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  1. Ultraviolet+Infrared Star Formation Rates: Hickson Compact Groups with Swift and SPitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Gronwall, C.; Immler, S.; Reines, A. E.; Hoversten, E.; Charlton, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present Swift UVOT ultraviolet (UV; 1600-3000 A) data with complete three-band UV photometry for a sample of 41 galaxies in 11 nearby (star formation rate, SFR(sub TOTAL). We use Spitzer MIPS 24 micron photometry to estimate SFR(sub IR), the component of SFR(sub TOTAL) that suffers dust extinction in the UV and is re-emitted in the IR. By combining the two components, we obtain SFR(sub TOTAL) estimates for all HCG galaxies. We obtain total stellar mass, M(sub *) estimates by means of Two Micron All Sky Survey K(sub s)-band luminosities, and use them to calculate specific star formation rates, SSFR is identical with SFR(sub TOTAL)/ M (sub *). SSFR values show a clear and significant bimodality, with a gap between low (approximately 1.2 x lO)exp -10)/yr) systems. We compare this bimodality to the previously discovered bimodality in alpha-IRAC, the MIR activity index from a power-law fit to the Spitzer IRAC 4.5-8 micron data for these galaxies. We find that all galaxies with alpha-IRAC 0) are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, as expected if high levels of star-forming activity power MIR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and a hot dust continuum. Consistent with this finding, all elliptical/SO galaxies are in the low-SSFR locus, while 22 out of 24 spirals / irregulars are in the high-SSFR locus, with two borderline cases. We further divide our sample into three subsamples (I, II, and III) according to decreasing H I richness of the parent galaxy group to which a galaxy belongs. Consistent with the SSFR and alpha-IRAC bimodality, 12 out of 15 type I (11 out of 12 type III) galaxies are in the high- (low-) SSFR locus, while type II galaxies span almost the full range of SSFR values. We use the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey (SINGS) to construct a comparison subsample of galaxies that (1) match HCG galaxies in J-band total galaxy luminosity and (2) are not strongly interacting and largely isolated. This selection eliminates mostly low

  2. Two formation channels of UCDs in Hickson Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rocha, C; Georgiev, I Y; Hilker, M; Ziegler, B L; de Oliveira, C Mendes

    2010-01-01

    The formation of ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) is believed to be interaction driven, and UCDs are abundant in the cores of galaxy clusters, environments that mark the end-point of galaxy evolution. Nothing is known about the properties of UCDs in compact groups of galaxies, environments where most of galaxy evolution and interaction is believed to occur and where UCDs in intermediate state of evolution may be expected. The main goal of this study is to detect and characterize, for the first time, the UCD population of compact groups. For that, 2 groups in different evolutionary stages, HCG 22 and HCG 90, were targeted with VLT/FORS2/MXU. We detect 16 and 5 objects belonging to HCG 22 and HCG 90, respectively, covering the magnitude range -10.0 > M_R > -11.5 mag. Their colours are consistent with old ages covering a broad range in metallicities. Photometric mass estimates put 4 objects in HCG 90 and 9 in HCG 22 in the mass range of UCDs (>2x10^6 M_Sun) for an assumed age of 12 Gyr. These UCDs are on aver...

  3. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.

    2014-01-01

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm ...... galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley....

  4. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lisenfeld, U. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bitsakis, T. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guillard, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-Sud XI, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Charmandaris, V. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T. [Astrophysics Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Dept of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7701, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Freeland, E. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Rasmussen, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Verdes-Montenegro, L. [Departamento Astronomía Extragaláctica, Instituto Astrofísica Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Yun, M., E-mail: kalatalo@ipac.caltech.edu [University of Massachusetts, Astronomy Department, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  5. Strong Far-IR Cooling Lines, Peculiar CO Kinematics and Possible Star Formation Suppression in Hickson Compact Group 57

    CERN Document Server

    Alatalo, K; Lisenfeld, U; Bitsakis, T; Guillard, P; Charmandaris, V; Cluver, M; Dopita, M A; Freeland, E; Jarrett, T; Kewley, L J; Ogle, P M; Rasmussen, J; Rich, J A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Xu, C K; Yun, M

    2014-01-01

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for{\\dag} Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson Compact Group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock and/or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L$_{\\rm FIR}$ and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-IR cooling supports a low density warm diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable PDR models. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H$_2$ emission have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock-heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently distu...

  6. The Infrared Properties of Hickson Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K E; Gallagher, S C; Charlton, J C; Hornschemeier, A E; Jarrett, T H; Reines, A E

    2007-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide a unique environment to study the mechanisms by which star formation occurs amid continuous gravitational encounters. We present 2MASS (JHK), Spitzer IRAC (3.5-8 micron) and MIPS (24 micron) observations of a sample of twelve Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs 2, 7, 16, 19, 22, 31, 42, 48, 59, 61, 62, and 90) that includes a total of 45 galaxies. The near-infrared colors of the sample galaxies are largely consistent with being dominated by slightly reddened normal stellar populations. Galaxies that have the most significant PAH and/or hot dust emission (as inferred from excess 8 micron flux) also tend to have larger amounts of extinction and/or K-band excess and stronger 24 micron emission, all of which suggest ongoing star formation activity. We separate the twelve HCGs in our sample into three types based on the ratio of the group HI mass to dynamical mass. We find evidence that galaxies in the most gas-rich groups tend to be the most actively star forming. Galaxies in the most ...

  7. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3813, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I., E-mail: tdesjar@uwo.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 95721 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  8. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  9. Kinematics and morphology of ionized gas in Hickson Compact Group 18

    CERN Document Server

    Plana, H; De Oliveira, C M; Balkowski, C

    2000-01-01

    We present new observations of $H\\alpha $ emission in the Hickson Compact Group 18 (HCG 18) obtained with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The velocity field does not show motions of individual group members but, instead, a complex common velocity field for the whole group. The gas distribution is very asymmetric with clumps of maximum intensity coinciding with the optically brightest knots. Comparing $H\\alpha $ and HI data we conclude that HCG 18 is not a compact group but instead a large irregular galaxy with several clumps of star formation.

  10. A mid-IR study of Hickson Compact Groups I : Probing the Effects of Environment in Galaxy Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Le Floc'h, E; Diaz-Santos, T; Slater, S K; Xilouris, E; Haynes, M P

    2010-01-01

    Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) are among the densest galaxy environments of the local universe. To examine the effects of the environment on the infrared properties of these systems, we present an analysis of Spitzer and ISO mid-infrared imaging as well as deep ground based near-infrared imaging of 14 HCGs containing a total of 69 galaxies. Based on mid-infrared color diagnostics we identify the galaxies which appear to host an active nucleus, while using a suite of templates, we fit the complete infrared spectral energy distribution for each group member. We compare our estimates of galaxy mass, star formation rate, total infrared luminosities, and specific star formation rates (sSFR) for our HCG sample, to samples of isolated galaxies and interacting pairs and find that overall there is no discernible difference among them. However, HCGs which can be considered as dynamically "old", host late-type galaxies with a slightly lower sSFR than the one found in dynamically "young" groups. This could be attributed t...

  11. Discovery of interaction signatures in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-08-01

    I describe new observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new telescope at the Wise Observatory. The observations that reach low surface brightness levels reveal a diffuse, ~20-kpc long low-surface-brightness tail emerging from the brightest component (NGC 6878) to the NW, and possibly a morphological abnormally in component B (NGC 6977). The N6878 tail could explain the asymmetry in this galaxy’s optical rotation curve. These findings show that significant interactions, including possible galactic cannibalism, have taken place in at least two galaxies of this group, contrary to previous claims that HCG88 is in a very early stage of interaction. This work emphasizes the surprisingly interesting results that can be obtained from deep imaging of interesting targets.

  12. The merger history, AGN and dwarf galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Tzanavaris, P; Hill, A R; Zabludoff, A I; Maier, M L; Elmegreen, D M; Charlton, J C; Johnson, K E; Brandt, W N; Walker, L M; Eracleous, M; Maybhate, A; Gronwall, C; English, J; Hornschemeier, A E; Mulchaey, J S

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8e13 Msun), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical o...

  13. Globular Cluster Population of Hickson Compact Group 22a and 90c

    CERN Document Server

    Barkhouse, W A; Bothun, G D; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; West, Michael J.; Bothun, Gregory D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the globular cluster populations of galaxies in Hickson compact groups, in order to investigate the effect of these high density environments on the formation and evolution of globular cluster systems. Based on V and R band images that we obtained of HCG 22a and HCG 90c with the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT), we find a total globular cluster population of $1590\\pm 854$ for HCG 22a and $2136\\pm 718$ for 90c. The specific frequency for HCG 22a was found to be $S_{N}=1.9\\pm 1.0$ and $S_{N}= 3.4\\pm 1.1$ for HCG 90c. A power-law fit to the globular cluster radial profile of HCG 22a yields $\\sigma\\sim R^{-2.01\\pm 0.30}$ and for HCG 90c we found $\\sigma \\sim R^{-1.20\\pm0.16}$. A comparison of the globular cluster radial profiles with the surface brightness of the parent galaxy shows that the globular cluster systems are at least as extended as the halo light. The measured values for the specific frequency are consistent with a scenario in which the host galaxies were in a low...

  14. Stellar Systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44 - I. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V Smith; Escudero, C G

    2016-01-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims. In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (mueff_g'~27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods. We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also search for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results. We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associati...

  15. The Revealing Dust: Mid-Infrared Activity in Hickson Compact Group Galaxy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Hornschemeier, A E; Charlton, J C; Hibbard, J E

    2007-01-01

    We present a sample of 46 galaxy nuclei from 12 nearby (z<4500 km/s) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with a complete suite of 1-24 micron 2MASS+Spitzer nuclear photometry. For all objects in the sample, blue emission from stellar photospheres dominates in the near-IR through the 3.6 micron IRAC band. Twenty-five of 46 (54%) galaxy nuclei show red, mid-IR continua characteristic of hot dust powered by ongoing star formation and/or accretion onto a central black hole. We introduce alpha_{IRAC}, the spectral index of a power-law fit to the 4.5-8.0 micron IRAC data, and demonstrate that it cleanly separates the mid-IR active and non-active HCG nuclei. This parameter is more powerful for identifying low to moderate-luminosity mid-IR activity than other measures which include data at rest-frame lambda<3.6 micron that may be dominated by stellar photospheric emission. While the HCG galaxies clearly have a bimodal distribution in this parameter space, a comparison sample from the Spitzer Nearby Galaxy Survey (SIN...

  16. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Muñoz, Roberto P; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W; Peng, Eric W; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\\!\\lesssim\\! r_{\\rm eff}/{\\rm kpc}\\! \\lesssim\\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\\!\\lesssim\\! M_U\\! \\lesssim\\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\\!\\lesssim\\! M_I\\! \\lesssim\\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\\!-\\!I)_0\\!\\simeq\\!1.1\\!-\\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\\mu_U\\!\\simeq\\!28.1\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\\mu_I\\!\\simeq\\!27.4\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\\odot} \\simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\\,Z_\\odot}\\!\\simeq\\!10^{6.3-8}\\,M_{\\odot}$. Three dwarfs are ol...

  17. Galaxy interactions in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    CERN Document Server

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-01-01

    I present observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new 28-inch telescope at the Wise Observatory. This galaxy group was advertised to be non-interacting, or to be in a very early interaction stage, but this is not the case. The observations reported here were done using a "luminance" filter, essentially a very broad R filter, reaching a low surface brightness level of about 26 mag per square arcsec. Additional observations were obtained in a narrow spectral band approximately centered on the rest-frame H-alpha line from the group. Contrary to previous studies, my observations show that at least two of the major galaxies have had significant interactions in the past, although probably not between themselves. I report the discovery of a faint extended tail emerging from the brightest of the group galaxies, severe isophote twisting and possible outer shells around another galaxy, and map the HII regions in all the galaxies.

  18. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A

    2015-01-01

    We present 21cm HI observations of four Hickson Compact Groups with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H I emission in a region of 25$^{\\prime}\\times$25$^{\\prime}$ (140-650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of HI masses. In particular, we detected 65% more \\HI than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG92. We also identify if the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high-surface brightness (HSB) HI features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the HI strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the HI observed with the GBT to have a similar spatial distribution as the HSB structures in HCGs 31 and 68. Conversely, the observed HI distributions in HCGs44 and 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG44 lies to the Northeast-Southwest region...

  19. The Merger History, AGN and Dwarf Galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Hill, A. R.; Zabludoff, A. I.; Maier, M. L.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Charlton, J. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Walker, L. M.; Eracleous, M.; Maybhate, A.; Gronwall, C.; English, J.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 x 10(exp 13) Stellar Mass), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic HII regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at approx. 1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity AGN in HCG 59A by its approx. 10(exp 40) erg/s X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR SED. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  20. THE MERGER HISTORY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS, AND DWARF GALAXIES OF HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 59

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Charlton, J. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Hill, A. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zabludoff, A. I. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maier, M. L. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, Colina el Pino S/N, La Serena (Chile); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P. O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Maybhate, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); English, J. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MN (Canada); Mulchaey, J. S., E-mail: iraklis@astro.psu.edu [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (Hubble Space Telescope), infrared (Spitzer), and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun }), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other are two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic H II regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at {approx}1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity active galactic nucleus in HCG 59A by its {approx}10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR spectral energy distribution. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  1. Stellar systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44. I. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Castelli, A. V.; Faifer, F. R.; Escudero, C. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims: In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (μeffg' ≃ 27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods: We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also searched for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results: We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associations. In that case, their sizes would be rather larger than those displayed by the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We have detected a few unresolved sources in the sky zone occupied by these galaxies showing colors and brightnesses typical of blue globular clusters. Conclusions: From the comparison of the properties of the galaxies presented in this work with those of similar objects reported in the literature, we have found that LSB galaxies display sizes covering a quite extended continous range (reff 0.3-4.5 kpc), in contrast to "normal" early-type galaxies, which show reff 1.0 kpc with a low dispersion. This fact might point to different formation processes for both types of galaxies.

  2. Magnetic Fields and Galactic Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, Sven; Falle, Sam A E G

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of molecular clouds within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas ($n_{\\rm{H}}>10^5\\:{\\rm{cm}^{-3}}$) at an efficiency of 2\\% per local free fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated $B$-field case of $80\\:{\\rm{\\mu}}$G. However, our chosen kpc scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbu...

  3. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  4. A Chandra-Swift View of Point Sources in Hickson Compact Groups: High AGN Fraction but a Dearth of Strong AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Fedotov, K.; Eracleous, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Desjardins, T. D.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray point source catalogs for 9 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs, 37 galaxies) at distances of 34-89 Mpc. We perform detailed X-ray point source detection and photometry and interpret the point source population by means of simulated hardness ratios. We thus estimate X-ray luminosities (L(sub x)) for all sources, most of which are too weak for reliable spectral fitting. For all sources, we provide catalogs with counts, count rates, power-law indices (gamma), hardness ratios, and L(sub X), in the full (0.5-8.0 keV), soft (0.5-2.0 keV), and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands. We use optical emission-line ratios from the literature to re-classify 24 galaxies as star-forming, accreting onto a supermassive black hole (AGNs), transition objects, or low-ionization nuclear emission regions. Two-thirds of our galaxies have nuclear X-ray sources with Swift/UVOT counterparts. Two nuclei have L(sub X),0.5-8.0 keV > 10(exp 42) erg s-1, are strong multi-wavelength active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and follow the known alpha OX-?L? (nearUV) correlation for strong AGNs. Otherwise, most nuclei are X-ray faint, consistent with either a low-luminosity AGN or a nuclear X-ray binary population, and fall in the 'non-AGN locus' in alpha OX-?L? (nearUV) space, which also hosts other normal galaxies. Our results suggest that HCG X-ray nuclei in high specific star formation rate spiral galaxies are likely dominated by star formation, while those with low specific star formation rates in earlier types likely harbor a weak AGN. The AGN fraction in HCG galaxies with MR (is) less than -20 and L(sub X),0.5-8.0 keV (is) greater than 10(exp 41) erg s-1 is 0.08+0.35 -0.01, somewhat higher than the 5% fraction in galaxy clusters.

  5. Thrombus Formation at High Shear Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2017-06-21

    The final common pathway in myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke is occlusion of blood flow from a thrombus forming under high shear rates in arteries. A high-shear thrombus forms rapidly and is distinct from the slow formation of coagulation that occurs in stagnant blood. Thrombosis at high shear rates depends primarily on the long protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets, with hemodynamics playing an important role in each stage of thrombus formation, including vWF binding, platelet adhesion, platelet activation, and rapid thrombus growth. The prediction of high-shear thrombosis is a major area of biofluid mechanics in which point-of-care testing and computational modeling are promising future directions for clinically relevant research. Further research in this area will enable identification of patients at high risk for arterial thrombosis, improve prevention and treatment based on shear-dependent biological mechanisms, and improve blood-contacting device design to reduce thrombosis risk.

  6. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  7. The Absolute Rate of LGRB Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J F

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the LGRB progenitor rate using our recent work on the effects of environmental metallically on LGRB formation in concert with SNe statistics via an approach patterned loosely off the Drake equation. Beginning with the cosmic star-formation history, we consider the expected number of broad-line Type Ic events (the SNe type associated with LGRBs) that are in low metallicity host environments adjusted by the contribution of high metallicity host environments at a much reduced rate. We then compare this estimate to the observed LGRB rate corrected for instrumental selection effects to provide a combined estimate of the efficiency fraction of these progenitors to produce LGRBs and the fraction of which are beamed in our direction. From this we estimate that an aligned LGRB occurs for approximately every 4000 low metallically broad-lined Type Ic Supernovae. Therefore if one assumes a semi-nominal beaming factor of 100 then only about one such supernova out of 40 produce an LGRB. Finally we propose an of...

  8. RATE OF INTRAMOLECULAR CONTACT FORMATION IN PROTEINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-xi Zhang; Ting-ting Sun; Xiang-hong Wang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we estimate the rate of contact formation between two residues in the interior of the proteins using the Szabo,Schulten,and Schulten formula with the probability distribution P(r)based on 375 proteins from PDB(Protein Data Bank).The probability distribution for residue pair in proteins is different from the Gaussian distribution,especially for short distance between two residues in proteins.The rate of contact formation in the interior of protein is discussed as a function of distance n(=|j-i|)between two residues,and it decreases monotonically with n and follows the scaling relationship of k∝"n-γ with γ=1.43 for the contact radius a=0.40 nm and γ=1.05 for a=0.50 nm.The diffusion coefficient for the relative diffusion of two residues in the interior of proteins is estimated as D=6.4×1 0.-6 cm2/s,which is close to the result that is found for monomer diffusion.

  9. Drill-in fluid reduces formation damage, increases production rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hands, N. [Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij B.V., Velsen (Netherlands); Kowbel, K. [Ensco International/NAM, Assen (Netherlands); Maikranz, S. [M-I LLC, Houston, TX (United States); Nouris, R. [M-I LLC, Velsen (Netherlands)

    1998-07-13

    A sodium formate drill-in fluid system reduced formation damage, resulting in better-than-expected production rates for an off-shore Dutch development well. Programmed to optimize production capacity and reservoir drainage from a Rotliegend sandstone gas discovery, the 5-7/8-in. subhorizontal production interval was drilled and completed barefoot with a unique, rheologically engineered sodium formate drill-in fluid system. The new system, consisting of a sodium formate (NaCOOH) brine as the base fluid and properly sized calcium carbonate as the formation-bridging agent, was selected on the basis of its well-documented record in reducing solids impairment and formation damage in similar sandstone structures in Germany. The system was engineered around the low-shear-rate viscosity (LSRV) concept, designed to provide exceptional rheological properties. After describing the drilling program, the paper gives results on the drilling and completion.

  10. Herschel observations of Hickson compact groups of galaxies: Unveiling the properties of cold dust

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; Appleton, P N; Diaz-Santos, T; Floc'h, E Le; da Cunha, E; Alatalo, K; Cluver, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a Herschel far-IR and sub-mm study of a sample of 120 galaxies in 28 Hickson Compact Groups. Fitting their UV to sub-mm spectral energy distributions with the model of da Cunha et al. (2008), we accurately estimate the dust masses, luminosities and temperatures of the individual galaxies. We find that nearly half of the late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups, those with more than 25% of early-type members and redder UV-optical colours, have also significantly lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to those of actively star-forming galaxies of the same mass found both in HCGs and the field. Examining their dust-to-gas mass ratios we conclude that dust was stripped out of these systems as a result of the gravitational and hydrodynamic interactions, experienced due to previous encounters with other group members. About 40% of the early-type galaxies (mostly lenticulars), in dynamically "old" groups, display dust properties similar to those of the UV-optical red late-type galaxies. Given th...

  11. XMM-Newton First-Light Observations of the Hickson Galaxy Group 16

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, M J L; Ponman, T J; Arnaud, M; Barbera, M; Bennie, P J; Boër, M; Briel, U G; Butler, I; Clavel, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the XMM-Newton first-light observations of the Hickson-16 compact group of galaxies. Groups are possibly the oldest large-scale structures in the Universe, pre-dating clusters of galaxies, and are highly evolved. This group of small galaxies, at a redshift of 0.0132 (or 80 Mpc) is exceptional in the having the highest concentration of starburst or AGN activity in the nearby Universe. So it is a veritable laboratory for the study of the relationship between galaxy interactions and nuclear activity. Previous optical emission line studies indicated a strong ionising continuum in the galaxies, but its origin, whether from starbursts, or AGN, was unclear. Combined imaging and spectroscopy with the EPIC X-ray CCDs unequivocally reveals a heavily obscured AGN and a separately identified thermal (starburst) plasma, in NGC 835, NGC 833 and NGC 839. NGC 838 shows only starburst thermal emission. Starbursts and AGN can evidently coexist in members of this highly evolved system of merged and merging g...

  12. ISO observations of Hickson Compact Group 31 with the central Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741

    CERN Document Server

    O'Halloran, B; McBreen, B; Laureijs, R J; Leech, K; Delaney, M; Watson, D; Hanlon, L O

    2002-01-01

    Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 31, consisting of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy NGC 1741 and its irregular dwarf companions, was observed using the Infrared Space Observatory. The deconvolved ISOCAM maps of the galaxies using the 7.7 micron and 14.3 micron (LW6 and LW3) filters are presented, along with ISOPHOT spectrometry of the central starburst region of NGC 1741 and the nucleus of galaxy HCG 31A. Strong mid-IR emission was detected from the central burst in NGC 1741, along with strong PAH features and a blend of features including [S IV] at 10.5 micron. The 14.3/6.75 micron flux ratio, where the 6.75 micron flux was synthesized from the PHT-S spectrum, and 14.3/7.7 micron flux ratios suggest that the central burst within NGC 1741 may be moving towards the post-starburst phase. Diagnostic tools including the ratio of the integrated PAH luminosity to the 40 to 120 micron infrared luminosity and the far-infrared colours reveal that despite the high surface brightness of the nucleus, the properties of NGC 1741 can be ex...

  13. Galaxy Evolution in Hickson Compact Groups: The Role of Ram Pressure Stripping and Strangulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Yun, Min S; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2008-01-01

    Galaxies in compact groups tend to be deficient in neutral hydrogen compared to isolated galaxies of similar optical properties. In order to investigate the role played by a hot intragroup medium (IGM) for the removal and destruction of HI in these systems, we have performed a Chandra and XMM-Newton study of eight of the most HI deficient Hickson compact groups. Diffuse X-ray emission associated with an IGM is detected in four of the groups, suggesting that galaxy-IGM interactions are not the dominant mechanism driving cold gas out of the group members. No clear evidence is seen for any of the members being currently stripped of any hot gas, nor for galaxies to show enhanced nuclear X-ray activity in the X-ray bright or most HI deficient groups. Combining the inferred IGM distributions with analytical models of representative disc galaxies orbiting within each group, we estimate the HI mass loss due to ram pressure and viscous stripping. While these processes are generally insufficient to explain observed HI ...

  14. A Comprehensive HST BVI Catalogue Of Star Clusters In Five Hickson Compact Groups Of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Bastian, N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Charlton, J; Johnson, K E; Chandar, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a photometric catalogue of star cluster candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 7, 31, 42, 59, and 92, based on observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogue contains precise cluster positions (right ascension and declination), magnitudes, and colours in the BVI filters. The number of detected sources ranges from 2200 to 5600 per group, from which we construct the high-confidence sample by applying a number of criteria designed to reduce foreground and background contaminants. Furthermore, the high-confidence cluster candidates for each of the 16 galaxies in our sample are split into two sub-populations: one that may contain young star clusters and one that is dominated by globular older clusters. The ratio of young star cluster to globular cluster candidates varies from group to group, from equal numbers to the extreme of HCG 31 which has a ratio of 8 to 1, due to a recent starburst induced by interactions in the grou...

  15. Relationship between Formation Water Rate, Equivalent Penetration Rate and Volume Flow Rate of Air in Air Drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kexiong; Zhang Laibin; Jiang Hongwei

    2007-01-01

    Formation water invasion is the most troublesome problem associated with air drilling. However, it is not economical to apply mist drilling when only a small amount of water flows into wellbore from formation during air drilling. Formation water could be circulated out of the wellbore through increasing the gas injection rate. In this paper,the Angel model was modified by introducing Nikurade friction factor for the flow in coarse open holes and translating formation water rate into equivalent penetration rate. Thus the distribution of annular pressure and the relationship between minimum air injection rate and formation water rate were obtained. Real data verification indicated that the modified model is more accurate than the Angel model and can provide useful information for air drilling.

  16. A $Chandra-Swift$ View of Point Sources in Hickson Compact Groups: High AGN fraction but a dearth of strong AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Tzanavaris, P; Hornschemeier, A E; Fedotov, K; Eracleous, M; Brandt, W N; Desjardins, T D; Charlton, J C; Gronwall, C

    2014-01-01

    We present $Chandra$ X-ray point source catalogs for 9 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs, 37 galaxies) at distances $34 - 89$ Mpc. We perform detailed X-ray point source detection and photometry, and interpret the point source population by means of simulated hardness ratios. We thus estimate X-ray luminosities ($L_X$) for all sources, most of which are too weak for reliable spectral fitting. For all sources, we provide catalogs with counts, count rates, power-law indices ($\\Gamma$), hardness ratios, and $L_X$, in the full ($0.5-8.0$ keV), soft ($0.5-2.0$ keV) and hard ($2.0-8.0$ keV) bands. We use optical emission-line ratios from the literature to re-classify 24 galaxies as star-forming, accreting onto a supermassive black hole (AGNs), transition objects, or low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs). Two-thirds of our galaxies have nuclear X-ray sources with $Swift$/UVOT counterparts. Two nuclei have $L_{X,{\\rm 0.5-8.0 keV}}$~$ > 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, are strong multi-wavelength AGNs and follow the known...

  17. Measuring the rate of intramolecular contact formation in polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Lisa; Eaton, William; Hofrichter, James

    2001-03-01

    Formation of a specific contact between two residues of a polypeptide chain is an important elementary process in protein folding. Here we describe a method for studying contact formation between tryptophan and cysteine based on measurements of the lifetime of the tryptophan triplet state. With tryptophan at one end of a flexible peptide and cysteine at the other, the triplet decay rate is identical to the rate of quenching by cysteine and is also close to the diffusion-limited rate of contact formation. The length dependence of this end-to-end contact rate was studied in a series of Cys-(Ala-Gly-Gln)_k-Trp peptides, with k varying from 1 to 6. The rate decreases from -1/(40 ns) for k = 1 to -1/(140 ns) for k = 6, approaching the length-dependence expected for a random coil (n-3/2) for the longest peptides. Comparing the intramolecular and bimolecular quenching rates for cysteine with two disulfide molecules (cystine and lipoate) determines the ratio of the equilibrium constants for forming the intramolecular and bimolecular contact pairs. This ratio depends on the persistence length of the chain and is therefore a measure of the flexibility of the polypeptide.

  18. Galaxy Mass, Metallicity, Radius and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Brisbin, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Working with 108,786 Sloan Digital Sky Survey low redshift galaxies, we have examined the relation between galaxy mass, metallicity, radius, and star formation rates. We subdivided the redshift range covered in our sample 0.072.8E10 Msun and exhibit high metallicities at high star formation rates, suggesting that for these galaxies star formation independent of mass infall plays a significant role. A toy model for the physics of infall accounts for the SFR Mi^(3/2) relation and permits us to estimate the mean densities and velocities of clumps of baryonic matter traversing the dark matter halos in which the SDSS galaxies may be embedded. The model also reproduces the gross features of the galaxy main sequence.

  19. Revisiting the Formation Rate and the Redshift Distribution of LGRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaan, Chadia

    2013-01-01

    Using a novel approach, the distribution of fluences of long gamma ray bursts derived from the Swift-BAT catalog, was reproduced by a jet-model characterized by the distribution of the total radiated energy in $\\gamma$-rays and the distribution of the aperture angle of the emission cone. The best fit between simulated and observed fluence distributions permits to estimate the parameters of the model. An evolution of the median energy of the bursts is required in order to reproduce adequately the observed redshift distribution of the events if the formation rate of $\\gamma$-ray bursts follows the cosmic star formation rate. For our preferred model, the median jet energy evolves as $E_J \\propto e^{0.5(1+z)}$ and the mean expected jet energy is $3.0\\times 10^{49}$ erg, which agrees with the mean value derived from afterglow data. The estimated local formation rate is $R_{grb}=290 Gpc^{-3}yr^{-1}$, representing less than 9% of the local formation rate of type Ibc supernovae. The present result suggests also that ...

  20. Local space density and formation rate of planetary nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, [No Value

    1996-01-01

    Individual distances of 50 nearby planetary nebulae are determined using a variety of methods, but excluding statistical methods or distance scales. These distances, together with a discussion of the sample completeness, are used to determine local PN formation rate. Together with the brightness of

  1. Star formation rates and efficiencies in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, A. T.; Longmore, S. N.; Battersby, C.; Bally, J.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Henshaw, J. D.; Walker, D. L.

    2017-08-01

    The inner few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way harbours gas densities, pressures, velocity dispersions, an interstellar radiation field and a cosmic ray ionization rate orders of magnitude higher than the disc; akin to the environment found in star-forming galaxies at high redshift. Previous studies have shown that this region is forming stars at a rate per unit mass of dense gas which is at least an order of magnitude lower than in the disc, potentially violating theoretical predictions. We show that all observational star formation rate diagnostics - both direct counting of young stellar objects and integrated light measurements - are in agreement within a factor two, hence the low star formation rate (SFR) is not the result of the systematic uncertainties that affect any one method. As these methods trace the star formation over different time-scales, from 0.1 to 5 Myr, we conclude that the SFR has been constant to within a factor of a few within this time period. We investigate the progression of star formation within gravitationally bound clouds on ∼parsec scales and find 1-4 per cent of the cloud masses are converted into stars per free-fall time, consistent with a subset of the considered 'volumetric' star formation models. However, discriminating between these models is obstructed by the current uncertainties on the input observables and, most importantly and urgently, by their dependence on ill-constrained free parameters. The lack of empirical constraints on these parameters therefore represents a key challenge in the further verification or falsification of current star formation theories.

  2. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. It is important to understand the mechanism by which alteration phases affect glass corrosion behavior and the glass dissolution rate to reliably predict whether or not similar effects will occur in a disposal environment and the impact of phase formation on the long-term performance of waste glass. While solid state transformation of a glass to thermodynamically more stable phases in kinetically prohibitive, contact by water provides an energetically favorable pathway for this transformation to occur by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. The kinetics of the transformation depends on the dissolution kinetics of the glass and the precipitation kinetics of the alteration phases. The rates of these two processes are linked primarily through the solution activity of orthosilicic acid (and perhaps also that of an aluminum-bearing species).

  3. A continuous low star formation rate in IZw 18?

    CERN Document Server

    Legrand, F; Roy, J R; Mas-Hesse, J M; Walsh, J R

    2000-01-01

    Deep long-slit spectroscopic observations of the blue compact galaxy IZw 18 obtained with the CFH 3.6 m Telescope are presented. The very low value of oxygen abundance previously reported is confirmed and a very homogeneous abundance distribution is found (no variation larger than 0.05 dex) over the whole ionized region. We concur with Tenorio-Tagle (1996) and Devost et al. (1997) that the observed abundance level cannot result from the material ejected by the stars formed in the current burst, and propose that the observed metals were formed in a previous star formation episode. Metals ejected in the current burst of star formation remain most probably hidden in a hot phase and are undetectable using optical spectroscopy. We discuss different scenarios of star formation in IZw 18. Combining various observational facts, for instance the faint star formation rate observed in low surface brightness galaxies van Zee et al. (1997), it is proposed that a low and continuous rate of star formation occurring during q...

  4. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  5. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Mitchell, Noah P

    2015-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing star formation activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The datasets are from the panchromatic STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, HST optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs - using four different models - agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far UV predicted fluxes do not. Further, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated far U...

  6. On the derivation of particle nucleation rates from experimental formation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kürten

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particle formation rates are usually measured at sizes larger than the critical size where nucleation occurs. Due to loss of particles during their growth to the detection threshold, the measured formation rate is often substantially smaller than the nucleation rate. For this reason a correction needs to be applied in order to determine the nucleation rate from the measured formation rate. An analytical formula for the correction factor is provided by Kerminen and Kulmala (2002. Their method was derived for atmospheric nucleation measurements and we show here that it has limited applicability to chamber nucleation studies. The reason for this limitation is that the particle loss rate generally has a different dependency on particle size in other environments. Here we propose an alternative, numerical method that allows precise nucleation rates to be determined in arbitrary experimental environments. The method requires knowledge of the particle size distribution above detection threshold, the particle growth rate, and the particle loss rates as a function of particle size.

  7. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar

  8. Constraints on the Star Formation Rate in Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M; Im, M; Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Im, Myungshin

    2006-01-01

    The [O II] 3727 emission line is often used as an indicator of star formation rate in extragalactic surveys, and it can be an equally effective tracer of star formation in systems containing luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In order to investigate the ongoing star formation rate of the host galaxies of AGNs, we measured the strength of [O II] and other optical emission lines from a large sample (~ 3600) of broad-line (Type 1) AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We performed a set of photoionization calculations to help evaluate the relative contribution of stellar and nonstellar photoionization to the observed strength of [O II]. Consistent with the recent study of Ho (2005), we find that the observed [O II] emission can be explained entirely by photoionization from the AGN itself, with little or no additional contribution from HII regions. This indicates that the host galaxies of Type 1 AGNs experience very modest star formation concurrent with the optically active phase of the nucleus. B...

  9. Variations in the Galactic star formation rate and density thresholds for star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, S N; Testi, L; Purcell, C R; Walsh, A J; Bressert, E; Pestalozzi, M; Molinari, S; Ott, J; Cortese, L; Battersby, C; Murray, N; Lee, E; Kruijssen, D

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of gas into stars is a fundamental process in astrophysics and cosmology. Stars are known to form from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps in interstellar molecular clouds, and it has been proposed that the resulting star formation rate is proportional to either the amount of mass above a threshold gas surface density, or the gas volume density. These star-formation prescriptions appear to hold in nearby molecular clouds in our Milky Way Galaxy's disk as well as in distant galaxies where the star formation rates are often much larger. The inner 500 pc of our Galaxy, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), contains the largest concentration of dense, high-surface density molecular gas in the Milky Way, providing an environment where the validity of star-formation prescriptions can be tested. Here we show that by several measures, the current star formation rate in the CMZ is an order-of-magnitude lower than the rates predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. In particular, the region 1...

  10. The Star Formation Rate Intensity Distribution Function--Implications for the Cosmic Star Formation Rate History of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzetta, K M; Pascarelle, S; Chen, H W; Fernández-Soto, A; Lanzetta, Kenneth M.; Yahata, Noriaki; Pascarelle, Sebastian; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Fernandez-Soto, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    We address the effects of cosmological surface brightness dimming on observations of faint galaxies by examining the distribution of "unobscured" star formation rate intensities versus redshift. We use the star formation rate intensity distribution function to assess the ultraviolet luminosity density versus redshift, based on our photometry and photometric redshift measurements of faint galaxies in the HDF and the HDF--S WFPC2 and NICMOS fields. We find that (1) previous measurements have missed a dominant fraction of the ultraviolet luminosity density of the universe at high redshifts by neglecting cosmological surface brightness dimming effects, which are important at redshifts larger than z = 2, (2) the incidence of the highest intensity star forming regions increases monotonically with redshift, and (3) the ultraviolet luminosity density plausibly increases monotonically with redshift through the highest redshifts observed. By measuring the spectrum of the luminosity density versus redshift, we also find...

  11. On the Star Formation Rates in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lada, Charles J; Alves, João F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the level of star formation activity within nearby molecular clouds. We employ a uniform set of infrared extinction maps to provide accurate assessments of cloud mass and structure and compare these with inventories of young stellar objects within the clouds. We present evidence indicating that both the yield and rate of star formation can vary considerably in local clouds, independent of their mass and size. We find that the surface density structure of such clouds appears to be important in controlling both these factors. In particular, we find that the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds is linearly proportional to the cloud mass (M_{0.8}) above an extinction threshold of A_K approximately equal to 0.8 magnitudes, corresponding to a gas surface density threshold of approximaely 116 solar masses per square pc. We argue that this surface density threshold corresponds to a gas volume density threshold which we estimate to be n(H_2) approximately equal to 10^4\\cc. Specifi...

  12. The Determination of the Star Formation Rate in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barbaro, G

    1997-01-01

    A spectrophotometric model able to compute the integrated spectrum of a galaxy, including the contribution both of the stellar populations and of the ionized interstellar gas of the HII regions powered by young hot stars, has been used to study several spectral features and photometric quantities in order to derive calibrations of the star formation history of late type galaxies. Attention has been paid to analyze the emission of the Balmer lines and the [OII]$\\lambda$3727 line to test their attitude at providing estimates of the present star formation rate in galaxies. Other features, like D$_{4000}$ and the equivalent width of the H$_{\\delta}$ line, influenced by the presence of intermediate age stars, have been considered. Several ways of estimating the star formation rates in normal galaxies are discussed and some considerations concerning the applicability of the models are presented. Criteria have been also studied for ascertaining the presence of a burst, current or ended not long ago. Bursts usually h...

  13. THE CURRENT STAR FORMATION RATE OF K+A GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Danielle M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ridgway, Susan E.; De Propris, Roberto [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Goto, Tomotsugu, E-mail: nielsen@astro.wisc.edu [Dark Cosmology Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2012-12-20

    We derive the stacked 1.4 GHz flux from the FIRST survey for 811 K+A galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. For these objects we find a mean flux density of 56 {+-} 9 {mu}Jy. A similar stack of radio-quiet white dwarfs yields an upper limit of 43 {mu}Jy at a 5{sigma} significance to the flux in blank regions of the sky. This implies an average star formation rate of 1.6 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for K+A galaxies. However, the majority of the signal comes from {approx}4% of K+A fields that have aperture fluxes above the 5{sigma} noise level of the FIRST survey. A stack of the remaining galaxies shows little residual flux consistent with an upper limit on star formation of 1.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Even for a subset of 456 'young' (spectral ages <250 Myr) K+A galaxies, we find that the stacked 1.4 GHz flux is consistent with no current star formation. Our data suggest that the original starburst has been terminated in the majority of K+A galaxies, but that this may represent part of a duty cycle where a fraction of these galaxies may be active at a given moment with dusty starbursts and active galactic nuclei being present.

  14. From quantum chemical formation free energies to evaporation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric new particle formation is an important source of atmospheric aerosols. Large efforts have been made during the past few years to identify which molecules are behind this phenomenon, but the actual birth mechanism of the particles is not yet well known. Quantum chemical calculations have proven to be a powerful tool to gain new insights into the very first steps of particle formation. In the present study we use formation free energies calculated by quantum chemical methods to estimate the evaporation rates of species from sulfuric acid clusters containing ammonia or dimethylamine. We have found that dimethylamine forms much more stable clusters with sulphuric acid than ammonia does. On the other hand, the existence of a very deep local minimum for clusters with two sulfuric acid molecules and two dimethylamine molecules hinders their growth to larger clusters. These results indicate that other compounds may be needed to make clusters grow to larger sizes (containing more than three sulfuric acid molecules.

  15. Calibration of Star Formation Rates Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring and mapping star-forming activity in galaxies is a key element for our understanding of their broad- band spectra, and their structure and evolution in our local, as well as the high-redshift Universe. The main tool we use for these measurements is the observed luminosity in various spectral lines and/or continuum bands. However, the available star-formation rate (SFR) indicators are often discrepant and subject to physical biases and calibration uncertainties. We are organizing a special session at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing, China (August 20-31, 2012) in order to bring together theoreticians and observers working in different contexts of star-formation to discuss the status of current SFR indicators, to identify open issues and to define a strategic framework for their resolution. The is an ideal time to synthesize information from the current golden era of space astrophysics and still have influence on the upcoming missions that will broaden our view of star-formation. We will be including high-energy constraints on SFR in the program and encourage participation from the high energy astrophysics community.

  16. A Star-Formation Rate Atlas of the Nearby Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Tristan; Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul A.

    2017-01-01

    We present our work in constructing a star-formation rate (SFR) atlas of nearby galaxies. We utilize GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) data and Spitzer 24 micron data to compute the SFR map of each galaxy using the relation described in Leroy et al. (2008). For each galaxy, the 24 micron data were downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive and subjected to outlier and overlap corrections through the automated Spitzer pipeline MOPEX. The FUV images were constructing using gphoton, and we then performed background subtraction using source-free regions away from the galaxy. These SFR maps represent an attempt to systematically characterize the local SFR in nearby galaxies, which we will then use to explore the relationship of SFR to the incidence of other phenomena such as supernovae and ultraluminous X-ray sources. We will make all SFR maps available to the community.

  17. Star formation rate in Holmberg IX dwarf galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009 to calculate star formation rate (SFR in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3:4 x 10-4M.yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  18. Star formation rates and mass distributions in interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapferer, W; Schindler, S; Van Kampen, E

    2005-01-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the star formation rate (hereafter SFR) in interacting disk galaxies. We determine the dependence of the overall SFR on different spatial alignments and impact parameters of more than 50 different configurations in combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations. We also show mass profiles of the baryonic components. We find that galaxy-galaxy interactions can enrich the surrounding intergalatic medium with metals very efficiently up to distances of several 100 kpc. This enrichment can be explained in terms of indirect processes like thermal driven galactic winds or direct processes like 'kinetic' spreading of baryonic matter. In the case of equal mass mergers the direct -kinetic- redistribution of gaseous matter (after 5 Gyr) is less efficient than the environmental enrichment of the same isolated galaxies by a galactic wind. In the case of non-equal mass mergers however, the direct -kinetic- process dominates the redistribution of gaseous matter. Compared to the isolated sy...

  19. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Conroy, Charlie

    2008-01-01

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs -- i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo--galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the n...

  20. Photoionising feedback and the star formation rates in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    MacLachlan, J M; Wood, K; Dale, J E

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods. We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results. We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by approximately 23 per cent over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from 0.042 solar masses per year in our control run to 0.032 solar masses per year after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneo...

  1. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Sara L; Rosario, David J; Mendel, J Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Using artificial neural network (ANN) predictions of total infra-red luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ~21,000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR selected AGN. SFR offsets (Delta SFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main sequence' galaxies (matched in M*, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of Delta SFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median Delta SFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median Delta SFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor ~1.5. We interpret the different distributions of Delta SFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied ...

  2. Black hole accretion versus star formation rate: theory confronts observations

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We use a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers to compare star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) for galaxies before the interaction ('stochastic' phase), during the 'merger' proper, lasting ~0.2-0.3 Gyr, and in the 'remnant' phase. We calculate the bi-variate distribution of SFR and BHAR and define the regions in the SFR-BHAR plane that the three phases occupy. No strong correlation between BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR is found. A possible exception are galaxies with the highest SFR and the highest BHAR. We also bin the data in the same way used in several observational studies, by either measuring the mean SFR for AGN in different luminosity bins, or the mean BHAR for galaxies in bins of SFR. We find that the apparent contradiction or SFR versus BHAR for observed samples of AGN and star forming galaxies is actually caused by binning effects. The two types of samples use different projections of the full bi-variate distribution, and the full information would lead to unamb...

  3. Are We Correctly Measuring Star-Formation Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen B.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Mitchell, Noah P.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction-corrected, integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV-SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ˜53% larger than previous relations. These results have signficant implications for measuring FUV-based SFRs of high-redshift galaxies.

  4. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  5. An Empirical Calibration of Star Formation Rate Estimators

    CERN Document Server

    Rosa-Gonzalez, D; Terlevich, R J

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) The observational determination of the behaviour of the star formation rate (SFR) with look-back time or redshift has two main weaknesses: 1- the large uncertainty of the dust/extinction corrections, and 2- that systematic errors may be introduced by the fact that the SFR is estimated using different methods at different redshifts. To assess the possible systematic differences among the different SFR estimators and the role of dust, we have compared SFR estimates using H$\\alpha$, SFR(H$\\alpha$), [OII]$\\lambda$3727\\AA, SFR(OII), UV, SFR(UV) and FIR, SFR(FIR) luminosities of a sample comprising the 31 nearby star forming galaxies having high quality photometric data in the UV, optical and FIR. We review the different "standard" methods for the estimation of the SFR and find that while the standard method provides good agreement between SFR(H$\\alpha$) and SFR(FIR), both SFR(OII) and SFR(UV) are systematically higher than SFR(FIR), irrespective of the extinction law. We show that the excess in the SFR(...

  6. Scaling Relations of Galactic Winds with Star Formation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The galactic scale outflows generated by nuclear starbursts consist of a multiphase medium where each phase has a distinct velocity depending on the characteristics of the starburst. Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydrodynamical simulations we probe the outflow velocity of the hot, warm, and neutral gas entrained in a galactic wind. By varying the star formation rate (SFR) in our simulations, we find no correlation between the outflow velocity of the hot gas with the SFR, but we do find a correlation between the outflow velocity of both warm and neutral gas with the SFR. The scaling relation between outflow velocity and SFR only holds for low SFR until the scaling relation abruptly flattens at a SFR determined by the mass loading of the starburst. The outflow velocity of the hot gas only depends on the mass loading of the starburst and not the SFR. For low SFRs the difference between the velocity of cold gas, as measured by absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas, may be 5-7 times lower than the velocity of the hot, highly ionized gas. The difference in velocity between the cold and hot gas for higher SFRs depends on the mass loading factor of the starburst. Thus the measured velocities of neutral or low ionized gas cannot be used to estimate the outflow velocity of the hot gas without determining the mass loading of the starburst.

  7. Decreased Specific Star Formation Rates in AGN Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, T Taro; Melendez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of AGN from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (\\mstar) from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and \\mstar{} as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray lum...

  8. UV Star Formation Rates in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Samir; Charlot, Stéphane; Brinchmann, Jarle; Johnson, Benjamin D; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Mallery, Ryan; Heckman, Timothy M; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2007-01-01

    We measure star formation rates of ~50,000 optically-selected galaxies in the local universe (z~0.1), spanning a range from gas-rich dwarfs to massive ellipticals. We obtain dust-corrected SFRs by fitting the GALEX (UV) and SDSS (optical) photometry to a library of population synthesis models that include dust attenuation. For star-forming galaxies, our UV-based SFRs compare remarkably well with those derived from SDSS H alpha. Deviations from perfect agreement between these two methods are due to differences in the dust attenuation estimates. In contrast to H alpha, UV provides reliable SFRs for galaxies with weak or no H alpha emission, and where H alpha is contaminated with an emission from an AGN. We use full-SED SFRs to calibrate a simple prescription that uses GALEX UV magnitudes to produce good SFRs for normal star-forming galaxies. The specific SFR is considered as a function of stellar mass for (1) star-forming galaxies with no AGN, (2) those hosting an AGN, and for (3) galaxies without H alpha emiss...

  9. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  10. Star Clusters as Tracers of Interactions in Stephan's Quintet (Hickson Compact Group 92)

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, K; Konstantopoulos, I S; Chandar, R; Bastian, N; Charlton, J C; Whitmore, B; Trancho, G

    2011-01-01

    Stephan's Quintet (SQ) is a compact group of galaxies that exhibits numerous signs of interactions between its members. Using high resolution images of SQ in B438, V606, and I814 bands from the Early Release Science project obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, we identify 496 star cluster candidates (SCCs), located throughout the galaxies themselves as well as in intergalactic regions. Our photometry goes \\sim2 mag deeper and covers an additional three regions, the Old Tail, NGC 7317, and the Southern Debris Region, compared to previous work. Through comparison of the B438 - V606 and V606 - I814 colors of the star cluster candidates with simple stellar population synthesis models we are able to constrain cluster ages. In particular, the most massive galaxy of SQ, NGC 7319, exhibits continuous star formation throughout its history, although at a lower rate over the past few tens of Myr. NGC 7318 A/B and the Northern Star Burst region both show ongoing active star formation; ther...

  11. Implications for the formation of star clusters from extra-galactic star-formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C; Larsen, S S

    2004-01-01

    Observations indicate that young massive star clusters in spiral and dwarf galaxies follow a relation between luminosity of the brightest young cluster and the star-formation rate (SFR) of the host galaxy, in the sense that higher SFRs lead to the formation of brighter clusters. Assuming that the empirical relation between maximum cluster luminosity and SFR reflects an underlying similar relation between maximum cluster mass (M_ecl,max) and SFR, we compare the resulting SFR(M_ecl,max) relation with different theoretical models. The empirical correlation is found to suggest that individual star clusters form on a free-fall time-scale with their pre-cluster molecular-cloud-core radii typically being a few pc independent of mass. The cloud cores contract by factors of 5 to 10 while building-up the embedded cluster. A theoretical SFR(M_ecl,max) relation in very good agreement with the empirical correlation is obtained if the cluster mass function of a young population has a Salpeter exponent beta approx. 2.35 and...

  12. Exchange rate formation in Ukraine and its impact on macroeconomic indicators

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The factors of exchange rate formation in Ukraine are analyzes in this paper, the influence of exchange rate on macroeconomic indicators of development and the main priorities of the exchange rate policy are determined exchange.

  13. [Effects of fundamental frequency and speech rate on impression formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Teruhisa; Nakaune, Naoko

    2004-12-01

    This study investigated the systematic relationship between nonverbal features of speech and personality trait ratings of the speaker. In Study 1, fundamental frequency (F0) in original speech was converted into five levels from 64% to 156.25%. Then 132 undergraduates rated each of the converted speeches in terms of personality traits. In Study 2 134 undergraduates similarly rated the speech stimuli, which had five speech rate levels as well as two F0 levels. Results showed that listener ratings along Big Five dimensions were mostly independent. Each dimension had a slightly different change profile over the five levels of F0 and speech rate. A quadratic regression equation provided a good approximation for each rating as a function of F0 or speech rate. The quadratic regression equations put together would provide us with a rough estimate of personality trait impression as a function of prosodic features. The functional relationship among F0, speech rate, and trait ratings was shown as a curved surface in the three-dimensional space.

  14. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bothwell, Matt S; Thompson, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Halpha to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Halpha luminosities. Using the UV and Halpha fluxes of a sample of ~300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 Msun/yr and 80-130 Msun/yr for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270^{+110}_{-80} Msun/yr, suggesting a mild tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with t...

  15. On column density thresholds and the star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical study designed to address the question of whether there is a column density threshold for star formation within molecular clouds. We have simulated a large number of different clouds, with volume and column densities spanning a wide range of different values, using a state-of-the-art model for the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution of the gas. We show that for low-mass clouds, around 1000 solar masses and below, star formation is only possible if the mean cloud column density exceeds 10^21 cm^-2. In more massive clouds, the required mean column density is a factor of a few lower. We demonstrate that this behaviour is well-described by a simple Jeans mass argument: clouds must contain multiple Jeans masses in order to form stars, and hence star-forming clouds cannot have arbitrarily low column densities. We have also examined the question of whether there is a column density threshold for the regions within clouds where star formation occurs. We show that th...

  16. Constraints from $^{26}Al$ Measurements on the Galaxy's Recent Global Star Formation Rate and Core Collapse Supernovae Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Hartmann, D H

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from the decay of $^{26}$Al offer a stringent constraint on the Galaxy's global star formation rate over the past million years, supplementing other methods for quantifying the recent Galactic star formation rate, such as equivalent widths of H$\\alpha$ emission. Advantages and disadvantages of using $^{26}$Al gamma-ray measurements as a tracer of the massive star formation rate are analyzed. Estimates of the Galactic $^{26}$Al mass derived from COMPTEL measurements are coupled with a simple, analytical model of the $^{26}$Al injection rate from massive stars and restrict the Galaxy's recent star formation rate to \\hbox{5 $\\pm$ 4 M\\sun yr$^{-1}$}. In addition, we show that the derived $^{26}$Al mass implies a present day \\hbox{Type II + Ib} supernovae rate of 3.4 $\\pm$ 2.8 per century, which seems consistent with other independent estimates of the Galactic core collapse supernova rate. If some independent measure of the massive star initial mass function or star formation rate or \\hbox{Type II + Ib}...

  17. Solid formation in piperazine rate-based simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    of view but also from a modeling perspective. The present work develops a rate-based model for CO2 absorption and desorption modeling for gas-liquid-solid systems and it is demonstrated for the piperazine CO2 capture process. This model is an extension of the DTU CAPCO2 model to precipitating systems....... It uses the extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model for phase equilibria and thermal properties estimation. The mass and heat transfer phenomena is implemented in a film model approach, based on second order reactions kinetics. The transfer fluxes are calculated using the concentration of the dissolved...

  18. Effect of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate on the formation rate of CO2 hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Chen; Yong Yu; Peng Zeng; Wei Yang; Qianqing Liang; Xiaoming Peng; Yansheng Liu; Yufeng Hu

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the addition of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate([C4mim][BF4])on the formation rates of CO2 hydrates was investigate.The isothermal and isobaric methods were used to measure the formation rates of CO2 hydrates.As compared to those of pure water,the data of phase equilibrium changed greatly.The effects of pressure,temperature,and the concentration of [C4mim][BF4] aqueous solution on the formation rates of CO2 hydrates were investigated.With a constant concentration of[C4mim][BF4],the rate of gas consumption was enhanced with the lowering of experimental temperature.However,a decrease in pressure exerted an opposite effect on the rate of gas consumption.Moreover,the addition of[C4mim][BF4]raised the equilibrium pressure of hydrate formation at the same temperature.

  19. What Is Its Purpose?——"Advancing RMB Exchange Rate Formation Mechanism"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yujie; You Zhixin; Wang Tao

    2010-01-01

    Spokesperson from People's Bank of China said on June 19th, "further advance the reform in RMB exchange rate formation mechanism, and strengthen the flex-ibility of RMB exchange rate." This is the first time for China central bank give a clear attitude on reform in RMB exchange rate, which attracts great attention for global market. Does strengthening the flexibility of RMB exchange rate mean that RMB will appreciate again? Why the central bank announces the news at this moment? How to choose the time for the reform in RMB exchange rate formation mechanism?

  20. Rate of three-body recombination of hydrogen molecules during primordial star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Forrey, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical models of primordial star formation require rate constants for three-body recombination as input. The current status of these rates for H2 due to collisions with H is far from satisfactory, with published rate constants showing orders of magnitude disagreement at the temperatures relevant for H2 formation in primordial gas. This letter presents an independent calculation of this recombination rate constant as a function of temperature. An analytic expression is provided for the rate constant which should be more reliable than ones currently being used in astrophysical models.

  1. Effect of common cryoprotectants on critical warming rates and ice formation in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jesse B; Badeau, Ryan; Warkentin, Matthew; Thorne, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    Ice formation on warming is of comparable or greater importance to ice formation on cooling in determining survival of cryopreserved samples. Critical warming rates required for ice-free warming of vitrified aqueous solutions of glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, polyethylene glycol 200 and sucrose have been measured for warming rates of order 10-10⁴ K/s. Critical warming rates are typically one to three orders of magnitude larger than critical cooling rates. Warming rates vary strongly with cooling rates, perhaps due to the presence of small ice fractions in nominally vitrified samples. Critical warming and cooling rate data spanning orders of magnitude in rates provide rigorous tests of ice nucleation and growth models and their assumed input parameters. Current models with current best estimates for input parameters provide a reasonable account of critical warming rates for glycerol solutions at high concentrations/low rates, but overestimate both critical warming and cooling rates by orders of magnitude at lower concentrations and larger rates. In vitrification protocols, minimizing concentrations of potentially damaging cryoprotectants while minimizing ice formation will require ultrafast warming rates, as well as fast cooling rates to minimize the required warming rates.

  2. On Star Formation Rates and Star Formation Histories of Galaxies out to z ~ 3

    CERN Document Server

    Wuyts, Stijn; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Bongiovanni, Angel; Cepa, Jordi; Cimatti, Andrea; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Genzel, Reinhard; Koekemoer, Anton M; Magnelli, Benjamin; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Garcia, Ana Perez; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Popesso, Paola; Pozzi, Francesca; Sanchez-Portal, Miguel; Sturm, Eckhard; Tacconi, Linda; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We compare multi-wavelength SFR indicators out to z~3 in GOODS-South. Our analysis uniquely combines U-to-8um photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24um and PACS 70, 100, and 160um photometry from the PEP survey, and Ha spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24um to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of LIR that are in the median consistent with the LIR derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low to intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR_IR/SFR_UV ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR_UV+IR \\gtrsim 100 Msun/yr) and redshifts (z \\gtrsim 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that Ha-based SFRs at 1.5

  3. The evolution of the star formation rate function and cosmic star formation rate density of galaxies at z ˜ 1-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Blanc, G.; Sargent, M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy star formation rate function (SFRF) and cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) of z ˜ 1-4 galaxies, using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations and a compilation of ultraviolet (UV), infrared (IR) and Hα observations. These tracers represent different populations of galaxies with the IR light being a probe of objects with high star formation rates and dust contents, while UV and Hα observations provide a census of low star formation galaxies where mild obscuration occurs. We compare the above SFRFs with the results of SPH simulations run with the code P-GADGET3(XXL). We focus on the role of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and supernovae in form of galactic winds. The AGN feedback prescription that we use decreases the simulated CSFRD at z < 3 but is not sufficient to reproduce the observed evolution at higher redshifts. We explore different wind models and find that the key factor for reproducing the evolution of the observed SFRF and CSFRD at z ˜ 1-4 is the presence of a feedback prescription that is prominent at high redshifts (z ≥ 4) and becomes less efficient with time. We show that variable galactic winds which are efficient at decreasing the SFRs of low-mass objects are quite successful in reproducing the observables.

  4. The evolution of the star formation rate function and cosmic star formation rate density of galaxies at $z \\sim 1-4$

    CERN Document Server

    Katsianis, Antonios; Blanc, Guillermo; Sargent, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy Star Formation Rate Function (SFRF) and Cosmic Star Formation Rate Density (CSFRD) of $z\\sim 1-4 $ galaxies, using cosmological Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations and a compilation of UV, IR and H$\\alpha$ observations. These tracers represent different populations of galaxies with the IR light being a probe of objects with high star formation rates and dust contents, while UV and H$\\alpha$ observations provide a census of low star formation galaxies where mild obscuration occurs. We compare the above SFRFs with the results of SPH simulations run with the code {\\small{P-GADGET3(XXL)}}. We focus on the role of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and supernovae in form of galactic winds. The AGN feedback prescription that we use decreases the simulated CSFRD at $z < 3$ but is not sufficient to reproduce the observed evolution at higher redshifts. We explore different wind models and find that the key factor for reproducing the evolution of the ob...

  5. Muon cycling rate in D/T mixture including doubly muonic molecule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Eskandari

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available   In the present work, the fundamental behavior of four body molecule formations of pt μμ , pd μμ , dt μμ , tt μμ , and pp μμ in a D/T fusion are considered. Their higher fusion rate, specially the available data for dt μμ , encouraged us to study the muon cycling rate in D/T fusion in the temperature range of (100-1400 K, density and deuterium-tritium concentration ratio. For this purpose, various values for the doubly muonic molecule formation are chosen and with the comparison to the experimental results, the doubly muonic formation rate of 109 s-1 is predicted theoretically. Our calculated cycling rate has shown that having not considered the doubly muonic formation in previous calculations had made no serious changes in the previously calculated values.

  6. The Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate Relation in WSRT SINGS Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (ΣSFR) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We

  7. The Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate Relation in WSRT SINGS Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (ΣSFR) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We

  8. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  9. The relation between surface star formation rate density and spiral arms in NGC 5236 (M83)

    CERN Document Server

    Silva-Villa, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    For a long time the consensus has been that star formation rates are higher in the interior of spiral arms in galaxies, compared to inter-arm regions. However, recent studies have found that the star formation inside the arms is not more efficient than elsewhere in the galaxy. Previous studies have based their conclusion mainly on integrated light. We use resolved stellar populations to investigate the star formation rates throughout the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5236. We aim to investigate how the star formation rate varies in the spiral arms compared to the inter-arm regions, using optical space-based observations of NGC 5236. Using ground-based H\\alpha images we traced regions of recent star formation, and reconstructed the arms of the galaxy. Using HST/ACS images we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Arms based on H\\alpha images showed to follow the regions where stellar crowding is higher. Star formation rates for individual arms over the fields covered were estimated ...

  10. Evolution of galaxy stellar masses and star formation rates in the EAGLE simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Furlong, M; Theuns, T; Schaye, J; Crain, R A; Schaller, M; Vecchia, C Dalla; Frenk, C S; McCarthy, I G; Helly, J; Jenkins, A; Rosas-Guevara, Y M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of galaxy masses and star formation rates in the Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environment (EAGLE) simulations. These comprise a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in a $\\Lambda$CDM cosmogony with subgrid models for radiative cooling, star formation, stellar mass loss, and feedback from stars and accreting black holes. The subgrid feedback was calibrated to reproduce the observed present-day galaxy stellar mass function and galaxy sizes. Here we demonstrate that the simulations reproduce the observed growth of the stellar mass density to within 20 per cent. The simulation also tracks the observed evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function out to redshift z = 7, with differences comparable to the plausible uncertainties in the interpretation of the data. Just as with observed galaxies, the specific star formation rates of simulated galaxies are bimodal, with distinct star forming and passive sequences. The specific star formation rates of star forming galaxies ar...

  11. Global Star Formation Rates in Disk Galaxies and Circumnuclear Starbursts from Cloud Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J C

    1999-01-01

    We invoke star formation triggered by cloud-cloud collisions to explain global star formation rates of disk galaxies and circumnuclear starbursts. Previous theories based on the growth rate of gravitational perturbations ignore the dynamically important presence of magnetic fields. Theories based on triggering by spiral density waves fail to explain star formation in systems without such waves. Furthermore, observations suggest gas and stellar disk instabilities are decoupled. Following the numerical work of Gammie, Jog & Ostriker (1991), the cloud collision rate is set by the shear velocity of encounters with initial impact parameters of a few tidal radii, due to differential rotation in the disk. This enhances the collision rate above that calculated from simply considering the random velocities of clouds. We predict Sigma_{SFR}(R) is proportional to Sigma_{gas} Omega (1 - 0.7 beta). In the case of constant circular velocity (beta = 0), this is in agreement with recent observations (Kennicutt 1998). We ...

  12. The Relative Rate of LGRB Formation as a Function of Metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J F

    2015-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) are preferentially formed in low-metallicity environments. However, the magnitude of this effect, and its functional dependence on metallicity have not been well characterized. In our previous paper, Graham & Fruchter (2013), we compared the metallicity distribution of LGRB host galaxies to the that of star forming galaxies in the local universe. Here we build upon this work by in effect dividing one distribution by the other, and thus directly determine the relative rate of LGRB formation as a function of metallicity in the low-redshift universe. We find a dramatic cutoff in LGRB formation above a metallicity of log(O/H)}+12 ~ 8.3 in the KK04 scale, with LGRBs forming >25 times more frequently per unit star-formation below this cutoff than above. Furthermore, our data suggests that the rate of LGRB formation per unit star formation continues to fall above this break. We estimate the LGRB formation rate per unit star formation may dr...

  13. Conditions for circumstellar disc formation - II. Effects of initial cloud stability and mass accretion rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate on to the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brakes the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with non-uniform densities.

  14. Analytical modeling of gas production rate in tight channel sand formation and optimization of artificial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruifei; Song, Hongqing; Tang, Hewei; Wang, Yuhe; Killough, John; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Permeability variation in tight channel sand formation makes an important role in gas production. Based on the features of channel sand formation, a mathematical model has been established considering anisotropy of permeability. The analytical solutions were derived for productivity of both vertical wells and vertically fractured wells. Simulation results show that, gas production rate of anisotropic channel sand formation is less than that of isotropic formation. For vertically fractured well, artificial fracture direction, drainage radius, permeability ratio and fracture half-length have considerable influence on production rate. The optimum fracture direction should be deviated less than π/8 from the maximum permeability direction (or the channel direction). In addition, the analytical model was verified by in situ measured data. The research provides theoretical basis for the development of tight channel sand gas reservoirs.

  15. Measuring the rates of spontaneous vortex formation in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Tyler; Samson, Edward; Bradley, Ashton; Davis, Matthew; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    By studying the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition in highly oblate (˜11:1 aspect ratio) traps, we have measured the dependence of spontaneous vortex formation on BEC growth rate, extending our previous experimental and numerical observations of spontaneous vortex formation in weakly oblate (˜2:1 aspect ratio) traps [1]. Our condensation procedure in these highly oblate traps allows us to create BECs over a large range of growth times, from approximately 200 ms to over 2 s. By characterizing vortex formation vs. BEC growth rate, and comparing experimental and numerical results, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for topological defect formation may be quantitatively studied in our system. [1] C.N. Weiler, T.W. Neely, D.R. Scherer, A.S. Bradley, M.J. Davis, and B.P. Anderson., Nature 455, 948 (2008).

  16. The Star-Formation Main Sequence: The Dependence of Specific Star Formation Rate and Its Dispersion on Galaxy Stellar Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Kexin; Wang, Tao; Fu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of the star-formation main sequence (SFMS) reflects the diversity of star formation histories and variation in star formation rates (SFRs) in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) with similar stellar masses ($M^\\ast$). We examine the dispersion of local SFMS using a complete sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies at 0.01$$8.8. The SFRs are estimated from H$\\alpha$ in combination with 22$\\mu m$ observation from WISE. The catalog of bulge+disk decomposition from Simard et al. (2011) is available for the sample galaxies. We measure the dispersion of specific SFR (SSFR) as a function of $M^*$. We confirm that the dispersion increases with $M^*$ from 0.37$\\pm0.01$dex at $\\log(M^\\ast/M_\\odot)$10.2. Despite star formation is mostly associated with disks, the dispersion of disk SSFR still increases with $M^*$. We conclude that the presence of bulges/bars is likely responsible for the large dispersion of SSFR in massive SFGs while low-mass SFGs are mostly disk-dominated and thus with small dispersion. Our ...

  17. Let's go formative: continuous student ratings with Web 2.0 application Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Stefan; Burger, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    Student ratings have been a controversial but important method for the improvement of teaching quality during the past several decades. Most universities rely on summative evaluations conducted at the end of a term or course. A formative approach in which each course unit is evaluated may be beneficial for students and teachers but has rarely been applied. This is most probably due to the time constraints associated with various procedures inherent in formative evaluation (numerous evaluations, high amounts of aggregated data, high administrative investment). In order to circumvent these disadvantages, we chose the Web 2.0 Internet application Twitter as evaluation tool and tested whether it is useful for the implementation of a formative evaluation. After a first pilot and subsequent experimental study, the following conclusions were drawn: First, the formative evaluation did not come to the same results as the summative evaluation at the end of term, suggesting that formative evaluations tap into different aspects of course evaluation than summative evaluations do. Second, the results from an offline (i.e., paper-pencil) summative evaluation were identical with those from an online summative evaluation of the same course conducted a week later. Third, the formative evaluation did not influence the ratings of the summative evaluation at the end of the term. All in all, we can conclude that Twitter is a useful tool for evaluating a course formatively (i.e., on a weekly basis). Because of Twitter's simple use and the electronic handling of data, the administrative effort remains small.

  18. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Kaisin, Serafim S; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2014-01-01

    We use data for faint (M_B > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the FIGGS survey to study the correlation between the atomic gas density (Sigma_gas,atomic) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ~ 0.1 Z_sun. Understanding star formation in such molecule poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20% (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the HI distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and HI distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies we compute the Sigma_gas,atomic and Sigma_SFR averaged over the entire star forming disk of the galaxy. For these galaxies we find a nearly linear relation betw...

  19. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  20. Kiloparsec-scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. IV. Regulation of Galactic Star Formation Rates by Stellar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Teyssier, Romain; Rosdahl, Joakim; Van Loo, Sven; Nickerson, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Star formation from the interstellar medium of galactic disks is a basic process controlling the evolution of galaxies. Understanding the star formation rate (SFR) in a local patch of a disk with a given gas mass is thus an important challenge for theoretical models. Here we simulate a kiloparsec region of a disk, following the evolution of self-gravitating molecular clouds down to subparsec scales, as they form stars that then inject feedback energy by dissociating and ionizing UV photons and supernova explosions. We assess the relative importance of each feedback mechanism. We find that H2-dissociating feedback results in the largest absolute reduction in star formation compared to the run with no feedback. Subsequently adding photoionization feedback produces a more modest reduction. Our fiducial models that combine all three feedback mechanisms yield, without fine-tuning, SFRs that are in excellent agreement with observations, with H2-dissociating photons playing a crucial role. Models that only include supernova feedback—a common method in galaxy evolution simulations—settle to similar SFRs, but with very different temperatures and chemical states of the gas, and with very different spatial distributions of young stars.

  1. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Combes, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68% plausible intervals from them. The 68% plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the star formation rates available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition...

  2. The sizes, masses and specific star formation rates of massive galaxies at 1.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLure, R. J.; Pearce, H. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Bruce, V. A.; Caputi, K. I.; Almaini, O.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bradshaw, E. J.; Buitrago, F.; Chuter, R.; Foucaud, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive study of the relationship between galaxy size, stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) at redshifts 1.3

  3. Probe Measurements of Ash Deposit Formation Rate and Shedding in a Biomass Suspension-Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...

  4. The star-formation rate density from z = 0-6

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Wang, Lingyu; Farrah, Duncan; Clements, David; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Marchetti, Lucia; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Varcari, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    We use 3035 Herschel-SPIRE 500$\\mu$m sources from 20.3 sq deg of sky in the HerMES Lockman, ES1 and XMM-LSS areas to estimate the star-formation rate density at z = 1-6. 500 mu sources are associated first with 350 and 250 mu sources, and then with Spitzer 24 mu sources from the SWIRE photometric redshift catalogue. The infrared and submillimetre data are fitted with a set of radiative-transfer templates corresponding to cirrus (quiescent) and starburst galaxies. Lensing candidates are removed via a set of colour-colour and colour-redshift constraints. Star-formation rates are found to extend from < 1 to 20,000 Mo/yr. Such high values were also seen in the all-sky IRAS Faint Source Survey. Star-formation rate functions are derived in a series of redshift bins from 0-6, combined with earlier far-infrared estimates, where available, and fitted with a Saunders et al (1990) functional form. The star-formation-rate density as a function of redshift is derived and compared with other estimates. There is reasonab...

  5. The sizes, masses and specific star formation rates of massive galaxies at 1.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLure, R. J.; Pearce, H. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Bruce, V. A.; Caputi, K. I.; Almaini, O.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bradshaw, E. J.; Buitrago, F.; Chuter, R.; Foucaud, S.; Hartley, W. G.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive study of the relationship between galaxy size, stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) at redshifts 1.3

  6. Galaxy Evolution in Cosmological Simulations With Outflows I: Stellar Masses and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    We examine the growth of the stellar content of galaxies from z=3-0 in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations incorporating parameterised galactic outflows. Without outflows, galaxies overproduce stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) compared to observations. Winds introduce a three-tier form for the galaxy stellar mass and star formation rate functions, where the middle tier depends on differential (i.e. mass-dependent) recycling of ejected wind material back into galaxies. A tight M*-SFR relation is a generic outcome of all these simulations, and its evolution is well-described as being powered by cold accretion, although current observations at z>2 suggest that star formation in small early galaxies must be highly suppressed. Roughly one-third of z=0 galaxies at masses below M^* are satellites, and star formation in satellites is not much burstier than in centrals. All models fail to suppress star formation and stellar mass growth in massive galaxies at z<2, indicating the need for an exter...

  7. Development of a Neural Fuzzy System for Advanced Prediction of Gas Hydrate Formation Rate in Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad JALALNEZHAD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the natural gas industry in the 20th century, the production, processing and distribution of natural gas under high-pressure conditions has become necessary. Under these conditions, it was found that the production and transmission pipelines were becoming blocked with what looked like to be ice. Hammerschmidt determined that hydrates were the cause of plugged natural gas pipelines. Gas hydrates and difficulties related to their formation in production and transmission pipelines and equipment, are the major concerns of the gas industry. The main objective of this study was to present a novel approach to access more accurate hydrate formation rate predicting models based on a combination of flow loop experimental data with learning power of adaptive neural-fuzzy inference systems and more than 900 data points of the , , , and i-  hydrate formation rate. Using this data set different predictive models were developed. It was found that such models can be used as powerful tools, with total errors less than 6 % for the developed models, in predicting hydrate formation rate in these cases.

  8. Some empirical estimates of the H2 formation rate in photon-dominated regions

    CERN Document Server

    Habart, E; Verstraete, L; Walmsley, C M; Pineau des Forêts, G

    2004-01-01

    We combine recent ISO observations of the vibrational ground state lines of H2 towards Photon-Dominated Regions (PDRs) with observations of vibrationally excited states made with ground-based telescopes in order to constrain the formation rate of H2 on grain surfaces under the physical conditions in the layers responsible for H2 emission. We use steady state PDR models in order to examine the sensitivity of different H2 line ratios to the H2 formation rate Rf. We show that the ratio of the 0-0 S(3) to the 1-0 S(1) line increases with Rf but that one requires independent estimates of the radiation field incident upon the PDR and the density in order to infer Rf from the H2 line data. We confirm the earlier result of Habart et al. (2003) that the H2 formation rate in regions of moderate excitation such as Oph W, S140 and IC 63 is a factor of 5 times larger than the standard rate inferred from UV observations of diffuse clouds. On the other hand, towards regions of higher radiation field such as the Orion Bar an...

  9. Formation of hydrogen bonds precedes the rate-limiting formation of persistent structure in the folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J;

    2000-01-01

    A burst phase in the early folding of the four-helix two-state folder protein acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) has been detected using quenched-flow in combination with site-specific NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. Several of the burst phase structures coincide with a structure consisting...... of eight conserved hydrophobic residues at the interface between the two N and C-terminal helices. Previous mutation studies have shown that the formation of this structure is rate limiting for the final folding of ACBP. The burst phase structures observed in ACBP are different from the previously reported...... collapsed types of burst phase intermediates observed in the folding of other proteins....

  10. Microtwin formation in the {alpha} phase of duplex titanium alloys affected by strain rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Hsiang; Wu, Shu-Ming [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Kao, Fang-Hsin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shing-Hoa, E-mail: shwang@ntou.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jer-Ren [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chia-Chih [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2 Pei Ning Road, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Chuan-Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 32003, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The long and dense twins in {alpha} phase of SP700 alloy occurring at lower strain rates promote a good ductility. {yields} The deformation in SP700 alloy changed to micro twins-controlled mechanism in {alpha} as the strain rate decreases. {yields} The material has time to redistribute the deformed strain between {alpha} and {beta} as the strain rate decreases. - Abstract: The effect of tensile strain rate on deformation microstructure was investigated in Ti-6-4 (Ti-6Al-4V) and SP700 (Ti-4.5Al-3V-2Mo-2Fe) of the duplex titanium alloys. Below a strain rate of 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, Ti-6-4 alloy had a higher ultimate tensile strength than SP700 alloy. However, the yield strength of SP700 was consistently greater than Ti-6-4 at different strain rates. The ductility of SP700 alloy associated with twin formation (especially at the slow strain rate of 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}), always exceeded that of Ti-6-4 alloy at different strain rates. It is caused by a large quantity of deformation twins took place in the {alpha} phase of SP700 due to the lower stacking fault energy by the {beta} stabilizer of molybdenum alloying. In addition, the local deformation more was imposed on the {alpha} grains from the surrounding {beta}-rich grains by redistributing strain as the strain rate decreased in SP700 duplex alloy.

  11. SLUG - Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies. II: Quantifying the Effects of Stochasticity on Star Formation Rate Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Robert L; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    The integrated light of a stellar population, measured through photometric filters that are sensitive to the presence of young stars, is often used to infer the star formation rate (SFR) for that population. However, these techniques rely on an assumption that star formation is a continuous process, whereas in reality stars form in discrete spatially- and temporally-correlated structures. This discreteness causes the light output to undergo significant time-dependent fluctuations, which, if not accounted for, introduce errors and biases in the inferred SFRs. We use SLUG (a code that Stochastically Lights Up Galaxies) to simulate galaxies undergoing stochastic star formation. We then use these simulations to present a quantitative analysis of these effects and provide tools for calculating probability distribution functions of SFRs given a set of observations. We show that, depending on the SFR tracer used, stochastic fluctuations can produce non-trivial errors at SFRs as high as 1 Msun/yr, and we suggest meth...

  12. Equipartition magnetic fields and star formation rates in normal galaxies at sub-kpc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Aritra

    2014-01-01

    We studied the total magnetic field strength in normal star-forming galaxies estimated using energy equipartition assumption. Using the well known radio--far infrared correlation we demonstrate that the equipartition assumption is valid in galaxies at sub-kpc scales. We find that the magnetic field strength is strongly correlated with the surface star formation rate in the galaxies NGC 6946 and NGC 5236. Further, we compare the magnetic field energy density to the total (thermal + turbulent) energy densities of gas (neutral + ionized) to identify regions of efficient field amplification in the galaxy NGC 6946. We find that in regions of efficient star formation, the magnetic field energy density is comparable to that of the total energy density of various interstellar medium components and systematically dominates in regions of low star formation efficiency.

  13. Some empirical estimates of the H2 formation rate in photon-dominated regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habart, E.; Boulanger, F.; Verstraete, L.; Walmsley, C. M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2004-02-01

    We combine recent ISO observations of the vibrational ground state lines of H2 towards Photon-Dominated Regions (PDRs) with observations of vibrationally excited states made with ground-based telescopes in order to constrain the formation rate of H2 on grain surfaces under the physiconditions in the layers responsible for H2 emission. We briefly review the data available for five nearby PDRs. We use steady state PDR models in order to examine the sensitivity of different H2 line ratios to the H2 formation rate R_f. We show that the ratio of the 0-0 S(3) to the 1-0 S(1) line increases with Rf but that one requires independent estimates of the radiation field incident upon the PDR and the density in order to infer Rf from the H2 line data. We confirm earlier work by \\cite{habart2003a} on the Oph W PDR which showed that an H2 formation rate higher than the standard value of 3 × 10-17 cm3 s-1 inferred from UV observations of diffuse clouds is needed to explain the observed H2 excitation. From comparison of the ISO and ground-based data, we find that moderately excited PDRs such as Oph W, S140 and IC 63 require an H2 formation rate of about five times the standard value whereas the data for PDRs with a higher incident radiation field such as NGC 2023 and the Orion Bar can be explained with the standard value of Rf. We compare also the H21-0 S(1) line intensities with the emission in PAH features and find a rough scaling of the ratio of these quantities with the ratio of local density to radiation field. This suggests but does not prove that formation of H2 on PAHs is important in PDRs. We also consider some empirical models of the H2 formation process with the aim of explaining these results. Here we consider both formation on classical grains of size roughly 0.1 μm and on very small (˜10 Å) grains by either direct recombination from the gas phase (Eley-Rideal mechanism) or recombination of physisorbed H atoms with atoms in a chemisorbed site. We conclude that

  14. Global Star Formation Rates and Dust Emission Over the Galaxy Interaction Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Lanz, Lauranne; Brassington, Nicola; Smith, Howard A; Ashby, Matthew L N; da Cunha, Elisabete; Fazio, Giovanni G; Hayward, Christopher C; Hernquist, Lars; Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    We measured and modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFR), specific star formation rates (sSFR), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increase...

  15. Formation of volcanic edifices in response to changes in magma budget at intermediate spreading rate ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J.; White, S. M.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices along mid-ocean ridges have a well known correlation with spreading rate. Along slow spreading centers, volcanic edifices are normally distributed about the segment center. Volcanic edifices along fast spreading centers have the opposing trend, i.e. edifices form primarily at the ends of segments. However, in ridges affected by plumes and at back arc basins, the spatial and abundance distributions of volcanic edifices differ from that observed at normal ridges of the same spreading rate. This suggests that magma supply rate may control the spatial and abundance distribution of volcanic edifices. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies along the Galapagos Spreading Centers (GSC), Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) and the Valu Fa (VF) and Eastern Lau Spreading Centers (ELSC) put tight constraints on crustal thickness, making it possible investigate the effect of magma budget and axial morphology on the formation of volcanic edifices. Volcanic edifices are described according to their volume, shape (their height to basal radius ratio) and their location relative to the end or center of a segment (abundance distribution). For the GSC, the shape and distribution of volcanic edifices correlate with changes in crustal thickness and axial morphology, consistent with a magma supply control on their formation in this region. This relationship is not apparent along the SEIR or JdFR, where edifices show little variation with changes in axial morphology at relatively constant spreading rates. Results for VF and ELSC are what we expect for changes in spreading rate, not axial morphology. Our study suggests that the formation of volcanic edifices at intermediate spreading rate ridges are influenced by magma budget but only when it is above a certain threshold.

  16. Physical origin of the large-scale conformity in the specific star formation rates of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-01-01

    Two explanations have been put forward to explain the observed conformity between the colours and specific star formation rates (SFR/$M_*$) of galaxies on large scales: 1) the formation times of their surrounding dark matter halos are correlated (commonly referred to as "assembly bias"), 2) gas is heated over large scales at early times, leading to coherent modulation of cooling and star formation between well-separated galaxies (commonly referred to as "pre-heating") . To distinguish between the pre-heating and assembly bias scenarios, we search for relics of energetic feedback events in the neighbourhood of central galaxies with different specific star formation rates. We find a significant excess of very high mass ($\\log M_* > 11.3$) galaxies out to a distance of 2.5 Mpc around low SFR/$M_*$ central galaxies compared to control samples of higher SFR/$M_*$ central galaxies with the same stellar mass and redshift. We also find that very massive galaxies in the neighbourhood of low SFR/$M_*$ galaxies have muc...

  17. Fibronectin alters the rate of formation and structure of the fibrin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-01-10

    Plasma fibronectin is a vital component of the fibrin clot; however its role on clot structure is not clearly understood. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of fibronectin on the kinetics of formation, structural characteristics and composition of reconstituted fibrin clots or fibrin matrices. Fibrin matrices were formed by adding thrombin to 1, 2 or 4 mg/ml fibrinogen supplemented with 0-0.4 mg/ml fibronectin. The rate of fibrin matrix formation was then monitored by measuring light absorbance properties at different time points. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein conjugated fibrinogen was used to visualize the structural characteristics of fibrin matrices. The amount of fibronectin in fibrin matrices was determined through electrophoresis and immunoblotting of solubilized matrices. Fibronectin concentration positively correlated with the initial rate of fibrin matrix formation and with steady state light absorbance values of fibrin matrices. An increase in fibronectin concentration resulted in thinner and denser fibers in the fibrin matrices. Electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed that fibronectin was covalently and non-covalently bound to fibrin matrices and in the form of high molecular weight multimers. The formation of fibronectin multimers was attributed to cross-linking of fibronectin by trace amounts Factor XIIIa. These findings are novel because they link results from light absorbance studies to microcopy analyses and demonstrate an influence of fibronectin on fibrin matrix structural characteristics. This data is important in developing therapies that destabilize fibrin clots.

  18. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-07

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  19. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Renzini, Alvio [Department of Physics and Astronomy Galileo Galilei, Universita degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  20. Primordial star formation: relative impact of H2 three-body rates and initial conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, S; Grassi, T

    2013-01-01

    Population III stars are the first stars in the Universe to form at z=20-30 out of a pure hydrogen and helium gas in minihalos of 10^5-10^6 M$_\\odot$ . Cooling and fragmentation is thus regulated via molecular hydrogen. At densities above 10^8 cm$^{-3}$, the three-body H2 formation rates are particularly important for making the gas fully molecular. These rates were considered to be uncertain by at least a few orders of magnitude. We explore the impact of new accurate three-body H2 formation rates derived by Forrey (2013) for three different minihalos, and compare to the results obtained with three-body rates employed in previous studies. The calculations are performed with the cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO (release 2.2) coupled with the chemistry package KROME (including a network for primordial chemistry), which was previously shown to be accurate in high resolution simulations. While the new rates can shift the point where the gas becomes fully molecular, leading to a different thermal evolution, th...

  1. An Empirical Model for the Galaxy Luminosity and Star-Formation Rate Function at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star-formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z~4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z>8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass M{_h} by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z~4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-M{_h} relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 10 indicate that JWST will be able to detect galaxies out to z~15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density and associated reionization history by galaxies for which we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit leads to a fully reionized universe by z~6.5 an...

  2. Resolved gas kinematics in a sample of low-redshift high star-formation rate galaxie

    CERN Document Server

    Varidel, Matthew; Croom, Scott; Owers, Matt; Sadler, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    We have used integral field spectroscopy of a sample of six nearby (z~0.01-0.04) high star-formation rate (SFR~10-40 solar masses per year) galaxies to investigate the relationship between local velocity dispersion and star formation rate on sub-galactic scales. The low redshift mitigates, to some extent, the effect of beam smearing which artificially inflates the measured dispersion as it combines regions with different line-of-sight velocities into a single spatial pixel. We compare the parametric maps of the velocity dispersion with the Halpha flux (a proxy for local star-formation rate), and the velocity gradient (a proxy for the local effect of beam smearing). We find, even for these very nearby galaxies, the Halpha velocity dispersion correlates more strongly with velocity gradient than with Halpha flux - implying that beam smearing is still having a significant effect on the velocity dispersion measurements. We obtain a first-order non parametric correction for the unweighted and flux weighted mean vel...

  3. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Heyer, M; Urquhart, J S; Csengeri, T; Wienen, M; Leurini, S; Menten, K; Wyrowski, F

    2016-01-01

    Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. A sample of 24 micron-based Class~I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f*, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 m...

  4. The COSMOS [OII] Survey: Evolution of Electron Density with Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa; Gupta, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies at $z > 1$ exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of star-forming conditions we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim 1.5$ with emission-line measurements of the $\\mathrm{[OII]} \\lambda \\lambda 3726,3729$ doublet. By comparing our $z\\sim 1.5$ sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of $114_{-27}^{+28} \\, \\mathrm {cm}^{-3} $ for our...

  5. A mid-IR study of Hickson Compact Groups II. Multi-wavelength analysis of the complete GALEX-Spitzer Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsakis, T; da Cunha, E; Diaz-Santos, T; Floc'h, E Le; Magdis, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the impact of the environment of compact galaxy groups on the evolution of their members using a multi-wavelength analysis, from the UV to the infrared, for a sample of 32 Hickson compact groups (HCGs) containing 135 galaxies. Fitting the SEDs of all galaxies with the state-of-the-art model of da Cunha (2008) we can accurately calculate their mass, SFR, and extinction, as well as estimate their infrared luminosity and dust content. We compare our findings with samples of field galaxies, early-stage interacting pairs, and cluster galaxies with similar data. We find that classifying the groups as dynamically "old" or "young", depending on whether or not at least one quarter of their members are early-type systems, is physical and consistent with past classifications of HCGs based on their atomic gas content. [...ABRIDGED...] We also examine their SF properties, UV-optical and mid-IR colors, and we conclude that all the evidence point to an evolutionary scenario in which the e...

  6. OH{sup +} in astrophysical media: state-to-state formation rates, Einstein coefficients and inelastic collision rates with He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana [Facultad de Química, Unidad Asociada CSIC-USAL, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Godard, Benjamin [LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon (France); Lique, François [LOMC-UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 540, F-76058 Le Havre (France); Bulut, Niyazi [Department of Physics, Firat University, 23169 Elazig (Turkey); Kłos, Jacek [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2021 (United States); Roncero, Octavio [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Alfredo [Facultad de Ciencias, Unidad Asociada de Química-Física Aplicada CSIC-UAM, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Aoiz, F. Javier; Castillo, Jesús F. [Departamento de Química Física I, Unidad Asociada de Química-Física CSIC-UCM, Facultad de Química, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales (ICMM-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-10

    The rate constants required to model the OH{sup +} observations in different regions of the interstellar medium have been determined using state of the art quantum methods. First, state-to-state rate constants for the H{sub 2}(v = 0, J = 0, 1) + O{sup +}({sup 4} S) → H + OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}, v', N) reaction have been obtained using a quantum wave packet method. The calculations have been compared with time-independent results to assess the accuracy of reaction probabilities at collision energies of about 1 meV. The good agreement between the simulations and the existing experimental cross sections in the 0.01-1 eV energy range shows the quality of the results. The calculated state-to-state rate constants have been fitted to an analytical form. Second, the Einstein coefficients of OH{sup +} have been obtained for all astronomically significant rovibrational bands involving the X {sup 3}Σ{sup –} and/or A {sup 3}Π electronic states. For this purpose, the potential energy curves and electric dipole transition moments for seven electronic states of OH{sup +} are calculated with ab initio methods at the highest level, including spin-orbit terms, and the rovibrational levels have been calculated including the empirical spin-rotation and spin-spin terms. Third, the state-to-state rate constants for inelastic collisions between He and OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}) have been calculated using a time-independent close coupling method on a new potential energy surface. All these rates have been implemented in detailed chemical and radiative transfer models. Applications of these models to various astronomical sources show that inelastic collisions dominate the excitation of the rotational levels of OH{sup +}. In the models considered, the excitation resulting from the chemical formation of OH{sup +} increases the line fluxes by about 10% or less depending on the density of the gas.

  7. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Lenkic, Laura; Gallagher, Sarah; Desjardins, Tyler; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann; Durrell, Pat; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended timescales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by \\citet{tzanavaris10} and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFR$_{\\mathrm{UV}}$) using the UVOT uvw2photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 \\micron\\ photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFR$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-"red"), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific star formation rates, and tend to lie in H~{\\sc i}-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-"blue") have redder ...

  8. Exploring the Role of Galaxy Morphology in the Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Anthony; Rafelski, Marc; Scarlata, Claudia; Pacifici, Camilla; Henry, Alaina L.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Elmegreen, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The Mass-Metallicity-Star Formation Rate (M-Z-SFR) fundamental relation reveals the underlying physics behind galaxy evolution: the mechanics of gas inflow, outflow, and the formation of stars are intimately connected. At higher redshift, we observe galaxies which are believed to be more actively accreting from the cosmic web, and as a result bright star-forming clumps are expected to form due to the increased gravitational instability of the galactic medium. We investigate these “clumpy” galaxies in context of their location on the M-Z-SFR plane to search for evidence of metal-poor gas inflows as predicted by theoretical models, and to help us understand how galaxies form and change at a higher redshift (1.3 fundamental plane to investigate possible diminished metallicity and heightened star formation rate compared to the remainder of the sample. This will enable us to better understand the theoretical underpinnings of gas accretion and galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  9. Measurement of Star-Formation Rate from H-$\\alpha$ in field galaxies at z = 1

    CERN Document Server

    Glazebrook, K; Economou, F; Lilly, S; Colless, M; Glazebrook, Karl; Blake, Chris; Economou, Frossie; Lilly, Simon; Colless, Matthew

    1998-01-01

    We report the results of J-band infrared spectroscopy of a sample of 13 z=1 field galaxies drawn from the Canada-France Redshift Survey, targeting galaxies whose redshifts place the rest frame H-alpha line emission from HII regions in between the bright night sky OH lines. As a result we detect emission down to a flux limit of ~10^{-16} ergs/cm^2/s corresponding to a luminosity limit of these luminosities we derive estimates of the star-formation rates in these galaxies which are independent of previous estimates based upon their rest-frame ultraviolet (2800 Angstroms) luminosity. The mean star-formation rate at z=1, from this sample, is found to be three times as high as the ultraviolet estimates. The dust extinction in these galaxies is inferred to be moderate, with a typical A_V=0.5-1.0 mags, comparable to local field galaxies. This suggests that the bulk of star-formation is not heavily obscured. Star-forming galaxies have the bluest colours and a preponderance of disturbed/interacting morphologies. We al...

  10. Dilution in elliptical galaxies: Implications for the relation between metallicity, stellar mass and star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether gradual dilution of the gas in some elliptical galaxies is the cause of a positive correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and gas-phase metallicity (Zg) at high stellar mass (M*) in the local Universe. To do this, two classes of massive (M* >= 10^10.5 Msun) galaxy are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Munich semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, L-Galaxies. The first class is selected by high specific star formation rates (sSFR) and high Zg, and the second class by low sSFR and low Zg. These criteria roughly distinguish disc-dominant galaxies from metal-poor, elliptical galaxies. In the semi-analytic model, the second class of galaxies obtain low sSFR and low Zg due to gradual dilution of the interstellar medium by accretion of metal-poor gas via infalling clumps and low-mass satellites. This occurs after a merger-induced starburst and the associated supernova feedback have quenched most of the original gas reservoir. A number of signatures of this evol...

  11. An Evolutionary Model for Collapsing Molecular Clouds and Their Star Formation Activity. II. Mass Dependence of the Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we presented a semi-analytical model for the regulation of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) in which the molecular clouds (MCs) were assumed to be in gravitational collapse, and the SFR was instantaneously controlled by evaporation of the cloud material by massive-star ionization feedback. In this model, the main parameter controlling the evolution of the clouds was found to be the gas mass involved in the process and here we discuss various properties of the SFR and SFE as a function of the cloud masses, that can be compared with observations and implemented in numerical models of galactic evolution. Because the model neglects magnetic fields, supernova explosions, and radiation pressure, the results presented are upper limits. We find that $\\SFRavg$ and $\\SFEavg$ are well represented as functions of the maximum cloud mass by the fits $\\SFRavg \\approx 100 (1+\\Mmax/2 \\times 10^5 ~ \\Msun)^{2} ~ \\Msun \\Myr^{-1}$ and $\\SFEavg \\approx 0.024 (\\Mmax/10^5 ~ \\Msun)^{0.28}$, resp...

  12. Microparticle Formation and Crystallization Rate of HMX with Supercritical CO2 Antisolvent Recrystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Microparticle formation and crystallization rate of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX) in acetone solution using supercritical carbon dioxide antisolvent (GAS) recrystallization were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared radiation were used to examine particle size, crystallinity and chemical structure. The results show that β-HMX microparticle in different average size (2-9.5μm) and with narrow size distribution were obtained by controlling the expansibility, expansion speed, initial concentration and temperature during recrystallization of HMX. The formation of nuclei may be a main cause of consumption of solute when the solution is expanded rapidly enough and the equilibrium concentration is lower, in which almost monodisperse microparticle can be obtained.

  13. Microparticle Formation and Crystallization Rate of HMX with Supercritical CO2 Antisolvent Recrystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡建国; 周展云; 邓修

    2001-01-01

    Microparticle formation and crystallization rate of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-l,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX) in acetone solution using supercritical carbon dioxide antisolvent (GAS) recrystallization were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared radiation were used to examine particle size, crystallinity and chemical structure. The results show that β-HMX microparticle in different average size (2--9.5μm) and with narrow size distribution were obtained by controlling the expansibility, expansion speed, initial concentration and temperature during recrystallization of HMX. The formation of nuclei may be a main cause of consumption of solute when the solution is expanded rapidly enough and the equilibrium concentration is lower, in which almost monodisperse microparticle can be obtained.

  14. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound ('clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ($\\sim10$ Myr) timescales ('associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters ($\\Gamma$) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that $\\Gamma$ increases with the gas surface density ($\\Sigma$) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density ($\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the $total$ number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of $\\Gamma$ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$, d...

  15. The impact of gas inflows on star formation rates and metallicities in barred galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Sara L; Patton, David R; Scudder, Jillian M; Mendel, J Trevor; Simard, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The star formation rates (SFRs) and metallicities of a sample of 294 galaxies with visually classified, strong, large-scale bars are compared to a control sample of unbarred disk galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. The fibre (inner few kpc) metallicities of barred galaxies are uniformly higher (at a given mass) than the unbarred sample by ~0.06 dex. However, the fibre SFRs of the visually classified barred galaxies are higher by about 60% only in the galaxies with total stellar mass log M > 10. The metal enhancement at log M10. However, due to the much lower fraction of pairs than bars, bars account for ~3.5 times more triggered central star formation than interactions.

  16. The density structure and star formation rate of non-isothermal polytropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is governed by supersonic turbulence, which likely controls the star formation rate (SFR) and initial mass function (IMF) of stars. Turbulence also plays an important role during structure formation in the early Universe. Despite its ubiquity and importance, we have yet to understand the statistics of turbulence. ISM turbulence is non-universal, with a wide range of Mach numbers, magnetic fields strengths, and is driven by various stellar feedback and galactic processes. Although some of these parameters were explored, the bulk of previous work assumed that the gas is isothermal. However, cold molecular clouds form out of the warm atomic medium, with the gas passing through various chemical and thermodynamic phases that are not isothermal. Here we determine the role of temperature variations by modelling non-isothermal hydrodynamic turbulence with a polytropic equation of state (EOS), P~rho^Gamma. We use grid resolutions of 2048^3 cells and compare polytropic exponents Gamm...

  17. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  18. Evolution of M81 with Exponentially Decreasing Star Formation Rate of PEGASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-Li Li; Xu Zhou; Jun Ma; Jian-Sheng Chen

    2004-01-01

    Based on the large field multicolor observations of Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) program, we obtain the spectral energy distribution (SED) for individual regions of M81. We study the structure and evolution of MS1 with an evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) model, PEGASE. We find that the exponentially deceasing star formation rate (SFR) with star formation scale 3 Gyr (hereafter Exp, τ = 3 Gyr) gives the best agreement between the model predictions and the observed SEDs. We then obtain the structure, age distribution and evolutionary history of M81. There is a clear age gradient between the central and outer regions. The populations in the central regions are older than 7 Gyr,those in the outer regions are younger, at about 4.5 Gyr. The youngest components in the spiral arms have ages of about 2.5 Gyr or less.

  19. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  20. Analysis of carrier gas flow rate effect on hydroxyapatite particle formation in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Setiawan, Adhi; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis has been well-known process for producing fine particles from single and multicomponent materials. Here, the effect of carrier gas flow rate in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process was studied in the particle formation of hydroxyapatite using solution precursor of Ca(CH3COO)2 and (NH4)2HPO4 with Ca/P ratio of 1.67. The experimental analysis was accompanied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for comparison. In the simulation, the evaporation of the solvent in the droplets, a second evaporation due to crust formation, the decomposition reaction of the precursor involving the transfer of heat and mass transfer from droplet to surrounding were considered. By maintaining temperature at 900 °C, the residence time increased with decreasing the carrier gas flow rate led to the increasing the evaporation rate and the reacted fraction of the precursor. The predicted and experimental results of average particles size were agreed well with discrepancy 6.3%.

  1. Influence of cooling rate on microstructure formation during rapid solidification of binary TiAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenel, C., E-mail: Christoph.Kenel@empa.ch; Leinenbach, C.

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Rapid solidification studies with varying cooling rates were realized for Ti–Al. • Experiments were combined with finite element simulations of heat transfer. • The resulting microstructure of Ti–Al alloys is strongly dependent on the Al content. • The microstructure and phase transformation behavior can be predicted. • The method allows alloy development for processes involving rapid solidification. - Abstract: Titanium aluminides as structural intermetallics are possible candidates for a potential weight reduction and increased performance of high temperature components. A method for the characterization of the microstructure formation in rapidly solidified alloys was developed and applied for binary Ti–(44–48)Al (at.%). The results show a strong dependency of the microstructure on the Al content at cooling rates between 6 ⋅ 10{sup 2} and 1.5 ⋅ 10{sup 4} K s{sup −1}. The formation of α → α{sub 2} ordering, lamellar α{sub 2} + γ colonies and interdendritic TiAl γ-phase were observed, depending on the Al amount. Based on thermodynamic calculations the observed microstructure can be explained using the CALPHAD approach taking into account the non-equilibrium conditions. The presented method provides a useful tool for alloy development for processing techniques involving rapid solidification with varying cooling rates.

  2. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: a Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, Eve C; Leroy, Adam K

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for regulation of galactic star formation rates Sigma_SFR in disk galaxies, in which ISM heating by stellar UV plays a key role. By requiring simultaneous thermal and (vertical) dynamical equilibrium in the diffuse gas, and star formation at a rate proportional to the mass of the self-gravitating component, we obtain a prediction for Sigma_SFR as a function of the total gaseous surface density Sigma and the density of stars + dark matter, rho_sd. The physical basis of this relationship is that thermal pressure in the diffuse ISM, which is proportional to the UV heating rate and therefore to Sigma_SFR, must adjust to match the midplane pressure set by the vertical gravitational field. Our model applies to regions where Sigma < 100 Msun/pc^2. In low-Sigma_SFR (outer-galaxy) regions where diffuse gas dominates, the theory predicts Sigma_SFR \\propto Sigma (rho_sd)^1/2. The decrease of thermal equilibrium pressure when Sigma_SFR is low implies, consistent with observations, that star formatio...

  3. Rate constants for the formation of SiO by radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairnie, M.; Forrey, R. C.; Babb, J. F.; Stancil, P. C.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2017-10-01

    Accurate molecular data for the low-lying states of SiO are computed and used to calculate rate constants for radiative association (RA) of Si and O. Einstein A-coefficients are also calculated for transitions between all of the bound and quasi-bound levels for each molecular state. The radiative widths are used together with elastic tunnelling widths to define effective RA rate constants which include both direct and indirect (inverse pre-dissociation) formation processes. The indirect process is evaluated for two kinetic models which represent limiting cases for astrophysical environments. The first case scenario assumes an equilibrium distribution of quasi-bound states and would be applicable whenever collisional and/or radiative excitation mechanisms are able to maintain the population. The second case scenario assumes that no excitation mechanisms are available which corresponds to the limit of zero radiation temperature and zero atomic density. Rate constants for SiO formation in realistic astrophysical environments would presumably lie between these two limiting cases.

  4. Resolved Gas Kinematics in a Sample of Low-Redshift High Star-Formation Rate Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varidel, Mathew; Pracy, Michael; Croom, Scott; Owers, Matt S.; Sadler, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    We have used integral field spectroscopy of a sample of six nearby (z 0.01-0.04) high star-formation rate (SFR ˜ 10-40 M_⊙ yr^{-1}) galaxies to investigate the relationship between local velocity dispersion and star-formation rate on sub-galactic scales. The low-redshift mitigates, to some extent, the effect of beam smearing which artificially inflates the measured dispersion as it combines regions with different line-of-sight velocities into a single spatial pixel. We compare the parametric maps of the velocity dispersion with the Hα flux (a proxy for local star-formation rate), and the velocity gradient (a proxy for the local effect of beam smearing). We find, even for these very nearby galaxies, the Hα velocity dispersion correlates more strongly with velocity gradient than with Hα flux-implying that beam smearing is still having a significant effect on the velocity dispersion measurements. We obtain a first-order non parametric correction for the unweighted and flux weighted mean velocity dispersion by fitting a 2D linear regression model to the spaxel-by-spaxel data where the velocity gradient and the Hα flux are the independent variables and the velocity dispersion is the dependent variable; and then extrapolating to zero velocity gradient. The corrected velocity dispersions are a factor of 1.3-4.5 and 1.3-2.7 lower than the uncorrected flux-weighted and unweighted mean line-of-sight velocity dispersion values, respectively. These corrections are larger than has been previously cited using disc models of the velocity and velocity dispersion field to correct for beam smearing. The corrected flux-weighted velocity dispersion values are σ m 20-50 km s-1.

  5. Mercury's Hollows: Depths, Estimation of Formation Rates, and the Nature of the Bright Haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, D. T.; Stadermann, A. C.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Xiao, Z.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's hollows are shallow depressions, often with high-reflectance interiors and haloes. The fresh appearance of hollows indicates that they are relatively young features. Their morphology is suggestive of formation via sublimation-like loss of a volatile-bearing phase through solar heating, destruction by UV photolysis, contact with molten rock, or bombardment by micrometeoroids and/or ions. Hollows are found within the low-reflectance material (LRM) color unit. Following an examination of all MESSENGER images with pixel sizes hollows. The mean depth is 24 ± 16 m. The narrow range of depths, despite formation within LRM units that are of much greater and more variable thickness, could result from development of a protective lag as the volatile-bearing phase is lost. The rate at which hollows form may be estimated as follows. The size-frequency distribution of Mercury rayed craters >4 km in diameter gives absolute model ages of 110 to 689 Ma, depending on the crater production model. The 41-km-diameter rayed crater Balanchine has a density of superposed craters similar to the average for all rayed craters, so we take Balanchine's age to be the population average. Hollows on Balanchine's floor are ~300 m wide. The average rate of hollows formation by horizontal scarp retreat for a 110 Ma model age would be 1 cm per 3700 Earth years. If Balanchine formed 689 Ma ago, then the average growth rate would be 1 cm per 23,000 yr. We also consider the mechanisms by which hollows form bright haloes. Calculations show that comet-style lofting of dust by sublimating gas is not important given Mercury's high surface gravitational acceleration. Instead, the bright haloes may form by condensation of sublimated material or by physical modification or chemical alteration of the surface by re-deposited sublimation products.

  6. Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Obscured Star Formation, GRB Rates, Cosmic Reionization, and Missing Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, A.; Mancuso, C.; Celotti, A.; Danese, L.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a holistic view of galaxy evolution at high redshifts z ≳ 4, which incorporates the constraints from various astrophysical/cosmological probes, including the estimate of the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density from UV/IR surveys and long gamma-ray burst (GRBs) rates, the cosmic reionization history following the latest Planck measurements, and the missing satellites issue. We achieve this goal in a model-independent way by exploiting the SFR functions derived by Mancuso et al. on the basis of an educated extrapolation of the latest UV/far-IR data from HST/Herschel, and already tested against a number of independent observables. Our SFR functions integrated down to a UV magnitude limit MUV ≲ ‑13 (or SFR limit around 10‑2 M⊙ yr‑1) produce a cosmic SFR density in excellent agreement with recent determinations from IR surveys and, taking into account a metallicity ceiling Z ≲ Z⊙/2, with the estimates from long GRB rates. They also yield a cosmic reionization history consistent with that implied by the recent measurements of the Planck mission of the electron scattering optical depth τes ≈ 0.058 remarkably, this result is obtained under a conceivable assumption regarding the average value fesc ≈ 0.1 of the escape fraction for ionizing photons. We demonstrate via the abundance-matching technique that the above constraints concurrently imply galaxy formation becoming inefficient within dark matter halos of mass below a few 108 M⊙ pleasingly, such a limit is also required so as not to run into the missing satellites issue. Finally, we predict a downturn of the Galaxy luminosity function faintward of MUV ≲ ‑12, and stress that its detailed shape, to be plausibly probed in the near future by the JWST, will be extremely informative on the astrophysics of galaxy formation in small halos, or even on the microscopic nature of the dark matter.

  7. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ziervogel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater. Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements

  8. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-03-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme

  9. Formation of the geometrically controlled carbon coils by manipulating the additive gas (SF6) flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Young-Chul; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-07-01

    Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under the thermal chemical vapor deposition system. The nickel catalyst layer deposition and then hydrogen plasma pretreatment were performed prior to the carbon coils deposition reaction. The flow rate and the injection time of SF6 varied according to the different reaction processes. Geometries of carbon coils developed from embryos to nanosized coils with increasing SF, flow rate from 5 to 35 sccm under the short SF6 flow injection time (5 minutes) condition. The gradual development of carbon coils geometries from nanosized to microsized types could be observed with increasing SF6 flow rate under the full time (90 minutes) SF6 flow injection condition. The flow rate of SF6 for the coil-type geometry formation should be more than or at least equal to the flow rate of carbon source gas (C2H2). A longer injection time of SF6 flow would increase the size of coils diameters from nanometer to micrometer.

  10. The reliability of [C II] as an indicator of the star formation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Cortese, Luca; Fritz, Jacopo

    2011-10-01

    The [C II] 157.74 μm line is an important coolant for the neutral interstellar gas. Since [C II] is the brightest spectral line for most galaxies, it is a potentially powerful tracer of star formation activity. In this paper, we present a calibration of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of the [C II] luminosity for a sample of 24 star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe. This sample includes objects classified as H II regions or low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions, but omits all Seyfert galaxies with a significant contribution from the active galactic nucleus to the mid-infrared photometry. In order to calibrate the SFR against the line luminosity, we rely on both Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet data, which is an ideal tracer of the unobscured star formation, and MIPS 24 μm, to probe the dust-enshrouded fraction of star formation. In the case of normal star-forming galaxies, the [C II] luminosity correlates well with the SFR. However, the extension of this relation to more quiescent (Hα EW ≤ 10 Å) or ultraluminous galaxies should be handled with caution, since these objects show a non-linearity in the ?-to-LFIR ratio as a function of LFIR (and thus, their star formation activity). We provide two possible explanations for the origin of the tight correlation between the [C II] emission and the star formation activity on a global galaxy-scale. A first interpretation could be that the [C II] emission from photodissociation regions (PDRs) arises from the immediate surroundings of star-forming regions. Since PDRs are neutral regions of warm dense gas at the boundaries between H II regions and molecular clouds and they provide the bulk of [C II] emission in most galaxies, we believe that a more or less constant contribution from these outer layers of photon-dominated molecular clumps to the [C II] emission provides a straightforward explanation for this close link between the [C II] luminosity and SFR. Alternatively, we consider the

  11. Calibrating the Star Formation Rate at z ~ 1 from Optical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Salim, Samir; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a star formation rate (SFR) calibration based on optical data that is consistent with average observed rates in both the red and blue galaxy populations at z ~ 1. The motivation for this study is to calculate SFRs for DEEP2 Redshift Survey galaxies in the 0.7 extinction at intermediate redshifts through either galaxy B-band luminosity or stellar mass. We find that an L[O II]-MB SFR calibration commonly used in the literature agrees well with our calculated SFRs after correcting for the average B-band luminosity evolution in L * galaxies. However, we find better agreement with a local L[O II]-based SFR calibration that includes stellar mass to correct for reddening effects, indicating that stellar mass is a better tracer of dust extinction for all galaxy types and less affected by systematic evolution than galaxy luminosity from z = 1 to the current epoch.

  12. Fissure formation in coke. 2: Effect of heating rate, shrinkage and coke strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Jenkins; M.R. Mahoney [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Mathematical and Information Sciences

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the effects of the heating rate, coke shrinkage and coke breakage strength upon the fissure pattern developed in a coke oven charge during carbonisation. This is done principally using a mechanistic model of the formation of fissures, which considers them to be an array of equally spaced fissures, whose depth follows a 'period doubling' pattern based upon the time history of the fissures. The model results are compared with pilot scale coke oven experiments. The results show that the effect of heating rate on the fissure pattern is different to the effect of coke shrinkage, while the effect of coke breakage strength on the pattern is less pronounced. The results can be seen in both the shape and size of resulting coke lumps after stabilisation. The approach gives the opportunity to consider means of controlling the carbonisation process in order to tune the size of the coke lumps produced. 7 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Timing of European fluvial terrace formation and incision rates constrained by cosmogenic nuclide dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Mirjam; Ehlers, Todd A.; Stor, Tomas; Torrent, Jose; Lobato, Leonardo; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-10-01

    Age constraints of late Cenozoic fluvial terraces are important for addressing surface process questions related to the incision rates of rivers, or tectonic and climate controls on denudation and sedimentation. Unfortunately, absolute age constraints of fluvial terraces are not always possible, and many previous studies have often dated terraces with relative age constraints that do not allow for robust interpretations of incision rates and timing of terrace formation. However, in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides allow absolute age determination, and hence incision rates, of fluvial deposits back to 5 Ma. Here we present, cosmogenic depth profile dating and isochron burial dating of four different river systems in Europe spanning 12° of latitude. We do this to determine river incision rates and spatial variations in the timing of terrace formation. Isochron burial age constraints of four selected terraces from the Vltava river (Czech Republic) range between 1.00 ± 0.21 to 1.99 ± 0.45Ma. An isochron burial age derived for the Allier river (Central France) is 2.00 ± 0.17Ma. Five terrace levels from the Esla river (NW Spain) were dated between 0.08 + 0.04 / - 0.01Ma and 0.59 + 0.13 / - 0.20Ma with depth profile dating. The latter age agrees with an isochron burial age of 0.52 ± 0.20Ma. Two terrace levels from the Guadalquivir river (SW Spain) were dated by depth profile dating to 0.09 + 0.03 / - 0.02Ma and 0.09 + 0.04 / - 0.03Ma. The one terrace level from the Guadalquivir river dated by isochron burial dating resulted in an age of 1.79 ± 0.18Ma. Results indicate that the cosmogenic nuclide-based ages are generally older than ages derived from previous relative age constraints leading to a factor 2-3 lower incision rates than previous work. Furthermore, the timing of terrace formation over this latitudinal range is somewhat obscured by uncertainties associated with dating older terraces and not clearly synchronous with global climate variations.

  14. The Dependence of Star Formation Rates on Stellar Mass and Environment at z~0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Shannon G; Kelson, Daniel D; Illingworth, Garth D; Franx, Marijn

    2009-01-01

    We examine the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies in a redshift slice encompassing the z=0.834 cluster RX J0152.7-1357. We used a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) to identify galaxies with z2x10^{10} M_sun) of 330 galaxies that were imaged by Spitzer MIPS at 24 micron to derive SFRs and study the dependence of specific SFR (SSFR) on stellar mass and environment. We find that the SFR and SSFR show a strong decrease with increasing local density, similar to the relation at z~0. Our result contrasts with other work at z~1 that find the SFR-density trend to reverse for luminosity-limited samples. These other results appear to be driven by star-formation in lower mass systems (M~10^{10} M_sun). Our results imply that the processes that shut down star-formation are present in groups and other dense regions in the field. Our data also suggest that the lower SFRs of galaxies in higher density environments may reflect a change in the ratio of star-forming to non-s...

  15. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, o...

  16. The Spitzer c2d Legacy Results: Star Formation Rates and Efficiencies; Evolution and Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Neal J; Jørgensen, Jes K; Enoch, Melissa L; Merín, Bruno; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Alcalá, Juan M; Myers, Philip C; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Huard, Tracy L; Allen, Lori E; Harvey, Paul M; van Kempen, Tim; Blake, Geoffrey A; Koerner, David W; Mundy, Lee G; Padgett, Deborah L; Sargent, Anneila I

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) The c2d Spitzer Legacy project obtained images and photometry with both IRAC and MIPS instruments for five large, nearby molecular clouds. This paper combines information drawn from studies of individual clouds into a combined and updated statistical analysis of star formation rates and efficiencies, numbers and lifetimes for SED classes, and clustering properties. Current star formation efficiencies range from 3% to 6%. Taken together, the five clouds are producing about 260 solar masses of stars per Myr. The star formation surface density is more than an order of magnitude larger than would be predicted from the Kennicutt relation used in extragalactic studies. Measured against the dense gas probed by the maps of dust continuum emission, the efficiencies are much higher, and the current stock of dense cores would be exhausted in 1.8 Myr on average. The derived lifetime for the Class I phase is 0.44 to 0.54 Myr, considerably longer than some estimates. Similarly, the lifetime for the Class 0 SED c...

  17. Observational Evidence of Dynamic Star Formation Rate in Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Eve J; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Star formation on galactic scales is known to be a slow process, but whether it is slow on smaller scales is uncertain. We cross-correlate 5469 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a new all-sky catalog with 256 star forming complexes (SFCs) to build a sample of 191 SFC-GMC complexes---collections of multiple clouds each matched to 191 SFCs. The total mass in stars harbored by these clouds is inferred from WMAP free-free fluxes. We measure the GMC mass, the virial parameter, the star formation efficiency $\\epsilon$ and the star formation rate per free-fall time $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$. Both $\\epsilon$ and $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ range over 3--4 orders of magnitude. We find that 68.3% of the clouds fall within $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon}=0.79\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ and $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.91\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ about the median. Compared to these observed scatters, a simple model with a time independent $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ that depends on the host GMC properties predicts $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.24$. Allowi...

  18. Pitfalls when observationally characterizing the relative formation rates of stars and stellar clusters in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Bastian, Nate

    2016-03-01

    Stars generally form in aggregates, some of which are bound (`clusters') while others are unbound and disperse on short ({˜ }10 { Myr}) time-scales (`associations'). The fraction of stars forming in bound clusters (Γ) is a fundamental outcome of the star formation process. Recent observational and theoretical work has suggested that Γ increases with the gas surface density (Σ) or star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR), both within galaxies and between different ones. However, a recent paper by Chandar et al. has challenged these results, showing that the total number of stellar aggregates per unit SFR does not vary systematically with the host galaxy's absolute SFR. In this Letter, we show that no variations are expected when no distinction is made between bound and unbound aggregates, because the sum of these two fractions should be close to unity. We also demonstrate that any scaling of Γ with the absolute SFR is much weaker than with ΣSFR, due to the mass-radius-SFR relation of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies. The environmental variation of Γ should therefore be probed as a function of area-normalized quantities, such as Σ or ΣSFR. We present a set of guidelines for meaningful observational tests of cluster formation theories and show that these resolve the reported discrepancy.

  19. The stellar masses and specific star-formation rates of submillimetre galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Cirasuolo, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Hayward, Christopher C; Watson, Darach

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the stellar masses (M*), and hence specific star-formation rates (sSFRs) of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) is crucial for determining their role in the cosmic history of galaxy/star formation. However, there is no consensus over the typical M* of SMGs with the widely differing results reported from studies of z~2-3 SMGs. Specifically, even for the same set of SMG, the reported average M* have ranged over an order of magnitude, from 5x10^10 Mo to 5x10^11 Mo. Here we study how different methods of analysis can lead to such widely varying results. We find that, contrary to recent claims in the literature, potential contamination of 3-8um photometry from hot dust associated with an active nucleus is not the origin of the discrepancies in derived M*. Instead, we expose in detail how inferred M* depends on assumptions of intial mass function, different evolutionary synthesis models, and different star-formation histories. We review current observational evidence for and against these alternatives as wel...

  20. Employment of Electrochemical Sensors in Determination of Corrosion Rate In Situ in Formation Water Petroleum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Hilario Davis Harriett

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical corrosion is a spontaneous process that causes deterioration or destruction of aninstallation or pipes, shortening therefore the useful life of the same ones. So, it is necessary to know themechanism of electrochemical corrosion that is developed, and subsequently monitored the corrosionrate in the facilities. The purpose of this investigation was to determine “in situ” the corrosion of the ductsconstruction steel which is in contact with the accompanying water of the petroleum. In the determinationof the corrosion rate a sensor of three electrodes was used and with the help of the electrochemical techniqueof resistance of lineal polarization (LPR the kinetics of corrosion was valued. The tests were carriedout under dynamic conditions with a fl ow velocity of the formation water of 100 m3/h and the temperatureof 70 oC and pH 10. The electrochemical technique of LPR allowed to obtain through the parameterof polarization resistance, the value of the corrosion rate of the steel of the ducts in the formation water.

  1. Lyman Break Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate of the Universe at z~6

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, E; Stanway, Elizabeth; Mahon, Andrew Bunker & Richard Mc

    2003-01-01

    We determine the space density of UV-luminous star-burst galaxies at z~6 using deep HST ACS SDSS-i' (F775W) and SDSS-z' (F850LP) and VLT ISAAC J and K_s band imaging of the Chandra Deep Field South. We find 8 galaxies and one star with (i'-z')>1.5 to a depth of z'(AB)= 25.6 (an 8 sigma detection in each of the 3 available ACS epochs). This corresponds to an unobscured star formation rate of ~15 M_sun/yr/h_{70}^2 at z=5.9, equivalent to L^* for the Lyman-break population at z = 3-4 (Omega_Lambda=0.7, Omega_M=0.3). We are sensitive to star forming galaxies at 5.6< z < 7.0 with an effective comoving volume of ~1.8E5 Mpc^3/h_{70}^3 after accounting for incompleteness at the higher redshifts due to luminosity bias. This volume should encompass the primeval sub-galactic scale fragments of the progenitors of about a thousand L^* galaxies at the current epoch. We determine a volume averaged global star formation rate of (6.7+/- 2.7) 10^{-4} h_{70} M_sun/yr/Mpc^3 at z~6 from rest-frame UV selected star-bursts. T...

  2. Evidence for Reduced Specific Star Formation Rates in the Centers of Massive Galaxies at z = 4

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Intae; Song, Mimi; Dickinson, Mark; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lu, Yu; Mobasher, Bahram; Papovich, Casey; Ryan, Russell E; Salmon, Brett; Straughn, Amber N

    2016-01-01

    We perform the first spatially-resolved stellar population study of galaxies in the early universe (z = 3.5 - 6.5), utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging dataset over the GOODS-S field. We select a sample of 418 bright and extended galaxies at z = 3.5 - 6.5 from a parent sample of ~ 8000 photometric-redshift selected galaxies from Finkelstein et al. (2015). We first examine galaxies at 3.5< z < 4.0 using additional deep K-band survey data from the HAWK-I UDS and GOODS Survey (HUGS) which covers the 4000A break at these redshifts. We measure the stellar mass, star formation rate, and dust extinction for galaxy inner and outer regions via spatially-resolved spectral energy distribution fitting based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. By comparing specific star formation rates (sSFRs) between inner and outer parts of the galaxies we find that the majority of galaxies with the high central mass densities show evidence for ...

  3. Feedback Regulated Turbulence, Magnetic Fields, and Star Formation Rates in Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the quasi-equilibrium states of galactic disks regulated by star formation feedback. We incorporate effects from massive-star feedback via time-varying heating rates and supernova (SN) explosions. We find that the disks in our simulations rapidly approach a quasi-steady state that satisfies vertical dynamical equilibrium. The star formation rate (SFR) surface density self-adjusts to provide the total momentum flux (pressure) in the vertical direction that matches the weight of the gas. We quantify feedback efficiency by measuring feedback yields, \\eta_c\\equiv P_c/\\Sigma_SFR (in suitable units), for each pressure component. The turbulent and thermal feedback yields are the same for HD and MHD simulations, \\eta_th~1 and \\eta_ turb~4, consistent with the theoretical expectations. In MHD simulations, turbulent magnetic fields are rapidly generated by turbulence, and saturate at a level corresponding to \\eta_mag,t~1. The presence of magn...

  4. The Link Between the Formation Rates of Clusters and Stars in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to test whether the formation rate of star clusters is proportional to the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. As a first step, we present the mass functions of compact clusters younger than 10 Myr in seven star-forming galaxies of diverse masses, sizes, and morphologies: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, NGC 4214, NGC 4449, M83, M51, and the Antennae. These cluster mass functions (CMFs) are well represented by power laws, dN/dM~M^b, with similar exponents b=-1.92+/-0.27, but with amplitudes that differ by factors up to ~10^3, corresponding to vast differences in the sizes of the cluster populations in these galaxies. We then normalize these CMFs by the SFRs in the galaxies, derived from dust-corrected H-alpha luminosities, and find that the spread in the amplitudes collapses, with a remaining rms deviation of only sigma_(logA)= 0.2. This is close to the expected dispersion from random uncertainties in the CMFs and SFRs. Thus, the data presented here are consistent with exact...

  5. Stellar Masses, Star Formation Rates and X-ray Constraints on Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrinda, Greg; Desjardins, T. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Gallagher, S.; Hammer, D.; Miller, N. A.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report on new measurements of star formation rates and stellar masses in the “infall” region of the nearby Coma cluster of galaxies. This region is approximately 1 Mpc from the cluster core, where relatively gas-rich galaxies are interacting with the hot intracluster medium, providing an important view of the impact of cluster processes on galaxy evolution. We have used infrared and ultraviolet data available from both ground and spaced-based observations to make these measurements. The star formation rates and stellar mass values were verified via comparison with published results in the Coma core as well as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral measurements. The infall region has also been observed by XMM-Newton to faint limits to obtain X-ray luminosities for the galaxies in this field. Specifically, we present X-ray photometry of approximately 20 galaxies with XMM-Newton coverage to constrain the X-ray - SFR correlation in a cluster environment. This project was supported by the Baltimore Excellence in STEM Teaching program via summer internship funding to Hrinda.

  6. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph M. Barnes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2 and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4 indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect.

  7. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  8. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ralph M; Tobin, Stephanie J; Johnston, Heather M; MacKenzie, Noah; Taglang, Chelsea M

    2016-01-01

    A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive) and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency) on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2) and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4) indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect.

  9. Determination of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Formation Rate Constants for Semi-Continuously Fed Anaerobic Digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Moestedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize commercial-scale biogas production, it is important to evaluate the performance of each microbial step in the anaerobic process. Hydrolysis and methanogenesis are usually the rate-limiting steps during digestion of organic waste and by-products. By measuring biogas production and methane concentrations on-line in a semi-continuously fed reactor, gas kinetics can be evaluated. In this study, the rate constants of the fermentative hydrolysis step (kc and the methanogenesis step (km were determined and evaluated in a continuously stirred tank laboratory-scale reactor treating food and slaughterhouse waste and glycerin. A process additive containing Fe2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ was supplied until day 89, after which Ni2+ was omitted. The omission resulted in a rapid decline in the methanogenesis rate constant (km to 70% of the level observed when Ni2+ was present, while kc remained unaffected. This suggests that Ni2+ mainly affects the methanogenic rather than the hydrolytic microorganisms in the system. However, no effect was initially observed when using conventional process monitoring parameters such as biogas yield and volatile fatty acid concentration. Hence, formation rate constants can reveal additional information on process performance and km can be used as a complement to conventional process monitoring tools for semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters.

  10. Hα imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hα and optical broad-band images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4-GHz radio continuum wavebands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in the literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα-based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFR estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star-forming galaxies, although it is seen here that the majority of dwarf WR galaxies have a radio deficiency. An analysis using the ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and the ratio of the FUV to Hα SFRs indicates that WR galaxies have lower non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to a lack of supernovae in the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  11. Ionosphere influence on success rate of GPS ambiguity resolution in a satellite formation flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Leandro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite formation flying is one of the most promising technologies for future space missions. The distribution of sensors and payloads among different satellites provides more redundancy, flexibility, improved communication coverage, among other advantages. One of the fundamental issues in spacecraft formation flying is precise position and velocity determination between satellites. For missions in low Earth orbits, GPS system can meet the precision requirement in relative positioning, since the satellite dynamics is modeled properly. The key for high accuracy GPS relative positioning is to resolve the ambiguities to their integer values. Ambiguities resolved successfully can improve the positioning accuracy to decimetre or even millimetre-level. So, integer carrier phase ambiguity resolution is often a prerequisite for high precision GPS positioning. The determination of relative position was made using an extended Kalman filter. The filter must take into account imperfections in dynamic modeling of perturbations affecting the orbital flight, and changes in solar activity that affects the GPS signal propagation, for mitigating these effects on relative positioning accuracy. Thus, this work aims to evaluate the impact of ionosphere variation, caused by changes in solar activity, in success rate of ambiguity resolution. Using the Ambiguity Dilution of Precision (ADOP) concept, the ambiguity success rate is analyzed and the expected precision of the ambiguity-fixed solution is calculated. Evaluations were performed using actual data from GRACE mission and analyzed for their performance in real scenarios. Analyses were conducted in different configurations of relative position and during different levels of solar activity. Results bring the impact of various disturbances and modeling of solar activity level on the success rate of ambiguity resolution.

  12. Dust Formation in the Presence of Photons I: Evaporation Rates for Small Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2014-01-01

    The temperature of newly forming dust is controlled by the radiation field. As dust forms around stars, stellar transients, quasars or supernovae, the grains must grow through a regime where they are stochastically heated by individual photons. Since evaporation rates increase exponentially with temperature while cooling times decrease only as a power law, the evaporation rates for these small grains are dominated by the temperature spikes. We calculate effective evaporation temperatures for a broad range of input spectra that are encapsulated in a series of simple interpolation formulae for both graphitic and silicate grains. These can be easily used to first determine if dust formation is possible and then to estimate the radius or time at which it commences for a broad range of radiation environments. With these additional physical effects, very small grains may form earlier than in standard models of AGB winds. Even for very high mass loss rates, the hottest stars that can form dust are G and F stars part...

  13. The formation of linear aggregates in magnetic hyperthermia: implications on specific absorption rate and magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Steven L; Qi, Bin; Baker, Jonathon; Stone, Roland; Camley, Robert E; Livesey, Karen L; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M; Mefford, O Thompson

    2014-06-15

    The design and application of magnetic nanoparticles for use as magnetic hyperthermia agents has garnered increasing interest over the past several years. When designing these systems, the fundamentals of particle design play a key role in the observed specific absorption rate (SAR). This includes the particle's core size, polymer brush length, and colloidal arrangement. While the role of particle core size on the observed SAR has been significantly reported, the role of the polymer brush length has not attracted as much attention. It has recently been reported that for some suspensions linear aggregates form in the presence of an applied external magnetic field, i.e. chains of magnetic particles. The formation of these chains may have the potential for a dramatic impact on the biomedical application of these materials, specifically the efficiency of the particles to transfer magnetic energy to the surrounding cells. In this study we demonstrate the dependence of SAR on magnetite nanoparticle core size and brush length as well as observe the formation of magnetically induced colloidal arrangements. Colloidally stable magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to form linear aggregates in an alternating magnetic field. The length and distribution of the aggregates were dependent upon the stabilizing polymer molecular weight. As the molecular weight of the stabilizing layer increased, the magnetic interparticle interactions decreased therefore limiting chain formation. In addition, theoretical calculations demonstrated that interparticle spacing has a significant impact on the magnetic behavior of these materials. This work has several implications for the design of nanoparticle and magnetic hyperthermia systems, while improving understanding of how colloidal arrangement affects SAR.

  14. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Gavilán, M.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Hoyos, C.; Díaz, A. I.

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity - the equivalent width of the Hα line and the (u - r) colour - with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of ˜82 500 galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. nature) is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. nurture) are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such events show little statistical significance in a probabilistic sense, and we find no evidence that galaxy interactions are, on average, a dominant driver of star formation. Although visually classified mergers tend to display systematically higher EW(Hα) and bluer (u - r) colours for a given luminosity, most galaxies with high SSFR have uncertain morphologies, which could be due to either internal or external processes. Field galaxies of early and late morphological types are consistent with the gradual `ageing' scenario, with no obvious signatures of a sudden decrease in their SSFR. In contrast, star formation is significantly reduced and sometimes completely quenched on a short time-scale in dense environments, where many objects are found on a `quenched sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane.

  15. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Telford, O Grace; Skillman, Evan D; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of S/N cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013) for ~130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these abundance ...

  16. Relation between Silver Nanoparticle Formation Rate and Antioxidant Capacity of Aqueous Plant Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azat Akbal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation between the antioxidant capacity and silver nanoparticle formation rates of pomegranate (Punica granatum, quince (Cydonia oblonga, chestnut (Castanea sativa, fig (Ficus carica, walnut (Juglans cinerea, black mulberry (Morus nigra, and white mulberry (Morus alba leaf extracts is investigated at a fixed illumination. Silver nanoparticles formed in all plant leaf extracts possess round shapes with average particle size of 15 to 25 nm, whereas corresponding surface plasmon resonance peak wavelengths vary between 422 nm and 451 nm. Cupric reducing antioxidant capacity technique is used as a reference method to determine total antioxidant capacity of the plant leaf extracts. Integrated absorbance over the plasmon resonance peaks exhibits better linear relation with antioxidant capacities of various plant leaf extracts compared to peak absorbance values, with correlation coefficient values of 0.9333 and 0.7221, respectively.

  17. Nature or nurture? Clues from the distribution of specific star formation rates in SDSS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Casado, Javier; Gavilán, Marta; Terlevich, Roberto; Terlevich, Elena; Hoyos, Carlos; Díaz, Ángeles I

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the main mechanism(s) that regulate the specific star formation rate (SSFR) in nearby galaxies, cross-correlating two proxies of this quantity -- the equivalent width of the \\Ha\\ line and the $(u-r)$ colour -- with other physical properties (mass, metallicity, environment, morphology, and the presence of close companions) in a sample of $\\sim82500$ galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The existence of a relatively tight `ageing sequence' in the colour-equivalent width plane favours a scenario where the secular conversion of gas into stars (i.e. `nature') is the main physical driver of the instantaneous SSFR and the gradual transition from a `chemically primitive' (metal-poor and intensely star-forming) state to a `chemically evolved' (metal-rich and passively evolving) system. Nevertheless, environmental factors (i.e. `nurture') are also important. In the field, galaxies may be temporarily affected by discrete `quenching' and `rejuvenation' episodes, but such eve...

  18. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  19. Extinction Corrected Star Formation Rates Empirically Derived from Ultraviolet-Optical Colors

    CERN Document Server

    Treyer, Marie; Johnson, Ben; Seibert, Mark; Wyder, Ted; Barlow, Tom A; Conrow, Tim; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Small, Todd; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2007-01-01

    Using a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic catalog with measured star-formation rates (SFRs) and ultraviolet (UV) photometry from the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey, we derived empirical linear correlations between the SFR to UV luminosity ratio and the UV-optical colors of blue sequence galaxies. The relations provide a simple prescription to correct UV data for dust attenuation that best reconciles the SFRs derived from UV and emission line data. The method breaks down for the red sequence population as well as for very blue galaxies such as the local ``supercompact'' UV luminous galaxies and the majority of high redshift Lyman Break Galaxies which form a low attenuation sequence of their own.

  20. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkic, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Cardiff, Ann H.; Durell, Pat R.

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 m photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 m photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-red), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-blue) have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M yr1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  1. Galactic star-formation rates gauged by stellar end-products

    CERN Document Server

    Persic, M

    2006-01-01

    Young galactic X-ray point sources (XPs) closely trace the ongoing star formation in galaxies. From measured XP number counts we extract the collective 2-10 keV luminosity of young XPs, L_yXP, which we use to gauge the current star-formation rate (SFR) in galaxies. We find that, for a sample of local star-forming galaxies (i.e., normal spirals and mild starbursts), L_yXP correlates linearly with the SFR over three decades in luminosity. A separate, high-SFR sample of starburst ULIRGs can be used to check the calibration of the relation. Using their (presumably SF-related) total 2-10 keV luminosities we find that these sources satisfy the SFR-L_yXP relation, as defined by the weaker sample, and extend it to span about 5 decades in luminosity. The SFR-L_yXP relation is likely to hold also for distant Hubble Deep Field North galaxies, especially so if these high-SFR objects are similar to the (more nearby) ULIRGs. It is argued that the SFR-L_yXP relation provides the most adequate X-ray estimator of instantaneou...

  2. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Puertas, S Duarte; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Kehrig, C; Perez-Montero, E; Rosales-Ortega, F F

    2016-01-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured $\\rm H\\alpha$ flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the $\\rm H\\alpha$ fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the $\\rm H\\alpha/H\\beta$ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for $\\sim$210,000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical $\\rm H\\alpha$ and $\\rm H\\alpha/H\\beta$ aperture corrections based ...

  3. The Environments of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies: Star Formation Rates increase with Density

    CERN Document Server

    Tekola, Abiy G; Berlind, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This work studies the environments and star formation relationships of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRG) in comparison to other types of local and distant z~1 galaxies. The infrared (IR) galaxies are drawn from the IRAS sample. The density of the environment is quantified using 6dF and Point Source Catalogue redshift survey (PSCz) galaxies in a cylinder of 2 Mpc radius and 10 Mpc length. Our most important result shows the existence of a dramatic density difference between local LIRGs and local non-LIRG IR galaxies. LIRGs live in denser environments than non-LIRG IR galaxies implying that L_IR = 10^11 L_sun marks an important transition point among IR-selected local galaxies. We also find that there is a strong correlation between the densities around LIRGs and their L_IR luminosity. On the other hand, the IR-activity of non-LIRG IR galaxies does not show any dependence on environment. Moreover, it is noted that the star formation rate and density around LIRGs are correlated. This trend in local LIRGs i...

  4. Star Formation Rate and Extinction in Faint z~4 Lyman-Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    To, Chun-Hao; Owen, Frazer N

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical detection of 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission from a sample of faint z~4 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). LBGs are key tracers of the high-redshift star formation history and important sources of UV photons that ionized the intergalactic medium in the early universe. In order to better constrain the extinction and intrinsic star formation rate (SFR) of high-redshift LBGs, we combine the latest ultradeep Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.5 GHz radio image and the Hubble Space Telescope Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North. We select a large sample of 1771 z~4 LBGs from the ACS catalogue using $\\bband$-dropout color criteria. Our LBG samples have $\\iband$~25-28 (AB), ~0-3 magnitudes fainter than M*_UV at z~4. In our stacked radio images, we find the LBGs to be point-like under our 2" angular resolution. We measure their mean 1.5 GHz flux by stacking the measurements on the individual objects. We achieve a statistical detection ...

  5. The 2-10 keV luminosity as a Star Formation Rate indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Setti, G

    2003-01-01

    Radio and far infrared luminosities of star-forming galaxies follow a tight linear relation. Making use of ASCA and BeppoSAX observations of a well-defined sample of nearby star-forming galaxies, we argue that tight linear relations hold between the X-ray, radio and far infrared luminosities. The effect of intrinsic absorption is investigated taking NGC3256 as a test case. It is suggested that the hard X-ray emission is directly related to the Star Formation Rate. Star formation processes may also account for most of the 2-10 keV emission from LLAGNs of lower X-ray luminosities (for the same FIR and radio luminosity). Deep Chandra observations of a sample of radio-selected star-forming galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North show that the same relation holds also at high (0.2< z< 1.3) redshift. The X-ray/radio relations also allow a derivation of X-ray number counts up to very faint fluxes from the radio Log N-Log S, which is consistent with current limits and models. Thus the contribution of star-formi...

  6. Estimating the Star Formation Rate at 1 kpc Scales in Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; de Blok, W J G; Boissier, Samuel; Bolatto, Alberto; Brinks, Elias; Madore, Barry; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Murphy, Eric; Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    Using combinations of H\\alpha, ultraviolet (UV), and infrared (IR) emission, we estimate the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, \\Sigma_SFR, at 1 kpc resolution for 30 disk galaxies that are targets of the IRAM HERACLES CO survey. We present a new physically-motivated IR spectral energy distribution-based approach to account for possible contributions to 24\\mum emission not associated with recent star formation. Considering a variety of "reference" SFRs from the literature, we revisit the calibration of the 24\\mum term in hybrid (UV+IR or H\\alpha+IR) tracers. We show that the overall calibration of this term remains uncertain at the factor of two level because of the lack of wide-field, robust reference SFR estimates. Within this uncertainty, published calibrations represent a reasonable starting point for 1 kpc-wide areas of star-forming disk galaxies but we re-derive and refine the calibration of the IR term in these tracers to match our resolution and approach to 24\\mum emission. We compare a large ...

  7. The Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate Relation in WSRT SINGS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Heesen, Volker; Leroy, Adam K; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We study the spatially resolved Radio Continuum-Star Formation Rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star-formation (SF) tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use hybrid Sigma_SFR maps (GALEX FUV plus Spitzer 24 mu), RC maps at 22/18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey, and H-alpha maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/MIR-based Sigma_SFR maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R_int = 0.78 +/- 0.38, consistent with Condon's relation. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Sigma_SFR for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Sigma_SFR agrees with the integrated ratio with only small quasi-random fluctuations as function of radius. Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log dia...

  8. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0

  9. Evolution of Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate in the Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahre, Michael A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    A central goal of extragalactic observational astronomy is to understand how normal galaxies evolve with redshift, and particularly when galaxies formed their stars. While optical and rest-frame UV observations have begun to address these issues, the interpretation of such data is particularly challenging because of the sensitivity to dust obscuration (at optical and UV wavelengths). The absorbed light is re-radiated at IR wavelengths, hence the optimal indicators of the star formation rate (SFR) is at a rest-frame wavelength of approx. 60 microns. The Spitzer Space Telescope mission is revolutionizing the study of the global properties and evolution of galaxies. Spitzer reaches nearly two orders of magnitude more sensitivity than previous IR space missions. This research program is to study the SFR using statistical samples of galaxies in the local universe, at intermediate redshifts, and set the stage for continuing studies up to z=5. The overall research program is divided into three main investigations: A Mid-IR Hubble Atlas and SFR estimators in the local universe, Evolution of the SFR at 0 formation and evolution at 1 < z < 5. The first papers from Spitzer were published during the last year, including ten refereed journal papers where the PI was first or co-author.

  10. The Evolution of Damped Lyman-alpha Absorbers: Metallicities and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, V P; Lauroesch, J T; Fall, S M; Khare, P; Woodgate, B E; Palunas, P; Meiring, J; Thatte, D G; Welty, D E; Truran, J W; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Lauroesch, James T.; Khare, Pushpa; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Palunas, Povilas; Meiring, Joseph; Thatte, Deepashri G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Truran, James W.

    2005-01-01

    The damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA quasar absorption lines provide powerful probes of the evolution of metals, gas, and stars in galaxies. One major obstacle in trying to understand the evolution of DLAs and sub-DLAs has been the small number of metallicity measurements at z < 1.5, an epoch spanning \\~70 % of the cosmic history. In recent surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope and Multiple Mirror Telescope, we have doubled the DLA Zn sample at z < 1.5. Combining our results with those at higher redshifts from the literature, we find that the global mean metallicity of DLAs does not rise to the solar value at low redshifts. These surprising results appear to contradict the near-solar mean metallicity observed for nearby (z ~ 0) galaxies and the predictions of cosmic chemical evolution models based on the global star formation history. Finally, we discuss direct constraints on the star formation rates (SFRs) in the absorber galaxies from our deep Fabry-Perot Ly-alpha imaging study and other emissio...

  11. Hot spring siliceous stromatolites from Yellowstone National Park: assessing growth rate and laminae formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W M; Corsetti, F A; Pepe-Ranney, C; Hammond, D E; Beaumont, W; Spear, J R

    2011-09-01

    Stromatolites are commonly interpreted as evidence of ancient microbial life, yet stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood. We apply radiometric tracer and dating techniques, molecular analyses and growth experiments to investigate siliceous stromatolite morphogenesis in Obsidian Pool Prime (OPP), a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. We examine rates of stromatolite growth and the environmental and/or biologic conditions that affect lamination formation and preservation, both difficult features to constrain in ancient examples. The "main body" of the stromatolite is composed of finely laminated, porous, light-dark couplets of erect (surface normal) and reclining (surface parallel) silicified filamentous bacteria, interrupted by a less-distinct, well-cemented "drape" lamination. Results from dating studies indicate a growth rate of 1-5 cm year(-1) ; however, growth is punctuated. (14)C as a tracer demonstrates that stromatolite cyanobacterial communities fix CO(2) derived from two sources, vent water (radiocarbon dead) and the atmosphere (modern (14)C). The drape facies contained a greater proportion of atmospheric CO(2) and more robust silica cementation (vs. the main body facies), which we interpret as formation when spring level was lower. Systematic changes in lamination style are likely related to environmental forcing and larger scale features (tectonic, climatic). Although the OPP stromatolites are composed of silica and most ancient forms are carbonate, their fine lamination texture requires early lithification. Without early lithification, whether silica or carbonate, it is unlikely that a finely laminated structure representing an ancient microbial mat would be preserved. In OPP, lithification on the nearly diurnal time scale is likely related to temperature control on silica solubility. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyo Keith EJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor or a larger protein (α-amylase. Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b overall transcription/translation repression, and (c oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases.

  13. Effects of the Size of Cosmological N-body Simulations on Physical Quantities – II: Halo Formation and Destruction Rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayanti Prasad

    2007-06-01

    In this study we show how errors due to finite box size affect formation and the destruction rate for haloes in cosmological N-body simulations. In an earlier study we gave an analytic prescription of finding the corrections in the mass function. Following the same approach, in this paper we give analytical expressions for corrections in the formation rate, destruction rate and the rate of change in comoving number density, and compute their expected values for the power law ( = -2) and LCDM models.

  14. Calibrating the Star Formation Rate at z=1 from Optical Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mostek, Nick; Moustakas, John; Salim, Samir; Weiner, Benjamin J

    2011-01-01

    We present a star-formation rate calibration based on optical data that is consistent with average observed rates in both the red and blue galaxy populations at z~1. The motivation for this study is to calculate SFRs for DEEP2 Redshift Survey galaxies in the 0.7

  15. The relation between accretion rates and the initial mass function in hydrodynamical simulations of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Maschberger, Th; Clarke, C J; Moraux, E

    2013-01-01

    We analyse a hydrodynamical simulation of star formation. Sink particles in the simulations which represent stars show episodic growth, which is presumably accretion from a core that can be regularly replenished in response to the fluctuating conditions in the local environment. The accretion rates follow $\\dot{m} \\propto m^{2/3}$, as expected from accretion in a gas-dominated potential, but with substantial variations over-laid on this. The growth times follow an exponential distribution which is tapered at long times due to the finite length of the simulation. The initial collapse masses have an approximately lognormal distribution with already an onset of a power-law at large masses. The sink particle mass function can be reproduced with a non-linear stochastic process, with fluctuating accretion rates $\\propto m^{2/3}$, a distribution of seed masses and a distribution of growth times. All three factors contribute equally to the form of the final sink mass function. We find that the upper power law tail of...

  16. The impact of angular momentum on black hole accretion rates in simulations of galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rosas-Guevara, Y M; Schaye, J; Furlong, M; Frenk, C S; Booth, C M; Crain, R; Vecchia, C Dalla; Schaller, M; Theuns, T

    2013-01-01

    Feedback from energy liberated by gas accretion onto black holes (BHs) is an attractive mechanism to explain the exponential cut-off at the massive end of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF). Semi-analytic models of galaxy formation in which this form of feedback is assumed to suppress cooling in haloes where the gas cooling time is large compared to the dynamical time do indeed achieve a good match to the observed SMF. Furthermore, hydrodynamic simulations of individual halos in which gas is assumed to accrete onto the central BH at the Bondi rate have shown that a self-regulating regime is established in which the BH grows just enough to liberate an amount of energy comparable to the thermal energy of the halo. However, this process is efficient at suppressing the growth not only of massive galaxies but also of galaxies like the Milky Way, leading to disagreement with the observed SMF. The Bondi accretion rate, however, is inappropriate when the accreting material has angular momentum. We present an impr...

  17. Growing black holes and galaxies: black hole accretion versus star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, Marta; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We present a new suite of hydrodynamical simulations and use it to study, in detail, black hole and galaxy properties. The high time, spatial and mass resolution, and realistic orbits and mass ratios, down to 1:6 and 1:10, enable us to meaningfully compare star formation rate (SFR) and BH accretion rate (BHAR) timescales, temporal behaviour and relative magnitude. We find that (i) BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR are typically temporally uncorrelated, and have different variability timescales, except during the merger proper, lasting ~0.2-0.3 Gyr. BHAR and nuclear (<100 pc) SFR are better correlated, and their variability are similar. Averaging over time, the merger phase leads typically to an increase by a factor of a few in the BHAR/SFR ratio. (ii) BHAR and nuclear SFR are intrinsically proportional, but the correlation lessens if the long-term SFR is measured. (iii) Galaxies in the remnant phase are the ones most likely to be selected as systems dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN), because of the long...

  18. Rate equation approach to understanding the ion-catalyzed formation of peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Sibirev, N. V.; Eliseev, I. E.; Vyazmin, S. Yu; Boitsov, V. M.; Natochin, Yu. V.; Dubina, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    The salt-induced peptide formation is important for assessing and approaching schemes of molecular evolution. Here, we present experimental data and an exactly solvable kinetic model describing the linear polymerization of L-glutamic amino acid in water solutions with different concentrations of KCl and NaCl. The length distributions of peptides are well fitted by the model. Strikingly, we find that KCl considerably enhances the peptide yield, while NaCl does not show any catalytic effect in most cases under our experimental conditions. The greater catalytic effect of potassium ions is entirely interpreted by one and single parameter, the polymerization rate constant that depends on the concentration of a given salt in the reaction mixture. We deduce numeric estimates for the rate constant at different concentrations of the ions and show that it is always larger for KCl. This leads to an exponential increase of the potassium- to sodium-catalyzed peptide concentration ratio with length. Our results show that the ion-catalyzed peptides have a higher probability to emerge in excess potassium rather than in sodium-rich water solutions.

  19. On the inconsistency between cosmic stellar mass density and star formation rate up to $z\\sim8$

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density and instantaneous star formation rate in redshift range $06$), the derived star formation history is consistent with the observations. This is the first time to test the discrepancy between the observed stellar mass density and instantaneous star formation rate up to very high redshift $z\\approx8$ using the Markov chain monte carlo method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of stellar mass density, initial mass function and cosmic metallicity evolution.

  20. A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tims S.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A catchment level study to obtain soil formation rates using beryllium-10 (10Be tracers has been undertaken in the Daly River Basin in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Three soil cores have been collected to bedrock, with depths ranging from ~1-3.5 m. Due to agricultural practices, modern soil loss rates can be significantly higher than long-term soil formation rates, but establishing soil formation rates has proved to be a difficult problem. At long-term equilibrium, however, soil formation from the underlying rock is balanced by soil loss from the surface. This long-term rate at which soil is being lost can be determined using the cosmogenic tracer 10Be, created in spallation of atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. Since the annual fallout rate of 10Be is known, the complete 10Be inventory over the depth of the top soil can be used to establish the soil formation rates.

  1. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikuisis, P; Kane, D M; McLellan, T M; Buick, F; Fairburn, S M

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low (approximately 45 W) or moderate (approximately 90 W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low- and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures (approximately 10% HbCO) deviated by less than 1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon.

  2. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikuisis, P.; Kane, D.M.; McLellan, T.M.; Buick, F.; Fairburn, S.M. (Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, North York, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low ([approximately]45 W) or moderate ([approximately]90W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low-and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures ([approximately]10% HbCO) deviated by <1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Gamma Ray Burst and star formation rates: The physical origin for the redshift evolution of their ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M; Tacchella, S

    2013-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and galaxies at high redshift represent complementary probes of the star formation history of the Universe. In fact, both the GRB rate and the galaxy luminosity density are connected to the underlying star formation. Here, we combine a star formation model for the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function from z=0 to z=10 with a metallicity-dependent efficiency for GRB formation to simultaneously predict the comoving GRB rate. Our model sheds light on the physical origin of the empirical relation often assumed between GRB rate and luminosity density-derived star formation rate: Rgrb(z) = \\epsilon(z)*SFR_{obs}(z), with \\epsilon(z) (1+z)^{1.2}. At z0. Models with total suppression of GRB formation at log(Z/Zsun)>0 are disfavored. At z>4, most of the star formation happens in low-metallicity hosts with nearly saturated efficiency of GRB production per unit stellar mass. However at the same epoch, galaxy surveys miss an increasing fraction of the predicted luminosity density because of f...

  4. Three Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Multiphase Galactic Disks with Star Formation Feedback: I. Regulation of Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2013-01-01

    The energy and momentum feedback from young stars has a profound impact on the interstellar medium (ISM), including heating and driving turbulence in the neutral gas that fuels future star formation. Recent theory has argued that this leads to a quasi-equilibrium self-regulated state, and for outer atomic-dominated disks results in the surface density of star formation $\\Sigma_{SFR}$ varying approximately linearly with the weight of the ISM (or midplane turbulent + thermal pressure). We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations to test the theoretical predictions for thermal, turbulent, and vertical dynamical equilibrium, and the implied functional dependence of $\\Sigma_{SFR}$ on local disk properties. Our models demonstrate that all equilibria are established rapidly, and that the expected proportionalities between mean thermal and turbulent pressures and $\\Sigma_{SFR}$ apply. For outer disk regions, this results in $\\Sigma_{SFR} \\propto \\Sigma \\sqrt{\\rho_{sd}}$, where $\\Sigma$ is the total ga...

  5. The relation between star formation rate and stellar mass of galaxies at z $\\sim$ 1-4

    CERN Document Server

    Katsianis, A; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01

    The relation between the Star Formation Rate (SFR) and stellar mass (${\\rm M}_{\\star}$) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation. However, the observed amplitude of the star formation rate - stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR$-{\\rm M}_{\\star}$ relation of $z\\sim 1-4 $ galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups and compare these with a range of observations. The comparison suggests that using Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) to estimate star formation rates, dust corrections and stellar masses produces the most reliable SFR$-{\\rm M}_{\\star}$ relations. On the contrary, the combination of IR and UV luminosities (UV+IR) overpredic...

  6. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  7. ESTIMATING THE STAR FORMATION RATE AT 1 kpc SCALES IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observtory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Boissier, Samuel [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Universite de Provence, CNRS (UMR6110), 38 rue Frederic Joliot Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Madore, Barry; Murphy, Eric [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sandstrom, Karin; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Using combinations of H{alpha}, ultraviolet (UV), and infrared (IR) emission, we estimate the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, at 1 kpc resolution for 30 disk galaxies that are targets of the IRAM HERACLES CO survey. We present a new physically motivated IR spectral-energy-distribution-based approach to account for possible contributions to 24 {mu}m emission not associated with recent star formation. Considering a variety of 'reference' SFRs from the literature, we revisit the calibration of the 24 {mu}m term in hybrid (UV+IR or H{alpha}+IR) tracers. We show that the overall calibration of this term remains uncertain at the factor of two level because of the lack of wide-field, robust reference SFR estimates. Within this uncertainty, published calibrations represent a reasonable starting point for 1 kpc-wide areas of star-forming disk galaxies, but we re-derive and refine the calibration of the IR term in these tracers to match our resolution and approach to 24 {mu}m emission. We compare a large suite of {Sigma}{sub SFR} estimates and find that above {Sigma}{sub SFR} {approx} 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} the systematic differences among tracers are less than a factor of two across two orders of magnitude dynamic range. We caution that methodology and data both become serious issues below this level. We note from simple model considerations that when focusing on a part of a galaxy dominated by a single stellar population, the intrinsic uncertainty in H{alpha}- and FUV-based SFRs is {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.5 dex.

  8. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  9. Effect of Rotation Rate on the Formation of Platinum-modified Polyaniline Film and Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Hong LI; Lin NIU; Chang Qiao ZHANG; Feng Hua WEI; Hu ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation of methanol was investigated on platinum-modified polyaniline electrode. Changes in the electrode rotation rates (Ω) during platinum electrodeposition remarkably affect the formation and distribution of platinum in the polymer matrix and consequently lead to different currents of methanol oxidation. The results show that platinum loading is proportional to rotation ratesΩ1/2.

  10. A kinetic rate expression for the time-dependent coke formation rate during propane dehydrogenation over a platinum alumina monolithic catalyst.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2001-01-01

    Coke formation rates under propane dehydrogenation reaction conditions on a used monolithic Pt/y-Al2O3 catalyst have been experimentally determined in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) as a function of time on stream covering wide temperature and concentration ranges. For relatively short times on

  11. The Star Formation Rate - Dense Gas Relation in the Nuclei of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Desika; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the star formation rate (SFR) and dense molecular gas mass in the nuclei of galaxies. To do this, we utilize the observed 850 micron luminosity as a proxy for the infrared luminosity and SFR, and correlate this with the observed CO (J=3-2) luminosity. We find tentative evidence that the LIR-CO (J=3-2) index is similar to the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) index (N ~ 1.5) in the central ~1.7 kpc of galaxies, and flattens to a roughly linear index when including emission from the entire galaxy. This result may imply that the volumetric Schmidt relation is the underlying driver behind the observed SFR-dense gas correlations, and provides tentative confirmation for recent numerical models. While the data exclude the possibility of a constant LIR-CO (J=3-2) index for both galaxy nuclei and global measurements at the ~80% confidence level, the considerable error bars cannot preclude alternative interpretations.

  12. The total infrared luminosity may significantly overestimate the star formation rate of recently quenched galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Christopher C; Ashby, Matthew L N; Fazio, Giovanni; Hernquist, Lars; Martínez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Noeske, Kai; Smith, Howard A; Wuyts, Stijn; Zezas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The total infrared (IR) luminosity is very useful for estimating the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies, but converting the IR luminosity into an SFR relies on assumptions that do not hold for all galaxies. We test the effectiveness of the IR luminosity as an SFR indicator by applying it to synthetic spectral energy distributions generated from three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of isolated disc galaxies and galaxy mergers. In general, the SFR inferred from the IR luminosity agrees well with the true instantaneous SFR of the simulated galaxies. However, for the major mergers in which a strong starburst is induced, the SFR inferred from the IR luminosity can overestimate the instantaneous SFR during the post-starburst phase by greater than two orders of magnitude. Even though the instantaneous SFR decreases rapidly after the starburst, the stars that were formed in the starburst remain dust-obscured and thus produce significant IR luminosity. Consequently, use of the IR luminosity as an SFR indica...

  13. The Radio Spectral Energy Distribution and Star Formation Rate Calibration in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Krause, M; Dumas, G; Meidt, S; Beck, R; Damas-Segovia, A; Murphy, E J; Mulcahy, D D; Groves, B; Bolatto, A; Dale, D; Galametz, M; Sandstrom, K; Boquien, M; Calzetti, D; Kennicutt, R C; Hunt, L K; De Looze, I; Pellegrini, E W

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum emission from the KINGFISH sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4GHz, 4.8GHz, 8.5GHz, and 10.5GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-radio continuum (1-10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations vs. the monochromatic radio luminosities. The radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Marchov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index (a_nt) and the thermal fraction (fth) with mean values of a_nt~ 0.97 for the 1-10 GHz frequency rang and fth~10% at 1.4GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ~3 orders of magnitude in the sample. The thermal emission is responsible for ~23% of the MRC on average. We also compare the extinction-corrected diagnostics of star formation rate with the thermal and nonthermal radio tracers and derive the fir...

  14. Probing the peak of the star formation rate density with the extragalactic background light

    CERN Document Server

    Raue, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL), i.e., the diffuse meta-galactic photon field in the ultraviolet to infrared, is dominated by the emission from stars in galaxies. It is, therefore, intimately connected with the integrated star formation rate density (SFRD). In this paper, the SFRD is constrained using recent limits on the EBL density derived from observations of distant sources of high and very-high energy gamma-rays. The stellar EBL contribution is modeled utilizing simple stellar population spectra including dust attenuation and emission. A wide range of values for the different model parameters (SFRD(z), metallicity, dust absorption) is investigated and their impact on the resulting EBL is studied. The calculated EBL densities are compared with the specific EBL density limits and constraints on the SFRD are derived. For the fiducial model, adopting a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), the SFRD is constrained to ~< 0.1 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3 and < 0.2 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3 for a redshift of z...

  15. What triggers black-hole growth? Insights from star formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Neistein, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    We present a new semi-analytic model for the common growth of black holes (BHs) and galaxies within a hierarchical Universe. The model is tuned to match the mass function of BHs at z=0 and the luminosity functions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z<4. We use a new observational constraint, which relates the luminosity of AGNs to the star-formation rate (SFR) of their host galaxies. We show that this new constraint is important in various aspects: a) it indicates that BH accretion events are episodic; b) it favours a scenario in which BH accretion is triggered by merger events of all mass ratios; c) it constrains the duration of both merger-induced star-bursts and BH accretion events. The model reproduces the observations once we assume that only 4 per cent of the merger events trigger BH accretion; BHs accretion is not related to secular evolution; and only a few per cent of the mass made in bursts goes into the BH. We find that AGNs with low or intermediate luminosity are mostly being triggered by mino...

  16. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  17. Luminosities, Masses and Star Formation Rates of Galaxies at High Redshift (IAU279 conference proceedings)

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    There has been great progress in recent years in discovering star forming galaxies at high redshifts (z>5), close to the epoch of reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM). The WFC3 and ACS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope have enabled Lyman break galaxies to be robustly identified, but the UV luminosity function and star formation rate density of this population at z=6-8 seems to be much lower than at z=2-4. High escape fractions and a large contribution from faint galaxies below our current detection limits would be required for star-forming galaxies to reionize the Universe. We have also found that these galaxies have blue rest-frame UV colours, which might indicate lower dust extinction at z>5. There has been some spectroscopic confirmation of these Lyman break galaxies through Lyman-alpha emission, but the fraction of galaxies where we see this line drops at z>7, perhaps due to the onset of the Gunn-Peterson effect (where the IGM is opaque to Lyman-alpha).

  18. SCUSS u-band Emission as a Star-formation-rate Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Hong; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Fan, Zhou; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Jing, Yi-Peng; Li, Cheng; Lesser, Michael; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Ma, Jun; Nie, Jun-Dan; Shen, Shi-Yin; Wang, Jia-Li; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Zou, Hu

    2017-01-01

    We present and analyze the possibility of using optical u-band luminosities to estimate star-formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies based on the data from the South Galactic Cap u band Sky Survey (SCUSS), which provides a deep u-band photometric survey covering about 5000 deg2 of the South Galactic Cap. Based on two samples of normal star-forming galaxies selected by the BPT diagram, we explore the correlations between u-band, Hα, and IR luminosities by combing SCUSS data with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The attenuation-corrected u-band luminosities are tightly correlated with the Balmer decrement-corrected Hα luminosities with an rms scatter of ∼0.17 dex. The IR-corrected u luminosities are derived based on the correlations between the attenuation of u-band luminosities and WISE 12 (or 22) μm luminosities, and then calibrated with the Balmer-corrected Hα luminosities. The systematic residuals of these calibrations are tested against the physical properties over the ranges covered by our sample objects. We find that the best-fitting nonlinear relations are better than the linear ones and recommended to be applied in the measurement of SFRs. The systematic deviations mainly come from the pollution of old stellar population and the effect of dust extinction; therefore, a more detailed analysis is needed in future work.

  19. Observational evidence for the evolution of nuclear metallicity and star formation rate as the merger stage

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Rui; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Wei, Peng; Guo, Xin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance and star formation rate (SFR) of local far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies along the merger sequence, as traced by their optical morphologies. The sample was drawn from a cross-correlation analysis of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ultraluminous infrared galaxies sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 database. The investigation is done by comparing our sample to a control sample matched in the normalized redshift distribution in two diagnostics, which are the nuclear gas-phase metallicity vs. stellar mass and the nuclear SFR vs. stellar mass diagrams. Galaxies with different morphological types show different mass-metallicity relations (MZR). Compared to the MZR defined by the control sample, isolated spirals have comparable metallicities with the control sample at a given stellar mass. Spirals in pairs and interacting galaxies with projected separations $r_{p} >$ 20 kpc show mild metallicity d...

  20. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries, Millisecond Radio Pulsars, and the Cosmic Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    White, N E; White, Nicholas E.; Ghosh, Pranab

    1998-01-01

    We report on the implications of the peak in the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) at redshift z ~ 1.5 for the resulting population of low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXB) and for that of their descendants, the millisecond radio pulsars (MRP). Since the evolutionary timescales of LMXBs, their progenitors, and their descendants are thought be significant fractions of the time-interval between the SFR peak and the present epoch, there is a lag in the turn-on of the LMXB population, with the peak activity occurring at z ~ 0.5 - 1.0. The peak in the MRP population is delayed further, occurring at z < 0.5. We show that the discrepancy between the birthrate of LMXBs and MRPs, found under the assumption of a stead-state SFR, can be resolved for the population as a whole when the effects of a time-variable SFR are included. A discrepancy may persist for LMXBs with short orbital periods, although a detailed population synthesis will be required to confirm this. Further, since the integrated X-ray luminosity distribution of...

  1. Observational evidence for the evolution of nuclear metallicity and star formation rate with the merger stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang; Wei, Peng; Guo, Xin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the evolution of nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance and star formation rate (SFR) of local far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies along the merger sequence, as traced by their optical morphologies. The sample was drawn from a cross-correlation analysis of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ultraluminous infrared galaxy sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 database. The investigation is done by comparing our sample to a control sample matched in the normalized redshift distribution in two diagnostics, which are the nuclear gas-phase metallicity vs. stellar mass and the nuclear SFR vs. stellar mass diagrams. Galaxies with different morphological types show different mass-metallicity relations (MZRs). Compared to the MZR defined by the control sample, isolated spirals have comparable metallicities with the control sample at a given stellar mass. Spirals in pairs and interacting galaxies with projected separations of r p > 20 kpc show a mild metallicity dilution of 0.02-0.03 dex. Interacting galaxies with r p nuclear metallicity. Moreover, the central SFR enhancement relative to the control sample evolves simultaneously with the nuclear gas-phase oxygen abundance. Our results support the predictions from numerical simulations.

  2. Simple, Fast and Accurate Photometric Estimation of Specific Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Stensbo-Smidt, Kristoffer; Igel, Christian; Zirm, Andrew; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale surveys make huge amounts of photometric data available. Because of the sheer amount of objects, spectral data cannot be obtained for all of them. Therefore it is important to devise techniques for reliably estimating physical properties of objects from photometric information alone. These estimates are needed to automatically identify interesting objects worth a follow-up investigation as well as to produce the required data for a statistical analysis of the space covered by a survey. We argue that machine learning techniques are suitable to compute these estimates accurately and efficiently. This study considers the task of estimating the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of galaxies. It is shown that a nearest neighbours algorithm can produce better sSFR estimates than traditional SED fitting. We show that we can obtain accurate estimates of the sSFR even at high redshifts using only broad-band photometry based on the u, g, r, i and z filters from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We addtional...

  3. Effects of hydraulic parameter cleaning variations on rate of penetration of soft formation insert bits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, H.H.; Deane, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    Effects of hydraulic cleaning parameter variations on rate of penetration response of 7 7/8 inch diameter soft formation insert bits have been measured in laboratory drilling tests. Tests were conducted in Mancos Shale rock samples at 700 psi and 4000 psi simulated overbalance pressure conditions using a 9.1 pound per gallon bentonite-barite water base drilling fluid. Bit hydraulic horsepower was varied from 0.72 to 9.5 HHP/in/sup 2/ using two or three nozzles in sizes ranging from 9/32 to 14/32 inches in diameter. Some improvements in ROP at constant bit hydraulic horsepower and impact force levels were obtained with two nozzle configurations vs. three nozzle configurations, but improvements were not consistently out of the range of normal test to test variations. Reduction in drilling costs due to the measured response of ROP to improved hydraulic cleaning is compared to increased operating costs required to provide additional hydraulics. Results indicate that bit hydraulic horsepower levels in excess of popular rules of thumb are cost effective in slow drilling due to high overbalance pressure.

  4. Panchromatic Estimation of Star Formation Rates in BzK Galaxies at 1

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, Peter; Huynh, Minh; Ivison, Rob J; Treister, Ezequiel; Smail, Ian; Blanc, Guillermo A; Cardamone, Carolin N; Greve, Thomas R; Schinnerer, Eva; Urry, Meg; van der Werf, Paul; Walter, Fabian

    2010-01-01

    We determine Star Formation Rates (SFRs) in a sample of color selected, star forming (sBzK) galaxies (K(AB)<21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field - South (ECDF-S). To avoid AGN, we eliminate 12% of the original sample that have X-ray detections in Chandra catalogs. X-ray stacking, including in the 4 Ms CDF-S, shows that the remaining 597 sBzK galaxies are not dominated by obscured AGN. Photometric redshift binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Chandra, Spitzer-MIPS, submillimeter, and radio data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). We determine total IR luminosities, compare SFR calibrations from X-ray, UV, 24 micron, FIR and radio wavebands, and we find preferred calibrations for each waveband. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR(IR+UV), to within a factor of two for dust corrected UV and the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results show that 24 micron-only ...

  5. The radio continuum-star formation rate relation in WSRT sings galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Heald, George [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Braun, Robert [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bigiel, Frank [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Beck, Rainer, E-mail: e.brinks@herts.ac.uk, E-mail: v.heesen@soton.ac.uk, E-mail: aleroy@nrao.edu, E-mail: heald@astron.nl, E-mail: Robert.Braun@csiro.au, E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based Σ{sub SFR} maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R{sub int}=0.78±0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR}, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (Σ{sub SFR}){sub RC}∝(Σ{sub SFR}){sub hyb}{sup 0.63±0.25}, implying that data points with high Σ{sub SFR} are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low Σ{sub SFR}. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio R of

  6. The merger rates and sizes of galaxies across the peak epoch of star formation from the HiZELS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Stott, John P; Smail, Ian; Bower, Richard; Best, Philip N; Geach, James E

    2013-01-01

    We use the HiZELS narrow-band H-alpha survey in combination with CANDELS, UKIDSS and WIRDS near-infrared imaging, to investigate the morphologies, merger rates and sizes of a sample of H-alpha emitting galaxies in the redshift range z=0.40 - 2.23, an epoch encompassing the rise to the peak of the star formation rate density. Merger rates are estimated from space- and ground-based imaging using the M20 coefficient. To account for the increase in the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) of the star forming `main-sequence' with redshift, we normalise the star-formation rate of galaxies at each epoch to the typical value derived from the H-alpha luminosity function. Once this trend in sSFR is removed we see no evidence for an increase in the number density of star-forming galaxies or the merger rate with redshift. We thus conclude that neither is the main driver of the enhanced star-formation rate density at z=1-2, with secular processes such as instabilities within efficiently fuelled, gas-rich discs or multiple ...

  7. Aperture-free star formation rate of SDSS star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Puertas, S.; Vilchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.

    2017-03-01

    Large area surveys with a high number of galaxies observed have undoubtedly marked a milestone in the understanding of several properties of galaxies, such as star-formation history, morphology, and metallicity. However, in many cases, these surveys provide fluxes from fixed small apertures (e.g. fibre), which cover a scant fraction of the galaxy, compelling us to use aperture corrections to study the global properties of galaxies. In this work, we derive the current total star formation rate (SFR) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, using an empirically based aperture correction of the measured Hα flux for the first time, thus minimising the uncertainties associated with reduced apertures. All the Hα fluxes have been extinction-corrected using the Hα/ Hβ ratio free from aperture effects. The total SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies has been derived applying pure empirical Hα and Hα/ Hβ aperture corrections based on the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey. We find that, on average, the aperture-corrected SFR is 0.65 dex higher than the SDSS fibre-based SFR. The relation between the SFR and stellar mass for SDSS star-forming galaxies (SFR-M⋆) has been obtained, together with its dependence on extinction and Hα equivalent width. We compare our results with those obtained in previous works and examine the behaviour of the derived SFR in six redshift bins, over the redshift range 0.005 ≤ z ≤ 0.22. The SFR-M⋆ sequence derived here is in agreement with selected observational studies based on integral field spectroscopy of individual galaxies as well as with the predictions of recent theoretical models of disc galaxies. A table of the aperture-corrected fluxes and SFR for 210 000 SDSS star-forming galaxies and related relevant data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A71 Warning, no authors

  8. Singlet Molecular Oxygen on Ice: Rates of Formation and Steady State Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, J. P.; Anastasio, C.

    2007-12-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*), the first electronically excited state of molecular oxygen, reacts rapidly with certain types of environmental pollutants such as furans, phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Its formation requires the absorption of light by a chromophore (a.k.a. sensitizer), which subsequently transfers energy to ground state molecular oxygen. In the environment, 1O2* chemistry has been studied primarily in the aqueous phase, such as in surface waters or cloud and fog drops. In this work, we expand our current understanding by investigating the rate of formation (Rf) and steady state concentration ([1O2*]) of 1O2* on ice. To investigate 1O2* kinetics, we use a chemical probe technique in which photoformed 1O2* reacts with furfuryl alcohol (FFA). To generate 1O2*, we illuminated frozen samples containing a sensitizer (Rose Bengal, RB) at 549 nm. The concentration of total solutes in each sample was controlled using sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). Following illumination, the decay of FFA was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Ice tests were conducted at 253, 263, and 268 K. Liquid tests for comparison were conducted at 278 K. Results showed dramatically faster (~104) FFA decay on ice than in liquid samples prepared from the same solutions, in agreement with the calculated solute concentration factor in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) on ice compared to bulk solution. Varying the concentration of RB resulted in similar changes in both Rf and [1O2*], with magnitudes of change close to those expected. Changing temperature and total solutes, both of which control the volume of the QLL on ice, revealed two model regimes: FFA as a major (1) or minor (2) sink of 1O2*. Experimental results from the former regime show good agreement with expected values for both Rf and [1O2*]. Experiments in the later regime are currently in progress. We will also discuss the potential implications of 1O2* to the chemistry of naturally

  9. Characterization and refinement of carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the Ta-C system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Patrick James [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The interaction between carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the tantalum-carbon system was investigated. The research was driven by the need to characterize carbide coating formation rates. The characterization of the carbide coating formation rates was required to engineer an optimum processing scheme for the fabrication of the ultracorrosion-resistant composite, carbon-saturated tantalum. A packed-bed carburization process was successfully engineered and employed. The packed-bed carburization process produced consistent, predictable, and repeatable carbide coatings. A digital imaging analysis measurement process for accurate and consistent measurement of carbide coating thicknesses was developed. A process for removing the chemically stable and extremely hard tantalum-carbide coatings was also developed in this work.

  10. Burst Format Design for Optimum Joint Estimation of Doppler-Shift and Doppler-Rate in Packet Satellite Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giugno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of optimizing the burst format of packet transmission to perform enhanced-accuracy estimation of Doppler-shift and Doppler-rate of the carrier of the received signal, due to relative motion between the transmitter and the receiver. Two novel burst formats that minimize the Doppler-shift and the Doppler-rate Cramér-Rao bounds (CRBs for the joint estimation of carrier phase/Doppler-shift and of the Doppler-rate are derived, and a data-aided (DA estimation algorithm suitable for each optimal burst format is presented. Performance of the newly derived estimators is evaluated by analysis and by simulation, showing that such algorithms attain their relevant CRBs with very low complexity, so that they can be directly embedded into new-generation digital modems for satellite communications at low SNR.

  11. 3D-HST Emission Line Galaxies at z ~ 2: Discrepancies in the Optical/UV Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Zeimann, Gregory R; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S; Feldmeier, John; Trump, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the H-beta line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the H-beta star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ~1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and star formation rate. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as H-beta is more greatly enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the star formation rate history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z ~ 2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  12. Massive Star Formation Rates and Radial Distributions from Halpha Imaging of 84 Virgo Cluster and Isolated Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmann, R A; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.

    2002-01-01

    The massive star formation properties of 55 Virgo Cluster and 29 isolated S0-Scd spiral galaxies are compared via analyses of R and Halpha surface photometry and integrated fluxes as functions of Hubble type and central R light concentration. The total massive star formation rates in Virgo Cluster spirals have been reduced by factors up to 2.5 in the median compared to isolated spirals. The inner disk star formation rates of most Virgo Cluster spirals are similar or enhanced by factors up to 2.5 in the median, while outer disk star formation rates are reduced by factors up to 7.1 in the median. Thus the reduction in total star formation of Virgo Cluster spirals is caused primarily by truncation of the star-forming disks. The star formation morphologies of Virgo Cluster spirals compared to isolated spirals can be divided into four categories: normal (27%), anemic (6%), enhanced (15%), and truncated (52%). Several galaxies with truncated star-forming disks have anemic inner disks, but the majority have normal-e...

  13. Star formation rates on global and cloud scales within the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Ashley Thomas; Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2016-01-01

    The environment within the inner few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way, known as the "Central Molecular Zone" (CMZ), harbours densities and pressures orders of magnitude higher than the Galactic Disc; akin to that at the peak of cosmic star formation (Kruijssen & Longmore 2013). Previous studies have shown that current theoretical star-formation models under-predict the observed level of star-formation (SF) in the CMZ by an order of magnitude given the large reservoir of dense gas it contains. Here we explore potential reasons for this apparent dearth of star formation activity.

  14. Massive star formation in Wolf-Rayet galaxies. V: Star formation rates, masses and the importance of galaxy interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) We have performed a comprehensive analysis of a sample of 20 starburst galaxies, most of them classified as Wolf-Rayet galaxies. In this paper, the last of the series, we analyze the global properties of our galaxy sample using multiwavelength data (X-ray, FUV, optical, NIR, FIR, and radio). The agreement between our Ha-based SFR and those provided by indicators at other wavelengths is remarkable, but we consider that the new Ha-based calibration provided by Calzetti et al. (2007) should be preferred over older calibrations. The FUV-based SFR provides a powerful tool to analyze the star-formation activity in both global and local scales independently to the Ha emission. We provide empirical relationships between the ionized gas mass, neutral gas mass, dust mass, stellar mass, and dynamical mass with the B-luminosity. Although all mass estimations increase with increasing luminosity, we find important deviations to the general trend in some objects, that seem to be consequence of their particular ev...

  15. Metallicity calibrations of galaxies with low star formation rates: the influence of a stochastic IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paalvast, Mieke; Brinchmann, Jarle

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of the consequences of an initial mass function (IMF) that is stochastically sampled on the main emission lines used for gas-phase metallicity estimates in extragalactic sources. We use the stochastic stellar population code slug and the photoionization code cloudy to show that the stochastic sampling of the massive end of the mass function can lead to clear variations in the relative production of energetic emission lines such as [O iii] relative to that of Balmer lines. We use this to study the impact on the Te, N2O2, R23 and O3N2 metallicity calibrators. We find that stochastic sampling of the IMF leads to a systematic overestimate of O/H in galaxies with low star formation rates (SFRs; ≤10-3 M⊙ yr-1) when using the N2O2, R23 and O3N2 strong-line methods, and an underestimate when using the Te method on galaxies of sub-solar metallicity. We point out that while the SFRH α-to-SFRUV ratio can be used to identify systems where the IMF might be insufficiently sampled, it does not provide sufficient information to fully correct the metallicity calibrations at low SFRs. Care must therefore be given in the choice of metallicity indicators in such systems, with the N2O2 indicator proving most robust of those tested by us, with a bias of 0.08 dex for models with SFR = 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 and solar metallicity.

  16. Hydroxyl radical in/on illuminated polar snow: formation rates, lifetimes, and steady-state concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeyuan; Chu, Liang; Galbavy, Edward S.; Ram, Keren; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-08-01

    While the hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the snowpack is likely a dominant oxidant for organic species and bromide, little is known about the kinetics or steady-state concentrations of •OH on/in snow and ice. Here we measure the formation rate, lifetime, and concentration of •OH for illuminated polar snow samples studied in the laboratory and in the field. Laboratory studies show that •OH kinetics and steady-state concentrations are essentially the same for a given sample studied as ice and liquid; this is in contrast to other photooxidants, which show a concentration enhancement in ice relative to solution as a result of kinetic differences in the two phases. The average production rate of •OH in samples studied at Summit, Greenland, is 5 times lower than the average measured in the laboratory, while the average •OH lifetime determined in the field is 5 times higher than in the laboratory. These differences indicate that the polar snows we studied in the laboratory are affected by contamination, despite significant efforts to prevent this; our results suggest similar contamination may be a widespread problem in laboratory studies of ice chemistry. Steady-state concentrations of •OH in clean snow studied in the field at Summit, Greenland, range from (0.8 to 3) × 10-15 M, comparable to values reported for midlatitude cloud and fog drops, rain, and deliquesced marine particles, even though impurity concentrations in the snow samples are much lower. Partitioning of firn air •OH to the snow grains will approximately double the steady-state concentration of snow-grain hydroxyl radical, leading to an average [•OH] in near-surface, summer Summit snow of approximately 4 × 10-15 M. At this concentration, the •OH-mediated lifetimes of organics and bromide in Summit snow grains are approximately 3 days and 7 h, respectively, suggesting that hydroxyl radical is a major oxidant for both species.

  17. Comparison of intelligent systems, artificial neural networks and neural fuzzy model for prediction of gas hydrate formation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Jalalnezhad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to present a novel approach for predication of gas hydrate formation rate based on the Intelligent Systems. Using a data set including about 470 data obtained from flow tests in a mini-loop apparatus, different predictive models were developed. From the results predicted by these models, it can be pointed out that the developed models can be used as powerful tools for prediction of gas hydrate formation rate with total errors of less than 4%.

  18. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  19. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  20. Star Formation at Low Rates: How a Lack of Massive Stars Impacts the Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    In recent years dedicated observations have uncovered star formation at extremely low rates in dwarf galaxies, tidal tails, ram-pressure stripped gas clouds, and the outskirts of galactic disks. At the same time, numerical simulations of galaxy evolution have advanced to higher spatial and mass resolutions, but have yet to account for the underfilling of the uppermost mass bins of stellar initial mass function (IMF) at low star-formation rates. In such situations, simulations may simply scale down the IMF, without realizing that this unrealistically results infractions of massive stars, along with fractions of massive star feedback energy (e.g., radiation and SNII explosions). Not properlyaccounting for such parameters has consequences for the self-regulation of star formation, the energetics of galaxies, as well as for the evolution of chemical abundances.Here we present numerical simulations of dwarf galaxies with low star-formation rates allowing for two extreme cases of the IMF: a "filled" case with fractional massive stars vs. a truncated IMF, at which the IMF is built bottom-up until the gas reservoir allows the formation of a last single star at an uppermost mass. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the different effects on galaxy evolution with respect to self-regulation, feedback, and chemistry. The case of a stochastic sampled IMF is situated somewhere in between these extremes.

  1. Digestion of high rate activated sludge coupled to biochar formation for soil improvement in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansubuga, Irene; Banadda, Noble; Ronsse, Frederik; Verstraete, Willy; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-09-15

    High rate activated sludge (HRAS) is well-biodegradable sludge enabling energy neutrality of wastewater treatment plants via anaerobic digestion. However, even through successful digestion a notable residue still remains. Here we investigated whether this residue can be converted to biochar, for its use as a fertilizer or as a solid fuel, and assessed its characteristics and overall process efficiency. In a first phase, HRAS was anaerobicaly digested under mesophilic conditions at a sludge retention time of 20 days. HRAS digested well (57.9 ± 6.2% VS degradation) producing on average 0.23 ± 0.04 L CH4 per gram VS fed. The digestate particulates were partially air-dried to mimic conditions used in developing countries, and subsequently converted to biochar by fixed-bed slow pyrolysis at a residence time of 15 min and at highest heating temperatures (HHT) of 300 °C, 400 °C and 600 °C. Subsequently, the produced chars were characterized by proximate analysis, CHN-elemental analysis, pH in solution and bomb calorimetry for higher heating value. The yield and volatile matter decreased with increasing HHT while ash content and fixed carbon increased with increasing HHT. The produced biochar showed properties optimal towards soil amendment when produced at a temperature of 600 °C with values of 5.91 wt%, 23.75 wt%, 70.35% on dry basis (db) and 0.44 for volatile matter, fixed carbon, ash content and H/C ratio, respectively. With regard to its use for energy purposes, the biochar represented a lower calorific value than the dried HRAS digestate likely due to high ash content. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that anaerobic digestion of HRAS and its subsequent biochar formation at HHT of 600 °C represents an attractive route for sludge management in tropic settings like in Uganda, coupling carbon capture to energy generation, carbon sequestration and nutrient recovery.

  2. Reconfigurable Digital Coherent Receiver for Metro-Access Networks Supporting Mixed Modulation Formats and Bit-rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Arlunno, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    A single, reconfigurable, digital coherent receiver is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for converged wireless and optical fiber transport. The capacity of reconstructing the full transmitted optical field allows for the demodulation of mixed modulation formats and bit-rates. We performed...

  3. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  4. Sustaining star formation rates in spiral galaxies - Supernova-driven turbulent accretion disk models applied to THINGS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B

    2010-01-01

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps (Vollmer & Beckert 2003) contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in star formation regime is realized by replacing the fr...

  5. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10-4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10-4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  6. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  7. INFLUENCE OF MORTGAGE RATES PRICE FORMATION ON THE PRIMARY HOUSING MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay I. Kornilov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers relationship of pricesin the primary market, depending on theregional origin and type of home, with thevalue of mortgage rates. Assesses thestrength of such a relationship and thepossible effects of changes in such rates.

  8. Growth-Phase Sterigmatocystin Formation on Lactose Is Mediated via Low Specific Growth Rates in Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Németh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed contamination with polyketide mycotoxins such as sterigmatocystin (ST produced by Aspergilli is a worldwide issue. The ST biosynthetic pathway is well-characterized in A. nidulans, but regulatory aspects related to the carbon source are still enigmatic. This is particularly true for lactose, inasmuch as some ST production mutant strains still synthesize ST on lactose but not on other carbon substrates. Here, kinetic data revealed that on d-glucose, ST forms only after the sugar is depleted from the medium, while on lactose, ST appears when most of the carbon source is still available. Biomass-specified ST production on lactose was significantly higher than on d-glucose, suggesting that ST formation may either be mediated by a carbon catabolite regulatory mechanism, or induced by low specific growth rates attainable on lactose. These hypotheses were tested by d-glucose limited chemostat-type continuous fermentations. No ST formed at a high growth rate, while a low growth rate led to the formation of 0.4 mg·L−1 ST. Similar results were obtained with a CreA mutant strain. We concluded that low specific growth rates may be the primary cause of mid-growth ST formation on lactose in A. nidulans, and that carbon utilization rates likely play a general regulatory role during biosynthesis.

  9. Slow Evolution of the Specific Star Formation Rate at z>2: The Impact of Dust, Emission Lines, and A Rising Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Valentino; llingworth, Garth; Labbe, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Magee, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR / Mstar) between redshift 4 and 6 to investigate the previous reports of "constant" sSFR at z>2. We obtain photometry on a large sample of galaxies at z~4-6 located in the HUDF and the ERS fields that have high quality imaging from HST and Spitzer. We have derived stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) through stellar population modeling of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We estimate the dust extinction from the observed UV colors. In the SED fitting process we have studied the effects of assuming a star formation history (SFH) both with constant SFR and one where the SFR rises exponentially with time. The latter SFH is chosen to match the observed evolution of the UV luminosity function. We find that neither the mean SFRs nor the mean stellar masses change significantly when the rising SFR (RSF) model is assumed instead of the constant SFR model. When focusing on galaxies with Mstar ~ 5x10^9 Msun, we find that the sS...

  10. Marine snow derived from abandoned larvacean houses: Sinking rates, particle content and mechanisms of aggregate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.L.S.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Alldredge, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics and formation mechanisms of marine snow aggregates from abandoned larvacean houses were examined by laboratory experiments and field sampling during a spring diatom bloom in a shallow fjord on the west coast of the USA. Intact aggregates were sampled both from sediment traps and dire......The dynamics and formation mechanisms of marine snow aggregates from abandoned larvacean houses were examined by laboratory experiments and field sampling during a spring diatom bloom in a shallow fjord on the west coast of the USA. Intact aggregates were sampled both from sediment traps...

  11. Halpha-Derived Star-Formation Rates For Three z ~ 0.75 EDisCS Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, R A; Poggianti, B M; Rudnick, G; Halliday, C; Milvang-Jensen, B; Pellò, R; Simard, L; Finn, Rose A.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jr., Donald W. McCarthy; Poggianti, Bianca; Rudnick, Gregory; Halliday, Claire; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Pello, Roser; Simard, Luc

    2005-01-01

    We present Halpha-derived star-formation rates (SFRs) for three z ~ 0.75 galaxy clusters. Our 1 sigma flux limit corresponds to a star-formation rate of 0.10-0.24 solar mass per year, and our minimum reliable Halpha + [N II] rest-frame equivalent width is 10\\AA. We show that Halpha narrowband imaging is an efficient method for measuring star formation in distant clusters. In two out of three clusters, we find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with projected distance from the cluster center. We also find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies decreases with increasing local galaxy surface density in the same two clusters. We compare the median rate of star formation among star-forming cluster galaxies to a small sample of star-forming field galaxies from the literature and find that the median cluster SFRs are \\~50% less than the median field SFR. We characterize cluster evolution in terms of the mass-normalized integrated cluster SFR and find that the z ~ 0.75 clusters have more SFR per...

  12. ON THE INCONSISTENCY BETWEEN COSMIC STELLAR MASS DENSITY AND STAR FORMATION RATE UP TO z ∼ 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.; Wang, F. Y., E-mail: fayinwang@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we test the discrepancy between the stellar mass density (SMD) and instantaneous star formation rate in the redshift range 0 < z < 8 using a large observational data sample. We first compile the measurements of SMDs up to z ∼ 8. Comparing the observed SMDs with the time-integral of instantaneous star formation history (SFH), we find that the observed SMDs are lower than that implied from the SFH at z < 4. We also use the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to derive the best-fitting SFH from the observed SMD data. At 0.5 < z < 6, the observed star formation rate densities are larger than the best-fitting one, especially at z ∼ 2 where they are larger by a factor of about two. However, at lower (z < 0.5) and higher redshifts (z > 6), the derived SFH is consistent with the observations. This is the first time that the discrepancy between the observed SMD and instantaneous star formation rate has been tested up to very high redshift z ≈ 8 using the MCMC method and a varying recycling factor. Several possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, such as underestimation of SMD, initial mass function, and evolution of cosmic metallicity.

  13. Impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on hydrogen generation rate calculations for the Savannah River Site tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-14

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) personnel requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluate available data and determine its applicability to defining the impact of planned glycolate anion additions to Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) on Tank Farm flammability (primarily with regard to H2 production). Flammability evaluations of formate anion, which is already present in SRS waste, were also needed. This report describes the impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) calculations for the SRS Tank Farm.

  14. Rates of cholestrol ester formation during storage of anchovy (Engraulis capensis) at various temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Koning, AJ

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available formation of cholesterol ester from free cholesterol has been shown to occur during spoilage of anchovy (Engraulis capensis). As a result, the quality of the oil produced from the fish is reduced, as esterified cholesterol is much more difficult to remove...

  15. Oil field chemicals synergistic effects on the corrosion rate of L-80 steel in sea and formation waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Hashem, A.; Carew, J. [Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat Kuwait (Kuwait); Al-Borno, A. [Charter Coating Service (2000) Ltd., no 6, 4604, 13 Street N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 6P1 (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion rate of tubular grade L-80 carbon steel under downhole conditions of a northern oil field of Kuwait was investigated. This was done using the injection seawater, formation water and a 50:50 mixture of both waters in the presence of commercially available corrosion inhibitor, scale inhibitor, and biocide products separately and in combination with each other. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the corrosion inhibitor and its interaction with the scale inhibitor and the biocide, as seen in the corrosion rate of L80 carbon steel. This was done using the manufacturers' recommended dosage levels of the corrosion inhibitor, scale inhibitor and biocide. The corrosion rates were measured by linear polarization. Tests were conducted using the rotating cylinder electrode method with rotational speeds of 1000 and 2000 rpm at 80 deg. C. The seawater results indicated that the corrosion-scale inhibitor and biocide-scale inhibitor combinations provided the best protection at both rotation speeds. In formation water, the effects of rotation speed were more apparent with higher corrosion rates of L-80 carbon steel accompanying higher shear forces. In the 50: 50 mix waters and the formation water, the corrosion-scale inhibitors-biocide combination provided the best protection at both rotational speeds under downhole conditions of a northern oil field of Kuwait. (authors)

  16. Rate of protein synthesis and polyribosome formation in the frog pancreas after fasting and feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venrooij, W.J. van; Poort, C.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. The rate of incorporation of [14C]leucine into the proteins of the frog pancreas was measured after the animals had been fasted or fed. The incorporation rate increased after feeding, being maximal at about 4 h after the meal. 2. 2. In homogenates of pancreases from fasted frogs only monoribo

  17. THE GROWTH RATE AND STATISTICAL FLUCTUATION OF BOSE-EINSTEIN CONDENSATE FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ke-zhu; Tan Wei-han

    2000-01-01

    Using the generating function method to solve the master equation ofBose-Einstein condensate and to evaluate the growth rate, statisticalfluctuation of condensate atoms, we find out that there is a plateau inthe growth rate curve and a super-Poisson distribution observed.

  18. Measuring Star-Formation Rates of AGNs and QSOs using a new calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papovich, Casey

    Understanding the coevolution of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion is one of the key questions in galaxy formation theory. This relation is important for understanding why at present the mass in galaxy bulges (on scales of kpc) correlates so tightly with the mass of galaxy central supermassive blackholes (on scales of AU). Feedback from supermassive black hole accretion may also be responsible for heating or expelling cold gas from galaxies, shutting off the fuel for star-formation and additional black hole growth. Did bulges proceed the formation of black holes, or vice versa, or are they contemporaneous? Therefore, understanding the exact rates of star-formation and supermassive black hole growth, and how they evolve with time and galaxy mass has deep implications for how galaxies form. It has previously been nearly impossible to study simultaneously both star-formation and accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies because the emission from black hole accretion contaminates nearly all diagnostics of star-formation. The "standard" diagnostics for the star-formation rate (the emission from hydrogen, UV emission, midIR emission, far-IR emission, etc) are not suitable for measuring star-formation rates in galaxies with actively accreting supermassive blackholes. In this proposal, the researchers request NASA/ADP funding for an archival study using spectroscopy with the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure simultaneously the star-formation rate (SFR) and bolometric emission from accreting supermassive blackholes to understand the complex relation between both processes. The key to this study is that they will develop a new calibrator for SFRs in galaxies with active supermassive black holes based on the molecular emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which emit strongly in the mid-IR (3 - 20 micron) and are very strong in spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The PAH molecules exist near photo-dissociation regions, and

  19. Numerical Modeling of Variable Fluid Injection-Rate Modes on Fracturing Network Evolution in Naturally Fractured Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, variable injection-rate technology was numerically investigated in a pre-existing discrete fracture network (DFN formation, the Tarim Basin in China. A flow-stress-damage (FSD coupling model has been used in an initial attempt towards how reservoir response to variable injection-rates at different hydraulic fracturing stages. The established numerical model simultaneously considered the macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneity characteristics. Eight numerical cases were studied. Four cases were used to study the variable injection-rate technology, and the other four cases were applied for a constant injection-rate in order to compare with the variable injection-rate technology. The simulation results show that the variable injection-rate technology is a potentially good method to a form complex fracturing networks. The hydraulic fracturing effectiveness when increasing the injection-rate at each stage is the best, also, the total injected fluid is at a minimum. At the initial stage, many under-fracturing points appear around the wellbore with a relatively low injection-rate; the sudden increase of injection rate drives the dynamic propagation of hydraulic fractures along many branching fracturing points. However, the case with decreasing injection rate is the worst. By comparing with constant injection-rate cases, the hydraulic fracturing effectiveness with variable flow rate technology is generally better than those with constant injection-rate technology. This work strongly links the production technology and hydraulic fracturing effectiveness evaluation and aids in the understanding and optimization of hydraulic fracturing simulations in naturally fractured reservoirs.

  20. Estimating the carbon sequestration capacity of shale formations using methane production rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiyuan; Clarens, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Hydraulically fractured shale formations are being developed widely for oil and gas production. They could also represent an attractive repository for permanent geologic carbon sequestration. Shales have a low permeability, but they can adsorb an appreciable amount of CO2 on fracture surfaces. Here, a computational method is proposed for estimating the CO2 sequestration capacity of a fractured shale formation and it is applied to the Marcellus shale in the eastern United States. The model is based on historical and projected CH4 production along with published data and models for CH4/CO2 sorption equilibria and kinetics. The results suggest that the Marcellus shale alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gt of CO2 between now and 2030, which represents more than 50% of total U.S. CO2 emissions from stationary sources over the same period. Other shale formations with comparable pressure-temperature conditions, such as Haynesville and Barnett, could provide significant additional storage capacity. The mass transfer kinetic results indicate that injection of CO2 would proceed several times faster than production of CH4. Additional considerations not included in this model could either reinforce (e.g., leveraging of existing extraction and monitoring infrastructure) or undermine (e.g., leakage or seismicity potential) this approach, but the sequestration capacity estimated here supports continued exploration into this pathway for producing carbon neutral energy.

  1. The History of Cosmic Baryons X-ray Emission vs. Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N

    1999-01-01

    We relate the star formation from cold baryons in virialized structures to the X-ray properties of the associated diffuse, hot baryonic component. Our computations use the standard ``semi-analytic'' models to describe i) the evolution of dark matter halos through merging after the hierarchical clustering, ii) the star formation governed by radiative cooling and by supernova feedback, iii) the hydro- and thermodynamics of the hot gas, rendered with our Punctuated Equilibria model. So we relate the X-ray observables concerning the intra-cluster medium to the thermal energy of the gas pre-heated and expelled by supernovae following star formation, and then accreted during the subsequent merging events. We show that at fluxes fainter than $F_X\\approx 10^{-15}$ erg/cm$^2 $ s (well within the reach of next generation X-ray observatories) the X-ray counts of extended extragalactic sources (as well as the faint end of the luminosity function, the contribution to the soft X-ray background, and the $L_X-T$ correlation ...

  2. A comprehensive mathematical model for estimating oil drainage rate in SAGD process considering wellbore/formation coupling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Linsong; Gu, Hao; Huang, Shijun

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive mathematical model for estimating oil drainage rate in Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process, more importantly, wellbore/formation coupling effect is considered. Firstly, mass and heat transfer in vertical and horizontal wellbores are described briefly. Then, a function of steam chamber height is introduced and the expressions for oil drainage rate in rising and expanding steam chamber stages are derived in detail. Next, a calculation flowchart is provided and an example is given to introduce how to use the proposed method. Finally, after the mathematical model is validated, the effects of wellhead steam injection rate on simulated results are further analyzed. The results indicate that heat injection power per meter reduces gradually along the horizontal wellbore, which affects both steam chamber height and oil drainage rate in the SAGD process. In addition, when production time is the same, the calculated oil drainage rate from the new method is lower than that from Butler's method. Moreover, the paper shows that when wellhead steam injection rate is low enough, the steam chamber is not formed at the horizontal well's toe position and enhancing the wellhead steam injection rate can increase the oil drainage rate.

  3. Critical rate of electrolyte circulation for preventing zinc dendrite formation in a zinc-bromine redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyeon Sun; Park, Jong Ho; Ra, Ho Won; Jin, Chang-Soo; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    In a zinc-bromine redox flow battery, a nonaqueous and dense polybromide phase formed because of bromide oxidation in the positive electrolyte during charging. This formation led to complicated two-phase flow on the electrode surface. The polybromide and aqueous phases led to different kinetics of the Br/Br- redox reaction; poor mixing of the two phases caused uneven redox kinetics on the electrode surface. As the Br/Br- redox reaction was coupled with the zinc deposition reaction, the uneven redox reaction on the positive electrode was accompanied by nonuniform zinc deposition and zinc dendrite formation, which degraded battery stability. A single-flow cell was operated at varying electrolyte circulation rates and current densities. Zinc dendrite formation was observed after cell disassembly following charge-discharge testing. In addition, the flow behavior in the positive compartment was observed by using a transparent version of the cell. At low rate of electrolyte circulation, the polybromide phase clearly separated from the aqueous phase and accumulated at the bottom of the flow frame. In the corresponding area on the negative electrode, a large amount of zinc dendrites was observed after charge-discharge testing. Therefore, a minimum circulation rate should be considered to avoid poor mixing of the positive electrolyte.

  4. FMOS near-IR spectroscopy of Herschel selected galaxies: star formation rates, metallicity and dust attenuation at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Roseboom, I G; Sumiyoshi, M; Wang, L; Dalton, G; Akiyama, M; Bock, J; Bonfield, D; Buat, V; Casey, C; Chapin, E; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Curtis-Lake, E; Cooray, A; Dunlop, J S; Farrah, D; Ham, S J; Ibar, E; Iwamuro, F; Kimura, M; Lewis, I; Macaulay, E; Magdis, G; Maihara, T; Marsden, G; Mauch, T; Moritani, Y; Ohta, K; Oliver, S J; Page, M J; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, M; Takato, N; Tamura, N; Totani, T; Yabe, K; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties (e.g. star formation rate, dust attentuation, stellar mass and metallicity) of a sample of infrared luminous galaxies at z \\sim 1 via near-IR spectroscopy with Subaru-FMOS. Our sample consists of Herschel SPIRE and Spitzer MIPS selected sources in the COSMOS field with photometric redshifts in the range 0.7 = 0.51\\pm0.27 for = 10^12 Lsol sources at = 1.36. By comparing star formation rates estimated from the IR and from the dust uncorrected H{\\alpha} line we find a strong relationship between dust attenuation and star formation rate. This relation is broadly consistent with that previously seen in star-forming galaxies at z ~ 0.1. Finally, we investigate the metallicity via the N2 ratio, finding that z ~ 1 IR-selected sources are indistinguishable from the local mass-metallicity relation. We also find a strong correlation between dust attentuation and metallicity, with the most metal-rich IR-sources experiencing the largest levels of dust attenuation.

  5. Particle number size distribution in the eastern Mediterranean: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine airborne atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanakis, I.; Chatoutsidou, S. E.; Torseth, K.; Glytsos, T.; Lazaridis, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particle number concentration was measured between June 2009 and June 2010 at Akrotiri research station in a rural/suburban region of western Crete (Greece). Overall, the available data covered 157 days during the aforementioned period of measurements. The objectives were to study the number size distribution characteristics of ambient aerosols and furthermore to identify new particle formation events and to evaluate particle formation rates and growth rates of the newborn particles. Aerosol particles with mobility diameters between 10 and 1100 nm were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system. Measurements were performed at ambient relative humidities. The median total particle number concentration was 525 #/cm3 whereas the number concentration ranged between 130 #/cm3 and 9597 #/cm3. The average percentage of particles with diameters between 10 nm and 100 nm (N10-100) to total particles was 53% during summer and spring, but reached 80% during winter. Maximum average contribution of nano-particles (10 nm coagulation sinks. Mean growth and formation rates were calculated and showed values equal to 6 nm hr-1 and 13 cm-3 s-1, respectively.

  6. ALFALFA HI Data Stacking III. Comparison of environmental trends in HI gas mass fraction and specific star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Fabello, Silvia; Catinella, Barbara; Li, Cheng; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that both the star formation rate and the cold gas content of a galaxy depend on the local density out to distances of a few Megaparsecs. In this paper, we compare the environmental density dependence of the atomic gas mass fractions of nearby galaxies with the density dependence of their central and global specific star formation rates. We stack HI line spectra extracted from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey centered on galaxies with UV imaging from GALEX and optical imaging/spectroscopy from SDSS. We use these stacked spectra to evaluate the mean atomic gas mass fraction of galaxies in bins of stellar mass and local density. For galaxies with stellar masses less than 10^10.5 M_sun, the decline in mean atomic gas mass fraction with density is stronger than the decline in mean global and central specific star formation rate. The same conclusion does not hold for more massive galaxies. We interpret our results as evidence for ram-pressure stripping of atomic gas from the outer disks of low ...

  7. Slow Evolution of the Specific Star Formation Rate at z > 2: The Impact of Dust, Emission Lines, and a Rising Star Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Valentino; Bouwens, Rychard; Illingworth, Garth; Labbé, Ivo; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Magee, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M stellar) between redshift 4 and 6 to assess the reported "constant" sSFR at z > 2. We derive stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) for a large sample of 750 z ~ 4-6 galaxies in the GOODS-S field by fitting stellar population models to their spectral energy distributions. Dust extinction is derived from the observed UV colors. We evaluate different star formation histories (SFHs, constant and rising with time) and the impact of optical emission lines. The SFR and M stellar values are insensitive to whether the SFH is constant or rising. The derived sSFR is very similar (within 0.1 dex) in two M stellar bins centered at 1 and 5 × 109 M ⊙. The effect of emission lines was, however, quite pronounced. Assuming no contribution from emission lines, the sSFR for galaxies at 5 × 109 M ⊙ evolves weakly at z > 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)0.6 ± 0.1), consistent with previous results. When emission lines are included in the rest-frame optical bands, consistent with the observed Infrared Array Camera [3.6] and [4.5] fluxes, the sSFR shows higher values at high redshift following sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)1.0 ± 0.1, i.e., the best-fit evolution shows a sSFR ~2.3 × higher at z ~ 6 than at z ~ 2. This is, however, a substantially weaker trend than that found at z 2 (sSFR(z)vprop(1 + z)2.5). Even accounting for emission lines, the observed sSFR(z) trends at z > 2 are still in tension with theoretical expectations.

  8. A Review of the Application of Rate Theory to Simulate Vacancy Cluster Formation and Interstitial Defect Formation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallon Laliberte

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV is subject to an extreme radiation, temperature, and pressure environment over several decades of operation; therefore it is necessary to understand the mechanisms through which radiation damage occurs and how it affects the mechanical and chemical properties of the RPV steel. Chemical rate theory is a mean field rate theory simulation model which applies chemistry to the evaluation of irradiation-induced embrittlement. It presents one method of analysis that may be coupled to other distinct methods, in order to analyze defect formation, ultimately providing useful information on strength, ductility, toughness and dimensional stability changes for effects such as embrittlement, reduction in ductility and toughness, void swelling, hardening, irradiation creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc. over time as materials are subjected to reactor operational irradiation. This paper serves as a brief review of rate theory fundamentals and presents several examples of research that exemplify the application and importance of rate theory in examining the effects of radiation damage on RPV steel.

  9. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  10. Role of Fe substitution and quenching rate on the formation of various quasicrystalline and related phases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varsha Khare; R S Tiwari; O N Srivastava

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated Fe substituted versions of the quasicrystalline (qc) alloy corresponding to Al65Cu20(Cr, Fe)15 with special reference to the possible occurrence of various quasicrystalline and related phases. Based on the explorations of various compositions it has been found that alloy compositions Al65Cu20Cr12Fe3 and Al65Cu20Cr9Fe6 exhibit interesting structural phases and features at different quenching rates. At higher quenching rates (wheel speed ∼ 25 m/sec) all the alloys exhibit icosahedral phase. For Al65Cu20Cr12Fe3 alloy, however, both the icosahedral and even the decagonal phases get formed at higher quenching rates. At higher quenching rate, alloy having Fe 3 at% exhibits two bcc phases, bccI ( = 8.9 Å) and bccII ( = 15.45 Å). The orientation relationships between icosahedral and crystalline phases are: Mirror plane ∥[001]bcc I and [351]bcc II, 5-fold ∥ [113]bcc II and 3-fold ∥ [110]bcc II. At lower quenching rate, the alloy having Fe 6 at% exhibits orthorhombic phase ( = 23.6 Å, = 12.4 Å, = 20.1 Å). Some prominent orientation relationships of the orthorhombic phase with decagonal phase have also been reported. At lower quenching rate (∼ 10 m/sec), the alloy (Al65Cu22Cr9Fe6) shows the presence of diffuse scattering of intensities along quasiperiodic direction of the decagonal phase. For making the occurrence of the sheets of intensities intelligible, a model based on the rotation and shift of icosahedra has been put forward.

  11. Ultraviolet Morphologies and Star-Formation Rates of CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; Fogarty, Kevin; Li, Yuan; Voit, G Mark; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Moustakas, John; Bradley, Larry; Ford, Holland

    2015-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) are usually quiescent, but many exhibit star formation. Here we exploit the opportunity provided by rest-frame UV imaging of galaxy clusters in the CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) Multi-Cycle Treasury Project to reveal the diversity of UV morphologies in BCGs and to compare them with recent simulations of the cool, star-forming gas structures produced by precipitation-driven feedback. All of the CLASH BCGs are detected in the rest-frame UV (280 nm), regardless of their star-formation activity, because evolved stellar populations produce a modest amount of UV light that traces the relatively smooth, symmetric, and centrally peaked stellar distribution seen in the near infrared. Ultraviolet morphologies among the BCGs with strong UV excesses exhibit distinctive knots, multiple elongated clumps, and extended filaments of emission that distinctly differ from the smooth profiles of the UV-quiet BCGs. These structures, which are similar to those seen in the few s...

  12. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. I. Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds. To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the Hyperion radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet and optically thin to infrared radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between Σ cl,0∼ 10--300 M⊙ pc-2, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, star cluster formation, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a log-normal distribution of gas surface density Σ for an initial virial parameter αvir,0=2, the log-normal standard deviation is σln Σ =1-1.5 and the star formation rate coefficient ɛff,ρ=0.3-0.5, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency (SFE) ɛfinal increases with Σcl,0 and decreases with α vir,0. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher Σ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed σln Σ), we provide an analytic upper bound on ɛfinal, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final SFE depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by the turbulent compression of gas.

  13. Updating of the hierarchical rock mass rating (HRMR) system and a new subsystem developed for weathered granite formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miranda Tiago; e Sousa L. Ribeiro; Tinoco Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    The RMR system is still very much applied in rock mechanics engineering context. It is based on the eval-uation of six weights to obtain a final rating. To obtain the final rating a considerable amount of informa-tion is needed concerning the rock mass which can be difficult to obtain in some projects or project stages at least with accuracy. In 2007 an alternative classification scheme based on the RMR, the Hierarchical Rock Mass Rating (HRMR) was presented. The main feature of this system was the adaptation to the level of knowledge existent about the rock mass to obtain the classification of the rock mass since it followed a decision tree approach. However, the HRMR was only valid for hard rock granites with low fracturing degrees. In this work, the database was enlarged with approximately 40%more cases considering other types of granite rock masses including weathered granites and based on this increased database the sys-tem was updated. Granite formations existent in the north of Portugal including Porto city are predom-inantly granites. Some years ago a light rail infrastructure was built in the city of Porto and surrounding municipalities which involved considerable challenges due to the high heterogeneity levels of the granite formations and the difficulties involved in their geomechanical characterization. In this work it is intended to provide also a contribution to improve the characterization of these formations with special emphasis to the weathered horizons. A specific subsystem applicable to the weathered formations was developed. The results of the validation of these systems are presented and show acceptable perfor-mances in identifying the correct class using less information than with the RMR system.

  14. Robust Control of PEP Formation Rate in the Carbon Fixation Pathway of C4 Plants by a Bi-functional Enzyme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hart, Yuval; Mayo, Avraham E; Milo, Ron; Alon, Uri

    2011-01-01

    .... We asked how PEP formation rate, a key step in the carbon fixation pathway, might work at a precise rate, regulated by light, despite fluctuations in substrate and enzyme levels constituting and regulating this process. Results...

  15. Robust control of PEP formation rate in the carbon fixation pathway of C(4) plants by a bi-functional enzyme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hart, Yuval; Mayo, Avraham E; Milo, Ron; Alon, Uri

    2011-01-01

    ...) carbon fixation pathway. We asked how PEP formation rate, a key step in the carbon fixation pathway, might work at a precise rate, regulated by light, despite fluctuations in substrate and enzyme levels constituting and regulating this process...

  16. The Structure, Dynamics and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rio, Nicola; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues on the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC, and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the ISM density, estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content...

  17. Migration rates and formation injectivity to determine containment time scales of sequestered carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide exhibits highly variable behavior over a range of reservoir pressure and temperature conditions. Because geologic sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide is targeted for subsurface injection and containment at depths ranging from approximately 3,000 to 13,000 feet, the investigation into the physical properties of this fluid can be restricted to the pressure and temperature conditions likely encountered in the sedimentary strata within this depth interval. A petrophysical based approach was developed to study the widest range of formation properties potentially encountered in sedimentary strata. Fractional porosities were varied from 5 to 95 percent, in 5-percent increments, and permeability values were varied over thirteen orders of magnitude, from 10.0 darcys down to 1.0 picodarcy.

  18. Three-fluid plasmas in star formation II. Momentum transfer rate coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    The charged component of the insterstellar medium consists of atomic and molecular ions, electrons, and charged dust grains, coupled to the local Galactic magnetic field. Collisions between neutral particles (mostly atomic or molecular hydrogen) and charged species, and between the charged species themselves, affect the magnetohydrodynamical behaviour of the medium and the dissipation of electric currents. The friction force due to elastic collisions between particles of different species in the multi-component interstellar plasma is a nonlinear function of the temperature of each species and the Mach number of the relative drift velocity. The aim of this paper is to provide an accurate and, as far as possible, complete set of momentum transfer rate coefficients for magnetohydrodynamical studies of the interstellar medium. Momentum transfer rates are derived from available experimental data and theoretical calculations of cross sections within the classic approach developed by Boltzmann and Langevin for a wid...

  19. Inferred H⍺ Flux as a Star Formation Rate Indicator at z ~ 4-5: Implications for Dust Properties, Burstiness, and the z = 4-8 Star Formation Rate Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Renske; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Oesch, Pascal A.

    2016-12-01

    We derive Hα fluxes for a large spectroscopic and photometric-redshift-selected sample of sources over GOODS-North and South in the redshift range z = 3.8-5.0 with deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Spitzer/IRAC, and ground-based observations. The Hα flux is inferred based on the offset between the IRAC 3.6 μm flux and that predicted from the best-fit spectral energy distribution (SED). We demonstrate that the Hα flux correlates well with dust-corrected UV star formation rate (SFR) and therefore can serve as an independent SFR indicator. However, we also find a systematic offset in the {{SFR}}{{H}α }/{{SFR}}{UV+β } ratios for z ˜ 4-5 galaxies relative to local relations (assuming the same dust corrections for nebular regions and stellar light). We show that we can resolve the modest tension in the inferred SFRs by assuming bluer intrinsic UV slopes (increasing the dust correction), a rising star formation history, or assuming a low-metallicity stellar population with a hard ionizing spectrum (increasing the {L}{{H}α }/{SFR} ratio). Using Hα as an SFR indicator, we find a normalization of the star formation main sequence in good agreement with recent SED-based determinations and also derive the SFR functions at z˜ 4{--}8. In addition, we assess for the first time the burstiness of star formation in z˜ 4 galaxies on <100 Myr timescales by comparing UV and Hα-based sSFRs; their one-to-one relationship argues against significantly bursty star formation histories.

  20. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent, Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces I: Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Skinner, M Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the {\\it Hyperion} radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet (UV) and optically thin to infrared (IR) radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between $\\Sigma_{\\rm cl,0} \\sim 10-300~M_{\\odot}~{\\rm pc^{-2}}$, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, formation of star clusters, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a lognormal distribution of gas surface density $\\Sigma$; for an initial virial parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm vir,0} = 2$, the lognormal standard deviation is $\\sigma_{\\rm ln \\Sigma} = 1-1.5$ and the star formation rate coefficient $\\varepsilon_{\\rm ff,\\bar\\rho} = 0.3-...

  2. Galaxies undergoing ram-pressure stripping: the influence of the bulge on morphology and star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauser, Dominik; Kapferer, Wolfgang; Schindler, Sabine; 10.1051/0004-6361/201118311

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of stellar bulges on the star formation and morphology of disc galaxies that suffer from ram pressure. Several tree-SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations have been carried out to study the dependence of the star formation rate on the mass and size of a stellar bulge. In addition, different strengths of ram pressure and different alignments of the disc with respect to the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are applied. As claimed in previous works, when ram pressure is acting on a galaxy, the star formation rate (SFR) is enhanced and rises up to four times with increasing ICM density compared to galaxies that evolve in isolation. However, a bulge suppresses the SFR when the same ram pressure is applied. Consequently, fewer new stars are formed because the SFR can be lowered by up to 2 M_sun/yr. Furthermore, the denser the surrounding gas, the more inter-stellar medium (ISM) is stripped. While at an ICM density of 10^-28 g/cm^3 about 30% of the ISM is stripped, the galaxy is alm...

  3. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at $0.4Formation Rates Measured from FUV and H$\\beta$

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yicheng; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Krumholz, Mark R; Trump, Jonathan R; Willner, S P; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F; Gardner, Jonathan P; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P; Koekemoer, Anton M; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at $0.4formation rates (SFRs) measured from FUV (1500 \\AA) and H$\\beta$ (FUV--to--H$\\beta$ ratio). Our sample contains 164 galaxies down to stellar mass (M*) of $10^{8.5} M_\\odot$ in the CANDELS GOODS-N region, where TKRS Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and HST/WFC3 F275W images from CANDELS and HDUV are available. When the ratio of FUV- and H$\\beta$-derived SFRs is measured, dust extinction correction is negligible (except for very dusty galaxies) with the Calzetti attenuation curve. The FUV--to--H$\\beta$ ratio of our sample increases with the decrease of M* and SFR. The median ratio is $\\sim$1 at M* $\\sim 10^{10} M_\\odot$ (or SFR = 20 $M_\\odot$/yr) and increases to $\\sim$1.6 at M* $\\sim 10^{8.5} M_\\odot$ (or SFR $\\sim 0.5 M_\\odot$/yr). At M* $< 10^{9.5} M_\\odot$, our median FUV--to--H$\\beta$ ratio is higher than that of local galaxies at the same M*, implying a redshift evolution. Bursty SFH on a ...

  4. Colors, Star formation Rates, and Environments of Star forming and Quiescent Galaxies at the Cosmic Noon

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert; Hopkins, Philip F; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the SFRs, stellar masses, galaxy colors, and dust extinctions of galaxies in massive (10^12.5-10^13.5 M_sun) halos at z~2 in high-resolution, cosmological zoom-in simulations as part of the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. The simulations do not model feedback from AGN but reproduce well the observed relations between stellar and halo mass and between stellar mass and SFR. About half of the simulated massive galaxies at z~2 have broad-band colors classifying them as `quiescent', and the fraction of quiescent centrals is steeply decreasing towards higher redshift, in agreement with observations. However, our simulations do not reproduce the reddest of the quiescent galaxies observed at z~2. While simulated quiescent galaxies are less dusty than star forming galaxies, their broad band colors are often affected by moderate levels of interstellar dust. The star formation histories of the progenitors of z~2 star forming and quiescent galaxies are typically bursty, especially at early t...

  5. The mechanism of amyloid-fibril formation by stefin B: temperature and protein concentration dependence of the rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerget, Katja; Vilfan, Andrej; Pompe-Novak, Marusa; Turk, Vito; Waltho, Jonathan P; Turk, Dusan; Zerovnik, Eva

    2009-02-01

    Cystatins, a family of structurally related cysteine proteinase inhibitors, have proved to be useful model system to study amyloidogenesis. We have extended previous studies of the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation by human stefin B (cystatin B) and some of its mutants, and proposed an improved model for the reaction. Overall, the observed kinetics follow the nucleation and growth behavior observed for many other amyloidogenic proteins. The minimal kinetic scheme that best fits measurements of changes in CD and thioflavin T fluorescence as a function of protein concentration and temperature includes nucleation (modeled as N(I) irreversible transitions with equivalent rates (k(I)), which fitted with N(I) = 64), fibril growth and nonproductive oligomerization, best explained by an off-pathway state with a rate-limiting escape rate. Three energies of activation were derived from global fitting to the minimal kinetic scheme, and independently through the fitting of the individual component rates. Nucleation was found to be a first-order process within an oligomeric species with an enthalpy of activation of 55 +/- 4 kcal mol(-1). Fibril growth was a second-order process with an enthalpy of activation (27 +/- 5 kcal mol(-1)), which is indistinguishable from that of tetramer formation by cystatins, which involves limited conformational changes including proline trans to cis isomerization. The highest enthalpy of activation (95 +/- 5 kcal mol(-1) at 35 degrees C), characteristic of a substantial degree of unfolding as observed prior to domain-swapping reactions, equated with the escape rate of the off-pathway oligomeric state.

  6. Five-Steps Star Formation Histories across M51: Hybrid FUV+IR Star Formation Rates and the Contribution of Older Stars to the IR Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Hornschemeier, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    Galaxies are products of gigayears of evolution and therefore have complex star formation histories (SFHs). Modeling star formation rate (SFR) as a flexible function of cosmic time is crucial to disentangle the contributions from stellar populations of different ages and best describe complex SFHs from current UV-to-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We present a novel approach modeling SFHs as a number of steps in time, maximizing the information obtained from these SEDs and minimizing degeneracies. Our model includes a variable attenuation curve and stellar metallicity. For this work, we adopted SFH bins with lookback times of 0-10Myr, 10-100Myr, 100Myr-1Gyr, 1-5Gyr, and 5-13Gyr, resulting in SFHs with five steps. Our resolved analysis across the nearby Whirlpool spiral galaxy, M51, shows that the three first bins (ages less than 1 Gyr) can be well recovered separated, but the other two have much-increased uncertainties, being only upper limits in the outskirts of the galaxy. No significant difference was found if the recent SFR is averaged over the last 10Myr or over the last 100Myr, suggesting SFR did not vary significantly in the last 100 Myr. A considerable SFR increase can be seen in the 100Myr-1Gyr bin, with relative intensities varying across the galaxy. The recovered intrinsic FUV is, as expected, directly proportional to the SFR averaged over the last 100 Myr and allows us to test the hybrid SFR traced by combining the observed FUV and a broadband intensity in the mid- or far-IR. We have also tested hybrid SFR tracers of the form Lobs(FUV) + acorr × Lobs(lambda_IR), deriving correction factors (acorr) for various wavelengths and found they all increase with specific star formation rate (sSFR). This indicates a significant IR contribution from stars older than 100 Myr, not associated with the recent SFR. We then empirically decomposed the full IR SED into a component related to the recent SFR and another not associated with it. We derived

  7. Adiabatic Shear Band Formation in Intermetallic WHA at High Strain Rates and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprey, K. E.; Clifton, R. J.; Griffo, A.; German, R. M.

    1997-07-01

    A novel tungsten-based composite is being developed at The Pennsylvania State University to enhance shear banding by introducing a strong thermo-plastic instability. This liquid phase sintered composite consists of tungsten grains embedded in an intermetallic alloy matrix which has the property that its flow stress increases with increasing temperature up to a critical temperature at which rapid thermal softening begins. Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are being used to subject thin plates of this composite to shearing at strain rates of 10^5 s-1 to 10^6 s-1 at pressures of 6 - 8 GPa, and temperatures up to 650 ^o C. The experiments, combined with computer simulation, are being conducted to determine the effects of the thermal properties of the matrix on the initiation and propagation of adiabatic shear bands.

  8. Dimethylarsenate (DMA) exposure influences germination rates, arsenic uptake and arsenic species formation in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Elliott G; Maher, William A; Foster, Simon D; Krikowa, Frank; O'Sullivan, Cathryn A; Roper, Margaret M

    2017-08-01

    The contamination of cereals with arsenic (As) is a global health and agronomic concern. This study compared the physiological response, As uptake and As speciation in the grains and above ground tissues of 20 wheat cultivars exposed to 5 mg As kg(-1) soil as either arsenate (As(V)) or dimethylarsenate (DMA) under glasshouse conditions. Germination rates for the majority of cultivars exceeded 80% for the majority of cultivars when exposed to As(V), but fell significantly to 20-40% when exposed to DMA. For a number of cultivars, grain yields were 20-50% lower when plants were exposed to DMA compared to As(V). Grain As concentrations were between 0.6 and 1.6 μg As g(-1) grain across the twenty cultivars when exposed to As(V), whereas grain As concentrations were much higher (2.2-4.6 μg As g(-1) grain) when exposed to DMA. When plants were exposed to As(V), 100% of the As present in the grain was found as inorganic As while in plants exposed to DMA, 70-90% of As was present as DMA with the remainder found as inorganic As. DMA is believed to be incorporated by plants via silica (Si) acid channels and assessment of grain Si concentrations demonstrated that up to 40% less Si was accumulated in grains when plants were exposed to DMA. The decreased germination rates and grain yields in the presence of DMA is similar to the symptoms described for straight head disease in rice, which has been linked to DMA exposure. The results presented here indicate some analogous processes occur in wheat to those described in rice. We hypothesise that exposure to DMA may have inhibited Si-metabolism and translocation which resulted in both developmental impairment and possibly an increased susceptibility to soil pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous high bit-rate format and mode conversion with a single tilted apodized few-mode fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Sun, Junqiang; Sima, Chaotan

    2016-10-01

    We propose an all-optical approach for simultaneous high bit-rate return-to-zero (RZ) to non-return-to-zero (NRZ) format and LP01 to LP11 mode conversion using a weakly tilted apodized few-mode fiber Bragg grating (TA-FM-FBG) with specific linear spectral response. The grating apodization profile is designed by utilizing an efficient inverse scattering algorithm and the maximum refractive index modulation is adjusted based on the grating tilt angle, according to Coupled-Mode Theory. The temporal performance and operation bandwidth of the converter are discussed. The approach provides potential favorable device for the connection of various communication systems.

  10. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C.; Hilker, M.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. Here, a large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also to shed light on the formation of NGC 1399 itself. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are the result of star cluster (SC) formation processes and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different formation epochs. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope - β. Each ECMF was characterized by a stellar upper mass limit, Mmax, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted Mmax of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribution of SFRs reveals under which conditions the GC/UCD sample around NGC 1399 formed. Considering the constraints set by the age of the GCs/UCDs and the present stellar mass of NGC 1399, we found that the formation of the GCs/UCDs can be well explained within our framework with values for β below 2.3. This finding agrees very well with the observation of young SCs where β ≈ 2.0 is usually found. Even though we took into account that some of the most massive objects might not be genuine SCs and applied different corrections for the mass loss, we found that these considerations do not influence much the outcome. We derived the peak SFRs to be between approximately 300 and 3000 M⊙ yr-1, which matches the SFRs observed in massive high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies and an SFR estimate inferred from NGC 1399 based on the so-called downsizing picture, meaning that more massive

  11. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15

    conductivity, pH and analytical concentration measured as a function of time decrease exponentially. In some cases nitrate, sulfate, chloride and fluoride ion concentrations increased with time and processing temperature with respect to the reference sample. The increasing concentration of these ions was due to the lack of formation of crystalline phases that can incorporate them in their structures, especially cancrinite. Another plausible explanations for their increase was due to the continuous withdrawal of cations with time, for example sodium to form zeolites, thereby increase their concentrations.

  12. Constraints on the Formation of Double Neutron Stars from the Observed Eccentricities and Current Limits on Merger Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, M.; Belczynski, K.; Bulik, T.; Gladysz, W.

    2017-03-01

    We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse supernovae (CCSN) from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of σ = 265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs and then modify this distribution by changing σ toward smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with σ = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both observational constraints simultaneously. The models with low kicks after CCSN for binaries with the second NS forming through core collapse SN are marginally consistent with the observations. This means that either 14 observed DNSs are not representative of the intrinsic Galactic population, or that our modeling of DNS formation needs revision.

  13. Connecting stellar mass and star-formation rate to dark matter halo mass out to z ˜ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Amblard, A.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Conley, A.; Cooray, A.; Halpern, M.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ilbert, O.; Ivison, R. J.; Marsden, G.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Smith, A. J.; Viero, M.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-05-01

    We have constructed an extended halo model (EHM) which relates the total stellar mass and star-formation rate (SFR) to halo mass (Mh). An empirical relation between the distribution functions of total stellar mass of galaxies and host halo mass, tuned to match the spatial density of galaxies over 0 EHM with the halo accretion histories from numerical simulations, we trace the stellar mass growth and star-formation history in haloes spanning a range of masses. We find that: (1) the intensity of the star-forming activity in haloes in the probed mass range has steadily decreased from z ˜ 2 to 0; (2) at a given epoch, haloes in the mass range between a few times 1011 M⊙ and a few times 1012 M⊙ are the most efficient at hosting star formation; (3) the peak of SFR density shifts to lower mass haloes over time; and (4) galaxies that are forming stars most actively at z ˜ 2 evolve into quiescent galaxies in today's group environments, strongly supporting previous claims that the most powerful starbursts at z ˜ 2 are progenitors of today's elliptical galaxies.

  14. Distribution of star formation rates during the rapid assembly of NGC 1399 as deduced from its globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, C; Kroupa, P; Pflamm-Altenburg, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) share many properties with globular clusters (GCs) and are found in similar environments. A large sample of UCDs and GCs around NGC 1399, the central giant elliptical of the Fornax galaxy cluster, is used to infer their formation history and also that of NGC 1399. We assumed that all GCs and UCDs in our sample are star clusters (SCs) and used them as tracers of past star formation activities. After correcting our GC/UCD sample for mass loss, we interpreted their overall mass function to be a superposition of SC populations that formed coevally during different times. The SC masses of each population were distributed according to the embedded cluster mass function (ECMF), a pure power law with the slope $-\\beta$ and a stellar upper mass limit, $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$, which depended on the star formation rate (SFR). We decomposed the observed GC/UCD mass function into individual SC populations and converted $M_{\\mathrm{max}}$ of each SC population to an SFR. The overall distribut...

  15. Providing Stringent Star Formation Rate Limits of z ˜ 2 QSO Host Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A.; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E.; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, S. C.

    2016-04-01

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ˜ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ˜0.″2 (˜1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (zHα = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (zHα = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M⊙ yr-1 originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290-350 km s-1. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M⊙ yr-1 distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ˜7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%-40% of the Eddington rate, if star formation is present in the host (1.4-20 kpc) it would have to occur diffusely with significant

  16. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  17. THE PROJECTED RATE OF COMPETENCE FORMATION AS A TOOL OF EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT OF ADVANCED LEVEL OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Lvov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Specially organized complex of the scientific research directed to obtaining the reliable advancing information about development of pedagogical members is necessary for the development of educational policy, the strategy of development for educational systems, and methods of management of quality of pedagogical activity at different stages of education. The result of the educational management of professional and educational process is caused by the quality of pedagogical design. In turn, the quality of pedagogical forecasting is a factor determining the overall effectiveness of management through the pedagogical design.The aim of this article is to describe the model that allows applying the rate of competence formation as a tool of educational management and providing the advanced level of education. Methodology and research methods are based on pre-competence and context approach, which supposes the content selection as a set of competencies and designing the educational and professional process with the use of the rate of formation of ability and readiness (competency as a tool of teaching management.Results. The author states socio-pedagogical contradiction, which is in acute shortage of predictive tools in the management of the educational process. The article describes terminology and empirical mathematical models that underpin pedagogical management of the educational and professional training of students that provides the advanced level of formation of organizational and managerial competence.Scientific novelty. The author clarifies the concept of the advanced level of education; introduces the term of the rate of formation of competency; proposes a new model to solve the problem of predicting learning outcomes and timely management influence by managers of education at all stages of the design and functioning of the educational system in the conditions of implementation of competence-based approach in the higher school

  18. Improving the Estimation of Star-formation Rates and Stellar Population Ages of High-redshift Galaxies from Broad-band Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seong-Kook; Somerville, Rachel S; Wiklind, Tommy; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    We explore methods to improve the estimates of star-formation rates and mean stellar population ages from broad-band photometry of high redshift star-forming galaxies. We use synthetic spectral templates with a variety of simple parametric star-formation histories to fit broad-band spectral-energy distributions. These parametric models are used to infer ages, star-formation rates and stellar masses for a mock data set drawn from a hierarchical semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution. Traditional parametric models generally assume an exponentially declining rate of star-formation after an initial instantaneous rise. Our results show that star-formation histories with a much more gradual rise in the star-formation rate are likely to be better templates, and are likely to give better overall estimates of the age distribution and star-formation rate distribution of Lyman-break galaxies. For B- and V-dropouts, we find the best simple parametric model to be one where the star-formation rate increases linearly with ...

  19. Stellar masses and star formation rates of lensed dusty star-forming galaxies from the SPT survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Jingzhe; Spilker, J S; Strandet, M; Ashby, M L N; Aravena, M; Béthermin, M; Bothwell, M S; de Breuck, C; Brodwin, M; Chapman, S C; Fassnacht, C D; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; Saliwanchik, B R; Vieira, J D; Weiß, A; Welikala, N

    2015-01-01

    To understand cosmic mass assembly in the Universe at early epochs, we primarily rely on measurements of stellar mass and star formation rate of distant galaxies. In this paper, we present stellar masses and star formation rates of six high-redshift ($2.8\\leq z \\leq 5.7$) dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) that are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. These sources were first discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at millimeter wavelengths and all have spectroscopic redshifts and robust lens models derived from ALMA observations. We have conducted follow-up observations, obtaining multi-wavelength imaging data, using {\\it HST}, {\\it Spitzer}, {\\it Herschel} and the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX). We use the high-resolution {\\it HST}/WFC3 images to disentangle the background source from the foreground lens in {\\it Spitzer}/IRAC data. The detections and upper limits provide important constraints on the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for these DSFGs, yielding stellar masses...

  20. Investigating H$\\alpha$, UV, and IR star-formation rate diagnostics for a large sample of z ~ 2 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shivaei, Irene; Steidel, Charles C; Shapley, Alice E

    2015-01-01

    We use a sample of 262 spectroscopically confirmed star-forming galaxies at redshifts $2.08\\leq z\\leq 2.51$ to compare H$\\alpha$, UV, and IR star-formation-rate diagnostics and to investigate the dust properties of the galaxies. At these redshifts, the H$\\alpha$ line shifts to the $K_{s}$-band. By comparing $K_{s}$-band photometry to underlying stellar population model fits to other UV, optical, and near-infrared data, we infer the H$\\alpha$ flux for each galaxy. We obtain the best agreement between H$\\alpha$- and UV-based SFRs if we assume that the ionized gas and stellar continuum are reddened by the same value and that the Calzetti attenuation curve is applied to both. Aided with MIPS 24$\\mu$m data, we find that an attenuation curve steeper than the Calzetti curve is needed to reproduce the observed IR/UV ratios of galaxies younger than 100 Myr. Furthermore, using the bolometric star-formation rate inferred from the UV and mid-IR data (SFR$_{IR}$+SFR$_{UV}$), we calculated the conversion between the H$\\alp...

  1. The Mass-Metallicity relation explored with CALIFA: I. Is there a dependence on the star formation rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, S F; Jungwiert, B; Iglesias-Paramo1, J; Vilchez, J M; Marino, R A; Walcher, C J; Husemann, B; Mast, D; Monreal-Ibero, A; Fernandes, R Cid; Perez, E; Delgado, R Gonzalez; Garcia-Benito, R; Galbany, L; van de Ven, G; Jahnke, K; Flores, H; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Lopez-Sánchez, A R; Stanishev, V; Miralles-Caballero, D; Diaz, A I; Sanchez-Blazquez, P; Molla, M; Gallazzi1, A; Papaderos, P; Gomes, J M; Gruel, N; Pérez, I; Ruiz-Lara, T; Florido, E; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Kehrig, C; Roth, M M; Ziegler, B; Alves, J; Wisotzki, L; Kupko, D; Quirrenbach, A; Bomans, D

    2013-01-01

    We present the results on the study of the global and local M-Z relation based on the first data available from the CALIFA survey (150 galaxies). This survey provides integral field spectroscopy of the complete optical extent of each galaxy (up to 2-3 effective radii), with enough resolution to separate individual HII regions and/or aggregations. Nearly $\\sim$3000 individual HII regions have been detected. The spectra cover the wavelength range between [OII]3727 and [SII]6731, with a sufficient signal-to-noise to derive the oxygen abundance and star-formation rate associated with each region. In addition, we have computed the integrated and spatially resolved stellar masses (and surface densities), based on SDSS photometric data. We explore the relations between the stellar mass, oxygen abundance and star-formation rate using this dataset. We derive a tight relation between the integrated stellar mass and the gas-phase abundance, with a dispersion smaller than the one already reported in the literature ($\\sig...

  2. The Bursty Star Formation Histories of Low-mass Galaxies at 0.4 < z < 1 Revealed by Star Formation Rates Measured From Hβ and FUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yicheng; Rafelski, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Willner, S. P.; Amorín, Ricardo; Barro, Guillermo; Bell, Eric F.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gawiser, Eric; Hathi, Nimish P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Pacifici, Camilla; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Ravindranath, Swara; Reddy, Naveen; Teplitz, Harry I.; Yesuf, Hassen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the burstiness of star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies at 0.4 models, e.g., non-universal initial mass function or stochastic star formation on star cluster scales, are unable to plausibly explain our results.

  3. Inferred H{\\alpha} Flux as a Star-Formation Rate Indicator at z ~ 4-5: Implications for Dust Properties, Burstiness, and the z = 4-8 Star-Formation-Rate Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Smit, Renske; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Wilkins, Stephen M; Oesch, Pascal A

    2015-01-01

    We derive H{\\alpha} fluxes for a large spectroscopic and photometric-redshift-selected sample of sources over GOODS-North and South in the redshift range z = 3.8-5.0 with deep HST, Spitzer/IRAC, and ground-based observations. The H{\\alpha} flux is inferred based on the offset between the IRAC 3.6 {\\mu}m flux and that predicted from the best-fit SED. We demonstrate that the H{\\alpha} flux correlates well with dust- corrected UV star-formation rate (SFR) and therefore can serve as an independent SFR indicator. However, we also find a systematic offset in the SFR_H{\\alpha}/SFR_UV ratios for z ~ 4-5 galaxies relative to local relations (assuming the same dust corrections for nebular regions and stellar light). We show that we can resolve the modest tension in the inferred SFRs by assuming bluer intrinsic UV slopes (increasing the dust correction), a rising star-formation history or assuming a low metallicity stellar population with a hard ionizing spectrum (increasing the L_H{\\alpha}/SFR ratio). Using H{\\alpha} a...

  4. Simulating the formation of massive seed black holes in the early Universe. II: Impact of rate coefficient uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, Simon C O

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how uncertainties in the chemical and cooling rate coefficients relevant for a metal-free gas influence our ability to determine the critical ultraviolet field strength required to suppress H2 cooling in high-redshift atomic cooling halos. The suppression of H2 cooling is a necessary prerequisite for the gas to undergo direct collapse and form an intermediate mass black hole. These black holes can then act as seeds for the growth of the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) observed at redshifts $z \\sim 6$. The viability of this model for SMBH formation depends on the critical ultraviolet field strength, Jcrit: if this is too large, then too few seeds will form to explain the observed number density of SMBHs. We show in this paper that there are five key chemical reactions whose rate coefficients are uncertain enough to significantly affect Jcrit. The most important of these is the collisional ionization of hydrogen by collisions with other hydrogen atoms, as the rate for this process is very poorly...

  5. Formation of coffee-stain patterns at the nanoscale: The role of nanoparticle solubility and solvent evaporation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Milzetti, Jasmin; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-21

    When droplets of nanoparticle suspension evaporate from surfaces, they leave behind a deposit of nanoparticles. The mechanism of evaporation-induced pattern formation in the deposit is studied by molecular dynamics simulations for sessile nanodroplets. The influence of the interaction between nanoparticles and liquid molecules and the influence of the evaporation rate on the final deposition pattern are addressed. When the nanoparticle-liquid interaction is weaker than the liquid-liquid interaction, an interaction-driven or evaporation-induced layer of nanoparticles appears at the liquid-vapor interface and eventually collapses onto the solid surface to form a uniform deposit independently of the evaporation rate. When the nanoparticle-liquid and liquid-liquid interactions are comparable, the nanoparticles are dispersed inside the droplet and evaporation takes place with the contact line pinned at a surface defect. In such a case, a pattern with an approximate ring-like shape is found with fast evaporation, while a more uniform distribution is observed with slower evaporation. When the liquid-nanoparticle interaction is stronger than the liquid-liquid interaction, evaporation always occurs with receding contact line. The final deposition pattern changes from volcano-like to pancake-like with decreasing evaporation rate. These findings might help to design nanoscale structures like nanopatterns or nanowires on surface through controlled solvent evaporation.

  6. Formation of coffee-stain patterns at the nanoscale: The role of nanoparticle solubility and solvent evaporation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Milzetti, Jasmin; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-01

    When droplets of nanoparticle suspension evaporate from surfaces, they leave behind a deposit of nanoparticles. The mechanism of evaporation-induced pattern formation in the deposit is studied by molecular dynamics simulations for sessile nanodroplets. The influence of the interaction between nanoparticles and liquid molecules and the influence of the evaporation rate on the final deposition pattern are addressed. When the nanoparticle-liquid interaction is weaker than the liquid-liquid interaction, an interaction-driven or evaporation-induced layer of nanoparticles appears at the liquid-vapor interface and eventually collapses onto the solid surface to form a uniform deposit independently of the evaporation rate. When the nanoparticle-liquid and liquid-liquid interactions are comparable, the nanoparticles are dispersed inside the droplet and evaporation takes place with the contact line pinned at a surface defect. In such a case, a pattern with an approximate ring-like shape is found with fast evaporation, while a more uniform distribution is observed with slower evaporation. When the liquid-nanoparticle interaction is stronger than the liquid-liquid interaction, evaporation always occurs with receding contact line. The final deposition pattern changes from volcano-like to pancake-like with decreasing evaporation rate. These findings might help to design nanoscale structures like nanopatterns or nanowires on surface through controlled solvent evaporation.

  7. The SILCC project --- IV. Impact of dissociating and ionising radiation on the interstellar medium and Halpha emission as a tracer of the star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C O; Girichidis, Philipp; Pellegrini, Eric; Klessen, Ralf S; Wünsch, Richard; Gatto, Andrea; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the impact of stellar winds, photoelectric heating, photodissociating and photoionising radiation, and supernovae on the chemical composition and star formation in a stratified disc model. This is followed with a sink-based model for star clusters with populations of individual massive stars. Stellar winds and ionising radiation regulate the star formation rate at a factor of ~10 below the simulation with only supernova feedback due to their immediate impact on the ambient interstellar medium after star formation. Ionising radiation (with winds and supernovae) significantly reduces the ambient densities for most supernova explosions to rho = 30 M_sun) with short lifetimes are responsible for significant fluctuations in the Halpha luminosities. The corresponding inferred star formation rates can underestimate the true instantaneous star formation rate by factors of ~10.

  8. MEASURING GALAXY STAR FORMATION RATES FROM INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY: INSIGHTS FROM COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF RESOLVED STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Benjamin D. [Institute d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Departamento de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Lee, Janice C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Boquien, Mederic [Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)

    2013-07-20

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from Hubble-Space-Telescope-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 8.5, with metallicities {approx}10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically overpredict observed luminosities by up to {approx}0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of {approx}2 variations in the UV luminosities relative to the assumption of a constant SFH over the past 100 Myr. These variations are not strongly correlated with UV-optical colors, implying that correcting UV-based SFRs for the effects of realistic SFHs is difficult using only the broadband SED. Additionally, for this diverse sample of galaxies, we find that stars older than 100 Myr can contribute from <5%-100% of the present day UV luminosity, highlighting the challenges in defining a characteristic star formation timescale associated with UV emission. We do find a relationship between UV emission timescale and broadband UV-optical color, though it is different than predictions based on exponentially declining SFH models. Our findings have significant implications for the comparison of UV-based SFRs across low-metallicity populations with diverse SFHs.

  9. STAR FORMATION RATES IN RESOLVED GALAXIES: CALIBRATIONS WITH NEAR- AND FAR-INFRARED DATA FOR NGC 5055 AND NGC 6946

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yiming; Crocker, Alison F.; Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Wilson, Christine D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kennicutt, Robert C.; Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Murphy, Eric J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandl, Bernhard R.; Groves, B. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Johnson, B. D. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gordon, K. D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Croxall, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hao, C.-N. [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Helou, G. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hunt, L. K., E-mail: yimingl@astro.umass.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); and others

    2013-05-10

    We use the near-infrared Br{gamma} hydrogen recombination line as a reference star formation rate (SFR) indicator to test the validity and establish the calibration of the Herschel/PACS 70 {mu}m emission as a SFR tracer for sub-galactic regions in external galaxies. Br{gamma} offers the double advantage of directly tracing ionizing photons and of being relatively insensitive to the effects of dust attenuation. For our first experiment, we use archival Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Br{gamma} and Ks images of two nearby galaxies: NGC 5055 and NGC 6946, which are also part of the Herschel program KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel). We use the extinction corrected Br{gamma} emission to derive the SFR(70) calibration for H II regions in these two galaxies. A comparison of the SFR(70) calibrations at different spatial scales, from 200 pc to the size of the whole galaxy, reveals that about 50% of the total 70 {mu}m emission is due to dust heated by stellar populations that are unrelated to the current star formation. We use a simple model to qualitatively relate the increase of the SFR(70) calibration coefficient with decreasing region size to the star formation timescale. We provide a calibration for an unbiased SFR indicator that combines the observed H{alpha} with the 70 {mu}m emission, also for use in H II regions. We briefly analyze the PACS 100 and 160 {mu}m maps and find that longer wavelengths are not as good SFR indicators as 70 {mu}m, in agreement with previous results. We find that the calibrations show about 50% difference between the two galaxies, possibly due to effects of inclination.

  10. High star formation rates in turbulent atomic-dominated gas in the interacting galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Bournaud, Frederic; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Struck, Curtis; Brinks, Elias; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    CO observations of the interacting galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207 are combined with HI, Halpha and 24 microns to study the star formation rate (SFR) surface density as a function of the gas surface density. More than half of the high SFR regions are HI dominated. When compared to other galaxies, these HI-dominated regions have excess SFRs relative to their molecular gas surface densities but normal SFRs relative to their total gas surface densities. The HI-dominated regions are mostly located in the outer part of NGC 2207, where the HI velocity dispersion is high, 40 - 50 km/s. We suggest that the star-forming clouds in these regions have envelopes at lower densities than normal, making them predominantly atomic, and cores at higher densities than normal because of the high turbulent Mach numbers. This is consistent with theoretical predictions of a flattening in the density probability distribution function for compressive, high Mach number turbulence.

  11. Non-equilibrium H$_2$ formation in the early Universe: energy exchanges, rate coefficients and spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Coppola, Carla Maria; Galli, Daniele; Tennyson, Jonathan; Longo, Savino

    2012-01-01

    Energy exchange processes play a crucial role in the early Universe, affecting the thermal balance and the dynamical evolution of the primordial gas. In the present work we focus on the consequences of a non-thermal distribution of the level populations of H$_2$: first, we determine the excitation temperatures of vibrational transitions and the non-equilibrium heat transfer; second, we compare the modifications to chemical reaction rate coefficients with respect to the values obtained assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium; third, we compute the spectral distortions to the cosmic background radiation generated by the formation of H$_2$ in vibrationally excited levels. We conclude that non-equilibrium processes cannot be ignored in cosmological simulations of the evolution of baryons, although their observational signatures remain below current limits of detection. New fits to the equilibrium and non-equilibrium heat transfer functions are provided.

  12. 3D-HST emission line galaxies at z ∼ 2: discrepancies in the optical/UV star formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S.; Trump, Jonathan R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feldmeier, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the Hβ line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the Hβ star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ∼1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and SFR. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as Hβ is more enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the SFR history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z ∼ 2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  13. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  14. Measuring Galaxy Star Formation Rates From Integrated Photometry: Insights from Color-Magnitude Diagrams of Resolved Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Benjamin D; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Johnson, L Clifton; Dale, Daniel A; Dolphin, Andrew E; de Paz, Armando Gil; Kennicutt, Robert C; Lee, Janice C; Skillman, Evan D; Williams, Benjamin F

    2013-01-01

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from HST-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of ~50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M/M_* < 8.5, with metallicities ~10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6micron and 4.5micron bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically over-predict observed luminosities by up to ~0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of ~2 variations in the...

  15. A panchromatic study of BLAST counterparts: total star-formation rate, morphology, AGN fraction and stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Chapin, Edward L; Cortese, Luca; Devlin, Mark J; Dye, Simon; Eales, Stephen; Griffin, Matthew; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Pascale, Enzo; Scott, Douglas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Viero, Marco; Wiebe, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We carry out a multi-wavelength study of individual galaxies detected by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) and identified at other wavelengths, using data spanning the radio to the ultraviolet (UV). We develop a Monte Carlo method to account for flux boosting, source blending, and correlations among bands, which we use to derive deboosted far-infrared (FIR) luminosities for our sample. We estimate total star-formation rates for BLAST counterparts with z 10^11 L_sun, z > 0.5, but the contribution from unobscured starlight cannot be neglected at L_FIR < 10^11 L_sun, z < 0.25. We assess that about 20% of the galaxies in our sample show indication of a type-1 active galactic nucleus (AGN), but their submillimeter emission is mainly due to star formation in the host galaxy. We compute stellar masses for a subset of 92 BLAST counterparts; these are relatively massive objects with a median mass of 10^11 M_sun. We argue that BLAST is bridging the mass gap at 0 < z < 2 betwe...

  16. Constraints on the formation of double neutron stars from the observed eccentricities and current limits on merger rates

    CERN Document Server

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Bulik, Tomasz; Gladysz, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse SN from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of sigma=265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs et al. (2005) and then modify this distribution by changing the velocity dispersion towards smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with sigma = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both obs...

  17. Vertical Equilibrium, Energetics, and Star Formation Rates in Magnetized Galactic Disks Regulated by Momentum Feedback from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Recent hydrodynamic (HD) simulations have shown that galactic disks evolve to reach well-defined statistical equilibrium states. The star formation rate (SFR) self-regulates until energy injection by star formation feedback balances dissipation and cooling in the interstellar medium (ISM), and provides vertical pressure support to balance gravity. In this paper, we extend our previous models to allow for a range of initial magnetic field strengths and configurations, utilizing three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We show that a quasi-steady equilibrium state is established as rapidly for MHD as for HD models unless the initial magnetic field is very strong or very weak, which requires more time to reach saturation. Remarkably, models with initial magnetic energy varying by two orders of magnitude approach the same asymptotic state. In the fully saturated state of the fiducial model, the integrated energy proportions E_kin:E_th:E_mag,t:E_mag,o are 0.35:0.39:0.15:0.11, while the proportions...

  18. In-situ, variable thickness, liquid crystal film target formation at moderate repetition rate for intense laser applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, P L; Cochran, G E; Hanna, R J; Andereck, C D; Schumacher, D W

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystal films have recently been demonstrated as variable thickness, planar targets for ultra-intense laser matter experiments and applications such as ion acceleration. By controlling the parameters of film formation, including liquid crystal temperature and volume, their thickness can be varied on-demand from 10 $nm$ to above 10 $\\mu m$. This thickness range enables for the first time real-time selection and optimization of various ion acceleration mechanisms using low cost, high quality targets. Our previous work employed these targets in single shot configuration, requiring chamber cycling after the pre-made films were expended. Presented here is a film formation device capable of drawing films from a bulk liquid crystal source volume to any thickness in the aforementioned range. This device will form films under vacuum within 2 $\\mu m$ of the same location each time, well within the Rayleigh range of even tight $F/ \\#$ systems. The repetition rate of the device exceeds 0.1 $Hz$ for sub-100 $nm$ fi...

  19. 对继续完善人民币汇率形成机制的思考%Thinking on RMB Exchange Rate Formation Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋玮

    2012-01-01

    本文试图解决以下问题:人民币汇率形成机制存在哪些问题;人民币汇率形成机制的缺陷对于我国的宏观经济和微观经济主体造成哪些影响;针对人民币汇率形成机制的缺陷,我国应该如何继续推进汇改。认清人民币汇率形成机制的缺陷以及对我国经济的影响,对于继续推进人民币汇率形成机制改革,保证我国经济平稳、持续增长具有现实意义。%This thesis will define the formation mechanism of RMB exchange rate as macro, meso and micro three levels. The macro level refers to the basic theory of the exchange rate, the meso level refers to the choice theory of ex- change rate and the micro level refers to the adjustment theory of exchange rate. After the definition of the RMB ex- change rate formation mechanism, this paper attempts to address the following issues: the problems the current RMB exchange rate formation mechanism; the impact on China' s macroeconomic and microeconomic main bodies because of the defect of the formation mechanism of RMB exchange rate; how to reform on the issues of the defect of the current RMB exchange rate formation mechanism. Having a clear awareness on the deficiencies of the current exchange rate formation mechanism and the influence on our nations' economy has the practical significance on promoting the reform of RMB exchange rate formation mechanism, and ensuring the stable and sustained growth of the economy.

  20. Appropriateness of a load-management agreement as the rate format for customer thermal storage: why a closeout sale on off-peak electricity should be adopted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.H.

    1980-03-01

    This report demonstrates why a load-management agreement is the best rate format for customer thermal energy storage (TES) from electricity. The first section presents the basic operating and cost characteristics of TES systems as well as potential problems that affect rate setting. Then, the criteria for choosing a rate structure are put forth, and the various rate formats available are analyzed considering the above information. Finally, the means of achieving the maximum social benefits using a load-management agreement are explored.

  1. PROVIDING STRINGENT STAR FORMATION RATE LIMITS OF z ∼ 2 QSO HOST GALAXIES AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Do, Tuan [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Larkin, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ∼ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ∼0.″2 (∼1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (z{sub Hα} = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (z{sub Hα} = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290–350 km s{sup −1}. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ∼7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%–40% of the Eddington rate, if

  2. The ALFALFA Hα Survey. I. Project Description and The Local Star-formation Rate Density from the Fall Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sistine, Angela; Salzer, John J.; Sugden, Arthur; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Jaskot, Anne E.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALFALFA Hα survey utilizes a large sample of H i-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA Hα contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ˜20 and ˜100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband Hα images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of Hα images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[M ⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3]) = -1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  3. Estimating Star Formation Rates from Infrared and Radio Luminosities The Origin of the Radio-Infrared Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, E F

    2003-01-01

    I have assembled a diverse sample of galaxies from the literature with far-ultraviolet (FUV), optical, infrared (IR) and radio luminosities to explore the calibration of radio-derived and IR-derived star formation (SF) rates, and the origin of the radio-IR correlation. By comparing the 8-1000 micron IR, which samples dust-reprocessed starlight, with direct stellar FUV emission, I show that the IR traces most of the SF in luminous L* galaxies but traces only a small fraction of the SF in faint ~0.01 L* galaxies. If radio emission were a perfect SF rate indicator, this effect would cause easily detectable curvature in the radio-IR correlation. Yet, the radio-IR correlation is nearly linear. This implies that the radio flux from low-luminosity galaxies is substantially suppressed, compared to brighter galaxies. This is naturally interpreted in terms of a decreasing efficiency of non-thermal radio emission in faint galaxies. Thus, the linearity of the radio-IR correlation is a conspiracy: both indicators underest...

  4. Method of joint bit rate/modulation format identification and optical performance monitoring using asynchronous delay-tap sampling for radio-over-fiber systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesmi, Latifa; Menif, Mourad

    2016-08-01

    In the context of carrying a wide variety of modulation formats and data rates for home networks, the study covers the radio-over-fiber (RoF) technology, where the need for an alternative way of management, automated fault diagnosis, and formats identification is expressed. Also, RoF signals in an optical link are impaired by various linear and nonlinear effects including chromatic dispersion, polarization mode dispersion, amplified spontaneous emission noise, and so on. Hence, for this purpose, we investigated the sampling method based on asynchronous delay-tap sampling in conjunction with a cross-correlation function for the joint bit rate/modulation format identification and optical performance monitoring. Three modulation formats with different data rates are used to demonstrate the validity of this technique, where the identification accuracy and the monitoring ranges reached high values.

  5. A protocol for adult somatic cell nuclear transfer in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) with a high rate of viable clone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Kaftanovskaya, Elena; Adachi, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Kinoshita, Masato; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we successfully generated fully grown, cloned medaka (the Japanese rice fish, Oryzias latipes) using donor nuclei from primary culture cells of adult caudal fin tissue and nonenucleated recipient eggs that were heat shock-treated to induce diploidization of the nuclei. However, the mechanism of clone formation using this method is unknown, and the rate of adult clone formation is not high enough for studies in basic and applied sciences. To gain insight into the mechanism and increase the success rate of this method of clone formation, we tested two distinct nuclear transfer protocols. In one protocol, the timing of transfer of donor nuclei was changed, and in the other, the size of the donor cells was changed; each protocol was based on our original methodology. Ultimately, we obtained an unexpectedly high rate of adult clone formation using the protocol that differed with respect to the timing of donor nuclei transfer. Specifically, 17% of the transplants that developed to the blastula stage ultimately developed into adult clones. The success rate with this method was 13 times higher than that obtained using the original method. Analyses focusing on the reasons for this high success rate of clone formation will help to elucidate the mechanism of clone formation that occurs with this method.

  6. Colours, star formation rates and environments of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at the cosmic noon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Hopkins, Philip F.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2017-09-01

    We analyse the star formation rates (SFRs), colours and dust extinctions of galaxies in massive (1012.5 - 1013.5 M⊙) haloes at z ∼ 2 in high-resolution, cosmological zoom-in simulations as part of the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. The simulations do not model feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) but reproduce well the observed relations between stellar and halo mass and between stellar mass and SFR. About half (a third) of the simulated massive galaxies (massive central galaxies) at z ∼ 2 have broad-band colours classifying them as 'quiescent', and the fraction of quiescent centrals is steeply decreasing towards higher redshift, in agreement with observations. The progenitors of z ∼ 2 quiescent central galaxies are, on average, more massive, have lower specific SFRs and reside in more massive haloes than the progenitors of similarly massive star-forming centrals. The simulations further predict a morphological mix of galaxies that includes disc-dominated, irregular and early-type galaxies. However, our simulations do not reproduce the reddest of the quiescent galaxies observed at z ∼ 2. We also do not find evidence for a colour bimodality, but are limited by our modest sample size. In our simulations, the star formation activity of central galaxies of moderate mass (Mstar ∼ 1010 - 1011 M⊙) is affected by a combination of two distinct physical processes. Outflows powered by stellar feedback result in a short-lived (experience a moderate reduction of their SFRs ('cosmological starvation'). The relative importance of these processes and AGN feedback is uncertain and will be explored in future work.

  7. The Small Molecule Hyperphyllin Enhances Leaf Formation Rate and Mimics Shoot Meristem Integrity Defects Associated with AMP1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poretska, Olena; Yang, Saiqi; Pitorre, Delphine; Rozhon, Wilfried; Zwerger, Karin; Uribe, Marcos Castellanos; May, Sean; McCourt, Peter; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Sieberer, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1 (AMP1) is a member of the M28 family of carboxypeptidases with a pivotal role in plant development and stress adaptation. Its most prominent mutant defect is a unique hypertrophic shoot phenotype combining a strongly increased organ formation rate with enhanced meristem size and the formation of ectopic meristem poles. However, so far the role of AMP1 in shoot development could not be assigned to a specific molecular pathway nor is its biochemical function resolved. In this work we evaluated the level of functional conservation between AMP1 and its human homolog HsGCPII, a tumor marker of medical interest. We show that HsGCPII cannot substitute AMP1 in planta and that an HsGCPII-specific inhibitor does not evoke amp1-specific phenotypes. We used a chemical genetic approach to identify the drug hyperphyllin (HP), which specifically mimics the shoot defects of amp1, including plastochron reduction and enlargement and multiplication of the shoot meristem. We assessed the structural requirements of HP activity and excluded that it is a cytokinin analog. HP-treated wild-type plants showed amp1-related tissue-specific changes of various marker genes and a significant transcriptomic overlap with the mutant. HP was ineffective in amp1 and elevated the protein levels of PHAVOLUTA, consistent with the postulated role of AMP1 in miRNA-controlled translation, further supporting an AMP1-related mode of action. Our work suggests that plant and animal members of the M28 family of proteases adopted unrelated functions. With HP we provide a tool to characterize the plant-specific functions of this important class of proteins. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. On the evolution of the star formation rate function of massive galaxies: constraints at 0.4 MUSIC catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanot, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano; Santini, Paola; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-03-01

    We study the evolution of the star formation rate function (SFRF) of massive (M★ > 1010 M⊙) galaxies over the 0.4 Origins Deep Survey-Multiwavelength Southern Infrared Catalog (GOODS-MUSIC) catalogue, which provides a suitable coverage of the spectral region from 0.3 to 24 ?m and either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for each object. Individual SFRs have been obtained by combining ultraviolet and 24-?m observations, when the latter were available. For all other sources a 'spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting' SFR estimate has been considered. We then define a stellar mass limited sample, complete in the M★ > 1010 M⊙ range and determine the SFRF using the 1/Vmax algorithm. We thus define simulated galaxy catalogues based on the predictions of three different state-of-the-art semi-analytical models (SAMs) of galaxy formation and evolution, and compare them with the observed SFRF. We show that the theoretical SFRFs are well described by a double power law functional form and its redshift evolution is approximated with high accuracy by a pure evolution of the typical SFR (SFR★). We find good agreement between model predictions and the high-SFR end of the SFRF, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, the observational SFRF is characterized by a double-peaked structure, which is absent in its theoretical counterparts. At z > 1.0 the observed SFRF shows a relevant density evolution, which is not reproduced by SAMs, due to the well-known overprediction of intermediate-mass galaxies at z˜ 2. SAMs are thus able to reproduce the most intense SFR events observed in the GOODS-MUSIC sample and their redshift distribution. At the same time, the agreement at the low-SFR end is poor: all models overpredict the space density of SFR ˜ 1 M⊙ yr-1 and no model reproduces the double-peaked shape of the observational SFRF. If confirmed by deeper infrared observations, this discrepancy will provide a key constraint on

  9. Star Formation in Hi Tails: HCG 92, HCG 100 and 6 Interacting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    deMello, D. F.; Urrutia-Viscarra, F.; MendesdeOliveira, C.; Torres-Flores, S.; Carrasco, E. R.; Cypriano, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present new Gemini spectra of 14 new objects found within the HI tails of Hickson Compact Groups 92 and 100. Nine of them are GALEX Far-UV (FUV) and Near-UV (NUV) sources. The spectra confirm that these objects are members of the compact groups and have metallicities close to solar, with an average value of 12+log(O/H)approx.8.5. They have average FUV luminosities 7 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, very young ages (HI tails, NGC 2623, NGC 3079, NGC 3359, NGC 3627, NGC 3718, NGC 4656. We found 35 UV sources with ages < 100 Myr, however most of them are on average less luminous/massive than the UV sources found around HCG 92 and 100. We speculate that this might be an environmental effect and that compact groups of galaxies are more favorable to TDG formation than other interacting systems.

  10. Ultrasound assisted reduction of graphene oxide to graphene in L-ascorbic acid aqueous solutions: kinetics and effects of various factors on the rate of graphene formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Abulikemu; Okitsu, Kenji; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to graphene (rGO) was achieved by using 20 kHz ultrasound in L-ascorbic acid (L-AA, reducing agent) aqueous solutions under various experimental conditions. The effects of ultrasound power, ultrasound pulse mode, reaction temperature, pH value and L-AA amount on the rates of rGO formation from GO reduction were investigated. The rates of rGO formation were found to be enhanced under the following conditions: high ultrasound power, long pulse mode, high temperature, high pH value and large amount of L-AA. It was also found that the rGO formation under ultrasound treatment was accelerated in comparison with a conventional mechanical mixing treatment. The pseudo rate and pseudo activation energy (Ea) of rGO formation were determined to discuss the reaction kinetics under both treatment. The Ea value of rGO formation under ultrasound treatment was clearly lower than that obtained under mechanical mixing treatment at the same condition. We proposed that physical effects such as shear forces, microjets and shock waves during acoustic cavitation enhanced the mass transfer and reaction of L-AA with GO to form rGO as well as the change in the surface morphology of GO. In addition, the rates of rGO formation were suggested to be affected by local high temperatures of cavitation bubbles.

  11. GAMA/H-ATLAS: Common star-formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L; Gunawardhana, M L P; Heinis, S; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bourne, N; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Cluver, M E; Cooray, A; da Cunha, E; Driver, S P; Dunne, L; Dye, S; Eales, S; Grootes, M W; Holwerda, B W; Hopkins, A M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R; Lacey, C; Lara-Lopez, M A; Loveday, J; Maddox, S J; lowski, M J Micha; Oteo, I; Owers, M S; Popescu, C C; Smith, D J B; Taylor, E N; Tuffs, R J; van der Werf, P

    2016-01-01

    We compare common star-formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the GAMA equatorial fields (around 160 sq. deg.), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared (FIR) and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from H-ATLAS, and Halpha spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope beta (SFRUV,corr), Halpha line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRHalpha,corr), and the combination of UV and IR emission (SFRUV+IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV,corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating IRX (i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Halpha (derived from BD) against beta. However, beta on its own is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stella...

  12. Rapid Circumstellar Disk Evolution and an Accelerating Star Formation Rate in the Infrared Dark Cloud M17 SWex

    CERN Document Server

    Povich, Matthew S; Robitaille, Thomas P; Broos, Patrick S; Orbin, Wesley T; King, Robert R; Naylor, Tim; Whitney, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of 840 X-ray sources and first results from a 100 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging study of the filamentary infrared dark cloud G014.225$-$00.506, which forms the central regions of a larger cloud complex known as the M17 southwest extension (M17 SWex). In addition to the rich population of protostars and young stellar objects with dusty circumstellar disks revealed by Spitzer Space Telescope archival data, we discover a population of X-ray-emitting, intermediate-mass pre--main-sequence stars (IMPS) that lack infrared excess emission from circumstellar disks. We model the infrared spectral energy distributions of this source population to measure its mass function and place new constraints on the inner dust disk destruction timescales for 2-8 $M_{\\odot}$ stars. We also place a lower limit on the star formation rate (SFR) and find that it is quite high ($\\dot{M}\\ge 0.007~M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$), equivalent to several Orion Nebula Clusters in G14.225$-$0.506 alone, and likely accelerating...

  13. Large Binocular Telescope and Sptizer Spectroscopy of Star-forming Galaxies at 1 Extinction and Star Formation Rate Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujopakarn, W.; Rieke, G. H.; Papovich, C. J.; Weiner, B. J.; Rigby, Jane; Rex, M.; Bian, F.; Kuhn, O. P.; Thompson, D.

    2012-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations in the rest-frame optical and near- to mid-infrared wavelengths of four gravitationally lensed infrared (IR) luminous star-forming galaxies at redshift 1 extinction, Av, of these systems, as well as testing star formation rate (SFR) indicators against the SFR measured by fitting spectral energy distributions to far-IR photometry. Our galaxies occupy a range of Av from 0 to 5.9 mag, larger than previously known for a similar range of IR luminosities at these redshifts. Thus, estimates of SFR even at z 2 must take careful count of extinction in the most IR luminous galaxies.We also measure extinction by comparing SFR estimates from optical emission lines with those from far- IR measurements. The comparison of results from these two independent methods indicates a large variety of dust distribution scenarios at 1 extinction, the Ha SFR indicator underestimates the SFR; the size of the necessary correction depends on the IR luminosity and dust distribution scenario. Individual SFR estimates based on the 6.2µm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission line luminosity do not show a systematic discrepancy with extinction, although a considerable, 0.2 dex, scatter is observed.

  14. The Relation Between [OIII]/H$\\beta$ and Specific Star Formation Rate in Galaxies at $z \\sim 2$

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, Claire Mackay; Oesch, Pascal; Whitaker, Katherine; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Leja, Joel; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Skelton, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Recent surveys have identified a seemingly ubiquitous population of galaxies with elevated [OIII]/H$\\beta$ emission line ratios at $z > 1$, though the nature of this phenomenon continues to be debated. The [OIII]/H$\\beta$ line ratio is of interest because it is a main component of the standard diagnostic tools used to differentiate between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming galaxies, as well as the gas-phase metallicity indicators $O_{23}$ and $R_{23}$. Here, we investigate the primary driver of increased [OIII]/H$\\beta$ ratios by median-stacking rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of star-forming galaxies in the 3D-HST survey in the redshift range $z\\sim1.4-2.2$. Using $N = 4220$ star-forming galaxies, we stack the data in bins of mass and specific star formation rates (sSFR) respectively. After accounting for stellar Balmer absorption, we measure [OIII]$\\lambda5007$\\AA/H$\\beta$ down to $\\mathrm{M} \\sim 10^{9.2} \\ \\mathrm{M_\\odot}$ and sSFR $\\sim 10^{-9.6} \\ \\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, more than an ord...

  15. The $H\\alpha$ Luminosity Function and Global Star Formation Rate From Redshifts of One to Two

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, L; Freudling, W; Teplitz, H I; Malumuth, E M; Weymann, R J; Malkan, M A; Yan, Lin; Carthy, Patrick J. Mc; Freudling, Wolfram; Teplitz, Harry I.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Weymann, Ray J.; Malkan, Matthew A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a luminosity function for H$\\alpha$ emission from galaxies at redshifts between 0.7 and 1.9 based on slitless spectroscopy with NICMOS on HST. The luminosity function is well fit by a Schechter function over the range $6 \\times 10^{41} < L(H\\alpha) < 2 \\times 10^{43} erg/sec$ with $L^* = 7 \\times 10^{42} erg/sec$ and $\\phi^* = 1.7 \\times 10^{-3} Mpc^{-3}$ for $H_0=50 km/s Mpc^{-1}$ and $q_0=0.5$. We derive a volume averaged star formation rate at $z = 1.3 \\pm 0.5$ of 0.13 M_{ødot} yr^{-1} Mpc^{-3} without correction for extinction. The SFR that we derive at $\\sim 6500 \\AA is a factor of 3 higher than that deduced from 2800 \\AA continua. If this difference is due entirely to reddening, the extinction correction at 2800 \\AA is quite significant. The precise magnitude of the total extinction correction at rest-frame UV wavelengths (e.g. 2800 \\AA and 1500 \\AA) is sensitive to the relative spatial distribution of the stars, gas and dust, as well as on the extinction law. In the extreme case of a ...

  16. Star Formation Rates in Resolved Galaxies: Calibrations with Near and Far Infrared Data for NGC5055 and NGC6946

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yiming; Calzetti, Daniela; Wilson, Christine D; Kennicutt, Robert C; Murphy, Eric J; Brandl, Bernhard R; Draine, B T; Galametz, M; Johnson, B D; Armus, L; Gordon, K D; Croxall, K; Dale, D A; Engelbracht, C W; Groves, B; Hao, C -N; Helou, G; Hinz, J; Hunt, L K; Krause, O; Roussel, H; Sauvage, M; Smith, J D T

    2013-01-01

    We use the near--infrared Br\\gamma hydrogen recombination line as a reference star formation rate (SFR) indicator to test the validity and establish the calibration of the {\\it Herschel} PACS 70 \\mu m emission as a SFR tracer for sub--galactic regions in external galaxies. Br\\gamma offers the double advantage of directly tracing ionizing photons and of being relatively insensitive to the effects of dust attenuation. For our first experiment, we use archival CFHT Br\\gamma and Ks images of two nearby galaxies: NGC\\,5055 and NGC\\,6946, which are also part of the {\\it Herschel} program KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel). We use the extinction corrected Br\\gamma emission to derive the SFR(70) calibration for H{\\sc ii} regions in these two galaxies. A comparison of the SFR(70) calibrations at different spatial scales, from 200 pc to the size of the whole galaxy, reveals that about 50% of the total 70\\mu m emission is due to dust heated by stellar populations that are unr...

  17. A New Star-Formation Rate Calibration from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features and Application to High Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shipley, Heath V; Rieke, George H; Brown, Michael J I; Moustakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We calibrate the integrated luminosity from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features at 6.2\\micron, 7.7\\micron\\ and 11.3\\micron\\ in galaxies as a measure of the star-formation rate (SFR). These features are strong (containing as much as 5-10\\% of the total infrared luminosity) and suffer minimal extinction. Our calibration uses \\spitzer\\ Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) measurements of 105 galaxies at $0 < z < 0.4$, infrared (IR) luminosities of $10^9 - 10^{12} \\lsol$, combined with other well-calibrated SFR indicators. The PAH luminosity correlates linearly with the SFR as measured by the extinction-corrected \\ha\\ luminosity over the range of luminosities in our calibration sample. The scatter is 0.14 dex comparable to that between SFRs derived from the \\paa\\ and extinction-corrected \\ha\\ emission lines, implying the PAH features may be as accurate a SFR indicator as hydrogen recombination lines. The PAH SFR relation depends on gas-phase metallicity, for which we supply an empirical correction for...

  18. DA white dwarfs from the LSS-GAC survey DR1: the preliminary luminosity and mass functions and formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A; Cojocaru, R; Yuan, H -B; Torres, S; Garcia-Berro, E; Xiang, M -X; Huang, Y; Koester, D; Hou, Y; Li, G; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Modern large-scale surveys have allowed the identification of large numbers of white dwarfs. However, these surveys are subject to complicated target selection algorithms, which make it almost impossible to quantify to what extent the observational biases affect the observed populations. The LAMOST (Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) Spectroscopic Survey of the Galactic anti-center (LSS-GAC) follows a well-defined set of criteria for selecting targets for observations. This advantage over previous surveys has been fully exploited here to identify a small yet well-characterised magnitude-limited sample of hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarfs. We derive preliminary LSS-GAC DA white dwarf luminosity and mass functions. The space density and average formation rate of DA white dwarfs we derive are 0.83+/-0.16 x 10^{-3} pc^{-3} and 5.42 +/- 0.08 x 10^{-13} pc^{-3} yr^{-1}, respectively. Additionally, using an existing Monte Carlo population synthesis code we simulate the population of single DA w...

  19. Ambiguities of the Rate of Oxygen Formation During Stellar Helium Burning in the 12C(a,g) Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The rate of oxygen formation determines the C/O ratio during stellar helium burning. It is the single most important nuclear input of stellar evolution theory including the evolution of Type II and Type Ia supernova. Yet the low energy cross section of the fusion of 4He + 12C denoted as the 12C(a,g)16O reaction still remains uncertain after forty years of extensive work. We analyze and critically review the most recent measurements of complete angular distributions of the outgoing gamma-rays at very low energies (Ecm > 1.0 MeV). Our analysis of the angular distribution measured with the EUROGAM/GANDI arrays lead us to conclude considerably larger error bars than published hence they are excluded from the current sample of "world data". We show that the current sample of "world data" of the measured E2 cross section factors below 1.7 MeV cluster to two distinct groups that lead to two distinct extrapolations of SE2(300) ~ 60 or ~ 154 keVb. We point to a much neglected discrepancy between the measured E1-E2 pha...

  20. Differences in the structural properties and star-formation rates of field and cluster galaxies at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Rebecca J; Glazebrook, Karl; Tran, Kim-Vy H; Spitler, Lee R; Straatman, Caroline M S; Cowley, Michael; Nanayakkara, Themiya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dependance of galaxy sizes and star-formation rates (SFRs) on environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with M>10^9.5 at z=0.92 selected from the NMBS survey. Using the GEEC2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (sigma=490 km/s) galaxies within two virial radius, Rvir, intervals of 0.51, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalised average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2-2.5 (7-9 sigma) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.

  1. The star formation rate cookbook at 1 < z < 3: Extinction-corrected relations for UV & [OII]{\\lambda}3727 luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Talia, M; Pozzetti, L; Rodighiero, G; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Daddi, E; Maraston, C; Mignoli, M; Kurk, J

    2015-01-01

    We use a spectroscopic sample of 286 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 1formation rate (SFR) estimators. Infrared (IR) data are used to derive empirical calibrations to correct ultraviolet (UV) and [OII]{\\lambda}3727 luminosities for dust extinction and dust-corrected estimates of SFR. In the selection procedure we fully exploit the available spectroscopic information. On the basis of three continuum indices, we are able to identify and exclude from the sample galaxies in which old stellar populations might bring a non-negligible contribution to IR luminosity (LIR) and continuum reddening. Using Spitzer-MIPS and Herschel-PACS data we derive LIR for two-thirds of our sample. The LIR/LUV ratio is used as a probe of effective attenuation (AIRX) to search for correlations with continuum and spectroscopic features. The relation between AIRX and UV continuum slope ({\\beta}) was tested for our sample and found to be broadly consistent with the literature results...

  2. The inner $\\sim$ 40 pc Radial Distribution of the Star formation Rate for a nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Li-Ling; He, Zhi-Cheng; Bian, Wei-Hao

    2015-01-01

    We investigate spatially resolved specific star formation rate (SSFR) in the inner $\\sim$ 40 pc for a nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy, M51 (NGC 5194) by analyzing spectra obtained with the \\emph{Hubble Space Telescope (HST)} Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). We present 24 radial spectra measured along the STIS long slit in M51, extending $\\sim 1\\arcsec$ from the nucleus (i.e., -41.5 pc to 39.4 pc). By the simple stellar population synthesis, the stellar contributions in these radial optical spectra are modeled. Excluding some regions with zero young flux fraction near the center (from -6 pc to 2 pc), we find that the mean flux fraction of young stellar populations (younger than 24.5 Myr) is about 9 \\%, the mean mass fraction is about 0.09\\%. The young stellar populations are not required in the center inner $\\sim$ 8 pc in M51, suggesting a possible SSFR suppression in the circumnuclear region ($\\sim$ 10 pc) from the feedback of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The radial distribution of SSFR in M51 is not sy...

  3. Improved Estimates of the Milky Way's Stellar Mass and Star Formation Rate from Hierarchical Bayesian Meta-Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Licquia, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    We present improved estimates of several global properties of the Milky Way, including its current star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass contained in its disk and bulge+bar components, as well as its total stellar mass. We do so by combining previous measurements from the literature using a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) statistical method that allows us to account for the possibility that any value may be incorrect or have underestimated errors. We show that this method is robust to a wide variety of assumptions about the nature of problems in individual measurements or error estimates. Ultimately, our analysis yields a SFR for the Galaxy of $\\dot{\\rm M}_\\star=1.65\\pm0.19$ ${\\rm M}_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. By combining HB methods with Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate the latest estimates of the Galactocentric radius of the Sun, $R_0$, the exponential scale-length of the disk, $L_d$, and the local surface density of stellar mass, $\\Sigma_\\star(R_0)$, we show that the mass of the Galactic bulge+bar is ${\\rm...

  4. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions - III. Calibration of Measurement Techniques of Star-formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Koepferl, Christine M; Dale, James E

    2016-01-01

    Through an extensive set of realistic synthetic observations (produced in Paper I), we assess in this part of the paper series (Paper III) how the choice of observational techniques affects the measurement of star-formation rates (SFRs) in star-forming regions. We test the accuracy of commonly used techniques and construct new methods to extract the SFR, so that these findings can be applied to measure the SFR in real regions throughout the Milky Way. We investigate diffuse infrared SFR tracers such as those using 24 {\\mu}m, 70 {\\mu}m and total infrared emission, which have been previously calibrated for global galaxy scales. We set up a toy model of a galaxy and show that the infrared emission is consistent with the intrinsic SFR using extra-galactic calibrated laws (although the consistency does not prove their reliability). For local scales, we show that these techniques produce completely unreliable results for single star-forming regions, which are governed by different characteristic timescales. We show...

  5. Calibrating [OII] star-formation rates at z>1 from dual H\\alpha-[OII] imaging from HiZELS

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Masao; Best, Philip N; Smail, Ian; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between H\\alpha\\ and [OII](\\lambda 3727) emission in faint star-forming galaxies at z=1.47 with dust uncorrected star formation rates (SFRs) down to 1.4 Msun/yr, using data in two narrow-bands from WFCAM/UKIRT and Suprime-Cam/Subaru. A stacking analysis allows us to investigate H\\alpha\\ emission flux from bright [OII] emitters as well as faint ones for which H\\alpha\\ is not individually detected, and to compare them with a large sample of local galaxies. We find that there is a clear, positive correlation between the average H\\alpha\\ and [OII] luminosities for [OII] emitters at z=1.47, with its slope being consistent with the local relation. [OII] emitters at z=1.47 have lower mean observed ratios of H\\alpha/[OII] suggesting a small but systematic offset (at 2.8\\sigma\\ significance) towards lower values of dust attenuation, A(H\\alpha)~0.35, than local galaxies. This confirms that [OII] selection tends to pick up galaxies which are significantly less dusty on average than H\\alph...

  6. The evolving relation between star-formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO Survey since $z=3$

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Russell; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the star-formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ($M_*$) relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy sample in the XMM-LSS field to $z\\sim 3.0$ using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and $M_*$ and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift PDF uncertainty. Applying a SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalisation of the SFR-$M_*$ relation out to $z\\sim 3$ and a roughly constant slope of (SFR $\\propto M_*^{\\alpha}$) $\\alpha=0.69\\pm0.02$ to $z\\sim 1.7$. We find this increases close to unity toward $z\\sim2.65$. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-$M_*$ relation between $0.7\\lesssim z\\lesssim2.0$ at the high mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR $\\prop...

  7. Local SDSS galaxies in the Herschel Stripe82 survey: A critical assessment of optically-derived star-formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Rosario, D J; Ellison, S L; Lutz, D; Trump, J R

    2016-01-01

    We study a set of 3319 galaxies in the redshift interval 0.04 < z < 0.15 with far-infrared (FIR) coverage from the Herschel Stripe 82 survey (HerS), and emission-line measurements, redshifts, stellar masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) from the SDSS (DR7) MPA/JHU database. About 40% of the sample are detected in the Herschel/SPIRE 250 micron band. Total infrared (TIR) luminosities derived from HerS and ALLWISE photometry allow us to compare infrared and optical estimates of SFR with unprecedented statistics for diverse classes of galaxies. We find excellent agreement between TIR-derived and emission line-based SFRs for H II galaxies. Other classes, such as active galaxies and evolved galaxies, exhibit systematic discrepancies between optical and TIR SFRs. We demonstrate that these offsets are attributable primarily to survey biases and the large intrinsic uncertainties of the D4000- and colour-based optical calibrations used to estimate the SDSS SFRs of these galaxies. Using a classification scheme w...

  8. The Gas Phase Mass Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies: Dependence on Star Formation Rate and HI Gas Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Jimmy,; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the VLT, we investigate the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR$_{\\text{HI}}$). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to study the FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$ and FMR$_{\\text{HI}}$ across the stellar mass range 10$^{6.6}$ to 10$^{8.8}$ M$_\\odot$, with metallicities as low as 12+log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1$\\sigma$ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1$\\sigma$ mean scatter in the FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$ (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR$_{\\text{SFR}}$ is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10$^{-2.4}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, however this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR$_{\\text{HI}}$. We also find that th...

  9. Photometric determination of the mass accretion rate of pre-main sequence stars. IV. Recent star formation in NGC 602

    CERN Document Server

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the young stellar populations in NGC 602, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using a novel method that we have developed to combine Hubble Space Telescope photometry in the V, I, and Halpha bands. We have identified about 300 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, all of which are still undergoing active mass accretion, and have determined their physical parameters (effective temperature, luminosity, age, mass and mass accretion rate). Our analysis shows that star formation has been present in this field over the last 60 Myr. In addition, we can recognise at least two clear, distinct, and prominent episodes in the recent past: one about 2 Myr ago, but still ongoing in regions of higher nebulosity, and one (or more) older than 30 Myr, encompassing both stars dispersed in the field and two smaller clusters located about 100 arcsec north of the centre of NGC 602. The relative locations of younger and older PMS stars do not imply a causal effect or triggering of one generation on the other. The strength of th...

  10. Comparison of H-alpha and UV Star Formation Rates in the Local Volume: Systematic Discrepancies for Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Janice C; Tremonti, Christy; Kennicutt, Robert C; Salim, Samir; Bothwell, Matthew; Calzetti, Daniela; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dale, Daniel; Engelbracht, Chad; J., Jose G Funes S; Johnson, Benjamin; Sakai, Shoko; Skillman, Evan; van Zee, Liese; Walter, Fabian; Weisz, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) Using a complete sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc, we evaluate the consistency between star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from the far ultraviolet (FUV) non-ionizing continuum and H-alpha nebular emission, assuming standard conversion recipes in which the SFR scales linearly with luminosity at a given wavelength. Our analysis probes SFRs over 5 orders of magnitude, down to ultra-low activities on the order of ~0.0001 M_sun/yr. The data are drawn from the 11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which has obtained H-alpha fluxes from ground-based narrowband imaging, and UV fluxes from imaging with GALEX. For normal spiral galaxies (SFR~1 M_sun/yr), our results are consistent with previous work which has shown that FUV SFRs tend to be lower than H-alpha SFRs before accounting for internal dust attenuation, but that there is relative consistency between the two tracers after proper corrections are applied. However, a puzzle is encountered at the faint end of the lumin...

  11. Dust-Corrected Star Formation Rates of Galaxies. I. Combinations of H-alpha and Infrared Tracers

    CERN Document Server

    Kennicutt, Robert C Jr; Calzetti, Daniela; Moustakas, John; Dale, Daniel A; Bendo, George; Engelbracht, Charles W; Johnson, Benjamin D; Lee, Janice C

    2009-01-01

    We combine H-alpha emission-line and infrared continuum measurements of two samples of nearby galaxies to derive dust attenuation-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). We use a simple energy balance based method that has been applied previously to HII regions in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), and extend the methodology to integrated measurements of galaxies. We find that our composite H-alpha+IR based SFRs are in excellent agreement with attenuation-corrected SFRs derived from integrated spectrophotometry, over the full range of SFRs (0.01 -- 80 solar mass per year) and attenuations (0 -- 2.5 mag) studied. We find that the combination of H-alpha and total infrared luminosities provides the most robust SFR measurements, but combinations of H-alpha measurements with monochromatic luminosities at 24 micron and 8 micron perform nearly as well. The calibrations differ significantly from those obtained for HII regions (Calzetti et al. 2007), with the difference attributable to a more evolved ...

  12. Near-infrared adaptive optics imaging of infrared luminous galaxies: the brightest cluster magnitude - star formation rate relation

    CERN Document Server

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Vaisanen, Petri; Kankare, Erkki; Kotilainen, Jari; Mattila, Seppo; Ryder, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ~ 40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M_K ~ - 2.6 log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying...

  13. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Escala, A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, FI-21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Ryder, S., E-mail: zara@saao.ac.za [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  14. [Effects of Yanggan Lidan Granule on rate of gallstone formation and content of plasma cholecystokinin in guinea pigs with induced cholesterol gallstones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-bo; Fang, Bang-jiang

    2008-04-01

    To explore the effects of Yanggan Lidan Granule (YGLDG), a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine for nourishing liver and improving choleresis, on the rate of gallstone formation and content of plasma cholecystokinin in guinea pigs with induced cholesterol gallstones. Eighty guinea pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were normal control group, untreated group, YGLDG-treated group and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)-treated group (n=20). Except the normal control group, gallstones were induced by high-cholesterol diet in the guinea pigs. YGLDG (1.81 g/kg daily) and UDCA (30.12 mg/kg daily) were given orally to guinea pigs in the corresponding group respectively for seven weeks; however, the guinea pigs of normal control group and untreated group were administered with normal saline. The physical signs of the guinea pigs and the rates of gallstone formation were examined, and the content of cholecystokinin (CCK) in the plasma was detected by radio-immunoassay. YGLDG could obviously improve the ethological signs of the guinea pigs. Gallstone formation rate of the untreated group (82.35%) was significantly increased as compared with that of the normal control group (5.26%) (Pgallstone formation rates of the YGLDG-treated group (27.28%) and UDCA-treated group (38.89%) were lower than that of the untreated group (P0.05). YGLDG can significantly decrease the rate of gallstone formation in guinea pigs. It may be related to elevating the content of CCK in the plasma.

  15. Mouse tail vertebrae adapt to cyclic mechanical loading by increasing bone formation rate and decreasing bone resorption rate as shown by time-lapsed in vivo imaging of dynamic bone morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, Floor M; Schulte, Friederike A; Kuhn, Gisela; Webster, Duncan J; Müller, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    It is known that mechanical loading leads to an increase in bone mass through a positive shift in the balance between bone formation and bone resorption. How the remodeling sites change over time as an effect of loading remains, however, to be clarified. The purpose of this paper was to investigate how bone formation and resorption sites are modulated by mechanical loading over time by using a new imaging technique that extracts three dimensional formation and resorption parameters from time-lapsed in vivo micro-computed tomography images. To induce load adaptation, the sixth caudal vertebra of C57BL/6 mice was cyclically loaded through pins in the adjacent vertebrae at either 8 N or 0 N (control) three times a week for 5 min (3000 cycles) over a total of 4 weeks. The results showed that mechanical loading significantly increased trabecular bone volume fraction by 20% (pbone formation rate was on average 23% greater (pbone resorption rate was on average 25% smaller (pbone formation rate for the 8 N group was mostly an effect of a significantly increased surface of bone formation sites (on average 16%, pbone formation packages was less affected (on average 5% greater, pbone resorption sites was significantly reduced (on average 15%, pbone increased significantly by 24% (pbone decreased significantly by 24% (ptail vertebrae adapt to mechanical loading by increasing the surface of formation sites and decreasing the surface of resorption sites, leading to an overall increase in bone strength. This new imaging technique will provide opportunities to investigate in vivo bone remodeling in the context of disease and treatment options, with the added value that both bone formation and bone resorption parameters can be nondestructively calculated over time.

  16. The Star Formation Rate Functions at z = 0-1: the Latter Half of the History of Visible and Hidden Star Formation in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T. T.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Giovannoli, E.; Murata, K. L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Hernández-Fernández, J.

    2010-06-01

    We found that the rapid decline of SFR density from z = 1 to z = 0 is accompanied by a rapid decline of the contribution of infrared (IR) galaxies [1]. Making use of FUV (GALEX) and FIR (IRAS/Spitzer) data, we have established a method to estimate the star-formation luminosity function (LF), that is a LF of galaxy luminosity produced by newly formed stars [1]. In this work, we have calculated the distribution function of SFR of galaxies (SFR function) as a function of redshift at z = 0-1 from UV and FIR selected galaxies in the CDFS. We found that, though the FUV- and FIR-based SFR functions agree until z = 0.7, the FUV-based one becomes significantly lower than FIR based one at z = 1. As for integrated value, this means that the SFR density is at least 40% underestimated, even after adding the contribution from obscured star formation.

  17. How Dead are Dead Galaxies? Mid-Infrared Fluxes of Quiescent Galaxies at Redshift 0.3Star Formation Rates and Dust Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; vanDokkum, Pieter; Brammer, Gabriel; DaCunha, Elisabete; FoersterSchreiber, Natascha M.; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Pacifici, Camilla; Skelton, Rosalind E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rates of quiescent galaxies at high redshift (0.3 star formation rates for quiescent galaxies (sSFR approx. 10(exp -12)/yr. However, SED fitting can miss star formation if it is hidden behind high dust obscuration and ionizing radiation is re-emitted in the mid-infrared. It is therefore fundamental to measure the dust-obscured SFRs with a mid-IR indicator. We stack the MIPS-24 micron images of quiescent objects in five redshift bins centered on z = 0.5, 0.9, 1.2, 1.7, 2.2 and perform aperture photometry. Including direct 24 micron detections, we find sSFR approx. 10(exp -11.9) × (1 + z)(sup 4)/yr. These values are higher than those indicated by SED fitting, but at each redshift they are 20-40 times lower than those of typical star forming galaxies. The true SFRs of quiescent galaxies might be even lower, as we show that the mid-IR fluxes can be due to processes unrelated to ongoing star formation, such as cirrus dust heated by old stellar populations and circumstellar dust. Our measurements show that star formation quenching is very efficient at every redshift. The measured SFR values are at z > 1.5 marginally consistent with the ones expected from gas recycling (assuming that mass loss from evolved stars refuels star formation) and well above that at lower redshifts.

  18. The SILCC project - IV. Impact of dissociating and ionizing radiation on the interstellar medium and Hα emission as a tracer of the star formation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C. O.; Girichidis, Philipp; Pellegrini, Eric; Klessen, Ralf S.; Wünsch, Richard; Gatto, Andrea; Baczynski, Christian

    2017-04-01

    We present three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the impact of stellar winds, photoelectric heating, photodissociating and photoionizing radiation, and supernovae on the chemical composition and star formation in a stratified disc model. This is followed by a sink-based model for star clusters with populations of individual massive stars. Stellar winds and ionizing radiation regulate the star formation rate at a factor of ∼10 below the simulation with only supernova feedback due to their immediate impact on the ambient interstellar medium after star formation. Ionizing radiation (with winds and supernovae) significantly reduces the ambient densities for most supernova explosions to ρ scale of 2 Gyr and shows the best agreement with observations. In the radiative models, the Hα emission is dominated by radiative recombination as opposed to collisional excitation (the dominant emission in non-radiative models), which only contributes ∼1-10 per cent to the total Hα emission. Individual massive stars (M ≥ 30 M⊙) with short lifetimes are responsible for significant fluctuations in the Hα luminosities. The corresponding inferred star formation rates can underestimate the true instantaneous star formation rate by a factor of ∼10.

  19. THE GAS PHASE MASS METALLICITY RELATION FOR DWARF GALAXIES: DEPENDENCE ON STAR FORMATION RATE AND HI GAS MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2015-10-20

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR{sub SFR}) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR{sub HI}). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMR{sub SFR} and FMR{sub HI} across the stellar mass range 10{sup 6.6}–10{sup 8.8} M{sub ⊙}, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMR{sub SFR} (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR{sub SFR} is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10{sup −2.4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR{sub HI}. We also find that the FMR{sub HI} is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FML{sub SFR}) and HI-gas mass (FML{sub HI}). We find that the FML{sub HI} relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FML{sub HI} relation is not improved over the FMR{sub HI} scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMR{sub HI} is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation.

  20. The impact of frequency rating scale formats on the measurement of latent variables in web surveys - an experimental investigation using a measure of affectivity as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menold Natalja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of verbal and/or numerical labeling and number of categories on the measurement of latent variables in web surveys are addressed. Data were collected online in a quota sample of the German adult population (N = 741. A randomized 2x2x2 experimental design was applied, with variation of the number of categories, as well as of verbal and numerical labeling, using an abbreviated version of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS. Experimental manipulation of the rating scale formats resulted in an effect on measurement model testing and reliability, as well as on factorial and convergent validity. In addition, measurement invariance between several rating scale formats was limited. With the five category end verbalized and fully labeled seven category formats, acceptable results for all measurement quality metrics could be obtained.

  1. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallam, Brett, E-mail: brett.hallam@unsw.edu.au; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, Level 1 Tyree Energy Technologies Building, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-14

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation.

  2. THE CLAY CONTENT EFFECT ON THE FORMATION OF SHALLOW MOLE DRAINAGE AND THE RATE OF LOWERING SOIL MOISTURE CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Suharyatun

    2014-10-01

    loam soil did not infl uence the rate of lowering soil moisture content. Contrary, the mole drainage installed in clay soil has effected to increase the rate of lowering soil moisture content. Keywords: Mole drainage, soil moisture content, clay content

  3. Methymercury Formation in Marine and Freshwater Systems: Sediment Characteristics, Microbial Activity and SRB Phylogeny Control Formation Rates and Food-Chain Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. K.; Saunders, F. M.

    2004-05-01

    Mercury research in freshwater and marine systems suggests that sediment characteristics such as organic substrate, mercury speciation, and sulfate/sulfide concentrations influence availability of inorganic mercury for methylation. Similarly, sediment characteristics also influence sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) respiration as well as the presence/distribution of phylogenetic groups responsible for mercury methylation. Our work illustrates that the process of methylmercury formation in freshwater and marine systems are not dissimilar. Rather, the same geochemical parameters and SRB phylogenetic groups determine the propensity for methylmercury formation and are applicable in both fresh- and marine-water systems. The presentation will include our integration of sediment geochemical and microbial parameters affecting mercury methylation in specific freshwater and marine systems. Constructed wetlands planted with Schoenoplectus californicus and amended with gypsum (CaSO4) have demonstrated a capacity to remove inorganic mercury from industrial outfalls. However, bioaccumulation studies of periphyton, eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) and lake chubsucker (Erimyzon sucetta) were conducted in order to ascertain the availability of wetland-generated methylmercury to biota. Total mercury concentrations in mosquitofish from non-sulfate treated controls and the reference location were significantly lower than those from the low and high sulfate treatments while mean total mercury concentrations in lake chubsuckers were also significantly elevated in the high sulfate treatment compared to the low sulfate, control and reference populations. Methylmercury concentrations in periphyton also corresponded with mercury levels found in the tissue of the lake chubsuckers, and these findings fit well given the trophic levels identified for both species of fish. Overall, data from this study suggest that the initial use of gypsum to accelerate the maturity of a constructed

  4. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; McDonald, M.; Whelan, John T.; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2017-03-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the centre of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 M⊙ yr-1. However, a very small number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and extinction law. We find that in the absence of any prior except that the maximum cooling rate Phoenix. The SFR dependence on the extinction is a reflection of the standard age-extinction degeneracy, which can be overcome by using a prior on one of the two quantities in question.

  5. Study on the effect of film formation process and deposition rate on the orientation of the CsI:Tl thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaochuan; Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina; Ma, Shijun; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Although many new scintillation materials are developed, CsI:Tl is still prevailing because of its high scintillation efficiency. In this work, CsI:Tl thin films were fabricated by vacuum thermal evaporative deposition method and their morphology properties and growth orientation were observed by SEM and XRD. Photoluminescent spectra were used to measure the luminescent properties of the CsI:Tl thin film. The results show us the film formation process of CsI:Tl thin film and analyze the effect of film formation process and the deposition rate on the orientation of the CsI:Tl thin film.

  6. Theoretical study of all-optical RZ-OOK to NRZ-OOK format conversion in uniform FBG for mixed line-rate DWDM systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oskars Ozolins; Vjaceslavs Bobrovs

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study all-optical multi-channel return-to-zero (RZ)-on-off keying (OOK) to nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ)-OOK format conversion in single uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG) for mixed line-rate dense wavelength-division multiplexing systems using mathematical simulations.Forty and 20 Gbit/s RZ-OOK signals with 33% and 50% duty cycles are converted to NRZ-OOK signals in single uniform FBG with 21% reflectivity.Impact of amplitude noise from FBG contrast profile on modulation format conversion efficiency is also studied.

  7. Formation of Valley Networks in a Cold and Icy Early Mars Climate: Predictions for Erosion Rates and Channel Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, J. P.; Head, J. W.

    2017-10-01

    Climate models suggest early Mars was cold and icy. To test this prediction we assess the influence of cold conditions and the presence of an ice-cemented substrate on the formation of the valley networks and compare results to morphometric data.

  8. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: Numerical Tests of the Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C

    2011-01-01

    We use vertically-resolved numerical hydrodynamic simulations to study star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic disks. We focus on outer disk regions where diffuse HI dominates, with gas surface densities Sigma_SFR=3-20 Msun/kpc^2/yr and star-plus-dark matter volume densities rho_sd=0.003-0.5 Msun/pc^3. Star formation occurs in very dense, cold, self-gravitating clouds. Turbulence, driven by momentum feedback from supernova events, destroys bound clouds and puffs up the disk vertically. Time-dependent radiative heating (FUV) offsets gas cooling. We use our simulations to test a new theory for self-regulated star formation. Consistent with this theory, the disks evolve to a state of vertical dynamical equilibrium and thermal equilibrium with both warm and cold phases. The range of star formation surface densities and midplane thermal pressures is Sigma_SFR ~ 0.0001 - 0.01 Msun/kpc^2/yr and P_th/k_B ~ 100 -10000 cm^-3 K. In agreement with observations, turbulent velocity dispersions are ~7 k...

  9. The drop in the cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused by a change in the mode of gas accretion and by AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    van de Voort, Freeke; Booth, C M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2011-01-01

    The cosmic star formation rate is observed to drop sharply after redshift z=2. We use a large, cosmological, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation to investigate how this decline is related to the evolution of gas accretion and to outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). We find that the drop in the star formation rate follows a corresponding decline in the global cold-mode accretion rate density onto haloes, but with a delay of order the gas consumption time scale in the interstellar medium. Here we define cold-mode (hot-mode) accretion as gas that is accreted and whose temperature has never exceeded (did exceed) 10^5.5 K. In contrast to cold-mode accretion, which peaks at z~3, the hot mode continues to increase to z~1 and remains roughly constant thereafter. By the present time, the hot mode strongly dominates the global accretion rate onto haloes. Star formation does not track hot-mode halo accretion because most of the hot halo gas never accretes onto galaxies. AGN feedback plays a crucial ro...

  10. Acute Effects of Different Formats of Small-Sided and Conditioned Handball Games on Heart Rate Responses in Female Students During PE Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Manuel Clemente

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of different formats (2-a-side, 3-a-side and 4-a-side on heart rate responses of female students during small-sided and conditioned handball games. The heart rate responses were measured using heart rate monitors during physical education classes. Eight female students participated in the study (15 ± 0.0 years. The one-way ANOVA showed statistical differences with moderate effect between the three different formats (F(2, 1674 = 86.538; p-value ˂ 0.001;  = 0.094; Power = 1.0. The results showed that smaller formats (2-a-side and 3-a-side increased the heart rate responses of female students during small-sided and conditioned handball games during physical education (PE classes. The results also suggested that 2-a-side games can be used for anaerobic workouts and the 3-a-side and 4-a-side games can be better used to reach lactate-threshold and for aerobic workouts of high intensity.

  11. Effect of Low-Pressurized Perfusion with Different Concentration of Elastase on the Aneurysm Formation Rate in the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Model in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Maoxiao; Yan, Yunfeng; Li, Xinhe; Feng, Tingting; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Mingduo; Zhao, Quanming

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an animal model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the key to study the pathogenesis and the pathophysiological features of AAAs. We investigated the effects of low-pressurized perfusion with different concentrations of elastase on aneurysm formation rate in the AAA model. Fifty male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, C, D, and E groups. 10 μL of normal saline was perfused into the abdominal aorta in group A and 1 U/mL, 10 U/mL, 100 U/mL, or 200 U/mL of elastase was, respectively, perfused for the other four groups. All the animals were perfused for 7 min. Doppler ultrasound examinations of the abdominal aorta were performed before surgery and on day 14 after surgery. The rabbits were sacrificed and the perfused segment of the abdominal aorta was observed visually and after staining. The aneurysm formation rate of group A, group B, group C, group D, and group E was, respectively, 0%, 0%, 33.3%, 102.5-146.8%, and 241.5-255.2%. The survival rate of five groups was 90%, 90%, 90%, 90%, and 40%, respectively. So, we concluded that low-pressurized perfusion with 100 U/mL of elastase can effectively establish AAAs in rabbits with a high aneurysm formation rate.

  12. The role of the Reserve Bank's macro-model in the formation of interest rate projections (1). (Articles)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hampton, Tim

    2002-01-01

    .... In this sense, model projections are referred to as endogenous interest rate projections. This article explains the rationale for endogenous interest rate projections and why the Reserve Bank has adopted this approach. 1 Introduction The Bank's submission to the Monetary Policy Review outlined a number of the reasons why we prepare and p...

  13. Determination of n+1 Gamete Transmission Rate of Trisomics and Location of Gene Controlling 2n Gamete Formation in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-He Zhang; Xiao-Feng Li; Shu-Xing Shen; He Yuan; Shu-Xin Xuan

    2009-01-01

    A set of trisomics of Chinese cabbage was used for determining the n+1 gamete transmission rate and locating the gene controlling 2n gamete formation on the corresponding chromosome. The results showed that the transmission rates of extra chromosomes in different trisomica varied from 0% to 15.38% by male gametes and from 0% to 17.39% by female gametes. Of the nine F2 populations derived from the hybridizations between each triaomic and Bp058 (2n gamete material), only Tri-4×Bp058 showed that the segregation ratio of plants without 2n gamete formation to plants with 2n gamete formation was 10.38:1, which fitted the expected segregation ratio of the trisomics (AAa) based on the 7.37% of n+1 gamete transmission through female and 5.88% through male. In other populations the segregation ratios varied from 2.48:1 to 3.72:1, which fitted the expected 3:1 segregation ratio of the bisomice (Aa). These results suggested that the gene controlling 2n gamete formation in Chinese cabbage Bp058 was located on chromosome 4. Further trisomic analysis based on the chromosome segregation and the incomplete stochastic chromatid segregation indicated that the gene locus was tightly linked to the centromere.

  14. Hα Star Formation Rates for z>1 Galaxy Clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey Using WFC3 IR Grism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimann, Gregory; Stanford, A.; Brodwin, M.; Dey, A.; Stern, D.; Gonzalez, A.

    2011-05-01

    We present new HST WFC3 grism data for 17 z>1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). Using the G141 grism (λ = 1.10 - 1.65 μm, 46.5 A/pixel), we identified ˜5-15 new cluster members in each cluster candidate with a visual inspection of emission line galaxies in the reduced 1-d and 2-d spectral extractions. Given the redshift range of the cluster candidates and the wavelength coverage of the G141 grism, the emission line most identified was the blended Hα+NII. Correlations found in the literature between the EW of Hα+NII and the line ratio of NII to Hα were used to deblend the two fluxes. Hα emission was used as an indicator of star formation. Our program is sensitive to an unobscured star formation rate of 4 M⊙ / Year for z=1.5 and a nominal 1:4 ratio of NII to Hα. Concurrent MIPS 24μm data allows for the comparison of different SFR tracers. Whenever possible, we also use the ratio of Hβ/Hα to estimate dust obscuration and correct the SFRs. This dataset allows the study of a wide-range of star formation rates in dense cluster cores during the peak epoch of galaxy formation.

  15. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2016-12-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  16. Dynamics of intramolecular contact formation in polypeptides: distance dependence of quenching rates in a room-temperature glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, L J; Eaton, W A; Hofrichter, J

    2001-12-17

    Quenching of the triplet state of tryptophan by cysteine is an important new tool for measuring the rate of forming a specific contact between amino acids in a polypeptide chain. To determine the length scale associated with this contact, tryptophan was embedded in a room-temperature glass containing a high concentration of cysteine. The decay of the triplet population is extended in time, consistent with a rate coefficient that decreases exponentially with distance. Solving the diffusion equation with this distant-dependent rate reproduces the observed bimolecular rates in water and shows that quenching at low viscosities takes place less than or similar to A from van der Waals contact between the tryptophan and cysteine.

  17. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2017-03-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  18. Induction of microcin B17 formation in Escherichia coli ZK650 by limitation of oxygen and glucose is independent of glucose consumption rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q; Fang, A; Demain, A L

    2001-06-01

    We examined the consumption of glucose from the media in which Escherichia coli ZK650 was grown. This organism, which produces the polypeptide antibiotic microcin B17 best under conditions of limiting supplies of glucose and air, was grown with a low level of glucose (0.5 mg/ml) as well as a high level (5.0 mg/ml) under both high and low aeration. Glucose consumption rates were virtually identical under both high and low aeration. Thus, glucose consumption rate is not a regulating factor in microcin B17 formation.

  19. Robust Control of PEP Formation Rate in the Carbon Fixation Pathway of C4 Plants by a Bi-functional Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Yuval

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C4 plants such as corn and sugarcane assimilate atmospheric CO2 into biomass by means of the C4 carbon fixation pathway. We asked how PEP formation rate, a key step in the carbon fixation pathway, might work at a precise rate, regulated by light, despite fluctuations in substrate and enzyme levels constituting and regulating this process. Results We present a putative mechanism for robustness in C4 carbon fixation, involving a key enzyme in the pathway, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, which is regulated by a bifunctional enzyme, Regulatory Protein (RP. The robust mechanism is based on avidity of the bifunctional enzyme RP to its multimeric substrate PPDK, and on a product-inhibition feedback loop that couples the system output to the activity of the bifunctional regulator. The model provides an explanation for several unusual biochemical characteristics of the system and predicts that the system's output, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP formation rate, is insensitive to fluctuations in enzyme levels (PPDK and RP, substrate levels (ATP and pyruvate and the catalytic rate of PPDK, while remaining sensitive to the system's input (light levels. Conclusions The presented PPDK mechanism is a new way to achieve robustness using product inhibition as a feedback loop on a bifunctional regulatory enzyme. This mechanism exhibits robustness to protein and metabolite levels as well as to catalytic rate changes. At the same time, the output of the system remains tuned to input levels.

  20. The challenging task of determining star formation rates: the case of a massive stellar burst in the brightest cluster galaxy of Phoenix galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies at the center of cooling-flow galaxy clusters is an important phenomenon in the context of formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Yet, star formation rates (SFRs) in such systems continue to be elusive. We use our Bayesian-motivated spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting code, BAYESCOOL, to estimate the plausible SFR values in the brightest cluster galaxy of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster, Phoenix. Previous studies of Phoenix have resulted in the highest measurement of SFR for any galaxy, with the estimates reaching up to 1000 solar masses/yr. However, very few number of models have been considered in those studies. BAYESCOOL allows us to probe a large parameter space. We consider two models for star formation history, instantaneous bursts and continuous star formation, a wide range of ages for the old and the young stellar population, along with other discrete parameters, such as the initial mass function, metallicities, internal extinction and e...

  1. Local SDSS galaxies in the Herschel Stripe 82 survey: a critical assessment of optically derived star formation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, D. J.; Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Lutz, D.; Trump, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    We study a set of 3319 galaxies in the redshift interval 0.04 neglected in existing studies. We also study the capabilities of infrared selection of star-forming galaxies. FIR selection reveals a substantial population of galaxies dominated by cold dust which are missed by the long-wavelength WISE bands. Our results demonstrate that Herschel large-area surveys offer the means to construct large, relatively complete samples of local star-forming galaxies with accurate estimates of SFR that can be used to study the interplay between nuclear activity and star formation.

  2. The effect of mixing rates on the formation and growth of condensation aerosols in a model stagnation flow

    KAUST Repository

    Alshaarawi, Amjad

    2015-03-01

    A steady, laminar stagnation flow configuration is adopted to investigate numerically the interaction between condensing aerosol particles and gas-phase transport across a canonical mixing layer. The mixing rates are varied by adjusting the velocity and length scales of the stagnation flow parametrically. The effect of mixing rates on particle concentration, polydispersity, and mean droplet diameter is explored and discussed. This numerical study reveals a complex response of the aerosol to varying flow times. Depending on the flow time, the variation of the particle concentration in response to varying mixing rates falls into one of the two regimes. For fast mixing rates, the number density and volume fraction of the condensing particles increase with residence time (nucleation regime). On the contrary, for low mixing rates, number density decreases with residence time and volume fraction reaches a plateau (condensation regime). It is shown that vapor scavenging by the aerosol phase is key to explaining the transition between these two regimes. The results reported here are general and illustrate genuine features of the evolution of aerosols forming by condensation of supersaturated vapor from heat and mass transport across mixing layers.

  3. Analysis on Concentration and Source Rate of Precursor Vapors Participating in Particle Formation and Growth at Xinken in the Pearl River Delta of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Youguo; SU Hang; CHENG Yafang; LIU Feng; WU Zhijun; HU Min; ZENG Limin; ZHANG Yuanhang

    2008-01-01

    Concentration and source rate of precursor vapors participating in particle formation and subsequent growth were investigated during the Pearl River Delta intensive campaign (PRD2004, October 2004) in southeastern China. Four new particle formation event days and a typical non-event day were selected for our analysis. Atmospheric sulphuric acid, the important precursor vapor in nucleation and growth, were simulated with a pseudo steady-state model based on the measurements of SO2, NOX, O3, CO, non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and ambient particle number concentrations as well as modeled photolysis frequencies obtained from measurements. The maximum midday sulphuric acid concentrations vary from 4.53 × 107 to 2.17 × 108 molecules cm-3, the corresponding source rate via reaction of OH and SO2 range between 2.37 × 106 and 1.16 × 107 molecules cm-3 s-1. Nucleation mode growth rate was derived from size spectral evolution during the events to be 6.8-13.8 nm h-1. Based on the growth rate, concentration of the vapors participating in subsequent growth were estimated to vary from 1.32 × 10s to 2.80 × 108 molecules cm-3 with corresponding source rate between 7.26 × 106 and 1.64 × 107 molecules cm-3 s-1. Our results show the degree of pollution is larger in PRD. Sulphuric acid concentrations are fairly high and have a close correlation with new particle formation events. Budget analysis shows that sulphuric acid alone is not enough for required growth; other nonvolatile vapors are needed. However, sulphuric acid plays an important role in growth; the contribution of sulphuric acid to growth in PRD is 12.4%-65.2%.

  4. Using Uranium-series Isotopes to Trace Water Sources to Streamflow and Estimate Soil Formation Rates in a Semiarid Montane Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, D. M.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, J. C.; Rasmussen, C.; Chorover, J.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical weathering is an important earth surface process that transfers nutrients from earth materials to the biosphere and provides a drawdown of CO2 over geologic timescales. Understanding controls on chemical weathering and soil formation rates is important to understanding long term landscape evolution and sustainability of the Critical Zone, the dynamic region of earth's surface where bedrock, water, soil, and life chemically and physically interact. The La Jara catchment (LJC), part of the Jemez-Santa Catalina Critical Zone Observatory, drains a portion of the southeast side of the resurgent volcanic dome Redondo Peak in New Mexico's Valles Caldera National Preserve and is well suited to study how aspect and lithology control chemical weathering rates. We will focus on two hillslopes in a zero-order basin within LJC: One east-facing hillslope of predominantly tuff lithology and one west-facing hillslope of rhyolite lithology. Several variables play a role in chemical weathering rates in this system, including water availability, lithology, temperature, vegetation, and atmospheric dust deposition. This study will use uranium-series isotopes, as well as major elemental chemistry, soil mineralogy, and particle size distributions to calculate soil formation rates and identify dominant controls on chemical and physical weathering processes. We hypothesize the east-facing hillslope will receive less solar radiation, leading to cooler temperatures and less sublimation of the snowpack, which will result in a larger volume of water input to soils and thus greater soil formation rates compared to the west-facing hillslope. This study will also use uranium-series isotopes to study modern hydrologic partitioning and trace source water contributions to streamflow during wet and dry seasons along La Jara stream. We hypothesize that the longitudinal evolution of streamwater chemistry and uranium-series isotopes will show increasing influence from deeper flowpaths with

  5. Effect of repulsive interactions on the rate of doublet formation of colloidal nanoparticles in the presence of convective transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we have performed a systematic investigation of the effect of electrostatic repulsive interactions on the aggregation rate of colloidal nanoparticles to from doublets in the presence of a convective transport mechanism. The aggregation rate has been computed by solving numerically the Fuchs-Smoluchowski diffusion-convection equation. Two convective transport mechanisms have been considered: extensional flow field and gravity-induced relative sedimentation. A broad range of conditions commonly encountered in the applications of colloidal dispersions has been analyzed. The relative importance of convective to diffusive contributions has been quantified by using the Peclet number Pe. The simulation results indicate that, in the presence of repulsive interactions, the evolution of the aggregation rate as a function of Pe can always be divided into three distinct regimes, no matter which convective mechanism is considered. At low Pe values the rate of aggregation is independent of convection and is dominated by repulsive interactions. At high Pe values, the rate of aggregation is dominated by convection, and independent of repulsive interactions. At intermediate Pe values, a sharp transition between these two regimes occurs. During this transition, which occurs usually over a 10-100-fold increase in Pe values, the aggregation rate can change by several orders of magnitude. The interval of Pe values where this transition occurs depends upon the nature of the convective transport mechanism, as well as on the height and characteristic lengthscale of the repulsive barrier. A simplified model has been proposed that is capable of quantitatively accounting for the simulations results. The obtained results reveal unexpected features of the effect of ionic strength and particle size on the stability of colloidal suspensions under shear or sedimentation, which have relevant consequences in industrial applications.

  6. Merging Rates of the First Objects and the Formation of First Mini-Filaments in Models with Massive Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hyunmi

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of massive neutrinos on the evolution of the early mini-halos (M~10^{6} M_{\\odot} at z~20) where the first stars may have formed. In the framework of the extended Press-Schechter formalism, we evaluate analytically the rates of merging of the mini-halos into zero-dimensional larger halos and one dimensional mini-filaments. It is shown that the halo-to-filament merging rate increases sharply with the neutrino mass fraction f_{\

  7. Providing stringent star formation rate limits of z$\\sim$2 QSO host galaxies at high angular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vayner, Andrey; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z=2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini-North Observatories using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z=2.15. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFS provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a PSF from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy. We detect H$\\alpha$ and [NII] for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 and SDSS J0925+06 that have both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line H$\\alpha$ is from star formation, we inf...

  8. The impact of mass segregation and star-formation on the rates of gravitational-wave sources from extreme mass ratio inspirals

    CERN Document Server

    Aharon, Danor

    2016-01-01

    Compact stellar objects inspiralling into massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are some of the most promising gravitational wave (GWs) sources for next generation GW-detectors. The rates of such extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) depend on the dynamics and distribution of compact objects around the MBH. Here we study the impact of mass-segregation processes on EMRI rates. In particular, we provide the expected mass function of EMRIs, given an initial mass function of stellar BHs (SBHs), and relate it to the mass-dependent detection rate of EMRIs. We then consider the role of star formation on the distribution of compact objects and its implication on EMRI rates. We find that the existence of a wide spectrum of SBH masses lead to the overall increase of EMRI rates, and to high rates of the EMRIs from the most-massive SBHs. However, it also leads to a relative quenching of EMRI rates from lower-mass SBHs, and together produces a steep dependence of the EMRI mass function on the highest-mass SBHs. Sta...

  9. Are LGRBs biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II: star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    CERN Document Server

    Japelj, J; Salvaterra, R; D'Avanzo, P; Mannucci, F; Fernandez-Soto, A; Boissier, S; Hunt, L K; Atek, H; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L; Scodeggio, M; Cristiani, S; Floc'h, E Le; Flores, H; Gallego, J; Ghirlanda, G; Gomboc, A; Hammer, F; Perley, D A; Pescalli, A; Petitjean, P; Puech, M; Rafelski, M; Tagliaferri, G

    2016-01-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparin...

  10. Average reservoir pressure determination for homogeneous and naturally fractured formations from multi-rate testing with the TDS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Freddy Humberto; Ibagon, Oscar Eduardo; Montealegre-M, Matilde [Universidad Surcolombiana, Av. Pastrana-Cra. 1, Neiva, Huila (Colombia)

    2007-11-15

    Average reservoir pressure is an important parameter which is utilized in almost all reservoir and production engineering studies. It also plays a relevant role in the majority of well intervention jobs, field appraisal, well sizing and equipment and surface facilities design. The estimation of the average reservoir pressure is normally obtained from buildup tests. However, it has a tremendous economic impact caused by shutting-in the well during the entire test. Since buildup tests are the most particular case of multi-rate tests, these are also used for estimation of the average reservoir pressure. Among them, two-rate tests present drawbacks because it is operationally difficult to keep constant the flow rates. Conventional methods for determination of the average reservoir pressure can be readily extended to multi-rate tests once the rigorous time is converted to equivalent time by time superposition. In this article a new, easy and practical methodology is presented for the determination of the average pressure in both homogeneous and naturally fractured reservoirs from multi-rate tests conducted in vertical oil wells located inside a close drainage region. The methodology which follows the philosophy of the TDS technique uses a normalized pressure and pressure derivative point found on any arbitrary point during the pseudosteady-state flow regime to readily provide the average reservoir pressure value. For verification of the effectiveness of the proposed solution, several field and simulated examples were worked out. We found that the average reservoir pressure results obtained from the proposed methodology match very well with those estimated from either conventional techniques or simulations. (author)

  11. Relationship between exercise-induced heart rate increase and the formation of microbubbles and high-intensity transient signals in mechanical heart valve implanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sünbül, Ayşegül; Kırbaş, Ahmet; Tanrıkulu, Nursen; Sengül, Cihan; Dağdeviren, Bahadır; Işık, Omer

    2014-08-29

    The formation and collapse of vapor-filled bubbles near a mechanical heart valve is called cavitation. Microbubbles can be detected in vivo by doppler ultrasonography (USG) as HITS (high intensity transient signals) in cranial circulation. We investigated the relationship between exercise induced heart rate increase and HITS formation in cranial circulation. Thirty-nine mechanical heart valve implanted (8 aortic valve replacement (AVR) + mitral valve replacement (MVR), 9 AVR, 22 MVR) patients aged 18-80 years old were included in our study. Microbubbles were counted in the left ventricular cavity via transthoracic echocardiography at rest per cardiac cycle. Afterwards transcranial Doppler USG was performed and HITS were counted in each patient's middle cerebral artery at 5 min duration. Subsequently an exercise test according to the Bruce protocol was performed. After achieving maximal heart rate, microbubbles in the left ventricle and HITS were counted again. Microbubbles in the left ventricle and transcranial HITS increased after exercise significantly compared to resting values (15.79 ±10.91 microbubbles/beat vs. 26.51 ±18.00 microbubbles/beat, p exercise (r = 0.55, p increasing as the heart rate increased and more HITS were propelled to the cerebral circulation. As previously shown, HITS can alter cognitive functions. Therefore heart rate control is essential in mechanical heart valve patients to protect neurocognitive functions.

  12. THE RELATION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS FOR GALAXIES AT 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 IN CANDELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, Brett; Papovich, Casey; Tilvi, Vithal [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Finlator, Kristian [DARK fellow, Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Behroozi, Peter; Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H. [Physics Department, Stanford University, Particle Astrophysics, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Davé, Romeel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Long, James [Department of Statistics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3143 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram; Reddy, Naveen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Somerville, Rachel S., E-mail: bsalmon@physics.tamu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Distant star-forming galaxies show a correlation between their star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, and this has deep implications for galaxy formation. Here, we present a study on the evolution of the slope and scatter of the SFR-stellar mass relation for galaxies at 3.5 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 using multi-wavelength photometry in GOODS-S from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. We describe an updated, Bayesian spectral-energy distribution fitting method that incorporates effects of nebular line emission, star formation histories that are constant or rising with time, and different dust-attenuation prescriptions (starburst and Small Magellanic Cloud). From z = 6.5 to z = 3.5 star-forming galaxies in CANDELS follow a nearly unevolving correlation between stellar mass and SFR that follows SFR ∼ M{sub ⋆}{sup a} with a =0.54 ± 0.16 at z ∼ 6 and 0.70 ± 0.21 at z ∼ 4. This evolution requires a star formation history that increases with decreasing redshift (on average, the SFRs of individual galaxies rise with time). The observed scatter in the SFR-stellar mass relation is tight, σ(log SFR/M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) < 0.3-0.4 dex, for galaxies with log M {sub *}/M {sub ☉} > 9 dex. Assuming that the SFR is tied to the net gas inflow rate (SFR ∼ M-dot {sub gas}), then the scatter in the gas inflow rate is also smaller than 0.3–0.4 dex for star-forming galaxies in these stellar mass and redshift ranges, at least when averaged over the timescale of star formation. We further show that the implied star formation history of objects selected on the basis of their co-moving number densities is consistent with the evolution in the SFR-stellar mass relation.

  13. Correlation between the Inhibition of Positronium Formation by Scavenger Molecules, and Chemical Reaction Rate of Electrons with these Molecules in Nonpolar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (VOo)f electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found...... for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of Vo had a maximum for C2HsBr, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V, for CC14. The inhibition coefficient for C2H5Br in a 1:l molar tetramethylsilane......-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation...

  14. SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Todd C.

    2014-06-09

    Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

  15. Effect of game format on heart rate, activity profile, and player involvement in elite and recreational youth players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randers, M B; Andersen, T. Bull; Rasmussen, L S

    2014-01-01

    and 11v11 (20 min) games. Activity profile, heart rate (HR), and technical actions were measured during all games using 10 Hz GPS, video filming, and HR monitors. For U10, no difference was found in total distance covered (1754 ± 237 vs 1771 ± 314 m, P = 0.650, d = 0.06), whereas mean HR (174 ± 10 vs 168...

  16. Effect of oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M; Dewers, Thomas A; Krumholz, Lee R

    2005-11-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  17. Galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Dvorkin, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In Lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In Lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  18. Follow up of the CFRS with HST, ISO and VLA the cosmic star formation rate as derived from the FIR luminosity density

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, F

    1998-01-01

    Properties of CFRS field galaxies up to z=1 are discussed. Estimations of the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) lead to serious problems if they not account for AGN emissions and for light reemitted at IR wavelengths. Deep ISOCAM and VLA photometries on one CFRS field have been performed. Multi-wavelength analyses from UV to Mid-IR and hence to radio allow us to classify sources from their spectral energy distributions. This provides an estimation of the FIR luminosity density related to star formation. The deduced SFR density is free of extinction effects and not contaminated by AGN emissions. About 55+/-20% of the star formation at z<=1 is related to FIR emission. If a non truncated Salpeter IMF is adopted, the derived stellar mass formed from z=0 to z=1 seems too high when compared to the present day stellar mass. An important fraction (30%) of the star formation at z=0.5-1 seems to be related to the rapidly evolving population of compact/Irr galaxies. Larger systems found at z=1, show a slower evolution...

  19. Low aqueous solubility of 11-cis-retinal limits the rate of pigment formation and dark adaptation in salamander rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Boyer, Nicholas P; Nickle, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Kalyan S; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K; Oprian, Daniel; Cornwall, M Carter

    2012-06-01

    We report experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the aqueous solubility of 11-cis-retinoids plays a significant role in the rate of visual pigment regeneration. Therefore, we have compared the aqueous solubility and the partition coefficients in photoreceptor membranes of native 11-cis-retinal and an analogue retinoid, 11-cis 4-OH retinal, which has a significantly higher solubility in aqueous medium. We have then correlated these parameters with the rates of pigment regeneration and sensitivity recovery that are observed when bleached intact salamander rod photoreceptors are treated with physiological solutions containing these retinoids. We report the following results: (a) 11-cis 4-OH retinal is more soluble in aqueous buffer than 11-cis-retinal. (b) Both 11-cis-retinal and 11-cis 4-OH retinal have extremely high partition coefficients in photoreceptor membranes, though the partition coefficient of 11-cis-retinal is roughly 50-fold greater than that of 11-cis 4-OH retinal. (c) Intact bleached isolated rods treated with solutions containing equimolar amounts of 11-cis-retinal or 11-cis 4-OH retinal form functional visual pigments that promote full recovery of dark current, sensitivity, and response kinetics. However, rods treated with 11-cis 4-OH retinal regenerated on average fivefold faster than rods treated with 11-cis-retinal. (d) Pigment regeneration from recombinant and wild-type opsin in solution is slower when treated with 11-cis 4-OH retinal than with 11-cis-retinal. Based on these observations, we propose a model in which aqueous solubility of cis-retinoids within the photoreceptor cytosol can place a limit on the rate of visual pigment regeneration in vertebrate photoreceptors. We conclude that the cytosolic gap between the plasma membrane and the disk membranes presents a bottleneck for retinoid flux that results in slowed pigment regeneration and dark adaptation in rod photoreceptors.

  20. Combining experts' risk judgments on technology performance of phytoremediation: self-confidence ratings, averaging procedures, and formative consensus building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Roland W; Hansmann, Ralf

    2007-02-01

    Expert panels and averaging procedures are common means for coping with the uncertainty of effects of technology application in complex environments. We investigate the connection between confidence and the validity of expert judgment. Moreover, a formative consensus building procedure (FCB) is introduced that generates probability statements on the performance of technologies, and we compare different algorithms for the statistical aggregation of individual judgments. The case study refers to an expert panel of 10 environmental scientists assessing the performance of a soil cleanup technology that uses the capability of certain plants to accumulate heavy metals from the soil in the plant body (phytoremediation). The panel members first provided individual statements on the effectiveness of a phytoremediation. Such statements can support policymakers, answering the questions concerning the expected performance of the new technology in contaminated areas. The present study reviews (1) the steps of the FCB, (2) the constraints of technology application (contaminants, soil structure, etc.), (3) the measurement of expert knowledge, (4) the statistical averaging and the discursive agreement procedures, and (5) the boundaries of application for the FCB method. The quantitative statement oriented part of FCB generates terms such as: "The probability that the concentration of soil contamination will be reduced by at least 50% is 0.8." The data suggest that taking the median of the individual expert estimates provides the most accurate aggregated estimate. The discursive agreement procedure of FCB appears suitable for deriving politically relevant singular statements rather than for obtaining comprehensive information about uncertainties as represented by probability distributions.

  1. The Evolution of the Star Formation Rate of Galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Rieke, George H; Papovich, Casey; Cool, Richard J; Moustakas, John; Januzzi, Buell T; Kochanek, Christopher S; Rieke, Marcia J; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter; Murray, Steve S; Brown, Michael J I; Floc'h, Emeric Le

    2010-01-01

    We present the 24 micron rest-frame luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.6 constructed from 4047 spectroscopic redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of 24 micron selected sources in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. This sample provides the best available combination of large area (9 deg^2), depth, and statistically complete spectroscopic observations, allowing us to probe the evolution of the 24 micron LF of galaxies at low and intermediate redshifts while minimizing the effects of cosmic variance. In order to use the observed 24 micron luminosity as a tracer for star formation, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that could contribute significantly at 24 micron are identified and excluded from our star-forming galaxy sample based on their mid-IR spectral energy distributions or the detection of X-ray emission. The evolution of the 24 micron LF of star-forming galaxies for redshifts of z < 0.65 is consistent with a pure luminos...

  2. Hypusine formation in eukaryotic initiation factor 4D is not reversed when rates or specificity of protein synthesis is altered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E D; Mora, R; Meredith, S C; Lindquist, S L

    1987-12-05

    In mammalian cells, a single major cellular protein (eukaryotic initiation factor 4D) is post-translationally modified by the conversion of a lysine residue into the unusual amino acid hypusine. This modification was reported to occur during mitogen-stimulated growth of lymphocytes but not during quiescence, suggesting that alternative forms of eukaryotic initiation factor 4D might play a role in the regulation of cell growth perhaps through the control of protein synthesis itself (Cooper, H. L., Park, M. H., and Folk, J. E. (1982) Cell 29, 791-797). We took advantage of the drastic changes in translational specificity which occur in heat-shocked cells of Drosophila melanogaster, and of the wide variations in translation rates which occur in response to alterations of growth media in the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to investigate the relationship between the intracellular level and state of modification of the hypusine-containing protein and the rate and specificity of translation. We also studied whether the hypusine residue in this protein might be subject to further modification or reversion to lysine. Under all conditions examined, the protein was remarkably long-lived. Furthermore, the hypusine persists in this protein as hypusine, without further modification or reversion to lysine. Thus, we observe no correlation between the state of cellular translation and the persistence or reversal of this protein's modification. In addition, the data imply that neither are the state of such key cellular processes as DNA replication, RNA transcription, or carbohydrate metabolism so correlated.

  3. Structure formation in sugar containing pectin gels - influence of tartaric acid content (pH) and cooling rate on the gelation of high-methoxylated pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, H; Kern, K; Wilde, R; Berthold, A; Einhorn-Stoll, U; Drusch, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was the application of a recently published method, using structuring parameters calculated from dG'/dt, for the characterisation of the pectin sugar acid gelation process. The influence of cooling rate and pH on structure formation of HM pectin gels containing 65 wt.% sucrose were investigated. The results show that the structure formation process as well as the properties of the final gels strongly depended on both parameters. With increasing cooling rates from 0.5 to 1.0 K/min the initial structuring temperature slightly decreased and the maximum structuring velocity increased. The lower the cooling rates, the firmer and more elastic were the final gels. With increasing acid content (decreasing pH from 2.5-2.0) the initial structuring temperatures were nearly constant. The final gel properties varied visibly but not systematically. Gels with the lowest and highest pH were less elastic and weaker compared to those with medium acid concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between the inhibition of positronium formation by scavenger molecules, and chemical reaction rate of electrons with these molecules in nonpolar liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O.E.

    1977-03-10

    o-Ps yields were determined in various liquid hydrocarbons, tetramethylsilane, and mixtures thereof as a function of C/sub 2/H/sub 5/Br and CCl/sub 4/ concentration. These molecules are known to be good electron scavengers and positronium inhibitors as well. The spur reaction model of Ps formation predicts a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (V/sub 0/) of electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of V/sub 0/ had a maximum for C/sub 2/H/sub 5/Br, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V/sub 0/ for CCl/sub 4/. The inhibition coefficient for C/sub 2/H/sub 5/Br in a 1 : 1 molar tetramethylsilane-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation method from the point of view of radiation chemistry is also emphasized.

  5. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  6. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In October–November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC, US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR systems and whole air sampling (WAS into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4–27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3, aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13–195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The

  7. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In October–November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC, US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR systems and whole air sampling (WAS into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4–27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3, aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13–195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC

  8. Crystallization field and rate study for the formation of single phase sodium-potassium and potassium clinoptilolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevenir, Oe.; Kalipcilar, H.; Culfaz, A. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    Reproducible synthesis of clinoptilolite as the single crystalline phase was achieved in the narrow crystallization field at or around the nominal batch composition of 2.1(Na{sub 2}O+K{sub 2}O):Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:10SiO{sub 2}:110H{sub 2}O at 140 C. Clinoptilolites of high purity were crystallized in the pure sodium or mixed sodium-potassium cation systems. Partial replacement of hydroxyl anions with the salts of carbonates or chlorides also yielded clinoptilolite as the single crystalline phase although at lower crystallization rates. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Pressure oscillations caused by momentum on shut in of a high rate well in a fractured formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, S.

    1989-06-01

    Pressure transient testing techniques are an important part of reservoir and production testing procedures. These techniques are frequently used to determine practical information about underground reservoirs such as the permeability, porosity, liquid content, reservoir and liquid discontinuities and other related data. This information is valuable in helping to analyze, improve and forecast reservoir performance. This report is concerned with developing models for pressure transient well testing in high permeability, high flow rate, naturally fractured reservoirs. In the present work, a study was made of the effects of liquid inertia in the fractures and the wellbore on the pressure response obtained during a well test. The effects of turbulent flow and multi-phase flow effects such as gravitational segregation or anisotropic porous media effects were not considered. The scope of the study was limited to studying inertial effects on the pressure response of a fractured reservoir.

  10. A Coherent Study of Emission Lines from Broad-Band Photometry: Specific Star-Formation Rates and [OIII]/H{\\beta} Ratio at 3 < z < 6

    CERN Document Server

    Faisst, A L; Hsieh, B C; Laigle, C; Salvato, M; Tasca, L; Cassata, P; Davidzon, I; Ilbert, O; Fevre, O Le; Masters, D; McCracken, H J; Steinhardt, C; Silverman, J D; De Barros, S; Hasinger, G; Scoville, N Z

    2016-01-01

    We measure the H{\\alpha} and [OIII] emission line properties as well as specific star-formation rates (sSFR) of spectroscopically confirmed 33 cannot be fully explained in a picture of cold accretion driven growth. We find a progressively increasing [OIII]{\\lambda}5007/H{\\beta} ratio out to z~6, consistent with the ratios in local galaxies selected by increasing H{\\alpha} EW (i.e., sSFR). This demonstrates the potential of using "local high-z analogs" to investigate the spectroscopic properties and relations of galaxies in the re-ionization epoch.

  11. Measurement of the dmud quartet-to-doublet molecular formation rate ratio (lambdaq : lambdad) and the mu d hyperfine rate (lambdaqd) using the fusion neutrons from mu- stops in D2 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Nandita

    The MuSun experiment will determine the microd capture rate (micro - + d → n + n + nue) from the doublet hyperfine state Lambdad, of the muonic deuterium atom in the 1S ground state to a precision of 1.5%. Modern effective field theories (EFT) predict that an accurate measurement of Lambdad would determine the two-nucleon weak axial current. This will help in understanding all weak nuclear interactions such as the stellar thermonuclear proton-proton fusion reactions, the neutrino reaction nu + d (which explores the solar neutrino oscillation problem). It will also help us understand weak nuclear interactions involving more than two nucleons---double beta decay---as they do involve a two-nucleon weak axial current term. The experiment took place in the piE3 beam-line of Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) using a muon beam generated from 2.2 mA proton beam---which is the highest intensity beam in the world. The muons first passed through entrance scintillator and multiwire proportional chamber for determining thier entrance timing and position respectively. Then they were stopped in a cryogenic time projection chamber (cryo-TPC) filled with D2 gas. This was surrounded by plastic scintillators and multiwire proportional chambers for detecting the decay electrons and an array of eight liquid scintillators for detecting neutrons. Muons in deuterium get captured to form microd atoms in the quartet and doublet spin states. These atoms undergo nuclear capture from these hyperfine states respectively. There is a hyperfine transition rate from quartet-to-doublet state---lambdaqd along with dmicrod molecular formation which further undergoes a fusion reaction with the muon acting as a catalyst (MCF). The goal of this dissertation is to measure the dmicro d quartet-to-doublet rate ratio (lambdaq : lambdad) and microd hyperfine rate (lambda qd) using the fusion neutrons from micro. stops in D2 gas. The dmicrod molecules undergo MCF reactions from the doublet and the quartet state

  12. Selection effects in Gamma Ray Bursts correlations: consequences on the ratio between GRB and star formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Shigehiro, Nagataki; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the $L_X-T^*_a$ correlation (hereafter LT) between the X-ray luminosity $L_X (T_a)$ at the end of the plateau phase, $T_a$, and the rest frame time $T^{*}_a$. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of $L_X$ and $T^*_a$. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al....

  13. Update of the Pompe disease mutation database with 107 sequence variants and a format for severity rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroos, Marian; Pomponio, Robert J; van Vliet, Laura; Palmer, Rachel E; Phipps, Michael; Van der Helm, Robert; Halley, Dicky; Reuser, Arnold

    2008-06-01

    Pompe disease was named after the Dutch pathologist Dr JC Pompe who reported about a deceased infant with idiopathic hypertrophy of the heart. The clinical findings were failure to thrive, generalized muscle weakness and cardio-respiratory failure. The key pathologic finding was massive storage of glycogen in heart, skeletal muscle and many other tissues. The disease was classified as glycogen storage disease type II and decades later shown to be a lysosomal disorder caused by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency. The clinical spectrum of Pompe disease appeared much broader than originally recognized. Adults with the same enzyme deficiency, alternatively named acid maltase deficiency, were reported to have slowly progressive skeletal muscle weakness and respiratory problems, but no cardiac involvement. The clinical heterogeneity is largely explained by the kind and severity of mutations in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene (GAA), but secondary factors, as yet unknown, have a substantial impact. The Pompe disease mutation database aims to list all GAA sequence variations and describe their effect. This update with 107 sequence variations (95 being novel) brings the number of published variations to 289, the number of non-pathogenic mutations to 67 and the number of proven pathogenic mutations to 197. Further, this article introduces a tool to rate the various mutations by severity, which will improve understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation and facilitate the diagnosis and prognosis in Pompe disease.

  14. Formation of the prebiotic molecule NH$_2$CHO on astronomical amorphous solid water surfaces: accurate tunneling rate calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Investigating how formamide forms in the interstellar medium is a hot topic in astrochemistry, which can contribute to our understanding of the origin of life on Earth. We have constructed a QM/MM model to simulate the hydrogenation of isocyanic acid on amorphous solid water surfaces to form formamide. The binding energy of HNCO on the ASW surface varies significantly between different binding sites, we found values between $\\sim$0 and 100 kJ mol$^{-1}$. The barrier for the hydrogenation reaction is almost independent of the binding energy, though. We calculated tunneling rate constants of H + HNCO $\\rightarrow$ NH$_2$CO at temperatures down to 103 K combining QM/MM with instanton theory. Tunneling dominates the reaction at such low temperatures. The tunneling reaction is hardly accelerated by the amorphous solid water surface compared to the gas phase for this system, even though the activation energy of the surface reaction is lower than the one of the gas-phase reaction. Both the height and width of the ba...

  15. Toxic effects of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate on metabolic activity, growth rate, and microcolony formation of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, K K; Hesselsøe, M; Roslev, P; Henriksen, K; Sørensen, J

    2001-06-01

    Strong inhibitory effects of the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on four strains of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are reported. Two Nitrosospira strains were considerably more sensitive to LAS than two Nitrosomonas strains were. Interestingly, the two Nitrosospira strains showed a weak capacity to remove LAS from the medium. This could not be attributed to adsorption or any other known physical or chemical process, suggesting that biodegradation of LAS took place. In each strain, the metabolic activity (50% effective concentration [EC(50)], 6 to 38 mg liter(-1)) was affected much less by LAS than the growth rate and viability (EC(50), 3 to 14 mg liter(-1)) were. However, at LAS levels that inhibited growth, metabolic activity took place only for 1 to 5 days, after which metabolic activity also ceased. The potential for adaptation to LAS exposure was investigated with Nitrosomonas europaea grown at a sublethal LAS level (10 mg liter(-1)); compared to control cells, preexposed cells showed severely affected cell functions (cessation of growth, loss of viability, and reduced NH(4)(+) oxidation activity), demonstrating that long-term incubation at sublethal LAS levels was also detrimental. Our data strongly suggest that AOB are more sensitive to LAS than most heterotrophic bacteria are, and we hypothesize that thermodynamic constraints make AOB more susceptible to surfactant-induced stress than heterotrophic bacteria are. We further suggest that AOB may comprise a sensitive indicator group which can be used to determine the impact of LAS on microbial communities.

  16. Using U-series isotopes to quantify regolith formation and chemical weathering rates along a climosequence associated with the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Chabaux, F. J.; Dere, A. L.; White, T.; Jin, L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Regolith formation and chemical weathering are important Critical Zone processes and are responsible for soil development. Despite their fundamental importance, we still lack effective tools to quantify these processes. U-series isotopes offer a powerful geochronometer to quantify regolith production rates and weathering duration. This is largely due to improvements in analytical methods and mathematical approaches made over the last decade in measuring U-series isotopes and interpreting their fractionation during chemical weathering. Here, we present a systematic study of U-series isotopes (238U, 234U and 230Th) in shale-derived soils from five small watersheds in the eastern USA to understand the rates of regolith formation as a function of climate. The selected watersheds in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, and Puerto Rico are part of the shale transect established as part of the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. We first measured U-series isotopes in six regolith profiles from two planar hill-slopes (north vs. south) within the Shale Hills CZO in central PA to evaluate the role of aspect on regolith formation in the small watershed. All regolith samples display significant U-series disequilibrium. These U-series disequilibrium values are explained by two processes acting on U-series isotopes during weathering: a loss of 234U, 238U, and 230Th during water-rock interactions and a gain from circulating soil water and/or downslope particle transport. Regolith production rates and weathering durations were calculated with a U-series isotope mass balance model. On the southern (shaded) slope, regolith production rates decrease systematically with increasing soil thickness and distance from the ridge: from ~44.5 m/Myr at the ridge top to ~15.0 m/Myr at the valley floor. Durations of chemical weathering within these profiles range from 6.7 kyr to 44.7 kyr, increasing from the ridge to the valley floor. The regolith profiles on the northern

  17. Evolution of the specific Star Formation Rate Function at z<1.4 - Dissecting the mass-SFR plane in COSMOS and GOODS

    CERN Document Server

    Ilbert, O; Floc'h, E Le; Aussel, H; Bethermin, H; Capak, P; Hsieh, B C; Kajisawa, M; Fevre, O Le; Lee, N; Lilly, S; McCracken, H J; Michel-Dansac, L; Moutard, T; Renzini, A; Salvato, M; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N; Sheth, K; Smolcic, V; Taniguchi, Y; Tresse, L

    2014-01-01

    The relation between the stellar mass and the star formation rate characterizes how the instantaneous star formation is determined by the galaxy past star formation history and by the growth of the dark matter structures. We deconstruct the M-SFR plane by measuring the specific SFR functions in several stellar mass bins from z=0.2 out to z=1.4. Our analysis is primary based on a MIPS 24$\\mu m$ selected catalogue combining the COSMOS and GOODS surveys. We estimate the SFR by combining mid- and far-infrared data for 20500 galaxies. The sSFR functions are derived in four stellar mass bins within the range 9.5

  18. The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Rubele, Stefano; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Piatti, Andres E; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P; Groenewegen, Martin A T; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2015-01-01

    We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation ...

  19. The near-infrared radiation background, gravitational wave background and star formation rate of Pop III and Pop II during cosmic reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Y P; Dai, Z G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain the NIRB and SBGWs from the early stars, which are constrained by the observation of reionization and star formation rate. We study the transition from Pop III to Pop II stars via the star formation model of different population, which takes into account the reionization and the metal enrichment evolution. We calculate the two main metal pollution channels arising from the supernova-driven protogalactic outflows and "genetic channel". We obtain the SFRs of Pop III and Pop II and their NIRB and SBGWs radiation. We predict that the upper limit of metallicity in metal-enriched IGM (the galaxies whose polluted via "genetic channel") reaches $Z_{\\rm crit}=10^{-3.5}Z_{\\odot}$ at $z\\sim13$ ($z\\sim11$), which is consistent with our star formation model. We constrain on the SFR of Pop III stars from the observation of reionization. The peak intensity of NIRB is about $0.03-0.2~nW m^{-2}{sr}^{-1}$ at $\\sim 1 \\mu m$ for $z>6$. The prediction of NIRB signal is consistent with the metallicity evol...

  20. Star formation rates from young-star counts and the structure of the ISM across the NGC 346/N66 complex in the SMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hony, S.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Galliano, F.; Galametz, M.; Cormier, D.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Dib, S.; Hughes, A.; Klessen, R. S.; Roman-Duval, J.; Smith, L.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bot, C.; Carlson, L.; Gordon, K.; Indebetouw, R.; Lebouteiller, V.; Lee, M.-Y.; Madden, S. C.; Meixner, M.; Oliveira, J.; Rubio, M.; Sauvage, M.; Wu, R.

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which interstellar gas is converted into stars, and its dependence on environment, is one of the pillars on which our understanding of the visible Universe is build. We present a comparison of the surface density of young stars (Σ⋆) and dust surface density (Σdust) across NGC 346 (N66) in 115 independent pixels of 6 × 6 pc2. We find a correlation between Σ⋆ and Σdust with a considerable scatter. A power-law fit to the data yields a steep relation with an exponent of 2.6 ± 0.2. We convert Σdust to gas surface density (Σgas) and Σ⋆ to star formation rate (SFR) surface densities (ΣSFR), using simple assumptions for the gas-to-dust mass ratio and the duration of star formation. The derived total SFR (4 ± 1×10-3 M⊙ yr-1) is consistent with SFR estimated from the Hα emission integrated over the Hα nebula. On small scales the ΣSFR derived using Hα systematically underestimates the count-based ΣSFR, by up to a factor of 10. This is due to ionizing photons escaping the area, where the stars are counted. We find that individual 36 pc2 pixels fall systematically above integrated disc galaxies in the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram by on average a factor of ˜7. The NGC 346 average SFR over a larger area (90 pc radius) lies closer to the relation but remains high by a factor of ˜3. The fraction of the total mass (gas plus young stars) locked in young stars is systematically high (˜10 per cent) within the central 15 pc and systematically lower outside (2 per cent), which we interpret as variations in star formation efficiency. The inner 15 pc is dominated by young stars belonging to a centrally condensed cluster, while the outer parts are dominated by a dispersed population. Therefore, the observed trend could reflect a change of star formation efficiency between clustered and non-clustered star formation.

  1. Star formation rates in Lyman break galaxies: radio stacking of LBGs in the COSMOS field and the sub-$\\mu$Jy radio source population

    CERN Document Server

    Carilli, C L; Capak, P; Schinnerer, E; Lee, K -S; McCraken, H; Yun, M S; Scoville, N; Smolcic, V; Giavalisco, M; Datta, A; Taniguchi, Y; Urry, C Megan

    2008-01-01

    We present an analysis of the radio properties of large samples of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at $z \\sim 3$, 4, and 5 from the COSMOS field. The median stacking analysis yields a statistical detection of the $z \\sim 3$ LBGs (U-band drop-outs), with a 1.4 GHz flux density of $0.90 \\pm 0.21 \\mu$Jy. The stacked emission is unresolved, with a size $< 1"$, or a physical size $< 8$kpc. The total star formation rate implied by this radio luminosity is $31\\pm 7$ $M_\\odot$ year$^{-1}$, based on the radio-FIR correlation in low redshift star forming galaxies. The star formation rate derived from a similar analysis of the UV luminosities is 17 $M_\\odot$ year$^{-1}$, without any correction for UV dust attenuation. The simplest conclusion is that the dust attenuation factor is 1.8 at UV wavelengths. However, this factor is considerably smaller than the standard attenuation factor $\\sim 5$, normally assumed for LBGs. We discuss potential reasons for this discrepancy, including the possibility that the dust attenuati...

  2. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  3. X-ray Background at High Redshifts from Pop III Remnants: Results from Pop III star formation rates in the Renaissance Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L; Wise, John H; O'Shea, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    Due to their long mean free paths, X-rays are expected to have many significant impacts globally on the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by their heating and ionizing processes on large scales. At high redshifts, X-rays from Population (Pop) III binaries might have important effects on cosmic reionization and the Lyman alpha forest. As a continuation of our previous work on Pop III binary X-rays (Xu et al. 2014), we use the Pop III distribution and evolution from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the formation of the first galaxies, to calculate the X-ray luminosity density and background over the redshift range 20 > z > 7.6. As we find that Pop III star formation continues at a low, nearly constant rate to the end of reionization, X-rays are being continuously produced at significant rates compared to other possible X-ray sources, such as AGNs and normal X-ray binaries during the same period of time. We estimate that Pop II...

  4. Star-formation rates from young-star counts and the structure of the ISM across the NGC346/N66 complex in the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Hony, S; Galliano, F; Galametz, M; Cormier, D; Chen, C -H R; Dib, S; Hughes, A; Klessen, R S; Roman-Duval, J; Smith, L; Bernard, J -P; Bot, C; Carlson, L; Gordon, K; Indebetouw, R; Lebouteiller, V; Lee, M -Y; Madden, S C; Meixner, M; Oliveira, J; Rubio, M; Sauvage, M; Wu, R

    2015-01-01

    The rate at which interstellar gas is converted into stars, and its dependence on environment, is one of the pillars on which our understanding of the visible Universe is build. We present a comparison of the surface density of young stars (Sigma_*) and dust surface density (Sigma_d) across NGC346 (N66) in 115 independent pixels of 6x6 pc^2. We find a correlation between Sigma_* and Sigma_d with a considerable scatter. A power law fit to the data yields a steep relation with an exponent of 2.6+-0.2. We convert Sigma_d to gas surface density (Sigma_g) and Sigma_* to star formation rate (SFR) surface densities (Sigma_SFR), using simple assumptions for the gas-to-dust mass ratio and the duration of star formation. The derived total SFR (4+-1 10^-3 M_sun/yr) is consistent with SFR estimated from the Ha emission integrated over the Ha nebula. On small scales the Sigma_SFR derived using Ha systematically underestimates the count-based Sigma_SFR, by up to a factor of 10. This is due to ionizing photons escaping the ...

  5. Galaxy Pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - V. Tracing changes in star formation rate and metallicity out to separations of 80 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Scudder, Jillian M; Torrey, Paul; Patton, David R; Mendel, J Trevor

    2012-01-01

    We present a sample of 1899 galaxies with a close companion taken from the SDSS DR7. The galaxy pairs are selected to have velocity differences < 300 km/s, projected separations (rp) < 80 kpc/h, mass ratios between 0.1 and 10, and robust measurements of star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities. We match the galaxies in total stellar mass, redshift, and local density to a set of 10 control galaxies per pair galaxy. For each pair galaxy we can therefore calculate the statistical change in star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity associated with the interaction process. Relative to the control sample, we find that galaxies in pairs show typical SFR enhancements that are, on average, 60% higher than the control sample at rp < 30 kpc/h. In addition, the pairs demonstrate more modest SFR enhancements of ~30% out to at least 80 kpc/h (the widest separations in our sample). Galaxies in both major and minor mergers show significant SFR enhancements at all rp, although the strongest starbursts (with S...

  6. Direct measurements of dust attenuation in z ∼ 1.5 star-forming galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for dust geometry and star formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Whitaker, Katherine E., E-mail: sedona@berkeley.edu [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust around star-forming regions (A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}) and the integrated dust content (A {sub V,} {sub star}). We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 with Hα signal-to-noise ratio ≥5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra to calculate A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}. First, we stack spectra in bins of A {sub V,} {sub star}, and find that A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} = 1.86 A {sub V,} {sub star}, with a significance of σ = 1.7. Our result is consistent with the two-component dust model, in which galaxies contain both diffuse and stellar birth cloud dust. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log SSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (log M {sub *}). We find that on average A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing SSFR. Interestingly, the data hint that the amount of extra attenuation decreases with increasing SSFR. This trend is expected from the two-component model, as the extra attenuation will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant in the galaxy spectrum. Finally, using Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected Hα SFRs, and find that stellar population modeling produces incorrect SFRs if rapidly declining star formation histories are included in the explored parameter space.

  7. Directly Imaging Damped Ly-Alpha Galaxies at Redshifts Greater Than 2. III: The Star Formation Rates of Neutral Gas Reservoirs at Redshifts of Approximately 2.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Michele; OMeara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rafelski, Marc; Kanekar, Nissim

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a survey designed to probe the star formation properties of 32 damped Ly alpha systems (DLAs) at redshifts of approximately 2.7. By using the "double-DLA" technique that eliminates the glare of the bright background quasars, we directly measure the rest-frame FUV flux from DLAs and their neighbouring galaxies. At the position of the absorbing gas, we place stringent constraints on the unobscured star formation rates (SFRs) of DLAs to 2 sigma limits of psi less than 0.09-0.27 solar mass yr(exp -1), corresponding to SFR surface densities sigma(sub sfr) less than 10(exp -2.6)-10(exp -1.5) solar mass yr(exp -1) kpc(exp -2). The implications of these limits for the star formation law, metal enrichment, and cooling rates of DLAs are examined. By studying the distribution of impact parameters as a function of SFRs for all the galaxies detected around these DLAs, we place new direct constraints on the bright end of the UV luminosity function of DLA hosts. We find that less than or equal to 13% of the hosts have psi greater than or equal to 2 solar mass yr(exp -1) at impact parameters b(sub dla) less than or equal to (psi/solar mass yr(exp -1))(exp 0.8) + 6 kpc, differently from current samples of confirmed DLA galaxies. Our observations also disfavor a scenario in which the majority of DLAs arise from bright LBGs at distances 20 less than or equal to b(sub dla) less than 100 kpc. These new findings corroborate a picture in which DLAs do not originate from highly star forming systems that are coincident with the absorbers, and instead suggest that DLAs are associated with faint, possibly isolated, star-forming galaxies. Potential shortcomings of this scenario and future strategies for further investigation are discussed.

  8. The hidden AGN main sequence: Evidence for a universal SMBH accretion to star formation rate ratio since z~2 producing a M_BH-M* relation

    CERN Document Server

    Mullaney, J R; Béthermin, M; Elbaz, D; Juneau, S; Pannella, M; Sargent, M T; Alexander, D M; Hickox, R C

    2012-01-01

    Using X-ray stacking analyses we estimate the average amounts of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth taking place in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z~1 and z~2 as a function of galaxy stellar mass (M*). We find the average rate of SMBH growth taking place in SFGs follows remarkably similar trends with both M* and redshift as the average star-formation rates (SFRs) of these galaxies (i.e., dM_BH/dt ~ M*^(0.86+/-0.39) for the z~1 sample and dM_BH/dt ~ M*^(1.05+/-0.36) for the z~2 sample). It follows that the ratio of SMBH growth rate to SFR is (a) flat with respect to galaxy stellar mass (b) not evolving with redshift and (c) close to the ratio required to maintain/establish a SMBH to stellar mass ratio of ~10^(-3) as also inferred from today's M_BH-M_Bulge relationship. We interpret this as evidence that SMBHs have, on average, grown in-step with their host galaxies since at least z~2, irrespective of host galaxy mass and AGN triggering mechanism and that the relative growth rates are more important in esta...

  9. Fe{sup 2+} oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Shan; Zhou Lixiang, E-mail: lxzhou@njau.edu.cn

    2012-05-01

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe{sup 2+} ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slow oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} is helpful in jarosite formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  10. Regularity underlying complexity: a redshift-independent description of the continuous variation of galaxy-scale molecular gas properties in the mass-star formation rate plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, M. T.; Daddi, E.; Béthermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Juneau, S.; Elbaz, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/Sérvice d' Astrophysique, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Magdis, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hwang, H. S. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Da Cunha, E., E-mail: mark.sargent@cea.fr [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    Star-forming galaxies (SFGs) display a continuous specific star formation rate (sSFR) distribution, which can be approximated by two log-normal functions: one encompassing the galaxy main sequence (MS), and the other a rarer, starbursting population. Starburst (SB) sSFRs can be regarded as the outcome of a physical process (plausibly merging) taking the mathematical form of a log-normal boosting kernel that enhances star formation activity. We explore the utility of splitting the star-forming population into MS and SB galaxies—an approach we term the '2-Star Formation Mode' framework—for understanding their molecular gas properties. Star formation efficiency (SFE) and gas fraction variations among SFGs take a simple redshift-independent form, once these quantities are normalized to the corresponding values for average MS galaxies. SFE enhancements during SB episodes scale supra-linearly with the SFR increase, as expected for mergers. Consequently, galaxies separate more clearly into loci for SBs and normal galaxies in the Schmidt-Kennicutt plane than in (s)SFR versus M {sub *} space. SBs with large deviations (>10 fold) from the MS, e.g., local ULIRGs, are not average SBs, but are much rarer events whose progenitors had larger gas fractions than typical MS galaxies. Statistically, gas fractions in SBs are reduced two- to threefold compared to their direct MS progenitors, as expected for short-lived SFR boosts where internal gas reservoirs are depleted more quickly than gas is re-accreted from the cosmic web. We predict variations of the conversion factor α{sub CO} in the SFR-M {sub *} plane and we show that the higher sSFR of distant galaxies is directly related to their larger gas fractions.

  11. Metal-Poor, Strongly Star-Forming Galaxies in the DEEP2 Survey: The Relationship Between Stellar Mass, Temperature-Based Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Chun; Rigby, Jane R.; Cooper, Michael; Yan, Renbin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 28 redshift (z) approximately equal to 0.8 metal-poor galaxies in DEEP2. These galaxies were selected for their detection of the weak [O (sub III)] lambda 4363 emission line, which provides a "direct" measure of the gas-phase metallicity. A primary goal for identifying these rare galaxies is to examine whether the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate (SFR) holds for low stellar mass and high SFR galaxies. The FMR suggests that higher SFR galaxies have lower metallicity (at fixed stellar mass). To test this trend, we combine spectroscopic measurements of metallicity and dust-corrected SFR with stellar mass estimates from modeling the optical photometry. We find that these galaxies are 1.05 plus or minus 0.61 dex above the redshift (z) approximately 1 stellar mass-SFR relation and 0.23 plus or minus 0.23 dex below the local mass-metallicity relation. Relative to the FMR, the latter offset is reduced to 0.01 dex, but significant dispersion remains dex with 0.16 dex due to measurement uncertainties). This dispersion suggests that gas accretion, star formation, and chemical enrichment have not reached equilibrium in these galaxies. This is evident by their short stellar mass doubling timescale of approximately equal to 100 (sup plus 310) (sub minus 75) million years which suggests stochastic star formation. Combining our sample with other redshift (z) of approximately 1 metal-poor galaxies, we find a weak positive SFR-metallicity dependence (at fixed stellar mass) that is significant at 94.4 percent confidence. We interpret this positive correlation as recent star formation that has enriched the gas but has not had time to drive the metal-enriched gas out with feedback mechanisms.

  12. Weathering profiles in granitoid rocks of the Sila Massif uplands, Calabria, southern Italy: New insights into their formation processes and rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarciglia, Fabio; Critelli, Salvatore; Borrelli, Luigi; Coniglio, Sabrina; Muto, Francesco; Perri, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    soil formation rates was achieved for different depths of corresponding weathering profile zones. Soil formation rates ranged from 0.01-0.07 mm a- 1 for A and Bw horizons (weathering class VI) to 0.04-0.36 mm a- 1 for the underlying saprolite (C and Cr layers; class V). By comparing these results with the corresponding erosion rates available in the literature for the study area, that range from < 0.01-0.05 to 0.10-0.21 mm a- 1, we suggest that the upland landscape of the Sila Massif is close to steady-state conditions between weathering and erosive processes.

  13. Pore-scale insights to the rate of organic carbon degradation and biofilm formation under variable hydro-biogeochemical conditions in soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yan, Z.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes that control microbial growth, organic carbon degradation, and CO2 production and migration are fundamentally occur at the pore scale. In this presentation, we will describe our recent results of a pore-scale simulation research to investigate: 1) how moisture content and distribution affects oxygen delivery, organic carbon availability, and microbial activities that regulate the rate of organic carbon degradation and CO2 production in aerobic systems; and 2) how pore-scale reactive transport processes affect local microbial growth, biofilm formation, and overall rate of microbial reactions in anoxic systems. The results revealed that there is an optimal moisture content for aerobic bacterial respiration and CO2 production. When moisture is below the optimal value, organic carbon availability limits its degradation due to diffusion and osmotic stress to bacterial reactivity; and when moisture is above the optimal value, oxygen delivery limits microbial respiration. The optimal moisture condition is, however, a function of soil texture and physical heterogeneity, bioavailable soil organic carbon, and microbial community function. In anoxic and saturated system, simulation results show that biofilm preferentially forms in concave areas around sand particles and macro aggregates where cross-directional fluxes of organic carbon and electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate) favor microbial growth and attachment. The results provide important insights to the establishment of constitutive relationships between the macroscopic rates of soil organic carbon degradation and moisture content, and to the development of biogeochemical reactive transport models that incorporate biofilm structures and physio-chemical heterogeneity in soils and sediments.

  14. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. I. The flocculent galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, M_max, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H2) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the flocculent galaxy M33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M_max is proportional to Sigma_gas^4.7, M_max is proportional Sigma_H2^1.3, and M_max is proportional to Sigma_SFR^1.0. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

  15. Stellar masses, star formation rates, metallicities and AGN properties for 200,000 galaxies in the SDSS Data Release Two (DR2)

    CERN Document Server

    Brinchmann, J; Heckman, T M; Kauffmann, G; Tremonti, C A; White, S D M; Brinchmann, Jarle; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy M.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Tremonti, Christy; White, Simon D.M.

    2004-01-01

    By providing homogeneous photometric and spectroscopic data of high quality for very large and objectively selected samples of galaxies, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows statistical studies of the physical properties of galaxies and AGN to be carried out at an unprecedented level of precision and detail. Here we publicly release catalogues of derived physical properties for 211,894 galaxies, including 33,589 narrow-line AGN. These are complete samples with well understood selection criteria drawn from the normal galaxy spectroscopic sample in the second SDSS public data release (DR2). We list properties obtained from the SDSS spectroscopy and photometry using modelling techniques presented in papers already published by our group. These properties include: stellar masses; stellar mass-to-light ratios; attenuation of the starlight by dust; indicators of recent major starbursts; current total and specific star-formation rates, both for the regions with spectroscopy and for the galaxies as a whole; gas-phase ...

  16. The evolution of the equivalent width of the Hα emission line and specific star formation rate in star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol-Queraltó, E.; McLure, R. J.; Cullen, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Fontana, A.; McLeod, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a study which uses spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to investigate the evolution of the equivalent width (EW) of the Hα emission line in star-forming galaxies over the redshift interval 1 mass range (9.5 luminosity and Hα line flux, we use our galaxy samples to compare the evolution of EW(Hα) and specific star formation rate (sSFR). Our results indicate that over the redshift range 1 masses M⋆ ≃ 10^{10}{ M_{sun;} are related by EW(Hα)/Å = (63 ± 7) × sSFR/Gyr-1. Given the current uncertainties in measuring the SFRs of high-redshift galaxies, we conclude that EW(Hα) provides a useful independent tracer of sSFR for star-forming galaxies out to redshifts of z = 5.

  17. Measuring Star-formation Rate and Far-Infrared Color in High-redshift Galaxies Using the CO (7-6) and [NII] 205 micron Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C Kevin; Gao, Yu; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Inami, Hanae; Howell, Justin; Liu, Lijie; Armus, Lee; Mazzarella, Joseph; Privon, George C; Lord, Steven D; Sanders, David B; Schulz, Bernhard; van der Werf, Paul P

    2015-01-01

    To better characterize the global star formation (SF) activity in a galaxy, one needs to know not only the star formation rate (SFR) but also the rest-frame, far-infrared (FIR) color (e.g., the 60-to-100 $\\mu$m color, $C(60/100)$] of the dust emission. The latter probes the average intensity of the dust heating radiation field and scales statistically with the effective SFR surface density in star-forming galaxies including (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies [(U)LIRGs]. To this end, we exploit here a new spectroscopic approach involving only two emission lines: CO\\,(7$-$6) at 372 $\\mu$m and [NII] at 205 $\\mu$m. For local (U)LIRGs, the ratios of the CO (7$-$6) luminosity ($L_{\\rm CO\\,(7-6)}$) to the total infrared luminosity ($L_{\\rm IR}$; 8$-$1000 $\\mu$m) are fairly tightly distributed (to within $\\sim$0.12 dex) and show little dependence on $C(60/100)$. This makes $L_{\\rm CO\\,(7-6)}$ a good SFR tracer, which is less contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) than $L_{\\rm IR}$ and may also be much less sens...

  18. Linking galaxies to dark matter haloes at $z\\sim1$ : dependence of galaxy clustering on stellar mass and specific star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Edge, Alastair C; Wake, David A; Merson, Alexander I; Jeon, Yiseul

    2015-01-01

    We study the dependence of angular two-point correlation functions on stellar mass ($M_{*}$) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of $M_{*}>10^{10}M_{\\odot}$ galaxies at $z\\sim1$. The data from UKIDSS DXS and CFHTLS covering 8.2 deg$^{2}$ sample scales larger than 100 $h^{-1}$Mpc at $z\\sim1$, allowing us to investigate the correlation between clustering, $M_{*}$, and star formation through halo modeling. Based on halo occupation distributions (HODs) of $M_{*}$ threshold samples, we derive HODs for $M_{*}$ binned galaxies, and then calculate the $M_{*}/M_{\\rm halo}$ ratio. The ratio for central galaxies shows a peak at $M_{\\rm halo}\\sim10^{12}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$, and satellites predominantly contribute to the total stellar mass in cluster environments with $M_{*}/M_{\\rm halo}$ values of 0.01--0.02. Using star-forming galaxies split by sSFR, we find that main sequence galaxies ($\\rm log\\,sSFR/yr^{-1}\\sim-9$) are mainly central galaxies in $\\sim10^{12.5} h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ haloes with the lowest clustering amplitu...

  19. ALMACAL II: Extreme star-formation-rate densities in a pair of dusty starbursts at $z = 3.442$ revealed by ALMA 20-milliarcsec resolution imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Oteo, I; Ivison, R J; Smail, I; Biggs, A D

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA ultra-high-spatial resolution ($\\sim 20 \\, {\\rm mas}$) observations of dust continuum at $920 \\, {\\rm \\mu m}$ and $1.2 \\, {\\rm mm}$ in a pair of submm galaxies (SMGs) at $z = 3.442$, ALMACAL-1 (A-1: $S_{\\rm 870 \\mu m} = 6.5 \\pm 0.2 \\, {\\rm mJy}$) and ALMACAL-2 (A-2: $S_{\\rm 870 \\mu m} = 4.4 \\pm 0.2 \\, {\\rm mJy}$). The spectroscopic redshifts of A-1 and A-2 have been confirmed via serendipitous detection of up to nine emission lines. Our ultra-high-spatial resolution data reveal that about half of the star formation in each of these starbursts is dominated by a single compact clump (FWHM size of $\\sim 350 \\, {\\rm pc}$). This structure is confirmed by independent datasets at $920 \\, {\\rm \\mu m}$ and $1.2 \\, {\\rm mm}$. The star-formation rate (SFR) surface densities of all these clumps are extremely high, $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR} \\sim 1200$ to $\\sim 3000 \\, {M_\\odot \\, {\\rm yr}^{-1} \\, {\\rm kpc}^{-2}}$, the highest found in high-redshift galaxies. There is a small probability that A-1 and A-2 are the le...

  20. PRIMUS+DEEP2: The Dependence of Galaxy Clustering on Stellar Mass and Specific Star Formation Rate at 0.2 < z < 1.2

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Moustakas, John

    2016-01-01

    We present results on the clustering properties of galaxies as a function of both stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR) using data from the PRIMUS and DEEP2 galaxy redshift surveys spanning 0.2 < z < 1.2. We use spectroscopic redshifts of over 100,000 galaxies covering an area of 7.2 deg^2 over five separate fields on the sky, from which we calculate cosmic variance errors. We find that the galaxy clustering amplitude is a stronger function of sSFR than of stellar mass, and that at a given sSFR, it does not depend on stellar mass, within the range probed here. We further find that within the star-forming population and at a given stellar mass, galaxies above the main sequence of star formation with higher sSFR are more clustered than galaxies below the main sequence with lower sSFR. We also find that within the quiescent population, galaxies with higher sSFR are less clustered than galaxies with lower sSFR, at a given stellar mass. We show that the galaxy clustering amplitude smoothly inc...

  1. The Star Formation Rate-Density Relation at 0.6

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Shannon G; Holden, Bradford P; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D

    2011-01-01

    We study the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies as a function of local galaxy density at 0.61.8x10^{10} Msun to conduct our main analysis. With three different SFR indicators, (1) Spitzer MIPS 24-micron imaging, (2) SED fitting, and (3) [OII]3727 emission, we find the median specific SFR (SSFR) and SFR to decline from the low-density field to the cores of groups and a rich cluster. For the SED and [OII] based SFRs, the decline in SSFR is roughly an order of magnitude while for the MIPS based SFRs, the decline is a factor of ~4. We find approximately the same magnitude of decline in SSFR even after removing the sample of galaxies near the cluster. Galaxies in groups and a cluster at these redshifts therefore have lower star formation (SF) activity than galaxies in the field, as is the case at z~0. We investigated whether the decline in SFR with increasing density is caused by a change in the proportion of quiescent and star forming galaxies (SFGs) or by a decline in the SFRs of SFGs. Using the rest-frame ...

  2. Ground-based Pa$\\alpha$ Narrow-band Imaging of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies I: Star Formation Rates and Surface Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Tateuchi, Ken; Motohara, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kato, Natsuko Mitani; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Todo, Soya; Toshikawa, Koji; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K; Ohsawa, Ryou; Asano, Kentaro; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Komugi, Shinya; Koshida, Shintaro; Manabe, Sho; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Nakashima, Asami; Okada, Kazushi; Takagi, Toshinobu; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Uchiyama, Mizuho; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Handa, Toshihiro; Kawara, Kimiaki; Kohno, Kotaro; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyata, Takashi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Soyano, Takeo; Tamura, Yoichi; Tanaka, Masuo; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Yoshii, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are enshrouded by a large amount of dust, produced by their active star formation, and it is difficult to measure their activity in the optical wavelength. We have carried out Pa$\\alpha$ narrow-band imaging observations of 38 nearby star-forming galaxies including 33 LIRGs listed in $IRAS$ RBGS catalog with the Atacama Near InfraRed camera (ANIR) on the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 1.0 m telescope (miniTAO). Star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from the Pa$\\alpha$ fluxes, corrected for dust extinction using the Balmer Decrement Method (typically $A_V$ $\\sim$ 4.3 mag), show a good correlation with those from the bolometric infrared luminosity of $IRAS$ data within a scatter of 0.27 dex. This suggests that the correction of dust extinction for Pa$\\alpha$ flux is sufficient in our sample. We measure the physical sizes and the surface density of infrared luminosities ($\\Sigma_{L(\\mathrm{IR})}$) and $SFR$ ($\\Sigma_{SFR}$) of star-forming region for individual ga...

  3. Directly imaging damped Ly-alpha galaxies at z>2. III: The star formation rates of neutral gas reservoirs at z~2.7

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J Xavier; Rafelski, Marc; Kanekar, Nissim

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a survey designed to probe the star formation properties of 32 damped Ly-alpha systems (DLAs) at z~2.7. By using the "double-DLA" technique that eliminates the glare of the bright background quasars, we directly measure the rest-frame FUV flux from DLAs and their neighbouring galaxies. We place stringent constraints on the star formation rates (SFRs) of DLAs to 2-sigma limits of 2 M/yr at impact parameters b < SFR^(0.8)+6 kpc, in contrast with current samples of confirmed DLA galaxies, which appear to be biased. Our observations also disfavor a scenario in which the majority of DLAs arise from bright LBGs at distances 20 < b < 100 kpc. These new findings corroborate a picture in which DLAs do not originate from highly star forming systems that are coincident with the absorbers, and instead suggest that DLAs are associated with faint, possibly isolated, star-forming galaxies. Potential shortcomings of this scenario and future strategies for further investigation are discussed.

  4. ZFIRE: Galaxy Cluster Kinematics, H$\\alpha$ Star Formation Rates, and Gas-Phase Metallicities of XMM-LSS J02182-05102 at z=1.6233

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Kim-Vy H; Yuan, Tiantian; Kacprzak, Glenn G; Glazebrook, Karl; Kewley, Lisa J; Momcheva, Ivelina; Papovich, Casey J; Quadri, Ryan; Rudnick, Greg; Saintonge, Amélie; Spitler, Lee R; Straatman, Caroline; Tomczak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We spectroscopically survey the galaxy cluster XMM-LSS J02182-05102 (hereafter IRC 0218) using LRIS (optical) and MOSFIRE (near-infrared) on Keck I as part of the ZFIRE survey. IRC 0218 has a narrow redshift range of $1.612formation rates (SFR), gas phase metallicities from [NII]/H$\\alpha$, and stellar masses. We measure an integrated H$\\alpha$ SFR of $\\sim325{\\rm M}_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ (26 members; R$_{\\rm proj}<2$ Mpc) and show that the elevated star formation in the cluster core (R$_{\\rm proj}<0.25$ Mpc) is driven by the concentration of star-forming members, but the average SFR per H$\\alpha$-detected galaxy is half th...

  5. Separate Ways: The Mass-Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Heckman, T.; Blanc, G. A.; The MaNGA Team

    2017-07-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  6. X-Ray Background at High Redshifts from Pop III Remnants: Results from Pop III Star Formation Rates in the Renaissance Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Ahn, Kyungjin; Norman, Michael L.; Wise, John H.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their long mean free paths, X-rays are expected to have global impacts on the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by their large-scale heating and ionizing processes. At high redshifts, X-rays from Population (Pop) III binaries might have important effects on cosmic reionization and the Lyα forest. As a continuation of our previous work on Pop III binary X-rays, we use the Pop III distribution and evolution from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the formation of the first galaxies, to calculate the X-ray luminosity density and background over the redshift range 20≥slant z≥slant 7.6. As we find that Pop III star formation continues at a low, nearly constant rate to the end of reionization, X-rays are being continuously produced at significant rates compared to other possible X-ray sources, such as AGNs and normal X-ray binaries during the same period of time. We estimate that Pop III binaries produce approximately 6 eV of energy in the X-rays per hydrogen atom. We calculate the X-ray background for different monochromatic photon energies. KeV X-rays redshift and accumulate to produce a strong X-ray background spectrum extending to roughly 500 eV. The X-ray background is strong enough to heat the IGM to ˜1000 K and to ionize a few percent of the neutral hydrogen. These effects are important for an understanding of the neutral hydrogen hyperfine transition 21 cm line signatures, the Lyα forest, and the Thomson optical depth to the CMB.

  7. Direct Measurement of Dust Attenuation in z approx. 1.5 Star-Forming Galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for Dust Geometry and Star Formation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Foerster; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust towards star-forming regions (measured using Balmer decrements) and the integrated dust properties (derived by comparing spectral energy distributions [SEDs] with stellar population and dust models) for a statistically significant sample of distant galaxies. We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 or = 5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra. First, we stack spectra in bins of integrated stellar dust attenuation, and find that there is extra dust extinction towards star-forming regions (AV,HII is 1.81 times the integrated AV, star), though slightly lower than found for low-redshift starburst galaxies. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log sSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (logM*). We find that on average AV,HII increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing sSFR. The amount of extra extinction also decreases with increasing sSFR and decreasing stellar mass. Our results are consistent with the two-phase dust model - in which galaxies contain both a diffuse and a stellar birth cloud dust component - as the extra extinction will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant. Finally, using our Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected H(alpha) SFRs, and find evidence that SED fitting produces incorrect SFRs if very rapidly declining SFHs are included in the explored parameter space. Subject headings: dust, extinction- galaxies: evolution- galaxies: high-redshift

  8. How dead are dead galaxies? Mid-Infrared fluxes of quiescent galaxies at redshift 0.3 < z < 2.5: implications for star formation rates and dust heating

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Brammer, Gabriel; da Cunha, Elisabete; Schreiber, Natascha M Forster; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Pacifici, Camilla; Skelton, Rosalind E

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the star formation rates of quiescent galaxies at high redshift (0.3 1.5 marginally consistent with the ones expected from gas recycling (assuming that mass loss from evolved stars refuels star formation) and well above that at lower redshifts.

  9. A Flat Photoionization Rate at 2Formation Beyond z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C -A; Hernquist, L; Zaldarriaga, M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the implications of our measurement of the Lyman-alpha forest opacity at redshifts 2~3. Our measurement argues against a star formation rate density declining beyond z~3, in contrast with existing state-of-the-art determinations of the cosmic star formation history from direct galaxy counts. Stellar emission from galaxies therefore likely reionized the Universe.

  10. Influence of genotype and processing on the in vitro rate of starch hydrolysis and resistant starch formation in peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabanja, V; Liljeberg, H G; Hedley, C L; Kreft, I; Björck, I M

    1999-05-01

    The formation of resistant starch (RS) and the rate of starch hydrolysis were evaluated in vitro in a wild type of green-seeded pea genotype RRRbRb BC3 (33-Am) with 32.7% amylose content and in two mutants RRrbrb BC3 (23-Am) and rrRbRb BC3 (65-Am) with amylose contents of 23.3 and 65.1%, respectively. Pea samples were intact or homogenized and subjected either to autoclaving or to boiling at atmospheric pressure. The amount of RS (total starch basis) varied from 6.2 to 12.9% in the 23-Am products and from 31.2 to 33.4% in the 65-Am products. The RS level of the 33-Am product with a regular amylose content was 11.0%. Both the 23-Am and the 65-Am products were abundant sources of dietary fiber (39 and 34%, dry matter basis, respectively) versus 23% in the regular pea product. The amylose/amylopectin ratio was an important determinant of the rate of starch hydrolysis. The hydrolysis indices (HI) and predicted glycemic indices were lowest in the 65-Am peas (HI range = 42-59) as compared to the 23-Am peas (HI range = 53-84). It is concluded that the pea genotypes covered a wide range in starch availability, which is likely to affect nutritional parameters such as glycemic responses and colonic delivery of starch.

  11. Relationship between star formation rate and black hole accretion at z=2: The different contributions in quiescent, normal and starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rodighiero, G; Daddi, E; Negrello, M; Mullaney, J R; Delvecchio, I; Lutz, D; Renzini, A; Franceschini, A; Baronchelli, I; Pozzi, F; Gruppioni, C; Strazzullo, V; Cimatti, A; Silverman, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the co-evolution of black-hole-accretion-rate (BHAR) and star-formation-rate (SFR) in $1.5

  12. Hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from tertiary amines by benzyloxyl and cumyloxyl radicals: influence of structure on the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-08-05

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from a series of tertiary amines by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. With the sterically hindered triisobutylamine, comparable hydrogen atom abstraction rate constants (k(H)) were measured for the two radicals (k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) = 2.8), and the reactions were described as direct hydrogen atom abstractions. With the other amines, increases in k(H)(BnO(•))/k(H)(CumO(•)) ratios of 13 to 2027 times were observed. k(H) approaches the diffusion limit in the reactions between BnO(•) and unhindered cyclic and bicyiclic amines, whereas a decrease in reactivity is observed with acyclic amines and with the hindered cyclic amine 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethylpiperidine. These results provide additional support to our hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through the rate-determining formation of a C-H/N hydrogen-bonded prereaction complex between the benzyloxyl α-C-H and the nitrogen lone pair wherein hydrogen atom abstraction occurs, and demonstrate the important role of amine structure on the overall reaction mechanism. Additional mechanistic information in support of this picture is obtained from the study of the reactions of the amines with a deuterated benzyloxyl radical (PhCD(2)O(•), BnO(•)-d(2)) and the 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyloxyl radical.

  13. COMBINED CO AND DUST SCALING RELATIONS OF DEPLETION TIME AND MOLECULAR GAS FRACTIONS WITH COSMIC TIME, SPECIFIC STAR-FORMATION RATE, AND STELLAR MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Burkert, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr., D-85748 Garching (Germany); Saintonge, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Magnelli, B. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Combes, F. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, CNRS, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); García-Burillo, S. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional-OAN, Observatorio de Madrid, Alfonso XII, 3, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Neri, R.; Boissier, J. [IRAM, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d' Heres, Grenoble (France); Bolatto, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Contini, T.; Boone, F.; Bouché, N. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Planétologie, Universite de Toulouse, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Lilly, S.; Carollo, M. [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, CH-8093 ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Bournaud, F. [Service d' Astrophysique, DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Colina, L. [CSIC Instituto Estructura Materia, C/Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cooper, M. C., E-mail: linda@mpe.mpg.de, E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) between z = 0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2, and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion timescale (t {sub depl}) and gas to stellar mass ratio (M {sub mol} {sub gas}/M{sub *} ) of SFGs near the star formation ''main-sequence'' with redshift, specific star-formation rate (sSFR), and stellar mass (M{sub *} ). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO → H{sub 2} mass conversion factor varies little within ±0.6 dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms, z, M {sub *})), and less than 0.3 dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that t {sub depl} scales as (1 + z){sup –0.3} × (sSFR/sSFR(ms, z, M {sub *})){sup –0.5}, with little dependence on M {sub *}. The resulting steep redshift dependence of M {sub mol} {sub gas}/M {sub *} ≈ (1 + z){sup 3} mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M{sub *} are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M {sub *} relation. Throughout the probed redshift range a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion timescale causes a larger sSFR at constant M {sub *}. As a result, galaxy integrated samples of the M {sub mol} {sub gas}-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine M {sub mol} {sub gas} with an accuracy of ±0.1 dex in relative terms, and ±0.2 dex including systematic uncertainties.

  14. SELECTION EFFECTS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST CORRELATIONS: CONSEQUENCES ON THE RATIO BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dainotti, M. G.; Shigehiro, N. [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, Riken, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Vecchio, R. Del [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, ul. Orla 171, 31-501 Kraków (Poland); Capozziello, S., E-mail: maria.dainotti@riken.jp, E-mail: mdainott@stanford.edu, E-mail: delvecchioroberta@hotmail.it, E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl, E-mail: mariagiovannadainotti@yahoo.it, E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Napoli " Federico II," Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edicio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2015-02-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the L{sub X} -T{sub a}{sup ∗} (hereafter LT) correlation between the X-ray luminosity L{sub X} (T{sub a} ) at the end of the plateau phase, T{sub a} , and the rest-frame time T{sub a}{sup ∗}. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of L{sub X} and T{sub a}{sup ∗}. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al. showing that in both cases the intrinsic slope of the LT correlation is ≈ – 1.0. This method is general and therefore relevant for investigating whether or not any other GRB correlation is generated by the biases themselves. Moreover, because the farthest GRBs and star-forming galaxies probe the reionization epoch, we evaluate the redshift-dependent ratio Ψ(z) = (1 + z){sup α} of the GRB rate to the star formation rate. We found a modest evolution –0.2 ≤ α ≤ 0.5 consistent with a Swift GRB afterglow plateau in the redshift range 0.99 < z < 9.4.

  15. Relationships Between Base-Catalyzed Hydrolysis Rates or Glutathione Reactivity for Acrylates and Methacrylates and Their NMR Spectra or Heat of Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kadoma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The NMR chemical shift, i.e., the π-electron density of the double bond, of acrylates and methacrylates is related to the reactivity of their monomers. We investigated quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs between the base-catalyzed hydrolysis rate constants (k1 or the rate constant with glutathione (GSH (log kGSH for acrylates and methacrylates and the 13C NMR chemical shifts of their α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups (δCα and δCβ or heat of formation (Hf calculated by the semi-empirical MO method. Reported data for the independent variables were employed. A significant linear relationship between k1 and δCβ, but not δCα, was obtained for methacrylates (r2 = 0.93, but not for acrylates. Also, a significant relationship between k1 and Hf was obtained for both acrylates and methacrylates (r2 = 0.89. By contrast, log kGSH for acrylates and methacrylates was linearly related to their δCβ (r2 = 0.99, but not to Hf. These findings indicate that the 13C NMR chemical shifts and calculated Hf values for acrylates and methacrylates could be valuable for estimating the hydrolysis rate constants and GSH reactivity of these compounds. Also, these data for monomers may be an important tool for examining mechanisms of reactivity.

  16. Constraints on regolith formation and erosion rates at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, PA, determined using meteoric 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N.; Kirby, E.; Bierman, P. R.; Rood, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    New meteoric 10Be data from 73 samples of bulk regolith collected along north- and south-facing hillslopes at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO) provide first-order constraints on the timescales of regolith formation. The SSHO is located in the presently temperate climate zone of central Pennsylvania; however, sustained periglacial climate during the time of maximal extent of the Laurentide ice sheet (~19-21 ka) and deforestation during mid-19th Century charcoal production may have exerted significant influence on regolith production. Here, we quantify soil residence times and corresponding rates of regolith production and erosion on the north- and south-facing slopes at SSHO, using meteoric 10Be in samples of regolith collected at 25 locations along each hillslope from ridge top to toe slope. Hillslopes within the SSHO are relatively planar, but exhibit a pronounced asymmetry; north-facing slopes are steeper (~20°) than south-facing slopes (~15°). Meteoric 10Be concentrations decrease systematically with depth at all 6 profile sites. Meteoric 10Be inventories are similar at the north and south ridgetop sites (1.89 ± 0.55 at/cm2 and 1.63 ± 0.41 at/cm2, respectively) and generally increase with position downslope. Assuming that the delivery of meteoric 10Be to regolith is balanced by its removal via erosion, the total meteoric 10Be inventories at the north and south ridgetops are consistent with soil 10Be residence times of 10.5 ± 3 ky and 9.1 ± 2 ky, and with steady lowering rates of ~ 16 m/My and ~ 19 m/My, respectively. Increases in meteoric 10Be inventories downslope are consistent with relatively slow creep, with transport velocities of 0.45 cm/y and 0.38 cm/y for the north and south hillslopes, respectively. Comparison of our results with previously-published estimates of regolith production rates inferred from U-series disequilibrium reveals that estimates of steady-state erosion calculated using meteoric 10Be are considerably

  17. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  18. Does the evolution of the radio luminosity function of star-forming galaxies match that of the star formation rate function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Matteo; Negrello, Mattia; Mancuso, Claudia; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Massardi, Marcella; Bonaldi, Anna; Sajina, Anna; Smolc̆ić, Vernesa; Schinnerer, Eva

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the relationship between radio continuum luminosity and star formation rate (SFR) is of crucial importance to make reliable predictions for the forthcoming ultra-deep radio surveys and to allow a full exploitation of their results to measure the cosmic star formation history. We have addressed this issue by matching recent accurate determinations of the SFR function up to high redshifts with literature estimates of the 1.4 GHz luminosity functions of star-forming galaxies (SFGs). This was done considering two options, proposed in the literature, for the relationship between the synchrotron emission (Lsynch), that dominates at 1.4 GHz, and the SFR: a linear relation with a decline of the Lsynch/SFR ratio at low luminosities or a mildly non-linear relation at all luminosities. In both cases, we get good agreement with the observed radio luminosity functions but, in the non-linear case, the deviation from linearity must be small. The luminosity function data are consistent with a moderate increase of the Lsynch/SFR ratio with increasing redshift, indicated by other data sets, although a constant ratio cannot be ruled out. A stronger indication of such increase is provided by recent deep 1.4-GHz counts, down to μJy levels. This is in contradiction with models predicting a decrease of that ratio due to inverse Compton cooling of relativistic electrons at high redshifts. Synchrotron losses appear to dominate up to z ≃ 5. We have also updated the Massardi et al. evolutionary model for radio loud AGNs.

  19. The MOSDEF Survey: Dissecting the Star Formation Rate versus Stellar Mass Relation Using Hα and Hβ Emission Lines at z ≤ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona H.; de Groot, Laura; Azadi, Mojegan

    2015-12-01

    We present results on the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M*) relation (i.e., the “main sequence”) among star-forming galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 using the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. Based on a sample of 261 galaxies with Hα and Hβ spectroscopy, we have estimated robust dust-corrected instantaneous SFRs over a large range in M* (˜109.5-1011.5 M⊙). We find a correlation between log(SFR(Hα)) and log(M*) with a slope of 0.65 ± 0.08 (0.58 ± 0.10) at 1.4 star-forming galaxies, and not accounting for Balmer absorption, can yield steeper slopes of the log(SFR)-log(M*) relation. Our sample is immune from these biases as it is rest-frame optically selected, Hα and Hβ are corrected for Balmer absorption, and the Hα luminosity is dust corrected using the nebular color excess computed from the Balmer decrement. The scatter of the log(SFR(Hα))-log(M*) relation, after accounting for the measurement uncertainties, is 0.31 dex at 2.1 relation with some intrinsic scatter, we argue that in the absence of direct measurements of galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the attenuation/extinction curves and the initial mass function, one cannot use the difference in the scatter of the SFR(Hα)- and SFR(UV)-M* relations to constrain the stochasticity of star formation in high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Phase formation of Cu{sub 50−x}Co{sub x}Zr{sub 50} (x = 0–20 at.%) alloys: Influence of cooling rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javid, F.A., E-mail: f.a.javid@ifw-dresden.de [Institute for Complex Materials, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Materials Science, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Mattern, N. [Institute for Complex Materials, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Samadi Khoshkhoo, M. [Institute for Complex Materials, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Materials Science, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Stoica, M.; Pauly, S. [Institute for Complex Materials, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Eckert, J. [Institute for Complex Materials, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Materials Science, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • Pseudo-binary (Cu,Co)Zr phase diagram. • Stable and metastable phases of Cu–Co–Zr alloys. • Martensitic transformation. -- Abstract: The dependence of phase formation on quenching rate and the thermodynamical stability of Cu{sub 50−x}Co{sub x}Zr{sub 50} (x = 0–20) was investigated. It was found that cobalt decreases the glass forming ability of the alloys and changes the crystalline products of the system from Cu{sub 10}Zr{sub 7} + CuZr{sub 2} to a (Cu,Co)Zr phase with a B2 structure. The results indicate that for the melt-spun ribbons with at least 5 at.% Co, the glass crystallizes directly into B2 (Cu,Co)Zr, while in the case of bulk specimens, compositions with 0 ⩽ x < 5 of Co contain the monoclinic (Cu,Co)Zr phase as well as Cu{sub 10}Zr{sub 7} and CuZr{sub 2}, whereas for x ⩾ 10, the B2 (Cu,Co)Zr phase is the equilibrium phase at room temperature. Complete solubility of cobalt in B2 CuZr is indicated by the linear change of the lattice constant, which can be readily understood by Vegard’s law. Furthermore, increasing the cobalt content decreases the martensitic transformation temperatures. The phase formation in the ternary system is summarized in a pseudo-binary (Cu,Co)Zr phase diagram. The results are useful for designing new shape memory alloys, as well as bulk metallic glass composites with the addition of glass former elements.

  1. GROUND-BASED Paα NARROW-BAND IMAGING OF LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. I. STAR FORMATION RATES AND SURFACE DENSITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateuchi, Ken; Konishi, Masahiro; Motohara, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kato, Natsuko Mitani; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Todo, Soya; Toshikawa, Koji; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Ohsawa, Ryou; Asano, Kentaro; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Okada, Kazushi [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ita, Yoshifusa [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Komugi, Shinya [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 2665-1, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Koshida, Shintaro [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Manabe, Sho [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Nakashima, Asami, E-mail: tateuchi@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are enshrouded by a large amount of dust produced by their active star formation, and it is difficult to measure their activity in optical wavelengths. We have carried out Paα narrow-band imaging observations of 38 nearby star forming galaxies including 33 LIRGs listed in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample catalog with the Atacama Near InfraRed camera on the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 1.0 m telescope (miniTAO). Star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from the Paα fluxes, corrected for dust extinction using the Balmer decrement method (typically A{sub V} ∼ 4.3 mag), show a good correlation with those from the bolometric infrared luminosity of the IRAS data within a scatter of 0.27 dex. This suggests that the correction of dust extinction for the Paα flux is sufficient in our sample. We measure the physical sizes and surface densities of infrared luminosities (Σ{sub L(IR)}) and the SFR (Σ{sub SFR}) of star forming regions for individual galaxies, and we find that most of the galaxies follow a sequence of local ultra-luminous or luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) on the L(IR)-Σ{sub L(IR)} and SFR-Σ{sub SFR} plane. We confirm that a transition of the sequence from normal galaxies to U/LIRGs is seen at L(IR) = 8 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}. Also, we find that there is a large scatter in physical size, different from normal galaxies or ULIRGs. Considering the fact that most U/LIRGs are merging or interacting galaxies, this scatter may be caused by strong external factors or differences in their merging stages.

  2. Star Formation Suppression in Compact Group Galaxies: A New Path to Quenching?

    CERN Document Server

    Alatalo, K; Lisenfeld, U; Bitsakis, T; Lanz, L; Lacy, M; Charmandaris, V; Cluver, M; Dopita, M A; Guillard, P; Jarrett, T; Kewley, L J; Nyland, K; Ogle, P M; Rasmussen, J; Rich, J A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Xu, C K; Yun, M

    2015-01-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H$_2$-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H$_2$ bright galaxies, with CARMA. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and early-type galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies show star formation suppression of $\\langle$S$\\rangle$=10$\\pm$5, distributed bimodally, with five objects exhibiting suppressions of S$\\gtrsim$10 and depletion timescales $\\gtrsim$10Gyr. This star formation inefficiency is also seen in the efficiency per freefall time. We investigate the gas-to-dust ratios of these galaxies to determine if an incorrect conversion caused the apparent suppression and find that HCGs have normal ratios. It is likely that the cause of the suppression in these objects is associated with shocks injecting turbulence int...

  3. Relationship between star formation rate and black hole accretion at z=3: the different contributions in quiescent, normal, and starburst galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodighiero, G.; Franceschini, A.; Baronchelli, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Universita’ di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 (Italy); Brusa, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Pozzi, F.; Cimatti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Daddi, E.; Strazzullo, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, Bât.709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Negrello, M.; Renzini, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Mullaney, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Lutz, D. [Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Gruppioni, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Silverman, J., E-mail: giulia.rodighiero@unipd.it [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-02-10

    We investigate the co-evolution of the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) and the star formation rate (SFR) in 1.5

  4. 星系中恒星形成率指针的比较研究%A Comparison of Star Formation Rate Indicators for Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊东鑫; 李金荣; 潘治政; 史菲; 方官文; 孔旭

    2012-01-01

    With the multi-wavelength data from GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer), SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey), UKIDSS (UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey), and Her-schel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey Science Demonstration Phase (H-ATLAS SDP), we have studied the star formation rate (SFR) indicators based on UV, Ha, and FIR, and found that the discrepancies among SFR estimates made by using different indicators are strongly correlated with star formation activities of galaxies. For those strong star forming galaxies (SSFGs), after correcting the dust attenuation and aperture effects, the SFR estimates from Ha agree with those from UV and infrared very well, only with a small scatter. For the low star forming galaxies (LSFGs), the difference between UV and Ha SFR indicators tends to increase with the age and stellar mass of galaxies. We have analyzed the reasons for those differences, and found that the recipe commonly applied to local star burst galaxies overestimates the dust attenuation of LSFGs, and then overestimates SFR(UV); and the SFR(Ha) for LSFGs was underestimated in the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics/Johns Hopkins University catalog.%利用赫歇尔空间望远镜的H-ATLAS (Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey) SDP (Science Demonstration Phase)天区从紫外到亚毫米波段数据,结合星族合成方法和尘埃模型,计算了星系的红外总光度.在此基础上,分别针对强恒星形成星系和弱恒星形成星系,研究了利用紫外光度、红外光度和Hα谱线计算得到的恒星形成率(Star Formation Rate,SFR)的差异以及导致差异的内在物理起因.发现对于恒星形成活动强的星系,这3种恒星形成率指针给出的结果基本一致,弥散较小.只是在高恒星形成率端,利用紫外光度算得的恒星形成率比利用Hα谱线流量算得的恒星形成率略微偏小;而在低恒星形成率端,紫外光度指针偏大于Hα谱线指针;红外光度指针与Hα谱线指

  5. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrow-band Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ly, C; Kashikawa, N; Shimasaku, K; Doi, M; Nagao, T; Iye, M; Kodama, T; Morokuma, T; Motohara, K; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matt A.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Doi, Mamoru; Nagao, Tohru; Iye, Masanori; Kodama, Tadayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Abridged: Subaru Deep Field line-emitting galaxies in four narrow-band filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broad-band colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple NB filters are used to distinguish Ha, [O II], and [O III] emitters between redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 to construct their luminosity functions (LFs). These LFs are derived down to faint magnitudes, which allows for a more accurate determination of the faint end slope. With a large (N~200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each LF. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [O III] and [O II] LFs reported in this paper agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al. The z=0.08 Ha LF, which reaches two orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al., is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low luminosity star-forming galaxies for z1, the star-formation rate densities are more or less constant. The latter is consistent with previous UV and [O II] measurements. Below z&...

  6. GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC): Star Formation Rates, Stellar Masses and Dust Attenuations of 700,000 Low-redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Samir; Janowiecki, Steven; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickinson, Mark; Boquien, Médéric; Burgarella, Denis; Salzer, John J; Charlot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present GALEX-SDSS-WISE Legacy Catalog (GSWLC), a catalog of physical properties (stellar masses, dust attenuations and star formation rates (SFRs)) of ~700,000 galaxies with SDSS redshifts below 0.3. GSWLC contains galaxies within the GALEX footprint, regardless of a UV detection, covering 90% of SDSS. The physical properties were obtained from UV/optical SED fitting following Bayesian methodology of Salim et al. (2007), with improvements such as blending corrections for low-resolution UV photometry, flexible dust attenuation laws, and emission line corrections. GSWLC includes mid-IR SFRs derived from IR templates based upon 22 micron WISE observations. These estimates are independent of UV/optical SED fitting, in order to separate possible systematics. The paper argues that the comparison of specific SFRs (SSFRs) is more informative and physically motivated than the comparison of SFRs. SSFRs resulting from the UV/optical SED fitting are compared to the mid-IR SSFRs, and to SSFRs from three...

  7. Effect of the C/O ratio on the C 60 and C 70 formation rates in soot synthesised by laser pyrolysis of benzene-based mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ténégal, F.; Petcu, S.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Armand, X.; Mayne, M.; Reynaud, C.

    2001-02-01

    The effect of varying the C to O atomic ratio on the formation of fullerenes in sooting flames produced by the laser pyrolysis of benzene-based mixtures was investigated. Infrared spectra were recorded on soot toluene extracts and quantification of C 60 and C 70 was performed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. A strong increase of the fullerenes yield (C 60+C 70) was observed with decreasing C/O ratio (2.2-1.2). The lowering of the C/O ratio was also found to influence dramatically the ratio of C 60 to C 70 through an increase of the C 60 yield faster than the C 70 one. These two effects can be fully interpreted by a kinetically based argument. A strong increase of the fullerenes content was also observed with decreasing residence time in the reaction flame, and a maximum total yield of 0.23% was reached with high conversion rates (from benzene to soot). Ponderable amounts of C 84 were also quantified.

  8. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Outskirts of Star Forming Galaxies from z~1 to z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Marc; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR) efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in Damped Ly-alpha Systems (DLAs) at z~3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z~1, z~2, and z~3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of HI gas at z>1 is ~1-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift...

  9. The applicability of FIR fine-structure lines as Star Formation Rate tracers over wide ranges of metallicities and galaxy types

    CERN Document Server

    De Looze, Ilse; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J; Boquien, Mederic; Boselli, Alessandro; Clements, David L; Cortese, Luca; Cooray, Asantha; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Isaak, Kate; Karczewski, Oskar L; Parkin, Tara J; Pellegrini, Eric W; Remy-Ruyer, Aurelie; Spinoglio, Luigi; Smith, Matthew; Sturm, Eckhard; Wilson, Christine D

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the applicability of far-infrared fine-structure lines [CII] 158 micron, [OI] 63 micron and [OIII] 88 micron to reliably trace the star formation rate (SFR) in a sample of low-metallicity dwarf galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey and compare with a broad sample of galaxies of various types and metallicities in the literature. We study the trends and scatter in the relation between the SFR (as traced by GALEX FUV and MIPS 24 micron) and far-infrared line emission, on spatially resolved and global galaxy scales, in dwarf galaxies. We assemble far-infrared line measurements from the literature and infer whether the far-infrared lines can probe the SFR (as traced by the total-infrared luminosity) in a variety of galaxy populations. In metal-poor dwarfs, the [OI] and [OIII] lines show the strongest correlation with the SFR with an accuracy on the SFR estimates better than a factor of 2, while the link between [CII] emission and the SFR is more dispersed (factor of 2.5 accuracy). The scatter i...

  10. The Most Luminous z~9-10 Galaxy Candidates yet Found: The Luminosity Function, Cosmic Star-Formation Rate, and the First Mass Density Estimate at 500 Myr

    CERN Document Server

    Oesch, P A; Illingworth, G D; Labbe, I; Smit, R; Franx, M; van Dokkum, P G; Momcheva, I; Ashby, M L N; Fazio, G G; Huang, J; Willner, S P; Gonzalez, V; Magee, D; Brammer, G B; Skelton, R E

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H_160 ~ 26 - 27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z~9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z~10 galaxy candidates that are known, just 500 Myr after the Big Bang. These sources were identified in a search over the full CANDELS-Deep dataset, building on our previous analysis of the HUDF09/XDF fields and GOODS-S. Three of these four galaxies are significantly detected at 4.5-6.2sigma in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 micron data. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z=10.2+-0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 micron (6.9sigma), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope beta=-2.0+-0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. The abundance of these luminous candidates suggests that the luminosity function evolves more significantly in phi_* than in L_* at z>~8. Despite the discovery of these luminous candidates, the cosmic star formation rate density for g...

  11. The [OII]3727 Luminosity function and Star Formation Rate at z~1.2 in the COSMOS 2 Square-degree Field and the Subaru Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, M I; Taniguchi, Y; Murayama, T; Ajiki, M; Sasaki, S S; Koizumi, O; Nagao, T; Scoville, N Z; Mobasher, B; Aussel, H; Capak, P; Carilli, C; Ellis, Richard S; Garilli, B; Giavalisco, M; Guzzo, L; Hasinger, G; Impey, C; Kitzbichler, M G; Koekemoer, A; Lefèvre, O; Lilly, S J; MacCagni, D; Renzini, A; Rich, M; Sanders, D B; Schinnerer, E; Scodeggio, M; Shopbell, P; Smolcic, V; Tribiano, S; Ideue, Y; Mihara, S

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out a wide-field imaging survey for [OII]3727 emitting galaxies at z~1.2 in the HST COSMOS 2 square degree field using the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. The survey covers a sky area of 6700 arcmin^2 in the COSMOS field, and a redshift range between 1.17 and 1.20 (Delta_z = 0.03), corresponding to a survey volume of 5.56*10^5 Mpc^3. We obtain a sample of 3176 [OII] emitting galaxies with observed emission-line equivalent widths greater than 26 AA. Since our survey tends to sample brighter [OII]3727 emitting galaxies, we also analyze a sample of fainter [OII]3727 emitting galaxies found in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). We find an extinction-corrected [OII] luminosity density of 10^{40.35^+0.08_-0.06} ergs s^-1 Mpc-3, corresponding to star formation rate density of 0.32^+0.06_-0.04 M_sun yr-1 Mpc^-3 in the COSMOS field at z~1.2. This is the largest survey for [OII]3727 emitters beyond z=1 currently available.

  12. The MOSDEF Survey: The strong agreement between H-alpha and UV-to-FIR star formation rates for z~2 star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A; Shapley, Alice E; Barro, Guillermo; Conroy, Charlie; Coil, Alison L; Freeman, William R; Mobasher, Bahram; Siana, Brian; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona H; Azadi, Mojegan; Pasha, Imad; Inami, Hanae

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic SED-based SFRs for z~2 galaxies. For this comparison we used 17 star-forming galaxies selected from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, with $3\\sigma$ detections for H$\\alpha$ and at least two IR bands (Spitzer/MIPS 24$\\mu$m and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160$\\mu$m, and in some cases Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500$\\mu$m). The galaxies have total IR (8-1000$\\mu$m) luminosities of $\\sim10^{11.4}-10^{12.4}\\,\\textrm{L}_\\odot$ and star-formation rates (SFRs) of $\\sim30-250\\,\\textrm{M}_\\odot\\,\\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models - which include both stellar and dust emission - and compare the inferred SFRs with the SFR(H$\\alpha$,H$\\beta$) values corrected for dust attenuation using Balmer decrements. The two SFRs agree with a scatter of 0.17 dex. Our results imply that the Balmer decrement accurately predicts the obscuration of the nebular lines and can be used t...

  13. Star Formation Rates and Stellar Masses of H-alpha Selected Star-Forming Galaxies at z=0.84: A Quantification of the Downsizing

    CERN Document Server

    Villar, V; Pérez-González, P-G; Barro, G; Zamorano, J; Noeske, K G; Koo, D C

    2011-01-01

    In this work we analyze the physical properties of a sample of 153 star forming galaxies at z~0.84, selected by their H-alpha flux with a NB filter. B-band luminosities of the objects are higher than those of local star forming galaxies. Most of the galaxies are located in the blue cloud, though some objects are detected in the green valley and in the red sequence. After the extinction correction is applied virtually all these red galaxies move to the blue sequence, unveiling their dusty nature. A check on the extinction law reveals that the typical extinction law for local starbursts is well suited for our sample but with E(B-V)_stars=0.55 E(B-V)_gas. We compare star formation rates (SFR) measured with different tracers (H-alpha, UV and IR) finding that they agree within a factor of three after extinction correction. We find a correlation between the ratios SFR_FUV/SFR_H-alpha, SFR_IR/SFR_H-alpha and the EW(H-alpha) (i.e. weighted age) which accounts for part of the scatter. We obtain stellar mass estimation...

  14. Dust Attenuation in UV-selected Starbursts at High Redshift and their Local Counterparts: Implications for the Cosmic Star Formation Rate Density

    CERN Document Server

    Overzier, Roderik; Wang, Jing; Armus, Lee; Buat, Veronique; Howell, Justin; Meurer, Gerhardt; Seibert, Mark; Siana, Brian; Basu-Zych, Antara; Charlot, Stéphane; Gonçalves, Thiago S; Martin, D Christopher; Neill, James D; Rich, R Michael; Salim, Samir; Schiminovich, David

    2010-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the dust obscuration in starburst galaxies at low and high redshift. This study is motivated by our unique sample of the most extreme UV-selected starburst galaxies in the nearby universe (z<0.3), found to be good analogs of high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in most of their physical properties. We find that the dust properties of the Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are consistent with the relation derived previously by Meurer et al. (M99) that is commonly used to dust-correct star formation rate measurements at a very wide range of redshifts. We directly compare our results with high redshift samples (LBGs, BzK, and sub-mm galaxies at z=2-3) having IR data either from Spitzer or Herschel. The attenuation in typical LBGs at z=2-3 and LBAs is very similar. Because LBAs are much better analogs to LBGs compared to previous local star-forming samples, including M99, the practice of dust-correcting the SFRs of high redshift galaxies based on the local calibration is now placed on...

  15. Gas surface density, star formation rate surface density, and the maximum mass of young star clusters in a disk galaxy. II. The grand-design galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass, and surface densities of total gas (Sigma_gas), molecular gas (Sigma_H_2), neutral gas (Sigma_HI) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the grand design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. We find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M_3rd, the median of the 5 most massive clusters, is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.4. There is no correlation with Sigma_gas, Sigma_H2, or Sigma_SFR. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_HI^0.6, M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_gas^0.5; there is no correlation with either Sigma_H_2 or Sigma_SFR. The results could hardly be more different than those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but M_3rd is proportional to Sigma_g...

  16. The FMOS-COSMOS survey of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 1.6 I. H\\alpha -based star formation rates and dust extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Kashino, D; Rodighiero, G; Renzini, A; Arimoto, N; Daddi, E; Lilly, S J; Sanders, D B; Kartaltepe, J; Zahid, H J; Nagao, T; Sugiyama, N; Capak, P; Carollo, C M; Chu, J; Hasinger, G; Ilbert, O; Kajisawa, M; Kewley, L J; Koekemoer, A M; Kovač, K; Fèvre, O Le; Masters, D; McCracken, H J; Onodera, M; Scoville, N; Strazzullo, V; Symeonidis, M; Taniguchi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We present first results from a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of the COSMOS field, using the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) on the Subaru telescope, designed to characterize the star-forming galaxy population at 1.4formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass. With further J-band spectroscopy for 89 of these, the level of dust extinction is assessed by measuring the Balmer decrement using co-added spectra. We find that the extinction (0.6\\lesssim A_H\\alpha\\ \\lesssim 2.5) rises with stellar mass and is elevated at high masses compared to low-redshift galaxies. Using this subset of the spectroscopic sample, we further find that the differential extinction b...

  17. Simulated star formation rate functions at $\\bf{z\\sim4-7}$, and the role of feedback in high-$\\bf{z}$ galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tescari, Edoardo; Wyithe, Stuart; Dolag, Klaus; Tornatore, Luca; Barai, Paramita; Viel, Matteo; Borgani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We study the role of feedback from supernovae and black holes in the evolution of the star formation rate function (SFRF) of $z\\sim4-7$ galaxies. We use a new set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, ANGUS (AustraliaN GADGET-3 early Universe Simulations), run with a modified and improved version of the parallel TreePM-smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-3 called P-GADGET3(XXL), that includes a self-consistent implementation of stellar evolution and metal enrichment. In our simulations both Supernova (SN) driven galactic winds and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) act simultaneously in a complex interplay. The SFRF is insensitive to feedback prescription at $z>5$, meaning that it cannot be used to discriminate between feedback models during reionisation. However, the SFRF is sensitive to the details of feedback prescription at lower redshift. By exploring different SN driven wind velocities and regimes for the AGN feedback, we find that the key factor for reproducing the observed SFRFs is a combination...

  18. The mass evolution of the first galaxies: stellar mass functions and star formation rates at $4 < z < 7$ in the CANDELS GOODS-South field

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Kenneth; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G; Guo, Yicheng; Ferguson, Henry C; Davé, Romeel; Lu, Yu; Ownsworth, Jamie; Ashby, Matthew L N; Dekel, Avishai; Dickinson, Mark; Faber, Sandra M; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M; Somerville, Rachel S; White, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    We measure new estimates for the galaxy stellar mass function and star formation rates for samples of galaxies at $z \\sim 4,~5,~6~\\&~7$ using data in the CANDELS GOODS South field. The deep near-infrared observations allow us to construct the stellar mass function at $z \\geq 6$ directly for the first time. We estimate stellar masses for our sample by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with synthetic stellar populations, including nebular line and continuum emission. The observed UV luminosity functions for the samples are consistent with previous observations, however we find that the observed $M_{UV}$ - M$_{*}$ relation has a shallow slope more consistent with a constant mass to light ratio and a normalisation which evolves with redshift. Our stellar mass functions have steep low-mass slopes ($\\alpha \\approx -1.9$), steeper than previously observed at these redshifts and closer to that of the UV luminosity function. Integrating our new mass functions, we find the observed stellar mass den...

  19. First Frontier Field Constraints on the Cosmic Star-Formation Rate Density at z~10 - The Impact of Lensing Shear on Completeness of High-Redshift Galaxy Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Oesch, P A; Illingworth, G D; Franx, M; Ammons, S M; van Dokkum, P G; Trenti, M; Labbe, I

    2014-01-01

    We search the complete Hubble Frontier Field dataset of Abell 2744 and its parallel field for z~10 sources to further refine the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density (SFRD) at z>8. We independently confirm two images of the recently discovered triply-imaged z~9.8 source by Zitrin et al. (2014) and set an upper limit for similar z~10 galaxies with red colors of J_125-H_160>1.2 in the parallel field of Abell 2744. We utilize extensive simulations to derive the effective selection volume of Lyman-break galaxies at z~10, both in the lensed cluster field and in the adjacent parallel field. Particular care is taken to include position-dependent lensing shear to accurately account for the expected sizes and morphologies of highly-magnified sources. We show that both source blending and shear reduce the completeness at a given observed magnitude in the cluster, particularly near the critical curves. These effects have a significant, but largely overlooked, impact on the detectability of high-redshift s...

  20. A Chandra Perspective On Galaxy-Wide X-ray Binary Emission And Its Correlation With Star Formation Rate And Stellar Mass: New Results From Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmer, B D; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Goulding, A D; Jenkins, L P; Ptak, A; Roberts, T P

    2010-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations that complete a sample of seventeen (17) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with D < 60 Mpc and low Galactic column densities of N_H < 5 X 10^20 cm^-2. The LIRGs in our sample have total infrared (8-1000um) luminosities in the range of L_IR ~ (1-8) X 10^11 L_sol. The high-resolution imaging and X-ray spectral information from our Chandra observations allow us to measure separately X-ray contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and normal galaxy processes (e.g., X-ray binaries and hot gas). We utilized total infrared plus UV luminosities to estimate star-formation rates (SFRs) and K-band luminosities and optical colors to estimate stellar masses (M*) for the sample. Under the assumption that the galaxy-wide 2-10 keV luminosity (LX) traces the combined emission from high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), and that the power output from these components are linearly correlated with SFR and M*, respectively, we constrain the relation ...

  1. Soil-restoration rate and initial soil formation trends on example of anthropogenically affected soils of opencast mine in Kursk region, Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigareva, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    The mining industry is one of the main factors which anthropogenically change the environment. Mining process results in removing of the rocks and mechanical changes of considerable amounts of ground. One of the main results of mining arising of antropic ecosystems as well as increasing of the new created soils total area is technosols. The main factor controlling the soil formation in postmining environment is the quality of spoiled materials. Initial soil formation has been investigated on spoils of the largest iron ore extraction complex in Russia - Mikhailovsky mining and concentration complex which is situated in Kursk region, Russia. Investigated soils are presented by monogenetic weak developed soils of different age (10-15-20 years). Young soils are formed on the loess parent materials (20 year-old soil), or on a mix of sand and clay overburdens (15 and 10-year-old soils). Anthropogenically affected soils are characterized by well-developed humus horizon which is gradually replaced by weakly changed soil-building rocks (profile type A-C for 10-, 15-years old soils, and A-AC-C for 20 years old soils). Gray-humus soils are characterized by presence of diagnostic humus horizon gradually replaced by soil-building rock. The maximum intensity of humus accumulation has been determined in a semi-hydromorphic 10-year-old soil developed on the mixed heaps which is connected with features of water-air conditions complicating mineralization of plant remnants. 20-year-old soil on loess is characterized by rather high rate of organic substances accumulation between all the automorphous soils. It was shown that one of the most effective restoration ways for anthropogenically affected soils is a biological reclamation. Since overburdens once appeared on a day surface are overgrown badly in the first years, they are subject to influence of water and wind erosion. Our researchers have found out that permanent grasses are able to grow quickly; they accumulate a considerable

  2. MEASURING STAR FORMATION RATES AND FAR-INFRARED COLORS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES USING THE CO(7–6) AND [N II] 205 μm LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanyao; Zhao, Yinghe; Xu, C. Kevin; Howell, Justin; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Schulz, Bernhard [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gao, Yu; Liu, Lijie [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, Vassilis [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Inami, Hanae [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Privon, George C. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160 C, Concepción (Chile); Lord, Steven D. [The SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Sanders, David B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Van der Werf, Paul P., E-mail: lu@ipac.caltech.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-03-20

    To better characterize the global star formation activity in a galaxy, one needs to know not only the star formation rate (SFR) but also the rest-frame, far-infrared color (e.g., the 60–100 μm color, C(60/100)) of the dust emission. The latter probes the average intensity of the dust heating radiation field and scales statistically with the effective SFR surface density in star-forming galaxies including (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs). To this end, here we exploit a new spectroscopic approach involving only two emission lines: CO(7–6) at 372 μm and [N ii] at 205 μm([N ii]{sub 205μm}). For local (U)LIRGs, the ratios of the CO(7–6) luminosity (L{sub CO(7–6)}) to the total infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}; 8–1000 μm) are fairly tightly distributed (to within ∼0.12 dex) and show little dependence on C(60/100). This makes L{sub CO(7–6)} a good SFR tracer, which is less contaminated by active galactic nuclei than L{sub IR} and may also be much less sensitive to metallicity than L{sub CO(1–0)}. Furthermore, the logarithmic [N ii]{sub 205μm}/CO(7–6) luminosity ratio depends fairly strongly (at a slope of ∼ −1.4) on C(60/100), with a modest scatter (∼0.23 dex). This makes it a useful estimator on C(60/100) with an implied uncertainty of ∼0.15 (or ≲4 K in the dust temperature (T{sub dust}) in the case of a graybody emission with T{sub dust} ≳ 30 K and a dust emissivity index β ≥ 1). Our locally calibrated SFR and C(60/100) estimators are shown to be consistent with the published data of (U)LIRGs of z up to ∼6.5.

  3. The MOSDEF Survey: The Strong Agreement between Hα and UV-to-FIR Star Formation Rates for z ~ 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaei, Irene; Kriek, Mariska; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Barro, Guillermo; Conroy, Charlie; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Mobasher, Bahram; Siana, Brian; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona H.; Azadi, Mojegan; Pasha, Imad; Inami, Hanae

    2016-04-01

    We present the first direct comparison between Balmer line and panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED)-based star formation rates (SFRs) for z˜ 2 galaxies. For this comparison, we used 17 star-forming galaxies selected from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, with 3σ detections for Hα and at least two IR bands (Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm, and in some cases Herschel/SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 μm). The galaxies have total IR (8-1000 μm) luminosities of ˜ 1011.4-1012.4 L⊙ and SFRs of ˜ 30-250 M⊙ yr-1. We fit the UV-to-far-IR SEDs with flexible stellar population synthesis (FSPS) models—which include both stellar and dust emission—and compare the inferred SFRs with the SFR(Hα, Hβ) values corrected for dust attenuation using Balmer decrements. The two SFRs agree with a scatter of 0.17 dex. Our results imply that the Balmer decrement accurately predicts the obscuration of the nebular lines and can be used to robustly calculate SFRs for star-forming galaxies at z˜ 2 with SFRs up to ˜ 200 M⊙ yr-1. We also use our data to assess SFR indicators based on modeling the UV-to-mid-IR SEDs or by adding SFR(UV) and SFR(IR), for which the latter is based on the mid-IR only or on the full IR SED. All these SFRs show a poorer agreement with SFR(Hα, Hβ) and in some cases large systematic biases are observed. Finally, we show that the SFR and dust attenuation derived from the UV-to-near-IR SED alone are unbiased when assuming a delayed exponentially declining star formation history. Based on observations made with the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. THE MOSDEF SURVEY: DISSECTING THE STAR FORMATION RATE VERSUS STELLAR MASS RELATION USING Hα AND Hβ EMISSION LINES AT z ∼ 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Siana, Brian; Mobasher, Bahram; Freeman, William R.; Groot, Laura de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Shapley, Alice E.; Sanders, Ryan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kriek, Mariska; Price, Sedona H. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Coil, Alison L.; Azadi, Mojegan [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    We present results on the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M{sub *}) relation (i.e., the “main sequence”) among star-forming galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 using the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey. Based on a sample of 261 galaxies with Hα and Hβ spectroscopy, we have estimated robust dust-corrected instantaneous SFRs over a large range in M{sub *} (∼10{sup 9.5}–10{sup 11.5} M{sub ⊙}). We find a correlation between log(SFR(Hα)) and log(M{sub *}) with a slope of 0.65 ± 0.08 (0.58 ± 0.10) at 1.4 < z < 2.6 (2.1 < z < 2.6). We find that different assumptions for the dust correction, such as using the color excess of the stellar continuum to correct the nebular lines, sample selection biases against red star-forming galaxies, and not accounting for Balmer absorption, can yield steeper slopes of the log(SFR)–log(M{sub *}) relation. Our sample is immune from these biases as it is rest-frame optically selected, Hα and Hβ are corrected for Balmer absorption, and the Hα luminosity is dust corrected using the nebular color excess computed from the Balmer decrement. The scatter of the log(SFR(Hα))–log(M{sub *}) relation, after accounting for the measurement uncertainties, is 0.31 dex at 2.1 < z < 2.6, which is 0.05 dex larger than the scatter in log(SFR(UV))–log(M{sub *}). Based on comparisons to a simulated SFR–M{sub *} relation with some intrinsic scatter, we argue that in the absence of direct measurements of galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the attenuation/extinction curves and the initial mass function, one cannot use the difference in the scatter of the SFR(Hα)– and SFR(UV)–M{sub *} relations to constrain the stochasticity of star formation in high-redshift galaxies.

  5. Star formation rates from [C II] 158 μm and mid-infrared emission lines for starbursts and active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargsyan, L.; Lebouteiller, V.; Weedman, D.; Barry, D.; Spoon, H. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Samsonyan, A. [Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory, Byurakan 0213 (Armenia); Bernard-Salas, J. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Houck, J., E-mail: sargsyan@isc.astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    A summary is presented for 130 galaxies observed with the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer instrument to measure fluxes for the [C II] 158 μm emission line. Sources cover a wide range of active galactic nucleus to starburst classifications, as derived from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon strength measured with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Redshifts from [C II] and line to continuum strengths (equivalent width (EW) of [C II]) are given for the full sample, which includes 18 new [C II] flux measures. Calibration of L([C II)]) as a star formation rate (SFR) indicator is determined by comparing [C II] luminosities with mid-infrared [Ne II] and [Ne III] emission line luminosities; this gives the same result as determining SFR using bolometric luminosities of reradiating dust from starbursts: log SFR = log L([C II)]) – 7.0, for SFR in M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and L([C II]) in L{sub ☉}. We conclude that L([C II]) can be used to measure SFR in any source to a precision of ∼50%, even if total source luminosities are dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN) component. The line to continuum ratio at 158 μm, EW([C II]), is not significantly greater for starbursts (median EW([C II]) = 1.0 μm) compared to composites and AGNs (median EW([C II]) = 0.7 μm), showing that the far-infrared continuum at 158 μm scales with [C II] regardless of classification. This indicates that the continuum at 158 μm also arises primarily from the starburst component within any source, giving log SFR = log νL{sub ν}(158 μm) – 42.8 for SFR in M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and νL{sub ν}(158 μm) in erg s{sup –1}.

  6. Effect of acid-catalyzed formation rates of benzimidazole-linked polymers on porosity and selective CO2 capture from gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Suha; İslamoğlu, Timur; Sekizkardes, Ali Kemal; El-Kaderi, Hani M

    2015-04-01

    Benzimidazole-linked polymers (BILPs) are emerging candidates for gas storage and separation applications; however, their current synthetic methods offer limited control over textural properties which are vital for their multifaceted use. In this study, we investigate the impact of acid-catalyzed formation rates of the imidazole units on the porosity levels of BILPs and subsequent effects on CO2 and CH4 binding affinities and selective uptake of CO2 over CH4 and N2. Treatment of 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride hydrate with 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-formylphenyl)benzene and 1,3,5-(4-formylphenyl)-benzene in anhydrous DMF afforded porous BILP-15 (448 m(2) g(-1)) and BILP-16 (435 m(2) g(-1)), respectively. Alternatively, the same polymers were prepared from the neutral 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine and catalytic amounts of aqueous HCl. The resulting polymers denoted BILP-15(AC) and BILP-16(AC) exhibited optimal surface areas; 862 m(2) g(-1) and 643 m(2) g(-1), respectively, only when 2 equiv of HCl (0.22 M) was u