CVn Stars and Underluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Warren R; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Kenyon, Scott J

    2010-01-01

    We study a complete, colour-selected sample of double-degenerate binary systems containing extremely low mass (ELM) 3% of AM CVn stars. More importantly, the ELM WD systems that may detonate merge at a rate comparable to the estimated rate of underluminous SNe, rare explosions estimated to produce only ~0.2 Msol worth of ejecta. At least 25% of our ELM WD sample belong to the old thick disk and halo components of the Milky Way. Thus, if merging ELM WD systems are the progenitors of underluminous SNe, transient surveys must find them in both elliptical and spiral galaxies.

  4. Fuel Efficient Galaxies: Sustaining Star Formation with Stellar Mass Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, Samuel N

    2010-01-01

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M*-star formation rate relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Using cosmological simulations of galaxy formation, we test a prescription for modeling the rate at which gas that was returned by stars to interstellar medium will be consumed by star formation. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star format...

  5. Regularity underlying complexity: a redshift-independent description of the continuous variation of galaxy-scale molecular gas properties in the mass-star formation rate plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, M. T.; Daddi, E.; Béthermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Juneau, S.; Elbaz, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Sérvice d' Astrophysique, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Magdis, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hwang, H. S. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Da Cunha, E., E-mail: mark.sargent@cea.fr [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    Star-forming galaxies (SFGs) display a continuous specific star formation rate (sSFR) distribution, which can be approximated by two log-normal functions: one encompassing the galaxy main sequence (MS), and the other a rarer, starbursting population. Starburst (SB) sSFRs can be regarded as the outcome of a physical process (plausibly merging) taking the mathematical form of a log-normal boosting kernel that enhances star formation activity. We explore the utility of splitting the star-forming population into MS and SB galaxies—an approach we term the '2-Star Formation Mode' framework—for understanding their molecular gas properties. Star formation efficiency (SFE) and gas fraction variations among SFGs take a simple redshift-independent form, once these quantities are normalized to the corresponding values for average MS galaxies. SFE enhancements during SB episodes scale supra-linearly with the SFR increase, as expected for mergers. Consequently, galaxies separate more clearly into loci for SBs and normal galaxies in the Schmidt-Kennicutt plane than in (s)SFR versus M {sub *} space. SBs with large deviations (>10 fold) from the MS, e.g., local ULIRGs, are not average SBs, but are much rarer events whose progenitors had larger gas fractions than typical MS galaxies. Statistically, gas fractions in SBs are reduced two- to threefold compared to their direct MS progenitors, as expected for short-lived SFR boosts where internal gas reservoirs are depleted more quickly than gas is re-accreted from the cosmic web. We predict variations of the conversion factor α{sub CO} in the SFR-M {sub *} plane and we show that the higher sSFR of distant galaxies is directly related to their larger gas fractions.

  6. The Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to $z \\sim 0.8$

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lihwai; Foucaud, Sebastien; Norberg, Peder; Bower, R G; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Heinis, Sebastien; Phleps, Stefanie; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Burgett, William; Chambers, K C; Denneau, L; Draper, P; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Huber, M E; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Price, Paul A; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2013-01-01

    Using a large sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey, we present the specific star formation rate (SSFR) - stellar mass (M*) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M* relation in different environments. We confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments ($M>10^{14}M_{solar}$), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star forming sequence of $17\\%$ at 4$\\sigma$ confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of...

  7. The Most Luminous z~9-10 Galaxy Candidates yet Found: The Luminosity Function, Cosmic Star-Formation Rate, and the First Mass Density Estimate at 500 Myr

    CERN Document Server

    Oesch, P A; Illingworth, G D; Labbe, I; Smit, R; Franx, M; van Dokkum, P G; Momcheva, I; Ashby, M L N; Fazio, G G; Huang, J; Willner, S P; Gonzalez, V; Magee, D; Brammer, G B; Skelton, R E

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H_160 ~ 26 - 27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z~9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z~10 galaxy candidates that are known, just 500 Myr after the Big Bang. These sources were identified in a search over the full CANDELS-Deep dataset, building on our previous analysis of the HUDF09/XDF fields and GOODS-S. Three of these four galaxies are significantly detected at 4.5-6.2sigma in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 micron data. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z=10.2+-0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 micron (6.9sigma), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope beta=-2.0+-0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. The abundance of these luminous candidates suggests that the luminosity function evolves more significantly in phi_* than in L_* at z>~8. Despite the discovery of these luminous candidates, the cosmic star formation rate density for g...

  8. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters: a measurable quantity

    CERN Document Server

    De Boni, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in investigating the growth of structures at the nonlinear scales of galaxy clusters from an observational perspective: we explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters from their mass profile beyond the virial radius. We derive the accretion rate from the mass of a spherical shell whose infall velocity is extracted from $N$-body simulations. In the redshift range $z=[0,2]$, our prescription returns an average mass accretion rate within $20-40 \\%$ of the average rate derived from the merger trees of dark matter haloes extracted from $N$-body simulations. Our result suggests that measuring the mean mass accretion rate of a sample of galaxy clusters is actually feasible, thus providing a new potential observational test of the cosmological and structure formation models.

  9. The sizes, masses and specific star-formation rates of massive galaxies at 1.3

    CERN Document Server

    McLure, R J; Dunlop, J S; Cirasuolo, M; Curtis-Lake, E; Bruce, V A; Caputi, K; Almaini, O; Bonfield, D G; Bradshaw, E J; Buitrago, F; Chuter, R; Foucaud, S; Hartley, W G; Jarvis, M J

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive study of the relationship between galaxy size, stellar mass and specific star-formation rate (sSFR) at redshifts 1.3= 6x10^10 Msun), spectroscopic sample from the UKIDSS Ultra-deep Survey (UDS), with accurate stellar-mass measurements derived from spectro photometric fitting, we find that at z~1.4 the location of massive galaxies on the size-mass plane is determined primarily by their sSFR. At this epoch we find that massive galaxies which are passive (sSFR <= 0.1 Gyr^-1) follow a tight size-mass relation, with half-light radii a factor f=2.4+/-0.2 smaller than their local counterparts. Moreover, amongst the passive sub-sample we find no evidence that the off-set from the local size-mass relation is a function of stellar population age. Based on a sub-sample with dynamical mass estimates we also derive an independent estimate of f=2.3+/-0.3 for the typical growth in half-light radius between z~1.4 and the present day. Focusing on the passive sub-sample, we conclude ...

  10. Formation of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    These lectures attempt to expose the most important ideas, which have been proposed to explain the formation of stars with particular emphasis on the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We first describe the important physical processes which trigger the collapse of a self-gravitating piece of fluid and regulate the star formation rate in molecular clouds. Then we review the various theories which have been proposed along the years to explain the origin of the stellar initial mass f...

  11. Tracing the Mass Growth and Star Formation Rate Evolution of Massive Galaxies from z~6 to z~1 in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Britt F; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Trenti, Michele; Bouwens, Rychard; Gonzalez, Valentino; Illingworth, Garth; Magee, Daniel; Oesch, Pascal; Stiavelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of $\\sim$1500 H160-selected photometric galaxies detected to a limiting magnitude of 27.8 in the HUDF, using imaging from the HST WFC3/IR camera in combination with archival UV, optical, and NIR imaging. We fit photometric redshifts and stellar population estimates for all galaxies with well-determined Spitzer IRAC fluxes, allowing for the determination of the cumulative mass function within the range $14$.

  12. Outflow forces in intermediate mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    van Kempen, T A; van Dishoeck, E F; Kristensen, L E; Belloche, A; Klaassen, P D; Leurini, S; Jose-Garcia, I San; Aykutalp, A; Choi, Y; Endo, A; Frieswijk, W; Harsono, D; Karska, A; Koumpia, E; van der Marel, N; Nagy, Z; Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Risacher, C; van Weeren, R J; Wyrowski, F; Yildiz, U A; Guesten, R; Boland, W; Baryshev, A

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate mass protostarsprovide a bridge between theories of low- and high-mass star formation. Emerging molecular outflows can be used to determine the influence of fragmentation and multiplicity on protostellar evolution through the correlation of outflow forces of intermediate mass protostars with the luminosity. The aim of this paper is to derive outflow forces from outflows of six intermediate mass protostellar regions and validate the apparent correlation between total luminosity and outflow force seen in earlier work, as well as remove uncertainties caused by different methodology. By comparing CO 6--5 observations obtained with APEX with non-LTE radiative transfer model predictions, optical depths, temperatures, densities of the gas of the molecular outflows are derived. Outflow forces, dynamical timescales and kinetic luminosities are subsequently calculated. Outflow parameters, including the forces, were derived for all sources. Temperatures in excess of 50 K were found for all flows, in line wi...

  13. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar

  14. Star Formation Triggered by Low-Mass Clump Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsionas, Spyridon; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    We investigate by means of high-resolution numerical simulations the phenomenology of star formation triggered by low-velocity collisions between low-mass molecular clumps. The simulations are performed using an SPH code which satisfies the Jeans condition by invoking On-the-Fly Particle Splitting (Kitsionas & Whitworth 2002). The efficiency of star formation appears to increase with increasing clump mass and/or decreasing impact parameter b and/or increasing clump velocity. For bcompressed layers which fragment into filaments that break up into cores. Protostellar objects then condense out of the cores and accrete from them. The resulting accretion rates are comparable to those of Class 0 objects. The densities in the filaments are sufficient that they could be mapped in ammonia or CS line radiation in nearby star formation regions. The phenomenology of star formation observed in our simulations compares rather well with the observed filamentary distribution of young stars in Taurus (Hartmann 2002).

  15. Magnetic Fields and Galactic Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, Sven; Falle, Sam A E G

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of molecular clouds within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas ($n_{\\rm{H}}>10^5\\:{\\rm{cm}^{-3}}$) at an efficiency of 2\\% per local free fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated $B$-field case of $80\\:{\\rm{\\mu}}$G. However, our chosen kpc scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbu...

  16. Mass transfer and disc formation in AGB binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We investigate mass transfer and the formation of discs in binary systems using a combination of numerical simulations and theory. We consider six models distinguished by binary separation, secondary mass and outflow mechanism. Each system consists of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and an accreting secondary. The AGB star loses its mass via a wind. In one of our six models, the AGB star incurs a short period of outburst. In all cases, the secondary accretes part of the ejected mass and also influences the mass-loss rate of the AGB star. The ejected mass may remain gravitationally bound to the binary system and form a circumbinary disc, or contribute to an accretion disc around the secondary. In other cases, the ejecta will escape the binary system. The accretion rate on to the secondary changes non-linearly with binary separation. In our closest binary simulations, our models exemplify the wind Roche lobe overflow while in our wide binary cases, the mass transfer exhibits Bondi-Hoyle accretion. The morphologies of the outflows in the binary systems are varied. The variety may provide clues to how the late AGB phase influences planetary nebula shaping. We employ the adaptive-mesh-refinement code astrobear for our simulations and include ray tracing, radiation transfer, cooling and dust formation. To attain the highest computational efficiency and the most stable results, all simulations are run in the corotating frame.

  17. Time Rate Gradient Effects and Negative Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksch, Edmond

    2008-03-01

    The Harvard tower Experiment and tests with accurate atomic clocks show that a clock at a high elevation indicates more elapsed time than a clock at a low elevation, both clocks properly measuring time at their locations. This fact mandates that Newton's first law of motion be rewritten to cite impulse balance rather than force balance. Time rate gradient effects explain how the weight of a precisely vertical and precisely uniform electric field or a precisely vertical and precisely uniform magnetic field is supported in a precisely unidirectional gravitational field. Time rate gradient effects also explain how the weight of a unidirectional gravitational field is reacted. It is confirmed that the mass density of the gravitational field is negative. http://www.TimeRateGradient.com; http://www.Negative-Mass.com; http://www.EinsteinsElevator.com

  18. Atmospheric Mass Loss During Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting, Hilke; Yalinewich, Almog

    2014-01-01

    We quantify the atmospheric mass loss during planet formation by examining the contributions to atmospheric loss from both giant impacts and planetesimal accretion. Giant impacts cause global motion of the ground. Using analytic self-similar solutions and full numerical integrations we find (for isothermal atmospheres with adiabatic index ($\\gamma=5/3$) that the local atmospheric mass loss fraction for ground velocities $v_g \\sqrt{2} \\rho_0 (\\pi h R)^{3/2}$ (25~km for the current Earth), are able to eject all the atmosphere above the tangent plane of the impact site, which is $h/2R$ of the whole atmosphere, where $h$, $R$ and $\\rho_0$ are the atmospheric scale height, radius of the target, and its atmospheric density at the ground. 2) Smaller impactors, but above $m>4 \\pi \\rho_0 h^3$ (1~km for the current Earth) are only able to eject a fraction of the atmospheric mass above the tangent plane. We find that the most efficient impactors (per unit impactor mass) for atmospheric loss are planetesimals just above...

  19. Photoionising feedback and the star formation rates in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    MacLachlan, J M; Wood, K; Dale, J E

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods. We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results. We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by approximately 23 per cent over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from 0.042 solar masses per year in our control run to 0.032 solar masses per year after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneo...

  20. Ionisation and the Formation of Low-Mass Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, James; Bate, M. R.; Price, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Molecular clouds are known to have strong magnetic fields and low ionisation rates. Numerical simulations performed with these more realistic conditions yield results closer to those observed, and furthermore, suggest additional observational signatures not yet explored. I will discuss my simulations of the formation of a single protostar starting from one solar mass of gas; the models include a self-consistent treatment of all three non-ideal MHD processes. My focus will be on how the ionisation parameters and non-ideal MHD processes affect the formation of the protostar and its environment.

  1. Thrombus Formation at High Shear Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2017-06-21

    The final common pathway in myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke is occlusion of blood flow from a thrombus forming under high shear rates in arteries. A high-shear thrombus forms rapidly and is distinct from the slow formation of coagulation that occurs in stagnant blood. Thrombosis at high shear rates depends primarily on the long protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets, with hemodynamics playing an important role in each stage of thrombus formation, including vWF binding, platelet adhesion, platelet activation, and rapid thrombus growth. The prediction of high-shear thrombosis is a major area of biofluid mechanics in which point-of-care testing and computational modeling are promising future directions for clinically relevant research. Further research in this area will enable identification of patients at high risk for arterial thrombosis, improve prevention and treatment based on shear-dependent biological mechanisms, and improve blood-contacting device design to reduce thrombosis risk.

  2. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Conroy, Charlie

    2008-01-01

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs -- i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo--galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the n...

  3. On the Star Formation Rates in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lada, Charles J; Alves, João F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the level of star formation activity within nearby molecular clouds. We employ a uniform set of infrared extinction maps to provide accurate assessments of cloud mass and structure and compare these with inventories of young stellar objects within the clouds. We present evidence indicating that both the yield and rate of star formation can vary considerably in local clouds, independent of their mass and size. We find that the surface density structure of such clouds appears to be important in controlling both these factors. In particular, we find that the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds is linearly proportional to the cloud mass (M_{0.8}) above an extinction threshold of A_K approximately equal to 0.8 magnitudes, corresponding to a gas surface density threshold of approximaely 116 solar masses per square pc. We argue that this surface density threshold corresponds to a gas volume density threshold which we estimate to be n(H_2) approximately equal to 10^4\\cc. Specifi...

  4. ORIGIN OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY-STAR FORMATION RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwit, Martin; Brisbin, Drew, E-mail: harwit@verizon.net [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in the low-redshift range 0.07 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy mass-metallicity-star formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most consequential among our findings is that, on average, extragalactic infall accounts for one half of the gas required for star formation, a ratio that is remarkably constant across galaxies with stellar masses ranging at least from M* = 2 × 10{sup 9} to 6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. This leads us to propose that star formation is initiated when extragalactic infall roughly doubles the mass of marginally stable interstellar clouds. The processes described may also account quantitatively for the metallicity of extragalactic space, though to check this the fraction of extragalactic baryons will need to be more firmly established.

  5. Star formation rates and efficiencies in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A. T.; Longmore, S. N.; Battersby, C.; Bally, J.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Henshaw, J. D.; Walker, D. L.

    2017-08-01

    The inner few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way harbours gas densities, pressures, velocity dispersions, an interstellar radiation field and a cosmic ray ionization rate orders of magnitude higher than the disc; akin to the environment found in star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Previous studies have shown that this region is forming stars at a rate per unit mass of dense gas which is at least an order of magnitude lower than in the disc, potentially violating theoretical predictions. We show that all observational star formation rate diagnostics - both direct counting of young stellar objects and integrated light measurements - are in agreement within a factor two, hence the low star formation rate (SFR) is not the result of the systematic uncertainties that affect any one method. As these methods trace the star formation over different time-scales, from 0.1 to 5 Myr, we conclude that the SFR has been constant to within a factor of a few within this time period. We investigate the progression of star formation within gravitationally bound clouds on ∼parsec scales and find 1-4 per cent of the cloud masses are converted into stars per free-fall time, consistent with a subset of the considered 'volumetric' star formation models. However, discriminating between these models is obstructed by the current uncertainties on the input observables and, most importantly and urgently, by their dependence on ill-constrained free parameters. The lack of empirical constraints on these parameters therefore represents a key challenge in the further verification or falsification of current star formation theories.

  6. The Absolute Rate of LGRB Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J F

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the LGRB progenitor rate using our recent work on the effects of environmental metallically on LGRB formation in concert with SNe statistics via an approach patterned loosely off the Drake equation. Beginning with the cosmic star-formation history, we consider the expected number of broad-line Type Ic events (the SNe type associated with LGRBs) that are in low metallicity host environments adjusted by the contribution of high metallicity host environments at a much reduced rate. We then compare this estimate to the observed LGRB rate corrected for instrumental selection effects to provide a combined estimate of the efficiency fraction of these progenitors to produce LGRBs and the fraction of which are beamed in our direction. From this we estimate that an aligned LGRB occurs for approximately every 4000 low metallically broad-lined Type Ic Supernovae. Therefore if one assumes a semi-nominal beaming factor of 100 then only about one such supernova out of 40 produce an LGRB. Finally we propose an of...

  7. RATE OF INTRAMOLECULAR CONTACT FORMATION IN PROTEINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-xi Zhang; Ting-ting Sun; Xiang-hong Wang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we estimate the rate of contact formation between two residues in the interior of the proteins using the Szabo,Schulten,and Schulten formula with the probability distribution P(r)based on 375 proteins from PDB(Protein Data Bank).The probability distribution for residue pair in proteins is different from the Gaussian distribution,especially for short distance between two residues in proteins.The rate of contact formation in the interior of protein is discussed as a function of distance n(=|j-i|)between two residues,and it decreases monotonically with n and follows the scaling relationship of k∝"n-γ with γ=1.43 for the contact radius a=0.40 nm and γ=1.05 for a=0.50 nm.The diffusion coefficient for the relative diffusion of two residues in the interior of proteins is estimated as D=6.4×1 0.-6 cm2/s,which is close to the result that is found for monomer diffusion.

  8. SHIELD: Comparing Gas and Star Formation in Low Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Teich, Yaron G; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Józsa, Gyula I G; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Salzer, John J; Skillman, Evan D; Warren, Steven R; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E C; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V; Thomann, Clara M; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the relationships between atomic, neutral hydrogen (HI) and star formation (SF) in the 12 low-mass SHIELD galaxies. We compare high spectral (~0.82 km/s/channel) and spatial resolution (physical resolutions of 170 pc - 700 pc) HI imaging from the VLA with H\\alpha and far-ultraviolet imaging. We quantify the degree of co-spatiality between star forming regions and regions of high HI column densities. We calculate the global star formation efficiencies (SFE, $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ / $\\Sigma_{\\rm HI}$), and examine the relationships among the SFE and HI mass, HI column density, and star formation rate (SFR). The systems are consuming their cold neutral gas on timescales of order a few Gyr. While we derive an index for the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation of N ~ 0.68 $\\pm$ 0.04 for the SHIELD sample as a whole, the values of N vary considerably from system to system. By supplementing SHIELD results with those from other surveys, we find that HI mass and UV-based SFR are strongly correlated over five orders of ma...

  9. Formation of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    These lectures attempt to expose the most important ideas, which have been proposed to explain the formation of stars with particular emphasis on the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We first describe the important physical processes which trigger the collapse of a self-gravitating piece of fluid and regulate the star formation rate in molecular clouds. Then we review the various theories which have been proposed along the years to explain the origin of the stellar initial mass function paying particular attention to four models, namely the competitive accretion and the theories based respectively on stopped accretion, MHD shocks and turbulent dispersion. As it is yet unsettled whether the brown dwarfs form as low-mass stars, we present the theory of brown dwarfs based on disk fragmentation stressing all the uncertainties due to the radiative feedback and magnetic field. Finally, we describe the results of large scale simulations performed to explain the collapse and fragmentation of molecular cl...

  10. Formation of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, P.

    2012-11-01

    These lectures attempt to expose the most important ideas, which have been proposed to explain the formation of stars with particular emphasis on the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We first describe the important physical processes which trigger the collapse of a self-gravitating piece of fluid and regulate the star formation rate in molecular clouds. Then we review the various theories which have been proposed along the years to explain the origin of the stellar initial mass function paying particular attention to four models, namely the competitive accretion and the theories based respectively on stopped accretion, MHD shocks and turbulent dispersion. As it is yet unsettled whether the brown dwarfs form as low-mass stars, we present the theory of brown dwarfs based on disk fragmentation stressing all the uncertainties due to the radiative feedback and magnetic field. Finally, we describe the results of large scale simulations performed to explain the collapse and fragmentation of molecular clouds.

  11. Origin of the Galaxy Mass-Metallicity-Star-Formation Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Harwit, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies in the low-redshift range $0.07\\leq z\\leq 0.3$ considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates (SFRs) to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy-mass-metallicity-star-formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most conseq...

  12. The most luminous z ∼ 9-10 galaxy candidates yet found: The luminosity function, cosmic star-formation rate, and the first mass density estimate at 500 Myr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Smit, R.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Van Dokkum, P. G.; Momcheva, I. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Willner, S. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Gonzalez, V. [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Brammer, G. B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Skelton, R. E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Spitler, L. R., E-mail: pascal.oesch@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2014-05-10

    We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H {sub 160} ∼ 26-27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z ∼ 9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z ∼ 10 galaxy candidates that are known, just ∼500 Myr after the big bang. Two similarly bright sources are also detected in a reanalysis of the GOODS-S data set. Three of the four galaxies in GOODS-N are significantly detected at 4.5σ-6.2σ in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 μm data, as is one of the GOODS-S candidates. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z = 10.2 ± 0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 μm (6.9σ), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope β = –2.0 ± 0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. Thorough testing and use of grism data excludes known low-redshift contamination at high significance, including single emission-line sources, but as-yet unknown low redshift sources could provide an alternative solution given the surprising luminosity of these candidates. Finding such bright galaxies at z ∼ 9-10 suggests that the luminosity function for luminous galaxies might evolve in a complex way at z > 8. The cosmic star formation rate density still shows, however, an order-of-magnitude increase from z ∼ 10 to z ∼ 8 since the dominant contribution comes from low-luminosity sources. Based on the IRAC detections, we derive galaxy stellar masses at z ∼ 10, finding that these luminous objects are typically 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. This allows for a first estimate of the cosmic stellar mass density at z ∼ 10 resulting in log{sub 10} ρ{sub ∗}=4.7{sub −0.8}{sup +0.5} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} for galaxies brighter than M {sub UV} ∼ –18. The remarkable brightness, and hence luminosity, of these z ∼ 9-10 candidates will enable deep spectroscopy to determine their redshift and nature, and highlights the opportunity for the James Webb Space Telescope to map the buildup of

  13. Variations in the Galactic star formation rate and density thresholds for star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, S N; Testi, L; Purcell, C R; Walsh, A J; Bressert, E; Pestalozzi, M; Molinari, S; Ott, J; Cortese, L; Battersby, C; Murray, N; Lee, E; Kruijssen, D

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of gas into stars is a fundamental process in astrophysics and cosmology. Stars are known to form from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps in interstellar molecular clouds, and it has been proposed that the resulting star formation rate is proportional to either the amount of mass above a threshold gas surface density, or the gas volume density. These star-formation prescriptions appear to hold in nearby molecular clouds in our Milky Way Galaxy's disk as well as in distant galaxies where the star formation rates are often much larger. The inner 500 pc of our Galaxy, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), contains the largest concentration of dense, high-surface density molecular gas in the Milky Way, providing an environment where the validity of star-formation prescriptions can be tested. Here we show that by several measures, the current star formation rate in the CMZ is an order-of-magnitude lower than the rates predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. In particular, the region 1...

  14. The simplest model of galaxy formation I: A formation history model of galaxy stellar mass growth

    CERN Document Server

    Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a simple model to self-consistently connect the growth of galaxies to the formation history of their host dark matter halos. Our model is defined by two simple functions: the "baryonic growth function" which controls the rate at which new baryonic material is made available for star formation, and the "physics function" which controls the efficiency with which this material is converted into stars. Using simple, phenomenologically motivated forms for both functions that depend only on a single halo property, we demonstrate the model's ability to reproduce the z=0 red and blue stellar mass functions. Furthermore, by adding redshift as a second input variable to the physics function we show that the reproduction of the global stellar mass function out to z=3 is improved. We conclude by discussing the general utility of our new model, highlighting its usefulness for creating mock galaxy samples which have a number of key advantages over those generated by other techniques.

  15. Chemical Diversity in High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Bergin, E A; Sridharan, T K

    2008-01-01

    Massive star formation exhibits an extremely rich chemistry. However, not much evolutionary details are known yet, especially at high spatial resolution. Therefore, we synthesize previously published Submillimeter Array high-spatial-resolution spectral line observations toward four regions of high-mass star formation that are in various evolutionary stages with a range of luminosities. Estimating column densities and comparing the spatially resolved molecular emission allows us to characterize the chemical evolution in more detail. Furthermore, we model the chemical evolution of massive warm molecular cores to be directly compared with the data. The four regions reveal many different characteristics. While some of them, e.g., the detection rate of CH3OH, can be explained by variations of the average gas temperatures, other features are attributed to chemical effects. For example, C34S is observed mainly at the core-edges and not toward their centers because of temperature-selective desorption and successive g...

  16. Disentangling Morphology, Star Formation, Stellar Mass, and Environment in Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Christlein, D; Christlein, Daniel; Zabludoff, Ann

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the spectroscopic and photometric properties of galaxies in six nearby clusters. We perform a partial correlation analysis on our dataset to investigate whether the correlation between star formation rates in galaxies and their environment is merely another aspect of correlations of morphology, stellar mass, or mean stellar age with environment, or whether star formation rates vary independently of these other correlations. We find a residual correlation of ongoing star formation with environment, indicating that even galaxies with similar morphologies, stellar masses, and mean stellar ages have lower star formation rates in denser environments. Thus, the current star formation gradient in clusters is not just another aspect of the morphology-density, stellar mass-density, or mean stellar age-density relations. Furthermore, the star formation gradient cannot be solely the result of initial conditions, but must partly be due to subsequent evolution through a mechanism (or mechanisms) sens...

  17. The formation of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that ~60% of all stars (including brown dwarfs) have masses below 0.2Msun. Currently, there is no consensus on how these objects form. I will briefly review the four main theories for the formation of low-mass objects: turbulent fragmentation, ejection of protostellar embryos, disc fragmentation, and photo-erosion of prestellar cores. I will focus on the disc fragmentation theory and discuss how it addresses critical observational constraints, i.e. the low-mass initial mass function, the brown dwarf desert, and the binary statistics of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. I will examine whether observations may be used to distinguish between different formation mechanisms, and give a few examples of systems that strongly favour a specific formation scenario. Finally, I will argue that it is likely that all mechanisms may play a role in low-mass star and brown dwarf formation.

  18. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Apai, Dániel [Department of Astronomy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. (United States)

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  19. Constraints from $^{26}Al$ Measurements on the Galaxy's Recent Global Star Formation Rate and Core Collapse Supernovae Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Hartmann, D H

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from the decay of $^{26}$Al offer a stringent constraint on the Galaxy's global star formation rate over the past million years, supplementing other methods for quantifying the recent Galactic star formation rate, such as equivalent widths of H$\\alpha$ emission. Advantages and disadvantages of using $^{26}$Al gamma-ray measurements as a tracer of the massive star formation rate are analyzed. Estimates of the Galactic $^{26}$Al mass derived from COMPTEL measurements are coupled with a simple, analytical model of the $^{26}$Al injection rate from massive stars and restrict the Galaxy's recent star formation rate to \\hbox{5 $\\pm$ 4 M\\sun yr$^{-1}$}. In addition, we show that the derived $^{26}$Al mass implies a present day \\hbox{Type II + Ib} supernovae rate of 3.4 $\\pm$ 2.8 per century, which seems consistent with other independent estimates of the Galactic core collapse supernova rate. If some independent measure of the massive star initial mass function or star formation rate or \\hbox{Type II + Ib}...

  20. Scaling Relations of Galactic Winds with Star Formation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The galactic scale outflows generated by nuclear starbursts consist of a multiphase medium where each phase has a distinct velocity depending on the characteristics of the starburst. Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydrodynamical simulations we probe the outflow velocity of the hot, warm, and neutral gas entrained in a galactic wind. By varying the star formation rate (SFR) in our simulations, we find no correlation between the outflow velocity of the hot gas with the SFR, but we do find a correlation between the outflow velocity of both warm and neutral gas with the SFR. The scaling relation between outflow velocity and SFR only holds for low SFR until the scaling relation abruptly flattens at a SFR determined by the mass loading of the starburst. The outflow velocity of the hot gas only depends on the mass loading of the starburst and not the SFR. For low SFRs the difference between the velocity of cold gas, as measured by absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas, may be 5-7 times lower than the velocity of the hot, highly ionized gas. The difference in velocity between the cold and hot gas for higher SFRs depends on the mass loading factor of the starburst. Thus the measured velocities of neutral or low ionized gas cannot be used to estimate the outflow velocity of the hot gas without determining the mass loading of the starburst.

  1. Protomagnetar and black hole formation in high-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obergaulinger, M.; Aloy, M. Á.

    2017-07-01

    Using axisymmetric simulations coupling special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), an approximate post-Newtonian gravitational potential and two-moment neutrino transport, we show different paths for the formation of either protomagnetars or stellar mass black holes. The fraction of prototypical stellar cores which should result in collapsars depends on a combination of several factors, among which the structure of the progenitor star and the profile of specific angular momentum are probably the foremost. Along with the implosion of the stellar core, we also obtain supernova-like explosions driven by neutrino heating and hydrodynamic instabilities or by magneto-rotational effects in cores of high-mass stars. In the latter case, highly collimated, mildly relativistic outflows are generated. We find that after a rather long post-collapse phase (lasting ≳1 s) black holes may form in cases both of successful and failed supernova-like explosions. A basic trend is that cores with a specific angular momentum smaller than that obtained by standard, one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations form black holes (and eventually collapsars). Complementary, protomagnetars result from stellar cores with the standard distribution of specific angular momentum obtained from prototypical stellar evolution calculations including magnetic torques and moderate to large mass-loss rates.

  2. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters: a measurable quantity

    CERN Document Server

    De Boni, Cristiano; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Giocoli, Carlo; Baldi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters by using dense galaxy redshift surveys of their outer regions. By approximating the accretion with the infall of a spherical shell, the mass accretion rate only depends on the mass profile of the cluster in a thin shell at radii larger than $R_{200}$. This approximation is rather crude in hierarchical clustering scenarios, where both smooth accretion and aggregation of smaller dark matter haloes contribute to the mass accretion of clusters. Nevertheless, in the redshift range $z=[0,1]$, our prescription returns an average mass accretion rate within $20 \\%$ of the average rate derived with the more realistic merger trees of dark matter haloes extracted from $N$-body simulations. The mass accretion rate of galaxy clusters has been the topic of numerous detailed numerical and theoretical investigations, but so far it has remained inaccessible to measurements in the real Universe. Our result suggests that measuring the mass accreti...

  3. Star Formation Modes in Low-Mass Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, J S

    2001-01-01

    Low-mass disk galaxies with well-organized structures are relatively common in low density regions of the nearby Universe. They display a wide range in levels of star formation activity, extending from sluggishly evolving `superthin' disk systems to nearby starbursts. Investigations of this class of galaxy therefore provides opportunities to test and define models of galactic star formation processes. In this paper we briefly explore characteristics of examples of quiescent and starbursting low-mass disk galaxies.

  4. Implications for the formation of star clusters from extra-galactic star-formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C; Larsen, S S

    2004-01-01

    Observations indicate that young massive star clusters in spiral and dwarf galaxies follow a relation between luminosity of the brightest young cluster and the star-formation rate (SFR) of the host galaxy, in the sense that higher SFRs lead to the formation of brighter clusters. Assuming that the empirical relation between maximum cluster luminosity and SFR reflects an underlying similar relation between maximum cluster mass (M_ecl,max) and SFR, we compare the resulting SFR(M_ecl,max) relation with different theoretical models. The empirical correlation is found to suggest that individual star clusters form on a free-fall time-scale with their pre-cluster molecular-cloud-core radii typically being a few pc independent of mass. The cloud cores contract by factors of 5 to 10 while building-up the embedded cluster. A theoretical SFR(M_ecl,max) relation in very good agreement with the empirical correlation is obtained if the cluster mass function of a young population has a Salpeter exponent beta approx. 2.35 and...

  5. The First Stars: A Low-Mass Formation Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the growth of a Population III stellar system under photodissociating feedback. We start from cosmological initial conditions at z = 100, self-consistently following the formation of a minihalo at z = 15 and the subsequent collapse of its central gas to high densities. The simulations resolve scales as small as approx. 1 AU, corresponding to gas densities of 10(exp 16)/cu cm. Using sink particles to represent the growing protostars, we evolve the stellar system for the next 5000 yr. We find that this emerging stellar group accretes at an unusually low rate compared with minihalos which form at earlier times (z = 20-30), or with lower baryonic angular momentum. The stars in this unusual system will likely reach masses ranging from stars will undergo an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. Based upon the simulation, we predict the rare existence of Population III stars that have survived to the present day and have been enriched by mass overflow from a previous AGB companion.

  6. Coriolis mass flow rate meters for low flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.

    2008-01-01

    The accurate and quick measurement of small mass flow rates (~10 mg/s) of fluids is considered an “enabling technology��? in semiconductor, fine-chemical, and food & drugs industries. Flowmeters based on the Coriolis effect offer the most direct sensing of the mass flow rate, and for this reason do

  7. Coriolis mass flow rate meters for low flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, Aditya

    2008-01-01

    The accurate and quick measurement of small mass flow rates (~10 mg/s) of fluids is considered an "enabling technology" in semiconductor, fine-chemical, and food & drugs industries. Flowmeters based on the Coriolis effect offer the most direct sensing of the mass flow rate, and for this reason do no

  8. Towards universal hybrid star formation rate estimators

    CERN Document Server

    Boquien, M; Calzetti, D; Dale, D; Galametz, M; Sauvage, M; Croxall, K; Draine, B; Kirkpatrick, A; Kumari, N; Hunt, L; De Looze, I; Pellegrini, E; Relano, M; Smith, J -D; Tabatabaei, F

    2016-01-01

    To compute the SFR of galaxies from the rest-frame UV it is essential to take into account the obscuration by dust. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the IR. Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. Doing so, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation, taking into account the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies. We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially-resolved FUV to FIR SED of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said p...

  9. Decreased Specific Star Formation Rates in AGN Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, T Taro; Melendez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (\\mstar) from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and \\mstar{} as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray lum...

  10. Binary Formation Mechanisms: Constraints from the Companion Mass Ratio Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Reggiani, Maddalena M

    2011-01-01

    We present a statistical comparison of the mass ratio distribution of companions, as observed in different multiplicity surveys, to the most recent estimate of the single object mass function (Bochanski et al. 2010). The main goal of our analysis is to test whether or not the observed companion mass ratio distribution (CMRD) as a function of primary star mass and star formation environment is consistent with having been drawn from the field star IMF. We consider samples of companions for M dwarfs, solar type and intermediate mass stars, both in the field as well as clusters or associations, and compare them with populations of binaries generated by random pairing from the assumed IMF for a fixed primary mass. With regard to the field we can reject the hypothesis that the CMRD was drawn from the IMF for different primary mass ranges: the observed CMRDs show a larger number of equal-mass systems than predicted by the IMF. This is in agreement with fragmentation theories of binary formation. For the open cluster...

  11. The formation of premuscle masses during chick wing bud development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, C; Solursh, M

    1990-01-01

    The skeletal musculature of chick limb buds is derived from somitic cells that migrate into the somatopleure of the future limb regions. These cells become organized into the earliest muscle primordia, the dorsal and ventral premuscle masses, prior to myogenic differentiation. Therefore, skeletal-muscle specific markers cannot be used to observe myogenic cells during the process of premuscle mass formation. In this study, an alternative marking method was used to determine the specific stages during which this process occurs. Quail somite strips were fluorescently labeled and implanted into chick hosts. Paraffin sections of the resulting chimeric wing buds were stained with the monoclonal antibody QH1 in order to identify graft-derived endothelium. Non-endothelial graft-derived cells present in the wing mesenchyme were assumed to be myogenic. At Hamburger and Hamilton stage 20, myogenic cells were distributed throughout the central region of the limb, including the future dorsal and ventral premuscle mass regions and the prechondrogenic core region. By stage 21, the myogenic cells were present at greater density in dorsal and ventral regions than in the core. By stage 23, nearly all myogenic cells were located in the dorsal and ventral premuscle masses. Therefore, the two premuscle masses become established by stage 21 and premuscle mass formation is not complete until stage 23 or later. Premuscle mass formation occurs concurrently with early chondrogenic events, as observed with the marker peanut agglutinin. To facilitate the investigation of possible underlying mechanisms of premuscle mass formation, the micromass culture system was evaluated, to determine whether or not it can serve as an accurate in vitro model system. The initially randomly distributed myogenic cells were observed to segregate from prechondrogenic regions prior to myogenic differentiation. This is similar to myogenic patterning in vivo.

  12. The HI mass function as a probe of photoionisation feedback on low mass galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Han-Seek; Power, C; Park, Jaehong; Lagos, C d P; Baugh, C M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the galaxy formation physics governing the low mass end of the HI mass function in the local Universe. Specifically, we predict the effects on the HI mass function of varying i) the strength of photoionisation feedback and the redshift of the end of the epoch of reionization, ii) the cosmology, iii) the supernovae feedback prescription, and iv) the efficiency of star formation. We find that the shape of the low-mass end of the HI mass function is most affected by the critical halo mass below which galaxy formation is suppressed by photoionisation heating of the intergalactic medium. We model the redshift dependence of this critical dark matter halo mass by requiring a match to the low-mass end of the HI mass function. The best fitting critical dark matter halo mass decreases as redshift increases in this model, corresponding to a circular velocity of $\\sim 50 \\, {\\rm km \\,s}^{-1}$ at $z=0$, $\\sim 30 \\, {\\rm km\\, s}^{-1}$ at $z \\sim 1$ and $\\sim 12 \\, {\\rm km \\, s}^{-1}$ at $z=6$. We find that an ev...

  13. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice

    2016-10-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions (CSMF) of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass halos changes behavior at a characteristic redshift zc ˜ 2. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environment, becoming zc ˜ 4 in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model is used to understand how galaxies form and evolve in dark matter halos, and to make predictions for other statistical properties of the galaxy population, such as the stellar mass functions of galaxies at high z, the star formation and stellar mass assembly histories in dark matter halos. A comparison of our model predictions with those of other empirical models shows that different models can make vastly different predictions, even though all of them are tuned to match the observed stellar mass functions of galaxies.

  14. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lan, T.-W.; Ménard, B.

    2017-01-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass haloes changes behaviour at a characteristic redshift zc ˜ 2. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environment, becoming zc ˜ 4 in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model is used to understand how galaxies form and evolve in dark matter haloes, and to make predictions for other statistical properties of the galaxy population, such as the stellar mass functions of galaxies at high z, the star formation, and stellar mass assembly histories in dark matter haloes. A comparison of our model predictions with those of other empirical models shows that different models can make vastly different predictions, even though all of them are tuned to match the observed stellar mass functions of galaxies.

  15. The star formation main sequence and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in the Illustris simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sparre, Martin; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Nelson, Dylan; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes that drive star formation is a key challenge for galaxy formation models. In this article we study the tight correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of galaxies at a given redshift, how halo growth influences star formation, and star formation histories of individual galaxies. We study these topics using Illustris, a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of galaxy formation. Illustris reproduces the observed relation (the star formation main sequence; SFMS) between SFR and stellar mass at redshifts z=0 and z=4, but at intermediate redshifts of z~2, the simulated SFMS has a significantly lower normalisation than reported by observations. The scatter in the relation is consistent with the observed scatter. However, the fraction of outliers above the SFR-stellar mass relation in Illustris is less than that observed. Galaxies with halo masses of ~10^{12} solar masses dominate the SFR density of the Universe, in agreement with the re...

  16. CHARACTERIZING THE STAR FORMATION OF THE LOW-MASS SHIELD GALAXIES FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Simones, Jacob E. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7900 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Elson, Ed C. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Ott, Jürgen, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    The Survey of Hi in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs is an on-going multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies that populate the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the Hi Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey based on their low Hi mass and low baryonic mass. Here, we measure the star formation properties from optically resolved stellar populations for 12 galaxies using a color–magnitude diagram fitting technique. We derive lifetime average star formation rates (SFRs), recent SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions. Overall, the recent SFRs are comparable to the lifetime SFRs with mean birthrate parameter of 1.4, with a surprisingly narrow standard deviation of 0.7. Two galaxies are classified as dwarf transition galaxies (dTrans). These dTrans systems have star formation and gas properties consistent with the rest of the sample, in agreement with previous results that some dTrans galaxies may simply be low-luminosity dwarf irregulars. We do not find a correlation between the recent star formation activity and the distance to the nearest neighboring galaxy, suggesting that the star formation process is not driven by gravitational interactions, but regulated internally. Further, we find a broadening in the star formation and gas properties (i.e., specific SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions) compared to the generally tight correlation found in more massive galaxies. Overall, the star formation and gas properties indicate these very low-mass galaxies host a fluctuating, non-deterministic, and inefficient star formation process.

  17. Drill-in fluid reduces formation damage, increases production rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hands, N. [Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij B.V., Velsen (Netherlands); Kowbel, K. [Ensco International/NAM, Assen (Netherlands); Maikranz, S. [M-I LLC, Houston, TX (United States); Nouris, R. [M-I LLC, Velsen (Netherlands)

    1998-07-13

    A sodium formate drill-in fluid system reduced formation damage, resulting in better-than-expected production rates for an off-shore Dutch development well. Programmed to optimize production capacity and reservoir drainage from a Rotliegend sandstone gas discovery, the 5-7/8-in. subhorizontal production interval was drilled and completed barefoot with a unique, rheologically engineered sodium formate drill-in fluid system. The new system, consisting of a sodium formate (NaCOOH) brine as the base fluid and properly sized calcium carbonate as the formation-bridging agent, was selected on the basis of its well-documented record in reducing solids impairment and formation damage in similar sandstone structures in Germany. The system was engineered around the low-shear-rate viscosity (LSRV) concept, designed to provide exceptional rheological properties. After describing the drilling program, the paper gives results on the drilling and completion.

  18. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): halo formation times and halo assembly bias on the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojeiro, Rita; Eardley, Elizabeth; Peacock, John A.; Norberg, Peder; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon P.; Henriques, Bruno; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Thomas, Peter; Tonini, Chiara; Wild, Vivienne

    2017-09-01

    We present evidence for halo assembly bias as a function of geometric environment (GE). By classifying Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) galaxy groups as residing in voids, sheets, filaments or knots using a tidal tensor method, we find that low-mass haloes that reside in knots are older than haloes of the same mass that reside in voids. This result provides direct support to theories that link strong halo tidal interactions with halo assembly times. The trend with GE is reversed at large halo mass, with haloes in knots being younger than haloes of the same mass in voids. We find a clear signal of halo downsizing - more massive haloes host galaxies that assembled their stars earlier. This overall trend holds independently of GE. We support our analysis with an in-depth exploration of the L-Galaxies semi-analytic model, used here to correlate several galaxy properties with three different definitions of halo formation time. We find a complex relationship between halo formation time and galaxy properties, with significant scatter. We confirm that stellar mass to halo mass ratio, specific star formation rate (SFR) and mass-weighed age are reasonable proxies of halo formation time, especially at low halo masses. Instantaneous SFR is a poor indicator at all halo masses. Using the same semi-analytic model, we create mock spectral observations using complex star formation and chemical enrichment histories, which approximately mimic GAMA's typical signal-to-noise ratio and wavelength range. We use these mocks to assert how well potential proxies of halo formation time may be recovered from GAMA-like spectroscopic data.

  19. Formation and composition of planets around very low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Alibert, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The recent detection of planets around very low mass stars raises the question of the formation, composition and potential habitability of these objects. We use planetary system formation models to infer the properties, in particular their radius distribution and water content, of planets that may form around stars ten times less massive than the Sun. Our planetary system formation and composition models take into account the structure and evolution of the protoplanetary disk, the planetary mass growth by accretion of solids and gas, as well as planet-planet, planet-star and planet-disk interactions. We show that planets can form at small orbital period in orbit about low mass stars. We show that the radius of the planets is peaked at about 1 rearth and that they are, in general, volatile rich especially if proto-planetary discs orbiting this type of stars are long-lived. Close-in planets orbiting low-mass stars similar in terms of mass and radius to the ones recently detected can be formed within the framewo...

  20. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  1. Mass evaporation rate of globular clusters in a strong tidal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Juan P.; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-09-01

    The mass evaporation rate of globular clusters evolving in a strong Galactic tidal field is derived through the analysis of large, multimass N-body simulations. For comparison, we also study the same evaporation rates using mocca Monte Carlo models for globular cluster evolution. Our results show that the mass evaporation rate is a dynamical value, that is, far from a constant single number found in earlier analytical work and commonly used in the literature. Moreover, the evaporation rate derived with these simulations is higher than values previously published. These models also show that the value of the mass evaporation rate depends on the strength of the tidal field. We give an analytical estimate of the mass evaporation rate as a function of time and galactocentric distance ξ(RGC, t). Upon extrapolating this formula to smaller RGC values, our results provide tentative evidence for a very high ξ value at small RGC. Our results suggest that the corresponding mass-loss in the inner Galactic potential could be high and it should be accounted for when star clusters pass within it. This has direct relevance to nuclear cluster formation/growth via the infall of globular clusters through dynamical friction. As an illustrative example, we estimate how the evaporation rate increases for an ∼105 M⊙ globular cluster that decays through dynamical friction into the Galactic Centre. We discuss the findings of this work in relation to the formation of nuclear star clusters by inspiralling globular clusters.

  2. UV Star Formation Rates in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Samir; Charlot, Stéphane; Brinchmann, Jarle; Johnson, Benjamin D; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Mallery, Ryan; Heckman, Timothy M; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2007-01-01

    We measure star formation rates of ~50,000 optically-selected galaxies in the local universe (z~0.1), spanning a range from gas-rich dwarfs to massive ellipticals. We obtain dust-corrected SFRs by fitting the GALEX (UV) and SDSS (optical) photometry to a library of population synthesis models that include dust attenuation. For star-forming galaxies, our UV-based SFRs compare remarkably well with those derived from SDSS H alpha. Deviations from perfect agreement between these two methods are due to differences in the dust attenuation estimates. In contrast to H alpha, UV provides reliable SFRs for galaxies with weak or no H alpha emission, and where H alpha is contaminated with an emission from an AGN. We use full-SED SFRs to calibrate a simple prescription that uses GALEX UV magnitudes to produce good SFRs for normal star-forming galaxies. The specific SFR is considered as a function of stellar mass for (1) star-forming galaxies with no AGN, (2) those hosting an AGN, and for (3) galaxies without H alpha emiss...

  3. Is Main Sequence Galaxy Star Formation Controlled by Halo Mass Accretion?

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Behroozi, Peter; Faber, S M

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the galaxy stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR) is nearly independent of redshift from z=0-4. This motivates us to construct a toy model in which we assume that the SMHR for central galaxies measured at redshift z~0 is independent of redshift, which implies that the star formation rate (SFR) is determined by the halo mass accretion rate, a phenomenon we call Stellar-Halo Accretion Rate Coevolution (SHARC). Moreover, we show here that the ~0.3 dex dispersion of the halo mass accretion rate (MAR) is similar to the observed dispersion of the SFR on the main sequence. In the context of bathtub-type models of galaxy formation, SHARC leads to mass-dependent constraints on the relation between SFR and MAR. The SHARC assumption is no doubt over-simplified, but we expect it to be possibly valid for central galaxies with stellar masses of 10^9 - 10^10.5 M_sol that are on the star formation main sequence. Such galaxies represent most of the life history of M_* galaxies, and therefore most of the star forma...

  4. The Limiting Stellar Initial Mass for Black Hole Formation in Close Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fryer, C L; Langer, N; Wellstein, S

    2002-01-01

    We present models for the complete life and death of a 60 solar mass star evolving in a close binary system, from the main sequence phase to the formation of a compact remnant and fallback of supernova debris. After core hydrogen exhaustion, the star expands, loses most of its envelope by Roche lobe overflow, and becomes a Wolf-Rayet star. We study its post-mass transfer evolution as a function of the Wolf-Rayet wind mass loss rate (which is currently not well constrained and will probably vary with initial metallicity of the star). Varying this mass loss rate by a factor 6 leads to stellar masses at collapse that range from 3.1 to 10.7 solar masses. Although the iron core masses at collapse are generally larger for stars with larger final masses, they do not depend monotonically on the final stellar mass or even the C/O-core mass. We then compute the evolution of all models through collapse and bounce. The results range from strong supernova explosions for the lower final masses to the direct collapse of the...

  5. Extreme mass ratio inspiral rates: dependence on the massive black hole mass

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, Clovis

    2009-01-01

    We study the rate at which stars spiral into a massive black hole (MBH) due to the emission of gravitational waves (GWs), as a function of the mass M of the MBH. In the context of our model, it is shown analytically that the rate approximately depends on the MBH mass as M^{-1/4}. Numerical simulations confirm this result, and show that for all MBH masses, the event rate is highest for stellar black holes, followed by white dwarfs, and lowest for neutron stars. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is expected to see hundreds of these extreme mass ratio inspirals per year. Since the event rate derived here formally diverges as M->0, the model presented here cannot hold for MBHs of masses that are too low, and we discuss what the limitations of the model are.

  6. Star formation and mass assembly in high redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Santini, P; Grazian, A; Salimbeni, S; Fiore, F; Fontanot, F; Boutsia, K; Castellano, M; Cristiani, S; De Santis, C; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Menci, N; Nonino, M; Paris, D; Pentericci, L; Vanzella, E

    2009-01-01

    We study the star formation and the mass assembly process of 0.30.3, the SFR is well correlated with stellar mass, and this relationship seems to steepen with redshift (using IR-based SFRs); b) The contribution to the global SFRD by massive galaxies increases with redshift up to ~2.5, faster than for galaxies of lower mass, but appears to flatten at higher z; c) Despite this increase, the most important contributors to the SFRD at any z are galaxies around, or immediately below, the characteristic stellar mass; d) At z~2, massive galaxies are actively star-forming, with a median SFR 300 Msun/yr. During this epoch, they assemble a substantial part of their final stellar mass; e) The SSFR shows a clear bimodal distribution. The analysis of the SFRD and the SSFR seems to sup port the downsizing scenario, according to which high mass galaxies have formed their stars earlier and faster than their low mass counterparts. A comparison with recent theoretical models shows that they follow the global increase of the SS...

  7. Formation and Detection of Earth Mass Planets around Low Mass Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Ryan; Laughlin, Greg

    2009-01-01

    We investigate an in-situ formation scenario for Earth-mass terrestrial planets in short-period, potentially habitable orbits around low-mass stars (M_star < 0.3 M_sun). We then investigate the feasibility of detecting these Earth-sized planets. Our simulations of terrestrial planet formation follow the growth of planetary embryos in an annular region around a fiducial M7 primary. Our simulations couple a semi-analytic model to a full N-body integration to follow the growth from ~3x10^21 g to...

  8. On column density thresholds and the star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical study designed to address the question of whether there is a column density threshold for star formation within molecular clouds. We have simulated a large number of different clouds, with volume and column densities spanning a wide range of different values, using a state-of-the-art model for the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution of the gas. We show that for low-mass clouds, around 1000 solar masses and below, star formation is only possible if the mean cloud column density exceeds 10^21 cm^-2. In more massive clouds, the required mean column density is a factor of a few lower. We demonstrate that this behaviour is well-described by a simple Jeans mass argument: clouds must contain multiple Jeans masses in order to form stars, and hence star-forming clouds cannot have arbitrarily low column densities. We have also examined the question of whether there is a column density threshold for the regions within clouds where star formation occurs. We show that th...

  9. Insights into high mass star formation from methanol maser observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Hontas Freeman

    2013-06-01

    We present high angular resolution data on Class I and Class II methanol masers, together with other tracers of star formation like H2O masers, ultracompact (UC) ionized hydrogen (H II) regions, and 4.5 um infrared sources, taken from the literature. The aim is to study what these data tell us about the process of high mass star formation; in particular, whether disk-outflow systems are compatible with the morphology exhibited by Class I and Class II methanol masers. Stars form in the dense cores inside molecular clouds, and while the process of the formation of stars like our Sun is reasonably well understood, details of the formation of stars with masses eight times that of our Sun or greater, the so-called high mass stars, remain a mystery. Being compact and bright sources, masers provide an excellent way to observe high mass star forming regions. In particular, Class II methanol masers are found exclusively in high mass star forming regions. Based on the positions of the Class I and II methanol and H2O masers, UCHII regions and 4.5 um infrared sources, and the center velocities (vLSR) of the Class I methanol and H2O masers, compared to the vLSR of the Class II methanol masers, we propose three disk-outflow models that may be traced by methanol masers. In all three models, we have located the Class II methanol maser near the protostar, and the Class I methanol maser in the outflow, as is known from observations during the last twenty years. In our first model, the H2O masers trace the linear extent of the outflow. In our second model, the H2O masers are located in a circumstellar disk. In our third model, the H2O masers are located in one or more outflows near the terminating shock where the outflow impacts the ambient interstellar medium. Together, these models reiterate the utility of coordinated high angular resolution observations of high mass star forming regions in maser lines and associated star formation tracers.

  10. Relationship between Formation Water Rate, Equivalent Penetration Rate and Volume Flow Rate of Air in Air Drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kexiong; Zhang Laibin; Jiang Hongwei

    2007-01-01

    Formation water invasion is the most troublesome problem associated with air drilling. However, it is not economical to apply mist drilling when only a small amount of water flows into wellbore from formation during air drilling. Formation water could be circulated out of the wellbore through increasing the gas injection rate. In this paper,the Angel model was modified by introducing Nikurade friction factor for the flow in coarse open holes and translating formation water rate into equivalent penetration rate. Thus the distribution of annular pressure and the relationship between minimum air injection rate and formation water rate were obtained. Real data verification indicated that the modified model is more accurate than the Angel model and can provide useful information for air drilling.

  11. Determining the Spatially Resolved Mass Outflow Rate in Markarian 573

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalski, Mitchell; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on current progress in calculating the narrow line region (NLR) mass outflow rate in the Seyfert 2 galaxy Markarian 573. Our goal is to determine the mass outflow rate as a function of distance from the nucleus in 10 nearby Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with spatially resolved NLRs. These nearby AGN allow us to study the feeding and feedback of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that may play an important role in understanding large scale structure, enrichment of the interstellar medium, and coevolution of SMBHs with their host galaxies. Utilizing archival spectra from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we measured emission line ratios from a wide range of ionized species. Next we used the line ratios to find a reddening correction and determined the physical conditions in the ionized gas using the photoionization code Cloudy. Specifically, we derived the mass of the ionized gas and then estimate the total mass outside of the spectral slit using HST [O III] images. Combined with kinematic models of the outflows we will determine the mass outflow rate and kinetic luminosity as a function of distance from the central AGN. Ultimately, we aim to determine if NLR outflows are effective in regulating AGN feedback by comparing our observed outflow rates with theoretical models.

  12. Formation pathway of Population III coalescing binary black holes through stable mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Hirai, Ryosuke; Kinugawa, Tomoya; Hotokezaka, Kenta

    2017-07-01

    We study the formation of stellar mass binary black holes (BBHs) originating from Population III (PopIII) stars, performing stellar evolution simulations for PopIII binaries with mesa. We find that a significant fraction of PopIII binaries form massive BBHs through stable mass transfer between two stars in a binary, without experiencing common envelope phases. We investigate necessary conditions required for PopIII binaries to form coalescing BBHs with a semi-analytical model calibrated by the stellar evolution simulations. The BBH formation efficiency is estimated for two different initial conditions for PopIII binaries with large and small separations, respectively. Consequently, in both models, ˜10 per cent of the total PopIII binaries form BBHs only through stable mass transfer and ˜10 per cent of these BBHs merge due to gravitational wave emission within the Hubble time. Furthermore, the chirp mass of merging BBHs has a flat distribution over 15 ≲ Mchirp/M⊙ ≲ 35. This formation pathway of PopIII BBHs is presumably robust because stable mass transfer is less uncertain than common envelope evolution, which is the main formation channel for Population II BBHs. We also test the hypothesis that the BBH mergers detected by LIGO originate from PopIII stars using the total number of PopIII stars formed in the early universe as inferred from the optical depth measured by Planck. We conclude that the PopIII BBH formation scenario can explain the mass-weighted merger rate of the LIGO's O1 events with the maximal PopIII formation efficiency inferred from the Planck measurement, even without BBHs formed by unstable mass transfer or common envelope phases.

  13. Global Star Formation Rates and Dust Emission Over the Galaxy Interaction Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Lanz, Lauranne; Brassington, Nicola; Smith, Howard A; Ashby, Matthew L N; da Cunha, Elisabete; Fazio, Giovanni G; Hayward, Christopher C; Hernquist, Lars; Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    We measured and modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFR), specific star formation rates (sSFR), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increase...

  14. Mass loss rates in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, C. de; Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; Hucht, K.A. van der

    1988-02-01

    From the literature we collected values for the rate of mass loss for 271 stars, nearly all of population I, and of spectral types 0 through M. Rates of stellar mass loss determined according to six different methods were compared and appear to yield the same result per star within the limits of errors; this is true regardless of the star's position in the HR-diagram. Thus average rates of mass loss were determined, and weights were allocated to the M-determinations for each star. In addition we studied some groups of other stars: fast rotators (22 Be-type stars), and chemically evolved stars (31 Wolf-Rayet stars; 11 C- and 4 S-type stars and 15 nuclei of planetary nebulae). The chemically evolved stars have rates of mass loss which are larger than those of ''normal'' stars occupying the same positions in the Hertzprung-Russel diagram, by factors: 160 for Wolf-Rayet stars; 11 for C-type stars, and by estimated factors of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ for the nuclei of planetary nebulae.

  15. FORMALDEHYDE MASERS: EXCLUSIVE TRACERS OF HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, E. D.; Brown, J. E. [Western Illinois University, Physics Department, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States); Olmi, L. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Ortiz, J. Morales [University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, Physical Sciences Department, P.O. Box 23323, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Hofner, P.; Creech-Eakman, M. J. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Physics Department, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Linz, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The detection of four formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) maser regions toward young high-mass stellar objects in the last decade, in addition to the three previously known regions, calls for an investigation of whether H{sub 2}CO masers are an exclusive tracer of young high-mass stellar objects. We report the first survey specifically focused on the search for 6 cm H{sub 2}CO masers toward non high-mass star-forming regions (non HMSFRs). The observations were conducted with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope toward 25 low-mass star-forming regions, 15 planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars, and 31 late-type stars. We detected no H{sub 2}CO emission in our sample of non HMSFRs. To check for the association between high-mass star formation and H{sub 2}CO masers, we also conducted a survey toward 22 high-mass star-forming regions from a Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey) sample known to harbor 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers. We detected a new 6 cm H{sub 2}CO emission line in G32.74−0.07. This work provides further evidence that supports an exclusive association between H{sub 2}CO masers and young regions of high-mass star formation. Furthermore, we detected H{sub 2}CO absorption toward all Hi-GAL sources, and toward 24 low-mass star-forming regions. We also conducted a simultaneous survey for OH (4660, 4750, 4765 MHz), H110α (4874 MHz), HCOOH (4916 MHz), CH{sub 3}OH (5005 MHz), and CH{sub 2}NH (5289 MHz) toward 68 of the sources in our sample of non HMSFRs. With the exception of the detection of a 4765 MHz OH line toward a pre-planetary nebula (IRAS 04395+3601), we detected no other spectral line to an upper limit of 15 mJy for most sources.

  16. The Mass Function of Unprocessed Dark Matter Halos and Merger Tree Branching Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    A common approach in semi-analytic modeling of galaxy formation is to construct Monte Carlo realizations of merger histories of dark matter halos whose masses are sampled from a halo mass function. Both the mass function itself, and the merger rates used to construct merging histories are calibrated to N-body simulations. Typically, "backsplash" halos (those which were once subhalos within a larger halo, but which have since moved outside of the halo) are counted in both the halo mass function, and in the merger rates (or, equivalently, progenitor mass functions). This leads to a double-counting of mass in Monte Carlo merger histories which will bias results relative to N-body results. We measure halo mass functions and merger rates with this double-counting removed in a large, cosmological N-body simulation with cosmological parameters consistent with current constraints. Furthermore, we account for the inherently noisy nature of N-body halo mass estimates when fitting functions to N-body data, and show that...

  17. Testing galaxy formation models with galaxy stellar mass functions

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Seunghwan; Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice

    2016-01-01

    We compare predictions of a number of empirical models and numerical simulations of galaxy formation to the conditional stellar mass functions (CSMF) of galaxies in groups of different masses obtained recently by Lan et al. to test how well different models accommodate the data. Among all the models considered, only the model of Lu et al. can match the observational data; all other models fail to reproduce the faint-end upturn seen in the observation. The CSMFs are used to update the halo-based empirical model of Lu et al., and the model parameters obtained are very similar to those inferred by Lu et al. from a completely different set of observational constraints. The observational data clearly prefer a model in which star formation in low-mass halos changes behavior at a characteristic redshift $z_c \\sim 2$. There is also tentative evidence that this characteristic redshift depends on environments, becoming $z_c \\sim 4$ in regions that eventually evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. The constrained model ...

  18. Measuring the rate of intramolecular contact formation in polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Lisa; Eaton, William; Hofrichter, James

    2001-03-01

    Formation of a specific contact between two residues of a polypeptide chain is an important elementary process in protein folding. Here we describe a method for studying contact formation between tryptophan and cysteine based on measurements of the lifetime of the tryptophan triplet state. With tryptophan at one end of a flexible peptide and cysteine at the other, the triplet decay rate is identical to the rate of quenching by cysteine and is also close to the diffusion-limited rate of contact formation. The length dependence of this end-to-end contact rate was studied in a series of Cys-(Ala-Gly-Gln)_k-Trp peptides, with k varying from 1 to 6. The rate decreases from -1/(40 ns) for k = 1 to -1/(140 ns) for k = 6, approaching the length-dependence expected for a random coil (n-3/2) for the longest peptides. Comparing the intramolecular and bimolecular quenching rates for cysteine with two disulfide molecules (cystine and lipoate) determines the ratio of the equilibrium constants for forming the intramolecular and bimolecular contact pairs. This ratio depends on the persistence length of the chain and is therefore a measure of the flexibility of the polypeptide.

  19. Characterizing the Star Formation of the Low-Mass SHIELD Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Skillman, Evan D; Haynes, Martha P; Simones, Jacob E; Salzer, John J; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Elson, Ed C; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Ott, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD) is an on-going multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies that populate the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. The galaxies were selected from the first ~10% of the HI ALFALFA survey based on their low HI mass and low baryonic mass. Here, we measure the star-formation properties from optically resolved stellar populations for 12 galaxies using a color-magnitude diagram fitting technique. We derive lifetime average star-formation rates (SFRs), recent SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions. Overall, the recent SFRs are comparable to the lifetime SFRs with mean birthrate parameter of 1.4, with a surprisingly narrow standard deviation of 0.7. Two galaxies are classified as dwarf transition galaxies (dTrans). These dTrans systems have star-formation and gas properties consistent with the rest of the sample, in agreement with previous results that some dTrans galaxies may simply...

  20. Revisiting the Formation Rate and the Redshift Distribution of LGRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaan, Chadia

    2013-01-01

    Using a novel approach, the distribution of fluences of long gamma ray bursts derived from the Swift-BAT catalog, was reproduced by a jet-model characterized by the distribution of the total radiated energy in $\\gamma$-rays and the distribution of the aperture angle of the emission cone. The best fit between simulated and observed fluence distributions permits to estimate the parameters of the model. An evolution of the median energy of the bursts is required in order to reproduce adequately the observed redshift distribution of the events if the formation rate of $\\gamma$-ray bursts follows the cosmic star formation rate. For our preferred model, the median jet energy evolves as $E_J \\propto e^{0.5(1+z)}$ and the mean expected jet energy is $3.0\\times 10^{49}$ erg, which agrees with the mean value derived from afterglow data. The estimated local formation rate is $R_{grb}=290 Gpc^{-3}yr^{-1}$, representing less than 9% of the local formation rate of type Ibc supernovae. The present result suggests also that ...

  1. Local space density and formation rate of planetary nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, [No Value

    1996-01-01

    Individual distances of 50 nearby planetary nebulae are determined using a variety of methods, but excluding statistical methods or distance scales. These distances, together with a discussion of the sample completeness, are used to determine local PN formation rate. Together with the brightness of

  2. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  3. The Mass Dependence of Star Formation Histories in Barred Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Carles, Christian; Ellison, Sara L; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We performed a series of 29 gasdynamical simulations of disc galaxies, barred and unbarred, with various stellar masses, to study the impact of the bar on star formation history. Unbarred galaxies evolve very smoothly, with a star formation rate (SFR) that varies by at most a factor of three over a period of 2 Gyr. The evolution of barred galaxies is much more irregular, especially at high stellar masses. In these galaxies, the bar drives a substantial amount of gas toward the centre, resulting in a high SFR, and producing a starburst in the most massive galaxies. Most of the gas is converted into stars, and gas exhaustion leads to a rapid drop of star formation after the starburst. In massive barred galaxies (stellar mass M* > 2x10^10 Msun) the large amount of gas funnelled toward the centre is completely consumed by the starburst, while in lower-mass barred galaxies it is only partially consumed. Gas concentration is thus higher in lower-mass barred galaxies than it is in higher-mass ones. Even though unbar...

  4. Investigating high-mass star formation through maser surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P; Cragg, D M; Sobolev, A M; Breen, S L; Godfrey, P D

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar masers are unique probes of the environments in which they arise. In studies of high-mass star formation their primary function has been as signposts of these regions and they have been used as probes of the kinematics and physical conditions in only a few sources. With a few notable exceptions, we know relatively little about the evolutionary phase the different maser species trace, nor their location with respect to other star formation tracers. While detailed studies of a small number of maser regions can reveal much about them, other information can only be obtained through large, systematic searches. In particular, such surveys are vital in efforts to determine an evolutionary sequence for the common maser species, and there is growing evidence that methanol masers may trace an earlier phase than the other common maser species of OH and water.

  5. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced ...

  6. Formation scenarios and mass-radius relation for neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Zdunik, J L

    2011-01-01

    Neutron star crust, formed via accretion of matter from a companion in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), has an equation of state (EOS) stiffer than that of catalyzed matter. At a given neutron star mass, M, the radius of a star with an accreted crust is therefore larger, by DR(M), than for usually considered star built of catalyzed matter. Using a compressible liquid drop model of nuclei, we calculate, within the one-component plasma approximation, the EOSs corresponding to different nuclear compositions of ashes of X-ray bursts in LMXB. These EOSs are then applied for studying the effect of different formation scenarios on the neutron-star mass-radius relation. Assuming the SLy EOS for neutron star's liquid core, derived by Douchin & Haensel (2001), we find that at M=1.4 M_sun the star with accreted crust has a radius more than 100 m larger that for the crust of catalyzed matter. Using smallness of the crust mass compared to M, we derive a formula that relates DR(M) to the difference in the crust EOS. Thi...

  7. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. It is important to understand the mechanism by which alteration phases affect glass corrosion behavior and the glass dissolution rate to reliably predict whether or not similar effects will occur in a disposal environment and the impact of phase formation on the long-term performance of waste glass. While solid state transformation of a glass to thermodynamically more stable phases in kinetically prohibitive, contact by water provides an energetically favorable pathway for this transformation to occur by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. The kinetics of the transformation depends on the dissolution kinetics of the glass and the precipitation kinetics of the alteration phases. The rates of these two processes are linked primarily through the solution activity of orthosilicic acid (and perhaps also that of an aluminum-bearing species).

  8. Gas mass derived by infrasound and UV cameras: Implications for mass flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Donne, D.; Ripepe, M.; Lacanna, G.; Tamburello, G.; Bitetto, M.; Aiuppa, A.

    2016-10-01

    Mass Flow Rate is one of the most crucial eruption source parameter used to define magnitude of eruption and to quantify the ash dispersal in the atmosphere. However, this parameter is in general difficult to be derived and no valid technique has been developed yet to measure it in real time with sufficient accuracy. Linear acoustics has been applied to infrasonic pressure waves generated by explosive eruptions to indirectly estimate the gas mass erupted and then the mass flow rate. Here, we test on Stromboli volcano (Italy) the performance of such methodology by comparing the acoustic derived results with independent gas mass estimates obtained with UV cameras, and constraining the acoustic source by thermal imagery. We show that different acoustic methods give comparable total gas masses in the 2 to 1425 kg range, which are fully consistent with the gas masses derived by UV cameras and previous direct SO2 measurements. We show that total erupted gas mass, estimated by infrasound is not simply a function of the initial pressure, but rather the full infrasonic waveform should be considered. Thermal imagery provides evidence that infrasound is generated during the entire gas thrust phase. We provide examples to show how total gas masses derived by infrasonic signals can be affected by large uncertainties if duration of the signal is neglected. Only when duration of infrasound is included, the best correlation (0.8) with UV cameras and the 1:1 direct linear proportionality is obtained. Our results open new perspective for remotely derived gas mass and mass flow rates from acoustic signals.

  9. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2016-01-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre $Q$ parameters to $\\sim$ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies' star formation rates by a factor of $\\sim$ 5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular ISM. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the...

  10. A continuous low star formation rate in IZw 18?

    CERN Document Server

    Legrand, F; Roy, J R; Mas-Hesse, J M; Walsh, J R

    2000-01-01

    Deep long-slit spectroscopic observations of the blue compact galaxy IZw 18 obtained with the CFH 3.6 m Telescope are presented. The very low value of oxygen abundance previously reported is confirmed and a very homogeneous abundance distribution is found (no variation larger than 0.05 dex) over the whole ionized region. We concur with Tenorio-Tagle (1996) and Devost et al. (1997) that the observed abundance level cannot result from the material ejected by the stars formed in the current burst, and propose that the observed metals were formed in a previous star formation episode. Metals ejected in the current burst of star formation remain most probably hidden in a hot phase and are undetectable using optical spectroscopy. We discuss different scenarios of star formation in IZw 18. Combining various observational facts, for instance the faint star formation rate observed in low surface brightness galaxies van Zee et al. (1997), it is proposed that a low and continuous rate of star formation occurring during q...

  11. Stability of mass transfer from massive giants: double black hole binary formation and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.; Belczynski, K.; Van, K. X.

    2017-02-01

    Mass transfer in binaries with massive donors and compact companions, when the donors rapidly evolve after their main sequence, determines the formation rates of merging double stellar-mass black hole (BH) binaries formed outside clusters. This mass transfer was previously postulated to be unstable and was expected to lead to a common envelope event. The common envelope event then ends with either the merger of the two stars or formation of a binary that eventually may become a merging double BH. We revisit the stability of this mass transfer and find an unanticipated third outcome: for a large range of binary orbital separations, this mass transfer is stable. This newly found stability allows us to reconcile the empirical rate obtained by LIGO, 9-240 Gpc-3 yr-1, with the theoretical rate for double BH binary mergers predicted by population synthesis studies by excluding a channel that predicts a merger rate above 1000 Gpc-3 yr-1. Furthermore, the stability of the mass transfer leads to the formation of ultraluminous X-ray sources. The theoretically predicted formation rates of bright ultraluminous X-ray sources powered by a stellar-mass BH are high enough to explain the number of observed bright ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  12. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Segers, Marijke C; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE and OWLS projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching $35 \\%$ and $19 \\%$, respectively, at $z=0$. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for $M_{\\ast} < 10^{10.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of AGB stars increases with time and towards galaxy centers. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by outflow...

  13. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  14. The evolution of the star formation rate function and cosmic star formation rate density of galaxies at z ˜ 1-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Blanc, G.; Sargent, M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy star formation rate function (SFRF) and cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) of z ˜ 1-4 galaxies, using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations and a compilation of ultraviolet (UV), infrared (IR) and Hα observations. These tracers represent different populations of galaxies with the IR light being a probe of objects with high star formation rates and dust contents, while UV and Hα observations provide a census of low star formation galaxies where mild obscuration occurs. We compare the above SFRFs with the results of SPH simulations run with the code P-GADGET3(XXL). We focus on the role of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and supernovae in form of galactic winds. The AGN feedback prescription that we use decreases the simulated CSFRD at z < 3 but is not sufficient to reproduce the observed evolution at higher redshifts. We explore different wind models and find that the key factor for reproducing the evolution of the observed SFRF and CSFRD at z ˜ 1-4 is the presence of a feedback prescription that is prominent at high redshifts (z ≥ 4) and becomes less efficient with time. We show that variable galactic winds which are efficient at decreasing the SFRs of low-mass objects are quite successful in reproducing the observables.

  15. A relation between screening masses and real-time rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, B.B. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg,93040 Regensburg (Germany); Francis, A. [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institute for Nuclear Physics,Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz,55099 Mainz (Germany); Laine, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Albert Einstein Center, University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Meyer, H.B. [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institute for Nuclear Physics,Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz,55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-05-23

    Thermal screening masses related to the conserved vector current are determined for the case that the current carries a non-zero Matsubara frequency, both in a weak-coupling approach and through lattice QCD. We point out that such screening masses are sensitive to the same infrared physics as light-cone real-time rates. In particular, on the perturbative side, the inhomogeneous Schrödinger equation determining screening correlators is shown to have the same general form as the equation implementing LPM resummation for the soft-dilepton and photon production rates from a hot QCD plasma. The static potential appearing in the equation is identical to that whose soft part has been determined up to NLO and on the lattice in the context of jet quenching. Numerical results based on this potential suggest that screening masses overshoot the free results (multiples of 2πT) more strongly than at zero Matsubara frequency. Four-dimensional lattice simulations in two-flavour QCD at temperatures of 250 and 340 MeV confirm the non-static screening masses at the 10% level. Overall our results lend support to studies of jet quenching based on the same potential at T≳250 MeV.

  16. Rates of mass, momentum, and energy transfer at the magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the global rates of transfer of solar wind mass, tangential momentum, and energy at the Earth's magnetopause are presented for comparison against model estimates based on the four principal mechanisms that have been proposed to explain such transfer. The comparisons, although not quite conclusive, strongly favor a model that incorporates some combination of direct magnetic connection and anomalous cross field diffusion. An additional global constraint, the rate at which magnetic flux is cycled through the magnetospheric convection system, strongly suggests that direct magnetic connection plays a significant if not dominant role in the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction.

  17. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Mitchell, Noah P

    2015-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing star formation activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The datasets are from the panchromatic STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, HST optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs - using four different models - agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far UV predicted fluxes do not. Further, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated far U...

  18. On the derivation of particle nucleation rates from experimental formation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kürten

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particle formation rates are usually measured at sizes larger than the critical size where nucleation occurs. Due to loss of particles during their growth to the detection threshold, the measured formation rate is often substantially smaller than the nucleation rate. For this reason a correction needs to be applied in order to determine the nucleation rate from the measured formation rate. An analytical formula for the correction factor is provided by Kerminen and Kulmala (2002. Their method was derived for atmospheric nucleation measurements and we show here that it has limited applicability to chamber nucleation studies. The reason for this limitation is that the particle loss rate generally has a different dependency on particle size in other environments. Here we propose an alternative, numerical method that allows precise nucleation rates to be determined in arbitrary experimental environments. The method requires knowledge of the particle size distribution above detection threshold, the particle growth rate, and the particle loss rates as a function of particle size.

  19. Constraints on the Star Formation Rate in Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M; Im, M; Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Im, Myungshin

    2006-01-01

    The [O II] 3727 emission line is often used as an indicator of star formation rate in extragalactic surveys, and it can be an equally effective tracer of star formation in systems containing luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In order to investigate the ongoing star formation rate of the host galaxies of AGNs, we measured the strength of [O II] and other optical emission lines from a large sample (~ 3600) of broad-line (Type 1) AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We performed a set of photoionization calculations to help evaluate the relative contribution of stellar and nonstellar photoionization to the observed strength of [O II]. Consistent with the recent study of Ho (2005), we find that the observed [O II] emission can be explained entirely by photoionization from the AGN itself, with little or no additional contribution from HII regions. This indicates that the host galaxies of Type 1 AGNs experience very modest star formation concurrent with the optically active phase of the nucleus. B...

  20. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disk morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Kyle W; Simmons, Brooke D; Masters, Karen L; Skibba, Ramin A; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O Ivy; Nichol, Robert C; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate relation in star-forming disk galaxies at z1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50% are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  1. Final Masses of Giant Planets II: Jupiter Formation in a Gas-Depleted Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Tanigawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Firstly, we study the final masses of giant planets growing in protoplanetary disks through capture of disk gas, by employing an empirical formula for the gas capture rate and a shallow disk gap model, which are both based on hydrodynamical simulations. The shallow disk gaps cannot terminate growth of giant planets. For planets less massive than 10 Jupiter masses, their growth rates are mainly controlled by the gas supply through the global disk accretion, rather than their gaps. The insufficient gas supply compared with the rapid gas capture causes a depletion of the gas surface density even at the outside of the gap, which can create an inner hole in the protoplanetary disk. Our model can also predict the depleted gas surface density in the inner hole for a given planet mass. Secondly, our findings are applied to the formation of our solar system. For the formation of Jupiter, a very low-mass gas disk with a few or several Jupiter masses is required at the beginning of its gas capture because of the non-sto...

  2. The star-formation history of mass-selected galaxies from the VIDEO survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, Jonathan T L; Deane, Roger P; Bonfield, David G; Knowles, Kenda; Madhanpall, Nikhita; Rahmani, Hadi; Smith, Daniel J B

    2014-01-01

    We measure star-formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (SSFRs) of Ks-selected galaxies from the VIDEO survey by stacking 1.4-GHz Very Large Array data. We split the sample, which spans 0 < z < 3 and stellar masses 10**8.0 < Mstellar/Msol < 10**11.5, into elliptical, irregular or starburst galaxies based on their spectral-energy distributions. We find that SSFR falls with stellar mass, in agreement with the `downsizing' paradigm. We consider the dependence of the SSFR-mass slope on redshift: for our full and elliptical samples the slope flattens, but for the irregular and starburst samples the slope is independent of redshift. The rate of SSFR evolution reduces slightly with stellar mass for ellipticals, but irregulars and starbursts co-evolve across stellar masses. Our results for SSFR as a function of stellar mass and redshift are in agreement with those derived from other radio-stacking measurements of mass-selected passive and star-forming galaxies, but inconsistent with those generated from ...

  3. Effects of excipients on hydrate formation in wet masses containing theophylline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airaksinen, Sari; Luukkonen, Pirjo; Jørgensen, Anna

    2003-01-01

    its dissolution rate. The aim of this study was to investigate whether excipients, such as alpha-lactose monohydrate or the highly water absorbing silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) can influence the hydrate formation of theophylline. In particular, the aim was to study if SMCC offers...... protection against the formation of theophylline monohydrate relative to alpha-lactose monohydrate in wet masses after an overnight equilibration and the stability of final granules during controlled storage. In addition, the aim was to study the use of spectroscopic methods to identify hydrate formation...... in the formulations containing excipients. Off-line evaluation of materials was performed using X-ray powder diffractometry, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy. alpha-Lactose monohydrate with minimal water absorbing potential was not able to prevent but enhanced hydrate formation of theophylline. Even though SMCC...

  4. Dynamical Formation of Low-mass Merging Black Hole Binaries like GW151226

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-02-01

    Using numerical models for star clusters spanning a wide range in ages and metallicities (Z) we study the masses of binary black holes (BBHs) produced dynamically and merging in the local universe (z ≲ 0.2). After taking into account cosmological constraints on star formation rate and metallicity evolution, which realistically relate merger delay times obtained from models with merger redshifts, we show here for the first time that while old, metal-poor globular clusters can naturally produce merging BBHs with heavier components, as observed in GW150914, lower-mass BBHs like GW151226 are easily formed dynamically in younger, higher-metallicity clusters. More specifically, we show that the mass of GW151226 is well within 1σ of the mass distribution obtained from our models for clusters with Z/Z⊙ ≳ 0.5. Indeed, dynamical formation of a system like GW151226 likely requires a cluster that is younger and has a higher metallicity than typical Galactic globular clusters. The LVT151012 system, if real, could have been created in any cluster with Z/Z⊙ ≲ 0.25. On the other hand, GW150914 is more massive (beyond 1σ) than typical BBHs from even the lowest-metallicity (Z/Z⊙ = 0.005) clusters we consider, but is within 2σ of the intrinsic mass distribution from our cluster models with Z/Z⊙ ≲ 0.05 of course, detection biases also push the observed distributions toward higher masses.

  5. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org .

  6. The Star Formation Rate Intensity Distribution Function--Implications for the Cosmic Star Formation Rate History of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzetta, K M; Pascarelle, S; Chen, H W; Fernández-Soto, A; Lanzetta, Kenneth M.; Yahata, Noriaki; Pascarelle, Sebastian; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Fernandez-Soto, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    We address the effects of cosmological surface brightness dimming on observations of faint galaxies by examining the distribution of "unobscured" star formation rate intensities versus redshift. We use the star formation rate intensity distribution function to assess the ultraviolet luminosity density versus redshift, based on our photometry and photometric redshift measurements of faint galaxies in the HDF and the HDF--S WFPC2 and NICMOS fields. We find that (1) previous measurements have missed a dominant fraction of the ultraviolet luminosity density of the universe at high redshifts by neglecting cosmological surface brightness dimming effects, which are important at redshifts larger than z = 2, (2) the incidence of the highest intensity star forming regions increases monotonically with redshift, and (3) the ultraviolet luminosity density plausibly increases monotonically with redshift through the highest redshifts observed. By measuring the spectrum of the luminosity density versus redshift, we also find...

  7. Calibrating the Star Formation Rate at z ~ 1 from Optical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Salim, Samir; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a star formation rate (SFR) calibration based on optical data that is consistent with average observed rates in both the red and blue galaxy populations at z ~ 1. The motivation for this study is to calculate SFRs for DEEP2 Redshift Survey galaxies in the 0.7 extinction at intermediate redshifts through either galaxy B-band luminosity or stellar mass. We find that an L[O II]-MB SFR calibration commonly used in the literature agrees well with our calculated SFRs after correcting for the average B-band luminosity evolution in L * galaxies. However, we find better agreement with a local L[O II]-based SFR calibration that includes stellar mass to correct for reddening effects, indicating that stellar mass is a better tracer of dust extinction for all galaxy types and less affected by systematic evolution than galaxy luminosity from z = 1 to the current epoch.

  8. The mass dependence of star formation histories in barred spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Christian; Martel, Hugo; Ellison, Sara L.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-11-01

    We performed a series of 29 gas dynamical simulations of disc galaxies, barred and unbarred, with various stellar masses, to study the impact of the bar on star formation history. Unbarred galaxies evolve very smoothly, with a star formation rate (SFR) that varies by at most a factor of 3 over a period of 2 Gyr. The evolution of barred galaxies is much more irregular, especially at high stellar masses. In these galaxies, the bar drives a substantial amount of gas towards the centre, resulting in a high SFR, and producing a starburst in the most massive galaxies. Most of the gas is converted into stars, and gas exhaustion leads to a rapid drop of star formation after the starburst. In massive barred galaxies (stellar mass M_{ast }>2{×} 10^{10} {M_{⊙}}) the large amount of gas funnelled towards the centre is completely consumed by the starburst, while in lower mass barred galaxies it is only partially consumed. Gas concentration is thus higher in lower mass barred galaxies than it is in higher mass ones. Even though unbarred galaxies funnelled less gas towards their centre, the lower SFR allows this gas to accumulate. At late times, the star formation efficiency is higher in barred galaxies than unbarred ones, enabling these galaxies to maintain a higher SFR with a smaller gas supply. Several properties, such as the global SFR, central SFR, or central gas concentration, vary monotonically with time for unbarred galaxies, but not for barred galaxies. Therefore one must be careful when comparing barred and unbarred galaxies that share one observational property, since these galaxies might be at very different stages of their respective evolution.

  9. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Combes, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68% plausible intervals from them. The 68% plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the star formation rates available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition...

  10. Calibration of Evolutionary Diagnostics in High-mass Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, S.; Merello, M.; Elia, D.; Cesaroni, R.; Testi, L.; Robitaille, T.

    2016-07-01

    The evolutionary classification of massive clumps that are candidate progenitors of high-mass young stars and clusters relies on a variety of independent diagnostics based on observables from the near-infrared to the radio. A promising evolutionary indicator for massive and dense cluster-progenitor clumps is the L/M ratio between the bolometric luminosity and the mass of the clumps. With the aim of providing a quantitative calibration for this indicator, we used SEPIA/APEX to obtain CH3C2H(J = 12-11) observations, which is an excellent thermometer molecule probing densities ≥slant {10}5 cm-3, toward 51 dense clumps with M≥slant 1000 M {}⊙ and uniformly spanning -2 ≲ Log(L/M) [L {}⊙ /M {}⊙ ] ≲ 2.3. We identify three distinct ranges of L/M that can be associated to three distinct phases of star formation in massive clumps. For L/M ≤slant 1 no clump is detected in CH3C2H, suggesting an inner envelope temperature below ˜30K. For 1 ≲ L/M ≲ 10 we detect 58% of the clumps with a temperature between ˜30 and ˜35 K independently from the exact value of L/M; such clumps are building up luminosity due to the formation of stars, but no star is yet able to significantly heat the inner clump regions. For L/M ≳ 10 we detect all the clumps with a gas temperature rising with Log(L/M), marking the appearance of a qualitatively different heating source within the clumps; such values are found toward clumps with UCH ii counterparts, suggesting that the quantitative difference in T versus L/M behavior above L/M ˜ 10 is due to the first appearance of ZAMS stars in the clumps.

  11. The Determination of the Star Formation Rate in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, G

    1997-01-01

    A spectrophotometric model able to compute the integrated spectrum of a galaxy, including the contribution both of the stellar populations and of the ionized interstellar gas of the HII regions powered by young hot stars, has been used to study several spectral features and photometric quantities in order to derive calibrations of the star formation history of late type galaxies. Attention has been paid to analyze the emission of the Balmer lines and the [OII]$\\lambda$3727 line to test their attitude at providing estimates of the present star formation rate in galaxies. Other features, like D$_{4000}$ and the equivalent width of the H$_{\\delta}$ line, influenced by the presence of intermediate age stars, have been considered. Several ways of estimating the star formation rates in normal galaxies are discussed and some considerations concerning the applicability of the models are presented. Criteria have been also studied for ascertaining the presence of a burst, current or ended not long ago. Bursts usually h...

  12. Filament Fragmentation in High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Johnston, K; Henning, Th; Hacar, A; Kainulainen, J T

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We resolve the length-scales for filament formation and fragmentation (res. <=0.1pc), in particular the Jeans length and cylinder fragmentation scale. Methods: We observed the prototypical high-mass star-forming filament IRDC18223 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) in the 3.2mm continuum and N2H+(1-0) line emission in a ten field mosaic at a spatial resolution of ~4'' (~14000AU). Results: The dust continuum emission resolves the filament into a chain of at least 12 relatively regularly spaced cores. The mean separation between cores is ~0.40(+-0.18)pc. While this is approximately consistent with the fragmentation of an infinite, isothermal, gravitationally bound gas cylinder, a high mass-to-length ratio of M/l~1000M_sun/pc requires additional turbulent and/or magnetic support against radial collapse of the filament. The N2H+(1-0) data reveal a velocity gradient perpendicular to the main filament. Although rotation of the filament cannot be excluded, the data are also consistent with the m...

  13. Pattern formation and mass transfer under stationary solutal Marangoni instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberger, Karin; Köllner, Thomas; Linde, Hartmut; Boeck, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    According to the seminal theory by Sternling and Scriven, solutal Marangoni convection during mass transfer of surface-active solutes may occur as either oscillatory or stationary instability. With strong support of Manuel G. Velarde, a combined initiative of experimental works, in particular to mention those of Linde, Wierschem and coworkers, and theory has enabled a classification of dominant wave types of the oscillatory mode and their interactions. In this way a rather comprehensive understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the oscillatory instability could be achieved. A comparably advanced state-of-the-art with respect to the stationary counterpart seemed to be out of reach a short time ago. Recent developments on both the numerical and experimental side, in combination with assessing an extensive number of older experiments, now allow one to draw a more unified picture. By reviewing these works, we show that three main building blocks exist during the nonlinear evolution: roll cells, relaxation oscillations and relaxation oscillations waves. What is frequently called interfacial turbulence results from the interaction between these partly coexisting basic patterns which may additionally occur in different hierarchy levels. The second focus of this review lies on the practical importance of such convection patterns concerning their influence on mass transfer characteristics. Particular attention is paid here to the interaction between Marangoni and buoyancy effects which frequently complicates the pattern formation even more. To shed more light on these dependencies, new simulations regarding the limiting case of stabilizing density stratification and vanishing buoyancy are incorporated.

  14. Formation Criteria and the Mass of Secondary Population III Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Susa, Hajime; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We explore the formation of secondary Population III (Pop III) stars under radiation hydrodynamic (RHD) feedback by a preformed massive star. To properly treat RHD feedback, we perform three-dimensional RHD simulations incorporating the radiative transfer of ionizing photons as well as H_2 dissociating photons from a preformed star. A collapsing gas cloud is settled at a given distance from a 120Msun Pop III star, and the evolution of the cloud is pursued including RHD feedback. We derive the threshold density depending on the distance, above which the cloud can keep collapsing owing to the shielding of H_2 dissociating radiation. We find that an H_2 shell formed ahead of an ionizing front works effectively to shield the H_2 dissociating radiation, leading to the positive feedback for the secondary Pop III star formation. Also, near the threshold density, the envelope of gas cloud is stripped significantly by a shock associated with an ionizing front. By comparing the mass accretion timescale with the Kelvin-...

  15. The Formation of Uranus & Neptune: Challenges and Implications For Intermediate-Mass Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the formation of Uranus and Neptune, according to the core-nucleated accretion model, considering formation locations ranging from 12 to 30 AU from the Sun, and with various disk solid-surface densities and core accretion rates. It is shown that in order to form Uranus-like and Neptune-like planets in terms of final mass and solid-to-gas ratio, very specific conditions are required. We also show that when recently proposed high solid accretion rates are assumed, along with solid surface densities about 10 times those in the minimum-mass solar nebula, the challenge in forming Uranus and Neptune at large radial distances is no longer the formation timescale, but is rather finding agreement with the final mass and composition of these planets. In fact, these conditions are more likely to lead to gas-giant planets. Scattering of planetesimals by the forming planetary core is found to be an important effect at the larger distances. Our study emphasizes how (even slightly) different con...

  16. New particle formation in air mass transported between two measurement sites in Northern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Komppula

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study covers four years of aerosol number size distribution data from Pallas and Värriö sites 250 km apart from each other in Northern Finland and compares new particle formation events between these sites. In air masses of eastern origin almost all events were observed to start earlier at the eastern station Värriö, whereas in air masses of western origin most of the events were observed to start earlier at the western station Pallas. This demonstrates that particle formation in a certain air mass type depends not only on the diurnal variation of the parameters causing the phenomenon (such as photochemistry but also on some properties carried by the air mass itself. The correlation in growth rates between the two sites was relatively good, which suggests that the amount of condensable vapour causing the growth must have been at about the same level in both sites. The condensation sink was frequently much higher at the downwind station. It seems that secondary particle formation related to biogenic sources dominate in many cases over the particle sinks during the air mass transport between the sites. Two cases of transport from Pallas to Värriö were further analysed with an aerosol dynamics model. The model was able to reproduce the observed nucleation events 250 km down-wind at Värriö but revealed some differences between the two cases. The simulated nucleation rates were in both cases similar but the organic concentration profiles that best reproduced the observations were different in the two cases indicating that divergent formation reactions may dominate under different conditions. The simulations also suggested that organic compounds were the main contributor to new particle growth, which offers a tentative hypothesis to the distinct features of new particles at the two sites: Air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean typically spent approximately only ten hours over land before arriving at Pallas, and thus the time for the

  17. Mass entrainment rate of an ideal momentum turbulent round jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medrano, Fermın Franco; Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Velte, Clara Marika;

    2017-01-01

    We propose a two-phase-fluid model for a full-cone turbulent round jet that describes its dynamics in a simple but comprehensive manner with only the apex angle of the cone being a disposable parameter. The basic assumptions are that (i) the jet is statistically stationary and that (ii) it can...... of the distance from the nozzle, from which the dynamic pressure and the mass entrainment rate are calculated. Assuming a far-field approximation, we theoretically derive a constant entrainment rate coefficient solely in terms of the cone angle. Moreover, we carry out experiments for a single-phase turbulent air...... jet and show that the predictions of our model compare well with this and other experimental data of atomizing liquid jets....

  18. Solid formation in piperazine rate-based simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    of view but also from a modeling perspective. The present work develops a rate-based model for CO2 absorption and desorption modeling for gas-liquid-solid systems and it is demonstrated for the piperazine CO2 capture process. This model is an extension of the DTU CAPCO2 model to precipitating systems....... It uses the extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model for phase equilibria and thermal properties estimation. The mass and heat transfer phenomena is implemented in a film model approach, based on second order reactions kinetics. The transfer fluxes are calculated using the concentration of the dissolved...

  19. Controlling Surface Roughness to Enhance Mass Flow Rates in Nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimon, Malgorzata; Emerson, David; Reese, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A very active field of research in fluid mechanics and material science is predicting the behavior of Newtonian fluids flowing over porous media with different wettabilities. Opposite effects have been observed: some state that wall roughness always suppresses fluid-slip, whereas others show that for some cases roughness may reduce the surface friction. In this work, MD simulations were carried out to further investigate physical mechanisms for liquid slip, and factors affecting it. A rough wall was formed by either periodically spaced rectangular protrusions or was represented by a cosine wave. The MD simulations were conducted to study Poiseuille and Couette flow of liquid argon in a nanochannel with hydrophilic kryptonian walls. The effect of wall roughness and interface wettability on the streaming velocity, and the slip-length at the walls, is observed to be significant. Our results show a dependency of mass flow rate on the type of flow and topography of the channel walls. For a fixed magnitude of the driving force, an increase in the mass flow rate, compared to the smooth surface, was observed for the wavy roughness, whereas the opposite effect was observed for Couette flow where a higher slip was obtained for rectangular gaps. The study is funded in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  20. THE CURRENT STAR FORMATION RATE OF K+A GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Danielle M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ridgway, Susan E.; De Propris, Roberto [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Goto, Tomotsugu, E-mail: nielsen@astro.wisc.edu [Dark Cosmology Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2012-12-20

    We derive the stacked 1.4 GHz flux from the FIRST survey for 811 K+A galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. For these objects we find a mean flux density of 56 {+-} 9 {mu}Jy. A similar stack of radio-quiet white dwarfs yields an upper limit of 43 {mu}Jy at a 5{sigma} significance to the flux in blank regions of the sky. This implies an average star formation rate of 1.6 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for K+A galaxies. However, the majority of the signal comes from {approx}4% of K+A fields that have aperture fluxes above the 5{sigma} noise level of the FIRST survey. A stack of the remaining galaxies shows little residual flux consistent with an upper limit on star formation of 1.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Even for a subset of 456 'young' (spectral ages <250 Myr) K+A galaxies, we find that the stacked 1.4 GHz flux is consistent with no current star formation. Our data suggest that the original starburst has been terminated in the majority of K+A galaxies, but that this may represent part of a duty cycle where a fraction of these galaxies may be active at a given moment with dusty starbursts and active galactic nuclei being present.

  1. From quantum chemical formation free energies to evaporation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric new particle formation is an important source of atmospheric aerosols. Large efforts have been made during the past few years to identify which molecules are behind this phenomenon, but the actual birth mechanism of the particles is not yet well known. Quantum chemical calculations have proven to be a powerful tool to gain new insights into the very first steps of particle formation. In the present study we use formation free energies calculated by quantum chemical methods to estimate the evaporation rates of species from sulfuric acid clusters containing ammonia or dimethylamine. We have found that dimethylamine forms much more stable clusters with sulphuric acid than ammonia does. On the other hand, the existence of a very deep local minimum for clusters with two sulfuric acid molecules and two dimethylamine molecules hinders their growth to larger clusters. These results indicate that other compounds may be needed to make clusters grow to larger sizes (containing more than three sulfuric acid molecules.

  2. Calibration of Star Formation Rates Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring and mapping star-forming activity in galaxies is a key element for our understanding of their broad- band spectra, and their structure and evolution in our local, as well as the high-redshift Universe. The main tool we use for these measurements is the observed luminosity in various spectral lines and/or continuum bands. However, the available star-formation rate (SFR) indicators are often discrepant and subject to physical biases and calibration uncertainties. We are organizing a special session at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing, China (August 20-31, 2012) in order to bring together theoreticians and observers working in different contexts of star-formation to discuss the status of current SFR indicators, to identify open issues and to define a strategic framework for their resolution. The is an ideal time to synthesize information from the current golden era of space astrophysics and still have influence on the upcoming missions that will broaden our view of star-formation. We will be including high-energy constraints on SFR in the program and encourage participation from the high energy astrophysics community.

  3. Cosmic Evolution of Mass Accretion Rate and Metalicity in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Netzer, H; Netzer, Hagai; Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2006-01-01

    We present line and continuum measurements for 9818 SDSS type-I active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with z le 0.75. The data are used to study the four dimensional space of black hole mass, normalized accretion rate (Ledd), metalicity and redshift. The main results are: 1. Ledd is smaller for larger mass black holes at all redshifts. 2. For a given black hole mass Ledd propto z^gamma or (1+z)^delta where the slope gamma increases with black hole mass. The mean slope is similar to the star formation rate slope over the same redshift interval. 3. The FeII/Hb line ratio is significantly correlated with Ledd. It also shows a weaker negative dependence on redshift. Combined with the known dependence of metalicity on accretion rate, we suggest that the FeII/Hb line ratio is a metalicity indicator. 4. Given the measured accretion rates, the growth times of most AGNs exceed the age of the universe. This suggests past episodes of faster growth for all those sources. Combined with the FeII/Hb result, we conclude that the bro...

  4. Stellar and HI Mass Functions Predicted by a Simple Preheating Galaxy Formation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    According to the new preheating mechanism of galaxy formation suggested by Mo et al., we construct a simple model of formation of disk galaxies within the current paradigm of galaxy formation. It incorporates preheating, gas cooling, bulge formation and star formation. The predicted stellar and HI mass functions of galaxies are discussed and compared with the observations. It is found that our model can roughly match both the observed galaxy luminosity function and the observed HI-mass function.

  5. The impact of gas inflows on star formation rates and metallicities in barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Sara L; Patton, David R; Scudder, Jillian M; Mendel, J Trevor; Simard, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) and metallicities of a sample of 294 galaxies with visually classified, strong, large-scale bars are compared to a control sample of unbarred disk galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. The fibre (inner few kpc) metallicities of barred galaxies are uniformly higher (at a given mass) than the unbarred sample by ~0.06 dex. However, the fibre SFRs of the visually classified barred galaxies are higher by about 60% only in the galaxies with total stellar mass log M > 10. The metal enhancement at log M10. However, due to the much lower fraction of pairs than bars, bars account for ~3.5 times more triggered central star formation than interactions.

  6. Properties and Star Formation Histories of Intermediate Redshift Dwarf Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Gallego, J.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2017-03-01

    The epoch when low-mass star-forming galaxies (LMSFGs) form the bulk of their stellar mass is uncertain. While some models predict an early formation, others favor a delayed scenario until later ages of the Universe. We present improved constraints on the physical properties and star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of intermediate redshift LMSFGs selected by their stellar mass or blue-compact-dwarf-like properties. Our work takes advantage of the deep UV-to-FIR photometric coverage available on the Extended-Chandra Deep Field South and our own dedicated deep VLT/VIMOS optical spectroscopy programs. On the one hand, we estimate the stellar mass (M_{*}), star formation rate (SFR), and SFH of each galaxy modeling its spectral energy distribution. We use a novel approach by Pacifici et al. 2012, that (1) consistently combines photometric (broad-band) and spectroscopic (emission line fluxes and equivalent widths) data, and (2) uses physically-motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the SFR as a function of time. On the other hand, we characterize the properties of their interstellar medium by analyzing the emission line features visible in the VIMOS spectroscopy. The final sample includes 91 spectroscopically confirmed LMSFGs (7.3 ≤ logM_{*}/M_{⊙} ≤ 9.5) at 0.3 mass, and high specific-SFR. Furthermore, they are characterized by strong emission lines, low metallicity, and an enhanced level of excitation. Our selection criterion based on mass gathers galaxies within a wide range of properties, and possibly, different evolutionary stages. Despite the individual differences, the average SFH that we obtain suggests a late and fast (˜2 Gyr prior their observation) assembly scenario for this type of system.

  7. Physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the specific star formation rates of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-01-01

    Two explanations have been put forward to explain the observed conformity between the colours and specific star formation rates (SFR/$M_*$) of galaxies on large scales: 1) the formation times of their surrounding dark matter halos are correlated (commonly referred to as "assembly bias"), 2) gas is heated over large scales at early times, leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies (commonly referred to as "pre-heating") . To distinguish between the pre-heating and assembly bias scenarios, we search for relics of energetic feedback events in the neighbourhood of central galaxies with different specific star formation rates. We find a significant excess of very high mass ($\\log M_* > 11.3$) galaxies out to a distance of 2.5 Mpc around low SFR/$M_*$ central galaxies compared to control samples of higher SFR/$M_*$ central galaxies with the same stellar mass and redshift. We also find that very massive galaxies in the neighbourhood of low SFR/$M_*$ galaxies have muc...

  8. An Empirical Model for the Galaxy Luminosity and Star-Formation Rate Function at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star-formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z~4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z>8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass M{_h} by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z~4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-M{_h} relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 10 indicate that JWST will be able to detect galaxies out to z~15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density and associated reionization history by galaxies for which we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit leads to a fully reionized universe by z~6.5 an...

  9. The COSMOS [OII] Survey: Evolution of Electron Density with Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa; Gupta, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies at $z > 1$ exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of star-forming conditions we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim 1.5$ with emission-line measurements of the $\\mathrm{[OII]} \\lambda \\lambda 3726,3729$ doublet. By comparing our $z\\sim 1.5$ sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of $114_{-27}^{+28} \\, \\mathrm {cm}^{-3} $ for our...

  10. Cosmological mass transport on galactic nuclei and the formation of high Z quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, A.; Prieto, J.

    2017-07-01

    By using AMR cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, we studied the mass transport processes onto galactic nuclei from high redshift up to z˜6. We were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from ˜50 kpc to ˜ few pc. We studied the BH growth at the galactic center in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds and the gravitational stress on the disc. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and SN feedback, the SMBH grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting ≍0.5 throughout its evolution. The α parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, αR, with αR»1. The gravitational part of the α parameter, αG, has an increasing trend toward the galactic center at higher redshifts, with values αG˜1 at radii &lesssim, few 101 pc contributing to the BH fueling. In terms of torques, we also found that gravity has an increasing contribution toward the galactic center at earlier epochs with a mixed contribution above ˜100 pc. This complementary work between pressure gradients and gravitational potential gradients allows an efficient mass transport on the disc with average mass accretion rates of the order ˜ few 1M⊙/yr. These level of SMBH accretion rates found in our cosmological simulations are needed in all models of SMBH growth that attempt to explain the formation of redshift 6-7 quasars.

  11. Tidal capture formation of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries from wide binaries in the field

    CERN Document Server

    Michaely, Erez

    2015-01-01

    We present a potentially efficient dynamical formation scenario for Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) in the field, focusing on black-hole (BH) LMXBs. In this formation channel LMXBs are formed from wide binaries $(>1000$ AU) with a BH component and a stellar companion. The wide binary is perturbed by fly-by's of field stars and its orbit random-walks and changes over time. This diffusion process can drive the binary into a sufficiently eccentric orbit such that the binary components tidally interact at peri-center and the binary evolves to become a short period binary, which eventually evolves into an LMXB. The formation rate of LMXBs through this channel mostly depends on the number of such BH wide binaries progenitors, which in turn depends on the velocity kicks imparted to BHs (or NSs) at birth. We consider several models for the formation and survival of such wide binaries, and calculate the LMXB formation rates for each model. We find that models where BHs form through direct collapse with no/little natal...

  12. Effects of the Size of Cosmological N-body Simulations on Physical Quantities – II: Halo Formation and Destruction Rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayanti Prasad

    2007-06-01

    In this study we show how errors due to finite box size affect formation and the destruction rate for haloes in cosmological N-body simulations. In an earlier study we gave an analytic prescription of finding the corrections in the mass function. Following the same approach, in this paper we give analytical expressions for corrections in the formation rate, destruction rate and the rate of change in comoving number density, and compute their expected values for the power law ( = -2) and LCDM models.

  13. Matching the Evolution of the Stellar Mass Function Using Log-normal Star Formation Histories

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Louis E; Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus; Poggianti, Bianca; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2014-01-01

    We show that a model consisting of individual, log-normal star formation histories for a volume-limited sample of $z\\approx0$ galaxies reproduces the evolution of the total and quiescent stellar mass functions at $z\\lesssim2.5$ and stellar masses $M_*\\geq10^{10}\\,{\\rm M_\\odot}$. This model has previously been shown to reproduce the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (${\\rm SFR}$--$M_*$) over the same interval, is fully consistent with the observed evolution of the cosmic ${\\rm SFR}$ density at $z\\leq8$, and entails no explicit "quenching" prescription. We interpret these results/features in the context of other models demonstrating a similar ability to reproduce the evolution of (1) the cosmic ${\\rm SFR}$ density, (2) the total/quiescent stellar mass functions, and (3) the ${\\rm SFR}$--$M_*$ relation, proposing that the key difference between modeling approaches is the extent to which they stress/address diversity in the (starforming) galaxy population. Finally, we suggest that observations revealing t...

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the effect of close interactions on star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, L J M; Driver, S P; Alpaslan, M; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Cluver, M E; Drinkwater, M J; Foster, C; Grootes, M W; Konstantopoulos, I S; Lara-Lopez, M A; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Loveday, J; Meyer, M J; Moffett, A J; Norberg, P; Owers, M S; Popescu, C C; De Propris, R; Sharp, R; Tuffs, R J; Wang, L; Wilkins, S M; Bourne, L Dunne N; Smith, M W L

    2015-01-01

    The modification of star formation (SF) in galaxy interactions is a complex process, with SF observed to be both enhanced in major mergers and suppressed in minor pair interactions. Such changes likely to arise on short timescales and be directly related to the galaxy-galaxy interaction time. Here we investigate the link between dynamical phase and direct measures of SF on different timescales for pair galaxies, targeting numerous star-formation rate (SFR) indicators and comparing to pair separation, individual galaxy mass and pair mass ratio. We split our sample into the higher (primary) and lower (secondary) mass galaxies in each pair and find that SF is indeed enhanced in all primary galaxies but suppressed in secondaries of minor mergers. We find that changes in SF of primaries is consistent in both major and minor mergers, suggesting that SF in the more massive galaxy is agnostic to pair mass ratio. We also find that SF is enhanced/suppressed more strongly for short-time duration SFR indicators (e.g. H-a...

  15. A Star-Formation Rate Atlas of the Nearby Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Tristan; Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul A.

    2017-01-01

    We present our work in constructing a star-formation rate (SFR) atlas of nearby galaxies. We utilize GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) data and Spitzer 24 micron data to compute the SFR map of each galaxy using the relation described in Leroy et al. (2008). For each galaxy, the 24 micron data were downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive and subjected to outlier and overlap corrections through the automated Spitzer pipeline MOPEX. The FUV images were constructing using gphoton, and we then performed background subtraction using source-free regions away from the galaxy. These SFR maps represent an attempt to systematically characterize the local SFR in nearby galaxies, which we will then use to explore the relationship of SFR to the incidence of other phenomena such as supernovae and ultraluminous X-ray sources. We will make all SFR maps available to the community.

  16. Star formation rate in Holmberg IX dwarf galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009 to calculate star formation rate (SFR in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3:4 x 10-4M.yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  17. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  18. North Atlantic Water Mass Formation as Depicted by Coupled Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, D.; McClean, J.

    2008-12-01

    We evaluate the realism of North Atlantic (NA) water mass properties in two fully coupled one-degree class Community Climate System Model 3.0 (CCSM3) simulations using Eulerian spectral (CCSM-T85) and finite- volume (CCSM-FV) atmospheric dynamical cores. We calculate the water mass transformation rates (WMTR) for the entire North Atlantic (NA) and separately for the Nordic Seas using 20-year monthly time series of sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, surface heat and freshwater fluxes due to the atmosphere-ocean and ice-ocean interactions. Compared to the CCSM3-T85 the CCSM3-FV has higher WMTR in narrower density ranges. It's subpolar mode water (σθ= 27.5 kg.m-3) formation rate is 25Sv while in CCSM-T85 it is 20Sv. In the Nordic Seas the CCSM-FV formation rate is about 7.5 Sv versus 6 Sv in CCSM-T85 in the σθ range 27.-28.35 kg.m-3. These results will be validated with observational estimates based on surface fluxes and sea surface temperature from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data and Polar science center Hydrographic Climatology (PHC) sea surface salinity monthly climatology. As expected the dominant formation process is the buoyancy flux caused by the atmosphere-ocean heat exchange. The effect of ice-ocean buoyancy fluxes is to reduce the WMTR mainly due to the freshwater component (freshening during melting). We investigate the interannual variability of the NA WMTR related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) for both models. The ocean response to the NAO mode is better simulated in the CCSM-FV with intensified water mass production during the negative phase when the winter convection in the Nordic Seas is stronger.

  19. The Link Between the Formation Rates of Clusters and Stars in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to test whether the formation rate of star clusters is proportional to the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. As a first step, we present the mass functions of compact clusters younger than 10 Myr in seven star-forming galaxies of diverse masses, sizes, and morphologies: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, NGC 4214, NGC 4449, M83, M51, and the Antennae. These cluster mass functions (CMFs) are well represented by power laws, dN/dM~M^b, with similar exponents b=-1.92+/-0.27, but with amplitudes that differ by factors up to ~10^3, corresponding to vast differences in the sizes of the cluster populations in these galaxies. We then normalize these CMFs by the SFRs in the galaxies, derived from dust-corrected H-alpha luminosities, and find that the spread in the amplitudes collapses, with a remaining rms deviation of only sigma_(logA)= 0.2. This is close to the expected dispersion from random uncertainties in the CMFs and SFRs. Thus, the data presented here are consistent with exact...

  20. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Sara L; Rosario, David J; Mendel, J Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Using artificial neural network (ANN) predictions of total infra-red luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ~21,000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR selected AGN. SFR offsets (Delta SFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main sequence' galaxies (matched in M*, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of Delta SFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median Delta SFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median Delta SFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor ~1.5. We interpret the different distributions of Delta SFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied ...

  1. Black hole accretion versus star formation rate: theory confronts observations

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We use a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers to compare star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) for galaxies before the interaction ('stochastic' phase), during the 'merger' proper, lasting ~0.2-0.3 Gyr, and in the 'remnant' phase. We calculate the bi-variate distribution of SFR and BHAR and define the regions in the SFR-BHAR plane that the three phases occupy. No strong correlation between BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR is found. A possible exception are galaxies with the highest SFR and the highest BHAR. We also bin the data in the same way used in several observational studies, by either measuring the mean SFR for AGN in different luminosity bins, or the mean BHAR for galaxies in bins of SFR. We find that the apparent contradiction or SFR versus BHAR for observed samples of AGN and star forming galaxies is actually caused by binning effects. The two types of samples use different projections of the full bi-variate distribution, and the full information would lead to unamb...

  2. A New Prescription for the Mass-loss Rates of WC and WO Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramper, F.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new empirical prescription for the mass-loss rates of carbon- and oxygen-sequence Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of their luminosity, surface chemical composition, and initial metallicity. The new prescription is based on results of detailed spectral analyses of WC and WO stars and improves the often applied Nugis and Lamers relation. We find that the mass-loss rates of WC and WO stars (with X = 0 and Y ≲ 0.98) can be expressed as {log} \\dot{M}=-9.20+0.85{log}(L/L ⊙) + 0.44 log Y + 0.25 log (Z Fe/Z Fe,⊙). This relation is based on mass-loss determinations that assume a volume-filling factor of 0.1, but the prescription can easily be scaled to account for other volume-filling factors. The residual of the fit is σ = 0.06 dex. We investigated whether the relation can also describe the mass loss of hydrogen-free WN stars and showed that it can when an adjustment of the metallicity dependence ({log} \\dot{M}\\propto 1.3{log}({Z}{Fe}/{Z}{Fe,⊙ })) is applied. Compared to that of Nugis and Lamers, \\dot{M} is less sensitive to the luminosity and the surface abundance, implying a stronger mass loss of massive stars in their late stages of evolution. The modest metallicity dependence implies that if WC or WO stars are formed in metal-deficient environments, their mass-loss rates are higher than currently anticipated. These effects may result in the formation of a larger number of SNe Ic and fewer black holes and may favor the production of superluminous SNe Ic through interaction with C- and O-rich circumstellar material or dense stellar wind.

  3. Kiloparsec-scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. IV. Regulation of Galactic Star Formation Rates by Stellar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Teyssier, Romain; Rosdahl, Joakim; Van Loo, Sven; Nickerson, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Star formation from the interstellar medium of galactic disks is a basic process controlling the evolution of galaxies. Understanding the star formation rate (SFR) in a local patch of a disk with a given gas mass is thus an important challenge for theoretical models. Here we simulate a kiloparsec region of a disk, following the evolution of self-gravitating molecular clouds down to subparsec scales, as they form stars that then inject feedback energy by dissociating and ionizing UV photons and supernova explosions. We assess the relative importance of each feedback mechanism. We find that H2-dissociating feedback results in the largest absolute reduction in star formation compared to the run with no feedback. Subsequently adding photoionization feedback produces a more modest reduction. Our fiducial models that combine all three feedback mechanisms yield, without fine-tuning, SFRs that are in excellent agreement with observations, with H2-dissociating photons playing a crucial role. Models that only include supernova feedback—a common method in galaxy evolution simulations—settle to similar SFRs, but with very different temperatures and chemical states of the gas, and with very different spatial distributions of young stars.

  4. Star Formation in a Stellar Mass Selected Sample of Galaxies to z=3 from the GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS)

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Amanda E; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Grutzbauch, Ruth; Bluck, Asa F L; Buitrago, Fernando; Mortlock, Alice

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the star-forming properties of a stellar mass-selected sample of galaxies in the GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS), based on deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the GOODS North and South fields. Using a stellar mass selected sample, combined with HST/ACS and Spitzer data to measure both UV and infrared derived star formation rates (SFR), we investigate the star forming properties of a complete sample of ~1300 galaxies down to log M*=9.5 at redshifts 1.510^11 Msun. We derive optical colours, dust extinctions, and ultraviolet and infrared SFR to determine how the star formation rate changes as a function of both stellar mass and time. Our results show that SFR increases at higher stellar mass such that massive galaxies nearly double their stellar mass from star formation alone over the redshift range studied, but the average value of SFR for a given stellar mass remains constant over this 2 Gyr period. Furthermore, we find no strong evolution in the SFR for our sample as a function of mass over...

  5. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  6. Are We Correctly Measuring Star-Formation Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen B.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Mitchell, Noah P.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction-corrected, integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ˜53% larger than previous relations. These results have signficant implications for measuring FUV-based SFRs of high-redshift galaxies.

  7. Star Formation at Low Rates: How a Lack of Massive Stars Impacts the Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    In recent years dedicated observations have uncovered star formation at extremely low rates in dwarf galaxies, tidal tails, ram-pressure stripped gas clouds, and the outskirts of galactic disks. At the same time, numerical simulations of galaxy evolution have advanced to higher spatial and mass resolutions, but have yet to account for the underfilling of the uppermost mass bins of stellar initial mass function (IMF) at low star-formation rates. In such situations, simulations may simply scale down the IMF, without realizing that this unrealistically results infractions of massive stars, along with fractions of massive star feedback energy (e.g., radiation and SNII explosions). Not properlyaccounting for such parameters has consequences for the self-regulation of star formation, the energetics of galaxies, as well as for the evolution of chemical abundances.Here we present numerical simulations of dwarf galaxies with low star-formation rates allowing for two extreme cases of the IMF: a "filled" case with fractional massive stars vs. a truncated IMF, at which the IMF is built bottom-up until the gas reservoir allows the formation of a last single star at an uppermost mass. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the different effects on galaxy evolution with respect to self-regulation, feedback, and chemistry. The case of a stochastic sampled IMF is situated somewhere in between these extremes.

  8. Mass loss rate determinations of southern OB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, P; Koribalski, B S

    2001-01-01

    A sample of OB stars (eleven Of, one O and one B supergiant) has been surveyed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 4.8 and 8.64 GHz with a resolution of 2'' -- 4''. Five stars were detected; three of them have negative spectral indices, consistent with non-thermal emission, and two have positive indices. The thermal radiation from HD 150135 and HD 163181 can be explained as coming from an optically thick ionized stellar wind. The non-thermal radiation from CD-47 4551, HD 124314 and HD 150136 possibly comes from strong shocks in the wind itself and/or in the wind colliding region if the stars have a massive early-type companion. The percentage of non-thermal emitters among detected O stars has increased up to ~50%. The Of star HD 124314 clearly shows flux density variations. Mass loss rates (or upper limits) were derived for all the observed stars and the results compared with non-radio measurements and theoretical predictions.

  9. Observational probes of the connection between Star Formation Efficiency and Dark Matter halo mass of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Veselina; Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Modern simulations predict that the stellar mass and the star formation efficiency of a galaxy are tightly linked to the dark matter (DM) halo mass of that galaxy. This prediction relies on a specific model of galaxy evolution and so testing this prediction directly tests our best models of galaxy formation and evolution. Recent DM numerical studies propose relationships between star formation efficiency and the DM halo mass with two domains based on SF feedback (low-mass) vs. AGN feedback (high-mass), see Moster et al. (2013). The observational probe of such parameters in the relationship imply globally important physics that are fundamental as, e.g., the star formation law (e.g., Kennicutt et al., 1998), the universal depletion time (Leroy et al. 2008), and the origin of the cold gas phase with respect to the stellar disc (Davis et al.2011). Thus, we can directly measure whether this parameterization is correct by estimating the stellar mass, star formation efficiency and dynamical (DM) mass for a set of galaxies at strategically selected points to test if they fall on the predicted relationship.We use CO data from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE) in conjunction with archival 21-cm data and spectroscopic data from Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field spectroscopy Area survey (CALIFA) to measure the stellar vs. halo mass and star-formation-efficiency vs. halo mass relations of the galaxies. We also analyze archival 21-cm spectra to estimate rotation speeds, atomic gas masses and halo masses for a set of EDGE galaxies. Data from CALIFA are used for high quality star formation efficiency and stellar mass measurements. By linking these three parameters - stellar mass, star formation efficiency (SFE) and DM halo mass - we can test the simulation models of how the gas is cooling in the potential wells of the dark matter halos and then forms stars.

  10. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-07

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  11. Galaxy Zoo: the dependence of the star formation-stellar mass relation on spiral disc morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Schawinski, Kevin; Simmons, Brooke D.; Masters, Karen L.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Melvin, Thomas; Wong, O. Ivy; Nichol, Robert C.; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Fortson, Lucy

    2015-05-01

    We measure the stellar mass-star formation rate (SFR) relation in star-forming disc galaxies at z ≤ 0.085, using Galaxy Zoo morphologies to examine different populations of spirals as classified by their kiloparsec-scale structure. We examine the number of spiral arms, their relative pitch angle, and the presence of a galactic bar in the disc, and show that both the slope and dispersion of the M⋆-SFR relation is constant when varying all the above parameters. We also show that mergers (both major and minor), which represent the strongest conditions for increases in star formation at a constant mass, only boost the SFR above the main relation by ˜0.3 dex; this is significantly smaller than the increase seen in merging systems at z > 1. Of the galaxies lying significantly above the M⋆-SFR relation in the local Universe, more than 50 per cent are mergers. We interpret this as evidence that the spiral arms, which are imperfect reflections of the galaxy's current gravitational potential, are either fully independent of the various quenching mechanisms or are completely overwhelmed by the combination of outflows and feedback. The arrangement of the star formation can be changed, but the system as a whole regulates itself even in the presence of strong dynamical forcing.

  12. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  13. An Empirical Calibration of Star Formation Rate Estimators

    CERN Document Server

    Rosa-Gonzalez, D; Terlevich, R J

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) The observational determination of the behaviour of the star formation rate (SFR) with look-back time or redshift has two main weaknesses: 1- the large uncertainty of the dust/extinction corrections, and 2- that systematic errors may be introduced by the fact that the SFR is estimated using different methods at different redshifts. To assess the possible systematic differences among the different SFR estimators and the role of dust, we have compared SFR estimates using H$\\alpha$, SFR(H$\\alpha$), [OII]$\\lambda$3727\\AA, SFR(OII), UV, SFR(UV) and FIR, SFR(FIR) luminosities of a sample comprising the 31 nearby star forming galaxies having high quality photometric data in the UV, optical and FIR. We review the different "standard" methods for the estimation of the SFR and find that while the standard method provides good agreement between SFR(H$\\alpha$) and SFR(FIR), both SFR(OII) and SFR(UV) are systematically higher than SFR(FIR), irrespective of the extinction law. We show that the excess in the SFR(...

  14. Evidence for a correlation between mass accretion rates onto young stars and the mass of their protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Manara, C F; Testi, L; Natta, A; Alcalá, J M; Williams, J P; Ansdell, M; Miotello, A; van der Marel, N; Tazzari, M; Carpenter, J; Guidi, G; Mathews, G S; Oliveira, I; Prusti, T; van Dishoeck, E F

    2016-01-01

    A relation between the mass accretion rate onto the central young star and the mass of the surrounding protoplanetary disk has long been theoretically predicted and observationally sought. For the first time, we have accurately and homogeneously determined the photospheric parameters, the mass accretion rate, and the disk mass for an essentially complete sample of young stars with disks in the Lupus clouds. Our work combines the results of surveys conducted with VLT/X-Shooter and ALMA. With this dataset we are able to test a basic prediction of viscous accretion theory, the existence of a linear relation between the mass accretion rate onto the central star and the total disk mass. We find a correlation between the mass accretion rate and the disk dust mass, with a ratio that is roughly consistent with the expected viscous timescale when assuming an ISM gas-to-dust ratio. This confirms that mass accretion rates are related to the properties of the outer disk. We find no correlation between mass accretion rate...

  15. Resolved gas kinematics in a sample of low-redshift high star-formation rate galaxie

    CERN Document Server

    Varidel, Matthew; Croom, Scott; Owers, Matt; Sadler, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    We have used integral field spectroscopy of a sample of six nearby (z~0.01-0.04) high star-formation rate (SFR~10-40 solar masses per year) galaxies to investigate the relationship between local velocity dispersion and star formation rate on sub-galactic scales. The low redshift mitigates, to some extent, the effect of beam smearing which artificially inflates the measured dispersion as it combines regions with different line-of-sight velocities into a single spatial pixel. We compare the parametric maps of the velocity dispersion with the Halpha flux (a proxy for local star-formation rate), and the velocity gradient (a proxy for the local effect of beam smearing). We find, even for these very nearby galaxies, the Halpha velocity dispersion correlates more strongly with velocity gradient than with Halpha flux - implying that beam smearing is still having a significant effect on the velocity dispersion measurements. We obtain a first-order non parametric correction for the unweighted and flux weighted mean vel...

  16. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Heyer, M; Urquhart, J S; Csengeri, T; Wienen, M; Leurini, S; Menten, K; Wyrowski, F

    2016-01-01

    Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. A sample of 24 micron-based Class~I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f*, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 m...

  17. Top-quark mass measurements using jet rates at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moch S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method to measure the top-quark mass in hadronic collisions[1]. The method uses the sensitivity of the tt¯+1$tar t + 1$-jet production on the top-quark mass. In detail we study the ℛ distribution defined as the tt¯+1$tar t + 1$-jet normalized cross section differential in the invariant mass of the total system and calculated at NLO accuracy. We prove that the ℛ distribution has a high sensitivity to the top-quark mass. Furthermore we investigate and quantify the impact of the dominant theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The results obtained show, that the method has the potential to be competitive in precision with established approaches and allows a complementary measurement of the top-quark mass at hadron colliders. We emphasize that in the proposed method the mass parameter is uniquely defined through one-loop renormalization.

  18. The Formation Mass of a Binary System via Fragmentation of a Rotating Parent Core with Increasing Total Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Arreaga-Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Recent VLA and CARMA observations have shown proto-stars in binaries with unprecedented resolution. Specifically, the proto-stellar masses of systems such as CB230 IRS1 and L1165-SMM1 have been detected in the range of $0.1-0.25 \\, M_{\\odot}$. These are much more massive than the masses generally obtained by numerical simulations of binary formation, around $0.01 \\, M_{\\odot}$. Motivated by these discrepancies in mass, in this paper we study the formation mass of a binary system as a function of the total mass of its parent core. To achieve this objective, we present a set of numerical simulations of the gravitational collapse of a uniform and rotating core, in which azimuthal symmetric mass seeds are initially implemented in order to favor the formation of a dense filament, out of which a binary system may be formed by direct fragmentation. We first observed that this binary formation process is diminished when the total mass of the parent core $M_0$ is increased; then we increased the level of the ratio of ...

  19. The density structure and star formation rate of non-isothermal polytropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is governed by supersonic turbulence, which likely controls the star formation rate (SFR) and initial mass function (IMF) of stars. Turbulence also plays an important role during structure formation in the early Universe. Despite its ubiquity and importance, we have yet to understand the statistics of turbulence. ISM turbulence is non-universal, with a wide range of Mach numbers, magnetic fields strengths, and is driven by various stellar feedback and galactic processes. Although some of these parameters were explored, the bulk of previous work assumed that the gas is isothermal. However, cold molecular clouds form out of the warm atomic medium, with the gas passing through various chemical and thermodynamic phases that are not isothermal. Here we determine the role of temperature variations by modelling non-isothermal hydrodynamic turbulence with a polytropic equation of state (EOS), P~rho^Gamma. We use grid resolutions of 2048^3 cells and compare polytropic exponents Gamm...

  20. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0

  1. Observational Evidence of Dynamic Star Formation Rate in Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Eve J; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Star formation on galactic scales is known to be a slow process, but whether it is slow on smaller scales is uncertain. We cross-correlate 5469 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a new all-sky catalog with 256 star forming complexes (SFCs) to build a sample of 191 SFC-GMC complexes---collections of multiple clouds each matched to 191 SFCs. The total mass in stars harbored by these clouds is inferred from WMAP free-free fluxes. We measure the GMC mass, the virial parameter, the star formation efficiency $\\epsilon$ and the star formation rate per free-fall time $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$. Both $\\epsilon$ and $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ range over 3--4 orders of magnitude. We find that 68.3% of the clouds fall within $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon}=0.79\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ and $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.91\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ about the median. Compared to these observed scatters, a simple model with a time independent $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ that depends on the host GMC properties predicts $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.24$. Allowi...

  2. The DiskMass Survey. VIII. On the Relationship Between Disk Stability and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Westfall, Kyle B; Bershady, Matthew A; Martinsson, Thomas P K; Swaters, Robert A; Verheijen, Marc A W

    2014-01-01

    We study the relationship between the stability level of late-type galaxy disks and their star-formation activity using integral-field gaseous and stellar kinematic data. Specifically, we compare the two-component (gas+stars) stability parameter from Romeo & Wiegert (Q_RW), incorporating stellar kinematic data for the first time, and the star-formation rate estimated from 21cm continuum emission. We determine the stability level of each disk probabilistically using a Bayesian analysis of our data and a simple dynamical model. Our method incorporates the shape of the stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) and yields robust SVE measurements for over 90% of our sample. Averaging over this subsample, we find a meridional shape of sigma_z/sigma_R = 0.51^{+0.36}_{-0.25} for the SVE and, at 1.5 disk scale lengths, a stability parameter of Q_RW = 2.0 +/- 0.9. We also find that the disk-averaged star-formation-rate surface density (Sigma-dot_e,*) is correlated with the disk-averaged gas and stellar mass surface densitie...

  3. Evidence for Reduced Specific Star Formation Rates in the Centers of Massive Galaxies at z = 4

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Intae; Song, Mimi; Dickinson, Mark; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lu, Yu; Mobasher, Bahram; Papovich, Casey; Ryan, Russell E; Salmon, Brett; Straughn, Amber N

    2016-01-01

    We perform the first spatially-resolved stellar population study of galaxies in the early universe (z = 3.5 - 6.5), utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging dataset over the GOODS-S field. We select a sample of 418 bright and extended galaxies at z = 3.5 - 6.5 from a parent sample of ~ 8000 photometric-redshift selected galaxies from Finkelstein et al. (2015). We first examine galaxies at 3.5< z < 4.0 using additional deep K-band survey data from the HAWK-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS) which covers the 4000A break at these redshifts. We measure the stellar mass, star formation rate, and dust extinction for galaxy inner and outer regions via spatially-resolved spectral energy distribution fitting based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. By comparing specific star formation rates (sSFRs) between inner and outer parts of the galaxies we find that the majority of galaxies with the high central mass densities show evidence for ...

  4. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - II. Mass dependence of cloud destruction and cluster properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2017-09-01

    The process of radiative feedback in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) is an important mechanism for limiting star cluster formation through the heating and ionization of the surrounding gas. We explore the degree to which radiative feedback affects early (≲5 Myr) cluster formation in GMCs having masses that range from 104 to 106 M⊙ using the flash code. The inclusion of radiative feedback lowers the efficiency of cluster formation by 20-50 per cent relative to hydrodynamic simulations. Two models in particular - 5 × 104 and 105 M⊙ - show the largest suppression of the cluster formation efficiency, corresponding to a factor of ∼2. For these clouds only, the internal energy, a measure of the energy injected by radiative feedback, exceeds the gravitational potential for a significant amount of time. We find a clear relation between the maximum cluster mass, Mc,max, formed in a GMC and the mass of the GMC itself, MGMC: Mc,max ∝ M_{GMC}^{0.81}. This scaling result suggests that young globular clusters at the necessary scale of 106 M⊙ form within host GMCs of masses near ∼5 × 107 M⊙. We compare simulated cluster mass distributions to the observed embedded cluster mass function [d log (N)/dlog (M) ∝ Mβ where β = -1] and find good agreement (β = -0.99 ± 0.14) only for simulations including radiative feedback, indicating this process is important in controlling the growth of young clusters. However, the high star formation efficiencies, which range from 16 to 21 per cent, and high star formation rates compared to locally observed regions suggest other feedback mechanisms are also important during the formation and growth of stellar clusters.

  5. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Globular Clusters: Masses, Merger Rates, and the Impact of Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Carl L; Rasio, Frederic A

    2016-01-01

    Expanding upon our previous work (Rodriguez et al., 2015), we study merging binary black holes formed in globular clusters using our Monte Carlo approach to stellar dynamics. We have created a new set of 52 cluster models with different masses, metallicities, and radii to fully characterize the binary black hole merger rate. These models include all the relevant dynamical processes (such as two-body relaxation, strong encounters, and three-body binary formation) and agree well with detailed direct N-body simulations. In addition, we have enhanced our stellar evolution algorithms with updated metallicity-dependent stellar wind and supernova prescriptions, allowing us to compare our results directly to the most recent population synthesis predictions for merger rates from isolated binary evolution. We explore the relationship between a cluster's global properties and the population of binary black holes that it produces. In particular, we derive a numerically calibrated relationship between the merger times of ...

  6. A robust measurement of the mass outflow rate of the galactic outflow from NGC 6090

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti Christy, A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of stellar feedback, it is critical to estimate the mass outflow rates of galaxies. Past estimates have been plagued by uncertain assumptions about the outflow geometry, metallicity, and ionization fraction. Here we use Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the nearby starburst NGC 6090 to demonstrate that many of these quantities can be constrained by the data. We use the Si IV absorption lines to calculate the scaling of velocity (v), covering fraction (Cf), and density with distance from the starburst (r), assuming the Sobolev optical depth and a velocity law of the form: v ∝ (1 - Ri/r)β (where Ri is the inner outflow radius). We find that the velocity (β = 0.43) is consistent with an outflow driven by an r-2 force with the outflow radially accelerated, while the scaling of the covering fraction (Cf ∝ r-0.82) suggests that cool clouds in the outflow are in pressure equilibrium with an adiabatically expanding medium. We use the column densities of four weak metal lines and CLOUDY photoionization models to determine the outflow metallicity, the ionization correction, and the initial density of the outflow. Combining these values with the profile fitting, we find Ri = 63 pc, with most of the mass within 300 pc of the starburst. Finally, we find that the maximum mass outflow rate is 2.3 M⊙ yr-1 and the mass-loading factor (outflow divided by the star formation rate) is 0.09, a factor of 10 lower than the value calculated using common assumptions for the geometry, metallicity, and ionization structure of the outflow.

  7. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Lenkic, Laura; Gallagher, Sarah; Desjardins, Tyler; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann; Durrell, Pat; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended timescales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by \\citet{tzanavaris10} and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFR$_{\\mathrm{UV}}$) using the UVOT uvw2photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFR$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-"red"), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific star formation rates, and tend to lie in H~{\\sc i}-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-"blue") have redder ...

  8. Observational evidence for the evolution of nuclear metallicity and star formation rate as the merger stage

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Rui; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Wei, Peng; Guo, Xin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance and star formation rate (SFR) of local far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies along the merger sequence, as traced by their optical morphologies. The sample was drawn from a cross-correlation analysis of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ultraluminous infrared galaxies sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 database. The investigation is done by comparing our sample to a control sample matched in the normalized redshift distribution in two diagnostics, which are the nuclear gas-phase metallicity vs. stellar mass and the nuclear SFR vs. stellar mass diagrams. Galaxies with different morphological types show different mass-metallicity relations (MZR). Compared to the MZR defined by the control sample, isolated spirals have comparable metallicities with the control sample at a given stellar mass. Spirals in pairs and interacting galaxies with projected separations $r_{p} >$ 20 kpc show mild metallicity d...

  9. Observational evidence for the evolution of nuclear metallicity and star formation rate with the merger stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Wei, Peng; Guo, Xin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the evolution of nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance and star formation rate (SFR) of local far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies along the merger sequence, as traced by their optical morphologies. The sample was drawn from a cross-correlation analysis of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ultraluminous infrared galaxy sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 database. The investigation is done by comparing our sample to a control sample matched in the normalized redshift distribution in two diagnostics, which are the nuclear gas-phase metallicity vs. stellar mass and the nuclear SFR vs. stellar mass diagrams. Galaxies with different morphological types show different mass-metallicity relations (MZRs). Compared to the MZR defined by the control sample, isolated spirals have comparable metallicities with the control sample at a given stellar mass. Spirals in pairs and interacting galaxies with projected separations of r p > 20 kpc show a mild metallicity dilution of 0.02-0.03 dex. Interacting galaxies with r p nuclear metallicity. Moreover, the central SFR enhancement relative to the control sample evolves simultaneously with the nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance. Our results support the predictions from numerical simulations.

  10. High Mass Star Formation. III. The Functional Form of the Submillimeter Clump Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, M A; Reid, Michael A.; Wilson, Christine D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the mass function of cold, dusty clumps in 11 low- and high-mass star-forming regions. Using a homogeneous fitting technique, we analyze the shape of each region's clump mass function and examine the commonalities among them. We find that the submillimeter continuum clump mass function in low-mass star-forming regions is typically best fit by a lognormal distribution, while that in high-mass star-forming regions is better fit by a double power law. A single power law clump mass distribution is ruled out in all cases. Fitting all of the regions with a double power law, we find the mean power law exponent at the high-mass end of each mass function is alpha_high = -2.4+/-0.1, consistent with the Salpeter result of alpha = -2.35. We find no region-to-region trend in alpha_high with the mass scale of the clumps in a given region, as characterized by their median mass. Similarly, non non-parametric tests show that the shape of the clump mass function does not change much from region to region, despit...

  11. A Theoretical Model of Non-conservative Mass Transfer with Non-uniform Mass Accretion Rate in Close Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gharami, Prabir; Rahaman, Farook

    2014-01-01

    Mass transfer in close binaries is often non-conservative and the modeling of this kind of mass transfer is mathematically challenging as in this case due to the loss of mass as well as angular momentum the governing system gets complicated and uncertain. In the present work a new mathematical model has been prescribed for the non-conservative mass transfer in a close binary system taking in to account the gradually decreasing profile of the mass accretion rate by the accreting star with respect to time as well as with respect to the increase in mass of the accreting star. The process of mass transfer is understood to occur up to a critical mass limit of the accreting star beyond which this process may cease to work.

  12. Exchange rate formation in Ukraine and its impact on macroeconomic indicators

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The factors of exchange rate formation in Ukraine are analyzes in this paper, the influence of exchange rate on macroeconomic indicators of development and the main priorities of the exchange rate policy are determined exchange.

  13. Gamma Ray Burst and star formation rates: The physical origin for the redshift evolution of their ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M; Tacchella, S

    2013-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and galaxies at high redshift represent complementary probes of the star formation history of the Universe. In fact, both the GRB rate and the galaxy luminosity density are connected to the underlying star formation. Here, we combine a star formation model for the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function from z=0 to z=10 with a metallicity-dependent efficiency for GRB formation to simultaneously predict the comoving GRB rate. Our model sheds light on the physical origin of the empirical relation often assumed between GRB rate and luminosity density-derived star formation rate: Rgrb(z) = \\epsilon(z)*SFR_{obs}(z), with \\epsilon(z) (1+z)^{1.2}. At z0. Models with total suppression of GRB formation at log(Z/Zsun)>0 are disfavored. At z>4, most of the star formation happens in low-metallicity hosts with nearly saturated efficiency of GRB production per unit stellar mass. However at the same epoch, galaxy surveys miss an increasing fraction of the predicted luminosity density because of f...

  14. Analysis of carrier gas flow rate effect on hydroxyapatite particle formation in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Setiawan, Adhi; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis has been well-known process for producing fine particles from single and multicomponent materials. Here, the effect of carrier gas flow rate in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process was studied in the particle formation of hydroxyapatite using solution precursor of Ca(CH3COO)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 with Ca/P ratio of 1.67. The experimental analysis was accompanied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for comparison. In the simulation, the evaporation of the solvent in the droplets, a second evaporation due to crust formation, the decomposition reaction of the precursor involving the transfer of heat and mass transfer from droplet to surrounding were considered. By maintaining temperature at 900 °C, the residence time increased with decreasing the carrier gas flow rate led to the increasing the evaporation rate and the reacted fraction of the precursor. The predicted and experimental results of average particles size were agreed well with discrepancy 6.3%.

  15. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: a Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, Eve C; Leroy, Adam K

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for regulation of galactic star formation rates Sigma_SFR in disk galaxies, in which ISM heating by stellar UV plays a key role. By requiring simultaneous thermal and (vertical) dynamical equilibrium in the diffuse gas, and star formation at a rate proportional to the mass of the self-gravitating component, we obtain a prediction for Sigma_SFR as a function of the total gaseous surface density Sigma and the density of stars + dark matter, rho_sd. The physical basis of this relationship is that thermal pressure in the diffuse ISM, which is proportional to the UV heating rate and therefore to Sigma_SFR, must adjust to match the midplane pressure set by the vertical gravitational field. Our model applies to regions where Sigma < 100 Msun/pc^2. In low-Sigma_SFR (outer-galaxy) regions where diffuse gas dominates, the theory predicts Sigma_SFR \\propto Sigma (rho_sd)^1/2. The decrease of thermal equilibrium pressure when Sigma_SFR is low implies, consistent with observations, that star formatio...

  16. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, Per; Donovan, E R;

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selecti...

  17. Effective photon mass from black-hole formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava Emelyanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We compute the value of effective photon mass mγ at one-loop level in QED in the background of small (1010 g≲M≪1016 g spherically symmetric black hole in asymptotically flat spacetime. This effect is associated with the modification of electron/positron propagator in presence of event horizon. Physical manifestations of black-hole environment are compared with those of hot neutral plasma. We estimate the distance to the nearest black hole from the upper bound on mγ obtained in the Coulomb-law test. We also find that corrections to electron mass me and fine structure constant α at one-loop level in QED are negligible in the weak gravity regime.

  18. Constraining the low-mass Slope of the star formation sequence at 0.5 < z < 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Henry, Alaina; Rigby, Jane R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbé, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, Cape Town 7935 (South Africa); Brammer, Gabriel B., E-mail: kate.whitaker@nasa.gov [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We constrain the slope of the star formation rate (SFR; log Ψ) to stellar mass (log M {sub *}) relation down to log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) = 8.4 (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) = 9.2) at z = 0.5 (z = 2.5) with a mass-complete sample of 39,106 star-forming galaxies selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, using deep photometry in the CANDELS fields. For the first time, we find that the slope is dependent on stellar mass, such that it is steeper at low masses (log Ψ∝log M {sub *}) than at high masses (log Ψ∝(0.3-0.6)log M {sub *}). These steeper low-mass slopes are found for three different star formation indicators: the combination of the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR), calibrated from a stacking analysis of Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm imaging; β-corrected UV SFRs; and Hα SFRs. The normalization of the sequence evolves differently in distinct mass regimes as well: for galaxies less massive than log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 10 the specific SFR (Ψ/M {sub *}) is observed to be roughly self-similar with Ψ/M {sub *}∝(1 + z){sup 1.9}, whereas more massive galaxies show a stronger evolution with Ψ/M {sub *}∝(1 + z){sup 2.2-3.5} for log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) = 10.2-11.2. The fact that we find a steep slope of the star formation sequence for the lower mass galaxies will help reconcile theoretical galaxy formation models with the observations.

  19. Calibration of evolutionary diagnostics in high-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Molinari, Sergio; Elia, Davide; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Testi, Leonardo; Robitaille, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary classification of massive clumps that are candidate progenitors of high-mass young stars and clusters relies on a variety of independent diagnostics based on observables from the near-infrared to the radio. A promising evolutionary indicator for massive and dense cluster-progenitor clumps is the L/M ratio between the bolometric luminosity and the mass of the clumps. With the aim of providing a quantitative calibration for this indicator we used SEPIA/APEX to obtain CH3C2H(12-11) observations, that is an excellent thermometer molecule probing densities > 10^5 cm^-3 , toward 51 dense clumps with M>1000 solar masses, and uniformly spanning -2 10 we detect all the clumps, with a gas temperature rising with Log(L/M), marking the appearance of a qualitatively different heating source within the clumps; such values are found towards clumps with UCHII counterparts, suggesting that the quantitative difference in T - L/M behaviour above L/M >10 is due to the first appearance of ZAMS stars in the clump...

  20. High Mass X-ray Binaries and Recent Star Formation History of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Shtykovskiy, P

    2007-01-01

    We study the relation between high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) population and recent star formation history (SFH) for the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Using archival optical SMC observations, we have approximated the color-magnitude diagrams of the stellar population by model stellar populations and, in this way, reconstructed the spatially resolved SFH of the galaxy over the past 100 Myr.We analyze the errors and stability of this method for determining the recent SFH and show that uncertainties in the models of massive stars at late evolutionary stages are the main factor that limits its accuracy. By combining the SFH with the spatial distribution of HMXBs obtained from XMM-Newton observations, we have derived the dependence of the HMXB number on the time elapsed since the star formation event. The number of young systems with ages 10 Myr is shown to be smaller than the prediction based on the type-II supernova rate. The HMXB number reaches its maximum ~20-50 Myr after the star formation event. This may be at...

  1. [Effects of fundamental frequency and speech rate on impression formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Teruhisa; Nakaune, Naoko

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated the systematic relationship between nonverbal features of speech and personality trait ratings of the speaker. In Study 1, fundamental frequency (F0) in original speech was converted into five levels from 64% to 156.25%. Then 132 undergraduates rated each of the converted speeches in terms of personality traits. In Study 2 134 undergraduates similarly rated the speech stimuli, which had five speech rate levels as well as two F0 levels. Results showed that listener ratings along Big Five dimensions were mostly independent. Each dimension had a slightly different change profile over the five levels of F0 and speech rate. A quadratic regression equation provided a good approximation for each rating as a function of F0 or speech rate. The quadratic regression equations put together would provide us with a rough estimate of personality trait impression as a function of prosodic features. The functional relationship among F0, speech rate, and trait ratings was shown as a curved surface in the three-dimensional space.

  2. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, C; Kroupa, P; Pflamm-Altenburg, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. A large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also that of NGC 1399. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are star clusters (SCs) and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different times. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope $-\\beta$ and a stellar upper mass limit, $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$ of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribut...

  3. Nonconservative Mass Transfer in Massive Binaries and the Formation of Wolf-Rayet+O Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mass transfer efficiency during the evolution of massive binaries is still uncertain. We model the mass transfer processes in a grid of binaries to investigate the formation of Wolf-Rayet+O (WR+O) binaries, taking into account two kinds of non-conservative mass transfer models: Model I with rotation-dependent mass accretion and Model II of half mass accretion. Generally the mass transfer in Model I is more inefficient, with the average efficiency in a range of $\\sim0.2-0.7$ and $ \\lesssim0.2 $ for Case A and Case B mass transfer, respectively. We present the parameter distributions for the descendant WR+O binaries. By comparing the modeled stellar mass distribution with the observed Galactic WR+O binaries, we find that highly non-conservative mass transfer is required.

  4. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  5. Constraining the Low-Mass Slope of the Star Formation Sequence at 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Katherine E; Leja, Joel; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Henry, Alaina; Skelton, Rosalind E; Fumagalli, Mattia; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Brammer, Gabriel B; Labbe, Ivo; Nelson, Erica J; Rigby, Jane R

    2014-01-01

    We constrain the slope of the star formation rate ($\\log\\Psi$) to stellar mass ($\\log\\mathrm{M_{\\star}}$) relation down to $\\log(\\mathrm{M_{\\star}/M_{\\odot}})=8.4$ ($\\log(\\mathrm{M_{\\star}/M_{\\odot}})=9.2$) at $z=0.5$ ($z=2.5$) with a mass-complete sample of 39,106 star-forming galaxies selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, using deep photometry in the CANDELS fields. For the first time, we find that the slope is dependent on stellar mass, such that it is steeper at low masses ($\\log\\mathrm{\\Psi}\\propto\\log\\mathrm{M_{\\star}}$) than at high masses ($\\log\\mathrm{\\Psi}\\propto(0.3-0.6)\\log\\mathrm{M_{\\star}}$). These steeper low mass slopes are found for three different star formation indicators: the combination of the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR), calibrated from a stacking analysis of Spitzer/MIPS 24$\\mu$m imaging; $\\beta$-corrected UV SFRs; and H$\\alpha$ SFRs. The normalization of the sequence evolves differently in distinct mass regimes as well: for galaxies less massive than $\\log(\\mathrm{M_{\\s...

  6. Impact of Protostellar Outflow on Star Formation: Effects of Initial Cloud Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Machida, Masahiro N

    2011-01-01

    Star formation efficiency controlled by the protostellar outflow in a single cloud core is investigated by three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations. Starting from the prestellar cloud core, the star formation process is calculated until the end of the main accretion phase. In the calculations, the mass of the prestellar cloud is parameterized. During the star formation, the protostellar outflow is driven by the circumstellar disk. The outflow extends also in the transverse direction until its width becomes comparable to the initial cloud scale, and thus, the outflow has a wide opening angle of >40 degrees. As a result, the protostellar outflow sweeps up a large fraction of the infalling material and ejects it into the interstellar space. The outflow can eject at most over half of the host cloud mass, significantly decreasing star formation efficiency. The outflow power is stronger in clouds with a greater initial mass. Thus, the protostellar outflow effectively suppresses star formation efficiency in a mas...

  7. Role of excipients in hydrate formation kinetics of theophylline in wet masses studied by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna C; Airaksinen, Sari; Karjalainen, Milja

    2004-01-01

    . Anhydrous theophylline was chosen as the hydrate-forming model drug compound and two excipients, silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) and alpha-lactose monohydrate, with different water absorbing properties, were used in formulation. An early stage of wet massing was studied with anhydrous...... theophylline and its 1:1 (w/w) mixtures with alpha-lactose monohydrate and SMCC with 0.1g/g of purified water. The changes in the state of water were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy, and the conversion of the crystal structure was verified using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). SMCC decreased...... the hydrate formation rate by absorbing water, but did not inhibit it. The results suggest that alpha-lactose monohydrate slightly increased the hydrate formation rate in comparison with a mass comprising only anhydrous theophylline....

  8. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bothwell, Matt S; Thompson, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Halpha to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Halpha luminosities. Using the UV and Halpha fluxes of a sample of ~300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 Msun/yr and 80-130 Msun/yr for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270^{+110}_{-80} Msun/yr, suggesting a mild tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with t...

  9. On the mass assembly of low-mass galaxies in hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    De Rossi, Maria E; Tissera, Patricia B; Gonzalez-Samaniego, Alejandro; Pedrosa, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations are studied in order to analyse generic trends for the stellar, baryonic and halo mass assembly of low-mass galaxies (M_* 2, the overall properties of simulated galaxies are not in large disagreement with those derived from observations.

  10. What triggers black-hole growth? Insights from star formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Neistein, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    We present a new semi-analytic model for the common growth of black holes (BHs) and galaxies within a hierarchical Universe. The model is tuned to match the mass function of BHs at z=0 and the luminosity functions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z<4. We use a new observational constraint, which relates the luminosity of AGNs to the star-formation rate (SFR) of their host galaxies. We show that this new constraint is important in various aspects: a) it indicates that BH accretion events are episodic; b) it favours a scenario in which BH accretion is triggered by merger events of all mass ratios; c) it constrains the duration of both merger-induced star-bursts and BH accretion events. The model reproduces the observations once we assume that only 4 per cent of the merger events trigger BH accretion; BHs accretion is not related to secular evolution; and only a few per cent of the mass made in bursts goes into the BH. We find that AGNs with low or intermediate luminosity are mostly being triggered by mino...

  11. Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Obscured Star Formation, GRB Rates, Cosmic Reionization, and Missing Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, A.; Mancuso, C.; Celotti, A.; Danese, L.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a holistic view of galaxy evolution at high redshifts z ≳ 4, which incorporates the constraints from various astrophysical/cosmological probes, including the estimate of the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density from UV/IR surveys and long gamma-ray burst (GRBs) rates, the cosmic reionization history following the latest Planck measurements, and the missing satellites issue. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting the SFR functions derived by Mancuso et al. on the basis of an educated extrapolation of the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and already tested against a number of independent observables. Our SFR functions integrated down to a UV magnitude limit MUV ≲ ‑13 (or SFR limit around 10‑2 M⊙ yr‑1) produce a cosmic SFR density in excellent agreement with recent determinations from IR surveys and, taking into account a metallicity ceiling Z ≲ Z⊙/2, with the estimates from long GRB rates. They also yield a cosmic reionization history consistent with that implied by the recent measurements of the Planck mission of the electron scattering optical depth τes ≈ 0.058 remarkably, this result is obtained under a conceivable assumption regarding the average value fesc ≈ 0.1 of the escape fraction for ionizing photons. We demonstrate via the abundance-matching technique that the above constraints concurrently imply galaxy formation becoming inefficient within dark matter halos of mass below a few 108 M⊙ pleasingly, such a limit is also required so as not to run into the missing satellites issue. Finally, we predict a downturn of the Galaxy luminosity function faintward of MUV ≲ ‑12, and stress that its detailed shape, to be plausibly probed in the near future by the JWST, will be extremely informative on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos, or even on the microscopic nature of the dark matter.

  12. The Spitzer c2d Legacy Results: Star Formation Rates and Efficiencies; Evolution and Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Neal J; Jørgensen, Jes K; Enoch, Melissa L; Merín, Bruno; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Alcalá, Juan M; Myers, Philip C; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Huard, Tracy L; Allen, Lori E; Harvey, Paul M; van Kempen, Tim; Blake, Geoffrey A; Koerner, David W; Mundy, Lee G; Padgett, Deborah L; Sargent, Anneila I

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) The c2d Spitzer Legacy project obtained images and photometry with both IRAC and MIPS instruments for five large, nearby molecular clouds. This paper combines information drawn from studies of individual clouds into a combined and updated statistical analysis of star formation rates and efficiencies, numbers and lifetimes for SED classes, and clustering properties. Current star formation efficiencies range from 3% to 6%. Taken together, the five clouds are producing about 260 solar masses of stars per Myr. The star formation surface density is more than an order of magnitude larger than would be predicted from the Kennicutt relation used in extragalactic studies. Measured against the dense gas probed by the maps of dust continuum emission, the efficiencies are much higher, and the current stock of dense cores would be exhausted in 1.8 Myr on average. The derived lifetime for the Class I phase is 0.44 to 0.54 Myr, considerably longer than some estimates. Similarly, the lifetime for the Class 0 SED c...

  13. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate

    2016-03-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound (`clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ({˜ }10 { Myr}) time-scales (`associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters (Γ) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that Γ increases with the gas surface density (Σ) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the total number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of Γ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with ΣSFR, due to the mass-radius-SFR relation of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies. The environmental variation of Γ should therefore be probed as a function of area-normalized quantities, such as Σ or ΣSFR. We present a set of guidelines for meaningful observational tests of cluster formation theories and show that these resolve the reported discrepancy.

  14. Growing black holes and galaxies: black hole accretion versus star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We present a new suite of hydrodynamical simulations and use it to study, in detail, black hole and galaxy properties. The high time, spatial and mass resolution, and realistic orbits and mass ratios, down to 1:6 and 1:10, enable us to meaningfully compare star formation rate (SFR) and BH accretion rate (BHAR) timescales, temporal behaviour and relative magnitude. We find that (i) BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR are typically temporally uncorrelated, and have different variability timescales, except during the merger proper, lasting ~0.2-0.3 Gyr. BHAR and nuclear (<100 pc) SFR are better correlated, and their variability are similar. Averaging over time, the merger phase leads typically to an increase by a factor of a few in the BHAR/SFR ratio. (ii) BHAR and nuclear SFR are intrinsically proportional, but the correlation lessens if the long-term SFR is measured. (iii) Galaxies in the remnant phase are the ones most likely to be selected as systems dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN), because of the long...

  15. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Green, L M

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of a sigmoidal (S shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  16. The stellar mass function and efficiency of galaxy formation with a varying initial mass function

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L; Balogh, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Several recent observational studies have concluded that the initial mass function (IMF) of stars varies systematically with galaxy properties such as velocity dispersion. In this paper, we investigate the effect of linking the circular velocity of galaxies, as determined from the Fundamental Plane and Tully-Fisher relations, to the slope of the IMF with parameterizations guided by several of these studies. For each empirical relation, we generate stellar masses of ~600,000 SDSS galaxies at z ~ 0.1, by fitting the optical photometry to large suites of synthetic stellar populations that sample the full range of galaxy parameters. We generate stellar mass functions and examine the stellar-to-halo mass relations using sub-halo abundance matching. At the massive end, the stellar mass functions become a power law, instead of the familiar exponential decline. As a result, it is a generic feature of these models that the central galaxy stellar-to-halo mass relation is significantly flatter at high masses (slope ~ -0...

  17. Correlation of the Rock Mass Rating (RMR) System with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS): Introduction of the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean N.; Kallu, Raj R.; Barnard, Chase K.

    2016-11-01

    Underground gold mines in Nevada are exploiting increasingly deeper ore bodies comprised of weak to very weak rock masses. The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification system is widely used at underground gold mines in Nevada and is applicable in fair to good-quality rock masses, but is difficult to apply and loses reliability in very weak rock mass to soil-like material. Because very weak rock masses are transition materials that border engineering rock mass and soil classification systems, soil classification may sometimes be easier and more appropriate to provide insight into material behavior and properties. The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) is the most likely choice for the classification of very weak rock mass to soil-like material because of its accepted use in tunnel engineering projects and its ability to predict soil-like material behavior underground. A correlation between the RMR and USCS systems was developed by comparing underground geotechnical RMR mapping to laboratory testing of bulk samples from the same locations, thereby assigning a numeric RMR value to the USCS classification that can be used in spreadsheet calculations and geostatistical analyses. The geotechnical classification system presented in this paper including a USCS-RMR correlation, RMR rating equations, and the Geo-Pick Strike Index is collectively introduced as the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR). It is the authors' hope that this system will aid in the classification of weak rock masses and more usable design tools based on the RMR system. More broadly, the RMR-USCS correlation and the W-RMR system help define the transition between engineering soil and rock mass classification systems and may provide insight for geotechnical design in very weak rock masses.

  18. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - IV. Mass and environmental quenching, conformity and clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Henriques, Bruno M B; Thomas, Peter A; Angulo, Raul E; Guo, Qi; Lemson, Gerard; Wang, Wenting

    2016-01-01

    We study the quenching of star formation as a function of redshift, environment and stellar mass in the galaxy formation simulations of Henriques et al. (2015), which implement an updated version of the Munich semi-analytic model (L-GALAXIES) on the two Millennium Simulations after scaling to a Planck cosmology. In this model massive galaxies are quenched by AGN feedback depending on both black hole and hot gas mass, and hence indirectly on stellar mass. In addition, satellite galaxies of any mass can be quenched by ram-pressure or tidal stripping of gas and through the suppression of gaseous infall. This combination of processes produces quenching efficiencies which depend on stellar mass, host halo mass, environment density, distance to group centre and group central galaxy properties in ways which agree qualitatively with observation. Some discrepancies remain in dense regions and close to group centres, where quenching still seems too efficient. In addition, although the mean stellar age of massive galaxi...

  19. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, David J R; Mitchell, Peter D; Helly, John C; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G; Lagos, Claudia del P; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a new high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the WMAP7 cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highligh...

  20. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Casado, Javier; Gavilán, Marta; Terlevich, Roberto; Terlevich, Elena; Hoyos, Carlos; Díaz, Ángeles I

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity -- the equivalent width of the \\Ha\\ line and the $(u-r)$ colour -- with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of $\\sim82500$ galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. `nature') is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. `nurture') are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such eve...

  1. Formation of Massive Primordial Stars: Intermittent UV Feedback with Episodic Mass Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Shingo; Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    We present coupled stellar evolution (SE) and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the evolution of primordial protostars, their immediate environment, and the dynamic accretion history under the influence of stellar ionizing and dissociating UV feedback. Our coupled SE RHD calculations result in a wide diversity of final stellar masses covering 10 {M}⊙ ≲ M * ≲ 103 {M}⊙ . The formation of very massive (≳250 {M}⊙ ) stars is possible under weak UV feedback, whereas ordinary massive (a few ×10 {M}⊙ ) stars form when UV feedback can efficiently halt the accretion. This may explain the peculiar abundance pattern of a Galactic metal-poor star recently reported by Aoki et al., possibly the observational signature of very massive precursor primordial stars. Weak UV feedback occurs in cases of variable accretion, in particular when repeated short accretion bursts temporarily exceed 0.01 {M}⊙ {{{yr}}}-1, causing the protostar to inflate. In the bloated state, the protostar has low surface temperature and UV feedback is suppressed until the star eventually contracts, on a thermal adjustment timescale, to create an H ii region. If the delay time between successive accretion bursts is sufficiently short, the protostar remains bloated for extended periods, initiating at most only short periods of UV feedback. Disk fragmentation does not necessarily reduce the final stellar mass. Quite the contrary, we find that disk fragmentation enhances episodic accretion as many fragments migrate inward and are accreted onto the star, thus allowing continued stellar mass growth under conditions of intermittent UV feedback. This trend becomes more prominent as we improve the resolution of our simulations. We argue that simulations with significantly higher resolution than reported previously are needed to derive accurate gas mass accretion rates onto primordial protostars.

  2. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Motte, Frédérique; Schneider, N; Schilke, P; Menten, K M

    2008-01-01

    As Pr. Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now "hot topics". We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class 0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  3. Theoretical Model of Non-Conservative Mass Transfer with Uniform Mass Accretion Rate in Contact Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharami, Prabir; Ghosh, Koushik; Rahaman, Farook

    2016-01-01

    In contact binaries mass transfer is usually non-conservative which ends into loss of mass as well as angular momentum in the system. In the present work we have presented a new mathematical model of the non-conservative mass transfer with a uniform mass accretion rate in a contact binary system with lower angular momentum. The model has been developed under the consideration of reverse mass transfer which may occur simultaneously with the original mass transfer as a result of the large scale circulations encircling the entire donor and a significant portion of the gainer. These circulations in contact binaries with lower angular momentum are caused by the overflow of the critical equipotential surface by both the components of the binary system making the governing system more intricate and uncertain.

  4. Towards an estimation of water masses formation areas from SMOS-based TS diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockmann, Marlene; Sabia, Roberto; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig; Font, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Temperature-Salinity (TS) diagrams emphasize the mutual variability of ocean temperature and salinity values, relating them to the corresponding density. Canonically used in oceanography, they provide a means to characterize and trace ocean water masses. In [1], a first attempt to estimate surface-layer TS diagrams based on satellite measurements has been performed, profiting from the recent availability of spaceborne salinity data. In fact, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [2]) and the Aquarius/SAC-D [3] satellite missions allow to study the dynamical patterns of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) for the first time on a global scale. In [4], given SMOS and Aquarius salinity estimates, and by also using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from the Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA, [5]) effort, experimental satellite-based TS diagrams have been routinely derived for the year 2011. They have been compared with those computed from ARGO-buoys interpolated fields, referring to a customised partition of the global ocean into seven regions, according to the water masses classification of [6]. In [7], moreover, besides using TS diagrams as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the temporal variation of SST and SSS (and their corresponding density) as estimated by satellite measurements, the emphasis was on the interpretation of the geographical deviations with respect to the ARGO baseline (aiming at distinguishing between the SSS retrieval errors and the additional information contained in the satellite data with respect to ARGO). In order to relate these mismatches to identifiable oceanographic structures and processes, additional satellite datasets of ocean currents, evaporation/precipitation fluxes, and wind speed have been super-imposed. Currently, the main focus of the study deals with the exploitation of these TS diagrams as a prognostic tool to derive water masses formation areas. Firstly, following the approach described in [8], the surface

  5. Terrestrial planet formation in a protoplanetary disk with a local mass depletion: A successful scenario for the formation of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C. [UNESP, Univ. Estadual Paulista - Grupo de Dinâmica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratinguetá, CEP 12.516-410, São Paulo (Brazil); Haghighipour, N. [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Tsuchida, M., E-mail: izidoro@feg.unesp.br, E-mail: nader@ifa.hawaii.edu [UNESP, Univ. Estadual Paulista, DCCE-IBILCE, São José do Rio Preto, CEP 15.054-000, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-02-10

    Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ∼ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system, or alternately, if the protoplanetary disk is truncated at 1.0 AU, simulations have been able to produce Mars-like bodies in the correct location. In this paper, we examine an alternative scenario for the formation of Mars in which a local depletion in the density of the protosolar nebula results in a non-uniform formation of planetary embryos and ultimately the formation of Mars-sized planets around 1.5 AU. We have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets in such a disk for different scales of the local density depletion, and for different orbital configurations of the giant planets. Our simulations point to the possibility of the formation of Mars-sized bodies around 1.5 AU, specifically when the scale of the disk local mass-depletion is moderately high (50%-75%) and Jupiter and Saturn are initially in their current orbits. In these systems, Mars-analogs are formed from the protoplanetary materials that originate in the regions of disk interior or exterior to the local mass-depletion. Results also indicate that Earth-sized planets can form around 1 AU with a substantial amount of water accreted via primitive water-rich planetesimals and planetary embryos. We present the results of our study and discuss their implications for the formation of terrestrial planets in our solar system.

  6. Basal metabolic rate scaled to body mass within species by the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marlene Botha

    2017-06-06

    Jun 6, 2017 ... basal metabolic rate (BMR) scaling exponent of c = 0.82, and white muscle is ..... Table 3 Metabolic rate exponents (bd) predicted from the product of visceral mass (d) and maximum ..... There are no conflicts of interest.

  7. The Galactic Starburst Region NGC 3603 : exciting new insights on the formation of high mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberger, D. E. A.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most fundamental, yet still unsolved problems in star formation research is addressed by the question "How do high mass stars form?". While most details related to the formation and early evolution of low mass stars are quite well understood today, the basic processes leading to the formation of high mass stars still remain a mystery. There is no doubt that low mass stars like our Sun form via accretion of gas and dust from their natal environment. With respect to the formation of high mass stars theorists currently discuss two possible scenarios controversely: First, similar to stars of lower masses, high mass stars form by continuous (time variable) accretion of large amounts of gas and dust through their circumstellar envelopes and/or disks. Second, high mass stars form by repeated collisions (coalescence) of protostars of lower masses. Both scenarios bear difficulties which impose strong constrains on the final mass of the young star. To find evidences for or against one of these two theoretical models is a challenging task for observers. First, sites of high mass star formation are much more distant than the nearby sites of low mass star formation. Second, high mass stars form and evolve much faster than low mass star. In particular, they contract to main sequence, hydrogen burning temperatures and densities on time scales which are much shorter than typical accretion time scales. Third, as a consequence of the previous point, young high mass stars are usually deeply embedded in their natal environment throughout their (short) pre-main sequence phase. Therefore, high mass protostars are rare, difficult to find and difficult to study. In my thesis I undertake a novel approach to search for and to characterize high mass protostars, by looking into a region where young high mass stars form in the violent neighbourhood of a cluster of early type main sequence stars. The presence of already evolved O type stars provides a wealth of energetic photons and

  8. A novel concept of measuring mass flow rates using flow induced stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P I Jagad; B P Puranik; A W Date

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of mass flow rate is important for automatic control of the mass flow rate in many industries such as semiconductor manufacturing and chemical industry (for supply of catalyst to a reaction). In the present work, a new concept for direct measurement of mass flow rates which does not depend on the volumetric flow rate measurement and obviates the need for the knowledge of density is proposed from the measurement of the flow induced stresses in a substrate. The concept is formulated by establishing the relationship between the mass flow rate and the stress in the substrate. To this end, the flow field and the stress field in the substrate are evaluated simultaneously using a numerical procedure and the necessary correlations are derived. A least squares based procedure is used to derive the mass flow rate from the correlations as a function of the stress in the substrate.

  9. Binary Formation in Planetesimal Disks II. Planetesimals with Mass Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kominami, Junko D

    2014-01-01

    Many massive objects have been found in the outer region of the Solar system. How they were formed and evolved has not been well understood, although there have been intensive studies on accretion process of terrestrial planets. One of the mysteries is the existence of binary planetesimals with near-equal mass components and highly eccentric orbits. These binary planetesimals are quite different from the satellites observed in the asteroid belt region. The ratio of the Hill radius to the physical radius of the planetesimals is much larger for the outer region of the disk, compared to the inner region of the disk. The Hill radius increases with the semi major axis. Therefore, planetesimals in the outer region can form close and eccentric binaries, while those in the inner region would simply collide. In this paper, we carried out $N$-body simulations in different regions of the disk and studied if binaries form in the outer region of the disk. We found that large planetesimals tend to form binaries. A signific...

  10. The role of metallicity in high mass X-ray binaries in galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Artale, M C; Tissera, P B

    2014-01-01

    Context: Recent theoretical works claim that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) could have been important sources of energy feedback into the interstellar and intergalactic media, playing a major role in the reionization epoch. A metallicity dependence of the production rate or luminosity of the sources is a key ingredient generally assumed but not yet probed. Aims: Our goal is to explore the relation between the X-ray luminosity (Lx) and star formation rate of galaxies as a possible tracer of a metallicity dependence of the production rates and/or X-ray luminosities of HMXBs. Methods: We developed a model to estimate the Lx of star forming galaxies based on stellar evolution models which include metallicity dependences. We applied our X-ray binary models to galaxies selected from hydrodynamical cosmological simulations which include chemical evolution of the stellar populations in a self-consistent way. Results: Our models successfully reproduce the dispersion in the observed relations as an outcome of the com...

  11. The total rate of mass return to the interstellar medium from red giants and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, G. R.; Rauch, K. P.; Wilcots, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    High luminosity post main sequence stars are observed to be losing mass in large amounts into the interstellar medium. The various methods used to estimate individual and total mass loss rates are summarized. Current estimates give MT 0.3 - 0.6 solar mass per year for the whole Galaxy.

  12. Absorption and desorption mass transfer rates in chemically enhanced reactive systems. Part II : Reverse kinetic rate parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2012-01-01

    The forward and reverse kinetic rate parameters have been determined for CO2 absorption and desorption mass transfer processes in aqueous 2.0 M MDEA solutions at temperatures of 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15 K and the loading of CO2 ranging from 0 to 0.8. The derived kinetic rate parameters have been b

  13. The quenched mass portion of star-forming galaxies and the origin of the star formation sequence slope

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Zhizheng; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Observationally, a massive disk galaxy can harbor a bulge component that is comparably inactive as a quiescent galaxy (QG). It has been speculated that the quenched component contained in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) is the reason why the star formation main sequence (MS) has a shallow slope at high masses. In this paper, we present a toy model to quantify the quenched mass portion of SFGs ($f_{\\rm Q}$) at fixed stellar mass ($M_{\\ast}$) and to reconcile the MS slopes both in the low and the high mass regimes. In this model, each SFG is composed by a star-forming plus a quenched component. The mass of the star-forming component ($M_{\\rm SF}$) correlates with the star formation rate (SFR) following a relation SFR $\\propto M_{\\rm SF}^{\\alpha_{\\rm SF}}$, where $\\alpha_{\\rm SF}\\sim 1.0$ . The quenched component contributes to the stellar mass but does not to the SFR. It is thus possible to quantify $f_{\\rm Q}$ based on the departure of the observed MS slope $\\alpha$ from $\\alpha_{\\rm SF}$. Adopting the redshift-d...

  14. A unified explanation for the supernova rate-galaxy mass dependency based on supernovae discovered in Sloan galaxy spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Using a method to discover and classify supernovae (SNe) in galaxy spectra, we detect 91 Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) and 16 Type II SNe (SNe II) among ~740,000 galaxies of all types and ~215,000 star-forming galaxies without active galactic nuclei, respectively, in Data Release 9 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Of these SNe, 22 SNe Ia and 8 SNe II are new discoveries reported here for the first time. We use our SN samples to measure SN rates per unit mass as a function of galaxy stellar mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR), as derived by the MPA-JHU Galspec pipeline. We confirm the rate-mass correlations, first discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, for both SNe Ia and SNe II at median redshifts of ~0.1 and ~0.075, respectively. The mass-normalized SN Ia and SN II rates, averaged over all masses and redshifts in their respective galaxy samples, are 0.10 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.01 (sys) X 10^-12 Msol^-1 yr^-1 and 0.52 +0.16 -0.13 (stat) +0.02 -0.05 (sys) X 10^-12 Msol^-1 yr^-1, respec...

  15. Stochastic Star Formation & Feedback: Mapping Low-Mass Galaxies to Dark Matter Haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Power, Chris; Robotham, Aaron S G; Lewis, Geraint F; Wilkinson, Mark I

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of observed satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (hereafter MW) with dark matter subhaloes in cosmological $N$-body simulations of MW-mass haloes suggest that such subhaloes, if they exist, are occupied by satellites in a stochastic fashion. We examine how inefficient massive star formation and associated supernova feedback in high-redshift progenitors of present-day low-mass subhaloes might contribute to this stochasticity. Using a Monte Carlo approach to follow the assembly histories of present-day low-mass haloes with $10^7 \\lesssim M \\leq 10^{10}$ ${\\rm M}_{\\odot}$, we identify when cooling and star formation is likely to proceed, and observe that haloes with present-day masses $\\lesssim 10^9 {\\rm M}_{\\odot}$ never grow sufficiently massive to support atomic hydrogen line cooling. Noting that the star formation timescale decreases sharply with stellar mass as $t_{\\rm PMS} \\propto m_{\\ast}^{-2.5}$, we argue that, should the conditions for high mass star formation arise in low-mass haloes, the ens...

  16. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  17. Sustaining star formation rates in spiral galaxies - Supernova-driven turbulent accretion disk models applied to THINGS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B

    2010-01-01

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps (Vollmer & Beckert 2003) contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in star formation regime is realized by replacing the fr...

  18. Halpha-Derived Star-Formation Rates For Three z ~ 0.75 EDisCS Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, R A; Poggianti, B M; Rudnick, G; Halliday, C; Milvang-Jensen, B; Pellò, R; Simard, L; Finn, Rose A.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jr., Donald W. McCarthy; Poggianti, Bianca; Rudnick, Gregory; Halliday, Claire; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Pello, Roser; Simard, Luc

    2005-01-01

    We present Halpha-derived star-formation rates (SFRs) for three z ~ 0.75 galaxy clusters. Our 1 sigma flux limit corresponds to a star-formation rate of 0.10-0.24 solar mass per year, and our minimum reliable Halpha + [N II] rest-frame equivalent width is 10\\AA. We show that Halpha narrowband imaging is an efficient method for measuring star formation in distant clusters. In two out of three clusters, we find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with projected distance from the cluster center. We also find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies decreases with increasing local galaxy surface density in the same two clusters. We compare the median rate of star formation among star-forming cluster galaxies to a small sample of star-forming field galaxies from the literature and find that the median cluster SFRs are \\~50% less than the median field SFR. We characterize cluster evolution in terms of the mass-normalized integrated cluster SFR and find that the z ~ 0.75 clusters have more SFR per...

  19. Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2002-07-21

    Demand response programs are often quickly and poorlycrafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisissubsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared whenthe next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate theevent-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demandresponsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such,demand response can be required as a condition of service, and theoffering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities asan element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore thecosts and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response systemcapable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operatorcontrolled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customercontrolled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Anydemand response program based on this system could consist of either orboth of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled,providing automatic load management through customer-programmed priceresponse, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability inCalifornia. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers toimplementation of such a program in California.

  20. Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2002-07-21

    Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

  1. Dust Formation in the Presence of Photons I: Evaporation Rates for Small Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2014-01-01

    The temperature of newly forming dust is controlled by the radiation field. As dust forms around stars, stellar transients, quasars or supernovae, the grains must grow through a regime where they are stochastically heated by individual photons. Since evaporation rates increase exponentially with temperature while cooling times decrease only as a power law, the evaporation rates for these small grains are dominated by the temperature spikes. We calculate effective evaporation temperatures for a broad range of input spectra that are encapsulated in a series of simple interpolation formulae for both graphitic and silicate grains. These can be easily used to first determine if dust formation is possible and then to estimate the radius or time at which it commences for a broad range of radiation environments. With these additional physical effects, very small grains may form earlier than in standard models of AGB winds. Even for very high mass loss rates, the hottest stars that can form dust are G and F stars part...

  2. Constraining the Low-Mass Slope of the Star Formation Sequence at 0.5≤z≤2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Henry, Alaina L.; Skelton, Rosalind; Fumagalli, Mattia; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Labbe, Ivo; Nelson, Erica; Rigby, Jane R.; 3D-HST Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of data from deep extragalactic surveys have revealed a picture where star-forming galaxies follow a tight relation between star formation rate and stellar mass. This observed star formation sequence encapsulates information about feedback, gas density and gas accretion rates over cosmic time. I will present a self-consistent empirical study measuring the slope of this relation for a complete sample of galaxies selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs at 0.5≤z≤2.5, using deep photometry in the CANDELS fields. Probing a factor of ten lower in stellar mass than previous high-redshift studies, we show that the slope of the star formation rate - stellar mass relation is mass-dependent; we measure a steep slope of order unity out to z=2.5 for low mass galaxies, and a slope that becomes increasingly flatter with time at the highest masses. These observations of the star formation sequence help reconcile existing tensions with theoretical galaxy formation models.

  3. HST measures of Mass Accretion Rates in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Manara, C F; Da Rio, N; Lodato, G; Hillenbrand, L A; Stassun, K G; Soderblom, D R

    2012-01-01

    The present observational understanding of the evolution of the mass accretion rates (Macc) in pre-main sequence stars is limited by the lack of accurate measurements of Macc over homogeneous and large statistical samples of young stars. Such observational effort is needed to properly constrain the theory of star formation and disk evolution. Based on HST/WFPC2 observations, we present a study of Macc for a sample of \\sim 700 sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster, ranging from the Hydrogen-burning limit to M\\ast \\sim 2M\\odot. We derive Macc from both the U-band excess and the H{\\alpha} luminosity (LH{\\alpha}), after determining empirically both the shape of the typical accretion spectrum across the Balmer jump and the relation between the accretion luminosity (Lacc) and LH{\\alpha}, that is Lacc/L\\odot = (1.31\\pm0.03)\\cdotLH{\\alpha}/L\\odot + (2.63\\pm 0.13). Given our large statistical sample, we are able to accurately investigate relations between Macc and the parameters of the central star such as mass and age....

  4. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  5. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  6. Shell model based reaction rates for rp-process nuclei in the mass range A=44-63

    CERN Document Server

    Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Wiescher, M C

    2001-01-01

    We have used large-scale shell-model diagonalization calculations to determine the level spectra, proton spectroscopic factors, and electromagnetic transition probabilities for proton rich nuclei in the mass range A=44-63. Based on these results and the available experimental data, we calculated the resonances for proton capture reactions on neutron deficient nuclei in this mass range. We also calculated the direct capture processes on these nuclei in the framework of a Woods-Saxon potential model. Taking into account both resonant and direct contributions, we determined the ground-state proton capture reaction rates for these nuclei under hot hydrogen burning conditions for temperatures between 10 sup 8 and 10 sup 1 sup 0 K. The calculated compound-nucleus level properties and the reaction rates are presented here; the rates are also available in computer-readable format from the authors.

  7. Stability of mass transfer from massive giants: double black-hole binary formation and ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovskii, K; Belczynski, K; Van, K X

    2016-01-01

    The mass transfer in binaries with massive donors and compact companions, when the donors rapidly evolve after their main sequence, is one of the dominant formation channels of merging double stellar-mass black hole binaries. This mass transfer was previously postulated to be unstable and was expected to lead to a common envelope event. The common envelope event then would end with either double black hole formation, or with the merger of the two stars. We re-visit the stability of this mass transfer, and find that for a large range of the binary orbital separations this mass transfer is stable. This newly found stability allows us to reconcile the theoretical rate for double black hole binary mergers predicted by population synthesis studies, and the empirical rate obtained by LIGO. Futhermore, the stability of the mass transfer leads to the formation of ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The theoretically predicted formation rates of ultra-luminous X-ray sources powered by a stellar-mass BH, as well as the range...

  8. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  9. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkic, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Cardiff, Ann H.; Durell, Pat R.

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 m photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 m photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-red), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-blue) have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M yr1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  10. Evolutionary implications of the new triple-alpha nuclear reaction rate for low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dotter, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Context: Ogata et al. (2009; hereafter OKK) presented a theoretical determination of the triple-alpha nuclear reaction rate. Their rate differs from the NACRE rate by many orders of magnitude at temperatures relevant for low mass stars. Aims: We explore the evolutionary implications of adopting the OKK triple-alpha reaction rate in low mass stars and compare the results with those obtained using the NACRE rate. Methods: The triple-alpha reaction rates are compared by following the evolution of stellar models at 1 and 1.5 Msol with Z=0.0002 and Z=0.02. Results: Results show that the OKK rate has severe consequences for the late stages of stellar evolution in low mass stars. Most notable is the shortening--or disappearance--of the red giant phase. Conclusions: The OKK triple-alpha reaction rate is incompatible with observations of extended red giant branches and He burning stars in old stellar systems.

  11. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  12. Slow Evolution of the Specific Star Formation Rate at z>2: The Impact of Dust, Emission Lines, and A Rising Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Valentino; llingworth, Garth; Labbe, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Magee, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR / Mstar) between redshift 4 and 6 to investigate the previous reports of "constant" sSFR at z>2. We obtain photometry on a large sample of galaxies at z~4-6 located in the HUDF and the ERS fields that have high quality imaging from HST and Spitzer. We have derived stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) through stellar population modeling of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We estimate the dust extinction from the observed UV colors. In the SED fitting process we have studied the effects of assuming a star formation history (SFH) both with constant SFR and one where the SFR rises exponentially with time. The latter SFH is chosen to match the observed evolution of the UV luminosity function. We find that neither the mean SFRs nor the mean stellar masses change significantly when the rising SFR (RSF) model is assumed instead of the constant SFR model. When focusing on galaxies with Mstar ~ 5x10^9 Msun, we find that the sS...

  13. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF MAJOR MERGER PAIRS AT z = 0: DUST MASS AND STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Chen [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University, Weihai, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Xu, Cong Kevin; Lu, Nanyao; Mazzarella, Joe [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Domingue, Donovan; Ronca, Joseph; Jacques, Allison [Georgia College and State University, CBX 82, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); Buat, Veronique [Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille—LAM, Université d’Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Cheng, Yi-Wen [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Gao, Yu [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Huang, Jiasheng [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jarrett, Thomas H. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Lisenfeld, Ute [Departamento de Fisica Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada (Spain); Sun, Wei-Hsin [Institute of Astrophysics, National Taiwan University and The National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hong [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yun, Min S., E-mail: caochen@sdu.edu.cn, E-mail: cxu@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We present Herschel PACS and SPIRE far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter imaging observations for a large K-band selected sample of 88 close major-merger pairs of galaxies (H-KPAIRs) in 6 photometric bands (70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm). Among 132 spiral galaxies in the 44 spiral–spiral (S+S) pairs and 44 spiral–elliptical (S+E) pairs, 113 are detected in at least 1 Herschel band. The star formation rate (SFR) and dust mass (M{sub dust}) are derived from the IR SED fitting. The mass of total gas (M{sub gas}) is estimated by assuming a constant dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.01. Star-forming spiral galaxies (SFGs) in S+S pairs show significant enhancements in both specific star formation rate (sSFR) and star formation efficiency (SFE), while having nearly the same gas mass compared to control galaxies. On the other hand, for SFGs in S+E pairs, there is no significant sSFR enhancement and the mean SFE enhancement is significantly lower than that of SFGs in S+S pairs. This suggests an important role for the disk–disk collision in the interaction-induced star formation. The M{sub gas} of SFGs in S+E pairs is marginally lower than that of their counterparts in both S+S pairs and the control sample. Paired galaxies with and without interaction signs do not differ significantly in their mean sSFR and SFE. As found in previous works, this much larger sample confirms that the primary and secondary spirals in S+S pairs follow a Holmberg effect correlation on sSFR.

  14. A grid of one-dimensional low-mass star formation collapse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaytet, N.; Haugbølle, T.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Numerical simulations of star formation are becoming ever more sophisticated, incorporating new physical processes in increasingly realistic set-ups. These models are being compared to the latest observations through state-of-the-art synthetic renderings that trace the different chemical species present in the protostellar systems. The chemical evolution of the interstellar and protostellar matter is very topical, with more and more chemical databases and reaction solvers available online to the community. Aims: The current study was developed to provide a database of relatively simple numerical simulations of protostellar collapse as a template library for observations of cores and very young protostars, and for researchers who wish to test their chemical modelling under dynamic astrophysical conditions. It was also designed to identify statistical trends that may appear when running many models of the formation of low-mass stars by varying the initial conditions. Methods: A large set of 143 calculations of the gravitational collapse of an isolated sphere of gas with uniform temperature and a Bonnor-Ebert-like density profile was undertaken using a 1D fully implicit Lagrangian radiation hydrodynamics code. The parameter space covered initial masses from 0.2 to 8 M⊙, temperatures of 5-30 K, and radii 3000 ≤ R0 ≤ 30 000 AU. Results: A spread due to differing initial conditions and optical depths, was found in the thermal evolutionary tracks of the runs. Within less than an order of magnitude, all first and second Larson cores had masses and radii essentially independent of the initial conditions. Radial profiles of the gas density, velocity, and temperature were found to vary much more outside of the first core than inside. The time elapsed between the formation of the first and second cores was found to strongly depend on the first core mass accretion rate, and no first core in our grid of models lived for longer than 2000 years before the onset of

  15. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between the approximately ten solar mass 'stellar mass' black holes and the 'supermassive' black holes of millions to billions of solar masses are the elusive 'intermediate-mass' black holes. Their discovery is key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth soon after the Big Bang. Currently, tentative evidence suggests that the progenitors of supermassive black holes were formed as ∼10(4)-10(5) M(⊙) black holes via the direct collapse of gas. Ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes at galaxy centres will help shed light on this formation mechanism.

  16. The galactocentric radius dependent upper mass limit of young star clusters: stochastic star formation ruled out

    CERN Document Server

    Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the distribution function of the masses of young star clusters is universal and can be purely interpreted as a probability density distribution function with a constant upper mass limit. As a result of this picture the masses of the most-massive objects are exclusively determined by the size of the sample. Here we show, with very high confidence, that the masses of the most-massive young star clusters in M33 decrease with increasing galactocentric radius in contradiction to the expectations from a model of a randomly sampled constant cluster mass function with a constant upper mass limit. Pure stochastic star formation is thereby ruled out. We use this example to elucidate how naive analysis of data can lead to unphysical conclusions.

  17. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Gavilán, M.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Hoyos, C.; Díaz, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity - the equivalent width of the Hα line and the (u - r) colour - with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of ˜82 500 galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. nature) is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. nurture) are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such events show little statistical significance in a probabilistic sense, and we find no evidence that galaxy interactions are, on average, a dominant driver of star formation. Although visually classified mergers tend to display systematically higher EW(Hα) and bluer (u - r) colours for a given luminosity, most galaxies with high SSFR have uncertain morphologies, which could be due to either internal or external processes. Field galaxies of early and late morphological types are consistent with the gradual `ageing' scenario, with no obvious signatures of a sudden decrease in their SSFR. In contrast, star formation is significantly reduced and sometimes completely quenched on a short time-scale in dense environments, where many objects are found on a `quenched sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane.

  18. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Daniel; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; West, Andrew A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /MIT, MKI; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2009-08-03

    We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

  19. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama Meguroku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  20. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  1. An Open Data Format for Visualization and Analysis of Cross-Linked Mass Spectrometry Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopmann, Michael R; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W; Shteynberg, David; Moritz, Robert L

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important element in the understanding of protein function, and chemical cross-linking shotgun mass spectrometry is rapidly becoming a routine approach to identify these specific interfaces and topographical interactions. Protein cross-link data analysis is aided by dozens of algorithm choices, but hindered by a lack of a common format for representing results. Consequently, interoperability between algorithms and pipelines utilizing chemical cross-linking remains a challenge. pepXML is an open, widely-used format for representing spectral search algorithm results that has facilitated information exchange and pipeline development for typical shotgun mass spectrometry analyses. We describe an extension of this format to incorporate cross-linking spectral search results. We demonstrate application of the extension by representing results of multiple cross-linking search algorithms. In addition, we demonstrate adapting existing pepXML-supporting software pipelines to analyze protein cross-linking results formatted in pepXML. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Mergers and Mass Accretion Rates in Galaxy Assembly: The Millennium Simulation Compared to Observations of z~2 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Genel, S; Bouché, N; Sternberg, A; Naab, T; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Shapiro, K L; Tacconi, L J; Lutz, D; Cresci, G; Buschkamp, P; Davies, R I; Hicks, E K S

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations of UV-/optically selected, massive star forming galaxies at z~2 indicate that the baryonic mass assembly and star formation history is dominated by continuous rapid accretion of gas and internal secular evolution, rather than by major mergers. We use the Millennium Simulation to build new halo merger trees, and extract halo merger fractions and mass accretion rates. We find that even for halos not undergoing major mergers the mass accretion rates are plausibly sufficient to account for the high star formation rates observed in z~2 disks. On the other hand, the fraction of major mergers in the Millennium Simulation is sufficient to account for the number counts of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), in support of observational evidence that these are major mergers. When following the fate of these two populations in the Millennium Simulation to z=0, we find that subsequent mergers are not frequent enough to convert all z~2 turbulent disks into elliptical galaxies at z=0. Similarly, mergers canno...

  3. High-Mass Star Formation in the Near and Far 3-KPC Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Green, J A; Caswell, J L; Ellingsen, S P; Fuller, G A; Quinn, L; Voronkov, M A; 10.1088/0004-637X/696/2/L156

    2009-01-01

    We report on the presence of 6.7-GHz methanol masers, known tracers of high-mass star formation, in the 3-kpc arms of the inner Galaxy. We present 49 detections from the Methanol Multibeam Survey, the largest Galactic plane survey for 6.7-GHz methanol masers, which coincide in longitude, latitude and velocity with the recently discovered far-side 3-kpc arm and the well known near-side 3-kpc arm. The presence of these masers is significant evidence for high-mass star formation actively occurring in both 3-kpc arms.

  4. Calibrating the Star Formation Rate at z=1 from Optical Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mostek, Nick; Moustakas, John; Salim, Samir; Weiner, Benjamin J

    2011-01-01

    We present a star-formation rate calibration based on optical data that is consistent with average observed rates in both the red and blue galaxy populations at z~1. The motivation for this study is to calculate SFRs for DEEP2 Redshift Survey galaxies in the 0.7mass. We the...

  5. The impact of angular momentum on black hole accretion rates in simulations of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rosas-Guevara, Y M; Schaye, J; Furlong, M; Frenk, C S; Booth, C M; Crain, R; Vecchia, C Dalla; Schaller, M; Theuns, T

    2013-01-01

    Feedback from energy liberated by gas accretion onto black holes (BHs) is an attractive mechanism to explain the exponential cut-off at the massive end of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF). Semi-analytic models of galaxy formation in which this form of feedback is assumed to suppress cooling in haloes where the gas cooling time is large compared to the dynamical time do indeed achieve a good match to the observed SMF. Furthermore, hydrodynamic simulations of individual halos in which gas is assumed to accrete onto the central BH at the Bondi rate have shown that a self-regulating regime is established in which the BH grows just enough to liberate an amount of energy comparable to the thermal energy of the halo. However, this process is efficient at suppressing the growth not only of massive galaxies but also of galaxies like the Milky Way, leading to disagreement with the observed SMF. The Bondi accretion rate, however, is inappropriate when the accreting material has angular momentum. We present an impr...

  6. Formation and evolution of molecular hydrogen in disk galaxies with different masses and Hubble types

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the physical properties of molecular hydrogen (H2) in isolated and interacting disk galaxies with different masses and Hubble types by using chemodynamical simulations with H2 formation on dust grains and dust growth and destruction in interstellar medium (ISM). We particularly focus on the dependences of H2 gas mass fractions (f_H2), spatial distributions of HI and H2, and local H2-scaling relations on initial halo masses (M_h), baryonic fractions (f_bary), gas mass fractions (f_g), and Hubble types. The principal results are as follows. The final f_H2 can be larger in disk galaxies with higher M_h, f_bary, and f_g. Some low-mass disk models with M_h smaller than 10^10 M_sun show extremely low f_H2 and thus no/little star formation, even if initial f_g is quite large (>0.9). Big galactic bulges can severely suppress the formation of H2 from HI on dust grains whereas strong stellar bars can not only enhance f_H2 but also be responsible for the formation of H2-dominated central rings. The projec...

  7. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, Ingo; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel; Marks, Michael [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (HISKP), Universität Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-02-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation.

  8. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - IV. Mass and environmental quenching, conformity and clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bruno M. B.; White, Simon D. M.; Thomas, Peter A.; Angulo, Raul E.; Guo, Qi; Lemson, Gerard; Wang, Wenting

    2017-08-01

    We study the quenching of star formation as a function of redshift, environment and stellar mass in the galaxy formation simulations of Henriques et al. (2015), which implement an updated version of the Munich semi-analytic model (L-GALAXIES) on the two Millennium Simulations after scaling to a Planck cosmology. In this model, massive galaxies are quenched by active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback depending on both black hole and hot gas mass, and hence indirectly on stellar mass. In addition, satellite galaxies of any mass can be quenched by ram-pressure or tidal stripping of gas and through the suppression of gaseous infall. This combination of processes produces quenching efficiencies which depend on stellar mass, host halo mass, environment density, distance to group centre and group central galaxy properties in ways which agree qualitatively with observation. Some discrepancies remain in dense regions and close to group centres, where quenching still seems too efficient. In addition, although the mean stellar age of massive galaxies agrees with observation, the assumed AGN feedback model allows too much ongoing star formation at late times. The fact that both AGN feedback and environmental effects are stronger in higher density environments leads to a correlation between the quenching of central and satellite galaxies which roughly reproduces observed conformity trends inside haloes.

  9. FMOS near-IR spectroscopy of Herschel selected galaxies: star formation rates, metallicity and dust attenuation at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Roseboom, I G; Sumiyoshi, M; Wang, L; Dalton, G; Akiyama, M; Bock, J; Bonfield, D; Buat, V; Casey, C; Chapin, E; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Curtis-Lake, E; Cooray, A; Dunlop, J S; Farrah, D; Ham, S J; Ibar, E; Iwamuro, F; Kimura, M; Lewis, I; Macaulay, E; Magdis, G; Maihara, T; Marsden, G; Mauch, T; Moritani, Y; Ohta, K; Oliver, S J; Page, M J; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, M; Takato, N; Tamura, N; Totani, T; Yabe, K; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties (e.g. star formation rate, dust attentuation, stellar mass and metallicity) of a sample of infrared luminous galaxies at z \\sim 1 via near-IR spectroscopy with Subaru-FMOS. Our sample consists of Herschel SPIRE and Spitzer MIPS selected sources in the COSMOS field with photometric redshifts in the range 0.7 = 0.51\\pm0.27 for = 10^12 Lsol sources at = 1.36. By comparing star formation rates estimated from the IR and from the dust uncorrected H{\\alpha} line we find a strong relationship between dust attenuation and star formation rate. This relation is broadly consistent with that previously seen in star-forming galaxies at z ~ 0.1. Finally, we investigate the metallicity via the N2 ratio, finding that z ~ 1 IR-selected sources are indistinguishable from the local mass-metallicity relation. We also find a strong correlation between dust attentuation and metallicity, with the most metal-rich IR-sources experiencing the largest levels of dust attenuation.

  10. Effect of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate on the formation rate of CO2 hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Chen; Yong Yu; Peng Zeng; Wei Yang; Qianqing Liang; Xiaoming Peng; Yansheng Liu; Yufeng Hu

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the addition of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate([C4mim][BF4])on the formation rates of CO2 hydrates was investigate.The isothermal and isobaric methods were used to measure the formation rates of CO2 hydrates.As compared to those of pure water,the data of phase equilibrium changed greatly.The effects of pressure,temperature,and the concentration of [C4mim][BF4] aqueous solution on the formation rates of CO2 hydrates were investigated.With a constant concentration of[C4mim][BF4],the rate of gas consumption was enhanced with the lowering of experimental temperature.However,a decrease in pressure exerted an opposite effect on the rate of gas consumption.Moreover,the addition of[C4mim][BF4]raised the equilibrium pressure of hydrate formation at the same temperature.

  11. What Is Its Purpose?——"Advancing RMB Exchange Rate Formation Mechanism"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yujie; You Zhixin; Wang Tao

    2010-01-01

    Spokesperson from People's Bank of China said on June 19th, "further advance the reform in RMB exchange rate formation mechanism, and strengthen the flex-ibility of RMB exchange rate." This is the first time for China central bank give a clear attitude on reform in RMB exchange rate, which attracts great attention for global market. Does strengthening the flexibility of RMB exchange rate mean that RMB will appreciate again? Why the central bank announces the news at this moment? How to choose the time for the reform in RMB exchange rate formation mechanism?

  12. Rate of three-body recombination of hydrogen molecules during primordial star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Forrey, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical models of primordial star formation require rate constants for three-body recombination as input. The current status of these rates for H2 due to collisions with H is far from satisfactory, with published rate constants showing orders of magnitude disagreement at the temperatures relevant for H2 formation in primordial gas. This letter presents an independent calculation of this recombination rate constant as a function of temperature. An analytic expression is provided for the rate constant which should be more reliable than ones currently being used in astrophysical models.

  13. The dynamical masses, densities, and star formation scaling relations of Lyα galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, Emily M. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fynbo, Johan P. U. [DARK Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Tilvi, Vithal S., E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyα galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, for nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. We use these measurements to study Lyα galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We also fit stellar population models to our sample and use them to place the Lyα sample on a stellar mass versus line width relation. The Lyα galaxies generally follow the same scaling relation as star-forming galaxies at lower redshift, although, lower stellar mass fits are also acceptable in ∼1/3 of the Lyα galaxies. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyα galaxies have unusually active star formation for their gas mass surface density. This behavior is consistent with what is observed in starburst galaxies, despite the typically smaller masses and sizes of the Lyα galaxy population. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ('wet') merging. In short, we find that Lyα galaxies are low-mass cousins of larger starbursts.

  14. Effect of common cryoprotectants on critical warming rates and ice formation in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jesse B; Badeau, Ryan; Warkentin, Matthew; Thorne, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    Ice formation on warming is of comparable or greater importance to ice formation on cooling in determining survival of cryopreserved samples. Critical warming rates required for ice-free warming of vitrified aqueous solutions of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 200 and sucrose have been measured for warming rates of order 10-10⁴ K/s. Critical warming rates are typically one to three orders of magnitude larger than critical cooling rates. Warming rates vary strongly with cooling rates, perhaps due to the presence of small ice fractions in nominally vitrified samples. Critical warming and cooling rate data spanning orders of magnitude in rates provide rigorous tests of ice nucleation and growth models and their assumed input parameters. Current models with current best estimates for input parameters provide a reasonable account of critical warming rates for glycerol solutions at high concentrations/low rates, but overestimate both critical warming and cooling rates by orders of magnitude at lower concentrations and larger rates. In vitrification protocols, minimizing concentrations of potentially damaging cryoprotectants while minimizing ice formation will require ultrafast warming rates, as well as fast cooling rates to minimize the required warming rates.

  15. HIghMass -- High HI Mass, HI-rich Galaxies at z~0: Sample Definition, Optical and Halpha Imaging, and Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shan; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael G; Adams, Elizabeth A; Brinchmann, Jarle; Chengalur, Jayaram N; Hunt, Leslie K; Masters, Karen L; Matsushita, Satoki; Saintonge, Amelie; Spekkens, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    We present first results of the study of a set of exceptional HI sources identified in the 40% ALFALFA extragalactic HI survey catalog alpha.40 as being both HI massive (M_HI > 10^10 Msun) and having high gas fractions for their stellar masses: the HIghMass galaxy sample. We analyze UV- and optical-broadband and Halpha images to understand the nature of their relatively underluminous disks in optical and to test whether their high gas fractions can be tracked to higher dark matter halo spin parameters or late gas accretion. Estimates of their star formation rates (SFRs) based on SED-fitting agree within uncertainties with the Halpha luminosity inferred SFRs. The HII region luminosity functions have standard slopes at the luminous end. The global SFRs demonstrate that the HIghMass galaxies exhibit active ongoing star formation (SF) with moderate SF efficiency, but relative to normal spirals, a lower integrated SFR in the past. Because the SF activity in these systems is spread throughout their extended disks, ...

  16. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run.

  17. Formation and Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies. III Star formation history as a function of mass and over-density

    CERN Document Server

    Merlin, Emiliano; Piovan, Lorenzo; Grassi, Tommaso; Buonomo, Umberto; La Barbera, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the initial proto-galaxies over-densities and masses on their evolution, to understand whether the internal properties of the proto-galactic haloes are sufficient to account for the varied properties of the galactic populations. By means of fully hydrodynamical N-body simulations performed with the code EvoL we produce twelve self-similar models of early-type galaxies of different initial masses and over-densities, following their evolution from z \\geq 20 down to z \\leq 1. The simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, stellar energy feedback, a reionizing photoheating background, and chemical enrichment of the ISM. We find a strong correlation between the initial properties of the proto-haloes and their star formation histories. Massive (10^13M\\odot) haloes experience a single, intense burst of star formation (with rates \\geq 10^3M\\odot/yr) at early epochs, consistently with observations, with a less pronounced dependence on the initial over-density; intermediate m...

  18. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  19. Mass spectrometry evidence for formation of estrogen-homocysteine conjugates: estrogens can regulate homocysteine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2013-12-01

    Homocysteine (HCys), a sulfur-containing amino acid, is formed during the metabolism of methionine. An imbalance between the rate of production and the use of HCys during methionine metabolism can result in an increase in the plasma and urinary levels of HCys. HCys has been shown to be toxic to vascular endothelial cells through several pathways. Many earlier clinical studies have revealed an association between plasma HCys and cardiovascular and other diseases. In contrast, estrogens are suggested to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. Several studies indicate that estrogen metabolites could be responsible for cardiovascular protection. It has been demonstrated that electrophilic estrogen quinones, E1(E2)-2,3-Q and E1(E2)-3,4-Q, can alkylate DNA as well as form conjugates with glutathione. I hypothesize that estrogen quinones generated in situ by oxidative enzymes, metal ions, or molecular oxygen can interact with HCys to form conjugates. This in turn could lower the levels of toxic HCys as well as quenching the reactive estrogen quinones, resulting in cardiovascular protective effects. To test the feasibility of a protective estrogen-HCys pathway, estrogen quinones were treated with HCys. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the assay mixture shows the formation of estrogen-HCys conjugates. Furthermore, incubation of catechol estrogens with myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of HCys resulted in the formation of respective estrogen-HCys conjugates. The identities of estrogen-HCys conjugates in MPO assay extracts were confirmed by comparing them to pure synthesized estrogen-HCys standards. I propose that through conjugation estrogens could chemically regulate HCys levels; moreover these conjugates could be used as potential biomarkers in determining health.

  20. On Star Formation Rates and Star Formation Histories of Galaxies out to z ~ 3

    CERN Document Server

    Wuyts, Stijn; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Bongiovanni, Angel; Cepa, Jordi; Cimatti, Andrea; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Genzel, Reinhard; Koekemoer, Anton M; Magnelli, Benjamin; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Garcia, Ana Perez; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Popesso, Paola; Pozzi, Francesca; Sanchez-Portal, Miguel; Sturm, Eckhard; Tacconi, Linda; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We compare multi-wavelength SFR indicators out to z~3 in GOODS-South. Our analysis uniquely combines U-to-8um photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24um and PACS 70, 100, and 160um photometry from the PEP survey, and Ha spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24um to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of LIR that are in the median consistent with the LIR derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low to intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR_IR/SFR_UV ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR_UV+IR \\gtrsim 100 Msun/yr) and redshifts (z \\gtrsim 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that Ha-based SFRs at 1.5

  1. Effect of growth rate and body mass on resting metabolic rate in galliform chicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, MW; Drent, RH

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we asked whether within-species variation in chick resting metabolic rate was related to variation in growth and whether this relationship changed during development in three galliform species (turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, guinea fowl, Numida meleagris, and Japanese quail, Coturnix co

  2. Light-controlled mass formation of aggregates of molecules in organic compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tariel D.Ebralidze; Nadia A.Ebralidze; Giorgi A.Mumladze; Enriko S.Kitsmarishvili

    2009-01-01

    During the mass formation of aggregates of molecules in a gelatin film dyed with the mixture of chrysophenine and acridine yellow dyes,photo-reorientation,photo-disorientation,and photo-orientation of the molecules are observed.Based on these observations,the photo-induction of granular aniso tropy may be realized.

  3. Gold finger formation studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry and in silico methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laskay, Ü.A.; Garino, C.; Tsybin, Y.O.; Salassa, L.; Casini, A.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies were employed for characterizing the formation of two gold finger (GF) domains from the reaction of zinc fingers (ZF) with gold complexes. The influence of both the gold oxidation state and the ZF coordination sphere

  4. Formation and spreading of Arabian Sea high-salinity water mass

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Prasad, T.G.

    The formation and seasonal spreading of the Arabian Sea High-Salinity Water (ASHSW) mass were studied based on the monthly mean climatology of temperature and salinity in the Arabian Sea, north of the equator and west of 80 degrees E, on a 2 degrees...

  5. Gold finger formation studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry and in silico methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laskay, Ü.A.; Garino, C.; Tsybin, Y.O.; Salassa, L.; Casini, A.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies were employed for characterizing the formation of two gold finger (GF) domains from the reaction of zinc fingers (ZF) with gold complexes. The influence of both the gold oxidation state and the ZF coordination sphere

  6. The evolution of the star formation rate function and cosmic star formation rate density of galaxies at $z \\sim 1-4$

    CERN Document Server

    Katsianis, Antonios; Blanc, Guillermo; Sargent, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy Star Formation Rate Function (SFRF) and Cosmic Star Formation Rate Density (CSFRD) of $z\\sim 1-4 $ galaxies, using cosmological Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations and a compilation of UV, IR and H$\\alpha$ observations. These tracers represent different populations of galaxies with the IR light being a probe of objects with high star formation rates and dust contents, while UV and H$\\alpha$ observations provide a census of low star formation galaxies where mild obscuration occurs. We compare the above SFRFs with the results of SPH simulations run with the code {\\small{P-GADGET3(XXL)}}. We focus on the role of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and supernovae in form of galactic winds. The AGN feedback prescription that we use decreases the simulated CSFRD at $z < 3$ but is not sufficient to reproduce the observed evolution at higher redshifts. We explore different wind models and find that the key factor for reproducing the evolution of the ob...

  7. Muon cycling rate in D/T mixture including doubly muonic molecule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Eskandari

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available   In the present work, the fundamental behavior of four body molecule formations of pt μμ , pd μμ , dt μμ , tt μμ , and pp μμ in a D/T fusion are considered. Their higher fusion rate, specially the available data for dt μμ , encouraged us to study the muon cycling rate in D/T fusion in the temperature range of (100-1400 K, density and deuterium-tritium concentration ratio. For this purpose, various values for the doubly muonic molecule formation are chosen and with the comparison to the experimental results, the doubly muonic formation rate of 109 s-1 is predicted theoretically. Our calculated cycling rate has shown that having not considered the doubly muonic formation in previous calculations had made no serious changes in the previously calculated values.

  8. The Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate Relation in WSRT SINGS Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (ΣSFR) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We

  9. The Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate Relation in WSRT SINGS Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (ΣSFR) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We

  10. Single Colour Diagnostics of the Mass-to-light Ratio: Predictions from Galaxy Formation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, Stephen M; Baugh, Carlton M; Lacey, Cedric G; Zuntz, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Accurate galaxy stellar masses are crucial to better understand the physical mechanisms driving the galaxy formation process. We use synthetic star formation and metal enrichment histories predicted by the {\\sc galform} galaxy formation model to investigate the precision with which various colours $(m_{a}-m_{b})$ can alone be used as diagnostics of the stellar mass-to-light ratio. As an example, we find that, at $z=0$, the {\\em intrinsic} (B$_{f435w}-$V$_{f606w}$) colour can be used to determine the intrinsic rest-frame $V$-band stellar mass-to-light ratio ($\\log_{10}\\Gamma_{V}=\\log_{10}[(M/M_{\\odot})/(L_{V}/L_{V\\odot})]$) with a precision of $\\sigma_{lg\\Gamma}\\simeq 0.06$ when the initial mass function and redshift are known beforehand. While the presence of dust, assuming a universal attenuation curve, can have a systematic effect on the inferred mass-to-light ratio using a single-colour relation, this is typically small as it is often possible to choose a colour for which the dust reddening vector is appro...

  11. The Quenched Mass Portion of Star-forming Galaxies and the Origin of the Star Formation Sequence Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhizheng; Zheng, Xianzhong; Kong, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Observationally, a massive disk galaxy can harbor a bulge component that is comparably inactive as a quiescent galaxy. It has been speculated that the quenched component contained in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) is the reason why the star formation main sequence (MS) has a shallow slope at high masses. In this paper, we present a toy model to quantify the quenched mass portion of SFGs (fQ) at fixed stellar mass (M*) and to reconcile the MS slopes in both the low- and the high-mass regimes. In this model, each SFG is composed of a star-forming plus a quenched component. The mass of the star-forming component (MSF) correlates with the star formation rate (SFR) following a relation SFR \\propto {M}{SF}{α {SF}}, where αSF ∼ 1.0. The quenched component contributes to the stellar mass but not to the SFR. It is thus possible to quantify fQ based on the departure of the observed MS slope α from αSF. Adopting the redshift-dependent MS slope reported by Whitaker et al., we explore the evolution of the {f}{{Q}}{--}{M}* relations over z = [0.5, 2.5]. We find that Milky Way-like SFGs (with {M}* ≈ {10}10.7 {M}ȯ ) typically have an fQ = 30%–40% at z ∼ 2.25, whereas this value rapidly rises up to 70%–80% at z ∼ 0.75. The origin of an α ∼ 1.0 MS slope seen in the low-mass regime is also discussed. We argue for a scenario in which the majority of low-mass SFGs stay in a “steady-stage” star formation phase. In this phase, the SFR is mainly regulated by stellar feedback and not significantly influenced by the quenching mechanisms, thus remaining roughly constant over cosmic time. This scenario successfully produces an α ∼ 1.0 MS slope, as well as the observed MS evolution from z = 2.5 to z = 0 at low masses.

  12. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  13. WATER MASS FORMATION IN THE SOUTH INDIAN OCEAN BY AIR-SEA FLUXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Feng

    2004-01-01

    Indian Central Water (ICW) and Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) formation rates are estimated from two air-sea flux products, the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) and the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) climatology. The ICW formation is estimated to be 8 Sv (1 Sv = 106m3·s-1) from both products, with more contributions from freshwater flux. From the COADS product, the SAMW formation rate is estimated to be 31 Sv in the potential density range of 26.5-26.9σθ, with also a significant contribution from freshwater flux. However, the SAMW formation rate estimated from the SOC product is much smaller, which may be due to bias of the SOC heat flux. Poorer quality of the flux products in the Southern Ocean may also contribute to the difference.

  14. In situ direct sampling mass spectrometric study on formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in toluene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Bikau; Susa, Akio; Miyoshi, Akira; Koshi, Mitsuo

    2007-08-30

    The gas-phase reaction products of toluene pyrolysis with and without acetylene addition produced in a flow tube reactor at pressures of 8.15-15.11 Torr and temperatures of 1136-1507 K with constant residence time (0.56 s) have been detected in an in situ direct sampling mass spectrometric study by using a vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique. Those products range from methyl radical to large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of mass 522 amu (C(42)H(18)) including smaller species, radicals, polyynes, and PAHs, together with ethynyl, methyl, and phenyl PAHs. On the basis of observed mass spectra, the chemical kinetic mechanisms of the formation of products are discussed. Especially, acetylene is mixed with toluene to understand the effect of the hydrogen abstraction and acetylene addition (HACA) mechanism on the formation pathways of products in toluene pyrolysis. The most prominent outputs of this work are the direct detection of large PAHs and new reaction pathways for the formation of PAHs with the major role of cyclopenta-fused radicals. The basis of this new reaction route is the appearance of different sequences of mass spectra that well explain the major role of aromatic radicals mainly cyclopenta fused radicals of PAHs resulting from their corresponding methyl PAHs, with active participation of c-C(5)H(5), C(6)H(5), C(6)H(5)CH(2) ,and C(9)H(7) in the formation of large PAHs. The role of the HACA only seemed important for the formation of stable condensed PAHs from unstable primary PAHs with zigzag structure (having triple fusing sites) in one step by ring growth with two carbon atoms.

  15. The formation of low-mass helium white dwarfs orbiting pulsars: Evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries below the bifurcation period

    CERN Document Server

    Istrate, Alina; Langer, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are generally believed to be old neutron stars (NSs) which have been spun up to high rotation rates via accretion of matter from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). However, many details of this recycling scenario remain to be understood. Here we investigate binary evolution in close LMXBs to study the formation of radio MSPs with low-mass helium white dwarf companions (He WDs) in tight binaries with orbital periods P_orb = 2-9 hr. In particular, we examine: i) if such observed systems can be reproduced from theoretical modelling using standard prescriptions of orbital angular momentum losses (i.e. with respect to the nature and the strength of magnetic braking), ii) if our computations of the Roche-lobe detachments can match the observed orbital periods, and iii) if the correlation between WD mass and orbital period (M_WD, P_orb) is valid for systems with P_orb < 2 days. Numerical calculations with a detailed stellar evolution code were used to trace the mass-tra...

  16. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-06

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion.

  17. Metallicity calibrations of galaxies with low star formation rates: the influence of a stochastic IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paalvast, Mieke; Brinchmann, Jarle

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of the consequences of an initial mass function (IMF) that is stochastically sampled on the main emission lines used for gas-phase metallicity estimates in extragalactic sources. We use the stochastic stellar population code slug and the photoionization code cloudy to show that the stochastic sampling of the massive end of the mass function can lead to clear variations in the relative production of energetic emission lines such as [O iii] relative to that of Balmer lines. We use this to study the impact on the Te, N2O2, R23 and O3N2 metallicity calibrators. We find that stochastic sampling of the IMF leads to a systematic overestimate of O/H in galaxies with low star formation rates (SFRs; ≤10-3 M⊙ yr-1) when using the N2O2, R23 and O3N2 strong-line methods, and an underestimate when using the Te method on galaxies of sub-solar metallicity. We point out that while the SFRH α-to-SFRUV ratio can be used to identify systems where the IMF might be insufficiently sampled, it does not provide sufficient information to fully correct the metallicity calibrations at low SFRs. Care must therefore be given in the choice of metallicity indicators in such systems, with the N2O2 indicator proving most robust of those tested by us, with a bias of 0.08 dex for models with SFR = 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 and solar metallicity.

  18. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  19. A new methodology to test galaxy formation models using the dependence of clustering on stellar mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David J. R.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Mitchell, Peter D.; Helly, John C.; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Lacey, Cedric G.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Simha, Vimal; Farrow, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    We present predictions for the two-point correlation function of galaxy clustering as a function of stellar mass, computed using two new versions of the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model. These models make use of a high resolution, large volume N-body simulation, set in the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmology. One model uses a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF), while the other assumes different IMFs for quiescent star formation and bursts. Particular consideration is given to how the assumptions required to estimate the stellar masses of observed galaxies (such as the choice of IMF, stellar population synthesis model, and dust extinction) influence the perceived dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass. Broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting is carried out to estimate stellar masses for the model galaxies in the same manner as in observational studies. We show clear differences between the clustering signals computed using the true and estimated model stellar masses. As such, we highlight the importance of applying our methodology to compare theoretical models to observations. We introduce an alternative scheme for the calculation of the merger time-scales for satellite galaxies in GALFORM, which takes into account the dark matter subhalo information from the simulation. This reduces the amplitude of small-scale clustering. The new merger scheme offers improved or similar agreement with observational clustering measurements, over the redshift range 0 Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey, depending on the GALFORM model used.

  20. Measuring Star-Formation Rates of AGNs and QSOs using a new calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papovich, Casey

    Understanding the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion is one of the key questions in galaxy formation theory. This relation is important for understanding why at present the mass in galaxy bulges (on scales of kpc) correlates so tightly with the mass of galaxy central supermassive blackholes (on scales of AU). Feedback from supermassive black hole accretion may also be responsible for heating or expelling cold gas from galaxies, shutting off the fuel for star-formation and additional black hole growth. Did bulges proceed the formation of black holes, or vice versa, or are they contemporaneous? Therefore, understanding the exact rates of star-formation and supermassive black hole growth, and how they evolve with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. It has previously been nearly impossible to study simultaneously both star-formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies because the emission from black hole accretion contaminates nearly all diagnostics of star-formation. The "standard" diagnostics for the star-formation rate (the emission from hydrogen, UV emission, midIR emission, far-IR emission, etc) are not suitable for measuring star-formation rates in galaxies with actively accreting supermassive blackholes. In this proposal, the researchers request NASA/ADP funding for an archival study using spectroscopy with the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure simultaneously the star-formation rate (SFR) and bolometric emission from accreting supermassive blackholes to understand the complex relation between both processes. The key to this study is that they will develop a new calibrator for SFRs in galaxies with active supermassive black holes based on the molecular emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which emit strongly in the mid-IR (3 - 20 micron) and are very strong in spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The PAH molecules exist near photo-dissociation regions, and

  1. High-energy irradiation and mass loss rates of hot Jupiters in the solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Lyman alpha luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy...

  2. The Star Formation Rate - Dense Gas Relation in the Nuclei of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Desika; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the star formation rate (SFR) and dense molecular gas mass in the nuclei of galaxies. To do this, we utilize the observed 850 micron luminosity as a proxy for the infrared luminosity and SFR, and correlate this with the observed CO (J=3-2) luminosity. We find tentative evidence that the LIR-CO (J=3-2) index is similar to the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) index (N ~ 1.5) in the central ~1.7 kpc of galaxies, and flattens to a roughly linear index when including emission from the entire galaxy. This result may imply that the volumetric Schmidt relation is the underlying driver behind the observed SFR-dense gas correlations, and provides tentative confirmation for recent numerical models. While the data exclude the possibility of a constant LIR-CO (J=3-2) index for both galaxy nuclei and global measurements at the ~80% confidence level, the considerable error bars cannot preclude alternative interpretations.

  3. Probing the peak of the star formation rate density with the extragalactic background light

    CERN Document Server

    Raue, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL), i.e., the diffuse meta-galactic photon field in the ultraviolet to infrared, is dominated by the emission from stars in galaxies. It is, therefore, intimately connected with the integrated star formation rate density (SFRD). In this paper, the SFRD is constrained using recent limits on the EBL density derived from observations of distant sources of high and very-high energy gamma-rays. The stellar EBL contribution is modeled utilizing simple stellar population spectra including dust attenuation and emission. A wide range of values for the different model parameters (SFRD(z), metallicity, dust absorption) is investigated and their impact on the resulting EBL is studied. The calculated EBL densities are compared with the specific EBL density limits and constraints on the SFRD are derived. For the fiducial model, adopting a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), the SFRD is constrained to ~< 0.1 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3 and < 0.2 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3 for a redshift of z...

  4. Improving the Estimation of Star-formation Rates and Stellar Population Ages of High-redshift Galaxies from Broad-band Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seong-Kook; Somerville, Rachel S; Wiklind, Tommy; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    We explore methods to improve the estimates of star-formation rates and mean stellar population ages from broad-band photometry of high redshift star-forming galaxies. We use synthetic spectral templates with a variety of simple parametric star-formation histories to fit broad-band spectral-energy distributions. These parametric models are used to infer ages, star-formation rates and stellar masses for a mock data set drawn from a hierarchical semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution. Traditional parametric models generally assume an exponentially declining rate of star-formation after an initial instantaneous rise. Our results show that star-formation histories with a much more gradual rise in the star-formation rate are likely to be better templates, and are likely to give better overall estimates of the age distribution and star-formation rate distribution of Lyman-break galaxies. For B- and V-dropouts, we find the best simple parametric model to be one where the star-formation rate increases linearly with ...

  5. The influence of mass-transfer variability on the growth of white dwarfs, and the implications for Type Ia supernova rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, S.; Voss, R.; Knigge, C.

    2014-06-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) can increase their mass by accretion from companion stars, provided the mass-accretion rate is high enough to avoid nova eruptions. The accretion regimes that allow growth of the WDs are usually calculated assuming constant mass-transfer rates. However, it is possible that these systems are influenced by effects that cause the rate to fluctuate on various time-scales. We investigate how long-term mass-transfer variability affects accreting WDs systems. We show that, if such variability is present, it expands the parameter space of binaries where the WD can effectively increase its mass. Furthermore, we find that the Type Ia supernova (SNIa) rate is enhanced by a factor 2-2.5 to a rate that is comparable with the lower limit of the observed rates. The changes in the delay-time distribution allow for more SNIae in stellar populations with ages of a few Gyr. Thus, mass-transfer variability gives rise to a new formation channel of SNIa events that can significantly contribute to the SNIa rate. Mass-transfer variability is also likely to affect other binary populations through enhanced WD growth. For example, it may explain why WDs in cataclysmic variables are observed to be more massive than single WDs, on average.

  6. From wind to superwind - The evolution of mass-loss rates for Mira models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.; Willson, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical atmosphere models were calculated for a large grid of variables with Mira-like properties satisfying the Iben radius-luminosity-mass relationship for evolving AGB stars. Their masses ranged from 0.7 to 2.4 solar masses, and their periods from 150 to 800 days. All were fundamental-mode pulsators, had solar metallicity, and included effects of dust. The mass-loss rate increases as an approximately exponential function of time, reaching 0.00001-0.0001 solar masses/yr. Further evolution is dominated by the powerful wind, which strips the star's envelope from the core. This 'superwind', a remarkably robust effect, occurs for all initial stellar masses and all modeling parameters that have been tested. Models with very low metallicity also show the effect, but at higher luminosities, which has intriguing implications for the number of supernovae in early low-metallicity populations and for the chemical evolution of galaxies.

  7. From wind to superwind - The evolution of mass-loss rates for Mira models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.; Willson, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical atmosphere models were calculated for a large grid of variables with Mira-like properties satisfying the Iben radius-luminosity-mass relationship for evolving AGB stars. Their masses ranged from 0.7 to 2.4 solar masses, and their periods from 150 to 800 days. All were fundamental-mode pulsators, had solar metallicity, and included effects of dust. The mass-loss rate increases as an approximately exponential function of time, reaching 0.00001-0.0001 solar masses/yr. Further evolution is dominated by the powerful wind, which strips the star's envelope from the core. This 'superwind', a remarkably robust effect, occurs for all initial stellar masses and all modeling parameters that have been tested. Models with very low metallicity also show the effect, but at higher luminosities, which has intriguing implications for the number of supernovae in early low-metallicity populations and for the chemical evolution of galaxies.

  8. The relation between surface star formation rate density and spiral arms in NGC 5236 (M83)

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Villa, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    For a long time the consensus has been that star formation rates are higher in the interior of spiral arms in galaxies, compared to inter-arm regions. However, recent studies have found that the star formation inside the arms is not more efficient than elsewhere in the galaxy. Previous studies have based their conclusion mainly on integrated light. We use resolved stellar populations to investigate the star formation rates throughout the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5236. We aim to investigate how the star formation rate varies in the spiral arms compared to the inter-arm regions, using optical space-based observations of NGC 5236. Using ground-based H\\alpha images we traced regions of recent star formation, and reconstructed the arms of the galaxy. Using HST/ACS images we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Arms based on H\\alpha images showed to follow the regions where stellar crowding is higher. Star formation rates for individual arms over the fields covered were estimated ...

  9. Mass Transfer in a closed stirred gas/liquid contactor: Part 1: The mass transfer rate kLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, W.T.; Thoenes, D.; Frankena, J.F.

    1973-01-01

    Liquid phase mass transfer rates kLS for the absorption of oxygen in tap water and in aqueous ionic solutions have been determined in two closed stirred tank contactors for a power input between 3 and 70 W/kg and (impeller diameter)f(tank diameter) ratios DifT of 0.3, 0.35 and 0.4. The contactors

  10. Radiative feedback and the low efficiency of galaxy formation in low-mass halos at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Ceverino, Daniel; Klimek, Elizabeth; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Churchill, Christopher W; Primack, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Any successful model of galaxy formation needs to explain the low rate of star formation in the small progenitors of today's normal galaxies. The low efficiency of star formation is necessary for reproducing the low stellar-to-halo mass fractions, as suggested by current abundance matching models. We found that the main driver of this low efficiency is the radiation pressure exerted by ionizing photons from massive and young stars. We model the effect of radiation pressure in cosmological, zoom-in galaxy formation simulations, as a non-thermal pressure that acts locally around dense and optically thick star-forming regions. We also include the effect of photoionization and photoheating on the gas cooling and heating rates. In some conditions, the full photoionization of HI reduces the HI peak of the cooling curve, effectively preventing cooling in the 10^4-10^4.5 K regime. We also consider a simple model for the boosting of radiation pressure due to the trapping of infrared radiation. The main effect of the l...

  11. Design and construction of a novel Coriolis mass flow rate meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, Aditya; Zwikker, Rini; Jouwsma, Wybren

    2009-01-01

    The Coriolis principle for measuring flow rates has great advantages compared to other flow measurement principles, the most important being that mass flow is measured directly. Up to now the measurement of low flow rates posed a great challenge. In a joint research project, the University of Twente

  12. Design and construction of a novel Coriolis mass flow rate meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Zwikker, Rini; Jouwsma, Wybren

    2009-01-01

    The Coriolis principle for measuring flow rates has great advantages compared to other flow measurement principles, the most important being that mass flow is measured directly. Up to now the measurement of low flow rates posed a great challenge. In a joint research project, the University of Twente

  13. Rates of stellar tidal disruption as probes of the supermassive black hole mass function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas C.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) due to two-body relaxation are calculated using a large galaxy sample (N ≈ 200) in order to explore the sensitivity of the TDE rates to observational uncertainties, such as the parametrization of galaxy light profiles and the stellar mass function. The largest uncertainty arises due to the poorly constrained occupation fraction of SMBHs in low-mass galaxies, which otherwise dominate the total TDE rate. The detection rate of TDE flares by optical surveys is calculated as a function of SMBH mass and other observables for several physically motivated models of TDE emission. We also quantify the fraction of galaxies that produce deeply penetrating disruption events. If the majority of the detected events are characterized by super-Eddington luminosities (such as disc winds, or synchrotron radiation from an off-axis relativistic jet), then the measured SMBH mass distribution will tightly constrain the low-end SMBH occupation fraction. If Eddington-limited emission channels dominate, however, then the occupation fraction sensitivity is much less pronounced in a flux-limited survey (although still present in a volume-complete event sample). The SMBH mass distribution of the current sample of TDEs, though highly inhomogeneous and encumbered by selection effects, already suggests that Eddington-limited emission channels dominate. Even our most conservative rate estimates appear to be in tension with much lower observationally inferred TDE rates, and we discuss several possible resolutions to this discrepancy.

  14. HIghMass-high H I mass, H I-rich galaxies at z ∼ 0 sample definition, optical and Hα imaging, and star formation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shan; Matsushita, Satoki [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Jones, Michael G.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Brinchmann, Jarle [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Chengalur, Jayaram N. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, Pune 411007 (India); Hunt, Leslie K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo East Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Masters, Karen L. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth POI 3FX (United Kingdom); Saintonge, Amelie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Spekkens, Kristine, E-mail: shan@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Royal Military College of Canada, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2014-09-20

    We present first results of the study of a set of exceptional H I sources identified in the 40% ALFALFA extragalactic H I survey catalog α.40 as both being H I massive (M{sub HI}>10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) and having high gas fractions for their stellar masses: the HIghMass galaxy sample. We analyze UV- and optical-broadband and Hα images to understand the nature of their relatively underluminous disks in optical and to test whether their high gas fractions can be tracked to higher dark matter halo spin parameters or late gas accretion. Estimates of their star formation rates (SFRs) based on spectral energy distribution fitting agree within uncertainties with the Hα luminosity inferred current massive SFRs. The H II region luminosity functions, parameterized as dN/dlog L∝L {sup α}, have standard slopes at the luminous end (α ∼ –1). The global SFRs demonstrate that the HIghMass galaxies exhibit active ongoing star formation (SF) with moderate SF efficiency but, relative to normal spirals, a lower integrated SFR in the past. Because the SF activity in these systems is spread throughout their extended disks, they have overall lower SFR surface densities and lower surface brightness in the optical bands. Relative to normal disk galaxies, the majority of HIghMass galaxies have higher Hα equivalent widths and are bluer in their outer disks, implying an inside-out disk growth scenario. Downbending double exponential disks are more frequent than upbending disks among the gas-rich galaxies, suggesting that SF thresholds exist in the downbending disks, probably as a result of concentrated gas distribution.

  15. Real time mass flow rate measurement using multiple fan beam optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, R; Leong, L C; Chan, K S; Rahiman, M H; Pang, J F

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the implementing multiple fan beam projection technique using optical fibre sensors for a tomography system. From the dynamic experiment of solid/gas flow using plastic beads in a gravity flow rig, the designed optical fibre sensors are reliable in measuring the mass flow rate below 40% of flow. Another important matter that has been discussed is the image processing rate or IPR. Generally, the applied image reconstruction algorithms, the construction of the sensor and also the designed software are considered to be reliable and suitable to perform real-time image reconstruction and mass flow rate measurements.

  16. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  17. Effect of rotational mixing and metallicity on the hot star wind mass-loss rates

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Hot star wind mass-loss rates depend on the abundance of individual elements. This dependence is usually accounted for assuming scaled solar chemical composition. However, this approach may not be justified in evolved rotating stars. The rotational mixing brings CNO-processed material to the stellar surface, increasing the abundance of nitrogen at the expense of carbon and oxygen, which potentially influences the mass-loss rates. We study the influence of the modified chemical composition resulting from the rotational mixing on the wind parameters, particularly the wind mass-loss rates. We use our NLTE wind code to predict the wind structure and compare the calculated wind mass-loss rate for the case of scaled solar chemical composition and the composition affected by the CNO cycle. We show that for a higher mass-fraction of heavier elements $Z/Z_\\odot\\gtrsim0.1$ the change of chemical composition from the scaled solar to the CNO-processed scaled solar composition does not significantly affect the wind mass-l...

  18. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Refining the Local Galaxy Merger Rate using Morphological Information

    CERN Document Server

    Casteels, Kevin R V; Bamford, Steven P; Salvador-Sole, Eduard; Norberg, Peder R; Agius, Nicola K; Baldry, Ivan; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J I; Drinkwater, Michael J; Driver, Simon P; Graham, Alister W; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kelvin, Lee S; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; Loveday, Jon; Robotham, Aaron S G; Vazquez-Mata, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    We use the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to measure the local Universe mass dependent merger fraction and merger rate using galaxy pairs and the CAS structural method, which identifies highly asymmetric merger candidate galaxies. Our goals are to determine which types of mergers produce highly asymmetrical galaxies, and to provide a new measurement of the local galaxy major merger rate. We examine galaxy pairs at stellar mass limits down to $M_{*} = 10^{8}M_{\\odot}$ with mass ratios of $$4:1) the lower mass companion becomes highly asymmetric, while the larger galaxy is much less affected. The fraction of highly asymmetric paired galaxies which have a major merger companion is highest for the most massive galaxies and drops progressively with decreasing mass. We calculate that the mass dependent major merger fraction is fairly constant at $\\sim1.3-2\\%$ between $10^{9.5}masses. When the observability time scales are taken into cons...

  19. Ultraviolet+Infrared Star Formation Rates: Hickson Compact Groups with Swift and SPitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Gronwall, C.; Immler, S.; Reines, A. E.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (star formation rate, SFR(sub TOTAL). We use Spitzer MIPS 24 micron photometry to estimate SFR(sub IR), the component of SFR(sub TOTAL) that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR(sub TOTAL) estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M(sub *) estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K(sub s)-band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR is identical with SFR(sub TOTAL)/ M (sub *). SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low (approximately 1.2 x lO)exp -10)/yr) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in alpha-IRAC, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 micron data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with alpha-IRAC 0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/SO galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals / irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and alpha-IRAC bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey (SINGS) to construct a comparison subsample of galaxies that (1) match HCG galaxies in J-band total galaxy luminosity and (2) are not strongly interacting and largely isolated. This selection eliminates mostly low

  20. ALMA and VLA Observations: Evidence for Ongoing Low-mass Star Formation near Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Cotton, W.; Wardle, M.; Royster, M. J.; Kunneriath, D.; Roberts, D. A.; Wootten, A.; Schödel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Using the VLA, we recently detected a large number of protoplanetary disk (proplyd) candidates lying within a couple of light years of the massive black hole Sgr A*. The bow-shock appearance of proplyd candidates point toward the young massive stars located near Sgr A*. Similar to Orion proplyds, the strong UV radiation from the cluster of massive stars at the Galactic center is expected to photoevaporate and photoionize the circumstellar disks around young, low mass stars, thus allowing detection of the ionized outflows from the photoionized layer surrounding cool and dense gaseous disks. To confirm this picture, ALMA observations detect millimeter emission at 226 GHz from five proplyd candidates that had been detected at 44 and 34 GHz with the VLA. We present the derived disk masses for four sources as a function of the assumed dust temperature. The mass of protoplanetary disks from cool dust emission ranges between 0.03 - 0.05 M⊙. These estimates are consistent with the disk masses found in star forming sites in the Galaxy. These measurements show the presence of on-going star formation with the implication that gas clouds can survive near Sgr A* and the relative importance of high vs low-mass star formation in the strong tidal and radiation fields of the Galactic center.

  1. Global Star Formation Rates in Disk Galaxies and Circumnuclear Starbursts from Cloud Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J C

    1999-01-01

    We invoke star formation triggered by cloud-cloud collisions to explain global star formation rates of disk galaxies and circumnuclear starbursts. Previous theories based on the growth rate of gravitational perturbations ignore the dynamically important presence of magnetic fields. Theories based on triggering by spiral density waves fail to explain star formation in systems without such waves. Furthermore, observations suggest gas and stellar disk instabilities are decoupled. Following the numerical work of Gammie, Jog & Ostriker (1991), the cloud collision rate is set by the shear velocity of encounters with initial impact parameters of a few tidal radii, due to differential rotation in the disk. This enhances the collision rate above that calculated from simply considering the random velocities of clouds. We predict Sigma_{SFR}(R) is proportional to Sigma_{gas} Omega (1 - 0.7 beta). In the case of constant circular velocity (beta = 0), this is in agreement with recent observations (Kennicutt 1998). We ...

  2. The Relative Rate of LGRB Formation as a Function of Metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J F

    2015-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) are preferentially formed in low-metallicity environments. However, the magnitude of this effect, and its functional dependence on metallicity have not been well characterized. In our previous paper, Graham & Fruchter (2013), we compared the metallicity distribution of LGRB host galaxies to the that of star forming galaxies in the local universe. Here we build upon this work by in effect dividing one distribution by the other, and thus directly determine the relative rate of LGRB formation as a function of metallicity in the low-redshift universe. We find a dramatic cutoff in LGRB formation above a metallicity of log(O/H)}+12 ~ 8.3 in the KK04 scale, with LGRBs forming >25 times more frequently per unit star-formation below this cutoff than above. Furthermore, our data suggests that the rate of LGRB formation per unit star formation continues to fall above this break. We estimate the LGRB formation rate per unit star formation may dr...

  3. Brain and high metabolic rate organ mass: contributions to resting energy expenditure beyond fat-free mass1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fahad; He, Qing; Davidson, Lance E; Thornton, John C; Albu, Jeanine; Boxt, Lawrence; Krasnow, Norman; Elia, Marinos; Kang, Patrick; Heshka, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Background: The degree to which interindividual variation in the mass of select high metabolic rate organs (HMROs) mediates variability in resting energy expenditure (REE) is unknown. Objective: The objective was to investigate how much REE variability is explained by differences in HMRO mass in adults and whether age, sex, and race independently predict REE after adjustment for HMRO. Design: A cross-sectional evaluation of 55 women [30 African Americans aged 48.7 ± 22.2 y (mean ± SD) and 25 whites aged 46.4 ± 17.7 y] and 32 men (8 African Americans aged 34.3 ± 18.2 y and 24 whites aged 51.3 ± 20.6 y) was conducted. Liver, kidney, spleen, heart, and brain masses were measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and fat and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results: REE estimated from age (P = 0.001), race (P = 0.006), sex (P = 0.31), fat (P = 0.001), and FFM (P brain (P = 0.006) to the model increased the explained variance to 75% and rendered the contributions of age, sex, and race statistically nonsignificant, whereas fat and FFM continued to make significant contributions (both P brain to the model rendered the intercept (69 kcal · kg−1 · d−1) consistent with zero, which indicated zero REE for zero body mass. Conclusions: Relatively small interindividual variation in HMRO mass significantly affects REE and reduces the role of age, race, and sex in explaining REE. Decreases in REE with increasing age may be partly related to age-associated changes in the relative size of FFM components. PMID:20164308

  4. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Testing galaxy formation models through the most massive galaxies in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva-Altamirano, P; Lidman, C; Couch, W J; Hopkins, A M; Colless, M; Taylor, E; Robotham, A S G; Gunawardhana, M L P; Ponman, T; Baldry, I; Bauer, A E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Cluver, M; Cameron, E; Conselice, C J; Driver, S; Edge, A C; Graham, A W; van Kampen, E; Lara-López, M A; Liske, J; López-Sánchez, A R; Loveday, J; Mahajan, S; Peacock, J; Phillipps, S; Pimbblet, K A; Sharp, R G

    2014-01-01

    We have analysed the growth of Brightest Group Galaxies and Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BGGs/BCGs) over the last 3 billion years using a large sample of 883 galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey. By comparing the stellar mass of BGGs and BCGs in groups and clusters of similar dynamical masses, we find no significant growth between redshift $z=0.27$ and $z=0.09$. We also examine the number of BGGs/BCGs that have line emission, finding that approximately 65 per cent of BGGs/BCGs show H$\\alpha$ in emission. From the galaxies where the necessary spectroscopic lines were accurately recovered (54 per cent of the sample), we find that half of this (i.e. 27 per cent of the sample) harbour on-going star formation with rates up to $10\\,$M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, and the other half (i.e. 27 per cent of the sample) have an active nucleus (AGN) at the centre. BGGs are more likely to have ongoing star formation, while BCGs show a higher fraction of AGN activity. By examining the position of the BGGs/BCGs with respe...

  5. A comprehensive mathematical model for estimating oil drainage rate in SAGD process considering wellbore/formation coupling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Linsong; Gu, Hao; Huang, Shijun

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive mathematical model for estimating oil drainage rate in Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process, more importantly, wellbore/formation coupling effect is considered. Firstly, mass and heat transfer in vertical and horizontal wellbores are described briefly. Then, a function of steam chamber height is introduced and the expressions for oil drainage rate in rising and expanding steam chamber stages are derived in detail. Next, a calculation flowchart is provided and an example is given to introduce how to use the proposed method. Finally, after the mathematical model is validated, the effects of wellhead steam injection rate on simulated results are further analyzed. The results indicate that heat injection power per meter reduces gradually along the horizontal wellbore, which affects both steam chamber height and oil drainage rate in the SAGD process. In addition, when production time is the same, the calculated oil drainage rate from the new method is lower than that from Butler's method. Moreover, the paper shows that when wellhead steam injection rate is low enough, the steam chamber is not formed at the horizontal well's toe position and enhancing the wellhead steam injection rate can increase the oil drainage rate.

  6. On the stream-accretion disk interaction - Response to increased mass transfer rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dgani, Ruth; Livio, Mario; Soker, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent interaction between the stream of mass from the inner Lagrangian point and the accretion disk, resulting from an increasing mass transfer rate is calculated. The calculation is fully three-dimensional, using a pseudoparticle description of the hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the results of such calculations, when combined with specific observations, have the potential of both determining essential parameters, such as the viscosity parameter alpha, and can distinguish between different models of dwarf nova eruptions.

  7. The star-formation history of low-mass disk galaxies: a case study of NGC\\,300

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Xiaoyu; Chang, Ruixiang; Wang, Lang; Cheng, Liantao

    2015-01-01

    Since NGC300 is a bulge-less, isolated low-mass galaxy and has not experienced radial migration during its evolution history, it can be treated as an ideal laboratory to test simple galactic chemical evolution models. By assuming its disk forms gradually from continuous accretion of primordial gas and including the gas-outflow process, we construct a simple chemical evolution model for NGC300 to build a bridge between its SFH and its observed data, especially the present-day radial profiles and global observed properties (e.g., cold gas mass, star-formation rate and metallicity). By means of comparing the model predictions with the corresponding observations, we adopt the classical $\\chi^{2}$ methodology to find out the best combination of free parameters $a$, $b$ and $b_{\\rm out}$. Our results show that, by assuming an inside-out formation scenario and an appropriate outflow rate, our model reproduces well most of the present-day observational values, not only the radial profiles but also the global observat...

  8. Constraints on galaxy formation models from the galaxy stellar mass function and its evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Luiz Felippe S; Bower, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We explore the parameter space of the semi-analytic galaxy formation model GALFORM, studying the constraints imposed by measurements of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) and its evolution. We use the Bayesian Emulator method to quickly eliminate vast implausible volumes of the parameter space and zoom in on the most interesting regions, allowing us to identify a set of models that match the observational data within the model uncertainties. We find that the GSMF strongly constrains parameters related to the quiescent star formation in discs, stellar and AGN feedback and the threshold for disc instabilities, but more weakly restricts other parameters. Constraining the model using the local data alone does not usually select models that match the evolution of the mass function well. Nevertheless, we show that a small subset of models provides an acceptable match to GSMF data out to redshift 1.5, without introducing an explicit redshift dependence of feedback parameters. We explore the physical significanc...

  9. The influence of mass-transfer variability on the growth of white dwarfs, and the implications for supernova type Ia rates

    CERN Document Server

    Toonen, Silvia; Knigge, Christian

    2014-01-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) can increase their mass by accretion from companion stars, provided the mass-accretion rate is high enough to avoid nova eruptions. The accretion regimes that allow growth of the WDs are usually calculated assuming constant mass-transfer rates. However, it is possible that these systems are influenced by effects that cause the rate to fluctuate on various timescales. We investigate how long-term mass-transfer variability affects accreting WDs systems. We show that, if such variability is present, it expands the parameter space of binaries where the WD can effectively increase its mass. Furthermore, we find that the supernova type Ia (SNIa) rate is enhanced by a factor 2-2.5 to a rate that is comparable with the lower limit of the observed rates. The changes in the delay-time distribution allow for more SNIae in stellar populations with ages of a few Gyr. Thus, mass-transfer variability gives rise to a new formation channel of SNIa events that can significantly contribute to the SNIa rate. M...

  10. Kinetic assessment of measured mass flow rates and streamwise pressure distributions in microchannel gas flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Fan; Chong Xie; Jianzheng Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Measured mass flow rates and streamwise pressure distributions of gas flowing through microchannels were reported by many researchers. Assessment of these data is crucial before they are used in the examination of slip models and numerical schemes, and in the design of microchannel elements in various MEMS devices. On the basis of kinetic solutions of the mass flow rates and pressure distributions in microchannel gas flows, the measured data available are properly normalized and then are compared with each other. The 69 normalized data of measured pressure distributions are in excellent agreement, and 67 of them are within 1 ± 0.05. The normalized data of mass flow-rates ranging between 0.95 and 1 agree well with each other as the inlet Knudsen number Kni > 0.02, but they scat ter between 0.85 and 1.15 as Kni < 0.02 with, to some extent, a very interesting bifurcation trend.

  11. Mass accretion rates in self-regulated disks of T Tauri stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, E I

    2008-01-01

    We have studied numerically the evolution of protostellar disks around intermediate and upper mass T Tauri stars (0.25 M_sun < M_st < 3.0 M_sun) that have formed self-consistently from the collapse of molecular cloud cores. In the T Tauri phase, disks settle into a self-regulated state, with low-amplitude nonaxisymmetric density perturbations persisting for at least several million years. Our main finding is that the global effect of gravitational torques due to these perturbations is to produce disk accretion rates that are of the correct magnitude to explain observed accretion onto T Tauri stars. Our models yield a correlation between accretion rate M_dot and stellar mass M_st that has a best fit M_dot \\propto M_st^{1.7}, in good agreement with recent observations. We also predict a near-linear correlation between the disk accretion rate and the disk mass.

  12. Analytical modeling of gas production rate in tight channel sand formation and optimization of artificial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruifei; Song, Hongqing; Tang, Hewei; Wang, Yuhe; Killough, John; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Permeability variation in tight channel sand formation makes an important role in gas production. Based on the features of channel sand formation, a mathematical model has been established considering anisotropy of permeability. The analytical solutions were derived for productivity of both vertical wells and vertically fractured wells. Simulation results show that, gas production rate of anisotropic channel sand formation is less than that of isotropic formation. For vertically fractured well, artificial fracture direction, drainage radius, permeability ratio and fracture half-length have considerable influence on production rate. The optimum fracture direction should be deviated less than π/8 from the maximum permeability direction (or the channel direction). In addition, the analytical model was verified by in situ measured data. The research provides theoretical basis for the development of tight channel sand gas reservoirs.

  13. Measuring the rates of spontaneous vortex formation in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Tyler; Samson, Edward; Bradley, Ashton; Davis, Matthew; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    By studying the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition in highly oblate (˜11:1 aspect ratio) traps, we have measured the dependence of spontaneous vortex formation on BEC growth rate, extending our previous experimental and numerical observations of spontaneous vortex formation in weakly oblate (˜2:1 aspect ratio) traps [1]. Our condensation procedure in these highly oblate traps allows us to create BECs over a large range of growth times, from approximately 200 ms to over 2 s. By characterizing vortex formation vs. BEC growth rate, and comparing experimental and numerical results, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for topological defect formation may be quantitatively studied in our system. [1] C.N. Weiler, T.W. Neely, D.R. Scherer, A.S. Bradley, M.J. Davis, and B.P. Anderson., Nature 455, 948 (2008).

  14. Mass flow-rate control through time periodic electro-osmotic flows in circular microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Ray, Subhashis

    2008-08-01

    The present study is directed towards devising a scientific strategy for obtaining controlled time-periodic mass flow-rate characteristics through the employment of pulsating electric fields in circular microchannels by exploiting certain intrinsic characteristics of periodic electro-osmosis phenomenon. Within the assumption of thin electrical double layers, the governing equations for potential distribution and fluid flow are derived, corresponding to a steady base state and a time-varying perturbed state, by assuming periodic forms of the imposed electrical fields and the resultant velocity fields. For sinusoidal pulsations of the electric field superimposed over its mean, a signature map depicting the amplitudes of the mass flow rate and the electrical field as well as their phase differences is obtained from the theoretical analysis as a function of a nondimensional frequency parameter for different ratios of the characteristic electric double layer thickness relative to the microchannel radius. Distinctive characteristics in the signature profiles are obtained for lower and higher frequencies, primarily attributed to the finite time scale for momentum propagation away from the walls. The signature characteristics, obtained from the solution of the prescribed sinusoidal electric field, are subsequently used to solve the "inverse" problem, where the mass flow rate is prescribed in the form of sinusoidal pulsations and the desired electric fields that would produce the required mass flow-rate variations are obtained. The analysis is subsequently extended for controlled triangular and trapezoidal pulsations in the mass flow rate and the required electric fields are successfully obtained. It is observed that the higher the double layer thickness is in comparison to the channel radius, the more prominent is the deviation of the shape of the required electric field pulsation from the desired transience in the mass flow-rate characteristics. Possible extensions of the

  15. Mass-loss rates from mid-infrared excesses in LMC and SMC O stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Prinja, R. K.

    2017-09-01

    We use a combination of BVJHK and Spitzer [3.6], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry to determine infrared (IR) excesses for a sample of 58 Large Magellanic Cloud and 46 Small Magellanic Cloud O stars. This sample is ideal for determining IR excesses because the very small line-of-sight reddening minimizes uncertainties due to extinction corrections. We use the core-halo model developed by Lamers & Waters to translate the excesses into mass-loss rates and demonstrate that the results of this simple model agree with the more sophisticated CMFGEN models to within a factor of 2. Taken at face value, the derived mass-loss rates are larger than those predicted by Vink et al., and the magnitude of the disagreement increases with decreasing luminosity. However, the IR excesses need not imply large mass-loss rates. Instead, we argue that they probably indicate that the outer atmospheres of O stars contain complex structures and that their winds are launched with much smaller velocity gradients than normally assumed. If this is the case, it could affect the theoretical and observational interpretations of the 'weak wind' problem, where classical mass-loss indicators suggest that the mass-loss rates of lower luminosity O stars are far less than expected.

  16. The relationship between body mass and field metabolic rate among individual birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lawrence N; Isaac, Nick J B; Reuman, Daniel C

    2013-09-01

    1. The power-law dependence of metabolic rate on body mass has major implications at every level of ecological organization. However, the overwhelming majority of studies examining this relationship have used basal or resting metabolic rates, and/or have used data consisting of species-averaged masses and metabolic rates. Field metabolic rates are more ecologically relevant and are probably more directly subject to natural selection than basal rates. Individual rates might be more important than species-average rates in determining the outcome of ecological interactions, and hence selection. 2. We here provide the first comprehensive database of published field metabolic rates and body masses of individual birds and mammals, containing measurements of 1498 animals of 133 species in 28 orders. We used linear mixed-effects models to answer questions about the body mass scaling of metabolic rate and its taxonomic universality/heterogeneity that have become classic areas of controversy. Our statistical approach allows mean scaling exponents and taxonomic heterogeneity in scaling to be analysed in a unified way while simultaneously accounting for nonindependence in the data due to shared evolutionary history of related species. 3. The mean power-law scaling exponents of metabolic rate vs. body mass relationships were 0.71 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.625-0.795] for birds and 0.64 (95% CI 0.564-0.716) for mammals. However, these central tendencies obscured meaningful taxonomic heterogeneity in scaling exponents. The primary taxonomic level at which heterogeneity occurred was the order level. Substantial heterogeneity also occurred at the species level, a fact that cannot be revealed by species-averaged data sets used in prior work. Variability in scaling exponents at both order and species levels was comparable to or exceeded the differences 3/4-2/3 = 1/12 and 0.71-0.64. 4. Results are interpreted in the light of a variety of existing theories. In particular, results

  17. Formation of close in Super-Earths \\& Mini-Neptunes: Required Disk Masses \\& Their Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting, Hilke E

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations by the {\\it Kepler} space telescope have led to the discovery of more than 4000 exoplanet candidates consisting of many systems with Earth- to Neptune-sized objects that reside well inside the orbit of Mercury, around their respective host stars. How and where these close-in planets formed is one of the major unanswered questions in planet formation. Here we calculate the required disk masses for {\\it in situ} formation of the {\\it Kepler} planets. We find that, if close-in planets formed as {\\it isolation masses}, then standard gas-to-dust ratios yield corresponding gas disks that are gravitationally unstable for a significant fraction of systems, ruling out such a scenario. We show that the maximum width of a planet's accretion region in the absence of any migration is $2 v_{esc}/\\Omega$, where $v_{esc}$ is the escape velocity of the planet and $\\Omega$ the Keplerian frequency and use it to calculate the required disk masses for {\\it in situ} formation with giant impacts. Even with giant...

  18. On the Formation of Galactic Black Hole Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chen; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are 24 black hole (BH) X-ray binary systems that have been dynamically confirmed in the Galaxy. Most of them are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) comprised of a stellar-mass BH and a low-mass donor star. Although the formation of these systems has been extensively investigated, some crucial issues remain unresolved. The most noticeable one is that, the low-mass companion has difficulties in ejecting the tightly bound envelope of the massive primary during the spiral-in process. While initially intermediate-mass binaries are more likely to survive the common envelope (CE) evolution, the resultant BH LMXBs mismatch the observations. In this paper, we use both stellar evolution and binary population synthesis to study the evolutionary history of BH LMXBs. We test various assumptions and prescriptions for the supernova mechanisms that produce BHs, the binding energy parameter, the CE efficiency, and the initial mass distributions of the companion stars. We obtain the birthrate and the distribution...

  19. An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Frasier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymassb. Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal’s characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal’s means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals’ skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or

  20. An explanation of the relationship between mass, metabolic rate and characteristic length for placental mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Mass, Metabolism and Length Explanation (MMLE) was advanced in 1984 to explain the relationship between metabolic rate and body mass for birds and mammals. This paper reports on a modernized version of MMLE. MMLE deterministically computes the absolute value of Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and body mass for individual animals. MMLE is thus distinct from other examinations of these topics that use species-averaged data to estimate the parameters in a statistically best fit power law relationship such as BMR = a(bodymass)b. Beginning with the proposition that BMR is proportional to the number of mitochondria in an animal, two primary equations are derived that compute BMR and body mass as functions of an individual animal’s characteristic length and sturdiness factor. The characteristic length is a measureable skeletal length associated with an animal’s means of propulsion. The sturdiness factor expresses how sturdy or gracile an animal is. Eight other parameters occur in the equations that vary little among animals in the same phylogenetic group. The present paper modernizes MMLE by explicitly treating Froude and Strouhal dynamic similarity of mammals’ skeletal musculature, revising the treatment of BMR and using new data to estimate numerical values for the parameters that occur in the equations. A mass and length data set with 575 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Proboscidea is used. A BMR and mass data set with 436 entries from the orders Rodentia, Chiroptera, Artiodactyla and Carnivora is also used. With the estimated parameter values MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every BMR and mass datum from the BMR and mass data set can be computed exactly. Furthermore MMLE can calculate characteristic length and sturdiness factor values so that every body mass and length datum from the mass and length data set can be computed exactly. Whether or not MMLE can

  1. The role of low-mass star clusters in massive star formation. The Orion Case

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Jimenez-Serra, I; Rodriguez-Franco, A

    2013-01-01

    To distinguish between the different theories proposed to explain massive star formation, it is crucial to establish the distribution, the extinction, and the density of low-mass stars in massive star-forming regions. We analyze deep X-ray observations of the Orion massive star-forming region using the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) catalog. We studied the stellar distribution as a function of extinction, with cells of 0.03 pc x 0.03 pc, the typical size of protostellar cores. We derived stellar density maps and calculated cluster stellar densities. We found that low-mass stars cluster toward the three massive star-forming regions: the Trapezium Cluster (TC), the Orion Hot Core (OHC), and OMC1-S. We derived low-mass stellar densities of 10^{5} stars pc^{-3} in the TC and OMC1-S, and of 10^{6} stars pc^{-3} in the OHC. The close association between the low-mass star clusters with massive star cradles supports the role of these clusters in the formation of massive stars. The X-ray observations show for ...

  2. A Hybrid Scenario for the Formation of Brown Dwarfs and Very Low Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Shantanu

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of protostellar disk formation and evolution in which gaseous clumps (essentially, the first Larson cores formed via disk fragmentation) are ejected from the disk during the early stage of evolution. This is a universal process related to the phenomenon of ejection in multiple systems of point masses. However, it occurs in our model entirely due to the interaction of compact, gravitationally-bound gaseous clumps and is free from the smoothing-length uncertainty that is characteristic of models using sink particles. Clumps that survive ejection span a mass range of 0.08--0.35 $M_\\odot$, and have ejection velocities $0.8 \\pm 0.35$ km s$^{-1}$, which are several times greater than the escape speed. We suggest that, upon contraction, these clumps can form substellar or low-mass stellar objects with notable disks, or even close-separation very-low-mass binaries. In this hybrid scenario, allowing for ejection of clumps rather than finished protostars/proto--brown-dwarfs, disk formation and ...

  3. Let's go formative: continuous student ratings with Web 2.0 application Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Stefan; Burger, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    Student ratings have been a controversial but important method for the improvement of teaching quality during the past several decades. Most universities rely on summative evaluations conducted at the end of a term or course. A formative approach in which each course unit is evaluated may be beneficial for students and teachers but has rarely been applied. This is most probably due to the time constraints associated with various procedures inherent in formative evaluation (numerous evaluations, high amounts of aggregated data, high administrative investment). In order to circumvent these disadvantages, we chose the Web 2.0 Internet application Twitter as evaluation tool and tested whether it is useful for the implementation of a formative evaluation. After a first pilot and subsequent experimental study, the following conclusions were drawn: First, the formative evaluation did not come to the same results as the summative evaluation at the end of term, suggesting that formative evaluations tap into different aspects of course evaluation than summative evaluations do. Second, the results from an offline (i.e., paper-pencil) summative evaluation were identical with those from an online summative evaluation of the same course conducted a week later. Third, the formative evaluation did not influence the ratings of the summative evaluation at the end of the term. All in all, we can conclude that Twitter is a useful tool for evaluating a course formatively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Because of Twitter's simple use and the electronic handling of data, the administrative effort remains small.

  4. The Formation of Free-Floating Brown Dwarves and Planetary-Mass Objects by Photo-Erosion of Prestellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Whitworth, A P

    2004-01-01

    We explore the possibility that, in the vicinity of an OB star, a prestellar core which would otherwise have formed an intermediate or low-mass star may form a free-floating brown dwarf or planetary-mass object, because the outer layers of the core are eroded by the ionizing radiation from the OB star before they can accrete onto the protostar at the centre of the core. The masses of objects formed in this way are given approximately by $\\sim 0.010 M_\\odot (a_{\\rm I} / 0.3 {\\rm km} {\\rm s}^{-1})^6 (\\dot{\\cal N}_{\\rm Lyc} / 10^{50} {\\rm s}^{-1})^{-1/3} (n_{\\rm 0} / 10^3 {\\rm cm}^{-3})^{-1/3} $, where $a_{\\rm I}$ is the isothermal sound speed in the neutral gas of the core, $\\dot{\\cal N}_{\\rm Lyc}$ is the rate of emission of Lyman continuum photons from the OB star (or stars), and $n_{\\rm 0}$ is the number-density of protons in the HII region surrounding the core. We conclude that the formation of low-mass objects by this mechanism should be quite routine, because the mechanism operates over a wide range of con...

  5. Adduct formation in liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometric measurement of bryostatin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thomas J; Sen, Abhik; Alkon, Daniel L; Sun, Miao-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Bryostatin 1, a potential anti-Alzheimer drug, is effective at subnanomolar concentrations. Measurement is complicated by the formation of low m/z degradation products and the formation of adducts with various cations, which make accurate quantitation difficult. Adduct formation caused the sample matrix or mobile phase to partition bryostatin 1 into products of different mass. Degradation of the 927 [M+Na](+) ion to a 869m/z product was strongly influenced by ionization conditions. We validated a bryostatin 1 assay in biological tissues using capillary column HPLC with nanospray ionization (NSI) in a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Adduct formation was controlled by adding 1mM acetic acid and 0.1mM sodium acetate to the HPLC buffer, maximizing the formation of the [M+Na](+) ion. Efficient removal of contaminating cholesterol from the sample during solvent extraction was also critical. The increased sensitivity provided by NSI and capillary-bore columns and the elimination of signal partitioning due to adduct formation and degradation in the ionization source enabled a detection limit of 1×10(-18)mol of bryostatin 1 and a LLOQ of 3×10(-18)mol from 1μl of sample. Bryostatin 1 at low pmol/l concentrations enabled measurement in brain and other tissues without the use of radioactive labels. Despite bryostatin 1's high molecular weight, considerable brain access was observed, with peak brain concentrations exceeding 8% of the peak blood plasma concentrations. Bryostatin 1 readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, reaching peak concentrations of 0.2nM, and specifically activates and translocates brain PKCɛ. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Growth hormone mitigates loss of periosteal bone formation and muscle mass in disuse osteopenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubbe, M.-C.; Thomsen, J. S.; Nyengaard, J. R.;

    2014-01-01

    limb. Sixty female Wistar rats, 14 weeks old, were divided into the following groups: baseline, controls, BTX, BTX+GH, and GH. GH was given at a dosage of 5 mg/kg/d for 4 weeks. Compared with controls, BTX resulted in lower periosteal bone formation rate (BFR/BS,-79%, Pmineral density (a...

  7. Formation of Massive Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters. II. IMF and Primordial Mass Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Bierbaum, Matt; Rasio, Frederic A

    2011-01-01

    A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is the runaway merger in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole. In this paper we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code for N-body systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our code now includes an explicit treatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Moreover, primordial mass segregation increases the average mass in the core, thus reducing the central relaxation time,...

  8. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Puertas, S.; Vilchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.

    2017-03-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured Hα flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the Hα fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the Hα/ Hβ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical Hα and Hα/ Hβ aperture corrections based on the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. We find that, on average, the aperture-corrected SFR is 0.65 dex higher than the SDSS fibre-based SFR. The relation between the SFR and stellar mass for SDSS star-forming galaxies (SFR-M⋆) has been obtained, together with its dependence on extinction and Hα equivalent width. We compare our results with those obtained in previous works and examine the behaviour of the derived SFR in six redshift bins, over the redshift range 0.005 ≤ z ≤ 0.22. The SFR-M⋆ sequence derived here is in agreement with selected observational studies based on integral field spectroscopy of individual galaxies as well as with the predictions of recent theoretical models of disc galaxies. A table of the aperture-corrected fluxes and SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies and related relevant data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A71 Warning, no authors

  9. FORMATION OF MULTIPLE-SATELLITE SYSTEMS FROM LOW-MASS CIRCUMPLANETARY PARTICLE DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takeda, Takaaki, E-mail: ryukih@stu.kobe-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ohtsuki@tiger.kobe-u.ac.jp [VASA Entertainment Co. Ltd. (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    Circumplanetary particle disks would be created in the late stage of planetary formation either by impacts of planetary bodies or disruption of satellites or passing bodies, and satellites can be formed by accretion of disk particles spreading across the Roche limit. Previous N-body simulation of lunar accretion focused on the formation of single-satellite systems from disks with large disk-to-planet mass ratios, while recent models of the formation of multiple-satellite systems from disks with smaller mass ratios do not take account of gravitational interaction between formed satellites. In the present work, we investigate satellite accretion from particle disks with various masses, using N-body simulation. In the case of accretion from somewhat less massive disks than the case of lunar accretion, formed satellites are not massive enough to clear out the disk, but can become massive enough to gravitationally shepherd the disk outer edge and start outward migration due to gravitational interaction with the disk. When the radial location of the 2:1 mean motion resonance of the satellite reaches outside the Roche limit, the second satellite can be formed near the disk outer edge, and then the two satellites continue outward migration while being locked in the resonance. Co-orbital satellites are found to be occasionally formed on the orbit of the first satellite. Our simulations also show that stochastic nature involved in gravitational interaction and collision between aggregates in the tidal environment can lead to diversity in the final mass and orbital architecture, which would be expected in satellite systems of exoplanets.

  10. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  11. The arc of Mass Spectrometry Exchange Formats is long, but it bends toward HDF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenazi, Manor; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Graumann, Johannes

    2016-10-14

    The evolution of data exchange in Mass Spectrometry spans decades and has ranged from human-readable text files representing individual scans or collections thereof (McDonald et al., 2004) through the official standard XML-based (Harold, Means, & Udemadu, 2005) data interchange standard (Deutsch, 2012), to increasingly compressed (Teleman et al., 2014) variants of this standard sometimes requiring purely binary adjunct files (Römpp et al., 2011). While the desire to maintain even partial human readability is understandable, the inherent mismatch between XML's textual and irregular format relative to the numeric and highly regular nature of actual spectral data, along with the explosive growth in dataset scales and the resulting need for efficient (binary and indexed) access has led to a phenomenon referred to as "technical drift" (Davis, 2013). While the drift is being continuously corrected using adjunct formats, compression schemes, and programs (Röst et al., 2015), we propose that the future of Mass Spectrometry Exchange Formats lies in the continued reliance and development of the PSI-MS (Mayer et al., 2014) controlled vocabulary, along with an expedited shift to an alternative, thriving and well-supported ecosystem for scientific data-exchange, storage, and access in binary form, namely that of HDF5 (Koranne, 2011). Indeed, pioneering efforts to leverage this universal, binary, and hierarchical data-format have already been published (Wilhelm et al., 2012; Rübel et al., 2013) though they have under-utilized self-description, a key property shared by HDF5 and XML. We demonstrate that a straightforward usage of plain ("vanilla") HDF5 yields immediate returns including, but not limited to, highly efficient data access, platform independent data viewers, a variety of libraries (Collette, 2014) for data retrieval and manipulation in many programming languages and remote data access through comprehensive RESTful data-servers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass

  12. The Structure, Dynamics and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rio, Nicola; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues on the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC, and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the ISM density, estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content...

  13. Effect of Pressure, Feed Rate, and Abrasive Mass Flow Rate on Water Jet Cutting Efficiency When Cutting Recombinant Bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of varying pressure, feed rate, and abrasive mass flow rate on the efficiency of an abrasive water jet cutting process was studied in this work. Recombinant bamboo samples with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 15 mm were cut by the abrasive water jet. The upper kerf width, lower kerf width, and the ratio of the upper kerf width to lower kerf width were chosen as the efficiency parameters. Mathematical models were developed to describe the relationship between the input process parameters and the efficiency parameters. The arrangement of experiments and analysis of results were performed based on response surface methodology. The evaluated model yielded predictions in agreement with experimental results.

  14. Galaxies undergoing ram-pressure stripping: the influence of the bulge on morphology and star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauser, Dominik; Kapferer, Wolfgang; Schindler, Sabine; 10.1051/0004-6361/201118311

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of stellar bulges on the star formation and morphology of disc galaxies that suffer from ram pressure. Several tree-SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations have been carried out to study the dependence of the star formation rate on the mass and size of a stellar bulge. In addition, different strengths of ram pressure and different alignments of the disc with respect to the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are applied. As claimed in previous works, when ram pressure is acting on a galaxy, the star formation rate (SFR) is enhanced and rises up to four times with increasing ICM density compared to galaxies that evolve in isolation. However, a bulge suppresses the SFR when the same ram pressure is applied. Consequently, fewer new stars are formed because the SFR can be lowered by up to 2 M_sun/yr. Furthermore, the denser the surrounding gas, the more inter-stellar medium (ISM) is stripped. While at an ICM density of 10^-28 g/cm^3 about 30% of the ISM is stripped, the galaxy is alm...

  15. The masses and density profiles of halos in a LCDM galaxy formation simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schaller, Matthieu; Bower, Richard G; Theuns, Tom; Jenkins, Adrian; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A; Furlong, Michelle; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; McCarthy, I G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the internal structure and density profiles of halos of mass $10^{10}-10^{14}~M_\\odot$ in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) simulations. These follow the formation of galaxies in a $\\Lambda$CDM Universe and include a treatment of the baryon physics thought to be relevant. The EAGLE simulations reproduce the observed present-day galaxy stellar mass function, as well as many other properties of the galaxy population as a function of time. We find significant differences between the masses of halos in the EAGLE simulations and in simulations that follow only the dark matter component. Nevertheless, halos are well described by the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile at radii larger than ~5% of the virial radius but, closer to the centre, the presence of stars can produce cuspier profiles. Central enhancements in the total mass profile are most important in halos of mass $10^{12}-10^{13}M_\\odot$, where the stellar fraction peaks. Over the radial range where t...

  16. Evidence for a fundamental stellar upper mass limit from clustered star formation, and some implications therof

    CERN Document Server

    Kroupa, P; Kroupa, Pavel; Weidner, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical considerations lead to the expectation that stars should not have masses larger than about m_{max*}=60-120Msun, while the observational evidence has been ambiguous. Only very recently has a physical stellar mass limit near 150Msun emerged thanks to modern high-resolution observations of local star-burst clusters. But this limit does not appear to depend on metallicity, in contradiction to theory. Important uncertainties remain though. It is now also emerging that star-clusters limit the masses of their constituent stars, such that a well-defined relation between the mass of the most massive star in a cluster and the cluster mass, m_{max}=F(M_ecl) \\le m_{max*}\\approx 150Msun, exists. One rather startling finding is that the observational data strongly favour clusters being built-up by consecutively forming more-massive stars until the most massive stars terminate further star-formation. The relation also implies that composite populations, which consist of many star clusters, most of which may be d...

  17. Energy expenditure in relation to flight speed: whay is the power of mass loss rate estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvist, A.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Lindström, A.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between mass loss rate and chemical power in Eying birds is analysed with regard to water and heat balance. Two models are presented: the first model is applicable to situations where heat loads are moderate, i.e. when heat balance can be achieved by regulating non-evaporative heat

  18. Mass Spectrometry Based Mechanistic Insights into Formation of Tris Conjugates: Implications on Protein Biopharmaceutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Pradeep G.; Sankaran, Praveen Kallamvalliillam; Palanivelu, Dinesh V.; Adhikary, Laxmi; Khedkar, Anand; Chatterjee, Amarnath

    2016-10-01

    We present here extensive mass spectrometric studies on the formation of a Tris conjugate with a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The results not only demonstrate the reactive nature of the Tris molecule but also the sequence and reaction conditions that trigger this reactivity. The results corroborate the fact that proteins are, in general, prone to conjugation and/or adduct formation reactions and any modification due to this essentially leads to formation of impurities in a protein sample. Further, the results demonstrate that the conjugation reaction happens via a succinimide intermediate and has sequence specificity. Additionally, the data presented in this study also shows that the Tris formation is produced in-solution and is not an in-source phenomenon. We believe that the facts given here will open further avenues on exploration of Tris as a conjugating agent as well as ensure that the use of Tris or any ionic buffer in the process of producing a biopharmaceutical drug is monitored closely for the presence of such conjugate formation.

  19. Development of Tissue to Total Mass Correction Factor for Porites divaricata in Calcification Rate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannone, T. C.; Kelly, S. K.; Foster, K.

    2013-05-01

    One anticipated result of ocean acidification is lower calcification rates of corals. Many studies currently use the buoyant weights of coral nubbins as a means of estimating skeletal weight during non-destructive experiments. The objectives of this study, conducted at the Little Cayman Research Centre, were twofold: (1) to determine whether the purple and yellow color variations of Porites divaricata had similar tissue mass to total mass ratios; and (2) to determine a correction factor for tissue mass based on the total coral mass. T-test comparisons indicated that the tissue to total mass ratios were statistically similar for purple and yellow cohorts, thus allowing them to be grouped together within a given sample population. Linear regression analysis provided a correction factor (r2 = 0.69) to estimate the tissue mass from the total mass, which may eliminate the need to remove tissue during studies and allow subsequent testing on the same nubbins or their return to the natural environment. Additional work is needed in the development of a correction factor for P. divaricata with a higher prediction accuracy.

  20. Assessing the Perceived Effectiveness of the Basic Communication Course: An Examination of the Mass-Lecture Format versus the Self-Contained Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Timothy S.; Tillson, Lou Davidson; Cox, Stephen A.; Malinauskas, Barbara K.

    2000-01-01

    Compares undergraduate college students' attitudes regarding student motivation, student perceptions of teacher verbal and nonverbal immediacy, and student perceptions of teacher credibility in two different instructional formats: mass-lecture/lab versus self-contained. Finds comparable perceptions across both instructional formats and concludes…

  1. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Kaisin, Serafim S; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2014-01-01

    We use data for faint (M_B > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the FIGGS survey to study the correlation between the atomic gas density (Sigma_gas,atomic) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ~ 0.1 Z_sun. Understanding star formation in such molecule poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20% (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the HI distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and HI distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies we compute the Sigma_gas,atomic and Sigma_SFR averaged over the entire star forming disk of the galaxy. For these galaxies we find a nearly linear relation betw...

  2. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  3. Evolution of Star Formation in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey Field - II. Star Formation as a Function of Stellar Mass Between z=1.46 and z=0.63

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Alyssa B; Baldry, Ivan K; James, Phil A; Collins, Chris A; Ouchi, Masami; Yuma, Suraphong; Dunlop, James S; Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01

    We present new results on the evolution of the cosmic star formation rate as a function of stellar mass in the SXDS-UDS field. We make use of narrow-band selected emission line galaxies in four redshift slices between z = 1.46 and z = 0.63, and compute stellar masses by fitting a series of templates to recreate each galaxy's star formation history. We determine mass-binned luminosity functions in each redshift slice, and derive the star formation rate density (rhoSFR) as a function of mass using the [OIII] or [OII] emission lines. We calculate dust extinction and metallicity as a function of stellar mass, and investigate the effect of these corrections on the shape of the overall rhoSFR(M). We find that both these corrections are crucial for determining the shape of the rhoSFR(M), and its evolution with redshift. The fully corrected rhoSFR(M) is a relatively flat distribution, with the normalisation moving towards lower values of rhoSFR with increasing cosmic time/decreasing redshift, and requiring star forma...

  4. Formation and Evolution of Neutron Star Binaries: Masses of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chang-Hwan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutron star (NS is one of the most interesting astrophysical compact objects for hardronic physics. It is believed that the central density of NS can reach several times the normal nuclear matter density (ρ0. Hence, the inner part of NS is the ultimate testing place for the physics of dense matter. Recently, the mass of NS in a NS-white dwarf (WD binary PSR J1614-2230 has been estimated to be 1.97 ± 0.04M๏ [1]. Since this estimate is based on the observed Shapiro delay, it can give the lower limit of the maximum NS mass and rules out many soft equations of state. On the other hand, all the well-measured NS masses in NS-NS binaries are smaller than 1.5M๏. In this work, by introducing the supercritical accretion during the binary evolution, we propose a possibility of forming higher mass NS in NS-WD binaries. In this scenario, the lifetimes of NS and WD progenitors are significantly different, and NS in NS-WD binary can accrete > 0.5M๏ after NS formation during the giant phase of the progenitor of WD. On the other hand, for the binary system with NS and heavier (> 8M๏ giants, the first-born NS will accrete more from the companion and can collapse into black hole. The only way to avoid the supercritical accretion is that the initial masses of progenitors of NS binary should be very close so that they evolve almost at the same time and don’t have time to accrete after NS formation.

  5. Probe Measurements of Ash Deposit Formation Rate and Shedding in a Biomass Suspension-Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...

  6. The star-formation rate density from z = 0-6

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Wang, Lingyu; Farrah, Duncan; Clements, David; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Marchetti, Lucia; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Varcari, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    We use 3035 Herschel-SPIRE 500$\\mu$m sources from 20.3 sq deg of sky in the HerMES Lockman, ES1 and XMM-LSS areas to estimate the star-formation rate density at z = 1-6. 500 mu sources are associated first with 350 and 250 mu sources, and then with Spitzer 24 mu sources from the SWIRE photometric redshift catalogue. The infrared and submillimetre data are fitted with a set of radiative-transfer templates corresponding to cirrus (quiescent) and starburst galaxies. Lensing candidates are removed via a set of colour-colour and colour-redshift constraints. Star-formation rates are found to extend from < 1 to 20,000 Mo/yr. Such high values were also seen in the all-sky IRAS Faint Source Survey. Star-formation rate functions are derived in a series of redshift bins from 0-6, combined with earlier far-infrared estimates, where available, and fitted with a Saunders et al (1990) functional form. The star-formation-rate density as a function of redshift is derived and compared with other estimates. There is reasonab...

  7. Simulation of coupled THM process in surrounding rock mass of nuclear waste repository in argillaceous formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋中明; 陈永贵

    2015-01-01

    To investigate and analyze the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupling phenomena of a surrounding rock mass in an argillaceous formation, a nuclear waste disposal concept in drifts was represented physically in an in-situ test way. A transversely isotropic model was employed to reproduce the whole test process numerically. Parameters of the rock mass were determined by laboratory and in-situ experiments. Based on the numerical simulation results and in-situ test data, the variation processes of pore water pressure, temperature and deformation of surrounding rock were analyzed. Both the measured data and numerical results reveal that the thermal perturbation is the principal driving force which leads to the variation of pore water pressure and deformations in the surrounding rock. The temperature, pore pressure and deformation of rock mass change rapidly at each initial heating stage with a constant heating power. The temperature field near the heater borehole is relatively steady in the subsequent stages of the heating phase. However, the pore pressure and deformation fields decrease gradually with temperature remaining unchanged condition. It also shows that a transversely isotropic model can reproduce the THM coupling effects generating in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository in an argillaceous formation.

  8. The Minimum Halo Mass for Star Formation at z = 6 - 8

    CERN Document Server

    Finlator, K; Oppenheimer, B D; Davé, R; Zackrisson, E; Livermore, R C; Finkelstein, S L; Thompson, R; Huang, S

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis of strongly-lensed sources in the Hubble Frontier Fields indicates that the rest-frame UV luminosity function of galaxies at $z=$6--8 rises as a power law down to $M_\\mathrm{UV}=-15$, and possibly as faint as -12.5. We use predictions from a cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation to map these luminosities onto physical space, constraining the minimum dark matter halo mass and stellar mass that the Frontier Fields probe. While previously-published theoretical studies have suggested or assumed that early star formation was suppressed in halos less massive than $10^9$--$10^{11} M_\\odot$, we find that recent observations demand vigorous star formation in halos at least as massive as (3.1, 5.6, 10.5)$\\times10^9 M_\\odot$ at $z=(6,7,8)$. Likewise, we find that Frontier Fields observations probe down to stellar masses of (8.1, 18, 32)$\\times10^6 M_\\odot$; that is, they are observing the likely progenitors of analogues to Local Group dwarfs such as Pegasus and M32. Our simulations yield somewha...

  9. Methanol masers Reliable tracers of the early stages of high-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P

    2006-01-01

    The GLIMPSE and MSX surveys have been used to examine the mid-infrared properties of a statistically complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The GLIMPSE point sources associated with methanol masers are clearly distinguished from the majority, typically having extremely red mid-infrared colors, similar to those expected of low-mass class 0 young stellar objects. The intensity of the GLIMPSE sources associated with methanol masers is typically 4 magnitudes brighter at 8.0 micron than at 3.6 micron. Targeted searches towards GLIMPSE point sources with [3.6]-[4.5] > 1.3 and an 8.0 micron magnitude less than 10 will detect more than 80% of class II methanol masers. Many of the methanol masers are associated with sources within infrared dark clouds (IRDC) which are believed to mark regions where high-mass star formation is in its very early stages. The presence of class II methanol masers in a significant fraction of IRDC suggests that high-mass star formation is common in these regions. Different maser specie...

  10. The minimum halo mass for star formation at z = 6-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlator, Kristian; Prescott, Moire K. M.; Oppenheimer, B. D.; Davé, Romeel; Zackrisson, E.; Livermore, R. C.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Thompson, Robert; Huang, Shuiyao

    2017-01-01

    Recent analysis of strongly lensed sources in the Hubble Frontier Fields indicates that the rest-frame UV luminosity function of galaxies at z = 6-8 rises as a power law down to MUV = -15, and possibly as faint as -12.5. We use predictions from a cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation to map these luminosities on to physical space, constraining the minimum dark matter halo mass and stellar mass that the Frontier Fields probe. While previously published theoretical studies have suggested or assumed that early star formation was suppressed in haloes less massive than 109-1011 M⊙, we find that recent observations demand vigorous star formation in haloes at least as massive as (3.1, 5.6, 10.5) × 109 M⊙ at z = (6, 7, 8). Likewise, we find that Frontier Fields observations probe down to stellar masses of (8.1, 18, 32) × 106 M⊙: that is, they are observing the likely progenitors of analogues to Local Group dwarfs such as Pegasus and M32. Our simulations yield somewhat different constraints than two complementary models that have been invoked in similar analyses, emphasizing the need for further observational constraints on the galaxy-halo connection.

  11. The minimum mass for star formation, and the origin of binary brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatellos, A P W D

    2006-01-01

    Our first aim is to calculate the minimum mass for Primary Fragmentation in a variety of potential star-formation scenarios, i.e. (i) hierarchical fragmentation of a 3-D medium; (ii) one-shot, 2-D fragmentation of a shock-compressed layer; (iii) fragmentation of a circumstellar disc. Our second aim is to evaluate the role of H2 dissociation in facilitating Secondary Fragmentation and thereby producing close, low-mass binaries. Results: (i)For contemporary, local star formation, the minimum mass for Primary Fragmentation is in the range 0.001-0.004Msun, irrespective of the scenario considered. (ii)Circumstellar discs are only able to radiate fast enough to undergo Primary Fragmentation in their cool outer parts (R>100AU). Therefore brown dwarfs (BDs) should have difficulty forming by Primary Fragmentation at R100AU could be the source of brown dwarfs in wide orbits, and could explain why massive discs with Rd>100AU are rarely seen.(iii)H2 dissociation can lead to collapse and Secondary Fragmentation, thereby c...

  12. The Interstellar Medium and Star Formation of Nearby, Low-Mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Steven Ray

    This thesis presents four different studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) and stellar content of ˜40 nearby (D ≲ 4 Mpc), low-mass galaxies. We aim to address two fundamental questions: "How do stellar processes effect the ISM in low-mass galaxies?" and "What are the local gas conditions which lead to molecular cloud formation?". Much of the data presented here come from our survey the "Very Large Array - Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury" (VLA-ANGST). VLA-ANGST is a targeted atomic hydrogen (H I) emission line survey directed towards 35 low-mass galaxies selected from the ANGST Hubble Space Telescope (HST) galaxy sample of the nearby universe. The VLA-ANGST project is the largest survey of its kind, demanding nearly 600 hours of VLA observing time. This unprecedented amount of observing time gives us data which has long lasting legacy value for its wealth of high resolution and high sensitivity information on the H I gas content and dynamics in a large sample of nearby, low-mass galaxies. H I data from the VLA-ANGST project will be used to explore the interactions between the gas and stellar content as well as trace the underlying dark matter distribution. Combining the H I and HST data with other tracers of recent star formation (e.g., emission processes from far ultraviolet star light, dust in the infrared, and carbon monoxide in the submillimeter) provides a comprehensive census of each galaxy, useful for understanding their evolution. We investigate the role of multiple generations of star formation in the formation of large, kiloparsec scale cavities observed in the global H I distributions of five nearby, low mass galaxies. The small gravitational potential wells of some low-mass galaxies allow the outflow of energy from stellar processes (e.g., winds, supernovae, etc.) to help shape their gas distributions. We find that stellar processes produce ample energy (at least an order of magnitude or more) to have been the dominant

  13. Quantification of volume, mass, and density of thrombus formation using brightfield and differential interference contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M.; Phillips, Kevin G.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Flow chamber assays, in which blood is perfused over surfaces of immobilized extracellular matrix proteins, are used to investigate the formation of platelet thrombi and aggregates under shear flow conditions. Elucidating the dynamic response of thrombi/aggregate formation to different coagulation pathway perturbations in vitro has been used to develop an understanding of normal and pathological cardiovascular states. Current microscopy techniques, such as differential interference contrast (DIC) or fluorescent confocal imaging, respectively, do not provide a simple, quantitative understanding of the basic physical features (volume, mass, and density) of platelet thrombi/aggregate structures. The use of two label-free imaging techniques applied, for the first time, to platelet aggregate and thrombus formation are introduced: noninterferometric quantitative phase microscopy, to determine mass, and Hilbert transform DIC microscopy, to perform volume measurements. Together these techniques enable a quantitative biophysical characterization of platelet aggregates and thrombi formed on three surfaces: fibrillar collagen, fibrillar collagen +0.1 nM tissue factor (TF), and fibrillar collagen +1 nM TF. It is demonstrated that label-free imaging techniques provide quantitative insight into the mechanisms by which thrombi and aggregates are formed in response to exposure to different combinations of procoagulant agonists under shear flow.

  14. Radio emission and mass loss rate limits of four young solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtinger, Bibiana; Güdel, Manuel; Mutel, Robert L.; Hallinan, Gregg; Gaidos, Eric; Skinner, Stephen L.; Lynch, Christene; Gayley, Kenneth G.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Observations of free-free continuum radio emission of four young main-sequence solar-type stars (EK Dra, π1 UMa, χ1 Ori, and κ1 Cet) are studied to detect stellar winds or at least to place upper limits on their thermal radio emission, which is dominated by the ionized wind. The stars in our sample are members of The Sun in Time programme and cover ages of 0.1-0.65 Gyr on the main-sequence. They are similar in magnetic activity to the Sun and thus are excellent proxies for representing the young Sun. Upper limits on mass loss rates for this sample of stars are calculated using their observational radio emission. Our aim is to re-examine the faint young Sun paradox by assuming that the young Sun was more massive in its past, and hence to find a possible solution for this famous problem. Methods: The observations of our sample are performed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) with excellent sensitivity, using the C-band receiver from 4-8 GHz and the Ku-band from 12-18 GHz. Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillitmeter Array (ALMA) observations are performed at 100 GHz. The Common Astronomy Software Application (CASA) package is used for the data preparation, reduction, calibration, and imaging. For the estimation of the mass loss limits, spherically symmetric winds and stationary, anisotropic, ionized winds are assumed. We compare our results to 1) mass loss rate estimates of theoretical rotational evolution models; and 2) to results of the indirect technique of determining mass loss rates: Lyman-α absorption. Results: We are able to derive the most stringent direct upper limits on mass loss so far from radio observations. Two objects, EK Dra and χ1 Ori, are detected at 6 and 14 GHz down to an excellent noise level. These stars are very active and additional radio emission identified as non-thermal emission was detected, but limits for the mass loss rates of these objects are still derived. The emission of χ1 Ori does not come from the main target

  15. A Spatially Resolved Map of the Kinematics, Star-Formation and Stellar Mass Assembly in a Star-Forming Galaxy at z=4.9

    CERN Document Server

    Swinbank, Mark; Richard, Johan; Bower, Richard; Ellis, Richard; Illingworth, Garth; Jones, Tucker; Kriek, Mariska; Smail, Ian; Stark, Dan; Van Dokkum, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the spatially resolved kinematics, star-formation and stellar mass in a highly amplified galaxy at z=4.92 behind the lensing cluster MS1358+62. We use the observed optical, near- and mid-infrared imaging from HST ACS & NICMOS and Spitzer IRAC to derive the stellar mass and the Gemini/NIFS IFU to investigate the velocity structure of the galaxy from the nebular [OII] emission. Using a detailed gravitational lens model, we account for lensing amplification factor 12.+/-2.0 and find that this intrinsically L* galaxy has a stellar mass of M*=7+/-2x10^8Mo, a dynamical mass of Mdyn=3+/-1x10^9csc^2(i)Mo (within of 2kpc) and a star-formation rate of 42+/-8Mo/yr. The source-plane UV/optical morphology of this galaxy is dominated by five discrete star-forming regions. Exploiting the dynamical information we derive masses for individual star-forming regions of Mcl~10^(8-9)Mo with sizes of ~200pc. We find that, at a fixed size, the star-formation rate density within these HII regions is...

  16. Measured Mass Loss Rates of Solar-like Stars as a Function of Age and Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, B E; Zank, G P; Linsky, J L; Wood, Brian E.; Mueller, Hans-Reinhard; Zank, Gary P.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Collisions between the winds of solar-like stars and the local ISM result in a population of hot hydrogen gas surrounding these stars. Absorption from this hot H I can be detected in high resolution Lyman-alpha spectra of these stars from the Hubble Space Telescope. The amount of absorption can be used as a diagnostic for the stellar mass loss rate. We present new mass loss rate measurements derived in this fashion for four stars (Epsilon Eri, 61 Cyg A, 36 Oph AB, and 40 Eri A). Combining these measurements with others, we study how mass loss varies with stellar activity. We find that for the solar-like GK dwarfs, the mass loss per unit surface area is correlated with X-ray surface flux. Fitting a power law to this relation yields Mdot ~ Fx^(1.15+/-0.20). The active M dwarf Proxima Cen and the very active RS CVn system Lambda And appear to be inconsistent with this relation. Since activity is known to decrease with age, the above power law relation for solar-like stars suggests that mass loss decreases with t...

  17. Does seed mass drive the differences in relative growth rate between growth forms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jennie; Thompson, Ken; Rees, Mark

    2013-07-07

    The idea that herbaceous plants have higher relative growth rates (RGRs) compared with woody plants is fundamental to many of the most influential theories in plant ecology. This difference in growth rate is thought to reflect systematic variation in physiology, allocation and leaf construction. Previous studies documenting this effect have, however, ignored differences in seed mass. As woody species often have larger seeds and RGR is negatively correlated with seed mass, it is entirely possible the lower RGRs observed in woody species is a consequence of having larger seeds rather than different growth strategies. Using a synthesis of the published literature, we explored the relationship between RGR and growth form, accounting for the effects of seed mass and study-specific effects (e.g. duration of study and pot volume), using a mixed-effects model. The model showed that herbaceous species do indeed have higher RGRs than woody species, and that the difference was independent of seed mass, thus at all seed masses, herbaceous species on average grow faster than woody ones.

  18. Slow Evolution of the Specific Star Formation Rate at z > 2: The Impact of Dust, Emission Lines, and a Rising Star Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Valentino; Bouwens, Rychard; Illingworth, Garth; Labbé, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Magee, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M stellar) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported "constant" sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ~ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M stellar values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M stellar bins centered at 1 and 5 × 109 M ⊙. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 109 M ⊙ evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)0.6 ± 0.1), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)1.0 ± 0.1, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ~2.3 × higher at z ~ 6 than at z ~ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)2.5). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  19. Identification of biomolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters in living cells by inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirmohammadi Adel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of in-vivo biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters from experimental data obtained by Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP is becoming more important. Methods and results The Osborne-Moré extended version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was coupled with the experimental data obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP protocol, and the numerical solution of a set of two partial differential equations governing macromolecule mass transport and reaction in living cells, to inversely estimate optimized values of the molecular diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor. The results indicate that the FRAP protocol provides enough information to estimate one parameter uniquely using a nonlinear optimization technique. Coupling FRAP experimental data with the inverse modeling strategy, one can also uniquely estimate the individual values of the binding rate coefficients if the molecular diffusion coefficient is known. One can also simultaneously estimate the dissociation rate parameter and molecular diffusion coefficient given the pseudo-association rate parameter is known. However, the protocol provides insufficient information for unique simultaneous estimation of three parameters (diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters owing to the high intercorrelation between the molecular diffusion coefficient and pseudo-association rate parameter. Attempts to estimate macromolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters simultaneously from FRAP data result in misleading conclusions regarding concentrations of free macromolecule and bound complex inside the cell, average binding time per vacant site, average time for diffusion of macromolecules from one site to the next, and slow or rapid mobility of biomolecules in cells. Conclusion To obtain unique values for molecular diffusion coefficient and

  20. Formation of truncated proteins and high-molecular-mass aggregates upon soft illumination of photosynthetic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinalducci, Sara; Campostrini, Natascia; Antonioli, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Different spot profiles were observed in 2D gel electrophoresis of thylakoid membranes performed either under complete darkness or by leaving the sample for a short time to low visible light. In the latter case, a large number of new spots with lower molecular masses, ranging between 15,000 and 25......,000 Da, were observed, and high-molecular-mass aggregates, seen as a smearing in the upper part of the gel, appeared in the region around 250 kDa. Identification of protein(s) contained in these new spots by MS/MS revealed that most of them are simply truncated proteins deriving from native ones......, fragments, or aggregates. This resulted from the formation of extremely reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can derive by the exposure of chlorophyll binding proteins of photosynthetic apparatus to low-intensity light during laboratory manipulation of sample for electrophoresis runs....

  1. Below One Earth Mass: The Detection, Formation, and Properties of Subterrestrial Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Sinukoff, E; Scuderi, L; Gaidos, E

    2013-01-01

    The Solar System includes two planets --- Mercury and Mars --- significantly less massive than Earth, and all evidence indicates that planets of similar size orbit many stars. In fact, one of the first exoplanets to be discovered is a lunar-mass planet around a millisecond pulsar. Novel classes of exoplanets have inspired new ideas about planet formation and evolution, and these "sub-Earths" should be no exception: they include planets with masses between Mars and Venus for which there are no Solar System analogs. Advances in astronomical instrumentation and recent space missions have opened the sub-Earth frontier for exploration: the Kepler mission has discovered dozens of confirmed or candidate sub-Earths transiting their host stars. It can detect Mars-size planets around its smallest stellar targets, as well as exomoons of comparable size. Although the application of the Doppler method is currently limited by instrument stability, future spectrographs may detect equivalent planets orbiting close to nearby ...

  2. Ambipolar diffusion in low-mass star formation. I. General comparison with the ideal MHD case

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, Jacques; Hennebelle, Patrick; Vaytet, Neil; Commerçon, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a more accurate description of the evolution of the magnetic flux redistribution during prestellar core collapse by including resistive terms in the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. We focus more particularly on the impact of ambipolar diffusion. We use the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES to carry out such calculations. The resistivities required to calculate the ambipolar diffusion terms were computed using a reduced chemical network of charged, neutral and grain species. The inclusion of ambipolar diffusion leads to the formation of a magnetic diffusion barrier in the vicinity of the core, preventing accumulation of magnetic flux in and around the core and amplification of the field above 0.1G. The mass and radius of the first Larson core remain similar between ideal and non-ideal MHD models. This diffusion plateau has crucial consequences on magnetic braking processes, allowing the formation of disk structures. Magnetically supported outflows launched in ideal MHD models...

  3. Methanol masers as tools to study high-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pestalozzi, Michele

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution I will attempt to show that the study of galactic 6.7 and 12.2GHz methanol masers themselves, as opposed to the use of methanol masers as signposts, can yield important conclusions contributing to the understanding of high-mass star formation. Due to their exclusive association with star formation, methanol masers are the best tools to do this, and their large number allows to probe the entire Galaxy. In particular I will focus on the determination of the luminosity function of methanol masers and on the determination of an unambiguous signature for a circumstellar masing disc seen edge-on. Finally I will try to point out some future fields of research in the study of methanol masers.

  4. Probing Neutrino Mass Hierarchy by Comparing the Charged-Current and Neutral-Current Interaction Rates of Supernova Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Kwang-Chang; Lee, Feng-Shiuh; Lin, Guey-Lin; Liu, Tsung-Che; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass hierarchy is one of the neutrino fundamental properties yet to be determined. We introduce a method to determine neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the interaction rate of neutral current (NC) interactions, $\

  5. The Formation of Supermassive Black Holes from Low-Mass Pop III Seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    The existence of 10$^9$ M$_{\\odot}$ black holes (BH) in massive galaxies by $z \\sim 7$ is one of the great unsolved mysteries in cosmological structure formation. One leading model argues that they originate from much smaller seeds at high redshift and then accrete at the Eddington limit down to the epoch of reionization, which requires that they have constant access to rich supplies of fuel. Because early numerical simulations suggested that many first stars had masses $\\gtrsim 100$ M$_{\\odot}$, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) seeds in this model were 100 - 300 M$_{\\odot}$ black holes formed by Pop III stars at $z \\sim 20$. However, there is growing numerical and observational evidence that most Pop III stars were tens of solar masses, not hundreds, and consequently that 20 - 140 M$_{\\odot}$ black holes may have been much more plentiful at high redshift. We have examined low-mass Pop III black holes as potential seeds of SMBH and find that the mass range for possible seeds is severely constrained. Progeni...

  6. Evidence for the rapid formation of low mass early-type galaxies in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yiqing; Blakeslee, John; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Puzia, Thomas H; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    We explore the environmental dependence of star formation timescales in low mass galaxies using the [$\\alpha$/Fe] abundance ratio as an evolutionary clock. We present integrated [$\\alpha$/Fe] measurements for 11 low mass ($M_\\star \\sim 10^9~M_\\odot$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) with a large range of cluster-centric distance in the Virgo Cluster. We find a gradient in [$\\alpha$/Fe], where the galaxies closest to the cluster center (the cD galaxy, M87) have the highest values. This trend is driven by galaxies within a projected radius of 0.4~Mpc (0.26 times the virial radius of Virgo~A), all of which have super-solar [$\\alpha$/Fe]. Galaxies in this mass range exhibit a large scatter in the [$\\alpha$/Fe]--$\\sigma$ diagram, and do not obviously lie on an extension of the relation defined by massive ETGs. In addition, we find a correlation between [$\\alpha$/Fe] and globular cluster specific frequency ($S_N$), suggesting that low-mass ETGs that formed their stars over a short period of time, were also efficient at f...

  7. The history of star formation and mass assembly in early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Clemens, M S; Nikolic, B; Rampazzo, R

    2008-01-01

    We define a volume limited sample of over 14,000 early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from data release six of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The density of environment of each galaxy is robustly measured. By comparing narrow band spectral line indices with recent models of simple stellar populations (SSPs) we investigate trends in the star formation history as a function of galaxy mass (velocity dispersion), density of environment and galactic radius. We find that age, metallicity and alpha-enhancement all increase with galaxy mass and that field ETGs are younger than their cluster counterparts by ~2 Gyr. We find negative radial metallicity gradients for all masses and environments, and positive radial age gradients for ETGs with velocity dispersion over 180 km/s. Our results are qualitatively consistent with a relatively simple picture for ETG evolution in which the low-mass halos accreted by a proto-ETG contained not only gas but also a stellar population. This fossil population is preferentially found at la...

  8. Evolution of collisionless systems of gravitating masses, and the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Klypin, A.A.

    1981-03-01

    A series of dissipation-free models are investigated for the formation of structure in elliptical galaxies or rich clusters of galaxies by the rapid relaxation process. Using the method of macroparticles, the evolution of two types of systems comprising approx.10/sup 4/ particles is computed numerically: a) a system of superposed homogeneous oblate ellipsoids differing widely in mass and initial density; b) successive accretion of a set of low-density envelopes. In all cases an extended, flattened power-law surface-density profile develops, in good agreement with the profiles observed. The relationship between the parameters of the initial and final distributions is discussed.

  9. Formation and thermodynamics of gaseous germanium and tin vanadates: a mass spectrometric and quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugurov, S M; Panin, A I; Lopatin, S I; Emelyanova, K A

    2015-06-07

    The stabilities of gaseous germanium and tin vanadates were confirmed by high temperature mass spectrometry, and its structures were determined by quantum chemical calculations. A number of gas-phase reactions involving these gaseous salts were studied. On the basis of the equilibrium constants, the standard formation enthalpies of gaseous GeV2O6 (-1520 ± 42 kJ mol(-1)) and SnV2O6 (-1520 ± 43 kJ mol(-1)) were determined at a temperature of 298 K.

  10. Formation of the First Low-Mass Stars from Cosmological Initial Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Bromm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We simulate the formation of a metal-poor ($10^{-2}\\,Z_{\\odot}$) stellar cluster in one of the first galaxies to form in the early Universe, specifically a high-redshift atomic cooling halo ($z\\sim14$). This is the first calculation that resolves the formation of individual metal-enriched stars in simulations starting from realistic cosmological initial conditions. We follow the evolution of a single dense clump among several in the parent halo. The clump forms a cluster of $\\sim40$ stars and sub-stellar objects within $7000$ yrs and could continue forming stars $\\sim5$ times longer. Protostellar dust heating has a negligible effect on the star formation efficiency, at least during the early evolutionary stages, but it moderately suppresses gaseous fragmentation and brown dwarf formation. We observe fragmentation in thin gaseous filaments and sustained accretion in larger, rotating structures as well as ejections by binary interactions. The stellar initial mass function above $0.1\\,M_{\\odot}$, evaluated after...

  11. qcML: An Exchange Format for Quality Control Metrics from Mass Spectrometry Experiments*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W. P.; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A.; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Heck, Albert J. R.; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data exchange format for reporting these performance metrics. We therefore developed the qcML format, an XML-based standard that follows the design principles of the related mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, and TraML standards from the HUPO-PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative). In addition to the XML format, we also provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml. PMID:24760958

  12. qcML: an exchange format for quality control metrics from mass spectrometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Mathias; Pernas, Lucia Espona; Nasso, Sara; Bittremieux, Wout; Nahnsen, Sven; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Pichler, Peter; van den Toorn, Henk W P; Staes, An; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mazanek, Michael; Taus, Thomas; Scheltema, Richard A; Kelstrup, Christian D; Gatto, Laurent; van Breukelen, Bas; Aiche, Stephan; Valkenborg, Dirk; Laukens, Kris; Lilley, Kathryn S; Olsen, Jesper V; Heck, Albert J R; Mechtler, Karl; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gevaert, Kris; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Martens, Lennart

    2014-08-01

    Quality control is increasingly recognized as a crucial aspect of mass spectrometry based proteomics. Several recent papers discuss relevant parameters for quality control and present applications to extract these from the instrumental raw data. What has been missing, however, is a standard data exchange format for reporting these performance metrics. We therefore developed the qcML format, an XML-based standard that follows the design principles of the related mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML, and TraML standards from the HUPO-PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative). In addition to the XML format, we also provide tools for the calculation of a wide range of quality metrics as well as a database format and interconversion tools, so that existing LIMS systems can easily add relational storage of the quality control data to their existing schema. We here describe the qcML specification, along with possible use cases and an illustrative example of the subsequent analysis possibilities. All information about qcML is available at http://code.google.com/p/qcml. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas, HI, and Star Formation in the Low-Mass, Low-Metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, Katherine E; Leroy, Adam K; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl; Hughes, Annie; Israel, Frank P; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Madden, Suzanne C; Bot, Caroline; Hony, Sacha; Cormier, Diane; Pellegrini, Eric W; Galametz, Maud; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    The Magellanic Clouds provide the only laboratory to study the effect of metallicity and galaxy mass on molecular gas and star formation at high (~20 pc) resolution. We use the dust emission from HERITAGE Herschel data to map the molecular gas in the Magellanic Clouds, avoiding the known biases of CO emission as a tracer of H2. Using our dust-based molecular gas estimates, we find molecular gas depletion times of ~0.4 Gyr in the LMC and ~0.6 SMC at 1 kpc scales. These depletion times fall within the range found for normal disk galaxies, but are shorter than the average value, which could be due to recent bursts in star formation. We find no evidence for a strong intrinsic dependence of the molecular gas depletion time on metallicity. We study the relationship between gas and star formation rate across a range in size scales from 20 pc to ~1 kpc, including how the scatter in molecular gas depletion time changes with size scale, and discuss the physical mechanisms driving the relationships. We compare the metal...

  14. Development of a Neural Fuzzy System for Advanced Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Rate in Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad JALALNEZHAD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the natural gas industry in the 20th century, the production, processing and distribution of natural gas under high-pressure conditions has become necessary. Under these conditions, it was found that the production and transmission pipelines were becoming blocked with what looked like to be ice. Hammerschmidt determined that hydrates were the cause of plugged natural gas pipelines. Gas hydrates and difficulties related to their formation in production and transmission pipelines and equipment, are the major concerns of the gas industry. The main objective of this study was to present a novel approach to access more accurate hydrate formation rate predicting models based on a combination of flow loop experimental data with learning power of adaptive neural-fuzzy inference systems and more than 900 data points of the , , , and i-  hydrate formation rate. Using this data set different predictive models were developed. It was found that such models can be used as powerful tools, with total errors less than 6 % for the developed models, in predicting hydrate formation rate in these cases.

  15. Empirical mass-loss rates for 25 O and early B stars, derived from Copernicus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, R.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Snow, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet line profiles are fitted with theoretical line profiles in the cases of 25 stars covering a spectral type range from O4 to B1, including all luminosity classes. Ion column densities are compared for the determination of wind ionization, and it is found that the O VI/N V ratio is dependent on the mean density of the wind and not on effective temperature value, while the Si IV/N V ratio is temperature-dependent. The column densities are used to derive a mass-loss rate parameter that is empirically correlated against the mass-loss rate by means of standard stars with well-determined rates from IR or radio data. The empirical mass-loss rates obtained are compared with those derived by others and found to vary by as much as a factor of 10, which is shown to be due to uncertainties or errors in the ionization fractions of models used for wind ionization balance prediction.

  16. Eutherians experienced elevated evolutionary rates in the immediate aftermath of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Thomas John Dixon; Upchurch, Paul; Goswami, Anjali

    2016-06-29

    The effect of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction on the evolution of many groups, including placental mammals, has been hotly debated. The fossil record suggests a sudden adaptive radiation of placentals immediately after the event, but several recent quantitative analyses have reconstructed no significant increase in either clade origination rates or rates of character evolution in the Palaeocene. Here we use stochastic methods to date a recent phylogenetic analysis of Cretaceous and Palaeocene mammals and show that Placentalia likely originated in the Late Cretaceous, but that most intraordinal diversification occurred during the earliest Palaeocene. This analysis reconstructs fewer than 10 placental mammal lineages crossing the K-Pg boundary. Moreover, we show that rates of morphological evolution in the 5 Myr interval immediately after the K-Pg mass extinction are three times higher than background rates during the Cretaceous. These results suggest that the K-Pg mass extinction had a marked impact on placental mammal diversification, supporting the view that an evolutionary radiation occurred as placental lineages invaded new ecological niches during the Early Palaeocene.

  17. Multiple low-turbulence starless cores associated with intermediate- to high-mass star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: Characterizing the gas and dust properties prior to and in the neighborhood of active intermediate- to high-mass star formation. Methods: Two Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) - IRDC 19175-4 and IRDC 19175-5 - that are located in the vicinity of the luminous massive star-forming region IRAS 19175+1357, but that remain absorption features up to 70 μm wavelength, were observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the 3.23 mm dust continuum as well as the N2H^+(1-0) and 13CS(2-1) line emission. Results: While IRDC 19175-4 is clearly detected in the 3.23 mm continuum, the second source in the field, IRDC 19175-5, is only barely observable above the 3σ continuum detection threshold. However, the N2H^+(1-0) observations reveal 17 separate sub-sources in the vicinity of the two IRDCs. Most of them exhibit low levels of turbulence (Δ v ≤ 1 km s-1), indicating that the fragmentation process in these cores may be dominated by the interplay of thermal pressure and gravity, but not so much by turbulence. Combining the small line widths with the non-detection up to 70 μm and the absence of other signs of star formation activity, most of these 17 cores with masses between sub-solar to ~10 M⊙ are likely still in a starless phase. The N2H+ column density analysis indicates significant abundance variations between the cores. Furthermore, we find a large CS depletion factor of the order 100. Although the strongest line and continuum peak is close to virial equilibrium, its slightly broader line width compared to the other cores is consistent with it being in a contraction phase potentially at the verge of star formation. Based on the 3.23 mm upper limits, the other cores may be gravitationally stable or even transient structures. The relative peak velocities between neighboring cores are usually below 1 km s-1, and we do not identify streaming motions along the filamentary structures. Average densities are between 105 and 106 cm-3 (one to two orders of magnitude

  18. Oscillating decay rate in electron capture and the neutrino mass difference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peshkin, Murray

    2015-04-09

    Reported oscillations in the rate of decay of certain ions by K -electron capture have raised questions about whether and how such oscillations can arise in quantum-mechanical theory and whether they can measure the neutrino mass difference. Here I show that simple principles of quantum mechanics answer some questions and clarify what must be performed theoretically or experimentally to answer some others. The principal result is that quantum mechanics does allow mass-difference-dependent oscillations in principle, but it imposes conditions not obeyed by the approximate dynamical models that have been put forth up to now. In particular, indirect coupling between two neutrino mass channels must be taken into account. What needs to be done experimentally and theoretically is discussed.

  19. Oscillating decay rate in electron capture and the neutrino mass difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshkin, Murray

    2015-04-01

    Reported oscillations in the rate of decay of certain ions by K -electron capture have raised questions about whether and how such oscillations can arise in quantum-mechanical theory and whether they can measure the neutrino mass difference. Here I show that simple principles of quantum mechanics answer some questions and clarify what must be performed theoretically or experimentally to answer some others. The principal result is that quantum mechanics does allow mass-difference-dependent oscillations in principle, but it imposes conditions not obeyed by the approximate dynamical models that have been put forth up to now. In particular, indirect coupling between two neutrino mass channels must be taken into account. What needs to be done experimentally and theoretically is discussed.

  20. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  1. Stellar mass black holes in star clusters: gravitational wave emission and detection rates

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of stellar-mass black holes (BH) in star clusters focusing on the dynamical formation of BH-BH binaries, which are very important sources of gravitational waves (GW). We examine the properties of these BH-BH binaries through direct N-body computations of Plummer clusters, having initially N(0) = 5 X 10^4, typically a few of them dynamically harden to the extent that they can merge via GW emission within the cluster. Also, for each of such clusters, there are a few ...

  2. Gravitational Waves from Merging Intermediate-mass Black Holes. II. Event Rates at Ground-based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH), we estimate the expected observational profile of gravitational waves at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Noting that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up (especially with KAGRA owing to its location at less seismic noise), we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH with mass Madvanced LIGO/VIRGO), we find that the BH merger of its total mass M∼ 60{M}ȯ is at the peak of the expected mass distribution. With its signal-to-noise ratio ρ =10 (30), we estimate the event rate R∼ 200 (20) per year in the most optimistic case, and we also find that BH mergers in the range M 1 per year for ρ =10. Thus, if we observe a BH with more than 100{M}ȯ in future gravitational-wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  3. Rapid mass movement of chloroplasts during segment formation of the calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W D Larkum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3-5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ∼0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. SIGNIFICANCE: This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity.

  4. Some empirical estimates of the H2 formation rate in photon-dominated regions

    CERN Document Server

    Habart, E; Verstraete, L; Walmsley, C M; Pineau des Forêts, G

    2004-01-01

    We combine recent ISO observations of the vibrational ground state lines of H2 towards Photon-Dominated Regions (PDRs) with observations of vibrationally excited states made with ground-based telescopes in order to constrain the formation rate of H2 on grain surfaces under the physical conditions in the layers responsible for H2 emission. We use steady state PDR models in order to examine the sensitivity of different H2 line ratios to the H2 formation rate Rf. We show that the ratio of the 0-0 S(3) to the 1-0 S(1) line increases with Rf but that one requires independent estimates of the radiation field incident upon the PDR and the density in order to infer Rf from the H2 line data. We confirm the earlier result of Habart et al. (2003) that the H2 formation rate in regions of moderate excitation such as Oph W, S140 and IC 63 is a factor of 5 times larger than the standard rate inferred from UV observations of diffuse clouds. On the other hand, towards regions of higher radiation field such as the Orion Bar an...

  5. Self-Consistent MHD Modeling of a Coronal Mass Ejection, Coronal Dimming, and a Giant Cusp-Shaped Arcade Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Shiota, D; Chen, P F; Yamamoto, T T; Sakajiri, T; Shibata, K; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Sakajiri, Takuma; Shibata, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We performed magnetohydrodynamic simulation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated giant arcade formations, and the results suggested new interpretations of observations of CMEs. We performed two cases of the simulation: with and without heat conduction. Comparing between the results of the two cases, we found that reconnection rate in the conductive case is a little higher than that in the adiabatic case and the temperature of the loop top is consistent with the theoretical value predicted by the Yokoyama-Shibata scaling law. The dynamical properties such as velocity and magnetic fields are similar in the two cases, whereas thermal properties such as temperature and density are very different.In both cases, slow shocks associated with magnetic reconnectionpropagate from the reconnection region along the magnetic field lines around the flux rope, and the shock fronts form spiral patterns. Just outside the slow shocks, the plasma density decreased a great deal. The soft X-ray images synthesized from t...

  6. A Kalman Filter for Mass Property and Thrust Identification of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Steven Z.

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four identically instrumented, spin-stabilized observatories, elliptically orbiting the Earth in a tetrahedron formation. For the operational success of the mission, on-board systems must be able to deliver high-precision orbital adjustment maneuvers. On MMS, this is accomplished using feedback from on-board star sensors in tandem with accelerometers whose measurements are dynamically corrected for errors associated with a spinning platform. In order to determine the required corrections to the measured acceleration, precise estimates of attitude, rate, and mass-properties are necessary. To this end, both an on-board and ground-based Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) were formulated and implemented in order to estimate the dynamic and quasi-static properties of the spacecraft.

  7. Formation of hydrogen bonds precedes the rate-limiting formation of persistent structure in the folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J;

    2000-01-01

    A burst phase in the early folding of the four-helix two-state folder protein acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) has been detected using quenched-flow in combination with site-specific NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. Several of the burst phase structures coincide with a structure consisting...... of eight conserved hydrophobic residues at the interface between the two N and C-terminal helices. Previous mutation studies have shown that the formation of this structure is rate limiting for the final folding of ACBP. The burst phase structures observed in ACBP are different from the previously reported...... collapsed types of burst phase intermediates observed in the folding of other proteins....

  8. Mass Spectrometric Calibration of Controlled Fluoroform Leak Rate Devices Technique and Uncertainty Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balsley, S D; Laduca, C A

    2003-01-01

    Controlled leak rate devices of fluoroform on the order of 10 sup - sup 8 atm centre dot cc sec sup - sup 1 at 25 C are used to calibrate QC-1 War Reserve neutron tube exhaust stations for leak detection sensitivity. Close-out calibration of these tritium-contaminated devices is provided by the Gas Dynamics and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Organization 14406, which is a tritium analytical facility. The mass spectrometric technique used for the measurement is discussed, as is the first principals calculation (pressure, volume, temperature and time). The uncertainty of the measurement is largely driven by contributing factors in the determination of P, V and T. The expanded uncertainty of the leak rate measurement is shown to be 4.42%, with a coverage factor of 3 (k=3).

  9. The mass transfer rate in X1916-053 - It is driven by gravitational radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J. H.; Taam, R. E.; White, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    A 50-minute period for a binary system harboring an X-ray burster would allow several alternatives for the mass-giving secondary, including an H-shell burning-plus-He degenerate core composite model. The burst properties of X1916-053 are presently used to argue against the He degenerate as well as the He main sequence solutions and to estimate whether, for any of the other solutions, the mass transfer rate could be consistent with that expected from gravitational radiation (GR). Within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, the transfer rate for the composite model solution is consistent with gravitational radiation, but enhancement by other mechanisms should be investigated.

  10. MERGERS AND STAR FORMATION: THE ENVIRONMENT AND STELLAR MASS GROWTH OF THE PROGENITORS OF ULTRA-MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE Z = 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulcani, Benedetta [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8582 (Japan); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); De Lucia, Gabriella [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Muzzin, Adam [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Stefanon, Mauro; Labbé, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Le Fèvre, Olivier [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Milvang-Jensen, Bo, E-mail: benedetta.vulcani@ipmu.jp [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-01-10

    The growth of galaxies is a key problem in understanding the structure and evolution of the universe. Galaxies grow their stellar mass by a combination of star formation and mergers, with a relative importance that is redshift dependent. Theoretical models predict quantitatively different contributions from the two channels; measuring these from the data is a crucial constraint. Exploiting the UltraVISTA catalog and a unique sample of progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies selected with an abundance matching approach, we quantify the role of the two mechanisms from z = 2 to 0. We also compare our results to two independent incarnations of semi-analytic models. At all redshifts, progenitors are found in a variety of environments, ranging from being isolated to having 5–10 companions with mass ratio at least 1:10 within a projected radius of 500 kpc. In models, progenitors have a systematically larger number of companions, entailing a larger mass growth for mergers than in observations, at all redshifts. Generally, in both observations and models, the inferred and the expected mass growth roughly agree, within the uncertainties. Overall, our analysis confirms the model predictions, showing how the growth history of massive galaxies is dominated by in situ star formation at z ∼ 2, both star formation and mergers at 1 < z < 2, and by mergers alone at z < 1. Nonetheless, detailed comparisons still point out tensions between the expected mass growth and our results, which might be due to either an incorrect progenitors-descendants selection, uncertainties on star-formation rate and mass estimates, or the adopted assumptions on merger rates.

  11. A new prescription for the mass-loss rates of WC and WO stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tramper, F; de Koter, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a new empirical prescription for the mass-loss rates of carbon and oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of their luminosity, surface chemical composition, and initial metallicity. The new prescription is based on results of detailed spectral analyses of WC and WO stars, and improves the often applied Nugis & Lamers (2000) relation. We find that the mass-loss rates of WC and WO stars (with $X=0$ and $Y < 0.98$) can be expressed as $\\log{\\dot{M}} = -9.20 + 0.85\\log{(L/L_{\\odot})} + 0.44\\log{Y} + 0.25\\log{(Z_{\\mathrm{Fe}}/Z_{\\mathrm{Fe}, \\odot})}$. This relation is based on mass-loss determinations that assume a volume-filling factor of 0.1, but the prescription can easily be scaled to account for other volume-filling factors. The residual of the fit is $\\sigma = 0.06$ dex. We investigated whether the relation can also describe the mass loss of hydrogen-free WN stars and showed that it can when an adjustement of the metallicty dependence ($\\log{\\dot{M}} \\propto 1.3\\log{(Z_{\\mathrm{Fe}...

  12. Formation of In Situ Stellar Haloes in Milky Way-Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Andrew P; Lowing, Ben; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We study the formation of stellar haloes in three Milky Way-mass galaxies using cosmological SPH simulations, focusing on the subset of halo stars that form in situ, as opposed to those accreted from satellites. In situ stars in our simulations dominate the stellar halo out to 20 kpc and account for 30 - 40 per cent of its total mass. We separate in situ halo stars into three straightforward, physically distinct categories according to their origin: stars scattered from the disc of the main galaxy ("heated disc"), stars formed from gas smoothly accreted onto the halo ("smooth"-gas) and stars formed in streams of gas stripped from infalling satellites ("stripped"-gas). We find that most belong to this latter category. Those originating in smooth gas outside the disc tend to form at the same time and place as the stripped-gas population, suggesting that their formation is associated with the same gas-rich accretion events. The scattered disc star contribution is negligible overall but significant in the Solar n...

  13. Multiple low-turbulence starless cores associated with intermediate- to high-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the initial conditions for intermediate- to high-mass star formation, we observed two Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) that remain absorption features up to 70mum wavelength, with the PdBI in the 3.23mm dust continuum as well as the N2H+(1--0) and 13CS(2-1) line emission. While IRDC19175-4 is clearly detected in the 3.23mm continuum, the second source in the field, IRDC19175-5, is only barely observable above the 3sigma continuum detection threshold. However, the N2H+(1-0) observations reveal 17 separate sub-sources in the vicinity of the two IRDCs. Most of them exhibit low levels of turbulence (dv \\leq 1km/s), indicating that the fragmentation process in these cores may be dominated by the interplay of thermal pressure and gravity, but not so much by turbulence. Combining the small line widths with the non-detection up to 70mum and the absence of other signs of star formation activity, most of these 17 cores with masses between sub-solar to ~10M_sun are likely still in a starless phase. Furthermo...

  14. The rotation rates of massive stars: the role of binary interaction trough tides, mass transfer and mergers

    CERN Document Server

    de Mink, S E; Izzard, R G; Sana, H; de Koter, A

    2012-01-01

    Rotation is thought to be a major factor in the evolution of massive stars, especially at low metallicity, with consequences for their chemical yields, ionizing flux and final fate. The natal rotation-rate distribution of stars is of high priority given its importance as a constraint on theories of massive star formation and as input for models of stellar populations in the local Universe and at high redshift. Recently, it has become clear that the majority of massive stars interact with a binary companion before they die. We investigate how this affects the distribution of rotation rates. For this purpose, we simulate a massive binary-star population typical for our Galaxy assuming continuous star formation. We find that, because of binary interaction, 20^+5_-10% of all massive main-sequence stars have projected rotational velocities in excess of 200km/s. We evaluate the effect of uncertain input distributions and physical processes and conclude that the main uncertainties are the mass transfer efficiency an...

  15. Microtwin formation in the {alpha} phase of duplex titanium alloys affected by strain rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Hsiang; Wu, Shu-Ming [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Kao, Fang-Hsin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shing-Hoa, E-mail: shwang@ntou.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jer-Ren [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chia-Chih [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Chuan-Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 32003, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The long and dense twins in {alpha} phase of SP700 alloy occurring at lower strain rates promote a good ductility. {yields} The deformation in SP700 alloy changed to micro twins-controlled mechanism in {alpha} as the strain rate decreases. {yields} The material has time to redistribute the deformed strain between {alpha} and {beta} as the strain rate decreases. - Abstract: The effect of tensile strain rate on deformation microstructure was investigated in Ti-6-4 (Ti-6Al-4V) and SP700 (Ti-4.5Al-3V-2Mo-2Fe) of the duplex titanium alloys. Below a strain rate of 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, Ti-6-4 alloy had a higher ultimate tensile strength than SP700 alloy. However, the yield strength of SP700 was consistently greater than Ti-6-4 at different strain rates. The ductility of SP700 alloy associated with twin formation (especially at the slow strain rate of 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}), always exceeded that of Ti-6-4 alloy at different strain rates. It is caused by a large quantity of deformation twins took place in the {alpha} phase of SP700 due to the lower stacking fault energy by the {beta} stabilizer of molybdenum alloying. In addition, the local deformation more was imposed on the {alpha} grains from the surrounding {beta}-rich grains by redistributing strain as the strain rate decreased in SP700 duplex alloy.

  16. Heat and mass transfer analogies for evaporation models at high evaporation rate

    OpenAIRE

    Trontin, P.; Villedieu, P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In the framework of anti and deicing applications, heated liquid films can appear above the ice thickness, or directly above the wall. Then, evaporation plays a major role in the Messinger balance and evaporated mass has to be predicted accurately. Unfortunately, it appears that existing models under-estimate evaporation at high temperature. In this study, different evaporation models at high evaporation rates are studied. The different hypothesis on which these models...

  17. SLUG - Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies. II: Quantifying the Effects of Stochasticity on Star Formation Rate Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Robert L; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    The integrated light of a stellar population, measured through photometric filters that are sensitive to the presence of young stars, is often used to infer the star formation rate (SFR) for that population. However, these techniques rely on an assumption that star formation is a continuous process, whereas in reality stars form in discrete spatially- and temporally-correlated structures. This discreteness causes the light output to undergo significant time-dependent fluctuations, which, if not accounted for, introduce errors and biases in the inferred SFRs. We use SLUG (a code that Stochastically Lights Up Galaxies) to simulate galaxies undergoing stochastic star formation. We then use these simulations to present a quantitative analysis of these effects and provide tools for calculating probability distribution functions of SFRs given a set of observations. We show that, depending on the SFR tracer used, stochastic fluctuations can produce non-trivial errors at SFRs as high as 1 Msun/yr, and we suggest meth...

  18. Equipartition magnetic fields and star formation rates in normal galaxies at sub-kpc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Aritra

    2014-01-01

    We studied the total magnetic field strength in normal star-forming galaxies estimated using energy equipartition assumption. Using the well known radio--far infrared correlation we demonstrate that the equipartition assumption is valid in galaxies at sub-kpc scales. We find that the magnetic field strength is strongly correlated with the surface star formation rate in the galaxies NGC 6946 and NGC 5236. Further, we compare the magnetic field energy density to the total (thermal + turbulent) energy densities of gas (neutral + ionized) to identify regions of efficient field amplification in the galaxy NGC 6946. We find that in regions of efficient star formation, the magnetic field energy density is comparable to that of the total energy density of various interstellar medium components and systematically dominates in regions of low star formation efficiency.

  19. Some empirical estimates of the H2 formation rate in photon-dominated regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habart, E.; Boulanger, F.; Verstraete, L.; Walmsley, C. M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2004-02-01

    We combine recent ISO observations of the vibrational ground state lines of H2 towards Photon-Dominated Regions (PDRs) with observations of vibrationally excited states made with ground-based telescopes in order to constrain the formation rate of H2 on grain surfaces under the physiconditions in the layers responsible for H2 emission. We briefly review the data available for five nearby PDRs. We use steady state PDR models in order to examine the sensitivity of different H2 line ratios to the H2 formation rate R_f. We show that the ratio of the 0-0 S(3) to the 1-0 S(1) line increases with Rf but that one requires independent estimates of the radiation field incident upon the PDR and the density in order to infer Rf from the H2 line data. We confirm earlier work by \\cite{habart2003a} on the Oph W PDR which showed that an H2 formation rate higher than the standard value of 3 × 10-17 cm3 s-1 inferred from UV observations of diffuse clouds is needed to explain the observed H2 excitation. From comparison of the ISO and ground-based data, we find that moderately excited PDRs such as Oph W, S140 and IC 63 require an H2 formation rate of about five times the standard value whereas the data for PDRs with a higher incident radiation field such as NGC 2023 and the Orion Bar can be explained with the standard value of Rf. We compare also the H21-0 S(1) line intensities with the emission in PAH features and find a rough scaling of the ratio of these quantities with the ratio of local density to radiation field. This suggests but does not prove that formation of H2 on PAHs is important in PDRs. We also consider some empirical models of the H2 formation process with the aim of explaining these results. Here we consider both formation on classical grains of size roughly 0.1 μm and on very small (˜10 Å) grains by either direct recombination from the gas phase (Eley-Rideal mechanism) or recombination of physisorbed H atoms with atoms in a chemisorbed site. We conclude that

  20. Ultrasound assisted reduction of graphene oxide to graphene in L-ascorbic acid aqueous solutions: kinetics and effects of various factors on the rate of graphene formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Abulikemu; Okitsu, Kenji; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to graphene (rGO) was achieved by using 20 kHz ultrasound in L-ascorbic acid (L-AA, reducing agent) aqueous solutions under various experimental conditions. The effects of ultrasound power, ultrasound pulse mode, reaction temperature, pH value and L-AA amount on the rates of rGO formation from GO reduction were investigated. The rates of rGO formation were found to be enhanced under the following conditions: high ultrasound power, long pulse mode, high temperature, high pH value and large amount of L-AA. It was also found that the rGO formation under ultrasound treatment was accelerated in comparison with a conventional mechanical mixing treatment. The pseudo rate and pseudo activation energy (Ea) of rGO formation were determined to discuss the reaction kinetics under both treatment. The Ea value of rGO formation under ultrasound treatment was clearly lower than that obtained under mechanical mixing treatment at the same condition. We proposed that physical effects such as shear forces, microjets and shock waves during acoustic cavitation enhanced the mass transfer and reaction of L-AA with GO to form rGO as well as the change in the surface morphology of GO. In addition, the rates of rGO formation were suggested to be affected by local high temperatures of cavitation bubbles.

  1. Pulsating low-mass white dwarfs in the frame of new evolutionary sequences. IV. The secular rate of period change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaferro, Leila M.; Córsico, Alejandro H.; Althaus, Leandro G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. An increasing number of low-mass (M⋆/M⊙ ≲ 0.45) and extremely low-mass (ELM, M⋆/M⊙ ≲ 0.18-0.20) white-dwarf stars are being discovered in the field of the Milky Way. Some of these stars exhibit long-period g-mode pulsations, and are called ELMV variable stars. Also, some low-mass pre-white dwarf stars show short-period p-mode (and likely radial-mode) photometric variations, and are designated as pre-ELMV variable stars. The existence of these new classes of pulsating white dwarfs and pre-white dwarfs opens the prospect of exploring the binary formation channels of these low-mass white dwarfs through asteroseismology. Aims: We aim to present a theoretical assessment of the expected temporal rates of change of periods (\\dot{Π}) for such stars, based on fully evolutionary low-mass He-core white dwarf and pre-white dwarf models. Methods: Our analysis is based on a large set of adiabatic periods of radial and nonradial pulsation modes computed on a suite of low-mass He-core white dwarf and pre-white dwarf models with masses ranging from 0.1554 to 0.4352 M⊙, which were derived by computing the non-conservative evolution of a binary system consisting of an initially 1 M⊙ ZAMS star and a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star companion. Results: We computed the secular rates of period change of radial (ℓ = 0) and nonradial (ℓ = 1,2) g and p modes for stellar models representative of ELMV and pre-ELMV stars, as well as for stellar objects that are evolving just before the occurrence of CNO flashes at the early cooling branches. We find that the theoretically expected magnitude of \\dot{Π} of g modes for pre-ELMVs is by far larger than for ELMVs. In turn, \\dot{Π} of g modes for models evolving before the occurrence of CNO flashes are larger than the maximum values of the rates of period change predicted for pre-ELMV stars. Regarding p and radial modes, we find that the larger absolute values of \\dot{Π} correspond to pre-ELMV models. Conclusions: We

  2. Period -- mass-loss rate relation of Miras with and without technetium

    CERN Document Server

    Uttenthaler, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We report the discovery that Mira variables with and without absorption lines of the element technetium (Tc) occupy two different regions in a diagram of near- to mid-infrared colour versus pulsation period. Tc is an indicator of a recent or ongoing mixing event called the third dredge-up (3DUP), and the near- to mid-IR colour, such as the (K-[22]) colour where [22] is the the 22 micron band of the WISE space observatory, is an indicator of the dust mass-loss rate of a star. Methods: We collected data from the literature about the Tc content, pulsation period, and near- and mid-infrared magnitudes of more than 190 variable stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to which Miras belong. The sample is naturally biased towards optical AGB stars, which have low to intermediate (dust) mass-loss rates. Results: We show that a clear relation between dust mass-loss rate and pulsation period exists if a distinction is made between Tc-poor and Tc-rich Miras. Surprisingly, at a given period, Tc-poor Miras are re...

  3. Estimation of mass outflow rates from viscous relativistic accretion discs around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    We investigated flow in Schwarzschild metric, around a non-rotating black hole and obtained self-consistent accretion-ejection solution in full general relativity. We covered the whole of parameter space in the advective regime to obtain shocked, as well as, shock-free accretion solution. We computed the jet streamline using von Zeipel surfaces and projected the jet equations of motion on to the streamline and solved them simultaneously with the accretion disc equations of motion. We found that steady shock cannot exist beyond α ≳ 0.06 in the general relativistic prescription, but is lower if mass-loss is considered too. We showed that for fixed outer boundary, the shock moves closer to the horizon with increasing viscosity parameter. The mass outflow rate increases as the shock moves closer to the black hole, but eventually decreases, maximizing at some intermediate value of shock location. The jet terminal speed increases with stronger shocks; quantitatively speaking, the terminal speed of jets vj∞ > 0.1 if rsh < 20rg. The maximum of the outflow rate obtained in the general relativistic regime is less than 6 per cent of the mass accretion rate.

  4. Mass flow-rate control unit to calibrate hot-wire sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, F.; Uensal, B. [FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Haddad, K. [FMP Technology GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, LSTM-Erlangen, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Erlangen (Germany); Al-Salaymeh, A.; Eid, Shadi [University of Jordan, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Amman (Jordan)

    2008-02-15

    Hot-wire anemometry is a measuring technique that is widely employed in fluid mechanics research to study the velocity fields of gas flows. It is general practice to calibrate hot-wire sensors against velocity. Calibrations are usually carried out under atmospheric pressure conditions and these suggest that the wire is sensitive to the instantaneous local volume flow rate. It is pointed out, however, that hot wires are sensitive to the instantaneous local mass flow rate and, of course, also to the gas heat conductivity. To calibrate hot wires with respect to mass flow rates per unit area, i.e., with respect to ({rho}U), requires special calibration test rigs. Such a device is described and its application is summarized within the ({rho}U) range 0.1-25 kg/m{sup 2} s. Calibrations are shown to yield the same hot-wire response curves for density variations in the range 1-7 kg/m{sup 3}. The application of the calibrated wires to measure pulsating mass flows is demonstrated, and suggestions are made for carrying out extensive calibrations to yield the ({rho}U) wire response as a basis for advanced fluid mechanics research on ({rho}U) data in density-varying flows. (orig.)

  5. The shape of the initial cluster mass function: what it tells us about the local star formation efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Parmentier, G; Kroupa, P; Baumgardt, H

    2008-01-01

    We explore how the expulsion of gas from star-cluster forming cloud-cores due to supernova explosions affects the shape of the initial cluster mass function, that is, the mass function of star clusters when effects of gas expulsion are over. We demonstrate that if the radii of cluster-forming gas cores are roughly constant over the core mass range, as supported by observations, then more massive cores undergo slower gas expulsion. Therefore, for a given star formation efficiency, more massive cores retain a larger fraction of stars after gas expulsion. The initial cluster mass function may thus differ from the core mass function substantially, with the final shape depending on the star formation efficiency. A mass-independent star formation efficiency of about 20 per cent turns a power-law core mass function into a bell-shaped initial cluster mass function, while mass-independent efficiencies of order 40 per cent preserve the shape of the core mass function.

  6. Characterization of microconcentric nebulizer uptake rates for capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Enrique G.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.

    2003-05-01

    There is demonstrated interest in combining capillary electrophoresis (CE) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for speciation determinations. When self-aspirating nebulizers are used for this application, it is important to offset the suction effect to avoid degradation of the separation. In this study, sample uptake rates for three microconcentric nebulizers of the same model, in combination with a cyclonic spray chamber, were characterized and compared for future utilization in CE-ICP-MS interfaces. The specific model studied was a MicroMist with a nominal uptake rate of 100 μl/min at 1 l/min argon gas flow rate per the manufacturer's specifications. Sample uptake rates at various nebulizer gas flows were measured by aspirating water from a weighed container and calculating the uptake rate in microliter per minute. The nebulizers studied provided good reproducibility from day to day, but a comparison of the different nebulizers reflected a significant difference in performance. A characteristic observed during the study was that uptake rates decreased with increasing nebulizer gas flow. This can be used for sample introduction for CE-ICP-MS. Interestingly, very different performance was observed when comparing the three different nebulizers of the same model. Uptake rates showed strong dependence on argon gas flow rates and the dimensions of the sample uptake tubing.

  7. How dead are dead galaxies? Mid-Infrared fluxes of quiescent galaxies at redshift 0.3 < z < 2.5: implications for star formation rates and dust heating

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Brammer, Gabriel; da Cunha, Elisabete; Schreiber, Natascha M Forster; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Pacifici, Camilla; Skelton, Rosalind E

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the star formation rates of quiescent galaxies at high redshift (0.3 1.5 marginally consistent with the ones expected from gas recycling (assuming that mass loss from evolved stars refuels star formation) and well above that at lower redshifts.

  8. Formation of volcanic edifices in response to changes in magma budget at intermediate spreading rate ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J.; White, S. M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices along mid-ocean ridges have a well known correlation with spreading rate. Along slow spreading centers, volcanic edifices are normally distributed about the segment center. Volcanic edifices along fast spreading centers have the opposing trend, i.e. edifices form primarily at the ends of segments. However, in ridges affected by plumes and at back arc basins, the spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices differ from that observed at normal ridges of the same spreading rate. This suggests that magma supply rate may control the spatial and abundance distribution of volcanic edifices. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies along the Galapagos Spreading Centers (GSC), Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the Valu Fa (VF) and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (ELSC) put tight constraints on crustal thickness, making it possible investigate the effect of magma budget and axial morphology on the formation of volcanic edifices. Volcanic edifices are described according to their volume, shape (their height to basal radius ratio) and their location relative to the end or center of a segment (abundance distribution). For the GSC, the shape and distribution of volcanic edifices correlate with changes in crustal thickness and axial morphology, consistent with a magma supply control on their formation in this region. This relationship is not apparent along the SEIR or JdFR, where edifices show little variation with changes in axial morphology at relatively constant spreading rates. Results for VF and ELSC are what we expect for changes in spreading rate, not axial morphology. Our study suggests that the formation of volcanic edifices at intermediate spreading rate ridges are influenced by magma budget but only when it is above a certain threshold.

  9. Fibronectin alters the rate of formation and structure of the fibrin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-01-10

    Plasma fibronectin is a vital component of the fibrin clot; however its role on clot structure is not clearly understood. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of fibronectin on the kinetics of formation, structural characteristics and composition of reconstituted fibrin clots or fibrin matrices. Fibrin matrices were formed by adding thrombin to 1, 2 or 4 mg/ml fibrinogen supplemented with 0-0.4 mg/ml fibronectin. The rate of fibrin matrix formation was then monitored by measuring light absorbance properties at different time points. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein conjugated fibrinogen was used to visualize the structural characteristics of fibrin matrices. The amount of fibronectin in fibrin matrices was determined through electrophoresis and immunoblotting of solubilized matrices. Fibronectin concentration positively correlated with the initial rate of fibrin matrix formation and with steady state light absorbance values of fibrin matrices. An increase in fibronectin concentration resulted in thinner and denser fibers in the fibrin matrices. Electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed that fibronectin was covalently and non-covalently bound to fibrin matrices and in the form of high molecular weight multimers. The formation of fibronectin multimers was attributed to cross-linking of fibronectin by trace amounts Factor XIIIa. These findings are novel because they link results from light absorbance studies to microcopy analyses and demonstrate an influence of fibronectin on fibrin matrix structural characteristics. This data is important in developing therapies that destabilize fibrin clots.

  10. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. Hence, by the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays need not reflect the true variation of the mass supply rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale t_{{visc}} also to spread around a mean value. In high mass X-ray binaries, which are thought to be primarily wind-fed, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller and thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the low mass X-ray binaries which are primarily fed by Roche lobe overflow. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a detailed knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales, such as when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term All Sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift satellites by different methods to look for such smearing effects and to infer what these results can tell us about the viscous processes inside the respective disks. We employ three different methods to seek imprints of periodicity on the X-ray variation and found that in all the cases, the location of the peak in the power density spectra is consistent with the orbital frequencies. Interestingly, in high mass X-ray binaries the peaks are sharp with high rms values, consistent with a small Keplerian disk in a wind fed system. However, in low mass X-ray binaries with larger Keplerian disk component, the peaks are spreaded out with much lower rms values. X-ray reflections, or superhump phenomena which may also cause such X-ray modulations would not be affected by the size of

  11. Colours, star formation rates and environments of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at the cosmic noon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Hopkins, Philip F.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2017-09-01

    We analyse the star formation rates (SFRs), colours and dust extinctions of galaxies in massive (1012.5 - 1013.5 M⊙) haloes at z ∼ 2 in high-resolution, cosmological zoom-in simulations as part of the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. The simulations do not model feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) but reproduce well the observed relations between stellar and halo mass and between stellar mass and SFR. About half (a third) of the simulated massive galaxies (massive central galaxies) at z ∼ 2 have broad-band colours classifying them as 'quiescent', and the fraction of quiescent centrals is steeply decreasing towards higher redshift, in agreement with observations. The progenitors of z ∼ 2 quiescent central galaxies are, on average, more massive, have lower specific SFRs and reside in more massive haloes than the progenitors of similarly massive star-forming centrals. The simulations further predict a morphological mix of galaxies that includes disc-dominated, irregular and early-type galaxies. However, our simulations do not reproduce the reddest of the quiescent galaxies observed at z ∼ 2. We also do not find evidence for a colour bimodality, but are limited by our modest sample size. In our simulations, the star formation activity of central galaxies of moderate mass (Mstar ∼ 1010 - 1011 M⊙) is affected by a combination of two distinct physical processes. Outflows powered by stellar feedback result in a short-lived (experience a moderate reduction of their SFRs ('cosmological starvation'). The relative importance of these processes and AGN feedback is uncertain and will be explored in future work.

  12. A Cluster in the Making: ALMA Reveals the Initial Conditions for High-mass Cluster Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Longmore, S. N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Bastian, N.; Contreras, Y.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  13. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW, 1710 (Australia); Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Jackson, J. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Alves, J. F. [University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Bally, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 8030 (United States); Foster, J. B. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101 New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Garay, G. [Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Kruijssen, J. M. D. [Max-Planck Institut fur Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Testi, L. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Walsh, A. J., E-mail: Jill.Rathborne@csiro.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  14. Preliminary experimental results on studying possibility of variable mass liner (VML) formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of the present experiment was to study the formation process and initial stage of acceleration of a variable-mass plasma liner (VML). The method is based on magnetic acceleration of a liner with the mass reduced during such acceleration. The experiment was carried out on February 16 at VNIIEF. This report describes the results of measurements obtained in the experiment and preliminary analysis of the results characterizing operation of the test facility main units: helical EMG; 5-module disk EMG 400 mm in diameter (DEMG); ponderomotive unit (PU) with a cylindric condensed liner and a special tooth-cutoff. The first part of the report presents measurement results obtained on the VNIIEF`s diagnostic equipment that are compared with those obtained by American specialists on their diagnostic equipment. Information submitted by American specialists is included in part 2 of this report. The second part of the report presents preliminary computational-theoretic analysis of the main measured results describing operation of DEMG TL system in the experiment; experimental data are compared with theoretical ones obtained before and after the experiment. But more emphasis is placed on the data preliminary analysis indicating that in the experiment a variable mass liner is formed (VML or plasma bubble).

  15. Physical and chemical structure of dense cores in regions of high mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zinchenko, A I; Caselli, P; Johansson, L E B; Malafeev, S; Turner, B; Zinchenko, Igor; Pirogov, Lev; Caselli, Paola; Johansson, Lars E.B.; Malafeev, Sergey; Turner, Barry

    2005-01-01

    We found that in regions of high mass star formation the CS emission correlates well with the dust continuum emission and is therefore a good tracer of the total mass while the N$_2$H$^+$ distribution is frequently very different. This is opposite to their typical behavior in low-mass cores where freeze-out plays a crucial role in the chemistry. The behavior of other high density tracers varies from source to source but most of them are closer to CS. Radial density profiles in massive cores are fitted by power laws with indices about -1.6, as derived from the dust continuum emission. The radial temperature dependence on intermediate scales is close to the theoretically expected one for a centrally heated optically thin cloud. The velocity dispersion either remains constant or decreases from the core center to the edge. Several cores including those without known embedded IR sources show signs of infall motions. They can represent the earliest phases of massive protostars. There are implicit arguments in favor...

  16. The star cluster mass--galactocentric radius relation: Implications for cluster formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Weijia; Fan, Zhou; Cameron, Ewan

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the initial star cluster mass function is established through a universal, galactocentric-distance-independent stochastic process, on the scales of individual galaxies, remains an unsolved problem. This debate has recently gained new impetus through the publication of a study that concluded that the maximum cluster mass in a given population is not solely determined by size-of-sample effects. Here, we revisit the evidence in favor and against stochastic cluster formation by examining the young ($\\lesssim$ a few $\\times 10^8$ yr-old) star cluster mass--galactocentric radius relation in M33, M51, M83, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. To eliminate size-of-sample effects, we first adopt radial bin sizes containing constant numbers of clusters, which we use to quantify the radial distribution of the first- to fifth-ranked most massive clusters using ordinary least-squares fitting. We supplement this analysis with an application of quantile regression, a binless approach to rank-based regression takin...

  17. The effect of feedback and reionization on star formation in low-mass dwarf galaxy haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Christine M; Johnston, Kathryn V; Smith, Britton D; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Sharma, Sanjib; Tumlinson, Jason

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of a 10^9 Msun dark matter halo in a cosmological setting with an adaptive-mesh refinement code as an analogue to local low luminosity dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The primary goal of our study is to investigate the roles of reionization and supernova feedback in determining the star formation histories of low mass dwarf galaxies. We include a wide range of physical effects, including metal cooling, molecular hydrogen formation and cooling, photoionization and photodissociation from a metagalactic background, a simple prescription for self-shielding, star formation, and a simple model for supernova driven energetic feedback. We carry out simulations excluding each major effect in turn. We find that reionization is primarily responsible for expelling most of the gas in our simulations, but that supernova feedback is required to disperse the dense, cold gas in the core of the halo. Moreover, we show that the timing of reionization can produce an order of magnitude dif...

  18. The effect of ram pressure on the star formation, mass distribution and morphology of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapferer, W; Schindler, S; Ferrari, C; Ziegler, B

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of star formation and the distribution of the components of galaxies on the strength of ram pressure. Several mock observations in X-ray, H$\\alpha$ and HI wavelength for different ram-pressure scenarios are presented. By applying a combined N-body/hydrodynamic description (GADGET-2) with radiative cooling and a recipe for star formation and stellar feedback 12 different ram-pressure stripping scenarios for disc galaxies were calculated. Special emphasis was put on the gas within the disc and in the surroundings. All gas particles within the computational domain having the same mass resolution. The relative velocity was varied from 100 km/s to 1000 km/s in different surrounding gas densities in the range from $1\\times10^{-28}$ to $5\\times10^{-27}$ g/cm$^3$. The temperature of the surrounding gas was initially $1\\times10^{7}$ K. The star formation of a galaxy is enhanced by more than a magnitude in the simulation with a high ram-pressure ($5\\times10^{-11}$ dyn/cm$^2$) in comparison...

  19. Primordial star formation: relative impact of H2 three-body rates and initial conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, S; Grassi, T

    2013-01-01

    Population III stars are the first stars in the Universe to form at z=20-30 out of a pure hydrogen and helium gas in minihalos of 10^5-10^6 M$_\\odot$ . Cooling and fragmentation is thus regulated via molecular hydrogen. At densities above 10^8 cm$^{-3}$, the three-body H2 formation rates are particularly important for making the gas fully molecular. These rates were considered to be uncertain by at least a few orders of magnitude. We explore the impact of new accurate three-body H2 formation rates derived by Forrey (2013) for three different minihalos, and compare to the results obtained with three-body rates employed in previous studies. The calculations are performed with the cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO (release 2.2) coupled with the chemistry package KROME (including a network for primordial chemistry), which was previously shown to be accurate in high resolution simulations. While the new rates can shift the point where the gas becomes fully molecular, leading to a different thermal evolution, th...

  20. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. IV: Candidates for isolated high-mass star formation in 30 Doradus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bressert, E.; Bastian, N.; Evans, C.J.; Sana, H.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Goodwin, S.P.; Parker, R.J.; Gieles, M.; Bestenlehner, J.M.; Vink, J.S.; Taylor, W.D.; Crowther, P.A.; Longmore, S.N.; Gräfener, G.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; de Koter, A.; Cantiello, M.; Kruijssen, J.M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Whether massive stars (≳30 M⊙) can occasionally form in relative isolation (e.g. in clusters with M < 100 M⊙) or if they require a large cluster of lower-mass stars around them is a key test in the differentiation of star-formation theories as well as how the initial mass function of stars is sample

  1. The Suppression of Star Formation in Low-Mass Galaxies Caused by the Reionization of their Local Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoodbhoy, Taha; Shapiro, Paul R.; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Ocvirk, Pierre; Gillet, Nicolas; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian T.; Teyssier, Romain; Yepes, Gustavo; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottloeber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda; Stranex, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The first stars and galaxies released enough ionizing radiation into the intergalactic medium (IGM) to ionize almost all the hydrogen atoms there by redshift z ~ 6. This process was "patchy" --- ionized zones grew in size over time until they overlapped to finish reionization.The photoheating associated with reionization caused a negative feedback on the galactic sources of reionization that suppressed star formation in low-mass galactic halos, especially those below 109 M⊙. To establish the causal connection between reionization and this suppression, we analyze the results of CoDa ("Cosmic Dawn"), the first fully-coupled radiation-hydrodynamical simulation of reionization and galaxy formation in the Local Universe, in a volume large enough to model reionization globally but with enough resolving power to follow all the atomic-cooling galactic halos in that volume. A 90 Mpc box was simulated from a constrained realization of primordial fluctuations, chosen to reproduce present-day features of the Local Group, including the Milky Way and M31, and the local universe beyond, including the Virgo cluster, with 40963 N-body particles for the dark matter and 40963 cells for the atomic gas and ionizing radiation. We use these results to show that the star formation rate in haloes below 109 M⊙ in different patches of the universe declined when each patch was reionized. Star formation in much more massive haloes continued, however. As a result, the earliest patches to develop structure and reionize ultimately produced more stars than they needed to reionize themselves, exporting their starlight to help reionize the regions that developed structure late.

  2. The role of angular momentum transport in establishing the accretion rate-protostellar mass correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    We model the mass accretion rate M˙ to stellar mass M* correlation that has been inferred from observations of intermediate to upper mass T Tauri stars-that is M˙ ∝ M*1.3±0.3. We explain this correlation within the framework of quiescent disk evolution, in which accretion is driven largely by gravitational torques acting in the bulk of the mass and volume of the disk. Stresses within the disk arise from the action of gravitationally driven torques parameterized in our 1D model in terms of Toomre's Q criterion. We do not model the hot inner sub-AU scale region of the disk that is likely stable according to this criterion, and appeal to other mechanisms to remove or redistribute angular momentum and allow accretion onto the star. Our model has the advantage of agreeing with large-scale angle-averaged values from more complex nonaxisymmetric calculations. The model disk transitions from an early phase (dominated by initial conditions inherited from the burst mode of accretion) into a later self-similar mode characterized by a steeper temporal decline in M˙. The models effectively reproduce the spread in mass accretion rates that have been observed for protostellar objects of 0.2 M⊙ ≤ M* ≤ 3.0 M⊙, such as those found in the ρ Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions. We then compare realistically sampled populations of young stellar objects produced by our model to their observational counterparts. We find these populations to be statistically coincident, which we argue is evidence for the role of gravitational torques in the late time evolution of quiescent protostellar disks.

  3. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF THE W3 GMC: CLUES TO THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS OF HIGH-MASS STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Martin, P. G.; Luong, Q. Nguyen; Roy, A. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Hennemann, M.; Men' shchikov, A.; Andre, Ph.; Arzoumanian, D.; Hill, T.; Minier, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU-CNRS/INSU-Universite Paris Diderot, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bontemps, S. [Universite Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Bernard, J.-Ph. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Avenue colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Di Francesco, J.; Fallscheer, C. [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Elia, D.; Pezzuto, S. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Li, J. Z. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2013-04-01

    The W3 GMC is a prime target for the study of the early stages of high-mass star formation. We have used Herschel data from the HOBYS key program to produce and analyze column density and temperature maps. Two preliminary catalogs were produced by extracting sources from the column density map and from Herschel maps convolved to 500 {mu}m resolution. Herschel reveals that among the compact sources (FWHM < 0.45 pc), W3 East, W3 West, and W3 (OH) are the most massive and luminous and have the highest column density. Considering the unique properties of W3 East and W3 West, the only clumps with ongoing high-mass star formation, we suggest a 'convergent constructive feedback' scenario to account for the formation of a cluster with decreasing age and increasing system/source mass toward the innermost regions. This process, which relies on feedback by high-mass stars to ensure the availability of material during cluster formation, could also lead to the creation of an environment suitable for the formation of Trapezium-like systems. In common with other scenarios proposed in other HOBYS studies, our results indicate that an active/dynamic process aiding in the accumulation, compression, and confinement of material is a critical feature of the high-mass star/cluster formation, distinguishing it from classical low-mass star formation. The environmental conditions and availability of triggers determine the form in which this process occurs, implying that high-mass star/cluster formation could arise from a range of scenarios: from large-scale convergence of turbulent flows to convergent constructive feedback or mergers of filaments.

  4. Dependence of the outer density profiles of halos on their mass accretion rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kravtsov, Andrey V., E-mail: bdiemer@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present a systematic study of the density profiles of ΛCDM halos, focusing on the outer regions, 0.1 < r/R {sub vir} < 9. We show that the median and mean profiles of halo samples of a given peak height exhibit significant deviations from the universal analytic profiles discussed previously in the literature, such as the Navarro-Frenk-White and Einasto profiles, at radii r ≳ 0.5R {sub 200m}. In particular, at these radii the logarithmic slope of the median density profiles of massive or rapidly accreting halos steepens more sharply than predicted. The steepest slope of the profiles occurs at r ≈ R {sub 200m}, and its absolute value increases with increasing peak height or mass accretion rate, reaching slopes of –4 and steeper. Importantly, we find that the outermost density profiles at r ≳ R {sub 200m} are remarkably self-similar when radii are rescaled by R {sub 200m}. This self-similarity indicates that radii defined with respect to the mean density are preferred for describing the structure and evolution of the outer profiles. However, the inner density profiles are most self-similar when radii are rescaled by R {sub 200c}. We propose a new fitting formula that describes the median and mean profiles of halo samples selected by their peak height or mass accretion rate with accuracy ≲ 10% at all radii, redshifts, and masses we studied, r ≲ 9R {sub vir}, 0 < z < 6, and M {sub vir} > 1.7 × 10{sup 10} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. We discuss observational signatures of the profile features described above and show that the steepening of the outer profile should be detectable in future weak-lensing analyses of massive clusters. Such observations could be used to estimate the mass accretion rate of cluster halos.

  5. Burst-properties as a function of mass accretion rate in GX 3+1

    CERN Document Server

    Den Hartog, P; Kuulkers, E; Cornelisse, R; Heisse, J; Bazzano, A; Cocchi, M; Natalucci, L; Ubertini, P

    2003-01-01

    GX 3+1 is a low-mass X-ray binary that is persistently bright since its discovery in 1964. It was found to be an X-ray burster twenty years ago proving that the compact object in this system is a neutron star. The burst rate is so low that only 18 bursts were reported prior to 1996. The Wide Field Cameras on BeppoSAX have, through a dedicated monitoring program on the Galactic center region, increased the number of X-ray bursts from GX 3+1 by 61. Since GX 3+1 exhibits a slow (order of years) modulation in the persistent flux of about 50%, these observations opens up the unique possibility to study burst properties as a function of mass accretion rate for very low burst rates. This is the first time that bursts are detected from GX 3+1 in the high state. From the analysis we learn that all bursts are short with e-folding decay times smaller than 10 s. Therefore, all bursts are due to unstable helium burning. Furthermore, the burst rate drops sixfold in a fairly narrow range of 2-20 keV flux; we discuss possibl...

  6. Formation and Assembly History of Stellar Components in Galaxies as a Function of Stellar and Halo Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2017-02-01

    Galaxy mass assembly is an end product of structure formation in the ΛCDM cosmology. As an extension of Lee & Yi, we investigate the assembly history of stellar components in galaxies as a function of halo environments and stellar mass using semi-analytic approaches. In our fiducial model, halo mass intrinsically determines the formation and assembly of the stellar mass. Overall, the ex situ fraction slowly increases in central galaxies with increasing halo mass but sharply increases for {log}{M}* /{M}ȯ ≳ 11. A similar trend is also found in satellite galaxies, which implies that mergers are essential to build stellar masses above {log}{M}* /{M}ȯ ∼ 11. We also examine the time evolution of the contribution of mass growth channels. Mergers become the primary channel in the mass growth of central galaxies when their host halo mass begins to exceed {log}{M}200/{M}ȯ ∼ 13. However, satellite galaxies seldom reach the merger-dominant phase despite their reduced star-formation activities due to environmental effects.

  7. Possible planet formation in the young, low-mass, multiple stellar system GG Tau A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Hervé; Chapillon, Edwige; Gueth, Fredéric; Huré, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Piétu, Vincent; Simon, Michal; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2014-10-30

    The formation of planets around binary stars may be more difficult than around single stars. In a close binary star (with a separation of less than a hundred astronomical units), theory predicts the presence of circumstellar disks around each star, and an outer circumbinary disk surrounding a gravitationally cleared inner cavity around the stars. Given that the inner disks are depleted by accretion onto the stars on timescales of a few thousand years, any replenishing material must be transferred from the outer reservoir to fuel planet formation (which occurs on timescales of about one million years). Gas flowing through disk cavities has been detected in single star systems. A circumbinary disk was discovered around the young low-mass binary system GG Tau A (ref. 7), which has recently been shown to