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Sample records for formation nw jordan

  1. Deposition and alteration of carbonaceous series within a Neotethyan rift at the western boundary of the Arabian plate: The late Permian Um Irna Formation, NW Jordan, a petroleum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 51 01 53 D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A.; Gratzer, R. [Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, University of Leoben, Peter Tunner Strasse 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Abu Hamad, A.M.B. [Geology Department, University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2010-01-07

    During the late Permian (Kungurian to Kazanian) a Neotethyan rift basin evolved at the western boundary of the Arabian Plate, in what is called today the Dead Sea Valley of western Jordan. The break-up of Pangaea was accompanied by low-sinuosity sandy braided- to meandering-fluvial drainage systems which were fed by the uplift of the Arabian Shield and by poorly aerated swamps and ponds that concentrated plant debris of the Cathaysian floral province in the Um Irna Formation. These proximal wet fan sediments are overlain by a dry fan characterized by extensive reddish floodplain deposits, anastomosing channel systems and paleosols. The wet fan is underlain by Cambrian sandstones. These units serve as the top and bottom seals of the OM-bearing system of the Um Irna Formation. The sedimentary rocks of the OM-bearing Um Irna Formation underwent supergene, diagenetic and epigenetic hydrothermal alteration under an elevated geothermal gradient. The temperature increased from the time of deposition of the wet to the time of deposition of the dry fan and caused remobilization of manganese already pre-concentrated in the Cambrian footwall rocks of the rift basin. The anomalous heat regime may be accounted for as a predecessor stage of the Dead Sea Rift which is still active today. Oil seeps are found along faults and fractures near this deep-seated lineamentary fault zone. The deposition and alteration of the organic matter in this late Permian rift are of great consequence for oil generation in the region. Organic petrographic investigations revealed that organic-rich terrestrial carbonaceous and coal rich sediments of mainly of type III kerogen are dominant in the Um Irna Formation. In addition, aquatic liptinite rich sedimentary input (fresh water lake and/or lacustrine swamp) of type I kerogen is also noted. Coal derived organic matter occurs in the form of coaly particles with ranks from subbituminous A to high volatile bituminous C. Higher plant-derived macerals as

  2. Quantifying sediment connectivity in Wadi Al-Arab (NW Jordan) using a sediment budget approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, Sabine; Pöppl, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    Due to data scarcity, sediment connectivity most often only qualitatively describes the potential transfer of sediments through a landscape. However, quantitative information on sediment delivery is of special relevance for modelling approaches as well as for sustainable land and water management, especially in water scarce regions such as Jordan, where valuable water reservoirs suffer from sediment pollution. Measurements are needed to quantify sediment outputs of the different land units and to trace their pathways though the catchments. This study uses the outcomes of a multiple response sediment budget approach conducted in the Wadi al-Arab catchment in northwest Jordan (263.5 km²) to quantify sediment connectivity. The catchment shows a Mediterranean to semi arid climate and consists of carbonatic and marly geology of the Upper Cretaceous. The topography ranges from rolling hills in the East to steeper mountainous areas in the North and West were olive orchards are the main agricultural use. Soil erosion measurements in the main land use units and relevant sediment sources, such as olive orchards, agricultural fields, and natural vegetated slopes uncovered the potential ranges of soil erosion rates in these units. Furthermore, the annual sediment yield in the Wadi Al Arab water reservoir was calculated. With the extrapolation of the erosion rates of the main contributing land use units and the annual sediment amount that reaches the sink, a maximum value of lateral sediment connectivity could be quantified, reaching up to 18%. A multiple sediment fingerprint method was used to delineate the relative contribution of each measured source to the sink based on the lake sediment samples. Supported by additional 137Cs analysis of terrace samples and a survey of the Wadi bed a high longitudinal connectivity could be derived. The applied method mix allowed the quantification of lateral sediment connectivity on catchment scale and gave a comprehensive understanding of

  3. Spring response to precipitation events using δ(18)O and δ(2)H in the Tanour catchment, NW Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Wiegand, Bettina; Toll, Mathias; Sauter, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The Tanour spring is one of the several karst springs located in the northern part of Jordan. Water samples from the Tanour spring and precipitation were collected in the area of Ajloun in NW Jordan for the analysis of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes to evaluate the spring response to precipitation events. Rainwater and snow samples were collected from different elevations during winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. In addition, spring samples were collected between December 2014 and March 2015. δ(18)O values in rainwater vary from -3.26 to -17.34 ‰ (average: -7.84 ± 3.23 ‰), while δ(2)H values range between -4.4 and -110.4 ‰ (average: -35.7 ± 25.0 ‰). Deuterium excess ranges from 17.8 to 34.1 ‰ (average: 27.1 ± 4.0 ‰). The Local Meteoric Water Line for the study area was calculated to be δ(2)H = 7.66*δ(18)O + 24.43 (R(2) = 0.98). Pre-event spring discharge showed variation in δ(18)O (range -6.29 to -7.17 ‰; average -6.58 ± 0.19 ‰) and δ(2)H values (range -28.8 to -32.7 ‰; average: -30.5 ± 1.0 ‰). In contrast, δ(18)O and δ(2)H rapidly changed to more negative values during rainfall and snowmelt events and persisted for several days before returning to background values. Spring water temperature, spring discharge, and turbidity followed the trend in isotopic composition during and after the precipitation events. The rapid change in the isotopic composition, spring discharge, water temperature, and turbidity in response to recharge events is related to fast water travel times and low storage capacity in the conduit system of the karst aquifer. Based on the changes in the isotopic composition of spring water after the precipitation events, the water travel time in the aquifer is in the order of 5-11 days.

  4. Quaternary tectonic activity in NW Jordan: Insights for a new model of transpression-transtension along the southern Dead Sea Transform Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Awabdeh, M.; Pérez-Peña, J. V.; Azañón, J. M.; Booth-Rea, G.; Abed, A.; Atallah, M.; Galve, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Dead Sea Transform Fault (DSTF) constitutes the transform plate boundary between the African and Arabian plates. The southern part of this fault has been traditionally divided into two main segments, the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) and the Jordan Valley Fault (JVF), connected through the Dead Sea continental pull-apart basin. Active tectonic studies in NW Jordan have traditionally focused on these DSTF structures and have neglected other prominent structures in the region, such as the Amman Hallabat Structure (AHS) and Shueib Structure (SHS) fault systems, which have been considered inactive since the Cretaceous. However, some recent studies have suggested a possible local reactivation of the southern parts of these structures. In this work, we carried out a detailed geological study of the NE Dead Sea Basin to analyze the Quaternary activity of the AHS and SHS based on field observations and structural analyses. Our findings have revealed that the AHS and SHS structures present clear Quaternary activity and accommodate a small part of the deformation of the southern DSTF. In the Quaternary, the southwestern part of the AHS has acted as the northernmost continuation of the WAF, whereas the SHS has acted as a transfer fault associated with NW-SE normal faults with low to moderate throws (meters to decameters) that connect this structure to the JVF. These NW-SE normal faults constitute the northeastern border of the Dead Sea depression (Jericho Valley). They produce a topographic front and separate the sediments of the Jordan Valley in the hanging wall from the Mesozoic sedimentary sequence located in the footwall.

  5. Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) phosphorites in Jordan: implications for the formation of a south Tethyan phosphorite giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pufahl, Peir K.; Grimm, Kurt A.; Abed, Abdulkader M.; Sadaqah, Rushdi M. Y.

    2003-10-01

    A record of sedimentary, authigenic, and biological processes are preserved within the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Alhisa Phosphorite Formation (AP) in central and northern Jordan. The AP formed near the eastern extremity of the south Tethyan Phosphorite Province (STPP), a carbonate-dominated Upper Cretaceous to Eocene "phosphorite giant" that extends from Colombia, North Africa to the Middle East. Multidisciplinary research of the AP and associated cherts, chalks, and oyster buildups indicate that phosphatic strata formed on a highly productive, storm-dominated, east-west trending epeiric platform along the south Tethyan margin. The onset of phosphogenesis and the accumulation of economic phosphorite coincided with a rise in relative sea level that onlapped peritidal carbonates of the Ajlun Group. Pristine phosphates are associated with well-developed micrite concretionary horizons and contain abundant non-keeled spiral planktic foraminifera and a low diversity benthic assemblage of Buliminacean foraminifera, suggesting that pristine phosphates are a condensed facies and phosphogenesis was stimulated by the effects of a highly productive surface ocean and the suboxic diagenesis of sedimentary organic matter. The bulk sediment composition and absence of Fe-bearing authigenic phases such as glauconite, pyrite (including pyrite molds), siderite, and goethite within pristine phosphates suggests that deposition and authigenesis occurred under conditions of detrital starvation and that "iron-pumping" played a minimal role in phosphogenesis. Authigenic precipitation of phosphate occurred in a broad array of sedimentary environments—herein termed a "phosphorite nursery"—that spanned the entire platform. This is a non-uniformitarian phenomenon reflecting precipitation of sedimentary apatite across a wide depositional spectrum in a variety of depositional settings, wherever the conditions were suitable for phosphogenesis. Sedimentologic data indicate that pristine

  6. Michael Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪仙美

    2000-01-01

    Many of us know Michael Jordan is a famous American basketball star. He is perhaps the greatest player in basketball history. Jordan is 1.98m tall. He plays guard(后卫)for the Chicago Bulls. He led his team to six NBA(National Basketball Association ) championships (冠军4).

  7. Timescales of Porphyry Cu Formation: Bajo de la Alumbrera, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buret, Y.; Von Quadt, A.; Heinrich, C. A.; Peytcheva, I.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-precision U-Pb dating we are potentially able to determine timescales of porphyry emplacement and ore formation. Previous studies have suggested timescales of porphyry Cu formation ranging from Bajo de la Alumbrera Cu-Au deposit, NW Argentina. The deposit consists of a composite stock of dacitic porphyries. The relative timing of each porphyry intrusion is established based on clear cross-cutting relationships between different porphyry intrusions, which include the pre-mineralisation P2 porphyry, pre-syn-minerlisation EP3 porphyry, and the post-mineralisation LP3 and P4 porphyries.Single zircon crystals from individual porphyry intrusions (P2, EP3, LP3, P4) in the Alumbrera deposit have been dated using CA-ID-TIMS, employing the ET2535 tracer solution for maximum precision and accuracy. All porphyries display protracted zircon crystal growth over 100-200 ka timescales. Using the youngest zircons from each of the porphyry intrusions, Cu mineralisation occurred on 10 ka timescales, similar to those proposed by recent numerical predictions [4]. Trace element and Hf isotopic analyses may reveal geochemical distinctions within the porphyry intrusions and record temporal changes in the magmatic evolution. References: [1] Cathles and Shannon (2007) EPSL 262:92-108; [2] Ballard et al. (2001) Geology 29:383-386; [3] Harris et al. (2008) Min Dep 43: 295-314; [4] Weis et al. (2012) Science 338: 1613-1616; [5] von Quadt et al. (2011) Geology 39: 731-734.

  8. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Architecture of the late Pleistocene-Holocene Succession of the Gargaresh Formation, Subratah Basin, NW Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlal, Osama; Bennur, Sami

    2014-05-01

    Gargaresh Formation outcrops is comprises the outcrops between the Misurata (N32o22'18'' E15o12'03'') to the Tripoli(N32o 51'10'' E13o 03'22'') areas is represented by prominent carbonate aeolianite exposed in extensive outcrops along the NW Libyan shoreline. Gargaresh Formation outcrops comprises two Members an upper Kaam Member of Aeolian origin and a lower Karrot Member of marine origin. The study of the Gargaresh Formation can provide useful information on reconstructions of Late Pleistocene-Holocene history of NW Libya and new insights on palaeogeography. It is forming low ridges and cliffs along the coastline of NW Libya and occurs as cliffs continuously attached to the sea tide, and occasionally interrupted by broad wadis or deep-cut embayment. The Gargaresh Formation sediments are dominated by calcarenites with skeletal marine fauna and non-skeletal grains of lithoclasts, aggregate, with oolites. In addition, these rocks are characterized by very well aeolian controlling factors represented by wind blown sediments such as large scale cross lamination (aeolianite) . The majority of palaeocurrent direction was to SE, on the other hand the dune migration was SE also. The sediments of Gargaresh Formation outcrops from Misurata to Tripoli NW Libya mostly allochthonous except the paleosols red-brown unit. Most of its fossils are thanatoconoses. Gargaresh Formation sediments shows that the original aragonite composition of pelecypoda and gastropods fragments are mostly preserved, but partly transformed into granular calcite as pendulous (meniscus) cement texture in response to meteoric fresh-water. Keywords: Sedimentology; Stratigraphic architecture; Aeolian origin; marine origin; Calcarenites; Late Pleistocene-Holocene

  9. Soil Formation of "Atlantic Rankers" from NW Spain - A High Resolution Aluminium and Iron Fractionation Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. KAAL; M. COSTA-CASAIS; C. FERRO-V(A)ZQUEZ; X. PONTEVEDRA-POMBAL; A. MARTINEZ-CORTIZAS

    2008-01-01

    Atlantic rankers belong to the group of "cryptopodzolic rankers", which are ubiquitous in the mountainous cool/tempe-rate humid regions of Western Europe. The rankers of Galicia (NW Spain) formed by thousands of years of colluviation.The preponderance of Al-stabilised organic matter (OM) masks the horizonation and polycyclic character (I.e., stratifi-cation) of these soils. Cryptopodzolic rankers are generally thought to be the outcome of podzolisation. This soil type is part of the recent discussion on how to classify soils developed from nonvolcanic parent material having andic properties.To better understand the formation processes of these soils, the Al and Fe fractionation of four typical Atlantic rankers were studied by selective dissolution in acid NH4-oxalate, Na-pyrophosphatc and the chlorides of K, La and Cu.A high-resolution sampling approach allowed us to investigate the soils in greater detail than simply sampling by horizon.The rankers studied display a distribution of Fe- and Al-OM complexes that is typical of cryptopodzolic soils. However,these organomineral associations were probably immobile due to the high Al saturation. We argue that the soils owe their characteristic chemical status to external factors rather than to translocation of organomineral associations: variations in Al-OM concentrations could be linked to changes in weathering/leaching intensity and colluviation rates caused by anthropogenic disturbances or changes in regional climate regime.

  10. MAPPING SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS ON THE EASTERN RED SEA COAST IN JORDAN USING GEOELECTRICAL TECHNIQUES: GEOLOGICAL AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

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    Batayneh Awni T.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available During 2006, geoelectrical measurements using the vertical electrical sounding (VES method were conducted on the eastern Red Sea coast in Jordan, using the SYSCAL-R2 resistivity instrument.
    The objectives of the study were (i to evaluate the possibility of mapping of Quaternary sediments medium in areas where little is known about the subsurface geology and to infer shallow geological
    structure from the electrical interpretation, and (ii to identify formations that may present fresh aquifer waters, and subsequently to estimate the relationship between groundwater resources and geological structures. Data collected at 47 locations were interpreted first with curve matching techniques, using theoretically calculated master curves, in conjunction with the auxiliary curves. The initial earth
    models were second checked and reinterpreted using a 1-D inversion program (i.e., RESIX-IP in order to obtain final earth models. The final layer parameters (thicknesses and resistivities were then
    pieced together along survey lines to make electrical cross sections. Resistivity measurements show a dominant trend of decreasing resistivity (thus increasing salinity with depth and westward toward
    the Red Sea. Accordingly, three zones with different resistivity values were detected, corresponding to three different bearing formations: (i a water-bearing formation in the west containing Red Sea saltwater; (ii a transition zone of clay and clayey sand thick formation; (iii stratas saturated with fresh groundwater in the east disturbed by the presence of clay and clayey sand horizons. Deep borehole (131 m drilled in the northwestern part of the study area for groundwater investigation, has
    confirmed the findings of the resistivity survey.

  11. Seasonal variations and depth dependence of soil radon concentration levels in different geological formations in Deir Abu-Said District, Irbid-Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shereideh, S.A. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan)]. E-mail: enidal@yu.edu.jo; Bataina, B.A. [Physics Department, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan); Ershaidat, N.M. [Physics Department, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan)

    2006-07-15

    Soil radon concentration levels in Deir Abu-Said District, Irbid-Jordan were measured using CR-39 track detectors in both summer and winter at several depths over six geological formations. Seasonal variations of soil radon were measured at five depths (10, 25, 50, 75 and 100cm). At a depth of 100cm; soil radon concentration levels, in summer, range from 6.85kBqm{sup -3} for Muwaqqar Chalky-Marl (MCM) to 35.5kBqm{sup -3} for Al-Hisa Phosphatic (AHP) Limestone, while in winter the range is between 4.01 and 24.6kBqm{sup -3}, respectively. The highest values of soil radon concentration obtained are found for AHP in both seasons at all depths. This is related to the high content of uranium of this geological formation. As expected, our data show an increase of soil radon concentration levels with depth.

  12. Cambrian Ichnofossils from the Zhoujieshan Formation (Quanji Group) Overlying Tillites in the Northern Margin of the Qaidam Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Wang; Xunlian Wang; Ye Wang

    2015-01-01

    The Quanji Group is composed of siliciclastics and carbonates and was deposited on a relatively stable block, in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin, NW China. It is one of the research hotspots in the Qilian-Qinling-Kunlun tectonic zones. However, it has long been argued whether the up-per Quanji Group should be assigned to the Precambrian or the Cambrian for lack of convincing fossil evidence. The discovery of ichnofossils, including Rusophycus, Cruziana, Dimorphichnus, Treptichnus, Skolithos, Arenicolites, Palaeophycus, and Helminthopsis, indicates that the upper member of the Zhou-jieshan Formation (top Quanji Group) is Cambrian in age, and at least above the Treptichnus (Phycodes) pedum Biozone, the lowermost biozone in the Cambrian. The lower member of the Zhoujieshan Forma-tion should belong to the Cambrian. During the time when the upper member of the Zhoujieshan For-mation was deposited, the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin was dominated by the Cruziana Ichno-facies, characterizing a lower-energy shelf (shallow) sea environment with moderate-rich oxygen con-tents. In addition, the conglomerates in the Hongtiegou Formation of the Quanji Group underlying the Zhoujieshan Formation were generally regarded as tillites. However, the dolostones of the lower member of the Zhoujieshan Formation are, in lithology and geochemistry, different from the typical cap-dolostones of the Doushantuo Formation in South China, so it is necessary to further study the ori-gins of the lower member of the Zhoujieshan Formation and the conglomerates of the Hongtiegou For-mation.

  13. Carboniferous calcareous algae and their associations in the San Emiliano and Lois-Ciguera Formations (Prov. León, NW Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rácz, L.

    1965-01-01

    This study of the calcareous algae in the limestone deposits of the two formations (San Emiliano and Lois-Ciguera) in NW Spain is based on field observations and microscopical study. It was possible in the field to divide almost all the limestone members into smaller units on the basis of physical,

  14. Formation mechanism of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the central Junggar Basin,NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Carbonate cemented zones are normally adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the central Junggar Basin,NW China.Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions and petrological investigations of carbonate cements in the carbonate cemented zones indicate that:(1) carbonate cements are composed dominantly of ferrocalcite,ferroan dolomite,and ankerite;(2) carbonate cements are formed under a high temperature circumstance in the subsurface,and organic fluid migration has an important effect on the formation of them;and(3) carbon and oxygen ions in the carbonate cements migrate from the underlying overpressured system.This suggests that the occurrence of carbonate cemented zones in this region results from multiple phases of organic fluid expulsion out of the overpressure compartment through geological time.This study provides a plausible mechanism of the formation of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to the top overpressured surface in the clastic sedimentary basins,and has an important implication for understanding the internal correlation between the formation of carbonate cemented zones adjacent to top overpressured surface and geofluids expulsion out of overpressured system.

  15. Effects of fracture reactivation and diagenesis on fracture network evolution: Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, J. N.; Eichhubl, P.; Xu, G.; Ahn, H.; Fall, A.; Hargrove, P.; Laubach, S.; Ukar, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian Eriboll Formation quartzarenites contain abundant fractures with varying degrees of quartz cement infill. Fractures exist that are entirely sealed; are locally sealed by bridging cements but preserve pore space among bridges; are mostly open but lined with veneers of cement; or are devoid of cement. Fracture propagation in the Eriboll Formation is highly sensitive to the presence of pre-existing fractures. Fracture reactivation occurs in opening mode as individual fractures repeatedly open and are filled or bridged by syn-kinematic cements. As well, reactivation occurs in shear as opening of one fracture orientation coincides with shear displacement along pre-existing fractures of different orientations. The tendency for pre-existing fractures to slip varies in part by the extent of cement infill, yet we observe shear and opening-mode reactivation even among sealed fractures. Paleotemperature analysis of fluid inclusions within fracture cements suggests some fractures now in outcrop formed deep in the subsurface. Fractures within the Eriboll Formation may therefore affect later fracture propagation throughout geologic time. With progressive strain, fault zones develop within fracture networks by a sequence of opening-mode fracture formation, fracture reactivation and linkage, fragmentation, cataclasis, and the formation of slip surfaces. Cataclasite within fault zones is commonly more thoroughly cemented than fractures in the damage zone or outside the fault zone. This variance of cement abundance is likely the result of (1) continued exposure of freshly broken quartz surfaces within cataclasite, promoting quartz precipitation, and (2) possibly more interconnected pathways for mass transfer within the fault zone. Enhanced cementation of cataclasite results in strengthening or diagenetic strain hardening of the evolving fault zone. Further slip is accommodated by shear localization along discrete slip surfaces. With further linkage of fault segments

  16. Depositional conditions of the coal-bearing Hirka Formation beneath late Miocene explosive volcanic products in NW central Anatolia, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, M. [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Dept. of Geology

    2007-04-15

    This work focuses on the relationship between the coal deposition and explosive volcanism of the Miocene basin, NW central Anatolia, Turkey. The coal-bearing Hirka Formation was deposited over the Galatian Andesitic Complex and/or massive lagoonal environments during the Miocene. The investigated lignite is a high ash (from 32 to 58%) and sulphur (from 1.43 to 3.03%) lignite which is petrographically characterised by a high humunite content. The mineral matter of the studied lignite samples is made up of mainly clay minerals (illite-smectite and kaolinite), plagioclase and quartz in Bolu coal field, clay minerals (illite-smectite, smectite and illite), quartz, calcite, plagioclase and gypsum in Seben coal field, quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase and clay minerals (kaolinite and illite) in Kibriscik, and dolomite, quartz, clinoptilolite, opal CT and gypsum in Camhdere coal field. The differences in these four types of lignite with specific mineralogical patterns may be due to the explosive volcanic events and depositional conditions which changed from one coal field to the others. There is a zonation from SW to SE in the studied area for zeolites. Carbonate minerals are commonly calcite in Seben and Kibriscik coal fields. In Bolu, coal samples are devoid of calcite and dolomite. These analyses show that there is an increase in the amount of Mg and a decrease in the amount of Na from the northwestern part to the southern part in the study area.

  17. GRAVITY-FLOW DEPOSITS IN THE TOARCIAN PERBLA FORMATION (SLOVENIAN BASIN, NW SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOSTJAN ROZIC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Perbla Formation represents typical Toarcian clay-rich pelagic sediment of the southern Tethyan passive continental margin. It was deposited in the Slovenian Basin, located in present-day western Slovenia. During the Early Jurassic the basin was surrounded by the Dinaric (Friuli Carbonate Platform to the south and by the Julian Carbonate Platform to the north. Today, the transitional areas between the platforms and basin are not preserved due to intense Cainozoic thrusting and erosion, with the only record of the evolution of these areas stored in gravity-flow deposits of the Perbla Formation. Coarser turbidites were deposited on the margins of the basin, with other types of gravity-flow deposits, observed mainly in the central part of the basin. These intercalations reflect regionally recognized events that characterized the sedimentary evolution of western Slovenia at the end of the Early Jurassic. Slumps that occasionally developed into debris-flows reflect uneven sea-bottom palaeotopography that originated during a pre- to early-Toarcian phase of accelerated subsidence. The early Toarcian transgression caused drowning of the adjacent carbonate platforms, an event reflected in the composition of coarser turbidites which consist almost exclusively of echinoderm fragments and thin-shelled bivalves. These turbidites originated from drowned platform margins and/or slopes and were subsequently redeposited in proximal parts of the basin. 

  18. The Formation and Distribution of the Marine Hydrocarbon Source Rock in the Tarim Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiyuan; WANG Yi

    2008-01-01

    There are significant differences in type and distribution between marine source rock and continental source rock. According to the lithology, the Cambrian-Ordovician source rock in the Tarim basin is divided into two types: the carbonate source rock and the mud source rock. The two sets of source rocks are developed mainly in three sets of formations, Lower-Middle Cambrian carbonate source rock and mud source rock, Lower-Middle Ordovician mud source rock and Upper Ordovician lime mud source rock. The stratigraphic and areal distributions of the source rocks are controlled by the altitude and the sedimentary facies respectively. The mud source rock is developed in slope-semi deep sea environment. The source rock developed in the slope sedimentary environment is related with the anoxic environment and the one developed in semi deep sea has a close relationship with the up-flowing sea water. The carbonate source rock is developed mainly in platform slope of highstand systems tract and it is usually intimately associated with the salt rock. The Lower-Middle Cambrian carbonate source rock is developed mainly in the Bachu, Tazhong, Taugguzibasi and Yingmaili areas. The Lower-Middle Cambrian mud source rock is mainly developed in the areas east of the line of Kunan 1-Tadong 1. The Lower-Middle Ordovician mud source rock is developed mainly in the east slope of the Manjiaer depression. The carbonate source rock of Early Ordovician is developed mainly in the platform slope of highstand systems tract, such as the south margin of Tabei, the north slope of Tazhong, the Bachu area and Keping area.

  19. Depositional conditions of the coal-bearing Hirka Formation beneath Late Miocene explosive volcanic products in NW central Anatolia, Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Şener

    2007-04-01

    This work focuses on the relationship between the coal deposition and explosive volcanism of the Miocene basin, NW central Anatolia, Turkey. The coal-bearing Hirka Formation was deposited over the Galatian Andesitic Complex and/or massive lagoonal environments during the Miocene. The investigated lignite is a high ash (from 32 to 58%) and sulphur (from 1.43 to 3.03%) lignite which is petrographically characterised by a high humunite content. The mineral matter of the studied lignite samples is made up of mainly clay minerals (illite–smectite and kaolinite), plagioclase and quartz in Bolu coal field, clay minerals (illite–smectite, smectite and illite), quartz, calcite, plagioclase and gypsum in Seben coal field, quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase and clay minerals (kaolinite and illite) in Kıbrıscık, and dolomite, quartz, clinoptilolite, opal CT and gypsum in C¸ amlıdere coal field. The differences in these four types of lignite with specific mineralogical patterns may be due to the explosive volcanic events and depositional conditions which changed from one coal field to the others. There is a zonation from SW to SE in the studied area for zeolites such as Opal CT+smectite-clinoptilolite-analcime-K-feldspar. Carbonate minerals are commonly calcite in Seben and Kıbrıscık coal fields. In Bolu, coal samples are devoid of calcite and dolomite. These analyses show that there is an increase in the amount of Mg and a decrease in the amount of Na from the northwestern part to the southern part in the study area.

  20. Special Education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Hamour, Bashir; Al-Hmouz, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a brief background about special education system in Jordan and particularly describes the present types of programmes and legislation provided within the country to students with special needs, as well as integration movement. Jordan has historically provided a limited number of educational opportunities…

  1. Architectural Guide of Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilberth, Thomas Roger

    2016-01-01

    Architectural and cultural guidebook for Jordan that also includes a view on the Syrian refugee situation, especially in the large UNHCR camp of Zaatari. The guide book is a preparatory study for a field trip our master studio undertook to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in Fall 2016....

  2. On Jordan's measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Brechenmacher, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    The Jordan measure, the Jordan curve theorem, as well as the other generic references to Camille Jordan's (1838-1922) achievements highlight that the latter can hardly be reduced to the "great algebraist" whose masterpiece, the Trait\\'e des substitutions et des equations alg\\'ebriques, unfolded the group-theoretical content of \\'Evariste Galois's work. The present paper appeals to the database of the reviews of the Jahrbuch \\"uber die Fortschritte der Mathematik (1868-1942) for providing an overview of Jordan's works. On the one hand, we shall especially investigate the collective dimensions in which Jordan himself inscribed his works (1860-1922). On the other hand, we shall address the issue of the collectives in which Jordan's works have circulated (1860-1940). Moreover, the time-period during which Jordan has been publishing his works, i.e., 1860-1922, provides an opportunity to investigate some collective organizations of knowledge that pre-existed the development of object-oriented disciplines such as gr...

  3. Structural and stress analysis based on fault-slip data in the Amman area, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabat, Abdullah A.

    2009-08-01

    This study presents a structural analysis based on hundreds of striated small faults (fault-slip data) in the Amman area east of the Dead Sea Transform System. Stress inversion of the fault-slip data was performed using an improved Right-Dihedral method, followed by rotational optimization (TENSOR Program, Delvaux, 1993). Fault-slip data (totaling 212) include fault planes, striations and sense of movements, are obtained from the Turonian Wadi As Sir Formation, distributed mainly along the southern side of the Amman - Hallabat structure in Jordan the study area. Results show that σ1 (SHmax) and σ3 (SHmin) are generally sub-horizontal and σ2 is sub-vertical in 8 of 11 paleostress tensors, which are belonging to a major strike-slip system with σ1 swinging around N to NW direction. The other three stress tensors show σ2 (SHmax), σ1 vertical and σ3 is NE oriented. This situation explained as permutation of stress axes σ1 and σ2 that occur during tectonic events and partitioned strike slip deformation. NW compressional stresses affected the area and produced the major Amman - Hallabat strike-slip fault and its related structures, e.g., NW trending normal faults and NE trending folds in the study area. The new paleostress results related with the active major stress field of the region the Dead Sea Stress Field (DSS) during the Miocene to Recent.

  4. Wood remains from the Late Triassic (Carnian) of Jordan and their paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Hamad, Abdalla M. B.; Jasper, André; Uhl, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    During field work in the Triassic of Jordan fossil wood remains have been discovered at five horizons (S-1AR-S-5AR) of the Late Triassic (Carnian) Abu Ruweis Formation in NW Jordan. In most horizons wood remains are too badly preserved to allow for a detailed xylotomic investigation. Only two horizons provided material which exhibited anatomical details: (1) in horizon S-1AR we found rare and rather small fragments of woody charcoal exhibiting cellular details (representing the first macroscopic evidence of paleo-wildfires from the Late Triassic of the Middle East), and (2) in horizon S-5AR surfaces of partly compressed (gagatized) and partly permineralized wood fragments exhibited anatomical details that could be investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. All wood remains that allow for a detailed investigation show features typical of gymnosperms, but at the moment nothing can be said about a more specific taxonomic affinity of most of the woods, although wood from horizon S-5AR exhibits characteristics of protopinoid wood. Our data provide evidence that gymnospermous woody vegetation cover has existed in the source areas of the sediments deposited in the Abu Ruweis Formation in Jordan and that this woody vegetation occasionally experienced wildfires. This, together with lithological data, provides evidence for a seasonally dry (maybe even arid) climate during deposition of the Abu Ruweis Formation. On a larger scale our findings contribute to the very scarce current knowledge about Late Triassic wildfires on the entire continent Gondwana, from where so far only three records of macro-charcoals, as undisputed evidence of paleo-wildfires, have been published from this period.

  5. Evidence of spring formation and subrosion-induced sinkhole development at Ghor Al-Haditha, Jordan, from repeated close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Eoghan, P. Holohan; Leila, Saberi; Hussam, Alrshdan; Thomas, Walter; Ali, Sawarieh; Torsten, Dahm

    2016-04-01

    The widespread development of sinkholes and land subsidence poses a major geological hazard to infrastructure, local population, agriculture and industry in the Dead Sea area. For assessment of the key physical factors in this development, repeated photogrammetric and field surveys at Ghor Al-Haditha in Jordan have been undertaken. Recent results provide evidence for subrosion based on strong periodic water flows, as the basic underlying physical process of such land subsidence phenomena. From combined Helikite- and Quatrocopter-based photogrammetric surveys, high resolution Digital Surface Models from October 2014 and October 2015 are compared. Change detection reveals: (1) active subsidence in a hundred metre-scale depression zone, (2) a highly-dynamic spring and canyon system connected with recent sinkhole collapses and (3) the rapid formation of new sinkholes both in alluvium and mud cover sediments. The formation of new sinkholes has been documented locally by means of aerial and field observations during a storm with strong rainfall. A new artesian spring formed in the former Dead Sea bed (mud-flat) at this event. The alluvial sediment load of the stream, a periodic location change of the spring and a connected uphill sinkhole cluster formation provide strong evidence for subrosion of weak material with subsequent underground void collapse. Additionally a documented lake and its' subsequent drainage forming a new canyon reveals the local penetration of the aquiclude behavior of the mud-flat in the major depression area, which can be explained by an under-saturated groundwater flow at a strong hydrostatic gradient. Furthermore an enlargement of the investigated area in the 2015 survey indicates a continuation of subsidence and sinkhole activity towards the North. It reveals several points of emanation of water streams in the mud-flat beneath the alluvial cover and vegetation as an indicator of relatively fresh groundwater inflow. This repeated photogrammetry

  6. Jordan Krall's speculative fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doubinsky, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Jordan Krall is one of the most interesting writers in American speculative fiction. This article studies the way Krall redefines the tropes and frames of classical dystopian fiction and references, turning them into an idiosyncratic construction.......Jordan Krall is one of the most interesting writers in American speculative fiction. This article studies the way Krall redefines the tropes and frames of classical dystopian fiction and references, turning them into an idiosyncratic construction....

  7. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kolesnikov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h and H = U(h # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  8. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h) and H = U(h) # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h) by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  9. Jordan: Surprisingly Stable

    OpenAIRE

    Ådnegard, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, research has demonstrated that conflict spreads to the host country as a consequence of massive influx of refugees. Most studies gathered empirical evidence from African countries and focused on cases where conflict had already spread. In contrast to this literature, the main objective of this thesis is to examine the absence of conflict in Jordan after receiving Syrian refugees that amount to about 10 percent of Jordan s original population over the past three years, 2011-201...

  10. Jordan Adjusted Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Jordan Human Development Index (HDI) and Adjusted Human Development Index (IHDI) In 1990, the United Nations Development Programme designed a Human Development Index composed of life expectancy at birth, level of education and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. In 2011, the UNDP ranked Jordan 95th out of 187 countries with a human development index of 0.698, up from 0.591 in 1990, making it the leading medium-range country for human development (fig. VIII.1). In 2010, the inequality adj...

  11. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium). The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  12. SESAME in Jordan

    CERN Document Server

    Vignola, Gaetano; Attal, Maher; Makahleh, Firas; Shehab, Maher M; Varnasseri, Seadat

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the status of SESAME is presented. SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East) is an Independent Intergovernmental Organization developed and officially established under the auspices of UNESCO. It involves at the present the following Member States: Bahrain, Egypt, Islamic Republic of Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestinian Authority, Turkey and United Arab Emirates. Moreover the following States are Observer of SESAME Council: France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Russian Federation, Sweden, UK and United States of America. SESAME will become a major international research center in the Middle East, located in Allan, Jordan. The machine design is based on a 2.5 GeV 3rd generation Light Source with an emittance of 26 nm.rad and 11 straights for insertion devices. The conceptual design of the accelerator complex has been frozen and the engineering design is started. The Phase I scientific program for SESAME has also been finalized and it foresees...

  13. Sedimentology and Stratigraphic architecture of the early Cretaceous Alpian-Aptian succession of the Kiklah Formation, Jabal Nafusah, NW Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlal, Osama

    2016-04-01

    Kiklah Formation is presents on the Jabal Nafusah escarpment for almost 400 km from the Tunisian border to the east of Gharyan. Kiklah Formation overlies the Early Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic sediments of Jabal Nafusah with marked unconformity. On the other hand, it is unconformably overlain by the Sidi as Sid Formation. This contact with overlying units is angular unconformity as it is evident only in the central Gharyan area. The Kiklah Formation consists mainly of continental deposits such as conglomeratic sandstone, pebble sandstone, and mudstone with minor lacustrine interbeds of reddish yellow to greenish claystone. In addition, these rocks were formed by a braided river system carrying heavy sediment loads, with frequent shifting of the principal channels. SEM studies show pitting and breakage features on the sand grains which are diagnostic of Fluvial depositional environment. In the Nafusah region the Kiklah Formation varies in thickness westward from absence near Gharyan to over 610 m in Tunisian subsurface.

  14. Biochronology and biostratigraphy of the Uquía Formation (Pliocene early Pleistocene, NW Argentina) and its significance in the Great American Biotic Interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguero, M. A.; Candela, A. M.; Alonso, R. N.

    2007-01-01

    The Uquía Formation crops out in the Quebrada de Humahuaca in Jujuy province, Eastern Cordillera, NW Argentina. This unit is composed of a sequence of fluviatile sediments and water-laid air-fall tuff beds; it is approximately 260 m thick and unconformably overlain by Pleistocene conglomerates and Quaternary alluvium. The sediments have been folded into a syncline and broken by several faults that generally trend northwest-southeast. Following Castellanos stratigraphy, we characterize three units (Lower, Middle, and Upper) of the Uquía Formation. Biochronologically, the Lower Unit is assigned to the late Chapadmalalan, the Middle Unit ("Uquian fauna") to the late Vorohuean and Sanandresian, and the Upper Unit to the Ensenadan. Biostratigraphic evidence provides a calibration of important biochronologic events in the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI), namely, the first appearances of Erethizon, Hippidion, and proboscideans at 2.5 Ma (late Pliocene) in South America. Geological and paleobiological evidence suggest that during the late Pliocene, the area could have been a wide intermountain valley at 1400-1700 m elevation, with a more humid environment than that of the present day and some wet-dry seasonality that permitted the coexistence of forest and open areas. Uquian mammals also indicate that northwestern Argentina and the Pampean region have represented distinct biogeographical areas since at least the late Pliocene.

  15. Households at Pella, Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    2007-01-01

    The excavation of six courtyard houses at Pella in the Jordan Valley, destroyed in a massive earthquake in the mid-eighth century AD, gives an exceptional opportunity to study a wide range of objectives from daily life within a secure archaeological context. The recovery of detailed information...... about the layout of buildings and the contextual origin of the many domestic objects recovered permit a full reconstruction of life in the household, especially the use of space. Generally, the upstairs area served as the primary living quarters, whereas the ground floor was used to house valuable...

  16. Early Eocene rodents (Mammalia) from the Subathu Formation of type area (Himachal Pradesh), NW sub-Himalaya, India: Palaeobiogeographic implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smita Gupta; Kishor Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Based on isolated upper cheek teeth, two new early Eocene rodents (Subathumys solanorius gen. et sp. nov. and Subathumys globulus gen. et sp. nov.) and three others (Birbalomys cf. sondaari, Birbalomys sp., cf. Chapattimys sp.) are recorded from the lower–middle part of the Subathu Formation of the type area in Himachal Pradesh, northwestern sub-Himalaya (India). The new rodents exhibit morphological features most similar to the unified ctenodactyloid family Chapattimyidae (including Yuomyidae), which is also represented in the assemblage from the upper part (middle Eocene) of the Subathu Formation. The associated lower cheek teeth are provisionally described as three indeterminate chapattimyid taxa. The new Subathu rodents are somewhat younger than the previously documented early Eocene assemblages from the Indian subcontinent, and are chronologically intermediate between the early Eocene ailuravines from Gujarat in the western peninsular India and the middle Eocene chapattimyids from northwestern India and Pakistan. They suggest that chapattimyids originated in the sub-Himalayan region during the Ypresian, which is earlier than previously believed. The absence of ailuravines in this as well as younger rodent assemblages from the subcontinent seems to suggest that ailuravines (Ischyromyidae), within a relatively short time after their appearance in the peninsular India in the early Eocene, may have been replaced by the indigenous chapattimyids. The co-occurrence in the early Eocene Subathu assemblage of three or more chapattimyids indicates their early radiation and dominance during the early and middle Eocene. This record of rodents opens the possibility of recovery of other small mammal remains in older levels of the Subathu Formation, which will be important for understanding linkage with early Eocene faunas from peninsular India, Europe and North America.

  17. The first dinosaur tracksite from Xinjiang, NW China (Middle Jurassic Sanjianfang Formation, Turpan Basin)——a preliminary report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver WINGS; Rico SCHELLHORN; Heinrich MALLISON; Ben THUY; Wenhao WU; Ge SUN

    2007-01-01

    A new dinosaur tracksite was discovered in a steeply inclined sandstone layer of the Middle Jurassic Sanjianfang Formation in the Shanshan area of the Turpan Basin. The site is the first record of dinosaur footprints from Xinjiang Province in northwestern China. More than 150 tridactyl theropod dinosaur footprints are preserved as positive hyporeliefs on the lower bedding plane of a fine-grained sandstone body. Most of the footprints are isolated and appear to be randomly distributed. Some show well defined phalangeal pads, heels and rarely indistinct impressions of the distal part of the metatarsus. Two distinct morphotypes are present: a larger type with relatively broad pads shows similarities to Changpeipus and Megalosauripus, and a slightly smaller, slender and gracile type which is similar to Grallator, Eubrontes and Anchisauripus. In both morphotypes, digit III is the longest with a length between 11.4 and 33.6 cm. A single imprint shows prominent scratches, probably formed during slipping of the track maker.

  18. Major factors controlling fracture development in the Middle Permian Lucaogou Formation tight oil reservoir, Junggar Basin, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Deyu; Luo, Qun; Liu, Luofu; Liu, Dongdong; Yan, Lin; Zhang, Yunzhao

    2017-09-01

    Natural fractures in seven wells from the Middle Permian Lucaogou Formation in the Junggar Basin were evaluated in light of regional structural evolution, tight reservoir geochemistry (including TOC and mineral composition), carbon and oxygen isotopes of calcite-filled fractures, and acoustic emission (AE). Factors controlling the development of natural fractures were analyzed using qualitative and/or semi-quantitative techniques, with results showing that tectonic factors are the primary control on fracture development in the Middle Permian Lucaogou Formation of the Junggar Basin. Analyses of calcite, dolomite, and TOC show positive correlations with the number of fractures, while deltaic lithofacies appear to be the most favorable for fracture development. Mineral content was found to be a major control on tectonic fracture development, while TOC content and sedimentary facies mainly control bedding fractures. Carbon and oxygen isotopes vary greatly in calcite-filled fractures (δ13C ranges from 0.87‰ to 7.98‰, while δ18O ranges from -12.63‰ to -5.65‰), indicating that fracture development increases with intensified tectonic activity or enhanced diagenetic alteration. By analyzing the cross-cutting relationships of fractures in core, as well as four Kaiser Effect points in the acoustic emission curve, we observed four stages of tectonic fracture development. First-stage fractures are extensional, and were generated in the late Triassic, with calcite fracture fills formed between 36.51 °C and 56.89 °C. Second-stage fractures are shear fractures caused by extrusion stress from the southwest to the northeast, generated by the rapid uplift of the Tianshan in the Middle and Late Jurassic; calcite fracture fills formed between 62.91 °C and 69.88 °C. Third-stage fractures are NNW-trending shear fractures that resulted from north-south extrusion and thrusting in a foreland depression along the front of the Early Cretaceous Bogda Mountains. Calcite fracture

  19. The nature of Mesoarchaean seawater and continental weathering in 2.85 Ga banded iron formation, Slave craton, NW Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugaard, Rasmus; Ootes, Luke; Creaser, Robert A.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2016-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIF) have been extensively used as proxies to infer the chemical composition of ancient bulk seawater. However, their proximity to ancient crust suggests that they might also be used to reveal the composition of emergent continental landmass at the time of their deposition. Here we use the combination of geochemistry and Sm-Nd isotopes on a layer-by-layer basis to interpret the relative contributions of hydrothermal, hydrogenous and terrestrial input to one of the oldest documented Superior-type BIF in the world. The ∼2.85 Ga Central Slave Cover Group BIF is deposited within a rift basin related to a continental margin and is found associated with basement gneisses, as well as shoreline and shallow-shelf type facies, such as fuchsitic quartzite and pebble-to-cobble conglomerate, that confirm a near-shore depositional setting for the BIF. The BIF ranges from a pure chemical oxide (magnetite)-silicate (grunerite + actinolite) sediment with low Al2O3 (segment exhibiting negative εNd(t) values averaging -1.1 and another with positive εNd(t) values averaging +2.5. This suggests input of dissolved REY into the upper seawater from weathering of isotopically different crustal components in the source region. Collectively, we speculate that the low REY in the upper seawater and the overall low Ni content implies a highly weathered crustal surface that was unable to contribute a significant dissolved load to the shelf environment.

  20. Volcanic Debris Flows of the Latest Paleozoic Arbasay Formation: Geomorphological Characters and Paleoenvironment Reconstruction of Northern Tian Shan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Liu, D.; Guo, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Texturally well-preserved volcanic debris flows (also called lahars) are exposed in the Latest Paleozoic Arbasay Formation, Northern Tian Shan. LA-ICP-MS zircon dating of the intercalated fallout tuff sample provided an age of 314.4±3.4 Ma (MSWD=1.6), suggesting they were deposited at Latest Carboniferous. The lahars consist primarily of two lithofacies: massive, poorly lithified diamictites and stratified, moderately lithified gravelly sandstones. The diamictites can be generally divided into two subfacies, i.e., the matrix-supported and the clast-supported diamictites. Most diamictites are structureless and nongraded. They are thick in beds and contain large clasts up to 3 m in dimension. The gravelly sandstones display much finer particle size and have wedge or lenticular geometries. Large clasts are absent within them and the sorting characters are much better than the diamictites. Despite the different size grading, the matrix and the clasts of the two lithofacies appear to be homogeneous. The matrix is generally sandy mudstone. The clasts comprise rhyolites, dacites, andesites, andesitic basalts and basalts, same to the co-existing volcanic rocks, suggesting they originate from the cognate volcanics. The disorganized diamictites are supposed to deposit from a turbulent flood or pyroclastic surge. The gravelly sandstone lithofacies are interpreted as sand-rich flood flows or hyperconcentrated flood flows during the waning stage of a mass-flow event. The overall characteristics of the deposits suggest a mass-flow dominated alluvial fan environment. It's noteable that several syn- sedimentary normal faults occurred within these lahar deposits, indicating that the Southern Junggar Basin was in an extensional regime during the lahars' deposition. Structure is dominated by normal faulting, allowing the existence of relatively small, highly compartmentalized depocenters. This is also supported by geochemistry and detrital zircon studies.

  1. The Arab Spring in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Elsa Annaklara; Hansen, Ditte Ingemann

    2013-01-01

    This project contains analysis and discussion of several social movements in Jordan. The uprising in Jordan and demands for more democratization are inspired by the Arab Spring observed in the Middle East. The most highlighted Jordanian social movements being the religious Muslim Brotherhood, the radical Salafi Movement and the newly proclaimed Popular Mobilization. Questions concerning the identification of them, their goals and ways of mobilizing and the hindrances for these movements to mo...

  2. Mapping Ecosystem Services in the Jordan Valley, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Ana; Marques, Ana; Ribeiro, Inês; Alho, Maria; Catarina Afonso, Ana; Almeida, Erika; Branquinho, Cristina; Talozi, Samer; Pinho, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade researchers started using ecosystem services as a new framework to understand the relationships between environment and society. Habitat quality and water quality are related with ecosystem services regulation and maintenance, or even provision. According to the Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES) both habitat quality and water quality are associated with lifecycle maintenance, habitat and gene pool protection, and water conditions, among others. As there is increased pressure on habitats and rivers especially for agricultural development, mapping and evaluating habitat and water quality has important implications for resource management and conservation, as well as for rural development. Here, we model and map habitat and water quality in the Jordan Valley, Jordan. In this study, we aim to identify and analyse ecosystem services both through 1) habitat quality and 2) water quality modelling using InVest, an integrated valuation of ecosystem services and tradeoffs. The data used in this study mainly includes the LULC, Jordan River watershed and main threats and pollutants in the study area, such as agriculture, industry, fish farms and urbanization. Results suggest a higher pressure on natural habitats in the Northern region of the Jordan Valley, where industry is dominant. Agriculture is present along the Jordan Valley and limits the few natural forested areas. Further, water pollution is mainly concentrated in disposal sites due to the low flow of the Jordan River. Our results can help to identify areas where natural resources and water resource management is most needed in the Jordan Valley. Acknowledgements: Transbasin FP7 project

  3. Mass-transport deposit and mélange formation in the Ligurian accretionary complex (NW-Italy) via mutual interactions of tectonic, sedimentary and diapiric processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, A.; Codegone, G.; Dilek, Y.; Ogata, K.; Pini, G.

    2011-12-01

    Slope instability and material removal from the overriding plate are common in frontal wedges of subduction-accretionary complexes, form mass-transport deposits (MTDs), and play an important role in controlling the internal dynamics of a critical taper Coulomb wedge and its slope instability. We present different examples of ancient MTDs emplaced during the late Cretaceous-Miocene evolution of the External Ligurian accretionary wedge and the related wedge-top basins (Epiligurian Units Auct.) in the NW-Apennines, Italy. These MTDs consist of sedimentary mélanges or olistostromes and display heterogeneous deformation controlled by the degree of sediment consolidation and the velocity of gravitational processes (Festa et al., 2010 IGR; Pini et al., 2011 Springer Book). Decimeter- to meter-thick shear zones associated with localized visco-plastic deformation and highly disturbed rounded and/or subangular blocks randomly distributed in a brecciated matrix form the two end-members of structures. Crosscutting relationships between MTDs and coherent successions, tectonic mélanges - broken formation and injection bodies (shaly-dykes and/or diapirs) allow us to document their time-progressive development, the correlation with tectonic and diapiric processes, and the material redistribution forming polygenic mélanges in the frontal part of the External Ligurian accretionary wedge. Out-of-sequence "megathrust" and strike-slip faulting, fluid overpressure, presence of low-permeable layers and methane-rich fluid circulation in the sedimentary column were the main factors that controlled the emplacement of various MTDs. In all the examples described, mass-transport was closely associated and had mutual interactions with tectonic and diapiric processes (Festa, 2011 GSA Sp Publ). Tectonics played the most prominent role (directly and indirectly), whereas fluid flow and overpressure strongly controlled the mechanical behavior of sediments and facilitated the emplacement of

  4. Jordan Banks Financial Soundness Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Kutum

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is to examine the Jordanian banks using financial soundness indicators. This is to establish if Jordanian banks were affected because of the 2007/2008 financial crisis and determine the underlying reasons. The research paper was conducted on 25 banks in Jordan listed in the countries securities exchange. The research methodology used consisted of examining the banks financial records in order to derive four crucial Basel III ratio such as the capital adequacy ratio, the leverage ratio, the liquidity ratio and finally the Total Provisions (As % Of Non-Performing Loans %. The results revealed that out of the four hypotheses under examination Jordan Banks do not meet Basel financial Indicators for Capital Adequacy Ratio, Jordan Banks does not meet Basel financial Indicators for Liquidity Ratio , Jordan Banks do not meet Basel financial Indicators for Leverage Ratio and Jordan Banks do not meet Basel financial Indicators for Total Provisions (As % Of Non-Performing Loans ratio. Only one hypothesis was accepted based on the research outcomes. The rest of the hypothesis was rejected since the average trend line did not go below the Basel III required ratio level. The general outcome of the research revealed that Jordanian banks were not affected significantly by the financial crisis.

  5. Structure and representations of Jordan algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Nathan

    1968-01-01

    The theory of Jordan algebras has played important roles behind the scenes of several areas of mathematics. Jacobson's book has long been the definitive treatment of the subject. It covers foundational material, structure theory, and representation theory for Jordan algebras. Of course, there are immediate connections with Lie algebras, which Jacobson details in Chapter 8. Of particular continuing interest is the discussion of exceptional Jordan algebras, which serve to explain the exceptional Lie algebras and Lie groups. Jordan algebras originally arose in the attempts by Jordan, von Neumann,

  6. Local derivations on Jordan triples

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    R. V. Kadison (J. Algebra 130 (1990) 494–509) defined the notion of local derivation on an algebra and proved that every continuous local derivation on a von Neumann algebra is a derivation. We provide the analogous result in the setting of Jordan triples.

  7. Jarosite versus Soluble Iron-Sulfate Formation and Their Role in Acid Mine Drainage Formation at the Pan de Azúcar Mine Tailings (Zn-Pb-Ag, NW Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Murray

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Secondary jarosite and water-soluble iron-sulfate minerals control the composition of acid mine waters formed by the oxidation of sulfide in tailings impoundments at the (Zn-Pb-Ag Pan de Azúcar mine located in the Pozuelos Lagoon Basin (semi-arid climate in Northwest (NW Argentina. In the primary zone of the tailings (9.5 wt % pyrite-marcasite precipitation of anglesite (PbSO4, wupatkite ((Co,Mg,NiAl2(SO44 and gypsum retain Pb, Co and Ca, while mainly Fe2+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, As3+/5+ and Cd2+ migrate downwards, forming a sulfate and metal-rich plume. In the oxidation zone, jarosite (MFe3(TO42(OH6 is the main secondary Fe3+ phase; its most suitable composition is M = K+, Na+, and Pb2+and TO4 = SO42−; AsO42−. During the dry season, iron-sulfate salts precipitate by capillary transport on the tailings and at the foot of DC2 (tailings impoundment DC2 tailings dam where an acid, Fe2+ rich plume outcrops. The most abundant compounds in the acid mine drainage (AMD are SO42−, Fe2+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Al3+, Mg2+, Cu2+, As3+/5+, Cd2+. These show peak concentrations at the beginning of the wet season, when the soluble salts and jarosite dissolve. The formation of soluble sulfate salts during the dry season and dilution during the wet season conform an annual cycle of rapid metals and acidity transference from the tailings to the downstream environment.

  8. Better Buildings NW Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Kevin [Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Districts or ESIDs and what is nationally known as Property Assessed Clean Energy or PACE districts and PACE financing. The project methodology followed the identify, develop, implement, monitor and measure format. These districts began in Toledo and adjoining areas and are expanding to TLCPA’s 28 county financing agency geographic footprint. What began as the Toledo Ohio Advanced Energy Improvement Corporation is now doing business as the Northwest Ohio Advanced Energy Improvement District recognizing it expansion into creating and financing other districts in NW Ohio. The program has been sought out as an advisor by major communities and states in the process of developing similar legislation and programs and has become one of the largest most successful PACE energy improvement and financing districts in the US. The program and the energy district focused on transforming energy use, delivery, conservation and renewable energy as “options of first choice”. The significant energy savings paid for many of the improvements and created a financially viable program well beyond the grant period. The program has become a model within the State of Ohio and Nationally on how to implement and finance projects in broad energy districts including how to evolve and integrate several financing methodologies. It is a unique utilization of revolving loan funds and energy bond pooling with revenue backing primarily from energy improvement special assessments on commercial properties along with some power purchase agreement (PPA) and loan agreement revenue. The program has also incorporated Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, State of Ohio Energy Loans (SEP), utility rebates, solar and renewable energy certificates, renewable tax incentives and grants, and owner funded equity as additional program leverage and funding. Other keys to this success have been a continual simplification and refinement of the application and documentation process to make funding available easily and

  9. Social Welfare Activism in Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marie Juul

    Many Jordanians perceive formal politics in Jordan as illegitimate, corrupt and authoritarian. Thus, when searching for agents of change and reform, we have to look beyond the formal political system. In this regard, recent years have seen an increasing interest in civil society. However, this in...... the organisations' positions on a number of concepts often associated with "democratisation", namely women's rights, participation and pluralism, paying particular attention to the role of Islam....

  10. Landscape development in the context of soil distribution in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Processes of landscape change can be assessed by studying the distribution of soil types and their connection to climate, the geology, and land use. In this context, even in areas where no virgin soils are available, paleosols pre-dating the introduction of agriculture can be utilized for estimating potential soil development without human impact. Soil distribution in Jordan follows closely the climate and topography: specific soil orders can be found within the dry and hot subtropical, subhumid-semiarid, semiarid-arid, and arid regions. The pattern of soil and paleosol distribution in Jordan points to an important role of the geology (bedrock and relief), and of climate in their formation, both locally such as in the vicinity of the ancient site of Abila, and regionally in the whole country. In contrast, the impact of land use appears relatively limited: overall erosion has been estimated not to exceed the expected geological rate, and Jordan is considered to be in the stable state of completed geologic erosion. This is further supported by strongly varying soil properties and archaeological material on agricultural fields, which suggests that overall erosion processes during historical periods were limited. The presence of a quite uniform 4 m thick loess cover around the site of Umm el-Jimal in north-east Jordan suggests that aeolian deposits are probably the by far dominating parent material of current soils in northern Jordan. In this context, an apparent division of some soil profiles into subsoil and topsoil could correspond to dominant in-situ soil formation out of bedrock weathering at the bottom, while the upper part of the profiles could correspond to aeolian dust as main parent material. A stone line or lithological discontinuity separating these two parts of the profile might refer to a major erosion event. If true, this could indicate that current soils in Jordan might represent a mixture of at least two phases of soil development with probably

  11. Jordan: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    incurring a bar to reentry. CRS Correspondence with USAID, March 3, 2011. Jordan: Background and U.S. Relations Congressional Research Service 13...commodities imported by Jordan consisted of aircraft parts, machinery and appliances, vehicles, and cereals . Two measures, in particular—the Free Trade

  12. Born-Jordan quantization theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    de Gosson, Maurice A

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive mathematical study of the operators behind the Born–Jordan quantization scheme. The Schrödinger and Heisenberg pictures of quantum mechanics are equivalent only if the Born–Jordan scheme is used. Thus, Born–Jordan quantization provides the only physically consistent quantization scheme, as opposed to the Weyl quantization commonly used by physicists. In this book we develop Born–Jordan quantization from an operator-theoretical point of view, and analyze in depth the conceptual differences between the two schemes. We discuss various physically motivated approaches, in particular the Feynman-integral point of view. One important and intriguing feature of Born-Jordan quantization is that it is not one-to-one: there are infinitely many classical observables whose quantization is zero.

  13. On Functional Inequalities Originating from Module Jordan Left Derivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sheon-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We first examine the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of functional inequality associated with module Jordan left derivation (resp., module Jordan derivation. Secondly, we study the functional inequality with linear Jordan left derivation (resp., linear Jordan derivation mapping into the Jacobson radical.

  14. On Functional Inequalities Originating from Module Jordan Left Derivations

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Sheon-Young; Chang Ick-Soon; Kim Hark-Mahn

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We first examine the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of functional inequality associated with module Jordan left derivation (resp., module Jordan derivation). Secondly, we study the functional inequality with linear Jordan left derivation (resp., linear Jordan derivation) mapping into the Jacobson radical.

  15. On Functional Inequalities Originating from Module Jordan Left Derivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ick-Soon Chang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We first examine the generalized Hyers-Ulam stability of functional inequality associated with module Jordan left derivation (resp., module Jordan derivation. Secondly, we study the functional inequality with linear Jordan left derivation (resp., linear Jordan derivation mapping into the Jacobson radical.

  16. Radionuclides, trace elements, and radium residence in phosphogypsum of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, R.A.; Al-Hwaiti, M. S.; Budahn, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Voluminous stockpiles of phosphogypsum (PG) generated during the wet process production of phosphoric acid are stored at many sites around the world and pose problems for their safe storage, disposal, or utilization. A major concern is the elevated concentration of long-lived 226Ra (half-life = 1,600 years) inherited from the processed phosphate rock. Knowledge of the abundance and mode-of-occurrence of radium (Ra) in PG is critical for accurate prediction of Ra leachability and radon (Rn) emanation, and for prediction of radiation-exposure pathways to workers and to the public. The mean (??SD) of 226Ra concentrations in ten samples of Jordan PG is 601 ?? 98 Bq/kg, which falls near the midrange of values reported for PG samples collected worldwide. Jordan PG generally shows no analytically significant enrichment (age of PG. Water-insoluble residues from Jordan PG constitute <10% of PG mass but contain 30-65% of the 226Ra. 226Ra correlates closely with Ba in the water-insoluble residues. Uniformly tiny (< 10 ??m) grains of barite (barium sulfate) observed with scanning electron microscopy have crystal morphologies that indicate their formation during the wet process. Barite is a well-documented and efficient scavenger of Ra from solution and is also very insoluble in water and mineral acids. Radium-bearing barite in PG influences the environmental mobility of radium and the radiation-exposure pathways near PG stockpiles. ?? 2010 US Government.

  17. Soil erosion and land degradation in the Highlands of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2013-04-01

    The Highlands of Jordan has a Mediterranean type of climate characterized by hot dry summers and cold wet winters. Unsustainable land use practices, recurrent droughts and climate change are the main causes of land degradation in the Highlands area of Jordan. Unsustainable land use practices include improper plowing, inappropriate rotations, inadequate or inexistent management of plant residues, overgrazing of natural vegetation, forest cutting, land fragmentation and over-pumping of groundwater. In addition, Jordan's rapid population growth (2.8% per year) is exerting considerable pressure upon its limited arable land through uncontrolled and random urbanization activities. Water erosion is the most widespread Land degradation type in the country. It greatly increases on slopes where the vegetation cover is (seasonally) reduced. It is further aggravated by a loss of soil structure and reduced infiltration rates. Wind erosion occurs most frequently in the arid and semi-arid portions of the southern Highlands, especially in areas with sandy or loamy soils. Rangeland degradation is the second most widespread land degradation type that is driven by overgrazing. The impact of overgrazing on the vegetation is evident from the excessive uprooting of the green matter (grass and bushes), leading to reduced seeding, reduced regeneration, and the consequent loss of plant cover which make the soil more susceptible to water and wind erosion. It is estimated that about 41 percent of Jordan's total land area is characterized as degraded of which 22 percent of the total land mass is classified as moderately degraded and agricultural productivity is greatly reduced. Observed aspects of land degradation include the recession of forest areas, high rate of erosion by water (formation of rills and gullies), expansion of urbanized area, reduction in soil organic matter and soil structure deterioration. Implementation of soil erosion control measures such as contour cultivation

  18. Jordan C*-Algebras and Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rios, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is known that black hole charge vectors of N=8 and magic N=2 supergravity in four and five dimensions can be represented as elements of Jordan algebras of degree three over the octonions and split-octonions and their Freudenthal triple systems. We show both such Jordan algebras are contained in the exceptional Jordan C*-algebra and construct its corresponding Freudenthal triple system and single variable extension. The transformation groups for these structures give rise to the complex forms of the U-duality groups for N=8 and magic N=2 supergravities in three, four and five dimensions.

  19. Jordan Higher Derivable Mappings on Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let R be a ring. We say that a family of maps D={dn}n∈N is a Jordan higher derivable map (without assumption of additivity on R if d0=IR (the identity map on R and dn(ab+ba=∑p+q=n‍dp(adq(b+∑p+q=n‍dp(bdq(a hold for all a,b∈R and for each n∈N. In this paper, we show that every Jordan higher derivable map on a ring under certain assumptions becomes a higher derivation. As its application, we get that every Jordan higher derivable map on Banach algebra is an additive higher derivation.

  20. Paleomagnetic studies on the late Ediacaran - Early Cambrian Puncoviscana and the late Cambrian Campanario formations, NW Argentina: New paleogeographic constraints for the Pampia terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschinis, Pablo R.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Escayola, Monica P.; Luppo, Tomás

    2016-10-01

    A magnetofabric and paleomagnetic study was carried out in the Late Ediacaran - Early Cambrian Puncoviscana and the early Late Cambrian Campanario formations, exposed in Santa Victoria Oeste, in northwestern Argentina. Ten sites (93 samples) were located in tuffs and volcanic sills interbedded in the Puncoviscana Formation, one of which had been dated at 537 ± 0.9 Ma. On the other hand, 42 samples were collected at three sites from red to purple sandstones of the Campanario Formation. The analysis of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) allowed to recognize a pre-Andean fabric in both formations indicating that it is previous to the Andean cycle. In the paleomagnetic study reliable magnetic components were isolated in only two sites of the Puncoviscana formation whose virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) are close to but do not coincide with the apparent polar wander path of Río de la Plata craton - Gondwana for the late Neoproterozoic - Cambrian. A new paleomagnetic pole (18.2°S, 358.8°W, K: 27.9; A95: 3.9) was computed for the Campanario formation which is close to but does not coincide with those obtained in other locations for this unit and were considered anomalous respect to the expected position in the Gondwana path. The pole presented here is closer to the apparent polar wander path of Gondwana for the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician suggesting two possible interpretations; the presence of different amounts of Andean tectonic rotations between different sampling locations of the Campanario Formation or the recording of a rapid Pampia dextral displacement along the Rio de la Plata craton margin in Cambrian times.

  1. Jordan structures in mathematics and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Iordanescu, Radu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer an overview of the most important applications of Jordan structures inside mathematics and also to physics, up-dated references being included. For a more detailed treatment of this topic see - especially - the recent book Iordanescu [364w], where sugestions for further developments are given through many open problems, comments and remarks pointed out throughout the text. Nowadays, mathematics becomes more and more nonassociative and my prediction is that in few years nonassociativity will govern mathematics and applied sciences. Keywords: Jordan algebra, Jordan triple system, Jordan pair, JB-, JB*-, JBW-, JBW*-, JH*-algebra, Ricatti equation, Riemann space, symmetric space, R-space, octonion plane, projective plane, Barbilian space, Tzitzeica equation, quantum group, B\\"acklund-Darboux transformation, Hopf algebra, Yang-Baxter equation, KP equation, Sato Grassmann manifold, genetic algebra, random quadratic form.

  2. The economics of tobacco use in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Nadia J; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    We conducted an independent survey of tobacco use in Jordan following the methods and template of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey. Using data collected on cigarette use and cigarette prices, we estimated the price elasticity of cigarette demand in Jordan. We used a 2-part model of cigarette demand. In the first part, we estimate the impact of prices on the decision to smoke while controlling for individual demographic and environmental characteristics. Conditional on smoking, we then estimate the effect of price on the number of cigarettes smoked. The total price elasticity of cigarette demand in Jordan was estimated to be -0.6. Smoking among women was found to be relatively unresponsive to price (elasticity of -0.01), whereas smoking among men was much more responsive to price (elasticity of -0.81). The price elasticity estimates suggest that significant increases in tobacco taxes are likely to be effective in reducing smoking in Jordan, particularly smoking among men.

  3. Jordan: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-08

    assistance of Carla Humud, Analyst in Middle Eastern and African Affairs. 3 UNHCR , Syrian refugee data, at http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/country.php?id...the establishment of an enterprise fund. Finally, Congress also appropriated additional Migration and Refugee Assistance funding (MRA) to help...countries like Jordan cope with the Syrian refugee crisis. Jordan: Background and U.S. Relations Congressional Research Service Contents Overview

  4. Water scarcity in the Jordan River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civic, M A

    1999-03-01

    This article reports the problem on water scarcity in the Jordan River basin. In the Jordan River basin, freshwater scarcity results from multiple factors and most severely affects Israel, Jordan, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip. One of these multiple factors is the duration of rainfall in the region that only occurs in a small area of highlands in the northwest section. The varying method of water use parallels that of Israel that utilizes an estimated 2000 million cu. m. The national patterns of water usage and politically charged territorial assertions compound the competition over freshwater resources in the region. The combination of political strife, resource overuse, and contaminated sources means that freshwater scarcity in the Jordan River basin will reach a critical level in the near future. History revealed that the misallocation/mismanagement of freshwater from the Jordan River basin was the result of centuries of distinct local cultural and religious practices combined with historical influences. Each state occupying near the river basin form their respective national water development schemes. It was not until the mid-1990s that a shared-use approach was considered. Therefore, the critical nature of water resource, the ever-dwindling supply of freshwater in the Jordan River basin, and the irrevocability of inappropriate policy measures requires unified, definitive, and ecologically sound changes to the existing policies and practices to insure an adequate water supply for all people in the region.

  5. JORDAN TEAM VALID8故人重来

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩颖

    2005-01-01

    作为与 JORDAN TEAM BIG FUND同时上市的 JORDAN TEAM 款式,JOR-DAN TEAM VALID8的受关注度远远没有前者大。外形与 AIR JORDAN Ⅳ相象的 JORDAN TEAM BIG FUND 凭借ⅢP HOP 风格得到了许多人的喜爱,而JORDAN TEAM VALID8却始终显得不温不火。其实,外观简单的 JORDAN TEAM

  6. The relation between stone disease and obesity in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Alex Abu Ghazaleh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity forms a growing challenge in medicine worldwide. In Jordan, the obese and the overweight population form 49.7% of the total population. The latest national male to female ratio in Jordan is 1:1.06. There is a relation between obesity and renal stone formation. This study is conducted to study the relation of renal stone and obesity in the Jordanian popu-lation. All patients with urolithiasis that attended the urology clinic at Prince Hussein Bin Abdullah Urology Center at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan, over the period from January 2006 to January 2011 were included in the study and analyzed for age, gender, body weight, number of visits to the clinic and number of procedures. Over a period of 60 months from January 2006 through January 2011, 8346 patients were treated for urolithiasis. The median age was 43.2 years. The male to female ratio was 1.46:1. 42.3% of the patients were obese, with body mass index (BMI >30 kg/m 2 and 25.8% of the patients were overweight, with BMI >25 kg/m 2 . The normal body weight population formed 31.9% of the total population. The majority of our urolithiasis patients were obese and overweight, forming 68.1% of the population, with a higher number of clinical visits and higher number of surgical procedures. In the Jordanian population, there is a clear relation between obesity and stone formation, where the majority of stone formers was obese.

  7. Baseline Characteristics of Jordan Creek, Juneau, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host, Randy H.; Neal, Edward G.

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous fish populations historically have found healthy habitat in Jordan Creek, Juneau, Alaska. Concern regarding potential degradation to the habitat by urban development within the Mendenhall Valley led to a cooperative study among the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, and the U.S. Geological Survey, that assessed current hydrologic, water-quality, and physical-habitat conditions of the stream corridor. Periods of no streamflow were not uncommon at the Jordan Creek below Egan Drive near Auke Bay stream gaging station. Additional flow measurements indicate that periods of no flow are more frequent downstream of the gaging station. Although periods of no flow typically were in March and April, streamflow measurements collected prior to 1999 indicate similar periods in January, suggesting that no flow conditions may occur at any time during the winter months. This dewatering in the lower reaches likely limits fish rearing and spawning habitat as well as limiting the migration of juvenile salmon out to the ocean during some years. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations may not be suitable for fish survival during some winter periods in the Jordan Creek watershed. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were measured as low as 2.8 mg/L at the gaging station and were measured as low as 0.85 mg/L in a tributary to Jordan Creek. Intermittent measurements of pH and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the mid-reaches of Jordan Creek were all within acceptable limits for fish survival, however, few measurements of these parameters were made during winter-low-flow conditions. One set of water quality samples was collected at six different sites in the Jordan Creek watershed and analyzed for major ions and dissolved nutrients. Major-ion chemistry showed Jordan Creek is calcium bicarbonate type water with little variation between sampling sites.

  8. Deformation microstructures and mechanisms in the high-pressure granulites of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal, NW Spain): going up to the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, P.; Abalos, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Cabo Ortegal complex is a nappe stack formed by fragments of subducted continental and oceanic lithosphere emplaced onto the Gondwana edge during the Variscan orogeny. The nappe units of Cabo Ortegal were metamorphosed under different high-pressure (HP) conditions and currently are separated by ductile tectonic contacts. They include mappable ultramafic massifs, N-MORB eclogites, metagabbros, metaserpentinites, metaperidotites, ortho- and paragneisses, and the Bacariza Formation granulites. The primary structure consists of the ultramafic massifs tectonically resting on top of the granulites of the Bacariza Formation, which overlie eclogites and HP gneisses with eclogite boudins. Granulites of the Bacariza Formation are mainly basic to intermediate in composition, although granulitic, carbonate-rich or mineralogically more exotic varieties also exist. On the basis of modal variations in the abundance of mafic and felsic mineral several lithotypes have been differentiated in order of decreasing outcrop area: (G1) plagio-pyrigarnites or common mafic granulites, (G2) intermediate to felsic, plagioclase-rich granulites, (G3) Mg-rich mafic granulites, (G4) pyrigarnite, or plagioclase-poor ultramafic granulites, and (G5) granulitic orthogneisses. The Bacariza Formation recorded a high-pressure metamorphic event. This event was polyphasic and two deformational phases are differentiated, D1 and D2, namely. D2 is associated to amalgamation of eclogite, high-pressure granulitic rocks and ultramafic sheets in deep portions of a subduction channel during the initial exhumation of the complex. As a result, transposition of the previous D1 fabrics took place due to the development of spectacular shear zones at the contacts with the bounding units. Pressure and temperature conditions estimated from the D2 mineral assemblage in equilibrium yield values of ca. 1.4 GPa and 740 °C, respectively. In this work we present a detailed study of a D2 shear zone located at the contact

  9. Tertiary lignites of As Pontes (NW-Spain) - an example for the composition of bright coal layers and its implications for formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, H.W.; Pickel, W. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Geologie, Geochemie und Lagerstaetten des Erdoels und der Kohle; Cabrera, L.; Saez, A. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Geologia Dinamica, Geofisica i Paleontologia

    1997-12-31

    The Tertiary lignite basin of As Pontes is characterized by the frequent occurrence of bright brown coal layers. These layers, macroscopically very similar to those described for example in the Weisselster Basin and various other lignite deposits were studied in detail mainly by means of organic petrography in one seam of the basin and the data were related to the brightness of the coals. The question, if the colour of lignite is mainly influenced by the original plant input or the depositional environment, is under strong controversial discussion up to now. The bright coals of the As Pontes Basin are mineral rich (especially in clay) and/or contain high amounts of lipid rich matter (liptinite), especially coalification products of cork-tissue (suberinite). The results of the study indicate that the bright coal is highly degraded in comparison to the dark coals of the same basin. The formation of bright, litinite/mineral-rich lignite layers occurred especially during early basin evolution stages influenced by water table oscillations. Sedimentological, petrographical and organic geochemical data point to the fact that, although the paleoenvironments, where peat deposition took place, did not experience drastic changes, they were affected by noticable variations in hydrochemistry and groundwater stability, related to the tectonic historical record of the basin and the paleoclimatic conditions. In summary the origin of the bright layers of the As Pontes lignite is mainly related to the depositional environment. (orig.)

  10. Miocene to present-day shortening and intermontane basin formation in the Andean Puna Plateau, NW Argentina (24°30'S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, M. R.; Bookhagen, B.; Alonso, R. N.; Pingel, H.; Freymark, J.

    2015-12-01

    With average elevations of about 3.7 km the Altiplano-Puna Plateau of the southern central Andes constitutes the world's second largest orogenic plateau. The plateau generally consists of internally drained, partly coalesced sedimentary basins bordered by reverse-fault bounded ranges, >5 km high. In the Puna, the Argentine sector of the plateau, active tectonism has been interpreted to be characterized by a low level of strike-slip and normal faulting associated with mafic volcanism. In contrast, the eastern plateau margins and the adjacent foreland record a higher level of seismicity and ongoing contraction. Despite ubiquitous Plio-Pleistocene normal faulting along the eastern plateau margins, our new observations record contraction in the plateau interior. Fanning of E-dipping Miocene sedimentary strata involved in the formation of an anticline in the Pocitos Basin of the central Puna interior indicates growth, which must have begun after 7 Ma; 1.5-m.y.-old lacustrine strata as well as tilted Pleistocene lacustrine shorelines associated with this structure indicate sustained uplift into the Quaternary. Corresponding observations along the eastern border of the Pocitos Basin show that <3.5-m.y.-old strata are involved in contractile deformation and basin compartmentalization. Shortening in the central Puna is compatible with Plio-Pleistocene shortening in the low-elevation Salar de Atacama farther west, and may indicate that low-elevation sectors of the plateau have not yet reached a critical elevation that is conducive to normal faulting as observed elsewhere. The onset of extensional deformation in the Puna is thus highly disparate in space and time. Coeval regional thrusting, strike-slip, and normal faulting do not support a structural and topographic setting that promotes wholesale extension and orogenic collapse of the plateau realm.

  11. Hom-alternative algebras and Hom-Jordan algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Makhlouf, Abdenacer

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Hom-alternative algebras and Hom-Jordan algebras. We discuss some of their properties and provide construction procedures using ordinary alternative algebras or Jordan algebras. Also, we show that a polarization of Hom-associative algebra leads to Hom-Jordan algebra.

  12. Radionuclides, trace elements, and radium residence in phosphogypsum of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Robert A; Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad S; Budahn, James R; Ranville, James F

    2011-04-01

    Voluminous stockpiles of phosphogypsum (PG) generated during the wet process production of phosphoric acid are stored at many sites around the world and pose problems for their safe storage, disposal, or utilization. A major concern is the elevated concentration of long-lived (226)Ra (half-life = 1,600 years) inherited from the processed phosphate rock. Knowledge of the abundance and mode-of-occurrence of radium (Ra) in PG is critical for accurate prediction of Ra leachability and radon (Rn) emanation, and for prediction of radiation-exposure pathways to workers and to the public. The mean (±SD) of (226)Ra concentrations in ten samples of Jordan PG is 601 ± 98 Bq/kg, which falls near the midrange of values reported for PG samples collected worldwide. Jordan PG generally shows no analytically significant enrichment (Phosphogypsum samples collected from two industrial sites with different sources of phosphate rock feedstock show consistent differences in concentration of (226)Ra and rare earth elements, and also consistent trends of enrichment in these elements with increasing age of PG. Water-insoluble residues from Jordan PG constitute <10% of PG mass but contain 30-65% of the (226)Ra. (226)Ra correlates closely with Ba in the water-insoluble residues. Uniformly tiny (<10 μm) grains of barite (barium sulfate) observed with scanning electron microscopy have crystal morphologies that indicate their formation during the wet process. Barite is a well-documented and efficient scavenger of Ra from solution and is also very insoluble in water and mineral acids. Radium-bearing barite in PG influences the environmental mobility of radium and the radiation-exposure pathways near PG stockpiles.

  13. The risk factors of CVA in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auais, Mohammad A; Alzyoud, Jehad M; Sbieh, Ziad; Abdulla, Fuad A

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to identify the main risk factors of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in Jordan. Identification of risk factors may help to reduce the incidence of CVA. A form was prepared for data collection which consisted of two parts to gather biodata and the incidence of risk factors. A sample of 200 patients with CVA (60% men) were randomly selected from various areas of Jordan. An age, region distribution, and gender-matched sample were selected to serve as control. Hypertension in the experimental group (66%) was significantly higher than the control group (32%) p  CVA compared to 14% in the control group (p  CVA group had hyperlipidemia in comparison to 13% in the controls (p CVA in Jordan.

  14. Jordan Canonical Form Theory and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Weintraub, Steven H

    2009-01-01

    Jordan Canonical Form (JCF) is one of the most important, and useful, concepts in linear algebra. The JCF of a linear transformation, or of a matrix, encodes all of the structural information about that linear transformation, or matrix. This book is a careful development of JCF. After beginning with background material, we introduce Jordan Canonical Form and related notions: eigenvalues, (generalized) eigenvectors, and the characteristic and minimum polynomials. We decide the question of diagonalizability, and prove the Cayley-Hamilton theorem. Then we present a careful and complete proof of t

  15. English in Jordan: Attitudes and Prestige

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saidat, Emad M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to discuss the attitudes of a number of Jordanian university students towards English as a foreign language and the place it occupies in Jordan. Although research of a similar nature has been done, this study complements others by following 420 students in their university studies, and it provides another avenue for examining…

  16. Water and Security in the Jordan Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-11

    political, and diplomatic strengths. For this reason alone, it serves as an excellent tool for working on the problems of the Jordan basin. 561...and Brdens:L R pr cm the West Bank and Gaza rip Ecnmi since 1967. New York: Carnegie Endowment, 1977. Weinbaum, Marvin G. F Devopment and Politing in

  17. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    Jordan is committed to aligning its national corporate financial reporting requirements with the International Accounting Standards and International Standards on Auditing, and it has achieved significant improvements, including issuance of a new Accountancy Profession Law. Although this law is a significant step toward regulating the profession, the Report on the Observance of Standards a...

  18. Communication Skills among Gifted Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarah, Yacoub Fareed

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the communication skills among gifted students in Jordan and to investigate the effect of gender and the level of students in acquiring these communication skills. A questionnaire was distributed among the sample of the study which comprised of (240) tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students from Al…

  19. The economic burden of hemodialysis in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Adel Al-Shdaifat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodialysis treatment is a costly procedure that requires specific resources. It has a considerable burden on patients, caregivers, and healthcare system. The aim of this study was to estimate the economic burden borne by the Ministry of Health (MOH in Jordan, with a focus on direct medical, direct non-medical, and indirect cost. Materials and Methods:The study was conducted at MOH hospitals in Jordan, from August to November 2010. A total of 138 patients and 49 caregivers were involved in the study. An economic evaluation study was used to analyze the burden of hemodialysis treatment at MOH, Jordan. Direct medical costs were estimated through micro and macro costing from the provider′s perspective. Patients′ and caregivers′ costs were included to calculate direct non-medical costs. Human capital approach was employed to evaluate the productivity loss for indirect cost and premature death and potential year life loss was used to estimate the premature death cost. Results: The total burden of hemodialysis at MOH, Jordan was USD17.70 million per year. Cost per session was $72 and the annual cost per patient was $9976. Direct medical cost was $7.20 million (41% and direct non-medical cost was $2.02 million (11%. On the other hand, indirect cost (productivity loss was $8.48 million (48%. All 722 patients on hemodialysis at MOH hospitals consumed 2.7% of MOH budget. Conclusions: Costs of treating and managing patients on hemodialysis at MOH hospitals in Jordan are substantial. Therefore, efforts should be taken to slow down the progress of renal failure to save resources and a comparative study with other modalities, such as continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and kidney transplantation, should be considered.

  20. Determination of groundwater travel time in a karst aquifer by stable water isotopes, Tanour and Rasoun spring (Jordan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Wiegand, Bettina; Sauter, Martin; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    . Water Information System, National Master Plan Directorate. Jordan. Hamdan I., Wiegand B., Toll M., Sauter M. (2016) Spring response to precipitation events using δ 18O and δ 2H in the Tanour catchment, NW-Jordan. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies journal. Accepted GIEH-2015-0139. Hamdan, I.~in preparation.~Characterization of groundwater flow and vulnerability assessment of karstic aquifer - A case study from Tanour and Rasoun spring catchment (Ajloun, NW-Jordan).~Ph.D. Thesis, University of Göttingen, Germany.

  1. Norms of certain Jordan elementary operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Ji, Guoxing

    2008-10-01

    Let be a complex Hilbert space and let denote the algebra of all bounded linear operators on . For , the Jordan elementary operator UA,B is defined by UA,B(X)=AXB+BXA, . In this short note, we discuss the norm of UA,B. We show that if and ||UA,B||=||A||||B||, then either AB* or B*A is 0. We give some examples of Jordan elementary operators UA,B such that ||UA,B||=||A||||B|| but AB*[not equal to]0 and B*A[not equal to]0, which answer negatively a question posed by M. Boumazgour in [M. Boumazgour, Norm inequalities for sums of two basic elementary operators, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 342 (2008) 386-393].

  2. Asymptotic Markov inequality on Jordan arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totik, V.

    2017-03-01

    Markov's inequality for the derivative of algebraic polynomials is considered on C^2-smooth Jordan arcs. The asymptotically best estimate is given for the kth derivative for all k=1,2,\\dots . The best constant is related to the behaviour around the endpoints of the arc of the normal derivative of the Green's function of the complementary domain. The result is deduced from the asymptotically sharp Bernstein inequality for the kth derivative at inner points of a Jordan arc, which is derived from a recent result of Kalmykov and Nagy on the Bernstein inequality on analytic arcs. In the course of the proof we shall also need to reduce the analyticity condition in this last result to C^2-smoothness. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  3. 76 FR 76703 - Jordan Whittaker; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ...-000] Jordan Whittaker; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To... and 21, 2011. d. Applicant: Jordan Whittaker. e. Name of Project: Eightmile Hydroelectric Project....

  4. Jordan blocks and Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions associated to a double pole of the S-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, E; Mondragón, A

    2002-01-01

    An accidental degeneracy of resonances gives rise to a double pole in the scattering matrix, a double zero in the Jost function and a Jordan chain of length two of generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions of the radial Schroedinger equation. The generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions are basis elements of an expansion in bound and resonant energy eigenfunctions plus a continuum of scattering wave functions of complex wave number. In this biorthonormal basis, any operator which is a regular function of the Hamiltonian is represented by a complex matrix which is diagonal except for a Jordan block of rank two. The occurrence of a double pole in the Green's function, as well as the non-exponential time evolution of the Gamow-Jordan generalized eigenfunctions are associated to the Jordan block in the complex energy representation.

  5. Salinization Sources Along the Lower Jordan River Under Draught Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, R.; Shavit, U.; Segal, M.; Vengosh, A.; Farber, E.; Gavrieli, I.

    2003-12-01

    solutes (e.g. Sulfate) that flows in the river. The assumption of a hydraulic gradient that points at inflows from subsurface flows is encouraged by high water levels measured in nearby piezometers. Possible natural subsurface sources include shallow groundwater or rising of water from deep formations. The existence of adjacent thermal wells strengthens the reasonability of such water rise. Possible anthropogenic sources include return flows and effluents. The results are consistent and agree with the geochemical and isotopic analyses. It is concluded that the impact of the subsurface component on the Jordan River is significant and must be taken into consideration, for future water management schemes and implementation of the Peace Treaty between Israel and Jordan.

  6. The Prevalence of Speech Disorders among University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraifi, Jehad Ahmad; Amayreh, Mousa Mohammad; Saleh, Mohammad Yusef

    2014-01-01

    Problem: There are no available studies on the prevalence, and distribution of speech disorders among Arabic speaking undergraduate students in Jordan. Method: A convenience sample of 400 undergraduate students at the University of Jordan was screened for speech disorders. Two spontaneous speech samples and an oral reading of a passage were…

  7. Wastewater irrigation in Jordan: A mismatch in macro nutrient provision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, S.; Huibers, F.P.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    By using sewage nutrients in irrigation, both the costs for nutrient removal and costs for fertilisers at the farm can be distinctly reduced. The present study describes the wastewater use scheme in the Seil Al-Zarqa and Middle Jordan Valley regions, Jordan. Through field studies, information on wat

  8. Social Support and Stress among University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M.; Dawani, Hania A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of social support and perceived stress among university students in Jordan. A sample of 241 university students from private and government universities in Jordan answered self-report questionnaires including the perceived social support scale and perceived stress scale.…

  9. Social Support and Stress among University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M.; Dawani, Hania A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perception of social support and perceived stress among university students in Jordan. A sample of 241 university students from private and government universities in Jordan answered self-report questionnaires including the perceived social support scale and perceived stress scale.…

  10. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu Visits Yemen and Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>From March 10 to 19, a CPAFFC delegation headed by its President Chen Haosu paid a goodwill visit to Yemen and Jordan as guests of the Yemeni-Chinese Friendship Association (YCFA) and the Jordan-China Friendship Society (JCFS).

  11. Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Engineering Education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqlan, Faisal; Al-Araidah, Omar; Al-Hawari, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a study of the quality assurance and accreditation in the Jordanian higher education sector and focuses mainly on engineering education. It presents engineering education, accreditation and quality assurance in Jordan and considers the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) for a case study. The study highlights the…

  12. A note on Bernstein-Jordan Algebras(2)

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Kohei

    2003-01-01

    As a contribution of the problem of classifying all Bernstein algebras, we attempt to describe the posibility of u-part decomposition of Bernstein-Jordan algebras in terms of the direct product of Bernstein algebras and study some conditions for a Bernstein-Jordan algebra to be u-part decomposable.

  13. Education Reform and the Quality of Kindergartens in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Obeidat, Osama M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluates a major education reform in Jordan--the implementation of public kindergartens--and provides an example of how evaluation can be incorporated into education reform. In the context of education reform in Jordan, 532 public kindergartens have been created over the last five years. A stratified random sample of…

  14. The Jordan River: Source of Life and Source of Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Africa, ending at Mozambique .19 Figure 1. – Map of The Jordan Basin The upper Jordan River flows swiftly through the Hula Valley, additional water...The Economic, Ecological and Geopolitical Dimensions of Water in Israel (Victoria, Canada: Centre for Sustainable Regional Development, 1993), 92

  15. Trends of contact lens prescribing in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Mera F; Bakkar, May; Gammoh, Yazan; Morgan, Philip

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate contact lens prescribing trends among optometrists in Jordan. Optometrists from 173 practices in Jordan were surveyed about prescribing contact lenses in their practice. Practitioners were required to record information for the last 10 patients that visited their practice. Demographic data such as age and gender was obtained for each patient. In addition, data relating to lens type, lens design, replacement methods and the care regime advised to each patient were recorded. Practitioners were required to provide information relating to their education and years of experience. The influence of education and experience with respect to lens prescribing trends was explored using linear regression models for the proportions of lens types fitted for patients. A total of 1730 contact lens fits were analyzed. The mean (±SD) age of lens wearers was 26.6 (±7.9) years, of whom 65% were female. Conventional hydrogel lenses were the most prescribed lenses, accounting for 60.3% of the fits, followed by silicone hydrogel lenses (31.3%), and rigid lenses (8.4%). In terms of lens design, spherical lenses appeared to be most commonly prescribed on monthly basis. Daily disposable lenses were second most prescribed lens modality, accounting for 20.4% of the study sample. Multi-purpose solution (MPS) was the preferred care regimen, with a prevalence of 88.1% reported in the study sample, compared to hydrogen peroxide (1-step and 2-step), which represented only 2.8% of the patients in this study. A relationship was established between the two educational groups for rigid lens prescribing (F=17.4, ptrends among optometrists in Jordan. Contact lens prescribing in terms of lens type, lens design, modality of wear and care regimen agree with global market trends with small variations. This report will help practitioners and the industry to detect any deficiencies in the contact lens market in Jordan, which will ease implementing current and future plans in developing contact

  16. Performance of Urban Transit in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Hashem R. Al-Masaeid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban public transit has essential and active role for sustainable and balanced socio-economic and environmental development. This study investigated the performance of urban public transit services in three major cities in Jordan, including Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa. Accessibility, mobility, productivity, punctuality, waiting time and comfort of public transit were investigated in the study. Data were obtained from Land Transport RegulatoryCommission of Jordan, municipalities, and field surveys. The accessibility was found to be relatively low in Irbid and Amman city. Also, the results indicated that the mobility and waiting time for public transit were found to be marginally comparable with that in developed countries. In contrast, the productivity of public transit was very high compared with the productivity of transit in developed countries. However, one-quarter of users’ rated the comfort inside public transit as poor. Thus, enhancement of public transit service and introduction of new modes of transport are necessary to ease the existed urban congestion levels

  17. Groundwater recharge in a semi-arid environment under high climatic variability and over-pumping: Ajlun Highlands example, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggad, Marwan; Salameh, Elias; Magri, Fabien; Siebert, Christian; Roediger, Tino; Moller, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Jordan's ground water resources are being exploited up to 190% of the safe yield while rainfall rates are decreasing and highly variable, thereby affecting recharge volumes of the aquifers. The Ajlun highlands, forming the northwestern edge of Jordan are characterized by annual rainfall rates exceeding 500 mm, the highest in the country, which leads to accordingly high replenishment of almost the entire groundwater system in northern Jordan. The high recharge and the NW-wards dipping strata lead to a groundwater flow towards the north and northwest, areas which host the vital aquifers of the region. Limited and degraded groundwater recharge combined with growing over-pumping are the main issues that regard the northern groundwater basins, such as Wadi Arab, Yarmouk and the Jordan Valley side basins. To evaluate the groundwater potential under high recharge variability, groundwater recharge was modeled and compared to different Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Groundwater recharge was calculated based on climatic data covering the time period from 1965 to 2014. Recharge modeling was conducted by applying the J2000 water budget model. The simulation of hydrologic processes uses independent parameters that are calculated prior to simulate the recharge flow. The simulations estimate recharge of 47.6 MCM, which is 12% less than the values given by the Jordanian authorities. The low calculated recharge is likely due to an overestimation of the evapotranspiration in areas with high topographic slopes. To examine the variability of groundwater recharge under current climatic conditions, statistical downscaling of global circulation models was conducted for the time period 1965 - 2000. Data for the time period 2001 - 2014 was used for the model validation. Results indicated a decline of 18.7% in precipitation by the year 2050 with an increase of 1.7 and 2.2 degrees in maximum and minimum temperatures respectively. Accordingly recharge for the year 2050 is 27% less than

  18. Provenance and Technology of Early Islamic Pottery from North Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarboush, Maher Mithqal Fayez

    study of pottery samples selected from four sites located in the north part of Jordan. Three of the sites were once major cities of the Decapolis: Jarash (Gerasa), Umm Qais (Gadara), and Tabaqat Fahl (Pella). The fourth site is Tal al - Husn, a substantial rural village located between Umm Qais...... Islamic pottery from northern Jordan alongside the old chronological and typological studies of this period in Jordan. Clear evidence argues for some urban continuation in the studied areas that indicate continuation of local productions technologies. Likewise, the results identifying the nature of Jarash...

  19. Preliminary study of the Gravimetric Local Geoid Model in Jordan: case study (GeoJordan Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Zoubi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been an increased interest in studying and defining the Local and Regional Geoid Model worldwide, due to its importance in geodetic and geophysics applications.The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS is internationally growing, yet the lack of a Geoid Model for Jordan has limited the use of GPS for the geodetic applications in the country. This work aims to present the preliminary results that we propose for «The Gravimetric Jordanian Geoid Model (GeoJordan». The model is created using gravimetric data and the GRAVSOFT program. The model is validated using GPS and precise level measurements in the Amman area. Moreover, we present a comparison using the Global Geopotential Model OSU91A and the EGM96 Model and the results showed great discrepancies. We also present the approach used to obtain the orthometric height from GPS ellipsoidal height measurements. We found that the error margin obtained in this work of the GeoJordan after fitting the data with GPS/leveling measurements is about (10 cm in the tested area whereas the standard error of the created model is about (40 cm.

  20. Survey of Micro- and Small Enterprises in Jordan (2015) [PUBLIC

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID Jordan Local Enterprise Support Project (LENS) conducted a survey of MSEs in 2014-2015 to better understand Jordanian enterprises and to assess the major...

  1. NOAA Ship David Starr Jordan Underway Meteorological Data, Quality Controlled

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Ship David Starr Jordan Underway Meteorological Data (delayed ~10 days for quality control) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic...

  2. Reconfiguring the West in Neil Jordan's short story "Love"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stipe Grgas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In introducing his article,  the author draws attention to the enormous importance space, especially the west of Ireland, has in the Irish culture and in the legitimization of Irish identity. The central part of the article is devoted to an analysis of Neil Jordan's  "A Love" in which the author describes the way Jordan uses the West as the privileged place of Irish self-representation. A close reading of the text shows the writer's strategies which subvert the conventional image of the West of Ireland  and the author voices the opinion that Jordan's text refers to the end of one conceptualization of Irish identity. Offering the concept of heterotopia (Foucault in his conclusion the author opens up the possibility of reading the representation of space in Jordan's story as his inscription of those places which were elided from the utopian Irish national saga.

  3. Performance of wastewater treatment plants in Jordan and suitability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of wastewater treatment plants in Jordan and suitability for reuse. ... for restricted use. Before reuse, effluent wastewater needs advanced treatment to prevent its impact on human health and the environment. ... Article Metrics.

  4. Performance of wastewater treatment plants in Jordan and suitability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (15), pp. ... Key words: Wastewater, treatment plants, water reuse, wastewater characteristics, wastewater treatment,. Jordan. ... separate), industrial waste entering the sewer, type of.

  5. Practice of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in Jordan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collection, 23.1 % formulated a therapeutic plan to be included within the patient's permanent record in their pharmacy .... counselling when dispensing each prescription. (e.g. directions for .... reality in Jordan, hindering an important element.

  6. Jordan-Brans-Dicke stochastic inflation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Bellido, J

    1994-01-01

    We study stochastic inflation in the presence of a dynamical gravitational constant. We describe the Arnowitt--Deser--Misner formalism for Jordan--Brans--Dicke theory of gravity with an inflaton field. The inflaton and dilaton scalar fields can be separated into coarse-grained background fields and quantum fluctuations. We compute the amplitude of the perturbations generated by those quantum fluctuations in JBD theory with an arbitrary potential for the inflaton field. The effect of the quantum fluctuations on the background fields is equivalent to a Brownian motion of the scalar fields, which can be described with the use of a Fokker--Planck diffusion equation. The probability to find a given value of the fields in the comoving frame can be written as a Gaussian distribution centered on their classical trajectory, with decreasing dispersion along both field directions. We also calculate the condition for the Universe to enter a self-regenerating inflationary phase. The probability distribution in the physica...

  7. The Jordan formulation of Quantum Mechanics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    This is a transcription of a conference proceedings from 1985. It reviews the Jordan algebra formulation of quantum mechanics. A possible novelty is the discussion of time evolution; the associator takes over the role of $i$ times the commutator in the standard density matrix formulation, and for the Jordan algebra of complex Hermitian matrices this implies a Hamiltonian of the form $H= i[x,y] + \\lambda \\mathbb{I}$ for traceless Hermitian $x,y$ and real number $\\lambda$. Other possibilities f...

  8. Public Awareness and Willingness for Recycle in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Aljaradin, Mohammad; Kenneth M. Persson; Al-Itawi, Hossam I

    2011-01-01

    Jordan has seen a large increase in population during the past five decades as a result of population growth and forced migrations, and also, accompanied with this increase, a cultural and economical development that has improved the standard of living and changing consumer habits in the community, resulting in a clear increase in the volume of waste. These changes urges the need for finding proper ways of making the living conditions for the people of Jordan more sustainable, rec...

  9. A preliminary study of NW Zhejiang foreland fold and thrust belt in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖文交; 李继亮; 何海清; 陈海泓

    1997-01-01

    The Upper Permian Dalong Formation (P2d) and Changxing Formation (P2c), and the Lower Tri-assic Zhengtang Formation (Tiz) are of deep-water turbidites. The sedimentary features of the NW Zhejiang are of SE-dipping passive continental margin from the Paleozoic to the early Triassic. Together with the foreland molasse basin during the late Triassic (T3w), the tectonics of the NW Zhejiang is characterised by a tectogenesis which took place in the middle Triassic. From SE to NW, the structural style varies from multi-duplex, antiformal stack to imbricate fans, and then to Jura Mountain-type fold zone with fold-style varying gradually from large-scale tight fold to mid-scale chevron fold, then to cylindrical fold, reviewing a preliminary scenario of foreland fold and thrust belt. The space-distributed structures and the tectonic vergence indicate the significance of deformation in (T1-T3).

  10. Urbanisation of Suweimeh area, Jordan, versus sinkholes and landslides proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closson, Damien; Abou Karaki, Najib

    2013-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a terminal lake whose level lowers each year of about one meter per year since more than one decade. This is caused mainly by the diversion of surface waters from its watershed. Currently, 1/10 of the Jordan River still reaches the salt lake. The rapid lowering of the lake level does not allow all the surrounding groundwater tables to adjust their level to that of the Dead Sea. This imbalance causes an always faster migration of a part of the groundwater causing underground erosion leading to the formation of sinkholes along the coast, especially where discontinuities, such as faults, are present. The first collapses occurred in the years 1980-90. From the 2000s, in Jordan, they have proliferated to the point of causing serious damages to the facilities of the Arab Potash Company, the agricultural area of Ghor Al Haditha, and more recently the touristic region of Suweimeh. Aware of the problem and the need for gradual rising of the lake level, the Jordanian authorities attended from 2009 to 2011 to the feasibility study of the Red Sea - Dead Sea conduit. Currently, on the one hand, the growing environmental imbalance, and, on the other hand, the desires to develop economic activities along the coast, imply that more goods will be exposed to damages. For example, the area of Wadi Mujib Bridge was rebuilt completely in the late 2000s. It is the same for the 12 km of the dam 18 of an evaporation pond Arab Potash Company. The Numeira Salt Factory was completely destroyed in Ghor Al Haditha and was relocated to Safi. In August 2012, during touristic period, a landslide destroyed half of the Holiday Inn front beach, Suweimeh area ... End of December 2012, a team lead by Prof. Najib Abou Karaki warned the Arab Potash Company of the presence of a circular depression 250 m in diameter within the evaporation pond SP-0A. Although the dike of this saltpan is closely monitored, the exact location and shape of this large sinkhole were not known to the security

  11. Automorphism Group of Heisenberg Jordan-Lie Algebra%Heisenberg Jordan-Lie代数的自同构群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳

    2014-01-01

    We introduced the notion of Heisenberg Jordan-Lie algebra so as to investigate some subgroups of the automorphism group Aut(H)of Heisenberg Jordan-Lie algebra H.Moreover,we discussed some basic structure of the automorphism group Aut (H ) in the case of H being low-dimensional.%通过给出 Heisenberg Jordan-Lie 代数的定义,得到 Heisenberg Jordan-Lie 代数H 的自同构群Aut(H )的一些子群,并在 H 为低维的情形下,讨论了自同构群 Aut (H )的基本结构。

  12. Geology of the Naturita NW quadrangle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Fred W.; Vogel, J.D.

    1953-01-01

    The Naturita NW quadrangle is one of eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles were mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore to large, tabular masses containing many thousands of tons. The ore consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear ro be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  13. Reference crop evapotranspiration derived from geo-stationary satellite imagery: a case study for the Fogera flood plain, NW-Ethiopia and the Jordan Valley, Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de H.A.R.; Trigo, I.F.; Jitan, M.A.; Enku, N.T.; Tol, van der C.; Gieske, A.S.M.

    2010-01-01

    First results are shown of a project aiming to estimate daily values of reference crop evapotranspiration ET0 from geo-stationary satellite imagery. In particular, for Woreta, a site in the Ethiopian highland at an elevation of about 1800 m, we tested a radiation-temperature based approximate formul

  14. Reference crop evapotranspiration derived from geo-stationary satellite imagery: a case study for the Fogera flood plain, NW-Ethiopia and the Jordan Valley, Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de H.A.R.; Trigo, I.F.; Jitan, M.A.; Enku, N.T.; Tol, van der C.; Gieske, A.S.M.

    2010-01-01

    First results are shown of a project aiming to estimate daily values of reference crop evapotranspiration ET0 from geo-stationary satellite imagery. In particular, for Woreta, a site in the Ethiopian highland at an elevation of about 1800 m, we tested a radiation-temperature based approximate

  15. Gondwana to Pangea: a detrital zircons tale from NW Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Galán, Daniel; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Brendan Murphy, J.; Fernández-Suárez, Javier; Hofmann, Mandy; Linnemann, Ulf

    2013-04-01

    The Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia preserves a voluminous, almost continuous, sedimentary sequence that ranges from Neoproterozoic to Early Permian in age. Its tectonic setting is controversial and recent hypotheses include (i) passive margin deposition along the northern margin of Gondwana or (ii) an active continental margin or (iii) a drifting ribbon continent. In this paper we present detrital zircon U-Pb laser ablation age data from 13 samples from the Cantabrian Zone sequence ranging from Early Silurian to Early Permian in depositional age, which, together with previously published detrital zircon ages from Ediacaran-Ordovician strata, allow a comprehensive analysis of changing provenance through time. Laser ablation U-Pb geochronological analysis of detrital zircons in thirteen samples of the Cantabrian Zone of the NW Iberian Variscan belt reveal that this portion of Iberia was part of the northern passive-margin of Gondwana from the Ordovician to Late Devonian, until the onset of collision between Gondwana and Laurentia. Zircon populations in these samples show important similarities with zircons found in coeval detrital rocks from central North Africa. Additionally, the populations found in NW Iberia are coherent with a Saharan source. We suggest that NW Iberia was situated from Ordovician to Late Devonian along the Gondwana northern passive margin close to the paleoposition of central North Africa and Saharan craton. Additionally, the Carboniferous-Permian samples studied record the provenance changes produced during the Variscan collision and basement exhumation, the Cantabrian orocline formation and the subsequent detachment of the lithospheric mantle. The provenance changes reflect major topographic variations due to the afore mentioned processes during Late Devonian to Early Permian times. Detrital zircon studies are a useful tool that can complement regional syntheses in deducing paleogeographic locations, the occurrence of major tectonic events such

  16. A review of midwifery education curriculum documents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Insaf; Leap, Nicky

    2012-12-01

    There is worldwide recognition that midwives are specialists in normal pregnancy, labour and birth and the postnatal period and that they should be educated to be primary providers of maternity care. In Jordan midwives currently have limited opportunities to fulfil this role. Since the mid-1980s, two public community colleges have offered three-year diploma midwifery education programmes in two major cities in Jordan. In 2002 the first and only four-year bachelor of midwifery education programme was established in one public university. A review to describe the design and content of midwifery education programmes in Jordan and address the question: Does the design of midwifery education programmes in Jordan encourage confidence that graduates will be competent to practise to the full capacity of the internationally defined role and scope of practice of the midwife and undertake the role of primary maternity care providers for women with low-risk pregnancies? A review of Jordanian midwifery education curriculum documents was undertaken using information and documents provided by midwifery programme coordinators. Programme coordinators in all institutions in Jordan providing midwifery education programmes. The curriculum documents reflected a medical model, with an emphasis on illness and intervention rather than preparation for the internationally defined full role and scope of practice of the midwife. This study provides a profile of midwifery education curriculum documents in Jordan with recommendations for changes that would position midwives as potential primary maternity care providers for women in Jordan who have uncomplicated pregnancies. Copyright © 2011 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stability of -Jordan Homomorphisms from a Normed Algebra to a Banach Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hi Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the hyperstability of -Jordan homomorphisms from a normed algebra to a Banach algebra, and also we show that an -Jordan homomorphism between two commutative Banach algebras is an -ring homomorphism.

  18. Dentist-assistant interaction styles in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Y S; Abu-Sharbain, G

    2009-05-01

    To assess dentist-assistant interaction and communication styles and their associated factors in Jordan. Three different areas in Amman where private dental clinics heavily cluster were chosen. The researcher visited all dental clinics in these areas and invited dentists to participate in this study. A structured self-administered questionnaire was designed and included the 22 items on staff communication that were used by Gorter and Freeman to assess communication styles. The culturally adapted items were analysed in such a way to reflect the structure that is used in the original study. There was a significant interaction between dentist's gender and communication styles (F = 3.8, P = 0.022). The only significant difference between men and women was for professional leadership style (P = 0.011) where men were more likely to adopt professional leadership style than women. For men, the average score for friendly leadership style was significantly lower than that for other styles. For women, the average score was the highest for gender interacting style which was significantly higher than that for friendly leadership style and professional interacting style, but not business leadership style. Communication and interaction styles between Jordanian dentists and their assistants differ according to gender. Jordanian dentists are less likely to adopt friendly leadership communication style compared with other styles.

  19. Prehistoric cultural ecology in southern jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, D O

    1994-07-15

    Research in the mountains of southern Jordan resulted in the discovery of 109 archaeological sites that are from the Lower Paleolithic to the Chalcolithic period [150 to 6 thousand years ago (ka)]. Beginning with the Middle Paleolithic (70 ka) two site types (long-term and ephemeral camps) are recognized. Long-term sites have larger areas, thicker deposits, higher artifact densities, and more abundant archaeological features than ephemeral sites. Their natural settings (elevation and exposure) and associated seasonal evidence (phytolith and cementum increment data) indicate that long-term sites were occupied during the winter, wet season and ephemeral sites during the warm, dry season. These differences in site use and seasonality likely reflect an adaptive strategy of transhumance that persisted to modern Bedouin times. At the end of the Pleistocene, the onset of warmer, drier conditions induced a shift of the long-term winter camps from relatively low (800 to 1000 meters above sea level) to high (1000 to 1250 meters above sea level) elevations and largely reversed the earlier transhumant pattern.

  20. Overview of extremity arterial trauma in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heis, H A; Bani-Hani, K E; Elheis, M A

    2008-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to review etiologies of trauma, associated injuries, diagnosis, management, and outcomes of patients with vascular injuries in the extremities and relate factors in their treatment to the outcome of the injured extremity. Data were collected retrospectively on 73 patients diagnosed to have upper and lower limbs arterial injuries at King Abdullah University Hospital, Jordan, between 2001 and 2006. Factors evaluated included demographic data, location of vessels injured, mechanism of injury, associated injuries, treatment, and outcome. Patients were predominantly males (54 patients). Isolated vascular trauma was present in 36 patients, while in the remaining 37 patients vascular trauma was aggravated by concomitant injuries. The most common etiology of vascular injuries in the upper and lower extremities was a penetrating injury found in 38 patients (52%). The vessels most commonly involved were the femoral and brachial arteries. Various associated injuries were identified mainly orthopedic in 21 patients (29%) and nerve injuries in 18 patients (25%). Autogenous vein graft interposition was mostly performed in 32 patients (44%). Permanent disability was seen in 8 patients (11%), limb amputation was performed in 5 patients (7%). Five patients died due to associated intraabdominal, thoracic, and head injuries giving a mortality rate of 7%. Delay in surgery, blunt trauma and extensive soft tissue defect in combined orthopedic and vascular injuries were associated with increased risk of amputation, while associated nerve injuries and bone injuries with extensive soft tissue damage are risk factors of poor quality outcome.

  1. Evaluation of Uranium Concentration in Soil Samples of Central Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ned Xoubi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring radionuclides such as uranium, thorium and their decay products (226Ra, 222Rn are present in a number of geological settings in Jordan. Motivated by the existence of uranium anomalies ‎coupled with its lack of conventional ‎‎energy ‎‎resources, Jordan decided that the development of ‎this indigenes ‎resource (uranium is the first step in introducing nuclear power as part of its energy mix. Uranium deposits in Central Jordan were perceived not only as a secured resource that will ‎fulfill Jordan’s energy needs, but also as an economic asset that will ‎finance Jordan’s nuclear program. The average uranium concentration of 236 soil samples using ICP-Mass (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was found to be 109 parts per million (ppm. Results analysis revealed a wide range of 1066 ppm for uranium concentration, and a median of 41 ppm uranium. The measurements frequency distribution indicates that 72% of samples measured had a uranium content of less than 100 ppm, a concentration that characterizes overburden and tailings quality, rather than minable reserves. This paper presents and evaluates the concentration of uranium in central Jordan, being the most promising area with the highest radioactive anomalies in Jordan.

  2. Emigration for Higher Education: The Case of Palestinians Living in Israel Studying in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid; Haj-Yehia, Kussai

    2010-01-01

    This study explored reasons for the rapid increase in the number of Palestinian Arabs from Israel (PAI) studying higher education (HE) in Jordan. Four hundred and sixty PAI studying in Jordan answered a questionnaire assessing factors related to HE in both countries. Lenient admission requirements and cultural-language similarity explain Jordan's…

  3. NW CSC annual report fiscal year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbal, Gustavo A.

    2013-01-01

    The Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC) was established in 2010 as one of eight regional Climate Science Centers created by the Department of the Interior (DOI). The NW CSC encompasses Washing-ton, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana and has overlapping boundaries with three Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs): the Great Northern, the Great Basin, and the North Pacific. With guidance from its Executive Stakeholder Advisory Committee (ESAC), the NW CSC and its partner LCCs are addressing the highest priority regional climate science needs of Northwest natural and cultural resource managers. Climate Science Centers tap into the scientific expertise of both the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and academic institutions. The NW CSC is supported by an academic consortium with the capacity to generate climate science and tools in a coordinated fashion, serving stakeholders across the Northwest region. This consortium is primarily represented by Oregon State University (OSU), the University of Id-ho (UI), and the University of Washington (UW). The academic consortium and USGS provide capabilities in climate science, ecology, impacts and vulnerability assessment, modeling, adaptation planning, and advanced information technology, all necessary to address and respond to climate change in the Northwest. University members also recruit and train graduate students and early-career scientists. This Annual Report summarizes progress for the goals set out in the NW CSC Strategic Plan for 2012-2015 (http://www.doi.gov/csc/northwest/upload/Northwest-CSC-Strategic-Plan.cfm) and the NW CSC Work-plan for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 (October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2013). The report follows the structure of the Strategic Plan, which describes the five core services (Executive, Science, Data, Communications, and Education and Training) provided by the NW CSC in support of the stated vision: Our Vision: To become nationally recognized as a best-practice model for the provision

  4. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the

  5. Approximation of Rainfall Erosivity Factors in North Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.I.ELTAIF; M.A.GHARAIBEH; F.AL-ZAITAWI; M.N.ALHAMAD

    2010-01-01

    Despite being in arid and semi-arid areas, erosion is largely a result of infrequent but heavy rainfall events; therefore,rainfall erosivity data can be used as an indicator of potential erosion risks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the spatial distribution of annual rainfall erosivity in North Jordan. A simplified procedure was used to correlate erosivity factor R values in both the universal soil loss equation (USLE) and the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) with annual rainfall amount or modified Fournier index (Fmod). Pluviometric data recorded at 18 weather stations covering North Jordan were used to predict R values. The annual values of erosivity ranged between 86-779 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 year-1. The northwest regions of Jordan showed the highest annual erosivity values, while the northeastern regions showed the lowest annual erosivity values.

  6. Epidemiology of Thyroid Cancer in Jordan from 1996 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Fayez Nimri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of thyroid cancer has varied from 2 per 100,000 in Europe to 21 per 100,000 in the Hawaiian Chinese population and is 2-3 fold more common in females. Middle East Cancer Consortium figures from 1996-2001 have recorded different age standardized incidence rates that ranged from 2 per 100,000 inEgypt to 7.5 per 100,000 among Israeli Jews. In Jordan the age standardized incidence rate of thyroid cancer was 3 per 100,000 during that period. This study aimed to define the incidence of thyroid cancer in Jordan and to explore the epidemiological char-acteristics of patients and tumors. Methods: This was a descriptive epidemiological study that utilized data reported to the Jordan Cancer Registry during 1996-2008. Results: The incidence rate in Jordan varied during the period from 1996 to 2008; however the recorded rate (2.6 per 100,000 in 1996 and 2008 was similar. The incidence rate was higher among Jordanian females. Age specific incidence rate and age standardized incidence rate were parallel during the study period with no peaks. The most common morphological type of thyroid cancer in Jordan was papillarycarcinoma (76%. The average annual incidence during the study period was highest (3.3 per 100,000 in Amman and (2.2 per 100,000 in Jarash governorates. Conclusion: The results of our study are consistent with international studies. The incidence of thyroid cancer in Jordan is not high when compared with other countries. The high incidence of thyroid cancer in Amman and Jarash governorates in comparisonto the incidence in other governorates needs further assessment.

  7. Management scenarios for the Jordan River salinity crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, E.; Vengosh, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Marie, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Mayer, B.; Holtzman, R.; Segal, M.; Shavit, U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent geochemical and hydrological findings show that the water quality of the base flow of the Lower Jordan River, between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, is dependent upon the ratio between surface water flow and groundwater discharge. Using water quality data, mass-balance calculations, and actual flow-rate measurements, possible management scenarios for the Lower Jordan River and their potential affects on its salinity are investigated. The predicted scenarios reveal that implementation of some elements of the Israel-Jordan peace treaty will have negative effects on the Jordan River water salinity. It is predicted that removal of sewage effluents dumped into the river (???13 MCM/a) will significantly reduce the river water's flow and increase the relative proportion of the saline groundwater flux into the river. Under this scenario, the Cl content of the river at its southern point (Abdalla Bridge) will rise to almost 7000 mg/L during the summer. In contrast, removal of all the saline water (16.5 MCM/a) that is artificially discharged into the Lower Jordan River will significantly reduce its Cl concentration, to levels of 650-2600 and 3000-3500 mg/L in the northern and southern areas of the Lower Jordan River, respectively. However, because the removal of either the sewage effluents or the saline water will decrease the river's discharge to a level that could potentially cause river desiccation during the summer months, other water sources must be allocated to preserve in-stream flow needs and hence the river's ecosystem. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure of associative subalgebras of Jordan operator algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Hamhalter, J

    2011-01-01

    We show that any order isomorphism between ordered structures of associative unital JB-subalgebras of JBW algebras is implemented naturally by a Jordan isomorphism. Consequently, JBW algebras are determined by the structure of their associative unital JB subalgebras. Further we show that in a similar way it is possible to reconstruct Jordan structure from the order structure of associative subalgebras endowed with an orthogonality relation. In case of abelian subalgebras of von Neuman algebra it is we shown that order isomorphisms of the structure of abelian C*-subalgebras that are well behaved with respect to the structure of two by two matrices over original algebra are implemented by *-isomorphisms.

  9. A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomy-flux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence ...

  10. A Jordan GNS Construction for the Holonomy-Flux *-algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Rios, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The holonomy-flux *-algebra was recently proposed as an algebra of basic kinematical observables for loop quantum gravity. We show the conventional GNS construction breaks down when the the holonomy-flux *-algebra is allowed to be a Jordan algebra of observables. To remedy this, we give a Jordan GNS construction for the holonomy-flux *-algebra that is based on trace. This is accomplished by assuming the holonomy-flux *-algebra is an algebra of observables that is also a Banach algebra, hence ...

  11. Road traffic fatalities in Qatar Jordan and UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Elawad, Elmogiera

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smeed’s equation is a widely used model for prediction of traffic fatalities but has been found inadequate for use in developing countries. We applied regression analysis to time-series data on vehicles, population and traffic fatalities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Jordan and Qatar. The data were fitted to exponential models for fatality prediction, producing an average absolute error of 20.9% for Qatar, 10.9% for Jordan and 5.5% for the UAE. We found a strong linear relations...

  12. Superconformal M2-branes and generalized Jordan triple systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Bengt E W

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal theories with six supersymmetries and SU(4) R-symmetry describing stacks of M2-branes are here proposed to be related to generalized Jordan triple systems. Writing the four-index structure constants in an appropriate form, the Chern-Simons part of the action immediately suggests a connection to such triple systems. In this note we show that the whole theory with six manifest supersymmetries can be naturally expressed in terms of structure constants of generalized Jordan triple systems. We comment on the associated graded Lie algebra, which corresponds to an extension of the gauge group.

  13. Positive projections of symmetric matrices and Jordan algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglede, Bent; Jensen, Søren Tolver

    2013-01-01

    An elementary proof is given that the projection from the space of all symmetric p×p matrices onto a linear subspace is positive if and only if the subspace is a Jordan algebra. This solves a problem in a statistical model.......An elementary proof is given that the projection from the space of all symmetric p×p matrices onto a linear subspace is positive if and only if the subspace is a Jordan algebra. This solves a problem in a statistical model....

  14. Sedentary lifestyle among adults in Jordan, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi F. Sharkas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sedentary lifestyle is a major risk factor for physical and mental problems, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal diseases, and psychological stress. About 60% of the world’s population is not sufficiently physically active in leisure time or during work and social activities. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of inactive Jordanian adults and describe their demographic and behavioral characteristics. Methods: The study used data from the behavioral risk factors surveillance survey conducted in Jordan in 2007. The sample size was 3654. Respondents who were physically inactive for more than 240 min daily (sleep time not included were considered to have a sedentary lifestyle. Data were analyzed with the program SPSS. Results: The prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle was 82.8% (2965 respondents, with a mean sedentary time of 587 min (95% confidence interval 581–594 min. Among the physically inactive adults, 52.6% were men, one third of them aged 35–44 years. Sedentary lifestyle was reported by 30% of those with a secondary level of education or above. Of those with a sedentary lifestyle, 37.6% were housewives and 37.5% were employees; 66% of them were overweight and obese. Of the physically inactive people, 2.5% had a history of heart failure and 1.3% had a history of cerebrovascular accidents; 57.2% of them tried to engage more in physical activity and almost three quarters of them were interested in improving their dietary habits. Conclusion: Most Jordanian adults have a sedentary lifestyle, which emphasizes that there is a public health problem. Many of them are attempting to lead a healthier lifestyle. Therefore, there is an urgent need to launch an applicable national plan that enables people to practice a healthier lifestyle.

  15. Public perception towards biobanking in jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahram, Mamoun; Othman, Areej; Shahrouri, Manal

    2012-08-01

    Ethnic differences in disease susceptibility and drug response necessitate the participation of the community in biomedical research. Public involvement includes the donation of biospecimens for basic and translational research with a focus on understanding the molecular make-up of individuals. A growing strategy that fosters public involvement is establishing biobanks that serve as a focal point for sample collection, storage, and dissemination. A biobank's success is dependent on the availability of high-quality biospecimens, as well as accessibility of personal and medical data. Diverse public participation in biobanks is also as critical. Due to lack of data related to public knowledge and attitude towards biospecimen-based research and their willingness to participate in biobanking, a structured questionnaire was conducted at the national level. Data were collected from 3196 individuals aged 18 and above, constituting a representative sample of the Jordanian population. Demographic data included age, gender, and education level. Although there was lack of knowledge of the term "biological samples," 80% of respondents approved the use of biospecimens in research. In addition, almost two-thirds of respondents agreed to donate both biospecimens and relevant information for biobanking. Approval of biospecimen-based research and willingness to participate in biobanking significantly correlated with younger age and increasing education, but not gender. Our results provide an insight into the perception of biobanking among the Jordanian population and strengthen the importance of educating the public about research and the value of biobanking. The data should enable researchers in Jordan and surrounding countries of similar culture to lay the foundation for a successful biobank and research program.

  16. Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentación de tipología arquitectónica y técnicas constructivas en el periodo de transición Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

  17. Two-dimensional streamflow simulations of the Jordan River, Midvale and West Jordan, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Terry A.; Freeman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    The Jordan River in Midvale and West Jordan, Utah, flows adjacent to two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites: Midvale Slag and Sharon Steel. At both sites, geotechnical caps extend to the east bank of the river. The final remediation tasks for these sites included the replacement of a historic sheet-pile dam and the stabilization of the river banks adjacent to the Superfund sites. To assist with these tasks, two hydraulic modeling codes contained in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Dimensional Surface-Water Modeling System (MD_SWMS), System for Transport and River Modeling (SToRM) and Flow and Sediment Transport and Morphological Evolution of Channels (FaSTMECH), were used to provide predicted water-surface elevations, velocities, and boundary shear-stress values throughout the study reach of the Jordan River. A SToRM model of a 0.7 mile subreach containing the sheet-pile dam was used to compare water-surface elevations and velocities associated with the sheet-pile dam and a proposed replacement structure. Maps showing water-surface elevation and velocity differences computed from simulations of the historic sheet-pile dam and the proposed replacement structure topographies for streamflows of 500 and 1,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) were created. These difference maps indicated that the velocities associated with the proposed replacement structure topographies were less than or equal to those associated with the historic sheet-pile dam. Similarly, water-surface elevations associated with the proposed replacement structure topographies were all either greater than or equal to water-surface elevations associated with the sheet-pile dam. A FaSTMECH model was developed for the 2.5-mile study reach to aid engineers in bank stabilization designs. Predicted water-surface elevations, velocities and shear-stress values were mapped on an aerial photograph of the study reach to place these parameters in a spatial context. Profile plots of predicted

  18. Geophysical analysis of the recent sinkhole trend at Ghor-Haditha (Dead Sea, Jordan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlynck, Christian; Bodet, Ludovic; Galibert, Pierre-Yves; Boucher, Marie; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah

    2013-04-01

    For essentially the last 30 year the water level of the Dead Sea has highly dropped. One of the major associated facts is sinkhole occurrences along the shoreline both in Jordan and Israel. As the principal invoked mechanism, many studies have concluded that sinkhole formation results from the dissolution of a previously immersed salt layer, progressively in contact with fresh to brackish water. In Jordan, the triggering of this phenomenon could also be the result of particular tectonic settings, associated with the Jordan-Dead Sea transform fault system. At Ghor Haditha (south-est Jordan), the consequences have been dramatic for farmers with the shrinking of temporary available lands and industry with the closing of at least one factory. The shallow material in this area is heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers of alluvial-colluvial origin, over a salty substratum, whose precise depth and thickness are yet partially hypothesized. Between 2005 and 2008, a multi-method high-resolution geophysical survey was performed, approximately over a 1 km2 area at Ghor Haditha, associating mainly electromagnetic soundings, magnetic resonance soundings (MRS), and seismic profiling, ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography. At the same time, this specific area was the location of a dramatic evolution of sinkhole occurences, regularly followed by geodetic measurements. Over the 3 years period, about 120 TEM (Transient ElectroMagnetic) soundings allow to map precisely the depth of the conductive layers below the resistive overburden. Two conductive layer are then revealed, the latter showing the lowest resistivity below 1 Ohm.m corresponding to the saline substratum. Several MRS (3 in 2005, repeated in 2007 and 12 additional soundings) show an east-west hydraulic gradient towards the Dead. However, the main sinkhole trend coincides with both: - a clear low transmissivity axis determined from MRS measurements; - the western side of a

  19. The Impacts of Heritage Tourism on Gadara, Northern Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobiedat, Ammar Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    As the tourism industry continues to grow and the desire to visit heritage sites becomes a popular pursuit, heritage has turn into a commodity in the marketplace. This dissertation analyzes the economic, sociocultural and environmental implications of tourism in Gadara, northwest Jordan. It also elaborates on the changing force of tourism and its…

  20. The Impacts of Heritage Tourism on Gadara, Northern Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobiedat, Ammar Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    As the tourism industry continues to grow and the desire to visit heritage sites becomes a popular pursuit, heritage has turn into a commodity in the marketplace. This dissertation analyzes the economic, sociocultural and environmental implications of tourism in Gadara, northwest Jordan. It also elaborates on the changing force of tourism and its…

  1. Prevalence of Speech Disorders in Elementary School Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jazi, Aya Bassam; Al-Khamra, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Goal: The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of speech (articulation, voice, and fluency) disorders among elementary school students from first grade to fourth grade. This research was based on the screening implemented as part of the Madrasati Project, which is designed to serve the school system in Jordan. Method: A sample of 1,231…

  2. Composite spherically symmetric configurations in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyrev, S

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a study of the scalar field shells in relativistic spherically symmetric configurations has been performed. We construct the composite solution of Jordan-Brans-Dicke field equation by matching the conformal Brans solutions at each junction surfaces. This approach allows us to associate rigorously with all solutions as a single glued "space", which is a unique differentiable manifold M^4.

  3. Adapting UASB technology for sewage treatment in Palestine and Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, N.A.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    High rate anaerobic technologies offer cost-effective solutions for "sewage" treatment in the temperate climate of Palestine and Jordan. However, local sewage characteristics demand amendments to the conventional UASB reactor design. A solution is found in a parallel operating digester unit that sta

  4. Pastoralist rock art in the Black Desert of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brusgaard, N.O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current problems that exist with the rock art research of the Black Desert in Jordan and presents some preliminary field results of the author’s research on the petroglyphs. It also explore the possibilities that the rock art affords to learn more about the elusive desert

  5. Library Education in Tunisia and Jordan: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazza, A.; Nimer, R.

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the state of development of library education in Jordan and Tunisia and pinpoints problems affecting this development in order to verify if library education in countries with similar cultures and type of economy evolves similarly and faces same problems. A brief introduction to the countries is provided. (EJS)

  6. Youth in Jordan: Transitions from Education to Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan Andrew; Constant, Louay; Glick, Peter; Grant, Audra K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite strong economic growth during the last decade, youth unemployment in Jordan remains stubbornly high, and labor-force participation markedly low. Young women in particular face labor??market barriers in access to many career paths, and their job aspirations are often discouraged by their parents. Graduates of secondary and postsecondary…

  7. AN ALGORITHM FOR JORDAN CANONICAL FORM OF A QUATERNION MATRIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜同松; 魏木生

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we first introduce a concept of companion vector, and studythe Jordan canonical forms of quaternion matrices by using the methods of complex representation and companion vector, not only give out a practical algorithm for Jordancanonical form J of a quaternion matrix A, but also provide a practical algorithm forcorresponding nonsingular matrix P with P- 1 AP = J.

  8. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  9. The Desert and the Sown Project in Northern Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerner, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The desert and sown project, which started in 1999 and continued in 2008-2009, studied the region between the settled areas east of Irbid and Ramtha and the surrounding desert at Mafraq (northern Jordan). Large parts of the material comes from the Palaeolithic period, while some smaller tells date...

  10. Evaluation of the Better Parenting Programme in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the Better Parenting Programme (BPP) which has been implemented nationally in Jordan to enhance parents' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours related to caring for young children. The participants (N = 337, 94% female) were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group participated in…

  11. Biomass Energy Utilization in Northeast Badia of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Al-Smairan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas systems can contribute to rural development, utilization of renewable energy, climate change mitigation, as well as environmental protection. Due to its multiple benefits, the Jordan Government must made great efforts to promote the development of biogas systems in rural areas, especially household biogas plants and medium scale biogas plants for intensive livestock and poultry farms. In order to better promote and improve biogas systems in rural Jordan, a comprehensive literature review of the various sources was undertaken for this research. This study aimed at exploring weaknesses in the biogas value chain that hinder wider dissemination of the technology in Jordan. The methodology used is holistic, combing literature review with interviews with farmers and observations of processes across the value chain in Jordan Badia regions, where biogas technology has no any history in Badia. It was revealed that wider dissemination of biogas is hampered by weaknesses in the processes and linkages among the actors. Many potential users are not aware of the technology and therefore the market remains slim. All these, coupled with inadequate policy environment, lack of stakeholder development, missing linkage to finance and few technicians, render the market unattractive to entrepreneurs who would have invested in the dissemination of the technology. The government should conduct awareness campaigns through media, translate current policies into actions to development key stakeholders, set the required institutional framework and programmes to support biogas dissemination activities. It should also train more technicians and concentrate on research and development.

  12. Oral Health Patterns among Schoolchildren in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALBashtawy, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the oral hygiene patterns among schoolchildren in Jordan. A school-based cross-sectional study was performed from January to March 2010. A simple random sampling method was used. Each student participant completed a detailed questionnaire regarding oral hygiene habits. Data were coded and analyzed using SPSS software version…

  13. 三角代数上的Jordan-triple初等映射及Jordan同构%Jordan-triple elementary maps and Jordan isomorphisms on triangular algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏妙; 张建华

    2009-01-01

    设U是三角代数,V为任意代数,证明了若映射M:U→V,M*:V→U为满射,并且满足Jordan-triple初等映射的形式,则M,M*可加.并进一步讨论了映射M,M*在什么条件下具有Jordan同构形式.

  14. Water pipe tobacco smoking among university students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Mohammed; Khabour, Omar F; Alkaraki, Almuthanna K; Eissenberg, Thomas; Alzoubi, Karem H; Primack, Brian A

    2010-06-01

    Although water pipe tobacco smoking is common in Lebanon and Syria, prevalence in neighboring Jordan is uncertain. The purposes of this study were (a) to assess the prevalence of water pipe tobacco smoking among university students in Jordan and (b) to determine associations between sociodemographic variables and water pipe tobacco smoking in this population. A trained interviewer administered a questionnaire among randomly selected students at four prominent universities in Jordan. The questionnaire assessed sociodemographic data, personal history of water pipe tobacco use, and attitudes regarding water pipe tobacco smoking. We used logistic regression to determine independent associations between sociodemographic and attitudinal factors and each of two dependent variables: ever use of water pipe and use at least monthly. Of the 548 participants, 51.8% were male and mean age was 21.7 years. More than half (61.1%) had ever smoked tobacco from a water pipe, and use at least monthly was reported by 42.7%. Multivariable analyses controlling for all relevant factors demonstrated significant associations between ever use and only two sociodemographic factors: (a) gender (for women compared with men, odds ratio [OR] = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.07-0.17) and (b) income (for those earning 500-999 Jordanian dinar (JD) monthly vs. pipe tobacco smoking is highly prevalent in Jordan. Although use is associated with male gender and upper middle income levels, use is widespread across other sociodemographic variables. Continued surveillance and educational interventions emphasizing the harm and addictiveness of water pipe tobacco smoking may be valuable in Jordan.

  15. Fabrics and deformational mechanisms in the high-pressure granulite of the Bacariza Formation (Cabo Ortegal Complex, NW Spain); Fabricas y mecanismos deformacionales en las granulitas de alta presion de la Formacion Bacariza (Complejo de Cabo Ortegal, NO de Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puelles, P.

    2009-07-01

    In the Cabo Ortegal Complex, mylonitic high-pressure granulites occur at the contacts between the HP granulitic Bacariza Formation and the adjacent units. This mylonitic stage is associated with the initial exhumation of the complex. The petrographic, microstructural and crystallographic analysis of the main constituent minerals in these rocks might provide valuable information on the deformation mechanisms operative at depth. Garnet accommodated part of the deformation by dislocation creep and rigid rotation, augite underwent dislocation creep accompanied by mass transfer and anisotropic growth while plagioclase, in turn, suffered dynamic subgrain rotation-recrystallization and climb-accommodated dislocation creep. Quartz fabrics developed under at least amphibolite-facies conditions. The shear sense criteria are consistent with a top-to-the-NE displacement of the hanging wall blocks. During their ascent to the surface, a static amphibolite-facies retrogressive stage was followed by plastic deformation accommodation under green schist- to lower amphibolite facies conditions. Deformation during the latest stages of exhumation was characterized by micro fracturing and seismic activity in conditions of high differential stresses and strain rates. (Author) 52 refs.

  16. Treated Sewage Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture. Theoretical design of farming systems in Seil Al Zarqa and the Middle Jordan Valley in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duqqah, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Most of Jordan is arid and water resources are limited. This situation becomes more acute the more Jordan develops. New techniques in agriculture, industry and the domestic sector place an increasing demand upon clean and safe water. Good-quality water is hardly available. Unco

  17. Treated sewagewater use in irrigated agriculture : theoretical design of farming systems in Seil Al Zarqa and the Middle Jordan Valley in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duqqah, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Most of Jordan is arid and water resources are limited. This situation becomes more acute the more Jordan develops. New techniques in agriculture, industry and the domestic sector place an increasing demand upon clean and safe water. Good-quality water is hardly

  18. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  19. Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of Jordan homomorphisms on Banach algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirasawa Go

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that a Jordan homomorphism from a Banach algebra into a semisimple commutative Banach algebra is a ring homomorphism. Using a signum effectively, we can give a simple proof of the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of a Jordan homomorphism between Banach algebras. As a direct corollary, we show that to each approximate Jordan homomorphism from a Banach algebra into a semisimple commutative Banach algebra there corresponds a unique ring homomorphism near to .

  20. Worker programs and resource use: Evidence from better work jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Nathan

    This paper examines data collected for the Better Work program in Jordan which aims to protect laborers in the garment industry from poor working conditions. Data are examined to look for benefits to the factories participating in the program beyond improved compliance with labor law. In particular, potential impacts to firm energy use are examined and correlations are tested between electricity use rates and measures of worker outcomes and a number of factory traits such as size and production input costs. Evidence was found to back up work done in Vietnam with regard to resource use and distribution of electricity expenses. It was also found that the type of data being collected is not ideal for examinations of energy, and more direct methods are desirable, and that considerable production obstacles are worker skill level, electricity prices, and to a greater degree in Jordan than in previously examined countries, water prices.

  1. A Water Resources Planning Tool for the Jordan River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bonzi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Jordan River basin is subject to extreme and increasing water scarcity. Management of transboundary water resources in the basin is closely intertwined with political conflicts in the region. We have jointly developed with stakeholders and experts from the riparian countries, a new dynamic consensus database and—supported by hydro-climatological model simulations and participatory scenario exercises in the GLOWA (Global Change and the Hydrological Cycle Jordan River project—a basin-wide Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP tool, which will allow testing of various unilateral and multilateral adaptation options under climate and socio-economic change. We present its validation and initial (climate and socio-economic scenario analyses with this budget and allocation tool, and invite further adaptation and application of the tool for specific Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM problems.

  2. Why Do the Quantum Observables Form a Jordan Operator Algebra?

    CERN Document Server

    Niestegge, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    The Jordan algebra structure of the bounded real quantum observables was recognized already in the early days of quantum mechanics. While there are plausible reasons for most parts of this structure, the existence of the distributive nonassociative multiplication operation is hard to justify from a physical or statistical point of view. Considering the non-Boolean extension of classical probabilities, presented in a recent paper, it is shown in this paper that such a multiplication operation can be derived from certain properties of the conditional probabilities and the observables, i.e., from postulates with a clear statistical interpretation. The well-known close relation between Jordan operator algebras and C*-algebras then provides the connection to the quantum-mechanical Hilbert space formalism, thus resulting in a novel axiomatic approach to general quantum mechanics that includes the types II and III von Neumann algebras.

  3. Body image dissatisfaction among adolescent schoolgirls in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Tamara Y; Mashal, Rima H; Al-Domi, Hayder A; Jibril, Musa A

    2010-01-01

    The present study has investigated the occurrence of body image dissatisfaction among adolescent schoolgirls in Amman, Jordan, and the risk factors that are known to predispose it including individual, familial and social variables. A sample of 326 adolescent girls aged 10-16 years was recruited from public and private schools in Amman. Participants completed a socio-demographic data sheet, eating attitude test, and body shape questionnaire. Approximately, 21.2% of participants displayed body image dissatisfaction in which physical changes associated with puberty and exhibiting negative eating attitudes were associated with this dissatisfaction. Additionally, mass media messages, as well as peers and family pressures towards thinness were associated with participants' preoccupation with their body image. In conclusion, negative body image perception was observed in the present sample. Therefore, well-controlled prospective studies and development of intervention programs on body image among adolescent girls in Jordan are needed.

  4. Quality assurance and accreditation of engineering education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqlan, Faisal; Al-Araidah, Omar; Al-Hawari, Tarek

    2010-06-01

    This paper provides a study of the quality assurance and accreditation in the Jordanian higher education sector and focuses mainly on engineering education. It presents engineering education, accreditation and quality assurance in Jordan and considers the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) for a case study. The study highlights the efforts undertaken by the faculty of engineering at JUST concerning quality assurance and accreditation. Three engineering departments were accorded substantial equivalency status by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology in 2009. Various measures of quality improvement, including curricula development, laboratories improvement, computer facilities, e-learning, and other supporting services are also discussed. Further assessment of the current situation is made through two surveys, targeting engineering instructors and students. Finally, the paper draws conclusions and proposes recommendations to enhance the quality of engineering education at JUST and other Jordanian educational institutions.

  5. Corporate Governance Quality and Earnings Management: Evidence from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan S. Abbadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of corporate governance quality on earnings management in Jordan. Using a panel data set of all industrial and service firms listed on Amman Stock Exchange (ASE during the period 2009-2013; this paper provides evidence that earnings management is affected negatively by corporate governance quality. In particular; the results show that earnings management is affected negatively by overall categories of governance index represented by board of director, board meeting, Audit and nomination and compensation committee. Furthermore, results suggest that corporate governance quality has increased over time. Thus, its ability to constrain earnings management has also increased. It is recommended to industrial and service companies to boost their compliance with corporate governance code to improve the integrity and reliability of financial reports. This paper fills a gap in the literature by providing evidence about the effect of corporate governance quality on earnings management in Jordan as an emerging economy.

  6. AIR JORDAN XX2重归蓝天

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾铭

    2007-01-01

    一提到AIR JORDAN,似乎每个SNEAKER都能滔滔不绝的说上许多,确实,这个系列为大家带来了太多的惊喜、感动。这22年来每个SNEAKER的发展都和AIR JORDAN有关,当你回忆起自己的球鞋之路时,肯定会拿一年一双的JORDAN BRAND做标尺。在步入22岁的时候,这个早已功成名就理应享受赞誉的长寿签名系列似乎一下又回归到了少时的战斗状态,科技概念并重的AIR JORDAN XX2不只是一件纪念品。

  7. Business continuity management in emerging markets: the case of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Anchor, John R

    2012-01-01

    Despite their considerable growth in last few decades, emerging markets (EM) face numerous risks that have the potential to slow down or obstruct their development. Three main issues are discussed in this paper: first, the risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets and Jordan in particular; secondly, the role of business continuity management (BCM) in emerging markets; and thirdly, potential factors that underpin the role of BCM in emerging markets. These issues are significant, as they represent the role of BCM in highly dynamic and fast changing business environments. The paper provides a discussion of the significance of BCM in reducing or preventing risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets, especially those in Jordan.

  8. Determinants of direct foreign investment: Evidence from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Zakaria Siam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to show the effect of direct foreign investment flows on the economy of Jordan, this studycomes to examine the economic and financial risks on FDI on the macro level over the period (1997-2007. This study applies a version of the model developed by Chan and Gemayel (2004 by usingMultiple Linear Regression Model. The analysis revealed that there exists significant and positiverelationship between foreign direct investment flows into the economy of Jordan and economic andfinancial variables. The study claims for further FDI promotion through incentives to attract newinvestments. These factors are: providing targeted fiscal incentives, such as tax concessions, cash grants,and specific subsidies; improving domestic infrastructure; promoting local skills development to meetinvestor needs and expectations; establishing broad-reaching FDI promotion agencies and improvingthe regulatory environment and decreasing red tape.

  9. Malignant catarrhal fever infection in a heifer in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameeh M. Abutarbush

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 14-month-old Holstein Friesian heifer was presented for decreased appetite, ocular discharge, and diarrhea. The heifer was raised at the farm since she was 3 days old. On presentation, the heifer had bilateral mucopurulent ocular discharge and corneal opacity, ulcerative and necrotic skin, and enlarged superficial lymph nodes. Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF infection was diagnosed based on clinical signs and PCR. MCF infection has never been reported in Jordan.

  10. Characterization of Generalized Jordan Higher Derivations on Triangular rings

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Xiaofei

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\mathcal A$ and $\\mathcal B$ be unital rings and $\\mathcal M$ be a $(\\mathcal A, \\mathcal B)$-bimodule, which is faithful as a left $\\mathcal A$-module and also as a right $\\mathcal B$-module. Let ${\\mathcal U}={\\rm Tri}(\\mathcal A, \\mathcal M, \\mathcal B)$ be the associated triangular ring. It is shown that every additive generalized Jordan (triple) higher derivation on $\\mathcal U$ is a generalized higher derivation.

  11. Jordan-Schwinger Representations and Factorised Yang-Baxter Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Kirschner

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The construction elements of the factorised form of the Yang-Baxter R operator acting on generic representations of q-deformed sl(n+1 are studied. We rely on the iterative construction of such representations by the restricted class of Jordan-Schwinger representations. The latter are formulated explicitly. On this basis the parameter exchange and intertwining operators are derived.

  12. Performance consequences of management accounting system information usage in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzah Al-Mawali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to contribute to the body of knowledge in the area of management accounting systems (MAS within the context of Jordanian manufacturing companies. However, the current study empirically investigated the relationship between MAS information usage and companies' performance. Data were collected from manufacturing companies listed in Amman Stock Exchange. The results of this study provide ample confirmation on the role of the usage of MAS information in enhance the manufacturing companies performance in Jordan

  13. Pharmacy Education in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wazaify, Mayyada; Matowe, Lloyd; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Al-Omran, Ola A.

    2006-01-01

    The practice of pharmacy, as well as pharmacy education, varies significantly throughout the world. In Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, the profession of pharmacy appears to be on the ascendance. This is demonstrated by an increase in the number of pharmacy schools and the number of pharmacy graduates from pharmacy programs. One of the reasons pharmacy is on the ascendance in these countries is government commitment to fund and support competitive, well-run pharmacy programs.

  14. E-Government Architecture In Jordan: A Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein A. Omari

    2006-01-01

    This study explains architecture for the E-Government system; its main concepts, objectives, most common applications, famous worldwide experiences and the E-Government in Jordan. It introduces the E-Government model as a modern evolution of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and how to convert the life of societies to the communication and networked age. It presents the experiences of countries like USA, UK, Singapore, UAE and Egypt. The study focuses on launching the E-Governmen...

  15. Morphological and morphometrical analysis of Heterodera spp. populations in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Lafi, Hamzeh A.; Al-Banna, Luma; Sadder, Monther T.; Hussein M. Migdadi

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity of five Jordanian populations of cyst nematodes, Heterodera spp. collected from five regions from Jordan (Ar-Ramtha, Madaba, Dana, Al-Karak, and Jerash) was investigated. Soil samples were collected from one representative field in each region. Morphological and morphometrical characteristics revealed that Heterodera latipons is dominated in cereal fields at Ar-Ramtha, Madaba, Dana and Al-Karak regions and Heterodera schachtii in Jerash. Cysts populations from all cereal ...

  16. New static spheroidal solution in Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyrev, S M

    2010-01-01

    The static spheroidal solutions of Jordan-Brands-Dicke theory (JBD) are studied. We consider the effect of the anisotropic stresses of scalar field on the shape of JBD self-graviting objects. It is shown that scalar fields can have significant effect on the structure and properties of self-graviting objects. In contrast with general relativity in JBD theory there are nonflat static spheroidal solutions.

  17. Generalized Derivations and Bilocal Jordan Derivations of Nest Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dangui Yan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Let H be a complex Hilbert space and B(H the collection of all linear bounded operators, A is the closed subspace lattice including 0 an H, then A is a nest, accordingly alg A={T∈B(H:TN⊆N,  ∀N∈A} is a nest algebra. It will be shown that of nest algebra, generalized derivations are generalized inner derivations, and bilocal Jordan derivations are inner derivations.

  18. Potential of energy savings in the hotel sector in Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Yahya [Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Mustafa, Mairna [Department of Sustainable Tourism, Queen Rania' s Institute of Tourism and Heritage, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Al-Mashaqbah, Shireen [International Office, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Mashal, Kholoud [Department of Land Management and Environment, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environment, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Mohsen, Mousa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan)

    2008-11-15

    This paper presents some insights into Jordan's energy consumption in the tourist accommodation sector. The results of a recent survey on environmental performance in the tourist accommodation sector in Jordan were used to evaluate energy conservation in hotels. A survey was designed and distributed to hotels' managers and departments' supervisors in order to understand the environmental performance in the tourist accommodation sector in Jordan during the period 10-17 August 2006. Also some field visits were conducted to fully understand hotels interaction regarding the environment, in addition to help interpreting the results of the survey. The study is limited to all classified hotels in Jordan. It was found that lighting hotels' main building and outside areas, and air conditioning consume more electricity compared to other departments. The results show that few classified hotels already installed energy saving equipments, though, it was noticed that managers of one star hotels were not really willing to make such changes in their hotels, on the other hand, other classified hotels (2-5 star hotels) have shown a high willingness to make changes in their hotels to reduce the consumption of different types of energy. Hotel's classification played a significant role in explaining variations in most of the results, particularly when it comes to long-term investments to reduce energy consumption by using energy efficient appliances. Five and four star hotels were the most hotels willing to use energy efficient appliances to reduce energy consumption. The study suggested some strategies to help reduce the negative impacts of high energy consumption in hotels. These strategies include better insulation, and enhanced insulation for the hot water reticulation system. Moreover, enhancing and increasing the level of awareness among all hoteliers through a directed and well-designed campaign. Also offer interest free loans; and activate precise

  19. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and lamivudine resistance mutations in Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and identify prevalent hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and to explore lamivudine-resistant mutations among treated and untreated patients in Jordan.METHODS: A total of 107 cases with chronic hepatitis B were recruited from different medical centers in Jordan. Serological tests were preformed for all cases using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. HBV Genotyping was performed for 70 cases using Line probe genotyping assay, The YMDD mutations were explored for 20 cases (4 were lamivudine naive) using the INNO-LiPA HBV DR assay.RESULTS: Genotype D was the only detected genotype. A total of 6 YMDD mutations were detected in 5 treated patients (31%) while one mutation was detected in the naive patients. Seventeen percent of cases were positive for HBeAg and had statistically significant higher levels of serum aminotransferases.CONCLUSION: HBV genotype D appears to be the only circulating type in Jordanian patients. The YMDD mutations were detected in 31% of lamivudine-treated cases with similar patterns to those found in the lit-erature. We also found a relatively low prevalence of HBeAg expression among examined cases (17%). Awareness of these serologic, genotypic and resistance patterns might help in the formulation of management plans and for predicting clinical outcomes. Further larger scale studies are needed to confirm our results and to examine possible associations among clinical, serologic, and genetic patterns of HBV infections in Jordan.

  20. Cardiovascular Nursing in Jordan: A Need for an Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawkab Shishani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD in developing countries are in rise. CVD burden is devastating because of onset of illnesses at younger ages, and an increase in incidence of preventable complications. The excess in consumption of health services due to mortality and morbidity associated with CVD constitutes burden on the health care systems. Jordan like other developing countries is substantially affected by CVD. Therefore, this review aims to examine the role of nurses in promoting CVD assessment, prevention and management in Jordan. Prevention at primary level is cost effective and is lifesaver. Modifiable risk factors for CVD are well known. Health promotion programs and campaigns raise public awareness of ways to adopt healthy lifestyles. Identification of high risk groups and adopting health policies to ensure implementation of screening programs helps in initiating treatments at early stage to ensure high prognosis. Even with presence of the disease, there is much that can be done. Complication can be prevented by effective management of the disease. Prevention of CVDs is multifactorial and is the responsibility of all health care providers including nurses and physicians. Nursing curricula in Jordan lack the adequate training of nurses in chronic disease prevention, in particular CVD. There is an urgent need for development and training and certification programs that are customized to prepare nurses for subspecialties such as CVD nursing, to enable nurses to meet the needs of persons with CVD. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 523-528

  1. Climate Change in Jordan: A Comprehensive Examination Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshrik R. Hamdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Jordan is experiencing harsh water shortage in different parts of the country due to high fluctuations in annual precipitation; the only source of water. In addition, heat waves are becoming more frequent in the region. Precipitation decrement and summer heat waves are being blamed on global warming. This study aimed to detect trends in weather parameters in Jordan. Approach: Data from six meteorological stations distributed around Jordan were analyzed using several parametric and nonparametric statistical approaches including Mann-Kendall, Linear Regression, Cusum, Rank Sum, Student's t-test, Rank Difference, Auto Correlation and Skewness-Kurtosis Normality test. Results: The results indicated that there are no visible trends indicating an increase or decrease in the annual precipitation and maximum temperature. However, there are good to strong trends indicating that annual minimum temperature has increased in the last decade while annual temperature range has decreased. Conclusion: Decreasing temperature range proved that the Earth’s atmosphere is becoming more efficient in trapping terrestrial infrared radiation, which is accountable for the global warming.

  2. Wage differentials in Jordan: effects on integrated labour market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, M A

    1987-06-01

    The emigration of Jordanian workers has benefited the country by reducing the scale of unemployment that existed in the 1960s and early 1970s. In addition, workers' remittances have had a favorable effect on the Jordanian balance of payments and contributed to increases in wage rates and demands for labor. Any shortages of labor resulting from the emigration flow appear to have been offset by the importation of workers from neighboring countries. A sample survey encompassing 495 foreign workers in Jordan and 518 Jordanian workers indicates that immigrant workers' wages are below those of Jordanian workers and considerably below the wages that Jordanian workers earn abroad. The average monthly wage for the Jordanians in the sample was JD 193.03 compared to JD 132.93 for the immigrants--a 45% difference. Over half of the immigrants surveyed earned under JD 99/month, while only 26% of the Jordanian workers were in this low income category. In part this wage differential is caused by the high proportions of immigrant workers employed in the clerical and unskilled occupational groups, where they are paid only half the wages earned by Jordanians engaged in the same occupations. A similar differential was observed in the average amount of monthly remittances to home countries: in 1982, Jordanians working abroad remitted an average of JD 77.5/worker compared with JD 59/worker remitted by foreign workers employed in Jordan. On balance, it appears that Jordan is a net gainer from the process of labor import and export.

  3. Molecular characterization of the circulating Bacillus anthracis in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqel, Amin Abdelfattah; Hailat, Ekhlas; Serrecchia, Luigina; Aqel, Suad; Campese, Emanuele; Vicari, Nadia; Fasanella, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    To understand the biomolecular charcteristics of Bacillus anthracis in Jordan, 20 blood smear slides from dead animals with suspected anthrax were analyzed using conventional and molecular approaches. All slides were positive for B. anthracis by conventional staining but no growth of the organism on selective media was detected. However, of the 20 samples, 16 were B. anthracis DNA-positive using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Seven samples provided enough quantity and quality of DNA, and their multilocus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA)-15 loci analysis revealed two different genotypes. All genotypes were belonging to A.B..r. 008/009 which is very common in Asia and Europe. Single nucleotide repeat (SNR) analysis revealed that there were no sub genotypes. Molecular diagnosis of animal anthrax in Jordan is not used routinely; henceforth, official diagnosis of anthrax is based on the observation of the slides by optical microscope and this can often cause reading errors. Therefore, the prevalence of the disease in Jordan might be slightly lower than that reported by the official bodies.

  4. Content-Based Analysis of Bumper Stickers in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Jaradat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study has set out to investigate bumper stickers in Jordan focusing mainly on the themes of the stickers. The study hypothesized that bumper stickers in Jordan reflect a wide range of topics including social, economic, and political. Due to being the first study of this phenomenon, the study has adopted content-based analysis to determine the basic topics. The study has found that the purpose of most bumper sticker is fun and humor; most of them are not serious and do not carry any biting messages. They do not present any criticism to the most dominant problems at the level of society including racism, nepotism, anti-feminism, inflation, high taxes, and refugees. Another finding is that politics is still a taboo; no political bumper stickers were found in Jordan. Finally, the themes the stickers targeted are: lessons of life 28.85 %; challenging or warning other drivers 16%; funny notes about social issues 12%; religious sayings 8%; treating the car as a female 7%; the low economic status of the driver 6%; love and treachery 5.5%; the prestigious status of the car 5%; envy 4%; nicknames for the car or the driver 4%; irony 3 %; and English sayings 1.5 %. Keywords: bumper stickers, themes, politics

  5. The surface heat flow of the Arabian Shield in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A.; Förster, H.-J.; Masarweh, R.; Masri, A.; Tarawneh, K.; Desert Group

    2007-04-01

    Surface heat flow in southern Jordan (western part of the Arabian Plate) was determined in a dense cluster of five, up to 900-m-deep boreholes that have encountered sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic (Ordovician and Silurian) age. These rocks are underlain by an igneous and metamorphic basement, which has been studied for its radiogenic heat production, along the eastern margin of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system. The heat flow, calculated from continuous temperature logs and laboratory-measured thermal conductivity of drillcores and surface samples, averages to 60.3 ± 3.4 mW m -2 and contrasts the common view of the late Proterozoic-consolidated Arabian Shield constituting a low heat-flow province of ⩽45 mW m -2. Although only characterizing an area of about 300 km 2, this average is unlikely representing a positive local anomaly caused by voluminous HHP granites/rhyolites at shallow depths. Instead, a heat flow of 60 mW m -2 is considered a robust estimate of the Phanerozoic conductive surface heat flow not only for Jordan, but for the Arabian Shield in areas unaffected by younger reactivation. The large variation in conductive heat flow (36-88 mW m -2) previously observed in Jordan, southern Syria, and Saudi Arabia is irreconcilable with their broad similarity in lithosphere structure and composition and rather reflects a combination of factors including low-quality temperature data and insufficient knowledge on thermal rock properties.

  6. Assessment of Corporate Governance in Jordan: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan S. Abbadi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the reality of corporate governance in Jordan. It identifies the framework of corporate governance, which has here been set into two dimensions – institutionalisations and regulations – and describes the five major principles of corporate governance. The study was carried out by interviews with key employees and the review of related laws and selected annual reports. The study found (1 basic shareholder rights were honoured in decision-making, except for large decisions such as major asset sales; (2 shareholders were not treated equitably in practice, although controllers sometimes took action and prohibited insider trading; (3 the role and rights of stakeholders in corporate governance were respected, and stakeholders had a number of legal protections, which were largely covered in Jordan's Company Law; (4 disclosure and transparency were observed to a large extent, although limited to quantity rather than quality, because Jordan has fully adopted IFRS and ISA and (5 boards largely fulfilled their responsibilities, as these are extensively defined by law and regulation.

  7. Preliminary Study of the Gravimetric Local Geoid Model in Jordan:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Zoubi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an increased interest in studying and defining the Local and Regional Geoid Model worldwide, due to its importance in geodetic and geophysics applications. The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS is internationally growing, yet the lack of any Geoid Model for Jordan has limited the use of GPS for geodetic applications. Therefore, this work aims to present the preliminary results that we propose for The Gravimetric Jordanian Geoid Model (GeoJordan. The model is created using gravimetric data and the GravSoft program. The validation of this model is done by using GPS measurements and precise leveling at Amman area. However, a comparison between the Global Geopotential Models OSU91A and EGM96 showed great discrepancies through the presented results. Also, presenting the approach used to obtain the orthometric height from GPS ellipsoidal height measurements. Nevertheless, the error margin; obtained in this initial study of the GeoJordan after fitting the data with GPS/leveling measurement; is about (10cm, in tested area whereas the standard error of the created model is about (40cm.

  8. Potential of energy savings in the hotel sector in Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Y.; Mustafa, M.; Al-Mashaqbah, S.; Mashal, K.; Mohsen, M. [Hashemite Univ., Zarqa (Jordan)

    2007-07-01

    The number of different types of tourism accommodation has been growing over the past few years. The country of Jordan will face significant challenges in trying to meet the growing energy need and electricity demands while, at the same time, developing the energy sector in a way that minimizes the adverse impacts on the economy, the environment, and social life. This paper discussed energy consumption in the tourist accommodation sector in Jordan. It presented an evaluation of energy conservation in hotels based on a recent survey on environmental performance in Jordan's tourism sector. A survey was designed and distributed to hotels managers and supervisors during August 2006. Field visits were also conducted. The findings focused on several themes, including electricity and diesel fuel consumption and the willingness to adopt energy efficient procedures. such as switching incandescent bulbs to energy saving light bulbs, installing power monitoring systems and using energy efficient appliances. It was concluded that most electricity was consumed for lighting and air-conditioning. 18 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs.

  9. Towards Sustainable Water Management in a Country that Faces Extreme Water Scarcity and Dependency: Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyns, J.; Hamaideh, A.; Hoekstra, A. Y.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Schyns, M.

    2015-12-01

    Jordan faces a great variety of water-related challenges: domestic water resources are scarce and polluted; the sharing of transboundary waters has led to tensions and conflicts; and Jordan is extremely dependent of foreign water resources through trade. Therefore, sustainable water management in Jordan is a challenging task, which has not yet been accomplished. The objective of this study was to analyse Jordan's domestic water scarcity and pollution and the country's external water dependency, and subsequently review sustainable solutions that reduce the risk of extreme water scarcity and dependency. We have estimated the green, blue and grey water footprint of five different sectors in Jordan: crop production, grazing, animal water supply, industrial production and domestic water supply. Next, we assessed the blue water scarcity ratio for the sum of surface- and groundwater and for groundwater separately, and calculated the water pollution level. Finally, we reviewed the sustainability of proposed solutions to Jordan's domestic water problems and external water dependency in literature, while involving the results and conclusions from our analysis. We have quantified that: even while taking into account the return flows, blue water scarcity in Jordan is severe; groundwater consumption is nearly double the sustainable yield; water pollution aggravates blue water scarcity; and Jordan's external virtual water dependency is 86%. Our review yields ten essential ingredients that a sustainable water management strategy for Jordan, that reduces the risk of extreme water scarcity and dependency, should involve. With respect to these, Jordan's current water policy requires a strong redirection towards water demand management. Especially, more attention should be paid to reducing water demand by changing the consumption patterns of Jordan consumers. Moreover, exploitation of fossil groundwater should soon be halted and planned desalination projects require careful

  10. Cyclone trends constrain monsoon variability during Late Oligocene sea level highstands (Kachchh Basin, NW India)

    OpenAIRE

    Reuter, M.; W. E. Piller; M. Harzhauser; Kroh, A

    2013-01-01

    Important concerns about the consequences of climate change for India are the potential impact on tropical cyclones and the monsoon. Herein we present a sequence of fossil shell beds from the shallow-marine Maniyara Fort Formation (Kachcch Basin) as an indicator of tropical cyclone activity along the NW Indian coast during the Late Oligocene warming period (~27–24 Ma). Direct proxies providing information about the atmospheric circulation dynamics over the Indian subcontinent at this ...

  11. Cyclone trends constrain monsoon variability during late Oligocene sea level highstands (Kachchh Basin, NW India)

    OpenAIRE

    Reuter, M.; W. E. Piller; M. Harzhauser; Kroh, A

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has an unknown impact on tropical cyclones and the Asian monsoon. Herein we present a sequence of fossil shell beds from the shallow-marine Maniyara Fort Formation (Kachcch Basin) as a recorder of tropical cyclone activity along the NW Indian coast during the late Oligocene warming period (~ 27–24 Ma). Proxy data providing information about the atmospheric circulation dynamics over the Indian subcontinent at this time are important since it corresponds to a major climate reorga...

  12. "You Have Come a Long Way Woman": A Sparkle Slogan without Realistic Meaning for Woman Status in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudeir, Dua'a Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    This research paper discusses woman status in the country of Jordan in terms of rights, equality and personal liberties, freedom of choice in particular. It argues that, although Jordan is working hard to be open to Western values and civilization; however, it lags behind when it comes to woman liberty and equality. Jordan is a patriarchal…

  13. Teaching for Sustainable Development in Higher Education Institutions: University of Jordan as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Hola, Imfadi R. M.; Tareef, Atif Bin

    2009-01-01

    In Jordan, a rapid movement of educational reform is taking place nowadays. Curricula development, teacher education, using information and communication technology (ICT), improving teaching and learning strategies and integrating different subjects are among the main objectives of this reform. One of the main challenges in Jordan in order to cope…

  14. Effects of Collateral Pledges in Reducing Credit Risks - Confronting Banks in Jordan, as Lending Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ahmad Z.  Siam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available he research aims at investigating the effects of Collaterals pledges in reducing credit Risks .To achieve research goals data were collected from all commercial banks operating in Jordan. Research concluded that banks in Jordan use collaterals effectively and in a wide range, and collaterals size have a direct impact on credit risk. Credit risk differs with collaterals.

  15. Hom-Maltsev, Hom-alternative, and Hom-Jordan algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Hom-Maltsev(-admissible) algebras are defined, and it is shown that Hom-alternative algebras are Hom-Maltsev-admissible. With a new definition of a Hom-Jordan algebra, it is shown that Hom-alternative algebras are Hom-Jordan-admissible. Hom-type generalizations of some well-known identities in alternative algebras, including the Moufang identities, are obtained.

  16. Child, Family and Community Characteristics Associated with School Readiness in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated demographic differences in school readiness within Jordan, a particularly interesting context because of widespread national reform currently sweeping the education system in Jordan. Teacher reports and researcher direct assessments of the school readiness of a national sample of 4681 Jordanian first grade children…

  17. K-Bessel functions associated to a 3-rank Jordan algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacen Dib

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the Bessel-Muirhead system, we can express the K-Bessel function defined on a Jordan algebra as a linear combination of the J-solutions. We determine explicitly the coefficients when the rank of this Jordan algebra is three after a reduction to the rank two. The main tools are some algebraic identities developed for this occasion.

  18. Treated Sewage Water Use in Irrigated Agriculture. Theoretical design of farming systems in Seil Al Zarqa and the Middle Jordan Valley in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Most of Jordan is arid and water resources are limited. This situation becomes more acute the more Jordan develops. New techniques in agriculture, industry and the domestic sector place an increasing demand upon clean and safe water. Good-quality water is hardly available. Unconventional water sources, including treated sewagewater, must be considered as alternative sources. This book focuses on treated sewagewater as a nutrient and water resource for agriculture. We expect that treated sewag...

  19. An Econometric Model for Water Sector in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed I.  Shahateet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study argued that there is an economic approach to reduce water problems faced by Jordan. The study took into consideration the increasing population size, the declining rainfall, a deepening shortage of supply and increasing demand for water, the production of agricultural and industrial sectors, price of unit exports, and lack of financial resources. Approach: The framework for a tool which takes into consideration the links between economic growth and the availability of water was developed in this study, in the form of a dynamic simulation econometric model. The model served as a quantitative tool to evaluate the water policy measures and forecast the effect of future policy variables on the water status in Jordan. Results: Agricultural, industrial and other types of production are affected by water uses which in turn are influenced by production and other socioeconomic variables, including population size, the extent of production market, and the size of linkage effects working through certain increases in water consumption. The results also showed the model can be used to solve key issues related to the formulation and implementation of water policy. They also identified lessons for water management policy within a broad socio-economic perspective. Conclusions: First, with regard to production sector, a major effect can be attributed to the supply of water. Second, gross domestic products of agricultural, industrial and other sectors were found to be highly significant factors in influencing the supply of water. Finally, priorities for making the most of Jordan's water resources should be given to options affecting water-supply strategy which relates the supply of water to the level of production.

  20. Water, sanitation and hygiene in Jordan's healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Yousef Saleh

    2017-08-14

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine water availability, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) services, and healthcare waste management in Jordan healthcare facilities. Design/methodology/approach In total, 19 hospitals (15 public and four private) were selected. The WSH services were assessed in hospitals using the WSH in health facilities assessment tool developed for this purpose. Findings All hospitals (100 percent) had a safe water source and most (84.2 percent) had functional water sources to provide enough water for users' needs. All hospitals had appropriate and sufficient gender separated toilets in the wards and 84.2 percent had the same in outpatient settings. Overall, 84.2 percent had sufficient and functioning handwashing basins with soap and water, and 79.0 percent had sufficient showers. Healthcare waste management was appropriately practiced in all hospitals. Practical implications Jordan hospital managers achieved major achievements providing access to drinking water and improved sanitation. However, there are still areas that need improvements, such as providing toilets for patients with special needs, establishing handwashing basins with water and soap near toilets, toilet maintenance and providing sufficient trolleys for collecting hazardous waste. Efforts are needed to integrate WSH service policies with existing national policies on environmental health in health facilities, establish national standards and targets for the various healthcare facilities to increase access and improve services. Originality/value There are limited WSH data on healthcare facilities and targets for basic coverage in healthcare facilities are also lacking. A new assessment tool was developed to generate core WSH indicators and to assess WSH services in Jordan's healthcare facilities. This tool can be used by a non-WSH specialist to quickly assess healthcare facility-related WSH services and sanitary hazards in other countries. This tool identified some areas

  1. Equivalence of Jordan and Einstein frames at the quantum level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sachin; Banerjee, Narayan

    2017-03-01

    It is shown that the Jordan frame and its conformally transformed version, the Einstein frame of nonminimally coupled theories of gravity, are actually equivalent at the quantum level. The example of the theory taken up is the Brans-Dicke theory, and the wave packet calculations are done for a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model in the purest form of the theory, i.e., in the absence of any additional matter sector. The calculations are clean and exact, and the result obtained are unambiguous.

  2. The Complexity of Proving the Discrete Jordan Curve Theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Phuong; Cook, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Jordan Curve Theorem (JCT) states that a simple closed curve divides the plane into exactly two connected regions. We formalize and prove the theorem in the context of grid graphs, under different input settings, in theories of bounded arithmetic that correspond to small complexity classes. The theory $V^0(2)$ (corresponding to $AC^0(2)$) proves that any set of edges that form disjoint cycles divides the grid into at least two regions. The theory $V^0$ (corresponding to $AC^0$) proves tha...

  3. Gendered utilization differences of mental health services in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, A; Graham, J R; Kandah, J

    2000-10-01

    A revised Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL), translated into Arabic, was distributed to a sample of 87 nonpsychotic mental health out-patients in Zarka, Jordan (male = 61, female = 26). Findings revealed no significant gendered differences, but higher responses among women in all dimensions. Regardless of gender, patients also expected and were satisfied with medicinal treatment; explained etiologies as having supernatural origins; and utilized informal community traditional healing and religious healing systems. The supernatural explanations and community healing systems varied by gender. Findings emphasize future treatment and programme development strategies that take into account the biomedical/traditional interface, culturally appropriate treatment modalities, different gendered patient needs, and the potential stigma of professional treatment.

  4. Equivalence of Jordan and Einstein frames at the quantum level

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the Jordan frame and its conformally transformed version, the Einstein frame of nonminimally coupled theories of gravity, are actually equivalent at the quantum level. The example of the theory taken up is the Brans-Dicke theory, and the wave packet calculations are done for a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model in the purest form of the theory, i.e., in the absence of any additional matter sector. The calculations are clean and exact, and the result obtained are unambiguous.

  5. Assessing Actual Visit Behavior through Antecedents of Tourists Satisfaction among International Tourists in Jordan: A Structural Equation Modeling (SEM Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed Moh’d Al Muala

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jordan tourism industry is facing fluctuating tourist visit provoked by dissatisfaction, high visit risk, low hotel service, or negative Jordan image. This study aims to examine the relationships between the antecedents of tourist satisfaction and actual visit behavior in tourism of Jordan, and the mediating effect of tourist satisfaction (SAT in the relationship between Jordan image (JOM, service climate (SER and actual visit behavior (ACT. A total of 850 international tourists completed a survey that were conducted at southern sites in Jordan. Using structural equation modeling (SEM technique, confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA was performed to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement, and the structural equation modeling techniques (Amos 6.0 were used to evaluate the casual model. Results of the study demonstrate the strong predictive power and explain of international tourists’ behavior in Jordan. The findings highlighted that the relationship between Jordan image and service climate are significant and positive on actual visit behavior.

  6. The Determinants of Deprivation in Jordan: Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed I. Shahateet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine and explain the factors that affect deprivation in Jordan. To do so, this study constructs and tests a model that determines the factors, which affect deprivation. It employs an econometric analysis to examine the relationship between some main socioeconomic variables and the status of deprivation in Jordan. It looks at how changes in income, unemployment, education, health, housing conditions and access to services, as well as pollution, will affect the status of deprivation. The study uses the raw data of the national Household Income and Expenditure Survey HIES, which was conducted by the Jordanian Department of Statistics during 2002/2003 and covered 12,792 households. The study concludes that deprivation was caused by low income, unemployment, low educational attainment, bad type of housing, barriers to essential services, poor health and pollution. However, the effect of these factors varies. Simulation results of the model predicts that if income deprivation, unemployment and education deprivation are reduced by 1% the overall deprivation index will decrease by 0.7%, holding other variables without change. Realizing such reductions, however, will require policies to further increase wages and salaries, encourage investment in human capital and job creation.

  7. Geospatial Techniques for Improved Water Management in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad T. Al-Bakri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research shows a case from Jordan where geospatial techniques were utilized for irrigation water auditing. The work was based on assessing records of groundwater abstraction in relation to irrigated areas and estimated crop water consumption in three water basins: Yarmouk, Amman-Zarqa and Azraq. Mapping of irrigated areas and crop water requirements was carried out using remote sensing data of Landsat 8 and daily weather records. The methodology was based on visual interpretation and the unsupervised classification for remote sensing data, supported by ground surveys. Net (NCWR and gross (GCWR crop water requirements were calculated by merging crop evapotranspiration (ETc, calculated from daily weather records, with maps of irrigated crops. Gross water requirements were compared with groundwater abstractions recorded at a farm level to assess the levels of abstraction in relation to groundwater safe yield. Results showed that irrigated area and GCWR were higher than officially recorded cropped area and abstracted groundwater. The over abstraction of groundwater was estimated to range from 144% to 360% of the safe yield in the three basins. Overlaying the maps of irrigation and groundwater wells enabled the Ministry of Water and Irrigation (MWI to detect and uncover violations and illegal practices of irrigation, in the form of unlicensed wells, incorrect metering of pumped water and water conveyance for long distances. Results from the work were utilized at s high level of decision-making and changes to the water law were made, with remote sensing data being accredited for monitoring water resources in Jordan.

  8. The Prevalence of Aflatoxinogenic Aspergillus parasiticus in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisreen Al-Hmoud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are potent carcinogens and produced by almost all Aspergillus parasiticus isolates and about 35% of Aspergillus flavus isolates. Chemical methods are used for detection of aflatoxins in food and feed. These methods cannot detect aflatoxinogenic fungi in samples, which contain undetectable amounts of aflatoxins. The objective of this research work was to ascertain the importance of molecular and microbiological methods in detection of aflatoxinogenic fungus A. parasiticus in food and feed samples in Jordan. Specific media for the detection of aflatoxins showed the prevalence of A. parasiticus (6–22% in contaminated food and feed samples. HPLC method confirmed the presence of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in food sample contaminated with A. parasiticus. Primer set OmtBII-F and OmtBII-R amplified DNA fragment of 611 base pairs from genomic DNA of aflatoxinogenic A. parasiticus isolated from food and feed samples but could not amplify DNA fragment of nonaflatoxinogenic A. flavus. The results of this study showed the prevalence of aflatoxinogenic A. parasiticus in food and feed samples in Jordan and give further evidence of suitability of microbiological and molecular methods in detection of aflatoxins, which are reliable low-cost approach to determine food and feed biosafety.

  9. First results from the Jordan COLTRIMS imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afaneh, Feras, E-mail: afaneh@hu.edu.jo [Physics Department, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Ali, Rami; Qasem, Rajaie; Balasmeh, Naeem [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan); Hamasha, Safeia [Physics Department, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Dörner, Reinhard; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst [Institut fuer Kernphysik, University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    A Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) apparatus has been constructed and operated cooperatively by the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory in the Physics Department at the Hashemite University, Jordan, and the Atomic and Molecular Physics Group at the 4.75 MeV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facility at the University of Jordan. This COLTRIMS imaging system allows the investigation of the dynamics of various ion impact induced atomic and molecular interactions and fragmentations. The performance of the COLTRIMS system was tested by carrying out preliminary studies of two collision systems. In the first study, electron capture processes in the He{sup 2+}–Ne collision system at 0.25 and 1.0 MeV impact energies were investigated. Significant simultaneous electron capture and target excitation has been observed for the 0.25 MeV as opposed to the 1.0 MeV impact energy. In the other study, projectile single electron loss and simultaneous single target ionization in the O{sup +}–He collision system was studied at three different projectile impact energies: 0.6, 1.45 and 2 MeV. Enhancement of the electron–electron contribution to projectile electron loss with increasing collision energy has been observed.

  10. Work-related stress among health professionals in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, A; Shawaheen, M; Khader, Y; Amarin, Z; Hill Rice, V

    2012-03-01

    Job stress is common in health care professionals in the west. Less is known about its prevalence in Middle Eastern countries. To determine job stress, its sources and its effect on health care professionals in northern Jordan. A simple random sample of 101 physician specialists, 126 dentists, 52 general practitioners and 123 pharmacists in northern Jordan completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire, and addressed structured questions about job stress. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses were used to describe and compare participants, and a binary logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with stress and reported health problems. Of the 402 health care professionals, 27% reported high levels of stress. Prevalence was highest among general practitioners (33%), then dentists (30%) and pharmacists (25%). The lowest stress was among physician specialists (12%). Factors associated with the highest stress were being a general practitioner, being a woman and having long working hours. Dealing with uncooperative patients and heavy workloads were additional stressors. The most frequent problems associated with high stress were irritability (58%), consuming more arousal drinks (e.g. coffee, cola) (56%), difficulty concentrating (51%), headaches (63%), chronic back pain (48%) and common colds (47%). Compared to physician specialists, general practitioners, dentists and pharmacists were significantly more stressed. Reported stress was associated with job title, being a woman and long working hours. Also uncooperative patients and heavy workloads were significant problems. Being irritable and having headaches and common colds were the most frequent health issues.

  11. Design, Development and Installation of Jordan Subcritical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ned Xoubi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following its announcement in 2007 to pursue a nuclear power program and in the absence of any nuclear facility essential for the education, training, and research, Jordan decided to build a subcritical reactor as its first nuclear facility. Jordan Subcritical Assembly (JSA is uranium fueled light water moderated and reflected subcritical reactor driven by a plutonium-beryllium source, and the core consists of 313 LEU fuel rods, loaded into a water-filled vessel in a square lattice of 19.11 mm pitch. The fuel rods are based on PWR fuel structural pattern type, made of uranium oxide (UO2 with 3.4 wt% 235U enrichment in zirconium alloy (Zr-4 cladding. Design, optimization, and verification were performed using MCNP5 nuclear code; the computed effective multiplication factor is 0.95923. The JSA is designed to fulfill the training needs of students and is equipped to perform all of the fundamental experiments required for a typical nuclear engineering university program. This paper presents the design, development, modeling, core analysis, and utilization of Jordan’s first nuclear facility and why this simplified low cost reactor presents an attractive choice to fulfill the preliminary experimental needs of nuclear engineering education in developing countries.

  12. Rainy Season Assessment of Azraq Basin in Eastern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Shatnawi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study considers the rainfall pattern in the Azraq basin in the Eastern part of Jordan. Azraq Basin is an extensive inland drainage system lying in the steppe and desert to the east of Jordan. The Azraq area is around 17,000 km2, which accounts for about 15% of the country’s total area, stretching from the lava peaks of Jebel Arab in southern Syria to Wadi Sirhan in northern Saudi Arabia. The Basin is considered part of the desert where the annual precipitation is estimated to be less than 150 mm/year and some areas receiving as little as 50 mm rainfall annually. Dry and hot climate during the summer and very cold winter with little rain falls in the form of thunderstorms and is similar to the continental climate of the desert climate where the big difference in temperature between day and night. The study aimed at assessing the rainy season’s conditions in the basin. The data for three rain gauges with monthly records of rainfall between (1960-2010 are used in the analysis. These stations are: Azraq, Um Alquttein and Deir Alkahf stations. The rainy seasons in the study area seem to get shorter and shifted in their start. The highest percentage of rain falls in the middle stage of the season (i.e., between December and February. This percentage is getting increased for Azraq and Deir Alkahf stations; however Um Alquttein shows a cyclic pattern of rainfall during the different seasons.

  13. Diabetes mellitus in two genetically distinct populations in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eitan, Laith N.; Nassar, Ahmad M.; Dajani, Rana B.; Almomani, Basima A.; Saadeh, Nesreen A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical, anthropometric, and laboratory characteristics in diabetes type 2 patients of 2 genetically-distinct ethnicities living in Jordan, Arabs and Circassians/Chechens. Methods: This cross sectional ethnic comparison study was conducted in King Abdullah University Hospital, Irbid and The National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Genetics, Amman, Jordan between June 2013 and February 2014. A sample of 347 (237 Arab and 110 Circassian/Chechen) people living with diabetes were included in the study. Data were collected through direct interviews with the participants. Clinical data were collected using a questionnaire and anthropometric measurements. Laboratory data were extracted from the patients’ medical records. Results: More Arabs with diabetes had hypertension as a comorbidity than Circassians/Chechens with diabetes. Arabs living with diabetes were generally more obese, whereas Circassians/Chechens living with diabetes had worse lipid control. Arabs with diabetes had higher means of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting blood sugar, and more Arabs with diabetes had unsatisfactory glycemic control (60.6%) than Circassians/Chechens with diabetes (38.2%) (HbA1c ≥7.0%). Most participants (88.8%) had at least one lipid abnormality (dyslipidemia). Conclusion: Multiple discrepancies among the 2 ethnic diabetic populations were found. New diabetes management recommendations and policies should be used when treating people living with diabetes of those ethnicities, particularly in areas of glycemic control, lipid control, and obesity. PMID:28133689

  14. Histoire du th\\'eor\\`eme de Jordan de la d\\'ecomposition matricielle (1870-1930)

    CERN Document Server

    Brechenmacher, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    The thesis takes as its point of departure the Jordan decomposition theorem and traces its evolution over the sixty-year period from its statement by Camille Jordan in 1870 to 1930 and the emergence of the theory of canonical matrices. A historical analysis of this particular theorem serves as a lens not only on internal developments of the evolving mathematics discipline of algebra but also on the external developments of mathematics as an internationalizing discipline in the decades around the turn of the twentieth century. The thesis draws from the study of networks of sources in order to analyze the theorem's transformation from a result in nineteenth-century group theory to one in the new twentieth century area of linear algebra, while, at the same time, the thesis explores issues of community formation and the role of tacit knowledge in the evolution of mathematical methods. The thesis will focus on a history the decomposition of matrices as a method of decomposition of a particular form of representati...

  15. Delay in Presentation, Diagnosis, and Treatment for Breast Cancer Patients in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Helalah, Ahmad Munir; Alshraideh, Ahmad Hussam; Al-Hanaqtah, Mo'tasem; Da'na, Moh'd; Al-Omari, Asim; Mubaidin, Rasmi

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer, and one of the leading causes of death for females in Jordan and many countries in the world. Studies have shown that delay in symptoms presentation, diagnosis or treatment would result in poor prognosis. There has been no published study from Jordan on delays in patient presentation, delays in diagnosis, or delays in treatment. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess these important quality indicators aiming to improve prognosis for breast cancer patients in Jordan. This project was a cross-sectional study on female breast cancer patients in Jordan. The total number of participants was 327. The proportion of patients with presentation delay, diagnosis delay, and treatment delay was 32.2%, 49.1%, or 32.4%, respectively. The main reported reasons for delay in presentation were ignorance of the nature of the problem (65.6%), limited/lack of knowledge that symptoms were suggestive of cancer diagnosis (16.7%), and misdiagnosis (16.7%). Predictors of delay and mean time for presentation, diagnosis, and treatment were identified. Our results reveal that breast cancer patients in Jordan are experiencing delays in presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. This could justify the advanced stages at diagnosis and poor outcomes for breast cancer patients in Jordan. We recommend revising the current early detection and down-staging programs in Jordan.

  16. Cancer incidence in Jordan from 1996 to 2009--a comprehensive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Said Ibrahim; Soubani, Majd; Nimri, Jena Monther; Al-Zeer, Ali Hazem

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem facing the entire world, and Jordan is no exception. However, patterns of cancer incidence and cancer burden in Jordan have never been explored thoroughly, and the aim of this study was to close this knowledge gap. The study was based on data obtained from the Jordan cancer registry from 1996 to 2009. All cancer cases that were diagnosed during the study period were registered and included in this study. A total of 51,626 cases were registered in Jordan during the 14- year period. The incidence rate showed no significant increase in males (percent change PC 6.8%), while in females a marked increase was observed (PC 14.8%). The major cancer sites for males were bronchus and lung, colorectal, bladder, leukemia and prostate. In females, the leading cancer sites were breast, colorectal, leukemia, thyroid and NHL. Compared to other countries in the region, Jordan has comparable rates. On the other hand the rates of cancer are markedly lower in Jordan compared to more industrialized countries such as the US and Europe. There was an overall increase in the incidence of cancer in Jordan, especially among females, which stresses the need for programs to raise awareness on the importance of early diagnosis and preventive life style measures.

  17. Population growth in the cities of Irbid Governorate, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, M

    1985-12-01

    This discussion of population growth in the cities of Irbid Governorate, Jordan, covers population growth development city inhabitants before the 20th century; city population in the 20th century; population growth factors; natural growth; migration patterns; and migration factors. Despite the fact that no census was conducted before the turn of this century, estimates indicate that no significant variation in the population growth of the cities was registered. Between 1946-52, Jordanian cities witnessed a significant population growth because of Palestinian immigration to Jordan, leading to a 3-fold increase in comparison with the 1946 figure. A historical review of development in Irbid cities shows a decline in population stability in the city of Ajlun after the end of the "Al-Mamalik" rule and the population was confined to a limited number of families. This trend continued until the early 18th century when a number of people from nearby areas settled in the cities. Since then and up to the end of the past century, population growth was slow due to high mortality rates. As for the cities of Ramtha and Shuna, Ramtha has maintained its population because of its geographical location, and the city of northern Shuna accommodated a number of families only. Population growth of Irbid cities in the 1st half of the 20th century was characterized by slow development and fluctuation and by sharp declines in some years, attributable to high mortality rates caused by epidemics, wars, and conflicts. In the 1930s, mortality rates in Jordan, in general, reached 25-27/1000; birth rates were estimated at 48/1000, a natural increase of 2% annually. Like other Jordanian cities, those in the Irbid governorate witnessed a noticeable population growth that was attributed to the growth in the State's population. Population growth has varied significantly among the cities of the governorate, ranging from 1 to 9% annually with no major differences in the natural growth for each city

  18. Detection and analysis of morphotectonic features utilizing satellite remote sensing and GIS: An example in SW Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaideh, Omar M. A.; Grasemann, Bernhard; Melichar, Rostislav; Mosar, Jon

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the dominant orientations of morphological features and the relationship between these trends and the spatial orientation of tectonic structures in SW Jordan. Landsat 8 and hill-shaded images, constructed from 30 m-resolution ASTER-GDEM data, were used for automatically extracting and mapping geological lineaments. The ASTER-GDEM was further utilized to automatically identify and extract drainage network. Morphological features were analyzed by means of azimuth frequency and length density distributions. Tectonic controls on the land surface were evaluated using longitudinal profiles of many westerly flowing streams. The profiles were taken directly across the northerly trending faults within a strong topographic transition between the low-gradient uplands and the deeply incised mountain front on the east side of the Dead Sea Fault Zone. Streams of the area are widely divergent, and show numerous anomalies along their profiles when they transect faults and lineaments. Five types of drainage patterns were identified: dendritic, parallel, rectangular, trellis, and modified dendritic/trellis. Interpretation and analysis of the lineaments indicate the presence of four main lineament populations that trend E-W, N-S, NE-SW, and NW-SE. Azimuthal distribution analysis of both the measured structures and drainage channels shows similar trends, except for very few differences in the prevailing directions. The similarity in orientation of lineaments, drainage system, and subsurface structural trends highlights the degree of control exerted by underlying structure on the surface geomorphological features. Faults and lineaments serve as a preferential conduit for surface running waters. The extracted lineaments were divided into five populations based on the main age of host rocks outcropping in the study area to obtain information about the temporal evolution of the lineament trends through geologic time. A general consistency in lineament trends over

  19. Journalism in Jordan: A comparative analysis of press freedom in the post-Arab spring environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matt J Duffy; Hadil Maarouf

    2015-01-01

      [...]many argue that Jordan has suppressed freedom of expression more since the Arab Spring, even though evidence shows that many populations are rejecting information from state-controlled entities...

  20. Neil Jordan jagab pühapäeval Viru keskuses autogramme / Triin Tael

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tael, Triin

    2006-01-01

    10. Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali oodatuim külaline saabub Tallinna 2. detsembril. 3. dets. Viru keskuses Rahva Raamatu kaupluses esitletakse raamatut: Jordan, Neil. Vari / tõlkinud Krista Kaer. Tallinn : Varrak, 2006

  1. Jordan-H\\"older theorems for derived categories of derived discrete algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yongyun

    2015-01-01

    For any positive integer $n$, $n$-derived-simple derived discrete algebras are classified up to derived equivalence. Furthermore, the Jordan-H\\"older theorems for all kinds of derived categories of derived discrete algebras are obtained.

  2. Neil Jordan jagab pühapäeval Viru keskuses autogramme / Triin Tael

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tael, Triin

    2006-01-01

    10. Pimedate Ööde Filmifestivali oodatuim külaline saabub Tallinna 2. detsembril. 3. dets. Viru keskuses Rahva Raamatu kaupluses esitletakse raamatut: Jordan, Neil. Vari / tõlkinud Krista Kaer. Tallinn : Varrak, 2006

  3. Alkylthiophenes as sensitive indicators of palaeoenvironmental changes : a study of a Cretaceous oil shale from Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kohnen, M.E.L.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen samples of the immature, Cretaceous Jurf ed Darawish oil shade (Jordan) were analysed quantitatively for aliphatic hydrocarbons and alkylthiophenes in the bitumens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after isolation of appropriate fractions.

  4. Cigarette demand is responsive to higher prices: findings from a survey of University students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Nadia J; Cherukupalli, Rajeev

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the price elasticity of cigarette demand for university students aged 18-24 years in Jordan. Questions from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey were adapted and administered to students from 10 public universities in Jordan in 2014. A two-part econometric model of cigarette demand was estimated. Nearly one-third of university students in Jordan smoke, purchasing 33.2 packs per month and paying 1.70 Jordanian dinars on average (US$2.40) for a pack of 20 cigarettes. The price elasticity of cigarette demand was estimated to be -1.15. Higher taxes may be particularly effective in reducing smoking among University students in Jordan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. 75 FR 41898 - Slash Support, Inc. Gamehouse Products Support Workers South Jordan, UT; Notice of Revised...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Slash Support, Inc. Gamehouse Products Support Workers South Jordan, UT; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration By application dated March 25, 2010,...

  6. Near infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigs, D. E.; Freelin, J. M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1983-02-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

  7. The Complexity of Proving the Discrete Jordan Curve Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Phuong

    2010-01-01

    The Jordan Curve Theorem (JCT) states that a simple closed curve divides the plane into exactly two connected regions. We formalize and prove the theorem in the context of grid graphs, under different input settings, in theories of bounded arithmetic that correspond to small complexity classes. The theory $V^0(2)$ (corresponding to $AC^0(2)$) proves that any set of edges that form disjoint cycles divides the grid into at least two regions. The theory $V^0$ (corresponding to $AC^0$) proves that any sequence of edges that form a simple closed curve divides the grid into exactly two regions. As a consequence, the Hex tautologies and the st-connectivity tautologies have polynomial size $AC^0(2)$-Frege-proofs, which improves results of Buss which only apply to the stronger proof system $TC^0$-Frege.

  8. Risk factors for human brucellosis in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Shehada, M N; Abu-Halaweh, M

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the risk factors of human brucellosis in Jordan. A case-control study was conducted involving 56 Jordanians who had been treated for brucellosis and at least 3 matched controls for each case (n = 247). Matching was for sex, age, locality (the same village) and socioeconomic standard. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. In all, 17 risk factors were examined related to: contact with various livestock, milk and milk product consumption, drinking-water treatment and disease awareness. Most variables were associated with brucellosis in the univariate analysis but the final logistic model included only 4: milking sheep and goats (OR 3.5), consumption of raw feta cheese made from sheep and goat milk (OR 2.8) and consumption of cows' milk (OR 0.4) and boiled feta cheese (OR 0.4). Small ruminant farmers need to be trained in safer milking practices and feta cheese making procedures.

  9. Oestrus ovis larval myiasis among goats in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud N; Batainah, Tharwat; Abuharfeil, Nizar; Torgerson, P R

    2003-05-30

    From December 1998 to December 1999, heads of 520 local goats slaughtered at the Irbid, Ramtha and Howarra Abattoirs (northern Jordan) were examined for the three larval instars (L(1)-L(3)) of Oestrus ovis. Of 520 heads, 126 (24%) were infested with O. ovis larvae. All three larval instars were observed in both sexes; all age groups were infested in each month of the year. The mean age of the goats sampled was 1.5 years. The numbers of parasites infesting hosts showed a significant (P<0.05) correlation with sheep age (r(sp)=0.31-0.42) for all three larval instars. The numbers of larvae in each host followed an overdispersed distribution, which fit a negative-binomial model (but not a Poisson distribution). There were more parasites recorded in the presence of purulent discharge or laryngitis, fewer in the presence of catarrhal discharge and no association with pharyngitis sinusitis, or rhinitis.

  10. Morphological and morphometrical analysis of Heterodera spp. populations in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafi, Hamzeh A; Al-Banna, Luma; Sadder, Monther T; Migdadi, Hussein M

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity of five Jordanian populations of cyst nematodes, Heterodera spp. collected from five regions from Jordan (Ar-Ramtha, Madaba, Dana, Al-Karak, and Jerash) was investigated. Soil samples were collected from one representative field in each region. Morphological and morphometrical characteristics revealed that Heterodera latipons is dominated in cereal fields at Ar-Ramtha, Madaba, Dana and Al-Karak regions and Heterodera schachtii in Jerash. Cysts populations from all cereal fields had bifenestrate vulval cone and a strong underbridge. Wherever, cysts of the cabbage population had ambifenestrate vulval cone with long vulval slit. The bullae were absent in Ar-Ramtha, Madaba and Dana populations, but present in Al-Karak and Jerash. Based on 12 morphometrical characters, the first three functions in canonical discriminant analysis accounted 99.3% of the total variation. Distance from dorsal gland duct opening to stylet base, underbridge length, a = L/W (body length/midbody width) and length of hyaline tail tip had strong and significant contributions in the first function. While the second function was strongly influenced by length of hyaline tail, fenestral length, fenestral width and tail length. However, the third canonical discriminate function was found to be influenced by stylet length, fenestral length, a = L/W (body length/midbody width) and underbridge width. The graphical representation of the distribution of the samples showed that the first canonical discriminant function clearly separated H. schachtii from Jerash from other populations. Whereas, H. latipons collected from Madaba and Dana were clearly separated in the second function. The results indicated that differences at morphological and morphometrical levels revealed diverse populations of Heterodera spp. in Jordan.

  11. Food security and humanitarian assistance among displaced Iraqi populations in Jordan and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Sirois, Adam; Anderson, Jamie; Tileva, Margarita; Biermann, Elizabeth; Storey, J Douglas; Burnham, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    The Iraq conflict resulted in the largest displacement in the Middle East in recent history, and provision of health services to the displaced population presents a critical challenge. With an increase in the number of people affected by complex emergencies and the number of people displaced in urban settings, the international community must adapt intervention strategies to meet the specific demands and contexts of this population. The study aimed to provide information on food security and livelihoods for Iraqi refugees in Syria and Jordan to inform humanitarian assistance planning. National cross-sectional cluster sample surveys of displaced Iraqi populations displaced were conducted in Jordan (October 2008) and Syria (March 2009). Clusters of ten households were randomly selected using probability-based sampling; a total of 1200 and 813 Iraqi households in Jordan and Syria, respectively, were interviewed about food security and receipt of humanitarian assistance. In Syria, 60% of households reported the household food situation had declined since the arrival period as compared to 46% in Jordan. Food aid receipt was reported by 18.0% of households in Jordan and 90.3% of households in Syria. In Jordan, 10.2% of households received cash assistance and in Syria 25.3% of households received cash assistance. In Jordan, cash assistance was associated with low socioeconomic status, large household size, and UNHCR registration. In Syria, female headed households, Damascus residents, families with children, and those registered with UNHCR were more likely to receive cash assistance. Food insecurity remains a concern among displaced Iraqi households in both Jordan and Syria. Improved targeting of both food and cash assistance and the expansion of cash-based programs could lead to a more effective use of funds and facilitate the implementation of assistance programs that are sustainable in the context of declining funding availability.

  12. On the equivalence of Gaussian elimination and Gauss-Jordan reduction in solving linear equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Nai-Kuan

    1989-01-01

    A novel general approach to round-off error analysis using the error complexity concepts is described. This is applied to the analysis of the Gaussian Elimination and Gauss-Jordan scheme for solving linear equations. The results show that the two algorithms are equivalent in terms of our error complexity measures. Thus the inherently parallel Gauss-Jordan scheme can be implemented with confidence if parallel computers are available.

  13. Pascual Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Pascual Jordan's path-breaking role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT) is recalled and his friendly dispute with Dirac's particle-based relativistic quantum theory is presented as the start of the field-particle conundrum which, though in modified form, persists up to this date. Jordan had an intuitive understanding that the existence of a causal propagation with finite propagation speed in a quantum theory led to radically different physical phenomena than those of QM. The conc...

  14. Olive Mounds, Roman cisterns, erosion pins - potential to characterize erosion in a Mediterranean catchment in north Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, Sabine; Ollesch, Gregor; Siebert, Christian; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of a three years' time period of a PhD thesis it is luck to catch the "right" rain events for good general erosion approximations. Methods that (i) cover longer time periods, (ii) are not confined to constructed boundaries, and finally (iii) include all possible erosion processes are crucial for good average estimates of sediment yields from different landscapes. The aim of the study was to get a first understanding of erosion processes and sediment yields in a Mediterranean to semi-arid catchment in NW Jordan, wherefore different measurement methods were tested in the predominant landscape units: olive orchards (27%), fields (14%) and natural shrubs on steep slopes (~30%). One of the applied methods was the measurement of topographic olive mounds within 7 orchards with an average size of 800 m2 in synergy with tree-coring and age estimation of the orchards. Furthermore the OSL dating of deposited sediments in two roman cisterns adjacent to fields was conducted and the 9 erosion pin fields, each about 200m2 large, were installed on steep slopes with natural vegetation. The methods cover different time scales from 560 years for the fields, an average of 32 years for the olive orchards and up to two rainy seasons for the erosion pin fields. Results show that olive orchards on steep slopes (>10%) have the highest erosion potential in the region with 95±8 t ha-1year-1 followed by natural vegetated slopes with 37±4 t ha-1year-1 of dislocated material and fields with 1.22±0.06 t ha-1year-1 sediment yield. These spatially constrained outcomes are supported by geochemical sediment fingerprint results of lake sediments from the catchment and will be discussed in regard to the basic assumption that underlie the principle of measurement and the limitations of the methods.

  15. (Never) Mind your p's and q's: Von Neumann versus Jordan on the Foundations of Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In early 1927, Pascual Jordan (1927b) published his version of what came to be known as the Dirac-Jordan statistical transformation theory. Later that year and partly in response to Jordan, John von Neumann (1927a) published the modern Hilbert space formalism of quantum mechanics. Central to both formalisms are expressions for conditional probabilities of finding some value for one quantity given the value of another. Beyond that Jordan and von Neumann had different views about the appropriate formulation of problems in the new theory. For Jordan, unable to let go of the analogy to classical mechanics, the solution of such problems required the identification of sets of canonically conjugate variables, i.e., p's and q's. Jordan (1927e) ran into serious difficulties when he tried to extend his approach from quantities with fully continuous spectra to those with wholly or partly discrete spectra. For von Neumann, not constrained by the analogy to classical physics and aware of the daunting mathematical difficul...

  16. Pascual Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, B.

    2010-04-01

    Pascual Jordan's path-breaking role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT) is recalled and his friendly dispute with Dirac's particle-based relativistic quantum theory is presented as the start of the field-particle conundrum which, though in modified form, persists up to this date. Jordan had an intuitive understanding that the existence of a causal propagation with finite propagation speed in a quantum theory led to radically different physical phenomena than those of QM. The conceptional-mathematical understanding for such an approach began to emerge only 30 years later. The strongest link between Jordan's view of QFT and modern "local quantum physics" is the central role of causal locality as the defining principle of QFT as opposed to the Born localization in QM. The issue of causal localization is also the arena where misunderstandings led to a serious derailment of large part of particle theory e.g. the misinterpretation of an infinite component pointlike field resulting from the quantization of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian as a spacetime quantum string. The new concept of modular localization, which replaces Jordan's causal locality, is especially important to overcome the imperfections of gauge theories for which Jordan was the first to note nonlocal aspects of physical (not Lagrangian) charged fields. Two interesting subjects in which Jordan was far ahead of his contemporaries will be presented in two separate sections. Dedicated to my teacher and role model: Rudolf Haag.

  17. Pascual Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, B.

    2011-04-01

    Pascual Jordan's path-breaking role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT) is recalled and his friendly dispute with Dirac's particle-based relativistic quantum theory is presented as the start of the field-particle conundrum which, though in modified form, persists up to this date. Jordan had an intuitive understanding that the existence of a causal propagation with finite propagation speed in a quantum theory led to radically different physical phenomena than those of QM. The conceptional-mathematical understanding for such an approach began to emerge only 30 years later. The strongest link between Jordan's view of QFT and modern "local quantum physics" is the central role of causal locality as the defining principle of QFT as opposed to the Born localization in QM. The issue of causal localization is also the arena where misunderstandings led to a serious derailment of large part of particle theory e.g. the misinterpretation of an infinite component pointlike field resulting from the quantization of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian as a spacetime quantum string. The new concept of modular localization, which replaces Jordan's causal locality, is especially important to overcome the imperfections of gauge theories for which Jordan was the first to note nonlocal aspects of physical(not Lagrangian) charged fields. Two interesting subjects in which Jordan was far ahead of his contemporaries will be presented in two separate sections.

  18. Algebraic Properties of Matrix Jordan Canonical Form%矩阵 Jordan 标准型的代数性质归纳

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云平

    2015-01-01

    矩阵的标准型理论是矩阵论中重要的一个方面,本文归纳总结了 Jordan 标准型代数领域的相关定理,以帮助读者更好的学习。%The theory of matrix canonical form is an important as-pect in the matrix theory. To help the readers to learn better, this paper sums up the relevant theorems of Jordan canonical form in the field of algebra.

  19. Significance of native arsenic in the Baogutu gold deposit, western Junggar, Xinjiang, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Fang; ZHU YongFeng

    2009-01-01

    Native arsenic together with comb quartz and stibnite is found in the Baogutu gold deposit, western Junggar (Xinjiang), NW China. It is anhedral with various grain size ( con-centration of hydrothermal fluid decrease obviously, whereas the As concentration increases. Coexis-tence with native arsenic of electrum and its contents of 0.5 wt%-1.3 wt% As suggest that As is im-portant to transport Au when S concentration decrease in hydrothermal fluid. Crystallization of native arsenic induced the deposition of electrum and consequently the formation of the Baogutu gold deposit.

  20. Infection by Paramphistomidae trematodes in cattle from two agricultural regions in NW Uruguay and NW Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchís, J; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Macchi, M I; Piñeiro, P; Suárez, J L; Cazapal-Monteiro, C; Maldini, G; Venzal, J M; Paz-Silva, A; Arias, M S

    2013-01-16

    The analysis of infection by Paramphistomidae trematodes was conducted in two agricultural regions with different knowledge on this parasitosis. Faecal and blood samples were collected from 374 cattle in Salto (NW Uruguay) where there is a lack of information about paramphistomosis. A total of 429 cattle from Galicia (NW Spain), an area with previous records of infection by gastric flukes, were sampled. Diagnostics of trematodosis was developed by using a copromicroscopic probe and an ELISA with excretory/secretory antigens collected from adult Calicophoron daubneyi (Paramphistomidae) specimens. Results were evaluated according intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In the Uruguay, the percentage of cattle passing Paramphistomidae-eggs by faeces was 7% (95% Confidence Interval 5, 10). A significantly higher prevalence of paramphistomosis in the Hereford × Angus cattle (OR=3.5) was recorded, as observed for the oldest ruminants (>3.5 years). An overall seroprevalence of 29% (25, 34) was obtained by ELISA, with the highest values in the Friesians (OR=3), the youngest bovines (Uruguay, especially by improving their management to avoid exposure to the gastric trematode. Further studies are in progress for identifying the species of Paramphistomidae affecting ruminants in Uruguay.

  1. Jordan's First Research Reactor Project: Driving Forces, Present Status and the Way Ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xoubi, Ned, E-mail: Ned@Xoubi.co [Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), P.O.Box 70, Shafa Badran, 11934 Amman (Jordan)

    2011-07-01

    In a gigantic step towards establishing Jordan's nuclear power program, Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) is building the first nuclear research and test reactor in the Kingdom. The new reactor will serve as the focal point for Jordan Center for Nuclear Research (JCNR), a comprehensive state of the art nuclear center not only for Jordan but for the whole region, the center will include in addition to the reactor a radioisotopes production plant, a nuclear fuel fabrication plant, a cold neutron source (CNS), a radioactive waste treatment facility, and education and training center. The JRTR reactor is the only research reactor new build worldwide in 2010, it is a 5 MW light water open pool multipurpose reactor, The reactor core is composed of 18 fuel assemblies, MTR plate type, with 19.75% enriched uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) in an aluminum matrix. It is reflected on all sides by beryllium and graphite blocks. Reactor power is upgradable to 10 MW with a maximum thermal flux of 1.45x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The reactor reactivity is controlled by four Hafnium Control Absorber Rods (CAR). Jordan Center for Nuclear Research is located in Ramtha city, it is owned by Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), and is contracted to Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Daewoo E and C. The JCNR project is a 56 months EPC fixed price contract for the design engineering, construction, and commissioning the JCNR reactor, and other nuclear facilities. The project presents many challenges for both the owner and the contractor, being the first nuclear reactor for Jordan, and the first nuclear export for Korea. The driving forces, present status and the way ahead will be presented in this paper. (author)

  2. Digital geologic map of the Thirsty Canyon NW quadrangle, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, S.A.; Orkild, P.P.; Sargent, K.A.; Warren, R.G.; Sawyer, D.A.; Workman, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This digital geologic map compilation presents new polygon (i.e., geologic map unit contacts), line (i.e., fault, fold axis, dike, and caldera wall), and point (i.e., structural attitude) vector data for the Thirsty Canyon NW 7 1/2' quadrangle in southern Nevada. The map database, which is at 1:24,000-scale resolution, provides geologic coverage of an area of current hydrogeologic and tectonic interest. The Thirsty Canyon NW quadrangle is located in southern Nye County about 20 km west of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and 30 km north of the town of Beatty. The map area is underlain by extensive layers of Neogene (about 14 to 4.5 million years old [Ma]) mafic and silicic volcanic rocks that are temporally and spatially associated with transtensional tectonic deformation. Mapped volcanic features include part of a late Miocene (about 9.2 Ma) collapse caldera, a Pliocene (about 4.5 Ma) shield volcano, and two Pleistocene (about 0.3 Ma) cinder cones. Also documented are numerous normal, oblique-slip, and strike-slip faults that reflect regional transtensional deformation along the southern part of the Walker Lane belt. The Thirsty Canyon NW map provides new geologic information for modeling groundwater flow paths that may enter the map area from underground nuclear testing areas located in the NTS about 25 km to the east. The geologic map database comprises six component ArcINFO map coverages that can be accessed after decompressing and unbundling the data archive file (tcnw.tar.gz). These six coverages (tcnwpoly, tcnwflt, tcnwfold, tcnwdike, tcnwcald, and tcnwatt) are formatted here in ArcINFO EXPORT format. Bundled with this database are two PDF files for readily viewing and printing the map, accessory graphics, and a description of map units and compilation methods.

  3. Modeling of groundwater flow for Mujib aquifer, Jordan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fayez Abdulla; Tamer Al-Assa’d

    2006-06-01

    Jordan is an arid country with very limited water resources.Groundwater is the main source for its water supply.Mujib aquifer is located in the central part of Jordan and is a major source of drinking water for Amman,Madaba and Karak cities.High abstraction rates from Mujib aquifer during the previous years lead to a major decline in water levels and deterioration in groundwater quality. Therefore,proper groundwater management of Mujib aquifer is necessary;and groundwater flow modeling is essential for proper management.For this purpose,Mod flow was used to build a groundwater flow model to simulate the behavior of the flow system under different stresses.The model was calibrated for steady state condition by matching observed and simulated initial head counter lines.Drawdown data for the period 1985-1995 were used to calibrate the transient model by matching simulated drawdown with the observed one.Then,the transient model was validated by using drawdown data for the period 1996-2002.The results of the calibrated model showed that the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the B2/A7 aquifer ranges between 0.001 and 40 m/d. Calibrated speci fic yield ranges from 0.0001 to 0.15.The water balance for the steady state condition of Mujib aquifer indicated that the total annual direct recharge is 20.4 × 106 m3, the total annual in flow is 13.0 × 106 m3, springs discharge is 15.3 × 106 m3, and total annual out flow is 18.7 × 106 m3. Different scenarios were considered to predict aquifer system response under different conditions. The results of the sensitivity analysis show that the model is highly sensitive to horizontal hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy and with lower level to the recharge rates.Also the model is sensitive to specific yield.

  4. Timing and Spatial Distribution of Loess in Xinjiang, NW China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    Full Text Available Central Asia is one of the most significant loess regions on Earth, with an important role in understanding Quaternary climate and environmental change. However, in contrast to the widely investigated loess deposits in the Chinese Loess Plateau, the Central Asian loess-paleosol sequences are still insufficiently known and poorly understood. Through field investigation and review of the previous literature, the authors have investigated the distribution, thickness and age of the Xinjiang loess, and analyzed factors that control these parameters in the Xinjiang in northwest China, Central Asia. The loess sediments cover river terraces, low uplands, the margins of deserts and the slopes of the Tianshan Mountains and Kunlun Mountains and are also present in the Ili Basin. The thickness of the Xinjiang loess deposits varies from several meters to 670 m. The variation trend of the sand fraction (>63 μm grain-size contour can indicate the local major wind directions, so we conclude that the NW and NE winds are the main wind directions in the North and South Xinjiang, and the westerly wind mainly transport dust into the Ili basin. We consider persistent drying, adequate regional wind energy and well-developed river terraces to be the main factors controlling the distribution, thickness and formation age of the Xinjiang loess. The well-outcropped loess sections have mainly developed since the middle Pleistocene in Xinjiang, reflecting the appearance of the persistent drying and the present air circulation system. However, the oldest loess deposits are as old as the beginning of the Pliocene in the Tarim Basin, which suggests that earlier aridification occurred in the Tarim Basin rather than in the Ili Basin and the Junggar Basin.

  5. Deformation and Fluid Flow in the Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Eric; Koehn, Daniel; Passchier, Cees; Davis, Jennifer; Salvona, Aron; Chung, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We studied deformation bands in sandstone and breccia veins in overlying basalts of the Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia, regarding their development and history of fluid flow within. The studied deformation bands can be divided into disaggregation bands and cataclastic bands. The former appear to develop in unsorted sandstone, whereas the latter form in well sorted sandstone. We estimated the porosity of the bands and host rock in thin sections using a simple image analysis software (ImageJ). Results show, that no or only a minor decrease in porosity occur in disaggregation bands, while the porosity in cataclastic bands is decreased by up to 82 % with respect to the host rock. These observations are in agreement with results of existing studies (e.g. Fossen et al., 2007). Hence the cataclastic bands form a seal to fluid flow in the host rock, yet it is observed in outcrops that deformation bands can develop into open fractures which in turn increase the permeability of the rock. Breccia veins in the overlying basalts show intense fracturing where the basalt is locally fractured into elongated chips. Mineral precipitation in these breccia veins indicates a hydrothermal origin of the fluids since the precipitates consist of extremely fine-grained quartz aggregates. Secondary mineralization with large crystals indicates that a long-lived fluid circulation through tubular networks was active at a later stage, which eventually sealed the veins completely. We propose that the Etendeka basalts on top of the sandstone formation produced a localized deformation along deformation bands and heated up fluid below the lavas. At a later stage fluid pressures were either high enough to break through the basalt or fracturing due to ongoing extension produced fluid pathways. References Fossen, H., Schultz, R., Shipton, Z. and Mair, K. (2007). Deformation bands in sandstone: a review. J. Geol. Soc., 164, 755-769.

  6. Sanitary Conditions of Public Swimming Pools in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abu Aqoulah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the summer of 2005 and investigated all of active public swimming pools (85 out of 93 in Amman, the capital of Jordan. The aim of this study was to find out if these swimming pools are in compliance with Jordanian Standards for Swimming Pools Water (JS 1562/2004. The pools were surveyed against the water microbial quality and other physicochemical parameters indicated in the standards. Two samples from each pool were collected for microbial analysis and pools monitoring were carried out during the afternoon of the weekends when the pools are most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pools water to the microbial parameters was 56.5%, for residual chlorine 49.4%, for pH 87.7%, water temperature 48.8%, and bathing load 70.6%. The results also indicated that water microbial quality deteriorated with time. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of water contamination with time of sample collection, residual chlorine, water temperature and load of swimmers. The poor compliance was attributed to lack of proper disinfection, staff training, proper maintenance, and timely inspection.

  7. Sanitary Conditions of Public Swimming Pools in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abu Aqoulah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the summer of 2005 and investigated all of active public swimming pools (85 out of 93 in Amman, the capital of Jordan. The aim of this study was to find out if these swimming pools are in compliance with Jordanian Standards for Swimming Pools Water (JS 1562/2004. The pools were surveyed against the water microbial quality and other physicochemical parameters indicated in the standards. Two samples from each pool were collected for microbial analysis and pools monitoring were carried out during the afternoon of the weekends when the pools are most heavily used. The results indicated overall poor compliance with the standards. Compliance of the pools water to the microbial parameters was 56.5%, for residual chlorine 49.4%, for pH 87.7%, water temperature 48.8%, and bathing load 70.6%. The results also indicated that water microbial quality deteriorated with time. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of water contamination with time of sample collection, residual chlorine, water temperature and load of swimmers. The poor compliance was attributed to lack of proper disinfection, staff training, proper maintenance, and timely inspection.

  8. English language education in Jordan: Some recent trends and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Madallh Alhabahba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to map out the status of English language teaching (ELT as practised in the Arab World and, specifically, in Jordan today. The study also aims to bring into focus significant issues that need to be addressed in ELT in the Arab World. This paper presents a review of the current status of English language education, with an emphasis on the need for urgent reforms in the teaching of English in the Arab World. Further, longitudinal data in respect to classroom and workplace English proficiency are presented. English language education seems to be up-to-date teacher-centred and bound to other issues such as teaching the textbook rather than focusing on developing lifelong strategies. There is a critical need for writing national standards for English language professional development programmes that should be based on the findings of sound research. The paper highlights the significance of teaching English language through observing and reviewing the current practices.

  9. An audit on public awareness of depression symptoms in Jordan

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    Sayer Al-Azzam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Depression is acommon mental health disorder. The aim of this study is to determine the level of public awareness regarding this illness, its symptoms, associated factors, available forms of treatment, and the attitude towards depressed people. Methods: A self administered questionnaire was filled in by approximately 5000 individuals selected from various regions of Jordan. Results: The majority of participants thought that depression is a treatable condition that can affect patient at any age, and may be controlled by the will power. Loss of interest in things and presence of negative feelings were the most commonly recognized symptoms of depression, while, unemployment and poverty were found to be the most recognized risk factors for depression. In addition, most participants considered support from family and friends (93.6% as well as exercise (80.4% to be the best available forms of depression treatment. Respondents found it acceptable to work, make friends with, or marry depressed individuals. The first choice persons for seeking help by most participants were family members and friends (49.8%. Conclusion: Collectively, the level of awareness of depression was acceptable. However, further efforts are necessary to establish public educational programs related to depression in order to raise awareness regarding the disease.

  10. Inorganic Chemical Composition of Swimming Pools in Amman-Jordan

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    Bety Saqarat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring was carried out during summer 2011 in three types of swimming pools in Amman-Jordan. Thirty six water samples, collected from three users type of swimming pools (adults, family and infants, were examined for its major ionic composition (HCO3-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4=, Ca+2, Mg+2, Na+, K+ and PO4+4 in addition to its BOD and COD content. All of the examined samples from the swimming pools water were acceptable according to the local and WHO standards. The type and number of users as well as the maintenance of the swimming pool water influenced the water quality. The results showed that there was a noticeable increase in NO3, PO4 and Cl than other ions. All of the examined samples from the swimming pools water were acceptable according to the local and WHO standards and although the water of the infant’s users changed frequently, it showed the highest concentration of most of the parameters and Adults’ pool showed the lowest.

  11. Site investigation on medical waste management practices in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Fayez; Abu Qdais, Hani; Rabi, Atallah

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the medical waste management practices used by hospitals in northern Jordan. A comprehensive inspection survey was conducted for all 21 hospitals located in the study area. Field visits were conducted to provide information on the different medical waste management aspects. The results reported here focus on the level of medical waste segregation, treatment and disposal options practiced in the study area hospitals. The total number of beds in the hospitals was 2296, and the anticipated quantity of medical waste generated by these hospitals was about 1400 kg/day. The most frequently used treatment practice for solid medical waste was incineration. Of these hospitals, only 48% had incinerators, and none of these incinerators met the Ministry of Health (MoH) regulations. As for the liquid medical waste, the survey results indicated that 57% of surveyed hospitals were discharging it into the municipal sewer system, while the remaining hospitals were collecting their liquid waste in septic tanks. The results indicated that the medical waste generation rate ranges from approximately 0.5 to 2.2 kg/bed day, which is comprised of 90% of infectious waste and 10% sharps. The results also showed that segregation of various medical waste types in the hospitals has not been conducted properly. The study revealed the need for training and capacity building programs of all employees involved in the medical waste management.

  12. Fraud Risk Factors and Audit Programme Modifications: Evidence from Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modar Abdullatif

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how audit firms in Jordan deal with the presence of fraud risk factors in audit clients. In doing so, the study seeks to explore which fraud risk factors are more important to Jordanianauditors, and how Jordanian auditors consider modifying their audit programmes when fraud risk factors are present in clients. The study uses a structured questionnaire that was administered to seniorlevel auditors in the largest Jordanian audit firms. The findings show that almost all of the 20 fraud risk factors included in the questionnaire were only slightly important (if not unimportant, a finding that is arguably alarming. The perceived importance of modifying the audit programme in the presence of each fraud risk factor was related to the perceived importance of the fraud risk factor itself. However, changes in the nature and extent of audit procedures were more important than changes in the timing of the procedures or the members of the audit team. The most important fraud risk factors were related to the characteristics of management and its attitude towards the audit, while the least important fraud risk factors were related to the difficulties in the client’s financial performance. Factor analysis found that the fraud risk factors could be classified into four separate groups. Possible interpretations of the findings were discussed, such as considering the Jordanian business environment characteristics, and the findings were compared to those of extant international studies.

  13. Evaluation of traffic noise pollution in Amman, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrah, Ahmad; Al-Omari, Abbas; Sharabi, Reem

    2006-09-01

    The City of Amman, Jordan, has been subjected to persistent increase in road traffic due to overall increase in prosperity, fast development and expansion of economy, travel and tourism. This study investigates traffic noise pollution in Amman. Road traffic noise index L10(1 h) was measured at 28 locations that cover most of the City of Amman. Noise measurements were carried out at these 28 locations two times a day for a period of one hour during the early morning and early evening rush hours, in the presence and absence of a barrier. The Calculation of Road Traffic Noise (CRTN) prediction model was employed to predict noise levels at the locations chosen for the study. Data required for the model include traffic volume, speed, percentage of heavy vehicles, road surface, gradient, obstructions, distance, noise path, intervening ground, effect of shielding, and angle of view. The results of the investigation showed that the minimum and the maximum noise levels are 46 dB(A) and 81 dB(A) during day-time and 58 dB(A) and 71 dB(A) during night-time. The measured noise level exceeded the 62 dB(A) acceptable limit at most of the locations. The CTRN prediction model was successful in predicting noise levels at most of the locations chosen for this investigation, with more accurate predictions for night-time measurements.

  14. Molecular identification of chlamydial cause of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Huthaifa Salah; Ababneh, Mustafa Mohammed Kheir; Hananeh, Wael Mahmoud; Alsheyab, Fawzi Mohammad; Jawasreh, Khaleel Ibraheem; Al-Gharaibeh, Moath Ahmad; Ababneh, Mohammed Mahmoud

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila abortus (Ch. abortus) is the etiological agent of ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) and one of the most common infectious agents of abortion in small ruminants worldwide. RFLP-PCR analysis of the outer membrane protein gene (OMP2 gene) was used for diagnosis and characterization of chlamydial causes of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan. Sixty-six placental tissues and 15 vaginal swabs were collected from aborted ewes and does to identify cause of abortion in Jordan. Thirty-eight placental samples (58 %) and 13 vaginal swabs (87 %) were positive for chlamydial DNA. Shedding of bacteria in vaginal swabs was detected within 7 days after abortion. The results of this study showed that chlamydiosis is one of the important causes of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan. In addition, vaginal swab is an excellent sample for molecular diagnosis of chlamydiosis. DNA sequencing and RFLP analysis of the OMP2 reveal that all chlamydial cause of abortion in small ruminants in Jordan are due to Ch. abortus. While, Ch. pecorum was not detected in any sample. OMP2 gene of the isolated Jordanian strain was identical (100 %) to Ch. abortus FAS strain. In conclusion, Ch. abortus is an important cause of abortion in Jordan; vaginal swab within 7 days of abortion can be used for molecular diagnosis of chlamydiosis in small ruminants.

  15. Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1, an Antibacterial Peptide-Producing Bacterium from Hot Springs in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalili, Rawana N; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Canbäck, Björn

    2015-07-23

    This paper reports the draft genome sequence of the firmicute Geobacillus sp. strain ZGt-1, an antibacterial peptide producer isolated from the Zara hot spring in Jordan. This study is the first report on genomic data from a thermophilic bacterial strain isolated in Jordan.

  16. Engel's Theorem of Jordan Lie Algebra and Its Applications%Jordan李代数的Engel定理及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱玲; 周佳; 陈良云

    2012-01-01

    证明了有限维Jordan李代数的Engel定理,并应用它得到了Jordan李代数的Cartan子代数的若干性质.%The authors prove Engel's theorem of Jordan Lie algebra and apply it to get some properties of Cartan subalgebras on Jordan Lie algebra.

  17. Geochemistry and petrology of nephrite from Alamas, Xinjiang, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Deng, Jun; Shi, Guanghai; Yui, Tzen-Fu; Zhang, Guibin; Abuduwayiti, Maituohuti; Yang, Liqiang; Sun, Xiang

    2011-08-01

    The Hetian nephrite deposit is one of the largest nephrite deposits worldwide. Located within the Hetian deposit, Xinjiang, Northwest China, the Alamas ore body occurs as veins on the contact between the Late Variscan granodiorite and Precambrian dolomitic marble. Petrographic studies and electronic microprobe analyses reveal two possible nephrite formation processes: (1) dolomitic marble → tremolite and (2) dolomitic marble → diopside → tremolite. Nephrite veins show continuous coloration zones, ranging from white and white-green zones to a green zone towards the granodiorite, with increasing concentrations of Cr, FeO and TFe 2O 3. All these nephrite samples have quite low Cr and Ni contents (8.95-178.7 ppm and 0.05-3.95 ppm, respectively) relative to serpentinite-related nephrite (Cr 2O 3, 0.07-0.43 wt.%; NiO, 0.08-0.36 wt.%). Their bulk-rock REE patterns exhibit strong negative Eu anomalies (0.03-0.21) with declined LREE, flat HREE and low ΣREE concentration (2.84-84.81 ppm), similar to those of host dolomitic marble samples with negative Eu anomalies (0.15-0.23), declined LREE, flat HREE and lower ΣREE concentration (8.48-11.1 ppm), indicating a close genetic relationship between them. Homogenization temperatures analyses on the fluid inclusions in tremolite yield a minimum temperature 293 °C for the nephrite formation. Nephrites have oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions in the range from +3.2 to +6.2 per mil and -83.0 to -94.7 per mil, respectively. The corresponding equilibrated fluids have isotope compositions of δ 18O = +3.1 to +6.1 (293 °C). Combined with field observation, there are at least three possible fluid sources: meteoric water, magmatic water and CO 2 derived from decarbonation of dolomite, and a metasomatic and dolomite-related origin is suggested for the Alamas ore body in the Hetian nephrite deposit, Xinjiang, NW China.

  18. Quo vadis NW Black Sea benthic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traian Gomoiu, Marian

    2016-04-01

    / thalasoterapy. Black Sea ecosystem restoration - Certainties and Uncertainties: Pressure on the Danube and other rivers has decreased, chemical discharges have decreased obviously, and yet there appear phenomena of water flowering - "red waters", hypoxia is still present at times and there is mass mortality of fish and other benthic organisms. Why? Signs of recovery should be considered cautiously and uncertainties may be resolved only in a longer time by increasing our scientific efforts. The results of the EU FP7 Project PERSEUS led to the identification of three important issues that should be resolved in order to achieve good environmental status: • Applying an adaptive management to increase the resilience of the ecosystems and to diminish the vulnerability of biodiversity; • Necessity of participative approach by stakeholders; • Identifying and obtaining adequate financial support for new R-D-I projects. Who are the actors in addressing and implementing the actions? • Academic educational and research institutions for adequate working condition; • More specialists trained for taxonomic groups; • Reasonable diversity of coordinating specialists, capable team leaders / satisfactory work packages; • Attracting NGO members towards nature conservation issues; • Resonable stakeholders committed to environmental issues. Studying the results of researches carried out by GeoEcoMar on the Romanian Black Sea coast in recent years, the author concluded that the major problems hampering progress towards a good ecosystem in NW Bent Black Sea are: • lack of diversity in the fields of research, both in theoretical and applied realms; • structural and functional consequences of ecological pressures and the disordered state of the ecosystems in the periods of paroxysmal eutrophication / pollution at the end of the 20th Century; • scarcity of data and knowledge on the Social-Economic System; • high costs of the new marine technology used directly in the sea and

  19. Occurrence and Distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV in the Jordan Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Anfoka

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In a survey conducted in 2002 and 2003, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV was detected in the Jordan Valley. The direct tissue blot immunoassay (DTBIA indicated that 12.7 and 15.2% of samples tested in the central and northern Jordan Valley respectively were infected with CTV. Similar results showed that all citrus species grown in the Jordan Valley were susceptible to CTV. DAS-ELISA analysis of samples from a citrus orchard in the Dir Alla area with severe CTV symptoms indicated that 49% of samples were infected with CTV. Using a CTV specific primer pair (CTV1/CTV10, the coat protein gene of the virus was successfully amplified from leaf extracts obtained from CTVinfected trees by IC-RT-PCR. After cloning and sequencing the coat protein gene, the sequence of the amplified product was deposited in the GenBank.

  20. 不仅是融合——JORDAN OL'SCHOOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晨; KICKS(图)

    2007-01-01

    自从2005年AIR JORDAN为旗下的TEAM产品推出了第一双基于“HYBRID”理念而设计的AIR JORDAN DUB-ZERO之后,这种将JORDAN鞋历代经典元素重新组合而繁衍出的JORDAN鞋便一双双地出现在我们眼前,并且每年都不乏主打作品,比如05年的DUB-ZERO和06年的SPIZ' IKE,而07年JORDAN TEAM的“HYBRID”主打作品JORDAN OL] SCHOOL现在也展现在我们面前。

  1. Pascual Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Pascual Jordan's path-breaking role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT) is recalled and his friendly dispute with Dirac's particle-based relativistic quantum theory is presented as the start of the field-particle conundrum which, though in modified form, persists up to this date. Jordan had an intuitive understanding that the existence of a causal propagation with finite propagation speed in a quantum theory led to radically different physical phenomena than those of QM. The conceptional-mathematical understanding for such an approach began to emerge only 30 years later. The strongest link between Jordan's view of QFT and modern "local quantum physics" is the central role of causal locality as the defining principle of QFT as opposed to the Born localization in QM. The issue of causal localization is also the arena where misunderstandings about localization led to a serious derailment of large part of particle theory:: the misinterpretation of an infinite component pointlike field resulting from ...

  2. T he Quality of Inte rnet Banking Service Encounter in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan K.A. Migdadi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify t he quality of internet banking service encounter of the retail banks in Jordan, and to identify the quality dimensions that should be improved or sustained , to achieve these pur poses t he banks' web sites were evaluated by using the web site quantitative evaluation method (QEM , the evaluation of the banks' web sites was conducted in March 2008 for sixteen retail banks in Jordan, the results indicated that; the banks in Jordan ha v e significant positive quality of the internet b an king service encounter , further the banks' web sites are rich in their content, and significant in the navigation, but the speed of home page down load and web site accessibility should be developed in the future

  3. Facilitation of Human Resource Information Systems on Performance of Public Sector in Jordan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzi Hasan Altaany

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to provide an introductory presentation of the concept of human recourse information system in theoretical framework and to identify the degree of satisfaction of uses Human resource information systems in Jordan. A questionnaire was justified and developed by the researcher to measure the performance of employees based on previous studies was applied to (95 employees at public sector in Jordan. The study was using SPSS to analyses data. The results indicate that employees at public sector in Jordan there were a statistically significant relationship between the planning, recruitment, training and development, performance appraisal, compensation and incentives, and career planning and performance of employees. However the sample reported a significant in the seven hypotheses and accepted but the hypotheses (Ha1, Ha2 and Hb1 is rejected. The study have recommendations should gives more attention to focus on.

  4. Chronic disease and disability among Iraqi populations displaced in Jordan and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Sirois, Adam; Tileva, Margarita; Storey, J Douglas; Burnham, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    The Iraq conflict resulted in the largest displacement in the Middle East since the Palestinian crisis, and provision of health services to the displaced population presents a critical challenge. The study aimed to provide information on chronic medical conditions and disability to inform humanitarian assistance planning. Nationally representative cross-sectional surveys of Iraqi populations displaced in Jordan and Syria were conducted in late 2008 and early 2009. Clusters of 10 household were randomly selected using probability-based sampling; a total of 1200 and 813 Iraqi households in Jordan and Syria, respectively, were interviewed. The majority of respondents in both countries perceived healthcare as unaffordable but accessible; cost was an important barrier to care. In Jordan, most routine health expenditures were for medications where in Syria, expenses were divided between medical consultations and medication. Chronic disease prevalence among adults was 51.5% (confidence interval (CI): 49.4-53.5) in Syria and 41.0% (CI: 39.4-42.7) in Jordan, most common were hypertension and musculoskeletal problems. Overall disability rates were 7.1% (CI: 6.3-8.0) in Syria and 3.4% (CI: 3.0-3.9) in Jordan. In both countries, the majority of disability was attributed to conflict, prevalence was higher in men than women, and depression was the leading cause of mental health disability. Chronic illnesses, disabilities and psychological health are key challenges for the Iraqi population and the health systems in Jordan and Syria. Continued attention to the development of systems to manage conditions that require secondary and tertiary care is essential, particularly given reported difficulties in accessing care and the anticipated prolonged displacement.

  5. From Weyl to Born-Jordan quantization: The Schrödinger representation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2016-03-01

    The ordering problem has been one of the long standing and much discussed questions in quantum mechanics from its very beginning. Nowadays, there is more or less a consensus among physicists that the right prescription is Weyl's rule, which is closely related to the Moyal-Wigner phase space formalism. We propose in this report an alternative approach by replacing Weyl quantization with the less well-known Born-Jordan quantization. This choice is actually natural if we want the Heisenberg and Schrödinger pictures of quantum mechanics to be mathematically equivalent. It turns out that, in addition, Born-Jordan quantization can be recovered from Feynman's path integral approach provided that one used short-time propagators arising from correct formulas for the short-time action, as observed by Makri and Miller. These observations lead to a slightly different quantum mechanics, exhibiting some unexpected features, and this without affecting the main existing theory; for instance quantizations of physical Hamiltonian functions are the same as in the Weyl correspondence. The differences are in fact of a more subtle nature; for instance, the quantum observables will not correspond in a one-to-one fashion to classical ones, and the dequantization of a Born-Jordan quantum operator is less straightforward than that of the corresponding Weyl operator. The use of Born-Jordan quantization moreover solves the "angular momentum dilemma", which already puzzled L. Pauling. Born-Jordan quantization has been known for some time (but not fully exploited) by mathematicians working in time-frequency analysis and signal analysis, but ignored by physicists. One of the aims of this report is to collect and synthesize these sporadic discussions, while analyzing the conceptual differences with Weyl quantization, which is also reviewed in detail. Another striking feature is that the Born-Jordan formalism leads to a redefinition of phase space quantum mechanics, where the usual Wigner

  6. Mapping Collected Memory: An Exploration of Memory-Based Navigation in Amman, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Mamou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to explore navigational and image-making methods in a context where maps and formal address systems have been minimally consulted in recent years. This investigation is approached by way of a research-based art project on subjective cartography, which was carried out from 2009 to 2010 during a Fulbright fellowship to Amman, Jordan. The project examines the mutability of a specific location as well as its relationship between obsolescence in cartographic resources and the photographic medium. By reaching out to Ammani residents for informal tours of the city, selected guides were asked to narrate their experiences of navigating the city by memory and then directed to point out key landmarks during this process. Later, these tours were re-memorized and landmarks were photographed as a representation of the afterimage to capture high-quality still images through the use of a large-format photographic device. These afterimages are not intended to serve as documents or memorials of Amman but rather as ruminations on the faculties of memory in an ever-changing environment. This subjective experience, or the observation of a city’s minutiae amid wayfinding, poses a series of inquiries, vis-à-vis memory-based navigation and the role of still images, as an alternative to the panoptic view of a map. The result is a meditative project considering the plasticity of an urban entity, presented as a composition of written material and large-scale photographs, fragments of the city that when viewed as a series come together as a constellation of a subjective whole. 

  7. High frequency of low serum levels of vitamin 12 among patients attending Jordan University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouti, F F; Younes, N A; Halaseh, L J; Said, T T; Ghraiz, S M

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the status of serum vitamin B12 level in patients attending Jordan University Hospital in Amman, and to examine the relationship with demographic data, chronic illness, dietary habits, haematological parameters and symptoms related to vitamin B12 levels. A total of 838 patients completed a questionnaire and gave blood samples; 44.6% were vitamin B12 deficient (vegan) diets. The high frequency of low vitamin B12 warrants the development of a strategy to correct this problem in Jordan.

  8. Maternal Health Care Utilization Among Syrian Refugees in Lebanon and Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappis, Hannah; Lyles, Emily; Burton, Ann; Doocy, Shannon

    2017-07-13

    Purpose The influx of Syrian refugees into Jordan and Lebanon over the last 5 years presents an immense burden to national health systems. This study was undertaken to assess utilization of maternal health services among Syrian refugees in both countries. Description A cross-sectional survey of Syrian refugees living in urban and rural (non-camp) settings was conducted using a two-stage cluster survey design with probability proportional to size sampling in 2014-2015. Eighty-six percent of surveyed households in Lebanon and 88% of surveyed households in Jordan included women with a live birth in the last year. Information from women in this sub-set of households was analyzed to understand antenatal and intrapartum health service utilization. Assessment A majority of respondents reported seeking antenatal care, 82% and 89% in Jordan and Lebanon, respectively. Women had an average of at least six antenatal care visits. Nearly all births (98% in Jordan and 94% in Lebanon) took place in a health facility. Cesarean rates were similar in both countries; approximately one-third of all births were cesarean deliveries. A substantial proportion of women incurred costs for intrapartum care; 33% of Syrian women in Jordan and 94% of Syrian women in Lebanon reported paying out of pocket for their deliveries. The proportion of women incurring costs for intrapartum care was higher in Jordan both countries for women with cesarean deliveries compared to those with vaginal deliveries; however, this difference was not statistically significant in either country (Jordan p-value = 0.203; Lebanon p-value = 0.099). Conclusion Syrian refugees living in Jordan and Lebanon had similar levels of utilization of maternal health services, despite different health systems and humanitarian assistance provisions. As expected, a substantial proportion of households incurred out-of-pocket costs for essential maternal and newborn health services, making cost a major factor in care

  9. An algorithm for calculation of the Jordan canonical form of a matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, B.; Jordan, D.

    1973-01-01

    Jordan canonical forms are used extensively in the literature on control systems. However, very few methods are available to compute them numerically. Most numerical methods compute a set of basis vectors in terms of which the given matrix is diagonalized when such a change of basis is possible. Here, a simple and efficient method is suggested for computing the Jordan canonical form and the corresponding transformation matrix. The method is based on the definition of a generalized eigenvector, and a natural extension of Gauss elimination techniques.

  10. Challenges of Utilizing E-Learning Systems in Public Universities in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhannad Anwar Al-Shboul

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper lists and discusses major challenges and barriers that may face faculty members at the public universities in Jordan in employing e-Learning systems authoring tools in their instructions. It also proposes several suggestions for the administrators in public universities in Jordan for what they could do to improve the utilization of e-Learning authoring tools at their campuses. E-Learning systems authoring tools allow instructors to easily create and deliver their e-contents and e-lectures. Furthermore, online course materials which uploaded by using such authoring tools could be viewed by any popular web browser system.

  11. Human resource management practices in ZAIN cellular communications company operating in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulieman Ibraheem Shelash Mohammad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the best human resource management (HRM practices at ZAIN; cellular communications company operating in Jordan. study consisted of employees in ZAIN Cellular Communications Company in Jordan. All participants of this study were employees working in the organization - staff, team leaders, supervisors, programmers, project leaders, business analysts, managers, assistant managers. The findings in the paper that there are relatively high levels of practice for the areas of Training and development, Performance Appraisal, along with Communication and information sharing. Recruitment and selection is the one area, on the other hand, where a considerably lower mean level of practice exists .

  12. Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qura'n, S

    2009-05-04

    Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use

  13. Young urban women and the nutrition transition in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanat, Hala N; Lindsay, Ryan; Campbell, Tiffany

    2011-04-01

    To determine the nutrition transition stage of female Jordanian college students. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess eating styles, disordered eating attitudes and behaviours, body esteem and dissatisfaction, and media influence. Public and private universities in Jordan. A total of 255 subjects were recruited through a government-initiated youth campaign. The majority of participants had a normal BMI (70.6%) with almost all (99.4%) reporting restrained eating behaviour. Scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) indicated that 45.2% of these female college students should be screening for eating disorders. Subscales of the Body Esteem Scale (BES) showed that these women did not have substantial body esteem issues and mean scores on the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ-3) indicated that overall these women did not feel the media was dictating the way their body should look. Where Jordanian women did feel pressure from Western media, there was a 6.7-fold increase in the likelihood that they wanted to lose weight. In addition, 48.2% of the female college students desired to lose weight and 14.4% desired weight gain, indicating a certain level of body dissatisfaction. With low levels of overweight and obesity and a propensity towards eating based on external hunger cues, college-aged Jordanian women may be less advanced in their development through the nutrition transition than the general population of women. However, high levels of restrained eating and disordered eating attitudes and behaviours indicate the need for an intervention to address healthy weight-loss strategies, assess eating disorders and help maintain healthy body esteem.

  14. Cochlear implants in children implanted in Jordan: A parental overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamra, Rana A

    2015-07-01

    Exploring the perspective of parents on the cochlear implant process in Jordan. Sixty parents of deaf children were surveyed on the information gathering process prior to cochlear implant surgery, and their implant outcome expectations post-surgery. Whether child or parent characteristics may impact parents' post-surgical expectations was explored. Although parents used a variety of information sources when considering a cochlear implant, the ear, nose and throat doctor comprised their major source of information (60%). Parents received a range of information prior to cochlear implant but agreed (93.3%) on the need for a multidisciplinary team approach. Post-surgically, parents' expected major developments in the areas of spoken language (97%), and auditory skills (100%). Receiving education in mainstream schools (92%) was expected too. Parents perceived the cochlear implant decision as the best decision they can make for their child (98.3%). A significant correlation was found between parents contentment with the cochlear implant decision and expecting developments in the area of reading and writing (r=0.7). Child's age at implantation and age at hearing loss diagnosis significantly affected parents' post-implant outcome expectations (pparents agree on the need for a comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Parents' education about cochlear implants prior to the surgery can affect their post-surgical outcome expectations. The parental perspective presented in this study can help professionals develop better understanding of parents' needs and expectations and henceforth improve their services and support during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Mapping of networks to detect priority zoonoses in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Sorrell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of emerging disease events is a priority focus area for cooperative bioengagement programs. Communication and coordination among national disease surveillance and response networks are essential for timely detection and control of a public health event. Although systematic information sharing between the human and animal health sectors can help stakeholders detect and respond to zoonotic diseases rapidly, resource constraints and other barriers often prevent efficient cross-sector reporting. The purpose of this research project was to map the laboratory and surveillance networks currently in place for detecting and reporting priority zoonotic diseases in Jordan in order to identify the nodes of communication, coordination, and decision-making where health and veterinary sectors intersect, and to identify priorities and gaps that limit information-sharing for action. We selected three zoonotic diseases as case studies: highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1, rabies, and brucellosis. Through meetings with government agencies and health officials, and desk research, we mapped each system from the index case through response – including both surveillance and laboratory networks, highlighting both areas of strength and those that would benefit from capacity-building resources. Our major findings indicate informal communication exists across sectors; in the event of emergence of one of the priority zoonoses studied there is effective coordination across the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Agriculture. However, routine formal coordination is lacking. Overall, there is a strong desire and commitment for multi-sectoral coordination in detection and response to zoonoses across public health and veterinary sectors. Our analysis indicates that the networks developed in response to HPAI can and should be leveraged to develop a comprehensive laboratory and surveillance One Health network.

  16. Chemical evolution of saline waters in the Jordan-Dead Sea transform and in adjoining areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Geyer, Stefan; Flexer, Akiva

    2007-06-01

    The Ca Mg relationship in groundwaters strongly points to the overall dolomitization and local albitization. The Mg/Ca ratios reveal two trends by which saline waters develop: increase of Mg/Ca ratio by evaporation and decreasing Mg/Ca ratios due to dolomitization and albitization. Br/Cl vs. Na/Cl ratios demonstrate that albitization does not play a major role which leaves dolomitization to be the main source for decreasing Mg/Ca ratios in saline waters. In the eastern and southern Region of Lake Kinneret, salinization occurs by mixing with a Ca/Mg molar ratio 1 dominates, which developed by the albitization of plagioclase in abundant mafic volcanics and the dolomitization of limestones. The most saline groundwater of the Tabgha-, Fuliya-, and Tiberias clusters could be regional derivatives of at least two mother brines: in diluted form one is represented by Ha’On water, the other is a Na-rich brine of the Zemah type. Additionally, a deep-seated Ca-dominant brine may ascend along the fractures on the western side of Lake Kinneret, which is absent on the eastern side. Groundwaters of the Lower Jordan Valley are chemically different on both sides of the Jordan River, indicating that the exchange of water is insignificant. All saline waters from the Dead Sea and its surroundings represent a complex mixture of brines, and precipitation and local dissolution of halite and gypsum. Many wells of the Arava/Araba Valley pump groundwater from the Upper Cretaceous limestone aquifer, the origin of the water is actually from the Lower Cretaceous Kurnub Group sandstones. Groundwater drawn from the Quaternary alluvial fill either originates from Kurnub Group sandstones (Eilat 108, Yaalon 117) or from altered limestones of the Judea Group. The origin of these waters is from floods flowing through wadis incised into calcareous formations of the Judea Group. On the other hand, as a result of step-faulting, hydraulic contact is locally established between the Kurnub- and the Judea

  17. Participatory groundwater management in Jordan: Development and analysis of options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebaane, Mohamed; El-Naser, Hazim; Fitch, Jim; Hijazi, Amal; Jabbarin, Amer

    Groundwater over-exploitation has been on the rise in Jordan. Competing demands have grown in the face of perennial water shortages, a situation which has been exacerbated by drought conditions in the past decade. This paper reports findings of a project in which management options to address over-exploitation were developed for one of Jordan's principal aquifer systems, the Amman-Zarqa Basin. Options for addressing the situation were developed through a participatory approach that involved government officials and various public and private sector interest groups. Particular efforts were made to involve well irrigators, who are likely to be heavily impacted by the changes required to reduce groundwater pumping to a sustainable level. With information obtained from a rapid appraisal survey as well as from interviews with farmers, community groups, government officials, and technical experts, an extensive set of options was identified for evaluation. Based on integrated hydrogeologic, social, and economic analysis, five complementary management options were recommended for implementation. These included the establishment of an Irrigation Advisory Service, buying out farm wells, placing firm limits on well ion and irrigated crop areas, exchanging treated wastewater for groundwater, and measures to increase the efficiency of municipal and industrial water use. Various combinations and levels of these options were grouped in scenarios, representing possible implementation strategies. The scenarios were designed to assist decision makers, well owners and other stakeholders in moving gradually towards a sustainable ion regime. Social and economic aspects of each option and scenario were analyzed and presented to stakeholders, together with a of legal, institutional and environmental ramifications. Combining scientific analysis with a participatory approach in the Amman Zarqa Basin groundwater management was devised as a prototype to be used in the management of other

  18. Late Cretaceous Volcaniclastics in NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katharina; Wolfgring, Erik; Omer Yilmaz, Ismail; Tüysüz, Okan; Wagreich, Michael

    2015-04-01

    On the southwestern coast of the Black Sea, in the western Pontides Upper Cretaceous tuff layers are present. The tuffs are intercalated with limestones, marls and turbidites and were investigated with focus on their geochemistry, to get new insights to the arrangement of terranes and ocean basins at this time. In the region two Upper Cretaceous volcanic units can be distinguished, separated by distinct red pelagic limestone successions, belonging to the Unaz Formation. The lower volcanic unit is named Dereköy Formation and is Turonian to Santonian in age. It is thought to be deposited within extension structures, contemporaneously with rifting in the western Black Sea basin. The upper volcanic unit is called Cambu Formation. According to biostratigraphic data it is deposited throughout Campanian, when spreading in the western Black Sea basin started. Interpreted as submarine deposits, element mobility has to be taken into account when interpreting geochemical ICP-MS data of the volcaniclastics. Multiple discrimination diagrams with suitable proxies elucidate the type of volcanism and contribute to reconstruction of the tectonic setting. The classified rock types range from basaltic to rhyodacitic in both volcanic formations. Basically degree of differentiation and alkalinity are the parameters looked at, when determining rock types of the volcanic eruption. Further volcanic series are specified as calc-alkaline to shoshonitic. Moreover, a volcanic arc setting seems to be the most likely case, following several discrimination diagrams, as well as normalized multi-element plots. This tectonic setting can be discussed in connection with paleo-tectonic reconstructions. Most cited in literature nowadays are models favoring a northward subduction of the northern branch of Neotethys, creating an extensional setting north of the Pontides. This kind of back arc extension is interpreted as the reason of a southward drift of the Istanbul continental fragment from Eurasia

  19. Paradaemonia thelia (Jordan e seus estágios imaturos (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae, Arsenurinae Paradaemonia thelia (Jordan and its immature stages (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae, Arsenurinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurides Furtado

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Dados sobre os estágios imaturos, o comportamento e a distribuição de Paradaemonia thelia (Jordan são apresentados. A larva solitária alimenta-se de Chrysophyllum marginatum (Hook. & Arn. Radlk. (Sapotaceae, sua planta hospedeira natural. Os ovos são postos isolados na face dorsal de folhas maduras. O desenvolvimento larval leva 18 dias e o estágio pupal 32-37 dias. Adultos, ovos, larvas e pupa são ilustrados a cores.Data on immature stages, the behavior and the range of Paradaemonia thelia (Jordan, 1922 are presented. The solitary larva feed on Chrysophyllum marginatum (Hook. & Arn. Radlk. (Sapotaceae, its natural hostplant. Isolated ovae are deposited on dorsal surface of mature leaves. Larval development required 18 days; the pupal stage lasted 32-37 days. Adults, ovae, larvae and pupa are illustrated in color.

  20. Evidence for volcanism in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, L.; Greeley, Ronald

    Venera 15/16 radar data for an area in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus, show an area with moderate radar return and a smooth textured surface which embays low lying areas of the surrounding mountainous terrain. Although this unit may be an extension of the lava plains of Lakshmi Planum to the southeast, detailed study suggests a separate volcanic center in NW Ishtar Terra. Lakshmi Planum, on the Ishtar Terra highland, exhibits major volcanic and tectonic features. On the Venera radar image radar brightness is influenced by slope and roughness; radar-facing slopes (east-facing) and rough surfaces (approx. 8 cm average relief) are bright, while west-facing slopes and smooth surfaces are dark. A series of semi-circular features, apparently topographic depressions, do not conform in orientation to major structural trends in this region of NW Ishtar Terra. The large depression in NW Ishtar Terra is similar to the calderas of Colette and Sacajawea Paterae, as all three structures are large irregular depressions. NW Ishtar Terra appears to be the site of a volcanic center with a complex caldera structure, possibly more than one eruptive vent, and associated lobed flows at lower elevations. The morphologic similarity between this volcanic center and those of Colette and Sacajawea suggests that centralized eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanism in Ishtar. The location of this volcanic center at the intersection of two major compressional mountain belts and the large size of the calders (with an inferred large/deep magma source) support a crustal thickening/melting rather than a hot-spot origin for these magmas.

  1. Interrelationships between Deformation and Metamorphic Events across the Western Hinterland Zone, NW Pakistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asghar Ali; Mustafa Yar; Muhammad Asif Khan; Shah Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic to mesoscopic structural investigations and foliation intersection axes (FIAs) preserved in porphyroblasts reveal a very complex history of deformation and tectonism within the southwestern part of the western hinterland zone along the northern margin of the Indian plate, NW Pakistan. D1, D2, and D3 related structures in the southwestern part resemble the F1/F2, F3, and F4 re-lated structures in the northeastern part of the western hinterland zone. These structures developed at the same time through the same changes in the direction of bulk shortening in southwestern and northeastern parts of the western hinterland zone. FIA set 1 indicates NW-SE shortening. The D2 fab-rics, mineral lineations and fold axes indicate E-W shortening. FIA set 2, D3 fold axesand mineral lineations indicate NNE-SSW shortening. D3 deformation event is equivalent to the F4 deformation event in the northeastern part of the western hinterland zone. D4 fold axes, mineral stretching linea-tions and axial plane foliation suggest ENE-WSW shortening. The D4 NNW-SSE fabrics, which formed in the region after the formation of the MMT (main mantle thrust), Khairabad-Panjal thrust fault, Hissartang thrust fault and MBT (main boundary thrust), likely resulted from ENE-WSW bulk shortening related to development of the Hazara-Kashmir syntaxis.

  2. 3D hydrogeological model of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge, Jordan Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Inbar, Nimrod; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rödiger, Tino; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Shentsis, Izabela; Tzoufka, Kalliopi; Siebert, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG) lies on the eastern margin of the lower Jordan Rift Valley (JRV), bounded to the south by the Ajlun and to the north by the Golan Heights. It allows the outflow of the Yarmouk drainage basin and flow into the Jordan River, a few kilometers south of Lake Tiberias. The main aquifer system of the LYG is built mostly of Cretaceous sandstones and carbonates confined by Maastrichtian aquiclude. Fissures allow hydraulic connections between the major water-bearing formations from Quaternary to Upper Cretaceous age. It is supposed that the gorge acts as the mixing zone of two crossing flow pathways: N-S from the Hermon Mountains and from the Ajlun Dome, and E-W from Jebel al Arab Mountain in Syria (also known as Huran Plateau or Yarmouk drainage basin). As a result, several springs can be found within the gorge. These are characterized by widespread temperatures (20 - 60 °C) which indicate that, beside the complex regional flow, also ascending thermal waters control the hydrologic behavior of the LYG. Previous simulations based on a conceptual simplified 3D model (Magri et al., 2016) showed that crossing flow paths result from the coexistence of convection, that can develop for example along NE-SW oriented faults within the gorge or in permeable aquifers below Maastrichtian aquiclude, and additional flow fields that are induced by the N-S topographic gradients. Here we present the first 3D hydrogeological model of the entire LYG that includes structural features based on actual logs and interpreted seismic lines from both Israeli and Jordanian territories. The model distinguishes seven units from upper Eocene to the Lower Triassic, accounting for major aquifers, aquicludes and deep-cutting faults. Recharges are implemented based on the numerical representation developed by Shentsis (1990) that considers relationships between mean annual rain and topographic elevation. The model reveals that topography-driven N-S and E-W flows strongly control

  3. Mobile Phone Applications in the University Classroom: Perceptions of Undergraduate Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Rateb; Alzghool, Haneen; Iyadat, Yousef; Abu-Alruz, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine the level of mobile phone applications in university classrooms in Jordan. A sample of 313 undergraduate students participated in the study by completing the researchers' designed questionnaire, which is composed of 13 items. The results of the study indicate that participants perceived a high…

  4. Human Capital Planning in Higher Education Institutions: A Strategic Human Resource Development Initiative in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to determine the status of human capital planning in higher education institutions in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: A random sample of 120 faculty members (in administrative positions) responded to a human capital planning (HCP) survey. The survey consisted of a pool of 38 items distributed over…

  5. Impact of Conflict in Syria on Syrian Children at the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Sinaria Abdel; Zaza, Haidar Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to investigate the impact of the conflict in Syria on Syrian refugee children. The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan was chosen for this task. Two control (comparison) groups of children were selected: one from the Jordanian Ramtha district, which is just across the border from Syria, and that indirectly feel…

  6. A Note on Jordan, Adamović-Mitrinović, and Cusa Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Hang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We improve the Jordan, Adamović-Mitrinović, and Cusa inequalities. As applications, several new Shafer-Fink type inequalities for inverse sine function and bivariate means inequalities are established, and a new estimate for sine integral is given.

  7. I Know There Is No Justice: Palestinian Perceptions of Higher Education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marar, Marianne Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes critical ethnography methods to illustrate Palestinian refugee perceptions of higher education in Jordan. Participants addressed their assimilation to the Jordanian national identity as a means of obtaining education. Content and access to education were more important than assimilation, maintenance of ethnic…

  8. An Alternative Method to Gauss-Jordan Elimination: Minimizing Fraction Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luke; Powell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    When solving systems of equations by using matrices, many teachers present a Gauss-Jordan elimination approach to row reducing matrices that can involve painfully tedious operations with fractions (which I will call the traditional method). In this essay, I present an alternative method to row reduce matrices that does not introduce additional…

  9. The Effect of the Time Management Art on Academic Achievement among High School Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, Maysoon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the effect of the Time Management Art on academic achievement among high school students in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The researcher employed the descriptive-analytic research to achieve the purpose of the study where he chose a sample of (2000) high school female and male students as respondents to the…

  10. Toward the full and proper implementation of Jordan's Principle: An elusive goal to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstock, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    First Nations children experience service delays, disruptions and denials due to jurisdictional payment disputes within and between federal and provincial/territorial governments. The House of Commons sought to ensure First Nations children could access government services on the same terms as other children when it unanimously passed a private members motion in support of Jordan's Principle in 2007. Jordan's Principle states that when a jurisdictional dispute arises regarding public services for a First Nations child that are otherwise available to other children, the government of first contact pays for the service and addresses payment disputes later. Unfortunately, the federal government adopted a definition of Jordan's Principle that was so narrow (complex medical needs with multiple service providers) that no child ever qualified. This narrow definition has been found to be unlawful by the Federal Court of Canada and the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. The present commentary describes Jordan's Principle, the legal cases that have considered it and the implications of those decisions for health care providers.

  11. Factors Influencing the Career Planning and Development of University Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate and validate an Arabic version of the career influence inventory for use in Jordan. The study also investigated perceptions of university students of the influential factors that have influenced their career planning and development. The validated career influence inventory was administered to 558…

  12. 75 FR 67122 - Notice of Entering Into a Compact With the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... reduce poverty and accelerate economic growth. The Compact is intended to support: (a) Rehabilitation of... Evaluation Plan Annex IV: Conditions to Disbursement of Compact Implementation Funding Annex V: Definitions... achieve lasting economic growth and poverty reduction; and Recognizing that MCC wishes to help Jordan...

  13. Political Economy of Cost-Sharing in Higher Education: The Case of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Taher H.; Al-Salamat, Mamdouh N.; Hanania, May D.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes patterns of expenditure on higher education in Jordan, explores the current system's adequacy, efficiency, and equity, and identifies its strengths and weaknesses in light of current constraints and future challenges. Among the constraints are the relatively low public expenditure on higher education, leaving households to…

  14. Political Economy of Cost-Sharing in Higher Education: The Case of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Taher H.; Al-Salamat, Mamdouh N.; Hanania, May D.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes patterns of expenditure on higher education in Jordan, explores the current system's adequacy, efficiency, and equity, and identifies its strengths and weaknesses in light of current constraints and future challenges. Among the constraints are the relatively low public expenditure on higher education, leaving households to…

  15. Determination of the Fate of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in the Three Wastewater Treatment Plants, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedyan, Mohammed; Al Harahsheh, Ahmed; Qnaisb, Esam

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the composition of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) species, particularly dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), over the traditional wastewater treatment operations in three biological nutrient removal (BNR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Jordan. It had been found that the DON percentage was up to 30% of TDN within…

  16. Mobile Phone Applications in the University Classroom: Perceptions of Undergraduate Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Rateb; Alzghool, Haneen; Iyadat, Yousef; Abu-Alruz, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine the level of mobile phone applications in university classrooms in Jordan. A sample of 313 undergraduate students participated in the study by completing the researchers' designed questionnaire, which is composed of 13 items. The results of the study indicate that participants perceived a high…

  17. Refugee warriors or war refugees? Iraqi refugees' predicament in Syria, Jordan and Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, R.

    2009-01-01

    This essay attempts to disentangle a debate within the study of refugee crises and their security implications involving 'refugee warriors'. It situates the debate in the context of the Iraqi refugee crisis and its purported and real manifestations in three main host countries: Syria, Jordan and

  18. Syrian Refugees: Are They a Non Traditional Threat to Water Supplies in Lebanon and Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Council for Europe UNHCR United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees WAJ Water Authority of Jordan WASH water, sanitation, and hygiene x...through political posturing ; however, states’ international water policies will actually support cooperation.19 The literature suggests domestic...water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).114 Despite the programs and projects established to help the refugees and Lebanese, there are many significant

  19. Learning Organization Disciplines in Higher Education Institutions: An Approach to Human Resource Development in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of higher education faculty members concerning the application of the learning organization disciplines, as proposed by Senge (1990), in the university environment. The study surveyed 202 faculty members at the Hashemite University, one of the leading state universities in Jordan. Results…

  20. Beliefs about Parental Authority Legitimacy among Refugee Youth in Jordan: Between- and Within-Person Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Ahmad, Ikhlas; Wray-Lake, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We examined within- and between-person variations in parental legitimacy beliefs in a sample of 883 Arab refugee youth (M[subscript age] = 15.01 years, SD = 1.60), 277 Iraqis, 275 Syrians, and 331 Palestinians, in Amman, Jordan. Latent profile analyses of 22 belief items yielded 4 profiles of youth. The "normative" profile (67% of the…

  1. Desert agricultural systems at EBA Jawa (Jordan): Integrating archaeological and paleoenvironmental records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meister, Julia; Krause, J.; Müller-Neuhofb, B.; Portillo, M.; Reimann, T.; Schütt, B.

    2017-01-01

    Located in the arid basalt desert of northeastern Jordan, the settlement of Jawa is by far the largest and best-preserved archaeological site in the region. The Early Bronze Age (EBA) settlement phase of Jawa (3500–3000 BCE) is characterized by a highly sophisticated water storage system made of a s

  2. Trends in the Incidence of Cervical Cancer in Jordan, 2000–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Sharkas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the incidence of cervical cancer in Jordan and assess its trend in over a 14-year period (2000–2013. Methods. This descriptive study was based on secondary analysis of cervical cancer data that are registered in the Jordan Cancer Registry (JCR. Results. A total of 591 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer in Jordan during the period 2000–2013. The age at diagnosis ranged between 15 and 97 years, with a median of 50 years. The average age standardized rate (ASR was 2.0/100,000 women. The incidence of cervical cancer started to decrease after 2006 but it remained relatively constant between 2008 and 2013. Over the 14-year period, ASR for cervical cancer decreased by 28.6% from 2.1 per 100,000 women in 2000 to 1.5 per 100,000 women in 2013. About 46.5% of the cases were of squamous cell carcinoma morphology. Early cancer constituted about 60% of the cases, regional cases constituted 9.6%, and distant metastatic cases constituted 10.7%. Conclusions. The incidence of cervical cancer in Jordan is low compared to regional estimates and remained relatively constant between 2008 and 2013. Implementation of screening measures could lead to better case finding, early diagnosis, and prevention of cervical cancer.

  3. Primary School Teachers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Views on Barriers to Inclusion in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Muna; Al-Natour, Mayada; Al-Abdallat, Bassam; Alkhamra, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    This study explores teachers' knowledge and attitudes toward the inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) in mainstream schools in Jordan. It also examines the barriers the teachers perceived to hinder successful inclusions. The study sample consisted of 87 primary school teachers who responded to an open-ended questionnaire asking…

  4. Epidemiological pattern of imported malaria in Jordan from 2007 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamain, H M; Abu Shaqra, Q A; Kanani, K A

    2013-12-01

    Imported malaria is of major health concern to countries considered as free from this infection and Jordan is no exception. The aim of this study was to highlight various epidemiological aspects of imported malaria into Jordan over a period of five years. Information pertinent to all malaria cases registered in the Ministry of Health (Jordan) from January 2007 to November 2011 was retrieved from the database of the Department of Parasitic and Zoonotic Diseases. Data was grouped according to age, gender, country of acquisition and etiologic agents. During the study period, a total of 304 malaria cases were registered, 192 cases among Jordanians returning home and the remaining were detected among foreign nationals who arrived in the country for work or tourism. The majority of infections were due to Plasmodium falciparum (199 cases) followed by Plasmodium vivax (93) and then Plasmodium malariae (8). Mixed infection was detected in just 4 cases. The origin of these imported cases was in a descending order; Eritrea, Côte d'Ivoire, India, Sudan, Liberia and Pakistan. These countries contributed to 86.5% of cases while the remaining were acquired from other areas. It is believed that most Jordanians with imported malaria were military personnel who participated in Peace Keeping Forces with the United Nations. It is concluded that with the exception of imported cases reported herein, Jordan remains a malaria free country. Continuous vigilance by health authorities is needed to avoid reintroduction of the disease into the kingdom.

  5. Country Partnership Framework for Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan for the Period FY17-FY22

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation; Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency

    2016-01-01

    The Government of Jordan, the World Bank Group (WBG), and the international community are working towards a paradigm shift in their collective response to the refugee crisis - a holistic approach which stresses the continuum between the humanitarian response and the country’s development agenda. In parallel, Jordan’s implicit social contract by which the state provided citizens with jobs a...

  6. The Influence of Demographic Variables on University Students' Adjustment in North Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderi, Mohd; Jdaitawi, Malek; Ishak, Noor Azniza; Jdaitawi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study is to investigate the student university adjustment particularly the determination of the adjustment level of first year university students in Jordan. The three domains are namely overall college adjustment, domain of social adjustment, and academic adjustment. In addition, in this analysis, gender, age, types of…

  7. J.R.R. TOLKIEN AND JORDANES. SOME RESEMBLANCES IN SPIRITUAL OUTLOOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryan Librán Moreno

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of three instances of the influence exerted by Jordanes on J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium: (a the notion that cultural and political decay may be caused by being exiled from a formerly paradisiacal situation; (b the notion that winning a war against Evil may become an unwanted cause of cultural devolution; (c the construction of a pseudo-history by establishing genetic and cultural links with a mythical, highly evolved people from the legendary past. Keywords: Tolkien, Jordanes, The Lord of the Rings, sources. // Resumen: Estudio de tres casos concretos del influjo de Jordanes sobre el legendarium de J.R.R. Tolkien: (a la idea de que la decadencia cultural y política puede deberse al exilio de una antigua situación paradisíaca; (b el concepto de que ganar una guerra contra el mal puede traer aparejada una involución cultural; (c la creación de una pseudo-historia mediante la asociación con un pueblo mítico y muy adelantado del pasado legendario. Palabras clave: Tolkien, Jordanes, El Señor de los anillos, fuentes.

  8. Application of Water Quality Model of Jordan River to Evaluate Climate Change Effects on Eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grouw, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Jordan River is a 51 mile long freshwater stream in Utah that provides drinking water to more than 50% of Utah's population. The various point and nonpoint sources introduce an excess of nutrients into the river. This excess induces eutrophication that results in an inhabitable environment for aquatic life is expected to be exacerbated due to climate change. Adaptive measures must be evaluated based on predictions of climate variation impacts on eutrophication and ecosystem processes in the Jordan River. A Water Quality Assessment Simulation Program (WASP) model was created to analyze the data results acquired from a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study conducted on the Jordan River. Eutrophication is modeled based on levels of phosphates and nitrates from point and nonpoint sources, temperature, and solar radiation. It will simulate the growth of phytoplankton and periphyton in the river. This model will be applied to assess how water quality in the Jordan River is affected by variations in timing and intensity of spring snowmelt and runoff during drought in the valley and the resulting effects on eutrophication in the river.

  9. The Impact of Foreign Housemaids on the Children of Working Mothers: A Case Study from Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Sinaria Kamil Abdel

    2014-01-01

    The role of grandparents and other close relatives in caring for the children of working mothers has been diminishing in modern societies everywhere including Jordan. Concurrently, the dependence on housemaids to care for the children of working mothers has been on the rise. The impact of housemaids on young Jordanian children (4-5 years old) was…

  10. A question mark on the equivalence of Einstein and Jordan frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Banerjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With an explicit example, we show that Jordan frame and the conformally transformed Einstein frames clearly lead to different physics for a non-minimally coupled theory of gravity, namely Brans–Dicke theory, at least at the quantum level. The example taken up is the spatially flat Friedmann cosmology in Brans–Dicke theory.

  11. Molecular Diagnosis and Identification of Leishmania Species in Jordan from Saved Dry Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Hijjawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of the endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in Jordan relies on patient clinical presentation and microscopic identification. Studies toward improved identification of the causative Leishmania species, especially in regions where multiple species exist, and the introduction of these techniques into medical diagnosis is paramount. This study looked at the current epidemiology of CL in Jordan. Clinically diagnosed 41 patients with CL were tested for the presence of Leishmania parasite using both Giemsa staining from skin scraps on glass slides and ITS1-PCR from samples blotted onto storage cards (NucleoCards®. Microscopically, 28 out of the 41 (68.3% collected samples were positive for amastigotes, whereas the molecular ITS1-PCR amplification successfully identified 30 of the 41 samples (73.2%. Furthermore, PCR-RFLP analysis allowed species identification which is impossible microscopically. Of the 30 PCR positive samples, 28 were Leishmania major positive and the other two samples were Leishmania tropica. This indicates that L. major is the most prevalent species in Jordan and the two L. tropica cases originated from Syria indicating possible future L. tropica outbreaks. Diagnosis of CL based on clinical presentation only may falsely increase its prevalence. Although PCR is more sensitive, it is still not available in our medical laboratories in Jordan.

  12. The EFQM Self-Assessment Processes in HEIs in Spain and in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Juan Jose; Madeleine, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) self-assessment model in higher education institutions (HEIs) in Spain and in Jordan. Case study methodology on eight services provided by a public university in Spain and seven services provided by one public university and one private university in…

  13. Methane Emissions from Domestic Waste Management Facilities in Jordan-Applicability of IPCC Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Fayez A; Al-Ghazzawi, Ziad D

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, methane emissions from municipal wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Jordan for 1994 have been estimated using the methodology developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). For this purpose, the 14 domestic wastewater treatment plants in the country were surveyed. Generation rates and characterization of MSW components as well as dumping and landfilling practices were surveyed in order to estimate 1994 CH4 emissions from these sites. Locally available waste statistics were used in cases where those of the IPCC guidelines were not representative of Jordan's statistics. Methane emissions from domestic wastewater in Jordan were estimated at 4.66 gigagrams (Gg). Total 1994 CH4 emissions from MSW management facilities in Jordan are estimated at 371.76 Gg-351.12 Gg (94.45%) from sanitary landfills, 19.83 Gg (5.33%) from MSW open dumps, and 0.81 Gg (0.22%) from raw sewage-water dumping ponds. Uncertainties associated with these estimations are presented.

  14. Methane emissions from domestic waste management facilities in Jordan--applicability of IPCC methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, F A; al-Ghazzawi, Z D

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, methane emissions from municipal wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Jordan for 1994 have been estimated using the methodology developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). For this purpose, the 14 domestic wastewater treatment plants in the country were surveyed. Generation rates and characterization of MSW components as well as dumping and landfilling practices were surveyed in order to estimate 1994 CH4 emissions from these sites. Locally available waste statistics were used in cases where those of the IPCC guidelines were not representative of Jordan's statistics. Methane emissions from domestic wastewater in Jordan were estimated at 4.66 gigagrams (Gg). Total 1994 CH4 emissions from MSW management facilities in Jordan are estimated at 371.76 Gg--351.12 Gg (94.45%) from sanitary landfills, 19.83 Gg (5.33%) from MSW open dumps, and 0.81 Gg (0.22%) from raw sewage-water dumping ponds. Uncertainties associated with these estimations are presented.

  15. Assessing Special Needs of Students with Hearing Impairment in Jordan and Its Relation to Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zraigat, Ibrahim A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to assess special needs for students with hearing impairment. The sample of the study consisted of 231 students enrolled at schools for deaf children in Jordan, 113 males and 118 females. A special needs scale was developed and used in assessing special needs for students. The reliability and validity of…

  16. Loneliness among Students with Blindness and Sighted Students in Jordan: A Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Muna S.; Al Khateeb, Jamal M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated loneliness among students with blindness and those who are sighted in Jordan, and examined whether loneliness levels vary according to gender. Students included 90 students with blindness and 79 sighted students selected from high schools and universities in the capital city of Amman. The instrument used to collect…

  17. Jordan frame no-hair for spherical scalar-tensor black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2017-06-01

    A no-hair theorem for spherical black holes in scalar-tensor gravity is presented. Contrary to the existing theorems, which are proved in the Einstein conformal frame, this proof is performed entirely in the Jordan frame. The theorem is limited to spherical symmetry (instead of axisymmetry) but holds for nonconstant Brans-Dicke couplings.

  18. Mitigating the risk of extreme water scarcity and dependency: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schyns, J.F.; Hamaideh, A.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Mekonnen, M.M.; Schyns, M.

    2015-01-01

    Jordan faces great internal water scarcity and pollution, conflict over trans-boundary waters, and strong dependency on external water resources through trade. This paper analyzes these issues and subsequently reviews options to reduce the risk of extreme water scarcity and dependency. Based on esti

  19. Developmental characters of Pseitina iijimae (Jordan and Starks), bothid flat fishes- pisces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    Post larval stages of Psettina iQimae (Jordan and Starks) ranging from 1.8 mm NL to 44.6 mm SL collected during Naga Expedition and International Indian Ocean Expedition (JIOE) are described The characteristics which help to identify larval stages...

  20. Beliefs about Parental Authority Legitimacy among Refugee Youth in Jordan: Between- and Within-Person Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; Ahmad, Ikhlas; Wray-Lake, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We examined within- and between-person variations in parental legitimacy beliefs in a sample of 883 Arab refugee youth (M[subscript age] = 15.01 years, SD = 1.60), 277 Iraqis, 275 Syrians, and 331 Palestinians, in Amman, Jordan. Latent profile analyses of 22 belief items yielded 4 profiles of youth. The "normative" profile (67% of the…

  1. Social Adaptation and Its Relationship to Achievement Motivation among High School Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZboon, Saleem Odeh

    2013-01-01

    The study amid at exploring and detecting the level of social adaptation and its relationship with the achievement motivation of the secondary school students in Jordan, the study sample consisted of 495 secondary school students in the province of Jerash, and to achieve the objective of this study comes the development of two tools: the first one…

  2. Alg\\`ebres de Jordan et th\\'eorie des invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Blind, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    If V is a simple complex euclidean Jordan algebra and G the subgroup of GL(V) fixing the determinant of V, we give a unified description of the invariant algebras C[pV]^G, for p not greater than three.

  3. Photovoltaic system as an alternative source of electricity generation : a case study in Hashemite University, Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etier, I. [Hashemite Univ., Zarqa (Jordan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Ababneh, M. [Hashemite Univ., Zarqa (Jordan). Dept. of Mechatronics Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Approximately 97 per cent of the primary energy is imported in Jordan, of which 30 per cent is used to generate electrical energy. In response to increasing oil prices, renewable-energy sources are becoming increasingly viable in Jordan. As such, photovoltaic (PV) systems are gaining attention as an alternative source of energy. This paper presented a case study involving the design and simulation of a 10-kW photovoltaic system in Hashemite University, Jordan. The purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using solar energy in Jordan using a grid-connected photovoltaic-system in an effort to encourage investment in this field. In addition, the site was selected because the campus is located in a desert area where the global radiation numbers are among the highest in the world; the campus has a great deal of safe building flat-roof areas to install solar panels; and most of the power demand occurs during the daytime so that implementing grid-connected PV system would contribute to a considerable savings in electricity. The paper discussed the PV system and described the system components. Actual and simulated meteorological data was used to define and optimize different parts of the system. It was concluded that future work might include improving system-efficiency and optimizing system components by investigating a new mechanism to keep the sun radiation vertical to solar-panels, or using newer technologies for solar cells and inverters. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  4. A question mark on the equivalence of Einstein and Jordan frames

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    With an explicit example, we show that Jordan frame and the conformally transformed Einstein frames clearly lead to different physics for a non-minimally coupled theory of gravity, namely Brans-Dicke theory, at least at the quantum level. The example taken up is the spatially flat Friedmann cosmology in Brans-Dicke theory.

  5. The Impact of Marketing Actions on Relationship Quality in the Higher Education Sector in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alak, Basheer A. M.

    2006-01-01

    This field/analytical study examined the marketing actions (antecedents) and performance (consequences) of relationship quality in a higher education setting. To analyze data collected from a random sample of 271 undergraduate students at AL-Zaytoonah Private University of Jordan, the linear structural relationship (LISREL) model was used to…

  6. Aqaba Core 18, Jordan Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1788 to 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Aqaba, Jordan, Marine Science Station Reef, cores C18 and C19 (29ó 26' N, 34ó 58' E) Water Depth 1m. collected 11/01/92 (upper 0-120cm), 11/01/93 (120-320cm)...

  7. Aqaba Core 19, Jordan Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1788 to 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Aqaba, Jordan, Marine Science Station Reef, cores C18 and C19 (29ó 26' N, 34ó 58' E) Water Depth 1m. collected 11/01/92 (upper 0-120cm), 11/01/93 (120-320cm)...

  8. An economic inquisition of water quality trading programs, with a case study of Jordan Lake, NC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Marzieh; Hoag, Dana L; Tasdighi, Ali; Arabi, Mazdak; Osmond, Deanna L

    2017-05-15

    A water quality trading (WQT) program was promulgated in North Carolina to address water quality issues related to nutrients in the highly urbanizing Jordan Lake Watershed. Although WQT programs are appealing in theory, the concept has not proved feasible in several attempts between point and nonpoint polluters in the United States. Many application hurdles that create wedges between success and failure have been evaluated in the literature. Most programs, however, face multiple hurdles; eliminating one may not clear a pathway to success. Therefore, we identify and evaluate the combined impact of four different wedges including baseline, transaction cost, trading ratio, and trading cost in the Jordan Lake Watershed program. Unfortunately, when applied to the Jordan Lake program, the analysis clearly shows that a traditional WQT program will not be feasible or address nutrient management needs in a meaningful way. The hurdles individually would be difficult to overcome, but together they appear to be unsurmountable. This analysis shows that there is enough information to pre-identify potential hurdles that could inform policy makers where, and how, the concept might work. It would have saved time, energy, and financial resources if North Carolina had done so before embarking to implement their program in the Jordan Lake Watershed.

  9. An assessment of using oil shale for power production in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, L.J.; Holcomb, R.S.; Petrich, C.H.; Roop, R.D.

    1990-11-01

    This report addresses the oil shale-for-power-production option in Jordan. Under consideration are 20- and 50-MW demonstration units and a 400-MW, commercial-scale plant with, at the 400-MW scale, a mining operation capable of supplying 7.8 million tonnes per year of shale fuel and also capable of disposal of up to 6.1 million tonnes per year of wetted ash. The plant would be a direct combustion facility, burning crushed oil shale through use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. The report emphasizes four areas: (1) the need for power in Jordan, (2) environmental aspects of the proposed oil shale-for-power plant(s), (3) the engineering feasibility of using Jordan's oil shale in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boiler, and (4) the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s). A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the economic feasibility of the proposed plant(s) under different cost assumptions and revenue flows over the plant's lifetime. The sensitivity results are extended to include the major extra-firm benefits of the shale-for-power option: (1) foreign exchange savings from using domestic energy resources, (2) aggregate income effects of using Jordan's indigenous labor force, and (3) a higher level of energy security. 14 figs., 47 tabs.

  10. Graduates in the kitchen. Educating girls: Jordan, Morocco and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D

    1993-01-01

    Muslim girls in Jordan have become better educated due to 3 decades of free and compulsory (10 years) schooling policy. Fertility has declined from 7.7 during 1971-75 to 5.6 during 1987-90. 58% of Jordanian women use some form of family planning (FP). Over 90% of eligible children are enrolled in school and 60% go on for advanced 2-year vocational or specialized training. There are actually more girls than boys in school. Although female literacy is high, only 14% are engaged in the labor force. A leader from the Business and Professional Women's Club related that man is considered the breadwinner. Some professions are considered unsuitable for women's employment. Traveling after dark alone is considered problematic for a decent woman. A visit to a school revealed that girls envisioned receiving training and working until marriage, having children, and looking after grandchildren. Many thought 3-4 children was an appropriate family size. Government statistics show that men enroll primarily in the industrial training courses and agriculture, while women tended toward more manual vocations such as sewing, knitting, cooking, hair styling, and secretarial skills. Out of the entire class there were only 2 or 3 girls who envisioned working after having children. Husbands were assumed to always work; if unemployment occurred, the girls thought that a factory job might be a possibility. Conversations with several women in the engineering school were conducted in a lecture hall rather than the cafeteria so the boys would not think they were making themselves available to them. Concern was also expressed about working with men, but the issue of unwanted approaches was dismissed during work hours because of their academic qualifications. Only if one worked lake in the day would there be anticipation of problems. There were many styles of dress for women ranging from modern Western garb to traditional attire in grey and black with a slit for the eyes. The most traditional

  11. Lateral structural variation along the Kalabagh Fault Zone, NW Himalayan foreland fold-and-thrust belt, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Chen, Lize; Ahmad, Sajjad; Ahmad, Irshad; Ali, Fayaz

    2012-05-01

    The NW Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt in Pakistan is of gentler regional slope and wider extent than the other parts of the convergent plate boundary between India and the rest of Asia. Large scale structural re-entrants typify the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) of the NW Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt in Pakistan. Understanding dynamics of the formation of these structural variations has been hampered by the lack of information about the lateral structures bounding the re-entrants. Our mapping of the Kalabagh Fault Zone, a lateral ramp linking the Salt and the Surghar Ranges, advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) data, field investigations and the interpreted reprocessed 2D seismic data. This integration of surface and subsurface geology provides new insights on the geometry and evolution of the Kalabagh Fault Zone, by showing that it forms an oblique ramp to the Main Frontal Thrust, and at north a lateral ramp with right-lateral strike slip movement. Our results indicate that the presence and areal extent of the evaporates is the dominant factor controlling lateral structural variation in the NW Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt of Pakistan. The Kalabagh Fault Zone acts as a zone that accommodates differential shortening and structural variation along the orogenic trend.

  12. Jordan Water Project: an interdisciplinary evaluation of freshwater vulnerability and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, S.; Yoon, J.; Rajsekhar, D.; Muller, M. F.; Zhang, H.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B.; Klassert, C. J. A.; Sigel, K.; Thilmant, A.; Avisse, N.; Lachaut, T.; Harou, J. J.; Knox, S.; Selby, P. D.; Mustafa, D.; Talozi, S.; Haddad, Y.; Shamekh, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Jordan Water Project, part of the Belmont Forum projects, is an interdisciplinary, international research effort focused on evaluation of freshwater security in Jordan, one of the most water-vulnerable countries in the world. The team covers hydrology, water resources systems analysis, economics, policy evaluation, geography, risk and remote sensing analyses, and model platform development. The entire project team communally engaged in construction of an integrated hydroeconomic model for water supply policy evaluation. To represent water demand and allocation behavior at multiple levels of decision making,the model integrates biophysical modules that simulate natural and engineered hydrologic phenomena with human behavioral modules. Hydrologic modules include spatially-distributed groundwater and surface-water models for the major aquifers and watersheds throughout Jordan. For the human modules, we adopt a multi-agent modeling approach to represent decision-making processes. The integrated model was developed in Pynsim, a new open-source, object-oriented platform in Python for network-based water resource systems. We continue to explore the impacts of future scenarios and interventions.This project had tremendous encouragement and data support from Jordan's Ministry of Water and Irrigation. Modeling technology is being transferred through a companion NSF/USAID PEER project awarded toJordan University of Science and Technology. Individual teams have also conducted a range of studies aimed at evaluating Jordanian and transboundary surface water and groundwater systems. Surveys, interviews, and econometric analyses enabled us to better understandthe behavior of urban households, farmers, private water resellers, water use pattern of the commercial sector and irrigation water user associations. We analyzed nationwide spatial and temporal statistical trends in rainfall, developed urban and national comparative metrics to quantify water supply vulnerability

  13. Quality of Health Services Provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghrid S. Suifan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quality of services measurement has been the concern of many scholars who have tried to develop scales for it. The most popular scale used was SERVQUAL. Hence the aim of this study is to discover the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers in Amman. Approach: A sample study was derived from (1652 male and female patients from five health centers: Ashrafieh Health Center; Al-Hashemi Health Center; Marka Health Center; Al-Taj Health Center and AL-Hussein Health Center. Means, Standard Deviation, Independent Sample T-Test, simple regression and the Scheffe Test were used to answer the study's main questions. Results: It was found that the quality of health services provided to the Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent health centers was high in all dimensions, the highest quality dimensions displayed among the health service available at Jordan Red Crescent health centers were tangibles and assurance, whereas the lowest quality dimensions were empathy and responsiveness, there was a significant difference in the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers (Ashrafieh Health Center, Al-Hashemi Health Center, Marka Health Center, Al-Taj Health Center and AL-Hussein Health Center from one center to another and there was a significant difference in the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent health centers based on the number of visits the Iraqis made to the center. Conclusion: The main recommendation presented in this study is that there is a need to expand the health services in cooperation with international humanitarian organizations in order to accommodate the rising number of Iraqis frequenting the centers.

  14. Antone Tarazi: the first Palestinian neurosurgeon and the first neurosurgeon in Jordan: a neurosurgeon of two countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Ahmed J; Jane, John A

    2014-12-01

    Antone (Tony) Tarazi (1927-1999) was the first Palestinian neurosurgeon and the first neurosurgeon in Jordan. In 1952, Tarazi received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. After completing neurosurgery training at the Montreal Neurological Institute in 1960, he returned to Palestine to practice neurosurgery in both Palestine and Jordan. For almost 10 years, he alone carried the load of neurosurgery for a population of >3 million people. His skills and knowledge enabled him to achieve admirable results with limited available resources. Tarazi was the president of the Palestinian Neurosurgical Society, a member of Jordan medical societies, and a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. His continuous efforts to improve medical services extended beyond neurosurgery to many other fields. This article recounts Antone Tarazi's achievements and contributions to neurosurgery in Palestine and Jordan.

  15. Prevalence and care-seeking for chronic diseases among Syrian refugees in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Lyles, Emily; Roberton, Timothy; Akhu-Zaheya, Laila; Oweis, Arwa; Burnham, Gilbert

    2015-10-31

    There are currently more people displaced by conflict than at any time since World War II. The profile of displaced populations has evolved with displacement increasingly occurring in urban and middle-income settings. Consequently, an epidemiological shift away from communicable diseases that have historically characterized refugee populations has occurred. The high prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) poses a challenge to in terms of provision of appropriate secondary and tertiary services, continuity of care, access to medications, and costs. In light of the increasing burden of NCDs faced by refugees, we undertook this study to characterize the prevalence of NCDs and better understand issues related to care-seeking for NCDs among Syrian refugees in non-camp settings in Jordan. A cross-sectional survey of 1550 refugees was conducted using a multi-stage cluster design with probability proportional to size sampling to obtain a nationally representative sample of Syrian refugees outside of camps. To obtain information on chronic conditions, respondents were asked a series of questions about hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and arthritis. Differences by care-seeking for these conditions were examined using chi-square and t-test methods and characteristics of interest were included in the adjusted logistic regression model. Among adults, hypertension prevalence was the highest (9.7%, CI: 8.8-10.6), followed by arthritis (6.8%, CI: 5.9-7.6), diabetes (5.3%, CI: 4.6-6.0), chronic respiratory diseases (3.1%, CI: 2.4-3.8), and cardiovascular disease (3.7%, CI: 3.2, 4.3). Of the 1363 NCD cases, 84.7% (CI: 81.6-87.3) received care in Jordan; of the five NCDs assessed, arthritis cases had the lowest rates of care seeking at 65%, (CI:0-88, p = 0.005). Individuals from households in which the head completed post-secondary and primary education, respectively, had 89% (CI: 22-98) and 88% (CI: 13-98) lower odds of seeking care

  16. NW Iberia Shelf Dynamics. Study of the Douro River Plume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Iglesias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available River plumes are one of the most important mechanisms that transport the terrestrial materials to the coast and the ocean. Some examples of those materials are pollutants, essential nutrients, which enhance the phytoplankton productivity or sediments, which settle on the seabed producing modifications on the bathymetry affecting the navigation channels. The mixing between the riverine and the oceanic waters can induce instabilities, which might generate bulges, filaments, and buoyant currents over the continental shelf. Offshore, the buoyant riverine water could form a front with the oceanic waters often related with the occurrence of current-jets, eddies and strong mixing. The study and modelling of the river plumes is a key factor for the complete understanding of sediment transport mechanisms and patterns, and of coastal physics and dynamic processes. On this study the Douro River plume will be simulated. The Douro River is located on the north-west Iberian coast and its daily averaged freshwater discharge can range values from 0 to 13000 m3/s. This variability impacts the formation of the river plumes and its dispersion along the continental shelf. This study builds on the long-term objective of generate a Douro River plume forecasting system as part of the RAIA and RAIA.co projects. Satellite imagery was analyzed showing that the river Douro is one of the main sources of suspended particles, dissolved material and chlorophyll in the NW Iberian Shelf. The Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS model was selected to reproduce scenarios of plume generation, retention and dispersion. Whit this model, three types of simulations were performed: (i schematic winds simulations with prescribed river flow, wind speed and direction; (ii multi-year climatological simulation, with river flow and temperature change for each month; (iii extreme case simulation, based on the Entre-os-Rios accident situation. The schematic wind case-studies suggest that the

  17. E-Commerce Adoption at Customer Level in Jordan: an Empirical Study of Philadelphia General Supplies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Masarweh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available E-commerce in developing countries has been studied by numerous researchers during the last decade and a number of common and culturally specific challenges have been identified.. This study considers Jordan as a case study of a developing country where E-commerce is still in its infancy. Therefore, this research work comes as a complement to previous research and an opportunity to refine E-commerce adaptation research. This research was conducted by survey distributed randomly across branches of Philadelphia General Supplies (PGS, a small and medium enterprise (SME. The key findings in this research indicated that Jordanian society is moving towards online shopping at very low rates of adoption, due to barriers including weak infrastructure throughout the country except in the capital, societal trends and culture and educational and computer literacy. This means that E-commerce in Jordan still remains an under-developed industry.

  18. Health-related quality of life of Palestinian refugees inside and outside camps in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduraidi, Hamza; Waters, Catherine M

    Jordan hosts more Palestinian refugees than any country in the world. Conditions under which people in a community live influence their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The purpose of this descriptive comparative cross-sectional study was to compare HRQOL of Palestinian refugees in Jordan who live inside camps with those who live outside camps. Participants, recruited from inside the Baqa'a camp (n = 86) and the surrounding Abu Nsair community (n = 91), completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief questionnaire. There were disparities in education and social relations and environment HRQOL related to income and residency, but not gender, among refugees. Refugees living inside camps, particularly if poorer, fared worse than refugees living outside camps. Enhanced programs and policies may be needed to improve HRQOL, education, and socioeconomics for camp refugees. Nursing's perspective on refugee health could make an important contribution to humanitarian efforts and health diplomacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diversity of bees (Hymenoptera, Apiformes in extensive orchards in the highlands of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ghzawi, A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees visiting the blossoms of fruit trees were surveyed for the first time in Jordan. A transect was determined in Ebbin village in Ajlun (32° 22″ N, 35° 49″ E where the bees were collected from blossoms of stone fruit trees. Most of the specimens were identified up to the species level and few specimens were identified up to the genus level only. A total of 1,461 specimens were collected during the study period and 53 bee species were identified and recorded for the first time in Jordan. The collected species represented five families: Apidae, Megachilidae, Halictidae, Andrenidae and Colletidae. The results showed that Apidae and Megachilidae were the largest in terms of diversity, while Halictidae showed the highest abundance.

  20. Psychosocial concerns reported by Syrian refugees living in Jordan: systematic review of unpublished needs assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ruth; Steel, Zachary; Abo-Hilal, Mohammad; Hassan, Abdul Halim; Lawsin, Catalina

    2016-08-01

    Humanitarian organisations supporting Syrian refugees in Jordan have conducted needs assessments to direct resources appropriately. To present a model of psychosocial concerns reported by Syrian refugees and a peer review of research practices. Academic and grey literature databases, the United Nations Syria Regional Response website, key humanitarian organisation websites and Google were searched for needs assessments with Syrian refugees in Jordan between February 2011 and June 2015. Information directly reporting the views of Syrian refugees regarding psychosocial needs was extracted and a qualitative synthesis was conducted. Respondents reported that psychological distress was exacerbated by both environmental (financial, housing, employment) and psychosocial outcomes (loss of role and social support, inactivity), which are themselves stressors. Need for improvement in research methodology, participatory engagement and ethical reporting was evident. Participatory engagement strategies might help to address identified psychosocial outcomes. More rigorous qualitative methods are required to ensure accuracy of findings. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  1. (Non?)-Equivalence of Einstein and Jordan frames in quantized cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Sachin; Banerjee, Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The present work sheds light on the nature of mathematical equivalence of Jordan frame and its conformally transformed version, the Einstein frame, as far as Brans-Dicke theory is concerned. It is shown that question of equivalence surviving a quantization of cosmological models in the theory is intricately related to whether the canonical structure breaks down while going from one frame to the other. It is found that that the consistent operator ordering to make two frames equivalent requires a non-canonical transformation that mixes gravity sector with scalar sector to undo the non minimal coupling, present in Jordan frame. The question of equivalence thus depends on the details of quantization prescriptions, i.e. whether we are allowed to make any such non-canonical transformation at classical level before quantizing the theory. We work with the Wheeler-deWitt quantization scheme and take up quite a few anisotropic cosmological models as examples.

  2. Small-Scale Industries in Jordan in the Globalization Era Performance and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basem M. Lozi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The research probes the implications of globalization and domestic economic liberalization for small-scale industries and analysis its growth performance. The research concludes with policy recommendations to ensure the sustenance and competitive growth of small-scale industries in Jordan. Results of the study show that the growth of small scale industries in Jordan in terms of units, employment, output and exports has come up due to globalization, domestic liberalization and dilution of sector specific measures. The government should involve the private sector in the development of infrastructure, to enable efficient monitoring and good facilities to the small scale industries. There is a need to create fund at the government level for disbursement as margin money through district industries centers to small scale industries units to encourage them to undertake technological innovations. A technological vibrant, internationally competitive small scale industries sector should be encouraged to emerge, to make a sustainable contribution to national income, employment and exports.

  3. Jordan M. Braciszewski: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Jordan M. Braciszewski as the 2011 winner of the American psychological Association APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. "For his concerted efforts to identify the needs of homeless and other at-risk populations and to design and provide necessary services for them. Jordan M. Braciszewski is committed to using applied psychological science and evidence-based intervention methods to assist the most disadvantaged in our society. He has already provided additions to the relevant research literature and has volunteered countless hours of his time to implement community-based interventions and provide direct services himself. He has sought out the training experiences necessary to assist him in doing an even better job in the future in these public service activities." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  4. Deformation and fluid flow in the Huab Basin and Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Eric; Koehn, Daniel; Passchier, Cees; Chung, Peter; Häger, Tobias; Salvona, Aron; Davis, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Twyfelfontein sandstone formation in the Huab Basin in NW Namibia shows the effects of volcanic activity on a potential reservoir rock. The formation was covered by the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province shortly before or during the onset of South-Atlantic rifting. Deformation bands found in the sandstone trend mostly parallel to the continental passive margin and must have formed during the extrusion of the overlying volcanic rocks, indicating that their formation is related to South-Atlantic rifting. 2D-image porosity analysis of deformation bands reveals significant porosity reduction from host rock to band of up to 70%. Cementation of the sandstone, linked to advective hydrothermal flow during volcanic activity, contributes an equal amount to porosity reduction from host rock to band when compared to initial grain crushing. Veins within the basaltic cover provide evidence for hot fluid percolation, indicated by spallation of wall rock and colloform quartz growth, and for a later low-temperature fluid circulation at low pressures indicated by stilbite growth sealing cavities. Sandstone samples and veins in the overlying volcanic rocks show that diagenesis of the Twyfelfontein sandstone is linked to Atlantic rifting and was affected by both hydrothermal and low-thermal fluid circulation.

  5. Seroprevalence and Potential Risk Factors Associated with Neospora spp. Infection among Asymptomatic Horses in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talafha, Abdelsalam Q; Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Rutley, David L

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence and to identify risk factors associated with Neospora spp. infection in horses in Jordan. Management related data were collected from each farm and individual horses. Sera from 227 horses from 5 of 6 climatic regions in Jordan were analyzed for the presence of antibodies to Neospora spp. by ELISA kit. The study was performed during spring of 2010. The association between seropositivity and risk factors was analyzed. A total of 7 (3%) of 227 sera had antibodies for Neospora spp. There was a significant regional difference (P=0.018) between the 5 climatic regions. Positive cases were located in Amman and Irbid, while the other regions (Zarqa, Jordan Valley, and Wadi Mousa) had zero prevalence. The use of anthelmintics at least once a year resulted in a significant reduction of the seroprevalence to Neospora spp. (1.6% vs 9.8%). However, this might be a phenomenon by chance and a better hygiene since owners can invest in anthelmintics. Other risk factors such as age, gender, breed, usage, body condition score, grazing, presence of other animals mixed with the horses in the same property, and a history of previous diseases were not significantly associated with the seroprevalence to Neospora spp. infection. This is the first study to report on the presence of Neospora seropositive horses in Jordan. Further studies are warranted to better understand the role of certain risk factors in the transmission of Neospora spp. among horse population and to determine which Neospora spp. are responsible for the infection.

  6. Water Scarcity as a Catalyst for Instability in the Jordan River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    and Paul J. Kern. “Bad Tidings.” The National Interest Jan/Feb (2008): 31- 33. Green Cross Italia . “The Jordan River Basin.” Water for Peace. 2006...Castañeda Library Map Collection, <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/middle_east_and_asia/israel_pol88.jpg> (4 January 2012). 117 Green Cross Italia , “The

  7. Deposit Rate and Lending Rate in Jordan, Which leads Which? A Cointegration Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    D. Sweidan, Osama

    2012-01-01

    This study intends to investigate empirically the long-run relationship between deposit and lending rates in Jordan by utilizing quarterly data over the period (1994-2010). Empirically, we search to identify the dominant interest rate; either deposit rate or lending rate. To achieve the current study goals, we employ the error correction model technique and the asymmetric short-run dynamic model. The empirical evidence of the Jordanian economy illustrates deposit and lending ra...

  8. Mitigating the Risk of Extreme Water Scarcity and Dependency: The Case of Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Schyns, Joep F.; Arwa Hamaideh; Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Mekonnen, Mesfin M.; Marlou Schyns

    2015-01-01

    Jordan faces great internal water scarcity and pollution, conflict over trans-boundary waters, and strong dependency on external water resources through trade. This paper analyzes these issues and subsequently reviews options to reduce the risk of extreme water scarcity and dependency. Based on estimates of water footprint, water availability, and virtual water trade, we find that groundwater consumption is nearly double the groundwater availability, water pollution aggravates blue water sca...

  9. Quantized Coulomb branches of Jordan quiver gauge theories and cyclotomic rational Cherednik algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Kodera, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    We study quantized Coulomb branches of quiver gauge theories of Jordan type. We prove that the quantized Coulomb branch is isomorphic to the spherical graded Cherednik algebra in the unframed case, and is isomorphic to the spherical cyclotomic rational Cherednik algebra in the framed case. We also prove that the quantized Coulomb branch is a deformation of a subquotient of the Yangian of the affine $\\mathfrak{gl}(1)$.

  10. Intermittent Water Supplies: Challenges and Opportunities for Residential Water Users in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, David E.; Talozi, Samer; Lund, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Intermittent access to improved urban water supplies is a large and expanding global problem. This paper describes 16 supply enhancement and 23 demand management actions available to urban residential water users in Jordan to cope with intermittent supplies. We characterize actions by implementation, costs, and water quantities and qualities acquired or conserved. This effort systematically identifies potential options prior to detailed study and shows that water users have significant capaci...

  11. Regional inequalities in child malnutrition in Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen: a Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Mesbah Fathy; Rashad, Ahmed Shoukry

    2016-12-01

    There is substantial evidence that on average, urban children have better health outcomes than rural children. This paper investigates the underlying factors that account for the regional disparities in child malnutrition in three Arab countries, namely; Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen. We use data on a nationally representative sample from the most recent rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey. A Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis is conducted to decompose the rural-urban differences in child nutrition outcomes into two components; one that is explained by regional differences in the level of the determinants (covariate effects), and another component that is explained by differences in the effect of the determinants on the child nutritional status (coefficient effects). Results show that the under-five stunting rates are 20 % in Egypt, 46.5 % in Yemen, and 7.7 % in Jordan. The rural- urban gap in child malnutrition was minor in the case of Egypt (2.3 %) and Jordan (1.5 %), while the regional gap was significant in the case of Yemen (17.7 %). Results of the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition show that the covariate effect is dominant in the case of Yemen while the coefficients effect dominates in the case of Jordan. Income inequality between urban and rural households explains most of the malnutrition gap. Results were robust to the different decomposition weighting schemes. By identifying the underlying factors behind the rural- urban health disparities, the findings of this paper help in designing effective intervention measures aimed at reducing regional inequalities and improving population health outcomes.

  12. Investigations needed to stimulate the development of Jordan's mineral resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    operation as quickly as possible. The task of collecting and interpreting basic data or mineral resources must be done largely by Jordanians, for only in this way will Jordan acquire the technical competence needed to use the information. Few Jordanians have enough training or experience to work independently in these fields now, however, so help from outside technicians would be necessary over an initial training period of several years. But the number of outside technicians should never exceed the number of Jordanian technicians, and for this reason, neither organization could have a staff of more than a few people during the early years of operation.

  13. Potential for Great Thrust Earthquakes in NE Colombia & NW Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, R. G.; Mencin, D.

    2013-05-01

    Sixty-five percent of the ≈19 mm/yr eastward velocity of the Caribbean Plate north of Aruba and the Guajira peninsula relative to the South American plate is accommodated by dextral slip on the Bocono Fault system in NW Venezuela at 12±1 mm/yr, the remaining ~3 mm/yr of shear apparently distributed to the NW of the fault (Perez et al., 2011). The N40E strike of the Bocono fault system, however, requires that 10.6±1 mm/yr of convergence should accompany this partitioned dextral shear, but GPS measurements reveal that less than 25% of this convergence occurs across the Venezuelan Andes. The remaining 6-8 mm of convergence is presumably accommodated by incipient subduction between the Bocono fault and a trench 300 km NW of the northern coast of Colombia. Hence NW Venezuela and NE Colombia may occasionally host great earthquakes. Our current poor understanding of the geometry of the plate interface permits the plate to be locked 300 km down-dip and possibly 600 km along-strike, and if the plate slips in 10 m ruptures it could do so every 1200 years in a M~9 earthquake. No great earthquake has occurred since 1492, since when ~4 m of potential slip has developed, but should slip occur on just 10% of the hypothesized décollement (100x150 km) it could do so now in an Mw=8.2 earthquake. In that a potential Mw>8 earthquake poses a future seismic and tsunami threat to the Caribbean it is important to examine whether great earthquakes have occurred previously near the NW Venezuela coast. It is possible that creep accommodates the entire convergence signal, since there is no suggestion from microseismicity for an abrupt locked-to-sliding transition, as, for example, signifies its location in the Himalaya. An alternative measure of future potential seismic energy release is to identify the locus and rate of present-day strain contraction. To this end, Venezuelan, Colombian and US (CU and UNAVCO) investigators are installing an array of more than a dozen continuous operating

  14. Assessment of Macro-Level Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Waterborne Diseases: The Case of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Polimeni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is an example of a country that suffers from high water scarcity. Additionally, due to the economic drivers in the country, such as phosphate and potash extraction and pharmaceutical production, the little fresh water that remains is generally polluted. The infrastructure, often antiquated in urban areas and non-existent in rural areas, also contributes to poor water conditions and to the spread of waterborne diseases. This paper examines the socioeconomic factors that contribute to diarrhea and hepatitis A on a macro level in Jordan and discusses the public-policies that government officials could use to abate those problems. Ordinary least squares time series models are used to understand the macro-level variables that impact the incidence of these diseases in Jordan. Public health expenditure has a significant impact on reducing their incidence. Furthermore, investment in sanitation facilities in rural regions is likely to reduce the number of cases of hepatitis A. Perhaps the most surprising outcome is that importation of goods and services likely results in a decrease in cases of hepatitis A. However, income has little impact on the incidence of diarrhea and hepatitis A.

  15. Formulation of an Integrated Model for Freshwater Resources Policy Evaluation in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, S.; Yoon, J.; Gawel, E.; Klauer, B.; Klassert, C. J. A.; Sigel, K.; Tilmant, A.; Lachaut, T.; Avisse, N.; Harou, J. J.; Padula, S.; Mustafa, D.

    2014-12-01

    Jordan is one of the four water poorest countries in the world. It is a highly vulnerable arid region whose freshwater system is at a tipping point due to the confluence of severely limited water supplies, rapid population growth, refugee influxes, climate change and variability, internal and transboundary competition for shared freshwater resources, and institutional impediments. Our team is engaged in an interdisciplinary effort aimed at developing a new approach to evaluate policies that enhance sustainability of freshwater resource systems. Our work adopts a multi-agent modeling framework that incorporates institutional complexity to evaluate policy instruments for improving water security in Jordan. We are developing this model using a modular approach, integrating biophysical modules that simulate natural and engineered phenomena (e.g., groundwater-surface water flow, reservoir storage, network routing, salt balance, and crop yield) with human modules that represent behavior at multiple scales of decision making. The human modules adopt a multi-agent simulation approach, defining agents as autonomous decision-makers at the government, administrative, organizational, and user levels. Our goal is to construct a suite of policy intervention scenarios that will form the basis for analysis of freshwater sustainability. This work has benefitted from a strong working relationship with leaders of the water sector in Jordan. Our approach and the merit of the policy interventions should have significant transfer value to other water-stressed regions.

  16. Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination and Simulation of Accounting Principles on Quantum Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Do Ngoc; Giang, Do Hoang; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    The paper is devoted to a version of Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination and its applications. In the first part, we construct the Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination (QGJE) Algorithm and estimate the complexity of computation of Reduced Row Echelon Form (RREF) of N × N matrices. The main result asserts that QGJE has computation time is of order 2 N/2. The second part is devoted to a new idea of simulation of accounting by quantum computing. We first expose the actual accounting principles in a pure mathematics language. Then, we simulate the accounting principles on quantum computers. We show that, all accounting actions are exhousted by the described basic actions. The main problems of accounting are reduced to some system of linear equations in the economic model of Leontief. In this simulation, we use our constructed Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination to solve the problems and the complexity of quantum computing is a square root order faster than the complexity in classical computing.

  17. Modelling groundwater over-extraction in the southern Jordan Valley with scarce data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Paulina; Liesch, Tanja; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-08-01

    To deal with the challenge of groundwater over-extraction in arid and semi-arid environments, it is necessary to establish management strategies based on the knowledge of hydrogeological conditions, which can be difficult in places where hydrogeological data are dispersed, scarce or present potential misinformation. Groundwater levels in the southern Jordan Valley (Jordan) have decreased drastically in the last three decades, caused by over-extraction of groundwater for irrigation purposes. This study presents a local, two-dimensional and transient numerical groundwater model, using MODFLOW, to characterise the groundwater system and the water balance in the southern Jordan Valley. Furthermore, scenarios are simulated regarding hydrological conditions and management options, like extension of arable land and closure of illegal wells, influencing the projection of groundwater extraction. A limited dataset, literature values, field surveys, and the `crop water-requirement method' are combined to determine boundary conditions, aquifer parameters, and sources and sinks. The model results show good agreement between predicted and observed values; groundwater-level contours agree with the conceptual model and expected flow direction, and, in terms of water balance, flow volumes are in accordance with literature values. Average annual water consumption for irrigation is estimated to be 29 million m3 and simulation results show that a reduction of groundwater pumping by 40% could recover groundwater heads, reducing the water taken from storage. This study presents an example of how to develop a local numerical groundwater model to support management strategies under the condition of data scarcity.

  18. Pascual Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert, E-mail: schroer@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-02-15

    After recalling Pascual Jordan's path breaking work in shaping quantum mechanics I explain his role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT). Particular emphasis is given to the 1929 Kharkov conference where Jordan not only presents a quite modern looking panorama about the state of art, but were some of his ideas already preempt an intrinsic point of view about a future QFT liberated from the classical parallelism and quantum field theory, a new approach for which the conceptional basis began to emerge only 30 years later. Two quite profound subjects in which Jordan was far ahead of his contemporaries will be presented in separate sections: 'Bosonization and Re-fermionization instead of Neutrino theory of Light' and 'Nonlocal gauge invariants and an algebraic monopole quantization'. The last section contains scientific episodes mixed with biographical details. It includes remarks about his much criticized conduct during the NS regime. Without knowing about his entanglement with the Nazis it is not possible to understand that such a giant of particle physics dies without having received a Nobel prize. (author)

  19. Energy conservation projects implementation at Jordan's industrial sector: a total quality management approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kablan, M.M. [Mutah University, Alkarak (Jordan). Engineering College

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents insights into the energy problem in Jordan and specifically into the energy conservation status in the industrial sector in Jordan. The results of a recent survey of the energy consumption of the industrial sector were used to draw deductions about the energy conservation situation. The country of Jordan imports oil from its neighbouring countries to cover about 94% of its total energy demand. In the year 2000, the annual share of the industrial sector of the final energy consumption of the country is around 23%. Energy conservation in the industrial sector is a crucial area for energy saving. Many representatives of industrial firms are reluctant to participate in energy conservation projects because they think that the investment in energy-saving equipment may result in higher prices for their products, which may lead to reducing their competitiveness in the local market. Some managers are resistant to change because they do not know how to implement an energy conservation project. This research proposes a methodology for the effective implementation of energy conservation projects for Jordanian industries. The proposed methodology is useful for other countries. (author)

  20. An Agent-Based Model of Farmer Decision Making in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Philip; Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Harou, Julien; Klassert, Christian; Yoon, Jim

    2016-04-01

    We describe an agent based hydro-economic model of groundwater irrigated agriculture in the Jordan Highlands. The model employs a Multi-Agent-Simulation (MAS) framework and is designed to evaluate direct and indirect outcomes of climate change scenarios and policy interventions on farmer decision making, including annual land use, groundwater use for irrigation, and water sales to a water tanker market. Land use and water use decisions are simulated for groups of farms grouped by location and their behavioural and economic similarities. Decreasing groundwater levels, and the associated increase in pumping costs, are important drivers for change within Jordan'S agricultural sector. We describe how this is considered by coupling of agricultural and groundwater models. The agricultural production model employs Positive Mathematical Programming (PMP), a method for calibrating agricultural production functions to observed planted areas. PMP has successfully been used with disaggregate models for policy analysis. We adapt the PMP approach to allow explicit evaluation of the impact of pumping costs, groundwater purchase fees and a water tanker market. The work demonstrates the applicability of agent-based agricultural decision making assessment in the Jordan Highlands and its integration with agricultural model calibration methods. The proposed approach is designed and implemented with software such that it could be used to evaluate a variety of physical and human influences on decision making in agricultural water management.

  1. Pascal Jordan's legacy and the ongoing research in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der FU Berlin (Germany)], e-mail: schroer@cbpf.br

    2010-07-01

    After recalling Pascual Jordan's path breaking work in shaping quantum mechanics I explain his role as the protagonist of quantum field theory (QFT). Particular emphasis is given to the 1929 Kharkov conference where Jordan not only presents a quite modern looking panorama about the state of art, but were some of his ideas already preempt an intrinsic point of view about a future QFT liberated from the classical parallelism and quantum field theory, a new approach for which the conceptional basis began to emerge only 30 years later. Two quite profound subjects in which Jordan was far ahead of his contemporaries will be presented in separate sections: 'Bosonization and Re-fermionization instead of Neutrino theory of Light' and {sup N}onlocal gauge invariants and an algebraic monopole quantization{sup .} The last section contains scientific episodes mixed with biographical details. It includes remarks about his much criticized conduct during the NS regime. Without knowing about his entanglement with the Nazis it is not possible to understand that such a giant of particle physics dies without having received a Nobel prize. (author)

  2. Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Mandatory Premarital Screening Among University Students in North Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaldi, Sireen M; Khatatbeh, Moawia M; Berggren, Vanja E M; Taha, Hana A

    2016-01-01

    A mandatory National Premarital Thalassemia Screening Program was implemented in Jordan in 2004. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitudes of university students in North Jordan toward this program. Data was collected from 542 students from four universities (two public and two private universities) located in North Jordan, using a structured questionnaire. Results of t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that while respondents had adequate knowledge of and positive attitudes toward the premarital screening program, there was still a lack of knowledge about the disease itself. Nearly half the respondents were under the impression that β-thalassemia (β-thal) is a disease that can be treated simply. One-third of the respondents believed that if both partners were carriers of β-thal they should proceed with marriage. Negative attitude was revealed when many respondents believed that diagnosing a family member as a carrier affects other family members' future marriage opportunities. Significant associations were detected between the knowledge scores and gender, urban/rural residence, and the university where the students were enrolled. Students in private universities showed significantly lower attitude scores. Consideration of prenatal diagnostic services as part of a β-thal prevention program is necessary. It would also be helpful to include information about β-thal as a preventable inherited illness with a severe debilitating impact on the family in the high school curriculum. There is also a need for social marketing of the program.

  3. Study of the Causes and Magnitude of Wastage of Materials on Construction Sites in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim A. Bekr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to study the causes and magnitude of wastage of construction materials on construction projects sites in Jordan. To achieve the research aim, the researcher had prepared a questionnaire form included questions about the causes of wastage and the estimated percentages of wastage of ten most popular kinds of materials used on construction sites in Jordan. Prior to the final formulation of the questionnaire form, a pilot survey was conducted. The form was revised in accordance with the feedback received. The number of causes adopted was 60 distributed on the six major categories. The form was distributed to 240 participants (clients, contractors, and consultants. The study revealed that the most important causes of wastage of materials on construction sites in Jordan are frequent design and client’s changes; rework due to workers mistakes; poor contract documents; wrong and lack of storage of materials; poor strategy for waste minimization; shortage and lack of experience of skilled workers; poor site conditions; damage during transportation; theft and vandalism; and mistakes in quantity surveying and over allowance. In addition the study concluded that the percentage of wastage materials is accounted for by values between 15% and 21% on Jordanian construction sites.

  4. Developing a green building assessment tool for developing countries - Case of Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Hikmat H. [Department of Architecture, Jordan University of Science and Technology, PO Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Al Nsairat, Saba F. [Department of Research and Design, Greater Amman Municipality, Amman (Jordan)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this research is to contribute to a better understanding of the concept of green building assessment tool and its role for achieving sustainable development through developing an effective green building rating system for residential units in Jordan in terms of the dimensions through which sustainable development tools are being produced and according to the local context. Developing such system is becoming necessary in the Developing World because of the considerable environmental, social and economical problems. Jordan as one of these countries is in need for this system, especially with poor resources and inefficient use. Therefore, this research studied international green building assessment tools such as such as LEED, CASBEE, BREEAM, GBTool, and others. Then defined new assessment items respecting the local conditions of Jordan and discussed them with (60) various stakeholders; 50% of them were experts of sustainable development. After selecting the assessment items they were weighted using the AHP method. The outcome of the research was a suggested green building assessment tool (SABA Green Building Rating System) - computer based program - that suits the Jordanian context in terms of environmental, social and economical perspectives. (author)

  5. Assessment of Macro-Level Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Waterborne Diseases: The Case of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, John M.; Almalki, Ahmad; Iorgulescu, Raluca I.; Albu, Lucian-Liviu; Parker, Wendy M.; Chandrasekara, Ray

    2016-01-01

    The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is an example of a country that suffers from high water scarcity. Additionally, due to the economic drivers in the country, such as phosphate and potash extraction and pharmaceutical production, the little fresh water that remains is generally polluted. The infrastructure, often antiquated in urban areas and non-existent in rural areas, also contributes to poor water conditions and to the spread of waterborne diseases. This paper examines the socioeconomic factors that contribute to diarrhea and hepatitis A on a macro level in Jordan and discusses the public-policies that government officials could use to abate those problems. Ordinary least squares time series models are used to understand the macro-level variables that impact the incidence of these diseases in Jordan. Public health expenditure has a significant impact on reducing their incidence. Furthermore, investment in sanitation facilities in rural regions is likely to reduce the number of cases of hepatitis A. Perhaps the most surprising outcome is that importation of goods and services likely results in a decrease in cases of hepatitis A. However, income has little impact on the incidence of diarrhea and hepatitis A. PMID:27898017

  6. Serological and molecular detection of avian pneumovirus in chickens with respiratory disease in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, S M; Algharaibeh, G R

    2007-08-01

    Avian pneumovirus (APV) causes upper respiratory tract infection in chickens and turkeys. There is a serious respiratory disease in chickens, resulting in catastrophic economic losses to chicken farmers in Jordan. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of APV as a factor in the respiratory disease of chickens in Jordan by serological and molecular methods. Thirty-eight chicken flocks were examined by competitive ELISA (23 broilers, 8 layers, and 7 broiler breeders), and 150 chicken flocks were examined by reverse-transcription PCR (133 broiler flocks, 7 layer flocks, and 10 broiler breeder flocks). Avian pneumovirus antibodies were detected in 5 out of 23 broiler flocks (21.7%), 6 out of 8 layer flocks (75%), and 7 out of 7 broiler breeder flocks (100%). Avian pneumovirus nucleic acid was detected in 17 broiler flocks (12.8%) and 3 layer flocks (42.9%). None of the broiler breeder flocks tested by reverse-transcription PCR was positive. All of the 20 detected APV isolates were subtype B. This is the first report of APV infection in Jordan. In conclusion, the Jordanian poultry industry, vaccination programs should be adjusted to include the APV vaccine to aid in the control of this respiratory disease.

  7. Assessment of Macro-Level Socioeconomic Factors That Impact Waterborne Diseases: The Case of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, John M; Almalki, Ahmad; Iorgulescu, Raluca I; Albu, Lucian-Liviu; Parker, Wendy M; Chandrasekara, Ray

    2016-11-25

    The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is an example of a country that suffers from high water scarcity. Additionally, due to the economic drivers in the country, such as phosphate and potash extraction and pharmaceutical production, the little fresh water that remains is generally polluted. The infrastructure, often antiquated in urban areas and non-existent in rural areas, also contributes to poor water conditions and to the spread of waterborne diseases. This paper examines the socioeconomic factors that contribute to diarrhea and hepatitis A on a macro level in Jordan and discusses the public-policies that government officials could use to abate those problems. Ordinary least squares time series models are used to understand the macro-level variables that impact the incidence of these diseases in Jordan. Public health expenditure has a significant impact on reducing their incidence. Furthermore, investment in sanitation facilities in rural regions is likely to reduce the number of cases of hepatitis A. Perhaps the most surprising outcome is that importation of goods and services likely results in a decrease in cases of hepatitis A. However, income has little impact on the incidence of diarrhea and hepatitis A.

  8. Rugose corals across the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary in NW Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Denayer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An uppermost Famennian (Strunian coral assemblage has been recovered in the middle part of the Yılanlı Formation of the Istanbul Zone (Zonguldak and Bartın areas, NW Turkey. In the Bartın area, the studied fossiliferous interval corresponds to a c. 30 m-thick unit of bioclastic to peloidal wackestone to packstone grading to grainstone and including two stromatoporoid biostromes. In the Zonguldak area, 60 km westward, the bioclastic facies is dominant. The rugose corals are mainly solitary taxa belonging to the genera Campophyllum, Bounophyllum, Amplexocarinia, and ?Metriophyllum, and only one colonial genus occurs: Pseudoendophyllum. This fauna is similar to that documented in Europe. The campophyllids and dibunophyllids are the main component of the uppermost Famennian assemblages in S Belgium, N France, W Germany, NW and S Poland. The endophyllids occur in S Poland, Novaya Zemlya, and in the Ural Mountains. The Istanbul Zone is supposed to be situated in the central part of the Palaeotethys Ocean, along the southern margin of Laurussia during the uppermost Devonian and Carboniferous. The rugose corals indicate some relationship with the eastern part of Laurussia, or that both areas were under a common marine influence at this time. The global Hangenberg event was not recognized in the Turkish localities, except for the disappearance of the corals, occurring less than 19 m below the Devonian–Carboniferous boundary based on the foraminifers. There is no major facies change through the boundary and the first Carboniferous corals (small Uralinia and Caninophyllum appear 6 m above the D–C boundary. The new species Caninophyllum charli sp. nov. is described from the upper part of the lower Tournaisian.

  9. Metaheuristic Technique for Finding Earthquake Locations in NW Himalayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anupam; Deep, Kusum; Kumar, Sushil; Sushil, Rama

    In this article, we have used a new metaheuristic technique particle swarm optimization (PSO) for development of the earthquake location models. Two models of different crustal structures has been taken based on the arbitrary tardiness structure that defines the heterogeneity of the earth’s crust. The problem of earthquake location is modeled as a least square function of travel times and solved by using the randomized search algorithm PSO. We have solved the problem by using an advanced version of PSOs. A real life data of earthquake in the NW Himalayan region has been taken for testing these developed models. The new locations are better than the existing results.

  10. TREPOSTOME BRYOZOANS FROM THE LOWER - MIDDLE DEVONIAN OF NW SPAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREJ ERNST

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents descriptions of 11 trepostome bryozoan species from the material deposited at the Geological Centrum Göttingen, Germany, and Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum (Naturalis, Leiden, Netherlands. The studied material comes from the Lower to Middle Devonian (Emsian-Eifelian deposits of different localities in Cantabrian Mountains, NW Spain. Three species are new: Leptotrypella maculata n. sp., Anomalotoechus tabulatus n. sp. and Eifelipora tenuis n. sp. The genus Mongoloclema is reported for the first time from the Devonian of Europe. The described fauna displays palaeobiogeographic relations to the Lower Devonian (Pragian of Bohemia and to the Middle Devonian of Kazakhstan and Michigan (USA. 

  11. Late Devonian Conodonts and Chondrichthyes from Taketai Formation in Western Junggar,NW China%晚泥盆世牙形刺及软骨鱼类在西准噶尔塔克台组中的发现及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志宏; 纵瑞文; 龚一鸣; 王成源

    2015-01-01

    新疆西准噶尔哈拉也门地区原有一套地层划分为下石炭统和布克河组,岩性组合与标准剖面差异较大,因此,新建塔克台组.在该组参考剖面 TK01第3层含化石的灰岩透镜体中,发现了少量非常重要的浅水相牙形刺,包括3属6种1未定种:Icriodus alternatus alternatus 、Icriodus cornutus 、Icriodus expansus 、Polygnathus krestovnikovi 、Polygnathus procerus 、Polyg-nathus makhlinae 、Ancyrognathus sp.,与这些牙形刺共生的还有软骨鱼类化石 Protacrodus sp.和 Phoebodus sp..该化石组合表明,新建的塔克台组的时代为晚泥盆世法门期早期.%The Devonian Famennian conodont and chondrichthy have been found from the newly established Taketai Formation which previously was assigned to the Early Carboniferous Hebukehe Formation in Halayemen region,western Junggar.Cono-dont fossils include 3 genera,6 species and 1 indeterminate species:Icriodus alternatus alternatus ,Icriodus cornutus ,Icriodus expansus,Icriodus sp.1,Icriodus sp.2,Polygnathus krestovnikovi ,Polygnathus procerus ,Polygnathus makhlinae ,Polyg-nathus sp.1,Polygnathus sp.2,Polygnathus sp.3,Ancyrognathus sp..Chondrichthyes include 2 genera:Protacrodus sp. and Phoebodus sp..It indicates that Taketai Formation belongs to early Famennian of Late Devonian.

  12. Assessment of natural recharges of the Plio-Plistocene shallow aquifer system in Al Uja area /Lower Jordan Valley / Occupied Palestinian Territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasra, Kayan; Marei, Amer; Sbiah, Mohamed; Uter, Hussam; Abu Thaher, Ayman

    2013-04-01

    Al Uja area locates in the Lower Jordan Valley/West Bank at 250 m below sea level. The availability of ground water, fertile soil, and warm climate during winter months make it remarkable for its agricultural activities where 600 hectares are under irrigation. Al Uja karstic spring that drain water from the Mountain carbonate aquifer system with a discharge rate between 0.5 and 8 MCM/a , and nine groundwater boreholes that tape water from the shallow Plio-Plistocene aquifer system, with an annual abstraction of 3.5 MCM are the water sources. The south-north fault system of the Jordan Rift Valley separates the two aquifer system. The shallow aquifer system locates to the east of the fault, where the Mountain aquifer system locates to the west. The Mountain aquifer consists of high fractured and karstified limestone and dolomite of Upper Cretaceous age, and the shallow aquifer system consists of gravel, sand, silt, and clay layers of the Dead Sea group. Groundwater recharge of the Mountain aquifer system takes place in the highland area in the West with an annual precipitation of about 550 mm. Formations of the shallow aquifer system crop out in the Jordan Valley where rainfall does not exceed 250 mm/a . Due to the high evaporation rate, direct recharge is neglected. Only small portion of flooding water about 0.4MCM/a infiltrate through wadi Al Uja drainage system in to the Alluvial deposits to the shallow aquifer system. In the other hand, and since more than 40 years, the nine groundwater boreholes are taping about 3 MCM/a, water table decline of about 5 m. Currently, water table locates between -290 m in the west and decrease to - 311 m in the east. Groundwater flows from the Mountain aquifer in the west to the Shallow aquifer in the east through the major fault system. The permeability of the Mountain carbonate layers is 2.49E-1 m/min and decrease to 1.6 E-2 m/min in the layers of the Shallow aquifer system, this decrease of Kf-value east wards cause a semi

  13. Cadomian (˜560 Ma) crust buried beneath the northern Arabian Peninsula: Mineral, chemical, geochronological, and isotopic constraints from NE Jordan xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robert J.; Ali, Kamal A.; Ren, Minghua; Jarrar, Ghaleb H.; Romer, Rolf L.; Leybourne, Matthew I.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Ibrahim, Khalil M.

    2016-02-01

    In order to better understand the nature and formation of the lower continental crust beneath northern Arabia, we studied lower crustal xenoliths brought up by Neogene basalts in NE Jordan. Most of these xenoliths are comprised of primary phases plagioclase + two-pyroxenes with magnetite and ilmenite. Most clinopyroxene are augite whereas orthopyroxene mostly are hypersthene (Mg# = 50-80). Plagioclase feldspar is dominantly andesine-labradorite; pyrope-rich garnet and Fe-rich olivine (Fo75 to Fo62) are rare. These xenoliths represent cumulates formed from intermediate magmas that pooled in the lower crust. Many xenoliths also contain small, fine-grained K-rich zones interpreted as melt pockets reflecting late magmatic infiltration of the lower crust. The xenoliths display a wide range in major element compositions (37-51 wt.% SiO2, 4-15 wt.% MgO and 0.1-6.3 wt.% TiO2), enrichment in Ba, K, Sr, Pb and Eu, and some trace element ratios atypical of bulk continental crust (e.g., K/Rb = 1265 ± 565, K/U = 63 000 ± 60 080 and Th/U = 0.96 ± 0.56); these extreme ratios reflect widespread K-metasomatism associated with melt pockets. The magmas from which these cumulates formed may have been generated at a reararc convergent margin setting. Four U-Pb zircon populations yield indistinguishable ages of 554 ± 4 Ma; 559 ± 5 Ma; 559 ± 6 Ma, and 563 ± 5 Ma. Initial 87Sr/86Sr values (0.70260-0.70352) and positive εNd(560) (with the exception of a single, more radiogenic sample (+9.6), range = + 1.3 to +4.8) indicate that the lower crust sampled by the xenoliths originated in the asthenospheric mantle, with little or no interaction with older crust, although Pb isotopic compositions allow for some interaction with older or subducted crustal materials. We interpret the geochemistry and mineralogy of these xenoliths to indicate that the lower crust beneath NE Jordan is mafic and comprised of plagioclase-rich 2-pyroxene igneous rocks. The lower crust of this area formed by

  14. 塔里木盆地东北缘敦煌群的形成和演化:锆石U-Pb年代学和Lu-Hf同位素证据%Evolution and formation of the Dunhuang Group in NE Tarim basin, NW China: Evidence from detrital-zircon geochronology and Hf isotope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟繁聪; 张建新; 相振群; 于胜尧; 李金平

    2011-01-01

    Dunhuang Group, which occurred in NW China.

  15. Spatial distribution patterns of molybdenum (Mo) concentrations in potable groundwater in Northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuisi, Mustafa; Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad; Mashal, Kholoud; Abed, Abdulkader M

    2015-03-01

    Two hundred and three groundwater samples were collected during March 2011 to June 2012 from the B2/A7 aquifer water supply wells of northern part of Jordan. The physicochemical properties were analyzed in situ for the major cations, anions, while certain heavy metals were analyzed in the laboratory. Some oilshale rock samples were geochemically analyzed. The Upper Cretaceous aquifer (B2/A7) is used as water supply for most of the communities in the study area. It consists of limestone, marly limestone, bedded chert, and minor phosphorite. Hydrochemical results from the B2/A7 aquifer indicate two main water types: alkaline-earth water (CaHCO3) and alkaline-earth water with high alkaline component (NaHCO3 (-), Na2SO4). Standard column leaching experiments on oilshale rock samples and the R-mode factor analysis suggest that the sources for elevated Mo concentrations in the groundwater of certain parts of northern Jordan are attributed to water-oilshale interaction, mobility of Mo down to the groundwater and the extensive use of fertilizers within these areas. Molybdenum (Mo) concentrations in the groundwater water range from 0.07 to 1.44 mg/L with an average value of 98 μg/L. They are found to exceed the JISM and WHO guidelines in two areas in northern part of Jordan. Spatial distribution of Mo, using ordinary kriging techniques and the resulting map, shows high Mo concentration in the northwestern part near Wadi Al Arab area reaching concentrations of 650 μg/L and in the southeastern corner of the investigated area, south of Al Ukaydir village, with an average concentration of 468 μg/L. Both areas are characterized by extensive oilshale exposures with average concentration of 11.7 mg/kg Mo and intensive agricultural activities. These two areas represent approximately 33 % of the groundwater in the northern part of Jordan. Mobility of Mo to the groundwater in northern part of Jordan is attributed to two mechanisms. First, there is reductive dissolution of Fe

  16. Evaluating Social and National Education Textbooks Based on the Criteria of Knowledge-Based Economy from the Perspectives of Elementary Teachers in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Edwan, Zaid Suleiman; Hamaidi, Diala Abdul Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge-based economy is a new implemented trend in the field of education in Jordan. The ministry of education in Jordan attempts to implement this trend's philosophy in its textbooks. This study examined the extent to which the (1st-3rd grade) social and national textbooks reflect knowledge-based economy criteria from the perspective of…

  17. The Securitisation of Refugee Flows and the Schooling of Refugees: Examining the Cases of North Koreans in South Korea and Iraqis in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Bruce A.; Bang, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on data collected in South Korea, Jordan and the USA, this paper examines the degree to which security concerns impact the schooling of North Korean refugees in South Korea and Iraqi refugees in Jordan. Operating from a framework examining the intersection of migration and securitisation, the authors find that accounts of negative images…

  18. Computation of Jordan Chains by Generalized Characteristic Matrices%用广义特征矩阵计算若当链

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大林

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method to define generalized characteristic matrices of a defective matrix by the common form of Jordan chains. The generalized characteristic matrices can be obtained by solving a system of linear equations and they can be used to compute Jordan basis.

  19. Evaluating Social and National Education Textbooks Based on the Criteria of Knowledge-Based Economy from the Perspectives of Elementary Teachers in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Edwan, Zaid Suleiman; Hamaidi, Diala Abdul Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge-based economy is a new implemented trend in the field of education in Jordan. The ministry of education in Jordan attempts to implement this trend's philosophy in its textbooks. This study examined the extent to which the (1st-3rd grade) social and national textbooks reflect knowledge-based economy criteria from the perspective of…

  20. The Effectiveness of Conflict Maps and the V-Shape Teaching Method in Science Conceptual Change among Eighth-Grade Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawaneh, Ali Khalid Ali; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md; Ghazali, Munirah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effectiveness of Conflict Maps and the V-Shape method as teaching methods in bringing about conceptual change in science among primary eighth-grade students in Jordan. A randomly selected sample (N = 63) from the Bani Kenana region North of Jordan was randomly assigned to the two teaching…

  1. Content Analysis of Science Books for Upper Primary Stage in Jordan and Intermediate Stage in Saudi Arabia from an Islamic Perspective: Analytical Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldossari, Ali Tarad; Al Khaldi, Jamal Khalil; Altarawneh, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify the current situation of science books in Jordan and Saudi Arabia from an Islamic perspective. For this end, the content analysis approach has been used through the analysis of the unit concept in the science books for the seventh, eighth and ninth grades in the academic year (2015/2016) in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. The…

  2. The Development of Accounting Education and Practice in an Environment of Socio-Economic Transformation in the Middle East: The Case of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharari, Nizar Mohammad

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of accounting education and practice as influenced by the socio-economic transformation in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents an explanatory study of how accounting education and practice has developed in relation to socio-economic change in Jordan, using the…

  3. The influence of indirect monetary tools on price and output: the case of Jordan (1993-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama R. Alqalawi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the main monetary policy tools in Jordan, then, to estimate their effect on price and output level. A time series data covering the period between 1993 and 2013 were utilized to estimate the targeted models using two-step regression. Firstly, the authors measured the impact of indirect policy tools on money supply and, secondly, they determined the impact of money supply on price and output levels. Results show that open market operations of the Central Bank of Jordan through issuance of certificates of deposit, especially at the beginning of 1993 and the repurchase agreements have been effective in influencing the money supply in Jordan. Unfortunately, this policy was not able to control the real or nominal output level even though it has an effect on the price level.

  4. Groundwater-level trends and forecasts, and salinity trends, in the Azraq, Dead Sea, Hammad, Jordan Side Valleys, Yarmouk, and Zarqa groundwater basins, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Senior, Lisa A.; Subah, Ali; Jaber, Ayman

    2013-01-01

    Changes in groundwater levels and salinity in six groundwater basins in Jordan were characterized by using linear trends fit to well-monitoring data collected from 1960 to early 2011. On the basis of data for 117 wells, groundwater levels in the six basins were declining, on average about -1 meter per year (m/yr), in 2010. The highest average rate of decline, -1.9 m/yr, occurred in the Jordan Side Valleys basin, and on average no decline occurred in the Hammad basin. The highest rate of decline for an individual well was -9 m/yr. Aquifer saturated thickness, a measure of water storage, was forecast for year 2030 by using linear extrapolation of the groundwater-level trend in 2010. From 30 to 40 percent of the saturated thickness, on average, was forecast to be depleted by 2030. Five percent of the wells evaluated were forecast to have zero saturated thickness by 2030. Electrical conductivity was used as a surrogate for salinity (total dissolved solids). Salinity trends in groundwater were much more variable and less linear than groundwater-level trends. The long-term linear salinity trend at most of the 205 wells evaluated was not increasing, although salinity trends are increasing in some areas. The salinity in about 58 percent of the wells in the Amman-Zarqa basin was substantially increasing, and the salinity in Hammad basin showed a long-term increasing trend. Salinity increases were not always observed in areas with groundwater-level declines. The highest rates of salinity increase were observed in regional discharge areas near groundwater pumping centers.

  5. Chronology and origin of VMS deposits in Xinjiang, NW CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Fuwen(陈富文); LI; Huaqin(李华芹); WANG; Denghong(王登红); XIE; Caifu(谢才富); LU; Yuanfa(路远发)

    2002-01-01

    VMS deposits in Xinjiang, NW China are widespread in the Altay, Tianshan and West Kunlun orogenic belt, mainly formed during the Proterozoic rifting and Phanerozoic post-orogenic extension and are related to the bimodal volcanism. The VMS deposits are middle and small in scale. According to assemblages of metallogenetic elements, they can be divided into four types (Cu-Zn, Cu-S, Pb-Zn-Cu and Pb-Zn types) with the Cu-Zn and Pb-Zn types being the most important ones. Research of isotopic chronology shows that the VMS deposits in Xinjiang were formed during the Proterozoic, Ordovician, Deovonian, Carboniferous and Permian periods and usually underwent multi-stage mineralization, especially the large-sized deposits usually have post- volcanic superimposed mineralization by tectonomagmatic or metamorphic hydrothermal metallogenic fluids.

  6. Buried Quaternary Valleys In NW Europe - Aquifers and Drilling Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huuse, M.; Lykke-Andersen, H.; Piotrowski, J.

    Buried Quaternary valleys are extremely widespread in the formerly glaciated, low- land areas of NW Europe (Huuse &Lykke-Andersen 2000, Fig. 4). The valleys may be several hundred metres deep, some kilometres across and few to several tens of kilometres long. Most of the deep valleys have irregular length profiles with sills and basins, unlike standard subaerial river systems. We interpret these as overdeepened valleys, formed mainly by subglacial meltwater erosion. Buried valleys located on- shore often provide sheltered reservoirs of clean groundwater, and much attention is presently focused on locating onshore valleys and quantifying their potential as groundwater aquifers. In nearshore areas, buried valleys may be a risk factor by pro- viding pathways of salt-water intrusion of onshore groundwater aquifers. Far offshore, buried valleys are located in the shallow subsurface above the prolific oil and gas fields of the central North Sea. Here, the valleys pose a risk for drilling operations by hosting shallow gas and potentially unstable sediments. The central North Sea is now largely covered by 3D seismic data, which often image the buried valleys in a level of de- tail much greater than that available onshore. Hence offshore valleys imaged by 3D seismic data may be used as analogues for groundwater reservoirs onshore NW Eu- rope. Here, we present examples of buried valleys from onshore, nearshore and far offshore locations, to illustrate how genetically and morphologically identical valleys may benefit or hamper the exploitation of subsurface accummulations of groundwater and hydrocarbons. Huuse, M. &Lykke-Andersen, H. 2000. Buried Quaternary valleys in the eastern Dan- ish North Sea: morphology and origin. Quaternary Science Reviews 19, 1233-1253.

  7. Detection of OXA-48-like and NDM carbapenemases producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Jordan: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqel, Amin A; Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Alzoubi, Hamed; Masalha, Ibrahim; Ellington, Matthew J; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis

    Little is known of carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPK) in Jordan. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of CPK in a major hospital in Amman, Jordan in 2012-2013 and to characterize the isolates and detect the types of carbapenemase(s) they produced. For the 296 isolates investigated, species identification and antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined (Vitek II, bioMérieux). Isolates with decreased ertapenem susceptibility were tested for carbapenemase production using the Modified Hodge Test. Isolates with a carbapenemase-positive phenotype were characterized further via multiplex PCRs for extended-spectrum β-lactamase and carbapenemase genes and by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven of 296 K. pneumoniae isolated in 2012-2013 (2.4%) were carbapenemase producers, five produced class D carbapenemases (OXA-48-like) and two produced a NDM metallo-beta-lactamase. All seven isolates also encoded CTX-M enzymes; CTX-M-1-like enzymes were detected in five isolates (two co-producing NDM enzymes and three co-producing OXA-48-like enzymes), CTX-M-9 was found in the two remaining OXA-48-like producers. PFGE revealed five genetically distinct types amongst the seven carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae, with two pairs of identical isolates associated with patients treated on the same wards. The emergence of OXA-48-like and NDM carbapenemases associated with multi-drug resistant (MDR) isolates in Jordan is concerning. The strict implementation of infection control practices will help to disrupt the spread of MDR carbapenemase producers in Jordanian hospitals.

  8. Family strategies for managing childhood cancer: using complementary and alternative medicine in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudimat, Mohammad R; Rozmus, Cathy L; Farhan, Nemah

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study that examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies among children with cancer in Jordan. Complementary and alternative medicine use by oncology patients has been gaining acceptance in the developed countries and developing countries. Healthcare professionals are becoming increasingly aware that patients use complementary and alternative medicine either covertly or overtly. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used with parents of children with cancer under treatment and follow-up in a paediatric oncology department in Jordan between August 2007 and April 2008. Parents of 69 children with cancer in Jordan were surveyed for their use of complementary and alternative medicine with their children. A total of 65.2% of the sample had used at least one type of complementary and alternative medicine during the course of their child's treatment. The use of biological and nutritional complementary and alternative medicine was 70.5% among the users. Use of body and soul complementary and alternative medicine strategies was reported for 22.2% of the children using complementary and alternative medicine. Twenty per cent of the sample used body movement complementary and alternative medicine for their children. A total of 45.5% of complementary and alternative medicine users perceived benefits in using complementary and alternative medicine for their children with cancer. However, 40% of complementary and alternative medicine users had stopped using complementary and alternative medicine for multiple reasons. Parents used complementary and alternative medicine to support their children's medical treatment and to use all possible methods to cure their children. The reason for parents not using complementary and alternative medicine included not being aware of complementary and alternative medicine. Most of the patients have not discussed the issue of using complementary and alternative medicine with the medical staff.

  9. A pastoral landscape for millennia: Investigating pastoral mobility in northeastern Jordan using quantitative spatial analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Julia; Knitter, Daniel; Krause, Jan; Müller-Neuhof, Bernd; Schütt, Brigitta

    2017-04-01

    Northeastern Jordan is one of the few remaining regions in the Middle East where pastoral nomadism is still practiced. In this desert region, pastoral mobility is an adapted land use—able to cope with low rainfall rates, great seasonal and annual rainfall variations and thus heterogeneous vegetation and water availability. During winter, herders and their livestock move into the desert; in summer they move to the desert margins to places with perennial water supply. The system of mobile pastoralism was introduced during the Early Late Neolithic. Within the basaltic region of northeastern Jordan, there is a dense distribution of archeological remains; some of them can be linked to pastoral groups due to the herders' ancient practice of building agglomerations of sub-circular enclosures ('clustered enclosures') made of basalt boulders for corralling their flocks and domestic activities. The resulting features provide an excellent opportunity to investigate a pastoral landscape that has been frequently used by herders during the last eight to nine millennia. In this study, 9118 clustered enclosures in the northeastern Jordanian basalt desert have been systematically recorded using satellite imagery. In order to investigate potential migration or communication routes, grazing lands and social interactions of former pastoralists, we examine their first- and second-order characteristics using distance and density based approaches of point pattern analyses by integrating geomorphometric and geomorphological site properties. The results of this spatial analysis are combined with available archaeological data and a review on traditional herding practices in northeastern Jordan. Overall, the results demonstrate that the observed spatial distribution of clustered enclosures is influenced locally by natural characteristics but regionally by cultural practices.

  10. Nutritional status of women and child refugees from Syria-Jordan, April-May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilukha, Oleg O; Jayasekaran, Douglas; Burton, Ann; Faender, Gabriele; King'ori, James; Amiri, Mohammad; Jessen, Dorte; Leidman, Eva

    2014-07-25

    As a result of civil war, an estimated 2.8 million refugees have fled Syria and reside in neighboring countries, mainly Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq. The largest Syrian refugee camp in the region is Zaatari camp in Jordan, with approximately 79,000 refugees; another estimated 500,000 Syrian refugees live in Jordanian cities, towns, and villages, mostly in the capital (Amman) and in four northern governorates (Irbid, Mafraq, Jarash, and Zarqa). Although all registered refugees in Jordan receive food vouchers from the World Food Programme (WFP) and vulnerable refugees receive cash assistance from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and nongovernmental organizations, the nutritional status of some refugees might be compromised because of dislocation, lack of income, and limited access to nutritious foods. To assess the nutritional status of Syrian refugees, UNHCR, WFP, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Medair International (a nongovernmental organization), and CDC, in collaboration with the United Nations Population Fund and the World Health Organization (WHO), conducted cross-sectional, population-representative cluster surveys in Zaatari camp and among refugees residing in the host community. The surveys were conducted during April-May 2014 with the principal objective of assessing nutritional status of refugee children aged 6-59 months and nonpregnant women of reproductive age (15-49 years). Preliminary findings indicated a high prevalence of anemia in Zaatari camp among both children and women (48.4% and 44.8%, respectively). Nutrition policies aimed at ensuring optimal child and maternal micronutrient status and addressing the underlying risk factors for anemia are likely to result in improved health outcomes and a reduction in anemia.

  11. Management approaches to integrated solid waste in industrialized zones in Jordan: a case of Zarqa City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrayyan, Bassam; Hamdi, Moshrik R

    2006-01-01

    There is a need to recognize the difficulties experienced in managing waste and to understand the reasons for those difficulties, especially in developing countries such as Jordan. Zarqa is a Governorate located in central Jordan, which has 2874 registered industries, making up more than 52% of the total industries in the country. Zarqa Governorate suffers from serious solid waste problems. These problems arise from an absence of adequate policies, facilitating legislation, and an environmentally enthused public, which therefore have a negative impact on the environment and health. Solid waste generation in Zarqa Governorate has increased exponentially and has polluted natural resources and the environment. A significant change in municipal solid waste generation was evident between the years 1994 and 2000. The Zarqa Governorate generated 482 tons/day in 2002 with a per capita rate of 0.44 kg/cap-day [Consulting Engineers, 2002, Feasibility study for the treatment of industrial wastewater in Zarqa Governorate. A project funded by METAP and Zarqa Chamber of Industry. Unpublished report]. This manuscript assesses the current operational and management practices of solid waste in the Zarqa Governorate; and evaluates the associated issues of solid waste collection, storage, transport, disposal and recycling in developing countries. The lack of techniques, financial funds and awareness among public and private sectors form an obstacle for achieving a successful environmental program. Several options are proposed to address management goals. Although Jordan became the first country in the Middle East to adopt a national environmental strategy; waste disposal is still largely uncontrolled and large quantities of waste go uncollected. Ensuring proper management of solid wastes, enforcing regulations, and implementing proper environmental awareness programs that will enhance the public understanding and achieve greater efficiency, are the findings of this study.

  12. Socio-demographic and dietary factors associated with obesity among female university students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Hammad, Shatha S; Tayyem, Reema F; Qatatsheh, Ala A

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the socio-demographic and dietary factors that may be associated with obesity among female university students in Jordan. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 406 female students recruited from two universities in Jordan. Data were collected through self-reporting, using a previously validated questionnaire. Weight and height were measured and body mass index was calculated to determine the weight status of the participants. High educational level of mothers [odds ratio (OR)=1.25] and monthly pocket money of more than 200 Jordanian Dinars (OR=1.67) were found to be risk factors for obesity, whereas a sibling ranking of more than six was a protective factor (OR=0.31). Those who were eating from the university cafeteria had double the risk for obesity (OR=2.41) than those who did not. Regular eating of meals and snacking between meals were found to be protective factors (OR ranged from 0.42 to 0.79). Regular consumption of milk products, fruit, canned fruit juices, bakery products and legumes were found to be protective factors. In contrast, the regular consumption of potato chips (OR=1.35), chicken (OR=1.51), and fish (OR=1.45) were found to be risk factors for obesity. Using a chi-square test, none of the factors studied showed significant association with obesity. A program to promote healthy eating among university students in Jordan should consider the local socio-demographic and food behavior factors that could be related to obesity to ensure the effectiveness of such a program.

  13. Road traffic fatalities in Qatar, Jordan and the UAE: estimates using regression analysis and the relationship with economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, A; Hussain, S J; Al-Malki, M a; Shotar, M M; Al-Said, M F; Jadaan, K S

    2010-03-01

    Smeed's equation is a widely used model for prediction of traffic fatalities but has been inadequate for use in developing countries. We applied regression analysis to time-series data on vehicles, exponential models for fatality prediction, producing an average absolute error of 20.9% for Qatar, 10.9% for population and traffic fatalities in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Jordan and Qatar. The data were fitted to Jordan and 5.5% for the UAE. We found a strong linear relationship between gross domestic product and fatality rate.

  14. Current sedation practice among general dental practitioners and dental specialists in Jordan: an example of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shayyab MH

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad H Al-Shayyab,1 Soukaina Ryalat,1 Najla Dar-odeh,1 Firas Alsoleihat21Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, 2Department of Conservative Dentistry and Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, JordanPurpose: The study reported here aimed to identify current sedation practice among general dental practitioners (GDPs and specialist dental practitioners (SDPs in Jordan in 2010.Methods: Questionnaires were sent by email to 1683 GDPs and SDPs who were working in Jordan at the time of the study. The contact details of these dental practitioners were obtained from a Jordan Dental Association list. Details on personal status, use of, and training in, conscious sedation techniques were sought by the questionnaires.Results: A total of 1003 (60% questionnaires were returned, with 748 (86.9% GDPs and 113 (13.1% SDPs responding. Only ten (1.3% GDPs and 63 (55.8% SDPs provided information on the different types of treatments related to their specialties undertaken under some form of sedation performed by specialist and/or assistant anesthetists. Approximately 0.075% of the Jordanian population received some form of sedation during the year 2010, with approximately 0.054% having been treated by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The main reason for the majority of GDPs (55.0% and many SDPs (40% not to perform sedation was lack of training in this field. While some SDPs (26.0% indicated they did not use sedation because of the inadequacy of sedative facilities.Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the provision of conscious sedation services in general and specialist dental practices in Jordan is inconsistent and inadequate. This stresses the great need to train practitioners and dental assistants in Jordan to enable them to safely and effectively perform all forms of sedation.Keywords: Jordan Dental

  15. Geometric Properties of Jordan Matrix Standard%矩阵Jordan标准型的几何性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云平

    2014-01-01

    Standard theory of the matrix is an important aspect of matrix theory, this paper gives the Jordan standard defini-tion, while the introduction and promotion of the relevant aspects of geometric theorems Jordan standard type.%矩阵的标准型理论是矩阵论中重要的一个方面,本文首先给出了Jordan标准型的定义,同时介绍并推广了Jordan标准型的几何方面的相关定理。

  16. Roads, travel, and time ‘across Jordan' in Byzantine and early Islamic times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmsley, Alan George

    2009-01-01

    Roads, means of travel and travel times required to journey from one place to another in antiquity are essential components in assessing the political, cultural and economic history of a region. This paper reviews archaeological and documentary material detailing the major routes that crossed...... Jordan, the manner in which they were transversed, and the time required to travel over them in the period ca. 300-800 CE. In this post-Roman period, roadways took on new meaning as the needs of empire gave way to wider, and more self-defining, social and economic requirements of late antiquity...

  17. Additive Preservers of Idempotence and Jordan Homorphisms between Rings of Square Matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Mei YAO; Chong Guang CAO; Xian ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Suppose R is an idempotence-diagonalizable ring. Let n and m be two arbitrary positive integers with n ≥ 3. We denote by Mn(R) the ring of all n × n matrices over R. Let (Jn(R)) be the additive subgroup of Mn(R) generated additively by all idempotent matrices. Let U = (Jn(R)) or Mn(R). We describe the additive preservers of idempotence from U to Mm(R) when 2 is a unit of R. Thereby, we also characterize the Jordan (respectively, ring and ring anti-) homomorphisms from Mn(R) to Mm(R) when 2 is a unit of R.

  18. Geochemical orientation for mineral exploration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, W.C.; Grimes, D.J.; Seitz, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This report is a supplement to previous accounts of geochemical exploration conducted in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan by the Natural Resources Authority of the Royal Government of Jordan and the U.S. Geological Survey. The field work on which this report is based was sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of State. Procedures used in collecting various kinds of rocks, ores, slags, eluvial and alluvial sediments, heavy-mineral concentrates, and organic materials for use as geochemical sample media are summarized, as are the laboratory procedures followed for the analysis of these sample materials by semiquantitative spectrographic, atomic absorption, fluorometric, and X-ray diffraction methods. Geochemical evaluations of the possibilities for economic mineral deposits in certain areas are presented. The results of these preliminary investigations open concepts for further use in geochemical exploration in the search for metallic mineral deposits in Jordan. Perhaps the most desirable new activity would be hydrogeochemical exploration for uranium and base metals, accompanied by interpretation of such remote-sensing data as results of airborne radiometric surveys and computer-enhanced LANDSAT imagery. For more conventional approaches to geochemical exploration, however, several fundamental problems regarding proper choice of geochemical sample media for different geologic and geographic parts of the Country must be solved before effective surveys can be made. The present results also show that such common geochemical exploration techniques as the determination of the trace-element contents of soils, plant ash, and slags have direct application also toward the resolution of several archaeological problems in Jordan. These include the relation of trace-elements chemistry of local soils to the composition of botanic remains, the trace-elements composition of slags to the technological development of the extractive metallurgy of

  19. Grey Water Reuse for Agricultural Purposes in the Jordan Valley: Household Survey Results in Deir Alla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon B. Megdal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Installation of decentralized grey water treatment systems in small rural communities contributes to a more sustainable water supply. In order to gauge community attitudes about collection and use of grey water, a door-to-door survey in the farming community of Deir Alla, Jordan was conducted by Royal Scientific Society interviewers. Outcomes of a detailed survey, designed specifically for this project, offer insights on people’s views on general water and wastewater issues, as well as their motivation, practices and concerns related to using grey water treatment for a portion of their household wastewater and reuse of the treated grey water for irrigation. A total of 47 respondents from different socio-economic background, aged over 18 years, from this community in the Jordan valley took part in the survey. The level of formal education of the respondents was low, and most of households’ incomes were below the poverty line in Jordan. Most of the respondents reported that the quality of water supplied by public network is acceptable, but the quantity is insufficient to meet their demand, with supplies being delivered to the household once a week. Respondents relied on the public water network as a first-most important resource (85.1%, and 57.4% of the respondent relied on private water tankers as a second-most important resource in addition to the public network. However, 6% of the respondents relied only on private water tankers with no access to the public network. Storage tanks are common practice in all the houses in order to store enough water for at least one week. The survey responses provide evidence that rural communities are willing to accept reuse of treated grey water for irrigation. Furthermore, some of people in the studied area are willing to learn more about grey water treatment and reuse in order to operate grey water systems for irrigation purposes. Water scarcity in this rural area of Jordan is the main determinant of

  20. Anti-TNF therapy in Jordan: a focus on severe infections and tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alawneh KM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Khaldoon M Alawneh,1 Mahmoud H Ayesh,1 Basheer Y Khassawneh,1 Salwa Shihadeh Saadeh,1 Mahmoud Smadi,2 Khaldoun Bashaireh31Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Abdullah University Hospital, 2College of Science, 3Department of Special Surgery, College of Medicine, King Abdullah University Hospital, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, JordanBackground: A high rate of infection has been reported in patients receiving treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF. This study describes the rate of and risk factors for serious infections in patients receiving anti-TNF agents in Jordan.Methods: This retrospective observational study was conducted at a large tertiary referral center in the north of Jordan. Between January 2006 and January 2012, 199 patients who received an anti-TNF agent (infliximab, adalimumab, or etanercept were included. Patients received the anti-TNF treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or other conditions. A serious infection was defined as any bacterial, viral, or fungal infection that required hospitalization, administration of appropriate intravenous antimicrobial therapy, and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment.Results: The mean duration of anti-TNF treatment was 26.2 months. Steroids were used in 29.1% of patients, while 54.8% were given additional immunosuppressant therapy (methotrexate or azathioprine. Only one anti-TNF agent was given in 70.4% of patients, while 29.6% received different anti-TNF agents for the duration of treatment. Serious infections were documented in 39 patients (19.6%, including respiratory tract infections (41%, urinary tract infections (30.8%, and skin infections (20.5%, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in three patients (7.7%. Exposure to more than one anti-TNF agent was the only factor associated with a significant increase in the rate of infection (relative risk 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.06–4.0, P=0

  1. Correspondence between Jordan-Einstein frames and Palatini-metric formalisms

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Vernieri, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the conformal symmetry between Jordan and Einstein frames considering their relations with the metric and Palatini formalisms for modified gravity. Appropriate conformal transformations are taken into account leading to the evident connection between the gravitational actions in the two mentioned frames and the Hilbert-Einstein action with a cosmological constant. We show that the apparent differences between Palatini and metric formalisms strictly depend on the representation while the number of degrees of freedom is preserved. This means that the dynamical content of both formalism is identical.

  2. Source detection in the Lower Jordan River - How to monitor the impossible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillel, Noa; Siebert, Christian; Licha, Tobias; Laronne, Jonathan B.

    2016-04-01

    The Lower Jordan River (LJR) is a major ecosystem in the semi-arid to arid Jordan-Dead Sea Graben, the backbone of abundant farming activities in the Lower Jordan Valley and the major inflow to the dying Dead Sea. During the 1960's the Sea of Galilee and the Yarmouk River, the main sources of the river, were dammed, decreasing its annual flow from ˜1.2×109 m3 to less than 0.2×109 m3, leaving a mix of point and non-point sources composing its base flow. Beside natural saline springs along its course, current day anthropogenic sources (e.g. sewage, agricultural return flow and fishpond effluents) have a negative impact on the water quality and the ecosystem, contributing high salinity and causing overall pollution. To enable an environmental assessment of the river and to satisfy the regulations of LJR international treaties, the temporal dynamics of water quantity and quality must be observed on a regular basis. As the LJR forms the highly secured border between Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian Authority, nearly the entire river course is physically inaccessible. To overcome that situation, considerable efforts have been made to install a network of 7 sampling stations along the LJR to identify and separate the different contributing sources. Automatic water samplers in three of the stations collect water daily in addition to continuous measurement of stage, EC, pH and temperature. Sensors at all locations transmit online real-time data. During monthly campaigns a total of 14 sites are manually sampled along the river and some tributaries. Water samples are analyzed for major ions, trace elements and stable isotopes. While the sensor network allows separating events occurring in different reaches along the river course and calculating travel time between stations, water sample analyses enable fingerprinting and separating the actual sources. By doing so, an unusual and very local event was recorded by the most southern station (5.5 km north of the Dead Sea

  3. Application of Mean-Field Jordan-Wigner Transformation to Antiferromagnet System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Liang; LEI Shu-Guo; JIANG Yu-Chi

    2008-01-01

    By using the mean-field Jordan-Wigner transformation analysis,this paper studies the one-dimensional spin-1/2 XYZ antiferromagnetic chain in the transverse field with uniform long-range interactions among the z-components of the spins.The thermodynamic quantities,such as Helmholtz free energy,the internal energy,the specific heat,and the isothermal susceptibility,are obtained.Under degenerating condition,our results agree with numerical results of the other literatures.

  4. Travelling between Jordan and Einstein frames, bounces, antigravity and sailing through singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenshchik, A Yu; Tronconi, A; Venturi, G; Vernov, S Yu

    2016-01-01

    We study the relation between the Jordan-Einstein frame transition and the possible description of the crossing of singularities, using the fact that the regular evolution in one frame can correspond to crossing singularities in the other frame. We show that some interesting effects arise in simple models such as one with a massless scalar field or another wherein the potential is constant in the Einstein frame. The dynamics in these models and in their conformally coupled counterparts are described in detail and a method for the continuation of such cosmological evolutions beyond the singularity is developed.

  5. Open Software Tools Applied to Jordan's National Multi-Agent Water Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Stephen; Meier, Philipp; Harou, Julien; Yoon, Jim; Selby, Philip; Lachaut, Thibaut; Klassert, Christian; Avisse, Nicolas; Khadem, Majed; Tilmant, Amaury; Gorelick, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Jordan is the fourth most water scarce country in the world, where demand exceeds supply in a politically and demographically unstable context. The Jordan Water Project (JWP) aims to perform policy evaluation by modelling the hydrology, economics, and governance of Jordan's water resource system. The multidisciplinary nature of the project requires a modelling software system capable of integrating submodels from multiple disciplines into a single decision making process and communicating results to stakeholders. This requires a tool for building an integrated model and a system where diverse data sets can be managed and visualised. The integrated Jordan model is built using Pynsim, an open-source multi-agent simulation framework implemented in Python. Pynsim operates on network structures of nodes and links and supports institutional hierarchies, where an institution represents a grouping of nodes, links or other institutions. At each time step, code within each node, link and institution can executed independently, allowing for their fully autonomous behaviour. Additionally, engines (sub-models) perform actions over the entire network or on a subset of the network, such as taking a decision on a set of nodes. Pynsim is modular in design, allowing distinct modules to be modified easily without affecting others. Data management and visualisation is performed using Hydra (www.hydraplatform.org), an open software platform allowing users to manage network structure and data. The Hydra data manager connects to Pynsim, providing necessary input parameters for the integrated model. By providing a high-level portal to the model, Hydra removes a barrier between the users of the model (researchers, stakeholders, planners etc) and the model itself, allowing them to manage data, run the model and visualise results all through a single user interface. Pynsim's ability to represent institutional hierarchies, inter-network communication and the separation of node, link and

  6. Determinação de idades e crescimento do linguado branco Paralichthys patagonicus (Jordan, 1889 no sul do Brasil Age and growth of the white flounder Paralichthys patagonicus (Jordan, 1889 in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Neves de Araújo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A idade e o crescimento do linguado-branco Paralichthys patagonicus (Jordan, 1889 foram estudados a partir de amostras obtidas da pesca comercial no sul do Brasil entre 1989 e 1991. As idades foram determinadas sobre cortes transversais de otólitos de 460 exemplares. A análise do tipo de bordo e dos incrementos marginais dos otólitos mostrou que, a cada ano ocorre a formação de uma zona translúcida e uma zona opaca nos otólitos. As "remeas atingem maiores tamanhos e idades (630 mm, 13 anos do que os machos (527 mm, 11 anos. Os parâmetros da equação de von Bertalanffy que representaram o crescimento em comprimento total das remeas foram: CT∞,= 623,0 mm, K= 0,279 e to= -0,243 anos; dos machos: CT∞,= 534,1 mm, K= 0,214 e t o = -1,589 anos e dos sexos agrupados: CT∞, = 609,1 mm, K = 0,255 to = - 0,462 anos. Os incrementos anuais em peso por idades aumentam até o final do quarto ano de vida quando a maioria já atingiu a primeira maturação sexual e ambos sexos alcançaram cerca de 30% do peso e 70% do comprimento assintóticos. Esta espécie é susceptível à sobrepesca de crescimento porque o redirecionamento do metabolismo do crescimento somático para a reprodução é gradativo e o potencial de crescimento após a maturação sexual é relativamente alto.Age and growth of the white flounder Paralichthys patagonicus (Jordan, 1889 were studied using sliced sagittae otoliths of 460 specimens collected from the commercial fishery along southem Brazil (1989 to 1991. The changes in the type of last band in formation and the marginal increments analysis showed that one translucent and one opaque zone were formed each year. Females attained larger totallength (TL and older ages (630 mm, 13 yr than males (527 mm, 11 yr. The parameters ofthe von Bertalanffy growth equations were: for females - TL∞,= 623.0 mm, K= 0.279 and t o = - 0.243 yr; for males - TL∞,= 534.1 mm, K= 0.214, to = - 1.589 yr and for pooled sexes - TL∞, = 609.1 mm

  7. Palaeozoic sandstone reservoirs of the Hamada Basin, NW Libya: effects of synsedimentary processes on porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, S.H.A.; Mansouri, A.; El Ghoul, M. (Arabian Gulf Oil Co., Benghazi (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Exploration Div.)

    1993-07-01

    The Hamada Basin of NW Libya is an intracratonic basin in which a thick sequence of clastic rocks was deposited during the Palaeozoic. These sediments were derived from a PreCambrian basement of felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, and include both sands and clays; almost all the clays in formations of Palaeozoic age were produced from the alteration of feldspar. Structures were developed as these sediments were draped over the surface of the basement. Reservoirs in the Lower Palaeozoic (Lower Devonian, Lower Silurian and Cambro-Ordovician Sandstones) appear to have developed as a result of synsedimentary processes, such as winnowing and washing-out of clayey material from the sand by percolating waters, and sliding and slumping on the steep depositional surface during or soon after deposition. Oil traps are independent of structural elevation, but appear to have developed on those surfaces which were sufficiently steep to have initiated the above synsedimentary processes. This theory has been successfully tested in many places in the basin, and may provide a lead for exploration in other basins in Libya that have similar geological settings. (Author)

  8. Geochemistry and mineral chemistry of Shahabad gabbroic intrusion, NW Nourabad, Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Zarei Sahamieh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Shahabad gabbroic intrusion, with NW-SE trend cropped out at the boundary of Zagros and Sanandaj-Sirjan zones is composed of olivine gabbro, orthogabbro and troctolite. Plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine are the main minerals; and magnetite, titanomagnetite and serpentine are minor and secondary minerals. Microprobe analyses of the minerals show that plagioclase is labradorite, pyroxene diopsidic augite and olivine, chrysolite. The rocks appear to have calc-alkaline and metaluminous nature. The plots of some trace elements and composition of clinopyroxenes in the tectonic discrimination diagrams indicate a volcanic arc environment. In addition, spider diagram pattern of elements shows Sr enrichment and Ti, Nb, Zr and P depletion, typical characteristics of volcanic arc subduction related magmas. Furthermore, close similarity between the patterns of spider diagram for the Shahabad pluton with those of Andean basic rocks suggests that the Shahabad calc-alkaline basic magma may have formed in a subduction environment. Based on geological, geochemical and mineralogical features, formation of the gabbros, as a part of ophiolite mélange, is attributed to a suprasubduction system.

  9. Origin and evolution of marginal basins of the NW Pacific: Diffuse-plate tectonic reconstructions

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Junyuan; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Yu, Ho-Shing

    2012-01-01

    Formation of the gigantic linked dextral pull-apart basin system in the NW Pacific is due to NNE- to ENE-ward motion of east Eurasia. This mainly was a response to the Indo-Asia collision which started about 50 Ma ago. The displacement of east Eurasia can be estimated using three aspects: (1) the magnitude of pull-apart of the dextral pull-apart basin system, (2) paleomagnetic data from eastern Eurasia and the region around the Arctic, and (3) the shortening deficits in the Large Tibetan Plateau. All the three aspects indicate that there was a large amount (about 1200 km) of northward motion of the South China block and compatible movements of other blocks in eastern Eurasia during the rifting period of the basin system. Such large motion of the eastern Eurasia region contradicts any traditional rigid plate tectonic reconstruction, but agrees with the more recent concepts of non-rigidity of both continental and oceanic lithosphere over geological times. Based on these estimates, the method developed for resto...

  10. Monazite geochronology unravels the timing of crustal thickening in NW Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübner, Konstanze; Grujic, Djordje; Parrish, Randall R.; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Kronz, Andreas; Wooden, Joe; Ahmad, Talat

    2014-12-01

    Greenschist to amphibolite grade Haimanta metasediments of the NW Himalaya preserve much of the prograde metamorphic history of Eohimalayan crustal thickening, which has been erased by Oligo-/Miocene migmatization elsewhere in the Himalaya. Our zircon and monazite U/Th-Pb data unravel a multi-stage prograde metamorphic evolution. The earliest evidence of prograde Barrovian metamorphic monazite growth is ~ 41 Ma. Peak metamorphic conditions (~ 8-8.5 kbar, ~ 600-700 °C) were attained at 37-36 Ma and followed by a prolonged evolution at high temperatures with at least three distinct episodes of monazite growth, which may be related to the formation of the northern Himalayan nappes (e.g., Shikar Beh nappe, Nyimaling nappe). Rapid exhumation of the crystalline started at ~ 26 Ma and resulted in cooling through the muscovite 40Ar/39Ar closure temperature by 21.8 Ma. Although a local continuation of the South Tibetan detachment is not unambiguously identified in central Himachal Pradesh extrusion was likely facilitated by a system of several minor late Oligocene/early Miocene top-to-the-N to NE shear zones. In contrast to the crystalline of Zanskar and eastern Himachal Pradesh, extrusion was not accompanied by widespread decompression melting.

  11. Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors from Aerial Parts of Ruta Chalepensis Grown in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayadah B. Shehadeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available From the aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis L., grown in Jordan, two furanocoumarins (bergapten and chalepensin, one flavonoid glycoside (rutin as well as several minor compounds have been isolated. The structural elucidation of these compounds was established based on spectral data (UV, IR, MS,1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. In Jordan, R. chalepensis is recommended for the treatment of rheumatism, mental disorders and menstrual problems. Fresh and dried leaves are used as flavoring agent in food and beverages. Antiplatelet activities of the crude methanolic and ethylacetate extracts in addition to the three isolated major compounds were measured by the aggrometric method according to Beretz and Casenave. Optical aggregometer connected to dual channel recorder was used for measuring aggregation. Both, ethylacetate and methanol extracts inhibited ADP- induced platelet aggregation (ADP-IA of human blood. However, only ethylacetate extract was able to induce 50% inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation (Co-IA platelet rich plasma. Bergapten was more active against ADP-IA compared to chalepensin while the latter was more active against Co-IA compared to bergapten.

  12. Microfinance As A Tool For Poverty Reduction: A Study Of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiaková M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of microfinance on the poor, particularly in the specific areas of economic and social development of people and their employment. The research was carried out in Jordan, a country with a well-developed microfinance sector. The results have shown that microfinance has led to an improvement in the financial and social situation of the poor, especially for female clients of microfinance institutions. Interestingly, the higher income of clients has not caused higher expenditure on their basic needs, but rather people have generated saving for their future and used the additional money for education. According to the results of the microfinance impact assessment, it can be assumed that people, particularly females, prefer to improve the social situation for future generations. Based on this finding, we consider microfinance an effective tool for breaking the vicious circles of poverty, especially in Jordan. Furthermore, microcredits have facilitated in increasing employment for the poor, mainly through self-employment. It is believed that there exists a direct connection to the future expansion of microcredits that will lead to the development of small businesses with a promising impact on employability throughout the population structure.

  13. Prevalence of coeliac disease among adult patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahid, O H; Khawaja, N; Shennak, M M; Batieha, A; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2014-02-11

    The prevalence of coeliac disease among patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism has not been studied before in Jordan and other Arab countries. A cross-sectional record-based review was made of all adult autoimmune hypothyroidism patients who attended a referral centre in Jordan, during an 8-month period. Coeliac disease in these patients was diagnosed by the attending physician based on positive serological tests for anti-endomysial antibodies IgA and IgG followed by duodenal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Of 914 patients recruited, 117 (12.8%) were seropositive for coeliac disease. Of 87 seropositive patients who underwent duodenal biopsy, 39 had positive histological findings of coeliac disease (44.8%). Extrapolating from these findings the overall rate of coeliac disease among autoimmune hypothyroidism patients was estimated to be 5.7%. In multivariate logistic regression coeliac disease was significantly associated with older age (> 40 years), presence of other autoimmune diseases, vitamin B12 deficiency and anaemia.

  14. Rate of teenage pregnancy in Jordan and its impact on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Yousef S; Batieha, Anwar; Al Fursan, Rana Kareem; Al-Hader, Rami; Hijazi, Sa'ad S

    2017-07-26

    Objective Research regarding the adverse outcomes of adolescent childbearing has suffered from many limitations such as a small sample size and non-representative samples. This study was conducted to determine the rate of teenage pregnancy among Jordanian adolescents and its associated adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Methods The study is a part of a comprehensive national study of perinatal mortality that was conducted between 2011 and 2012 in Jordan. All women who gave birth after 20 weeks of gestation in 18 maternity hospitals in Jordan between 2011 and 2012 were invited to participate in the study. Consenting women were interviewed by the trained midwives in these hospitals using a structured questionnaire prepared for the purpose of this study. Additional information was also collected based on the physical examination by the midwife and the obstetrician at admission and at discharge. Data on the newborn were also collected by the pediatric nurses and the neonatologists in these hospitals. Results The overall rate of teenage pregnancy [95% confidence interval (CI) was 6.2% (5.9%, 6.5%)]. Of the studied maternal and neonatal outcomes, women aged Teenage pregnancy was associated with increased risk of premature delivery, apart from the effects of socioeconomic factors.

  15. Hybrid wind-PV grid connected power station case study: Al Tafila, Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Tous, Yousif [Department of Electrical Engineering/Faculty of Engineering Technology/ Al-Balqa' Applied University, Amman, P.O.Box (15008), Marka Ashamalia (Jordan); Al-Battat, Saleh [Department of substation maintenance and protection, National Electric Power Company (NEPCO), Amman (Jordan); Abdel Hafith, Sandro [Department of technical support and project supervision/Integrated power systems co., Amman (Jordan)

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we are providing an attempt to highlight the importance of renewable energy, more specifically, the one produced from a wind-solar hybrid system. This purpose will be achieved through providing a detailed case study for such system that would be applied in Al-Tafila, Jordan. First and foremost site assessment has been conducted based on an intensive literature review for the data available regarding the availability of wind and solar energy in Jordan and resulted in the selection of Al-Tafila 2 district as the best option among all. Then, the components of the power station and its size have been selected based on specific criteria that make the station as much efficient and competitive as possible. To obtain the output of the different components with respect to the demand for a period of 25 years, a system model was built using HOMER. Finally, the total capital cost of the system was calculated and resulted to be (63400168) $ and with a cost of energy of (0.053) $/kWh which is a very competitive and feasible cost compared to similar international projects and to the conventional energy price.

  16. Drinking water sources, availability, quality, access and utilization for goats in the Karak Governorate, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaza'leh, Ja'far Mansur; Reiber, Christoph; Al Baqain, Raid; Valle Zárate, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Goat production is an important agricultural activity in Jordan. The country is one of the poorest countries in the world in terms of water scarcity. Provision of sufficient quantity of good quality drinking water is important for goats to maintain feed intake and production. This study aimed to evaluate the seasonal availability and quality of goats' drinking water sources, accessibility, and utilization in different zones in the Karak Governorate in southern Jordan. Data collection methods comprised interviews with purposively selected farmers and quality assessment of water sources. The provision of drinking water was considered as one of the major constraints for goat production, particularly during the dry season (DS). Long travel distances to the water sources, waiting time at watering points, and high fuel and labor costs were the key reasons associated with the problem. All the values of water quality (WQ) parameters were within acceptable limits of the guidelines for livestock drinking WQ with exception of iron, which showed slightly elevated concentration in one borehole source in the DS. These findings show that water shortage is an important problem leading to consequences for goat keepers. To alleviate the water shortage constraint and in view of the depleted groundwater sources, alternative water sources at reasonable distance have to be tapped and monitored for water quality and more efficient use of rainwater harvesting systems in the study area is recommended.

  17. The State of Using SMS-Based e-Government Services: Case Study in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Al-ma'aitah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has wide spread of information technology and communications. In addition, it has improved the infrastructure of mobile phone networks. This encourage government to take advantage of this development and trying to provide SMS-Based e-Government Services through their e-government program. This paper tries to evaluate the state of using SMS-Based e-Government Service in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and study the factors that affect on citizen adoption of this service. This study investigated a sample formed of (600 individuals distributed on three categorize were university students and Employees, public sector employees, private sector employees. The study presented statistical information explained the state of using SMS-based e-government service by Jordanian citizens. In addition the study showed that individual’s beliefs have positive effect on use SMSbased e-government services. Furthermore it orders these factors ascending depending on importance, from Jordanian citizens' perspective. The top three factors were Perceived ease of use, perceived efficiency in time and distance, perceived value for money.

  18. Toxoplasmosis-Related Knowledge and Preventive Practices among Undergraduate Female Students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya A; Obaidat, Mohammad M; Bani Salman, Alaa E; Lafi, Shawkat Q

    2015-06-01

    Foodborne toxoplasmosis is a leading cause of foodborne deaths and hospitalization worldwide. The level of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii is influenced by culture and eating habits. There is a scarcity of data about women's knowledge and perception of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine toxoplasmosis knowledge and preventive practices of young childbearing age women in Jordan. A descriptive cross-sectional study recruited a random sample of 1,390 undergraduate university female students and was stratified based on place of residency. About half of students (51.1%) reported having "ever" heard or read about toxoplasmosis, and almost all students (98.6%) had never been tested for toxoplasmosis. Overall, there was a lack of awareness about toxoplasmosis, its risk factors, symptoms, and timing of infection, and preventive practices. High percentages of females reported a high level of hygienic practices related to hand washing after gardening, changing cat litter, and handling raw meat. However, 16.7% of students reported eating raw meat, 26.5% usually eat traditional herbs, and 17.2% drink untreated spring water. This study establishes a baseline for the awareness levels about toxoplasmosis among young women in Jordan. These findings highlight the urgent need for toxoplasmosis awareness and preventive education for childbearing females. An effective education and outreach program should cover important topics concerning risk factors, high-risk foods, and preventive measures against toxoplasmosis.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy and their predictors among university students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazeen, Jameel Khaleel; Abu-Helalah, Munir Ahmad; Alshraideh, Hussam Ahmad; Alrawashdeh, Omar Salameh; Hawa, Fadi Nather; Dalbah, Tariq Asem; Abdallah, Fadi Walid

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge about epilepsy and the attitudes toward people with epilepsy (PWE) and their predictors among university students in Jordan. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed in three of the largest public universities in Jordan, and a total of 500 questionnaires were collected from each university. The number of students who reported that they had heard or read about epilepsy was 1165 (77.6%), and their data were analyzed. A significant proportion of students thought that epilepsy could be caused by the evil spirit (31.5%) and the evil eye (28.1%) or that it could be a punishment from God (25.9%). Epilepsy's most commonly reported treatment methods were the Holy Quran (71.4%), medications (71.3%), and herbs (29.3%). The most common negative attitudes toward PWE were that the students would refuse to marry someone with epilepsy (50.5%) and that children with epilepsy must join schools for persons with disabilities (44.4%). Male students, students of humanities, and students with a low socioeconomic status tended to have more negative attitudes toward PWE. In conclusion, many students have misconceptions about the causes, treatment, and nature of epilepsy, and students have moderate negative attitudes toward PWE. Universities should have health promotion programs to increase awareness of their students about major public health problems such as epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Methods Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1January to 31December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. Findings There were 27 166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31 747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18 432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Conclusion Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases. PMID:22690034

  1. Mitigating the Risk of Extreme Water Scarcity and Dependency: The Case of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joep F. Schyns

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jordan faces great internal water scarcity and pollution, conflict over trans-boundary waters, and strong dependency on external water resources through trade. This paper analyzes these issues and subsequently reviews options to reduce the risk of extreme water scarcity and dependency. Based on estimates of water footprint, water availability, and virtual water trade, we find that groundwater consumption is nearly double the groundwater availability, water pollution aggravates blue water scarcity, and Jordan’s external virtual water import dependency is 86%. The review of response options yields 10 ingredients for a strategy for Jordan to mitigate the risks of extreme water scarcity and dependency. With respect to these ingredients, Jordan’s current water policy requires a strong redirection towards water demand management. Actual implementation of the plans in the national water strategy (against existing oppositions would be a first step. However, more attention should be paid to reducing water demand by changing the consumption pattern of Jordanian consumers. Moreover, unsustainable exploitation of the fossil Disi aquifer should soon be halted and planned desalination projects require careful consideration regarding the sustainability of their energy supply.

  2. Statistical Verification of Folk Medicinal Potentiality of Wild Dicot Aquatic Plants in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Al-Qura'n

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a floristic study of Jordan with its environs. The study was carried out during 2001-2003 and 287 aquatic dicot samples were collected and photographed in the field. After the identification of the specimens, the total wild aquatic dicot species have been determined as 87 species belonging to 59 genera and 33 plant families were presented in investigated Jordan sites. The endemism rate of the investigated area is 26.4% for the 23 species. The largest 3 families are Labiatae (9 aquatic species, Compositae (7 species and Salicaceae (7 species. The largest genera are Mentha (6 species, Polygonum (5 species and Salix (5 species. Similarities between the taxa and those of neighbouring regions performed were compared in this study. 63 aquatic dicot species (73.3% have therapeutic similarities with neighbouring countries, while the 24 remaining species (26.7% haven't such therapeutic similarity. Emerged species (living with close contact with water body were the most recorded, while amphibious, submerged and floating species were the least. The folk medicinal importance value of aquatic species recorded was identified according to Friedman et al. [1]. Twenty one species (24% have ROP values higher than 50 and therefore; have the highest popularity in folk medicinal potentiality. Twenty six species (29.9% have therapeutic effects informed by less than three informants and therefore; excluded from further consideration. Forty species (46.1% have ROP values less than 50 and therefore; considered nonpopular medicinal plants.

  3. Geophysical Surveys at Khirbat Faynan, an Ancient Mound Site in Southern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Novo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Faynan in Jordan contains the largest copper ore resource zone in the southern Levant (Israel, Jordan, Palestinian territories, Lebanon, Syria, and the Sinai Peninsula. Located 50 km southeast of the Dead Sea, it is home to one of the world’s best-preserved ancient mining and metallurgy districts encompassing an area of ca. 400 km2. During the past three decades, archaeologists have carried out numerous excavations and surveys recording hundreds of mines and sites related to metallurgical activities that span the past 10 millennia. Khirbat Faynan (Biblical Punon, is situated in the main Faynan Valley and is the largest (ca. 15 ha settlement site in the region and has remained unexcavated until 2011. As Jordan’s most southern mound site with indications of widespread ancient architecture, we employed a suite of noninvasive geophysical survey methods to identify areas suitable for excavation. Earlier geophysical surveys were carried out in the Faynan region by our team in the late 1990s when only EMI (electromagnetic induction proved successful, but with relatively poor resolution. As reported here, by 2011, improvements in data processing software and 3D ERT (electrical resistivity tomography sampling protocols made it possible to greatly improve the application of noninvasive geophysical surveying in this hyperarid zone.

  4. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qojas, M.

    1999-03-01

    This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

  5. Comparison of GRACE data and groundwater levels for the assessment of groundwater depletion in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesch, Tanja; Ohmer, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived groundwater storage (GWS) data are compared with in-situ groundwater levels from five groundwater basins in Jordan, using newly gridded GRACE GRCTellus land data. It is shown that (1) the time series for GRACE-derived GWS data and in-situ groundwater-level measurements can be correlated, with R 2 from 0.55 to 0.74, (2) the correlation can be widely ascribed to the seasonal and trend component, since the detrended and deseasonalized time series show no significant correlation for most cases, implying that anomalous signals that deviate from the trend or seasonal behaviour are overlaid by noise, (3) estimates for water losses in Jordan based on the trend of GRACE data from 2003 to 2013 could be up to four times higher than previously assumed using estimated recharge and abstraction rates, and (4) a significant time-lagged cross correlation of the monthly changes in GRACE-derived groundwater storage and precipitation data was found, suggesting that the conventional method for deriving GWS from GRACE data probably does not account for the typical conditions in the study basins. Furthermore, a new method for deriving plausible specific yields from GRACE data and groundwater levels is demonstrated.

  6. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection (Caseous Lymphadenitis in Camels (Camelus dromedarius in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi D. Hawari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study was conducted to describe & report for the first time outbreaks of natural C.pseudotuberculosis infection in adult camel herds (Camelus dromedarius in Jordan. An infectious disease syndrome was reported in three camel herds (Camelus dromedarius intensively raised at south province in Jordan. Approach: The herds included over 160 adult camels out of which about 8% were affected with multiple muscle and subcutaneous abscesses at various sites of the body. The camels were also heavily infested with ticks. Results: The infected camels did not respond favorably to several broad spectrum antibiotics. Post-mortem examination of 5 carcasses revealed emaciation and presence of external and internal multiple abscesses particularly in the lungs. The abscesses were encapsulated by fibrous tissue and contained creamy yellowish white pus. The lymph nodes were slightly congested and swollen. Conclusion: Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis type I strain or biovar ovis (the known cause of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep was isolated from pus, lymph nodes, ticks, milk, blood and liver samples. The clinical symptoms, nature and distribution of lesions of caseous lymphadenitis in camels are not as typical as in sheep. Recommendations for pseudotuberculosis control were given.

  7. An agent-based hydroeconomic model to evaluate water policies in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; Gorelick, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modern water systems can be characterized by a complex network of institutional and private actors that represent competing sectors and interests. Identifying solutions to enhance water security in such systems calls for analysis that can adequately account for this level of complexity and interaction. Our work focuses on the development of a hierarchical, multi-agent, hydroeconomic model that attempts to realistically represent complex interactions between hydrologic and multi-faceted human systems. The model is applied to Jordan, one of the most water-poor countries in the world. In recent years, the water crisis in Jordan has escalated due to an ongoing drought and influx of refugees from regional conflicts. We adopt a modular approach in which biophysical modules simulate natural and engineering phenomena, and human modules represent behavior at multiple scales of decision making. The human modules employ agent-based modeling, in which agents act as autonomous decision makers at the transboundary, state, organizational, and user levels. A systematic nomenclature and conceptual framework is used to characterize model agents and modules. Concepts from the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are adopted to promote clear conceptualization of model classes and process sequencing, establishing a foundation for full deployment of the integrated model in a scalable object-oriented programming environment. Although the framework is applied to the Jordanian water context, it is generalizable to other regional human-natural freshwater supply systems.

  8. Community-based rehabilitation in Jordan: challenges to achieving occupational justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHeresh, Rawan; Bryant, Wendy; Holm, Margo

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents theories of occupational and social justice and applies the theoretical tenets to a community-based rehabilitation (CBR) program in a Palestinian refugee camp in Jordan. The example of building a playground for children with disabilities, and other aspects of the social, political and cultural context in Jordan are described in relation to the theory and practice of CBR, occupational and social justice. Key concepts are explained, analyzed and applied, namely occupational justice, social justice, occupational form and occupational deprivation (a strong determinant of occupational injustice), all of which were relevant in the refugee camp where children with disabilities were deprived of resources and chances to play. Grounding CBR in an occupational justice framework offers justification and inspiration for occupational therapy in similar settings deprived of resources and opportunities wherein both individuals and communities could benefit. Occupational deprivation, such as that seen in refugee camps, is associated with poor mental health and physical frailty. CBR in refugee camps can lead to both occupational justice and social justice for persons with disabilities. Disability laws and legislation must be implemented, not just stated on paper, in order to address the rights of persons with disabilities and social justice.

  9. Hybrid wind-PV grid connected power station case study: Al Tafila, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif El-Tous, Saleh Al-Battat, Sandro Abdel Hafith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we are providing an attempt to highlight the importance of renewable energy, more specifically, the one produced from a wind-solar hybrid system. This purpose will be achieved through providing a detailed case study for such system that would be applied in Al-TafilaJordan. First and foremost site assessment has been conducted based on an intensive literature review for the data available regarding the availability of wind and solar energy in Jordan and resulted in the selection of Al-Tafila 2 district as the best option among all. Then, the components of the power station and its size have been selected based on specific criteria that make the station as much efficient and competitive as possible. To obtain the output of the different components with respect to the demand for a period of 25 years, a system model was built using HOMER. Finally, the total capital cost of the system was calculated and resulted to be (63400168 $ and with a cost of energy of (0.053 $/kWh which is a very competitive and feasible cost compared to similar international projects and to the conventional energy price.

  10. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Chlamydophila abortus infection in dairy herds in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talafha, Abdelsalam Q; Ababneh, Mohammed M; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Al-Majali, Ahmad M

    2012-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine seroprevalence and to identify risk factors associated with Chlamydophila abortus infection in 62 nonvaccinated dairy herds (671 cows) in Jordan between January and June 2007. Information regarding herd management was recorded through a personal interview with farmers. Antibodies against C. abortus were detected using an ELISA test kit. Chi-square analysis and multivariable logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors associated with C. abortus seropositivity. The true prevalence of antibodies against C. abortus in individual cows and cattle herds were 19.9 % and 66.3 %, respectively. Univariable Chi-square analysis revealed three variables with P ≤ 0.25 that were further offered to multivariable logistic regression analysis. Small-sized herds were identified as a risk factor for seropositivity to C. abortus, while sweeping followed by water hosing and using disinfectants were identified as protective factors. Cows in the age groups of >8 and ≤ 10 years old and >2 and ≤ 6 years old had the highest and lowest significant seroprevalence to C. abortus, respectively. Results of this study indicated that C. abortus is highly prevalent in Jordan's dairy herds and Chlamydophila infection could be controlled by applying strict biosecurity measures in the dairy farms.

  11. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-09-01

    The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

  12. Using Landscape Metrics Analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process to Assess Water Harvesting Potential Sites in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Albalawneh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jordan is characterized as a “water scarce” country. Therefore, conserving ecosystem services such as water regulation and soil retention is challenging. In Jordan, rainwater harvesting has been adapted to meet those challenges. However, the spatial composition and configuration features of a target landscape are rarely considered when selecting a rainwater-harvesting site. This study aimed to introduce landscape spatial features into the schemes for selecting a proper water-harvesting site. Landscape metrics analysis was used to quantify 10 metrics for three potential landscapes (i.e., Watershed 104 (WS 104, Watershed 59 (WS 59, and Watershed 108 (WS 108 located in the Jordanian Badia region. Results of the metrics analysis showed that the three non–vegetative land cover types in the three landscapes were highly suitable for serving as rainwater harvesting sites. Furthermore, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to prioritize the fitness of the three target sites by comparing their landscape metrics. Results of AHP indicate that the non-vegetative land cover in the WS 104 landscape was the most suitable site for rainwater harvesting intervention, based on its dominance, connectivity, shape, and low degree of fragmentation. Our study advances the water harvesting network design by considering its landscape spatial pattern.

  13. Deep crustal structure and continent-ocean boundary along the Galicia continental margin (NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druet, María; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Carbó, Andrés; Acosta, Juan; Granja Bruña, José Luis; Llanes, Pilar; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Ercilla, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    The Galicia continental margin is a magma-poor rifted margin with an extremely complex structure. Its formation involves several rifting episodes during the Mesozoic in the vicinity of a ridge triple junction, which produces a change in the orientation of the main structures. In addition, there is an overimposed Cenozoic partial tectonic inversion along its northern border. Although this continental margin has been widely studied since the 70's, most studies have focused on its western part in the transition to the Iberia Abyssal Plain, and there is a significant lack of information on the north and northwestern flanks of this margin. This fact, along with its great structural complexity, has resulted in the absence of a previous comprehensive regional geodynamic model integrating all the processes observed. In the present study we integrate a large volume of new geophysical data (gravity, swath bathymetry and 2D multichannel reflection seismic). Data come from the systematic mapping of the Spanish EEZ project which provides a dense grid of gravity data and full seafloor coverage with swath bathymetry, and from the ERGAP project which provides serially-arranged 2D seismic reflection profiles across the NW Iberia margin. The combined interpretation and modelling of this new information has arisen significant constraints on the origin, the deep crustal structure and the physiographic complexity of the margin, as well as on the characterization of the along- and across-strike variation of the ocean-continent transition along NW Iberia margin. The analysis of this information leads us to propose a conceptual model for the initiation of the tectonic inversion of a magma-poor rifted margin. Finally, a framework for the geodynamic evolution of the Galicia margin has been constructed, involving three main stages: A) an early stage from the end of rifting and oceanic drift in the Bay of Biscay (Santonian); B) an intermediate stage with the beginning of tectonic inversion in

  14. A Holocene speleothem record from Morocco, NW Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenburg, Jasper; Fietzke, Jan; Richter, Detlev; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    A well dated Holocene speleothem (stalagmite) from the Middle Atlas Mountains in Morocco has been investigated for its continental climate record. The aim is to compile an improved understanding of the climatically complex triple point of the North Atlantic, Mediterranean and Saharan / Monsoonal climate realms in NW Africa. At present, only few studies concerning continental climate reconstructions from NW Africa have been published (Lamb et al. 1995, Cheddadi et al. 1998, Genty et al. 2006). Given the significance of this region, this lack of data forms a strong motivation for additional, well dated climate records. The speleothem (GP2) was sampled in the 'Grotte de Piste' (ca 800 m above sea level), mean annual precipitation is about 930 mm (mainly falling in the winter season) and the mean annual temperature is about 13° C. GP2 is 60 cm tall and grew - based on U/Th MC-ICP-MS data - continuously between 11.5 kyr BP (early Holocene) and 2.9 kyr BP (late Holocene). X-Ray Diffraction data indicate a mainly aragonitic mineralogy. 'Hendy tests' suggest that CaCO3 precipitation was close to isotopic equilibrium with respect to oxygen isotopes, however kinetic effects might have influenced carbon isotopes. Carbon and oxygen isotope data have been measured along a transect with increments of approximately 1 mm representing a resolution of about 15 yrs. Highly covariant oscillations in δ13C and δ18O with an average cyclicity of about 410 yrs. are observed. These oscillations coincide with macroscopically visible high density and low density layers, possibly reflecting a higher or lower amount of inclusions and perhaps higher and lower growth rates. Geochemical analysis of speloan aragonite is accompanied by cave monitoring that has started in November 2009. Parameters quantified include: drip water parameters, cave air humidity, pCO2 and cave air temperature. Precipitation experiments using watch glasses will also be performed. References Cheddadi, R., Lamb, H. F

  15. Situation Report--Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in twelve foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bahrain, Central African Republic, Gabon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two…

  16. The Impact of Employing Brainstorming Strategy on Improving Writing Performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoush, Kholoud Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying the impact of employing brainstorming strategy on improving writing performance of English Major Students at Balqa Applied University in Jordan. The sample of the study which consisted of 80 male and female university students was distributed into two groups; experimental (taught by brainstorming strategy) and…

  17. Attitude of Ash-Shobak University College Students to E-Exam for Intermediate University Degree in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da'asin, Khaled Awad

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the attitude of Ash-Shobak university college students concerning the electronic exam for intermediate university degree in Jordan, and identify the impact of gender and grade point average (GPA) variables on students' attitudes. To achieve this objective, a questionnaire consisting of (26) items was used, and…

  18. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Ghunmi, L.N.A.H.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Fayyed, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD5, COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1) d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and 560

  19. Utility of multi temporal satellite images for crop water requirements estimation and irrigation management in the Jordan Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying the spatial and temporal distribution of crop water requirements is a key for successful management of water resources in the dry areas. Climatic data were obtained from three automated weather stations to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ETO) in the Jordan Valley according to the...

  20. Passive smoking as a risk factor of anemia in young children aged 0–35 months in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Beltran Martin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passive smoking unfavorably affects pregnancy, child birth and child health. Passive smoking associates with still-birth, premature birth as well as acute respiratory infection, asthma, disorder in red blood cell metabolism in children. This study examined the effects of passive smoking on anemia in young children in Jordan. Methods The analysis based on the information from 740 children aged 0–35 months that were tested for hemoglobin levels included in the 2002 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey. This study used multivariate logistic regression method to analyze the effect of passive smoking on anemia in young children in Jordan, controlling for a number of risk factors and confounding factors for anemia. Results Results indicated that independent of other risk factors and confounding factors, anemia in young children was strongly positively associated with exposure to passive smoking from both parents (OR= 2.99, p p Conclusion Passive smoking from both parents was strongly positively associated with anemia in young children in Jordan independent of other risk factors and confounding factors. The results support the importance of smoking prevention during and after pregnancy that prevent childhood anemia and others morbidities in young children.

  1. Situation Report--Algeria, Bangladesh, Fiji, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Iran, Jordan, New Zealand, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in nine foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Algeria, Bangledesh, Fiji, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Iran, Jordan, New Zealand, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone. Information is provided under two topics, general background and family planning situation, where…

  2. Effectiveness of Analogy Instructional Strategy on Undergraduate Student's Acquisition of Organic Chemistry Concepts in Mutah University, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Nawaf Ahmad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of analogy instructional strategy on undergraduate students' acquisition of organic chemistry concepts in Mutah University, Jordan. A quasi-experimental design was used in the study; Participants were 97 students who enrolled in organic chemistry course at the department of chemistry during the…

  3. Developing a Numerical Ability Test for Students of Education in Jordan: An Application of Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Eman Rasmi; Al-Absi, Mohammad Mustafa; Abu shindi, Yousef Abdelqader

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is developing a test to measure the numerical ability for students of education. The sample of the study consisted of (504) students from 8 universities in Jordan. The final draft of the test contains 45 items distributed among 5 dimensions. The results revealed that acceptable psychometric properties of the test;…

  4. Developing water and sanitation services in refugee settings from emergency to sustainability - The case of Zaatari Camp in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, A.W.C.; Bhai, A.; Coloni, F.; Koning, W.J.G.; De Bakker, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Three years after Zaatari camp was established in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, to host Syrian refugees, its population has grown to 82,000 persons. Zaatari is one of the largest refugee camps in the world, in one of the most water scarce areas on earth. Since its establishment, drinking water ha

  5. Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching and Learning--A Comparison of Teachers' and Student Teachers' Beliefs from Jordan, Turkey and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoush, Siham; Markic, Silvija; Usak, Muhammet; Erdogan, Mehmet; Eilks, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses beliefs about teaching and learning chemistry. The sample includes chemistry student teachers and in-service teachers from Jordan, Turkey, and Germany. Two test instruments were used to investigate (student) teachers' beliefs. A qualitative instrument was used to explore Beliefs about Classroom Organization, Beliefs about…

  6. Rationales of a Shift towards Knowledge Economy in Jordan from the Viewpoint of Educational Experts and Relationship with Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Zboon, Mohammad Saleem; Al Ahmad, Suliman Diab Ali; Al Zboon, Saleem Odeh

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify rationales underlying a shift towards knowledge economy in education as perceived by the educational experts in Jordan and relationship with some variables. The random stratum sample (n = 90) consisted of educational experts representing faculty members in the Jordanian universities and top leaders…

  7. Acquisition of Some Selected Prepositions of Time by English Major Undergraduates at Balqa Applied University in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudah, Ayat Khalid

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the acquisition of some selected prepositions of time by English major undergraduates at Balqa Applied University in Jordan and to reveal any significant differences among their acquisition attributed to the academic level (1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year levels) and to studying "English Basic Grammar" course. A…

  8. Developing water and sanitation services in refugee settings from emergency to sustainability - The case of Zaatari Camp in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, A.W.C.; Bhai, A.; Coloni, F.; Koning, W.J.G.; De Bakker, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Three years after Zaatari camp was established in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, to host Syrian refugees, its population has grown to 82,000 persons. Zaatari is one of the largest refugee camps in the world, in one of the most water scarce areas on earth. Since its establishment, drinking water

  9. Organizational Conflict among Teachers and the Principal's Strategies of Dealing with It from the Teachers' Perspective in Schools of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubran, Ali Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate the degree of organizational conflict among teachers in Jordanian schools, along with the principal strategies to deal with them effectively. The research population was based on a sample of 123 teachers from Irbid, Jordan for the academic year 2013/2014. A descriptive research approach was adopted with the help of…

  10. Jordan-3: measuring visual reversals in children as symptoms of learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Brian T; Martin, Nancy; Austin, J Sue

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to establish new norms for the Jordan-3 for children ages 5 to 18 years. The research also investigated the frequency of visual reversals in children previously identified as having reading disability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and broader learning disabilities. Participants were regular education students, ages 5 through 18 years, and special education students previously diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, reading disability, or broader learning disability. Jordan-3 Accuracy and Error raw scores were compared to assess if there was a significant difference between the two groups. Mean Accuracy and Error scores were compared for males and females. Children with learning disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had higher reversals when compared to regular education children, which lends continued support to the Jordan-3 as a valid and reliable measure of visual reversals in children and adolescents. This study illustrates the utility of the Jordan-3 when assessing children who may require remediation to reach their academic potential.

  11. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Ghunmi, L.N.A.H.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Fayyed, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD5, COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1) d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and

  12. New records for the horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan with remarks on ecology and zoogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan is the richest in the Levant, with 24 known species. During the 20-year project “the ecology and zoogeography of the Lepidoptera of the Near East,” USDA, Agricultural Research Service scientists in Gainesville, FL and Israeli scientists regularly c...

  13. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of grey water for reuse requirements and treatment alternatives: the case of Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Ghunmi, L.N.A.H.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Fayyed, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the potentials and requirements for grey water reuse in Jordan. The results revealed that urban, rural and dormitory grey water production rate and concentration of TS, BOD5, COD and pathogens varied between 18-66 L cap(-1) d(-1), 848-1,919, 200-1,056, and 560

  14. The Future Justification to Adopt Governance System at the Jordan Universities from the Perspective of Educational Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nair, Natheer Sihan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal the future justification to adopt governance system at the Jordanian Universities from the perspective of educational experts. The study society was the academic staff in the field of education at Al-Balqa Applied University and Jordan University, at the first semester of the academic year 2013-2014. The study…

  15. Learning English as a Second Language at the University Level in Jordan: Motivation, Self-Regulation and Learning Environment Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Eman; Aldridge, Jill M.; Khine, Myint Swe

    2016-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of the learning environment and whether these influenced their motivation and self-regulation in learning English as a second language at the university level in Jordan. Our sample involved 994 students, drawn from 13 schools, within three faculties (humanities, health…

  16. Developing water and sanitation services in refugee settings from emergency to sustainability - The case of Zaatari Camp in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, A.W.C.; Bhai, A.; Coloni, F.; Koning, W.J.G.; De Bakker, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Three years after Zaatari camp was established in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, to host Syrian refugees, its population has grown to 82,000 persons. Zaatari is one of the largest refugee camps in the world, in one of the most water scarce areas on earth. Since its establishment, drinking water ha

  17. 78 FR 25623 - Importation of Fresh Beans, Shelled or in Pods, From Jordan Into the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... from Jordan. A quarantine pest is defined in Sec. 319.56-2 as ``a pest of potential economic importance...: Lycaenidae........ Medium Fungus Phoma exigua var. diversispora Ascomycete: Mitosporic fungi... Medium (Bub k... pest, the fungus Phoma exigua var. diversispora, also causes conspicuous damage to fresh beans in the...

  18. Learning English as a Second Language at the University Level in Jordan: Motivation, Self-Regulation and Learning Environment Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, Eman; Aldridge, Jill M.; Khine, Myint Swe

    2016-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of the learning environment and whether these influenced their motivation and self-regulation in learning English as a second language at the university level in Jordan. Our sample involved 994 students, drawn from 13 schools, within three faculties (humanities, health…

  19. A model-based assessment of the effects of projected climate change on the water resources of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A J; Black, E; Brayshaw, D J; El-Bastawesy, M; Holmes, P A C; Butterfield, D; Nuimat, S; Jamjoum, K

    2010-11-28

    This paper is concerned with the quantification of the likely effect of anthropogenic climate change on the water resources of Jordan by the end of the twenty-first century. Specifically, a suite of hydrological models are used in conjunction with modelled outcomes from a regional climate model, HadRM3, and a weather generator to determine how future flows in the upper River Jordan and in the Wadi Faynan may change. The results indicate that groundwater will play an important role in the water security of the country as irrigation demands increase. Given future projections of reduced winter rainfall and increased near-surface air temperatures, the already low groundwater recharge will decrease further. Interestingly, the modelled discharge at the Wadi Faynan indicates that extreme flood flows will increase in magnitude, despite a decrease in the mean annual rainfall. Simulations projected no increase in flood magnitude in the upper River Jordan. Discussion focuses on the utility of the modelling framework, the problems of making quantitative forecasts and the implications of reduced water availability in Jordan.

  20. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  1. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Necker, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 2 sites at Necker in the NW...

  2. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Laysan, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 3 sites around Laysan in the NW...

  3. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  4. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Midway, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Midway in the NW...

  5. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Necker, NW Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 2 sites at Necker in the NW...

  6. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Lisianski, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 9 sites at Lisianski in the NW...

  7. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 9 sites at Maro Reef in the NW...

  8. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Midway, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 9 sites at Midway in the NW...

  9. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Maro Reef in the NW...

  10. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands (NWHI), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Kure Atoll in the NW...

  11. CRED REA Fish Team Stationary Point Count Surveys at Midway, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stationary Point Counts at 4 stations at each survey site were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) conducted at 9 sites around Midway in the NW...

  12. CRED REA Fish Team Belt Transect Survey at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 3 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 9 sites at Maro Reef in the NW...

  13. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Laysan, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 3 sites at Laysan in the NW...

  14. Microplankton from three Palaeozoic formations in the province of León, NW-Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, F.H.

    1964-01-01

    In the Lower Palaeozoic where true palynological microfossils become rare, much use can be made of other acid-resistant microfossils such as acritarchs and chitinozoans. This study gives some of the results of an investigation on the presence of acritarchs and chitinozoans in three essentially Lower

  15. Hillslope surface deformation on chalky landscape under the influence of Quaternary tectonics coupled with periglacial processes, Picardy (NW France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperret, Anne; Vandycke, Sara; Colbeaux, Jean-Pierre; Raimbault, Celine; Duguet, Timothée; Van vliet-lanoe, Brigitte

    2017-04-01

    Chalky hillslopes observed in Picardy region (NW Paris basin, France) evidence specific surficial ridges and steps, of several meters high and several ten-meters length, roughly parallel oriented to slopes on some dry valleys. They are locally named "rideaux" or strip-lynchets. Their origin is still discussed among the communities of geology, geography, archeology and pedology. Detailed observations of the Picardy coastal chalk cliffs using high resolution low-lying aerial LiDAR and field works allow us to precisely describe and understand ridges and steps formation. At Bois de Cise, a rectangular depression with ridges and steps was observed in 3D on the ground, due to its natural overlap by the cliff face. This structure proves to be a graben, controlled by conjugate normal faults, at the top of which the ridges and steps are developed. The set forms a "step-graben" composed of a system of faults in relay and ramps, involved in the superficial covering of quaternary loess. Steps formation will be discussed in relation with the tectonic context (paleo-constraint fields), the continental water circulation within the karst, the presence of break-up structures on the fault planes, the role of cryogenic processes during the last glacial epochs and the remobilization of loess surface deposits. Caves and temporary springs of fresh water along faults evidence a karstic behavior in the chalk and suggests step-graben structures as geological guides for hydrogeological circulation in the chalk of Picardy. In this context, chalky surficial step-structures appears as tectonically controlled and as the witness of a recent active tectonics in the NW european chalk basin. In addition, the field of steps developed on a coastal fossil cliff tends to prove the occurrence of a fractured system, developed according to a paleo-field of NW-SE extensive stresses. Data from the CROCOLIT-Leg1 (Duperret, 2013) campaign carried out on the offshore subtidal platform (shallow bathymetry, THR

  16. Methane emissions from the upwelling area off Mauritania (NW Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kock

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal upwelling regions have been identified as sites of enhanced CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The coastal upwelling area off Mauritania (NW Africa is one of the most biologically productive regions of the world's ocean but its CH4 emissions have not been quantified so far. More than 1000 measurements of atmospheric and dissolved CH4 in the surface layer in the upwelling area off Mauritania were performed as part of the German SOPRAN (Surface Ocean Processes in the Anthropocene study during two cruises in March/April 2005 (P320/1 and February 2007 (P348. During P348 enhanced CH4 saturations of up to 200% were found close to the coast and were associated with upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water. An area-weighted, seasonally adjusted estimate yielded overall annual CH4 emissions in the range from 1.6 to 2.9 Gg CH4. Thus the upwelling area off Mauritania represents a regional hot spot of CH4 emissions but seems to be of minor importance for the global oceanic CH4 emissions.

  17. Eruptive Variable Stars and Outflows in Serpens NW

    CERN Document Server

    Hodapp, Klaus W; Watermann, Ramon; Lemke, Roland

    2011-01-01

    We study the outflow activity, photometric variability and morphology of three very young stellar objects in the Serpens NW star forming region: OO Serpentis, EC 37 (V370 Ser) and EC 53 (V371 Ser). High spatial resolution Keck/NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics images obtained in 2007 and 2009 in broad-band K and in a narrow-band filter centered on the 1-0 S(1) emission line of molecular hydrogen allow us to identify the outflows from all three objects. We also present new, seeing-limited data on the photometric evolution of the OO Ser reflection nebula and re-analyze previously published data. We find that OO Ser declined in brightness from its outburst peak in 1995 to about 2003, but that this decline has recently stopped and actually reversed itself in some areas of the reflection nebula. The morphology and proper motions of the shock fronts MHO 2218 near EC 37 suggest that they all originate in EC 37 and that this is an outflow seen nearly along its axis. We identify a molecular hydrogen jet emerging ...

  18. Influence of family history and lifestyle on blood pressure and heart rate in young adults in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safi, Saafan A; Aboul-Enein, Faisal H; Aboul-Enein, Basil H; Manuel, Bradley

    2006-11-01

    The most prevalent disease in Jordan is hypertension. Jordan is a small, middle-income developing country in the Middle East. It has a population of 5611202 people. Few studies have examined the associated cardiovascular risk factors in Jordan. The aim of this investigation was to explore specific lifestyles in Jordan, measuring blood pressure and heart rate through a randomized cross-sectional population study. A total of 14310 adult males (7400) and females (6910) were selected in various regions of Jordan. Selected participants were interviewed by trained senior pharmacy students. They were asked whether they had hypertension or other cardiovascular disorders and if the answer was negative further questions were asked. This was followed by measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. Demographic data such as age, sex and nationality were also recorded, as was family history of hypertension. For each individual of the sample, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate were measured three times with 10-15min intervals in a sitting position and resting state. The Student's unpaired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results were considered statistically significant when the P value was less than 0.05. A general trend in all the results tables was a lower blood pressure among those without a family history of cardiovascular disease and higher values among those with a family history of cardiovascular disease. This study demonstrates that SBP and DBP increase with all associated risk factors if a family history of hypertension is positive. This cross-sectional study revealed the presence of a consistent and strong relationship between certain lifestyle risk factors with an elevation in blood pressure concurrent with a positive family history of hypertension.

  19. Children in Jordan: what is their health status and how do they perceive nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Ma'aitah, R

    1995-10-01

    45% of Jordan's 1991 population of 4.2 million was younger than age 15 years. The 1992 rate of infant mortality was 35 deaths/1000 live births and there were 5 child deaths/1000. 94%, 94%, and 88% of two-year old children in 1993 were fully immunized, respectively, against polio, triple, and measles. The major causes of infant mortality are prematurity (19.5%), pneumonia (18.4%), gastrointestinal problems (11%), and infectious diseases (7.4%), while the major causes of death among children under the age of five years are gastrointestinal (14%), pneumonia (12.5%), infectious diseases (3.5%), and accidents (3%). Causes of death among infants and children under five were known for only 50% and 30% of deaths, respectively. In 1990, approximately 94% of infants were breastfed, with the percentage falling to 84% by age 4-5 months and 66% after 9 months. 5.6% of infants younger than age one year and 13.1% of children aged 2-5 years were anemic. 20% of children under five were stunted or short for their age and another 3% of children under age five were wasted. The majority of these children's health problems could be managed and improved through health promotion and primary prevention. Nurses can greatly influence the health status of children and mothers in Jordan by providing quality care at all levels of promotion and health care intervention. Assessing children's image of nurses is an important aspect of nursing care. Jordanian children aged 6-12 were therefore asked to make two representational drawings and commentary of a nurse doing something and a nurse and doctor working together. Independent nurse roles perceived by the children included treating, examining children, and planning for care. Only a minority depicted doctors in a dominant, larger size. 30% of Jordanian nurses are male, but all drawings depicted female nurses; only female nurses care for children in Jordan. 62% drew nonsmiling nurses, 52% drew nonsmiling children, 96% of children's drawings depicted

  20. Climate Risk assessment and management in rainfed agriculture areas in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural production is closely tied to climate, making agriculture one of the most climate-sensitive of all economic sectors. Figures and data from official resources and previous studies demonstrated that most of agricultural areas in Jordan were rainfed which made agriculture in the country more susceptible to climate change. The percentage of harvested to cultivated areas in those areas over the past ten years ranged from 45-55%, indicating a high risk associated with rainfed agriculture in Jordan. The anticipated increase in temperature and decrease in precipitation would adversely affect crops and water availability, critically influencing the patterns of future agricultural production, threatens livelihoods and keeps vulnerable people insecure. The anticipated increase in temperature and decrease in precipitation would result in 15-20% yield reduction for major field crops and vegetable crops by 2050 and 2070. This study was conducted to help in formulating action plans to adapt to climate change by assessing the risk from climate change on rainfed agriculture. The scenarios of climate change were used to assess the impact of climate change on rainfed agriculture. The overall risk level was based on possible land use shifts and crop yield under the most probable climate change scenarios. Accordingly, adaptive measures were proposed to reduce the impacts of climate change on agriculture in Jordan. The adaptation measures included the improvement of soil water storage to maximize plant water availability, the management of crop residue and tillage to conserve soil and water, the selection of drought-tolerant crop varieties, the expansion of water harvesting schemes through encouraging the farmers to adopt and apply the in-situ water harvesting systems (micro-catchment). Finally, the study emphasized the need for capacity building and awareness creation at the levels of farmers and extension staff. This would require the formulation of plans and strategies

  1. Practicing Conservation Agriculture to mitigate and adapt to Climate Change in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2016-04-01

    Climate change scenarios indicate that Jordan and the Middle East could suffer from reduced agricultural productivity and water availability among other negative impacts. Based on the projection models for the area, average temperature in Jordan is projected to increase between 1.2 and 1.6 °C by 2050. Projections for precipitation trends are projected to decrease by 16% by the year 2050. Evaporation is likely to increase due to higher temperatures. This is likely to increase the incidence of drought potential since precipitation is projected to decrease. The dominant form of agriculture system in Jordan is based on intensive tillage. This form of tillage has resulted in large losses of organic soil carbon, weaker soil structure, and cause compaction. It has negative effects on soil aeration, root development and water infiltration among other factors. There is a need to transform farming practices to conservation agriculture to sequester carbon so that climate change mitigation becomes an inherent property of future farming systems. Conservation Agriculture, a system avoiding or minimizing soil disturbance, combined with soil cover and crop diversification, is considered to be a sustainable production system that can also sequester carbon unlike tillage agriculture. Conservation agriculture promotes minimal disturbance of the soil by tillage (zero tillage), balanced application of chemical inputs and careful management of residues and wastes. This study was conducted to develop a clear understanding of the impacts and benefits of the two most common types of agriculture, traditional tillage agriculture and conservation agriculture with respect to their effects on land productivity and on soil carbon pools. The study results indicated that conservation agriculture contributed to the reduction of the farming systems' greenhouse gas emissions and enhance its role as carbon sinks. Also, it was found that by shifting to conservation agriculture labor cost needed for

  2. Source detection by chemical and isotopic means - the Lower Jordan River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillel, Noa; Geyer, Stefan; Khayat, Saed; Licha, Tobias; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Siebert, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the past several decades the volume of freshwater carried by the Lower Jordan River (LJR) has been reduced by 90% due to damming of its main tributaries, leaving a mixed flow of polluted and brackish to saline water from anthropogenic and partly known geogenic sources. Since the river represents the highly secured border between Jordan, Israel and the West Bank, neither systematic nor long-term measurements were conducted in it. Only vague knowledge exists about the amount and composition of natural contributors and no knowledge concerning their temporal dynamics. However, since the river water is intensely used for irrigation along its course and represents the major source of water to the Dead Sea, the spatio-temporal variation of water discharge and chemistry are required for water resource assessment in the Lower Jordan Valley and the Dead Sea. To monitor the temporal variations of water discharge and hydrochemistry, an automatic sampler, including water level and EC sensors with real time transmission were installed at the Baptism site, a few kilometers upstream of the delta. Major ions are analyzed on a daily basis, while stable isotopes of sulfate (δ34S, δ18O), nitrate (δ15N, δ18O) and water (δ2H, δ18O) are analyzed on an event basis. A general inverse correlation between EC and water level was found although extreme high conductivity values relate to flood events during the wet period. Due to the high-resolution monitoring, a series of flood events could be observed, some having unusually high saline water. Results from Cl/Br, Na/Cl, Mg/Ca, δ34S allow separation and identification of sources: (i) the dissolution of evaporite minerals, abundant in the surrounding geological strata, (ii) sewage and (iii) brine springs. The continuous monitoring is an essential tool for understanding long-term processes and changes in such a dynamic system, and is crucial for identifying rarely occurring extreme flow events. However, a single sampling location is

  3. Late Pleistocene eolian features in southeastern Maryland and Chesapeake Bay region indicate strong WNW-NW winds accompanied growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Litwin, R.J.; Pavich, M.J.; Brook, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Inactive parabolic dunes are present in southeastern Maryland, USA, along the east bank of the Potomac River. More elongate and finer-grained eolian deposits and paha-like ridges characterize the Potomac River-Patuxent River upland and the west side of Chesapeake Bay. These ridges are streamlined erosional features, veneered with eolian sediment and interspersed with dunes in the low-relief headwaters of Potomac- and Patuxent-river tributaries. Axis data for the dunes and ridges indicate formation by WNW-NW winds. Optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon age data suggest dune formation from ??? 33-15??ka, agreeing with the 30-13??ka ages Denny, C.S., Owens, J.P., Sirkin, L., Rubin, M., 1979. The Parsonburg Sand in the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1067-B, 16??pp. suggested for eolian deposits east of Chesapeake Bay. Age range and paleowind direction(s) for eolian features in the Bay region approximate those for late Wisconsin loess in the North American midcontinent. Formation of midcontinent loess and Bay-region eolian features was coeval with rapid growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and strong cooling episodes (??18O minima) evident in Greenland ice cores. Age and paleowind-direction coincidence, for eolian features in the midcontinent and Bay region, indicates strong mid-latitude WNW-NW winds for several hundred kilometers south of the Laurentide glacial terminus that were oblique to previously simulated anticyclonic winds for the last glacial maximum.

  4. Underway physical and meteorological data from NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN in the North Pacific from 2000-04-06 to 2000-12-09 (NCEI Accession 0000362)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conductivity, temperature, salinity, pressure, and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN from April 6, 2000 to December 9, 2000. Data were...

  5. Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar ST

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sami T Azar,1 Hadi Abu Hantash,2 Selim Jambart,3 Mohammad M El-Zaheri,4 Rachoin Rachoin,5 Amal Chalfoun,6 Layla Lahoud,6 Osama Okkeh,2 Peter Bramlage,7 Philippe Brudi,8 Baishali M Ambegaonkar81American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Istishari Hospital, Amman, Jordan; 3St Joseph University Faculty of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon; 4Jordan Hospital, Amman, Jordan; 5Notre Dame des Secours Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon; 6MSD Levant, Beirut, Lebanon; 7Institut für Pharmakologie und präventive Medizin, Mahlow, Germany; 8Merck and Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USABackground: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Therefore, as part of the Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS, we have analyzed the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and risk factors for dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan.Methods: This cross-sectional, multicenter study enrolled 617 patients at 13 hospitals in Lebanon and Jordan. Patients were at least 45 years old and had been treated with statins for at least 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient characteristics contributing to dyslipidemia during statin therapy.Results: Our findings indicated that 55.9% of statin-treated patients (mean age 60.3 years, 47% female in Lebanon and Jordan did not achieve goal levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol which were dependent on Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE risk, and 70% of patients (76% men and 63.3% of women were at very high cardiovascular risk. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals were not achieved in 67.2% of those with very high cardiovascular risk. The most commonly prescribed statin was atorvastatin (44.6%, followed by simvastatin (27.7%, rosuvastatin (21.2%, fluvastatin (3.3%, pravastatin (3%, and lovastatin (0.2%. Approximately half of the population was treated with a statin dose potency of 4, equaling 40 mg of simvastatin. In

  6. Heterogeneity in Perceptions of Parenting Among Arab Refugee Adolescents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G; Ahmad, Ikhlas

    2017-06-15

    Heterogeneity in parenting was examined in 883 Arab refugee adolescents in Jordan (Mage  = 15.01 years, SD = 1.60). Latent profile analyses of five parenting dimensions rated separately for mothers and fathers yielded authoritative, authoritarian, indifferent, punitive, and for mothers, permissive profiles, with most mothers (60%) and fathers (66%) classified as authoritative. Parenting was more often authoritative for women than men and punitive (for fathers) or permissive (for mothers) of boys than girls. Authoritative fathers and authoritarian mothers were better educated than punitive parents, whose offspring reported more norm breaking and internalizing symptoms and lower academic achievement than other youth. Adjustment was better when adolescents had at least one authoritative parent than when parents were either consistent or discrepant but nonauthoritative. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  7. Symplectic Covariance Properties for Shubin and Born-Jordan Pseudo-Differential Operators

    CERN Document Server

    de Gosson, Maurice A

    2011-01-01

    Among all classes of pseudo-differential operators only the Weyl operators enjoy the property of symplectic covariance with respect to conjugation by elements of the metaplectic group. In this paper we show that there is, however, a weaker form of symplectic covariance for Shubin's {\\tau}-dependent operators, in which the intertwiners no longer are metaplectic, but still are invertible non-unitary operators. We also study the case of Born--Jordan operators, which are obtained by averaging the {\\tau}-operators over the interval [0,1] (such operators have recently been studied by Boggiatto and his collaborators). We show that metaplectic covariance still hold for these operators, with respect top a subgroup of the metaplectic group.

  8. Halopeplis amplexicauis (Vahl Ung.-Sternb (Chenopodiaceae Family. Re-collection in Zarqa of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakher J. Aukour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Halopeplis amplexicaulis is an annual halophytic species that is widespread in salty habitats throughout the countries of the Mediterranean. This species is a Naturalized exotic. In Jordan it was reported that this species was dominant in Wadi Araba, Wadi Rum, Eastern Desert, Shaumari and Al-Azraq Oasis, in the desert (saharo-arabian around the Dead Sea region, and Abar al Hazim. This species might be considered as invader one in such chorotype area, in that it is distributed in the Mediterranean Woodlands and Shrub lands, Deserts and extreme deserts. as the study area considered a dry habit, and on account of its special edaphic and water requirements, it is rare to see this species in such habitat.

  9. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents in Amman, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Joan W; Heath, Nancy L; Emery, Amber A; Toste, Jessica R; Daoud, Fawzi A

    2015-01-01

    While previous research has demonstrated cross-national differences in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), most studies to date have taken place in North America. The present study investigated the prevalence and characteristics of NSSI in a sample of 952 Jordanian adolescents (49.8% female) between the ages of 11-19 years. Participants completed a screening measure to assess occurrence of NSSI and its characteristics. Results indicate an overall lifetime prevalence of 22.6% (n = 215), with significantly more males (26.98%, n = 129) than females (18.14%, n = 86) reporting having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. This study provides empirical evidence that adolescent engagement in NSSI occurs at similar prevalence levels in Jordan, relative to North American samples, whereas gender comparisons of prevalence and characteristics revealed several differences.

  10. Einstein and Jordan reconciled. A frame-invariant approach to scalar-tensor cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pietroni, M. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy); Scarabello, L. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy)]|[Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2006-04-15

    Scalar-Tensor theories of gravity can be formulated in different frames, most notably, the Einstein and the Jordan one. While some debate still persists in the literature on the physical status of the different frames, a frame transformation amounts to a change of units, and then should not affect physical results. We analyze the issue in a cosmological context. In particular, we define all the relevant observables (redshift, distances, cross-sections,..) in terms of frame-independent quantities. Then, we give a frame-independent formulation of the Boltzmann equation, and outline its use in relevant examples such as particle freeze-out and the evolution of the CMB photon distribution function. Finally, we derive the gravitational equations for the frame-independent quantities at first order in perturbation theory. From a practical point of view, the present approach allows the simultaneous implementation of the good aspects of the two frames in a clear and straightforward way. (orig.)

  11. A Sudden Change In Rainfall Characteristics In Amman, Jordan During The Mid 1950s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Samdi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines recent changes, trends and fluctuations in the total rainfall and number of rainy days at Amman Airport Meteorological (AAM station in Jordan during the period 1922-2003. The occurrence of abrupt changes and trends were examined and identified using the Pettitt test, a combination of cumulative sum charts (CUSUM and bootstrapping and the sequential version of Mann-Kendall rank tests. A sudden change and shift in the average of the total rainfall and annual number of rain days occurred in 1957. Annual total rainfall series from Madaba and Mafraq stations are also analyzed and showed similar change and shift points as that which appeared in AAM station. The analysis prevail a decline in the total rainfall and number of rain days in the second half of the past centaury.

  12. Higgs Inflation with a Gauss-Bonnet term in the Jordan Frame

    CERN Document Server

    van de Bruck, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    We consider an extension of Higgs inflation in which the Higgs field is coupled to the Gauss-Bonnet term. Working solely in the Jordan frame, we firstly recover the standard predictions of Higgs inflation without a Gauss-Bonnet term. We then calculate the power spectra for scalar and tensor perturbations in the presence of a coupling to a Gauss-Bonnet term. We show that generically the predictions of Higgs inflation are robust and the contributions to the power spectra coming from the Gauss-Bonnet term are negligible. We find, however, that the end of inflation can be strongly modified and that we hence expect the details of (p)reheating to be significantly altered, leading to some concerns over the feasibility of the model which require further investigations.

  13. Pediculosis capitis among primary-school children in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBashtawy, M; Hasna, F

    2012-01-01

    Pediculosis capitis (head lice infestation) is a worldwide public health concern affecting mostly primary-school children. In a cross-sectional study in 2009/2010, the prevalence of pediculosis capitis and some risk factors for infestation were investigated among 1550 randomly selected primary-school children in Mafraq governorate, Jordan. The prevalence of pediculosis capitis was 26.6%. There were significant differences in the prevalence between girls (34.7%) and boys (19.6%), rural (31.2%) and urban (23.5%) residents, and history of infestation in the previous year (57.4%) versus no history (11.5%), as well as between children of different ages, family size and income (Ppediculosis capitis and the importance of good personal hygiene.

  14. Inorganic analysis of dust fall and office dust in an industrial area of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Qasem M; Momani, Kamal A; Jbarah, Abdel-Aziz Q; Massadeh, Adnan

    2004-10-01

    This article deals with the determination and comparison of heavy metals and water-soluble anions and cations in indoor dust and outdoor dust fall in the petroleum refinery area in Jordan. Three sampling sites were considered in the Jordanian petroleum refinery complex for the collection of dust fall and office dust samples. These samples were analyzed for water-soluble anions (F-, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, C2O4(2-), and SO4(2-)) and cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) using auto-suppressed ion chromatography. Heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, and Al) were determined using flame or graphite-furnace atomic absorption. No correlations were found between heavy metal concentrations in dust fall and office dust samples, indicating different sources. High enrichment factors for heavy metals were found in dust-fall samples, except for Fe and Cr. Zinc showed the highest and cadmium the lowest flux rates.

  15. Design and implementation of a national public health surveillance system in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhali, Sami Adel; Abdallat, Mohammed; Mabdalla, Sultan; Al Qaseer, Bashir; Khorma, Rania; Malik, Mamunur; Profili, Maria Cristina; Rø, Gunnar; Haskew, John

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and improving the health status of communities depend on effective public health surveillance. Adoption of new technologies, standardised case definitions and clinical guidelines for accurate diagnosis, and access to timely and reliable data, remains a challenge for public health surveillance systems however and existing public health surveillance systems are often fragmented, disease specific, inconsistent and of poor quality. We describe the application of an enterprise architecture approach to the design, planning and implementation of a national public health surveillance system in Jordan. This enabled a well planned and collaboratively supported system to be built and implemented using consistent standards for data collection, management, reporting and use. The system is case-based and integrated and employs mobile information technology to aid collection of real-time, standardised data to inform and improve decision-making at different levels of the health system.

  16. Petrology and Origin of Ultramfic Xenoliths from North Eastern Jordan Volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Al-Fugha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of major, minor and trace elements in the Cenozoic alkali basalt from north-eastern Jordan indicates a homogeneous lava flow from a mantle source. These basaltic rocks contain abundant upper mantle xenoliths (spinal lherzolite, harzburgile and olivine- websterite. Theses xenoliths contain olivine, orthopyroxne, clinoporoxene and a few amounts of spinal. Their mineral assemblages, chemistry, texture and major elements abundances indicate they were derived and equilibrated under upper mantle conditions within temperature range for 970-1090°C. Pressure estimates based on the spinal lherzolite stability field restrict the xenoliths source depth to around 65 km. The concentrations of incompatible trace elements (Ba, Rb and Sr. imply a derivation from ultramafic predictive source from the upper mantle with low degree of melting (<20%. Low concentration of Lithium and Rubidium in the basalt is used as an argument against the contamination of the basaltic magma during its journey to the surface.

  17. Counseling Women and Couples on Family Planning: A Randomized Study in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Marianne; Thornton, Rebecca; Chatterji, Minki; Kamhawi, Sarah; Sloane, Phoebe; Halassa, Mays

    2016-09-01

    This article evaluates the effects of involving men in family planning counseling in Jordan using a randomized experiment. We randomly assigned a sample of 1,247 married women to receive women-only counseling, couples counseling, or no counseling. We measured the effects of each type of counseling on family planning use, knowledge, attitudes, and spousal communication about family planning. Compared to no counseling, couples counseling led to a 54 percent increase in uptake of modern methods. This effect is not significantly different from the 46 percent increase in modern method uptake as a result of women-only counseling. This outcome may be due, in part, to lower rates of compliance with the intervention among those assigned to couples counseling compared to women-only counseling. To realize the possible added benefits of involving men, more tailored approaches may be needed to increase men's participation.

  18. 再圆太空梦 AIR JORDAN XI SPACE JAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    207ers

    2009-01-01

    在SNEAKER领域,一双球鞋因在某部电影中“现身”而成为经典的案例不在少数,同样一部电影因某双球鞋的“客串”而引来关注也并不少见,但能像电影《太空大灌篮》(SPACE JAM)与剧中乔丹那双黑/白/蓝配色的AIR JORDAN XI SPACE JAM那样收获“双赢”结果的,却实属可遇而不可求。

  19. Transformations between Jordan and Einstein frames: Bounces, antigravity, and crossing singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenshchik, Alexander Yu.; Pozdeeva, Ekaterina O.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.; Tronconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    We study the relation between the Jordan-Einstein frame transition and the possible description of the crossing of singularities in flat Friedmann universes, using the fact that the regular evolution in one frame can correspond to crossing singularities in the other frame. We show that some interesting effects arise in simple models such as one with a massless scalar field or another wherein the potential is constant in the Einstein frame. The dynamics in these models and in their conformally coupled counterparts are described in detail, and a method for the continuation of such cosmological evolutions beyond the singularity is developed. We compare our approach with some other, recently developed, approaches to the problem of the crossing of singularities.

  20. Near-infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honigs, D.E.; Freelin, J.M.; Hieftje, G.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1983-11-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.