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Sample records for formation determines interaction

  1. Microsocial determinants of the formation verbal-behavioral social practices interact with the mentally ill

    O. F. Pironkova

    2014-01-01

    For respondents with higher education and high social status were characterized by a more humanistic and tolerant practices of interaction with the mentally ill against the possibility of hidden­negativities attitude towards the mentally ill, which is reflected in social practices bypassing the declared position.

  2. Determinants for gallstone formation

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Monsted; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    . Gallstone incidence was assessed through repeated ultrasound examinations. Body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, self-rated health, lifestyle variables, blood lipids, and use of female sex hormones were measured at the baseline examination. Statistical analyses included logistic regression. Based...... re-examination were followed-up completely (mean 11.6 years, N = 2848). The overall cumulative incidence of gallstones was 0.60% per year. Independent positive determinants for incident gallstones were age, female sex, non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol, and gallbladder polyps...... associations were found for blood pressure, smoking, alcohol consumption, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides in meta-analyses. Conclusions: Age, female sex, BMI, non-HDL cholesterol, and polyps are independent determinants for gallstone formation. Incident gallstones and the metabolic syndrome share common risk...

  3. Interactions, Starbursts, and Star Formation

    Johan H. Knapen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study how interactions between galaxies affect star formation within them by considering a sample of almost 1500 of the nearest galaxies, all within a distance of ∼45 Mpc. We use the far-IR emission to define the massive star formation rate (SFR, and then normalise the SFR by the stellar mass of the galaxy to obtain the specific star formation rate (SSFR. We explore the distribution of (SSFR with morphological type and with stellar mass. We calculate the relative enhancement of SFR and SSFR for each galaxy by normalising them by the median SFR and SSFR values of individual control samples of similar non-interacting galaxies. We find that both the median SFR and SSFR are enhanced in interacting galaxies, and more so as the degree of interaction is higher. The increase is moderate, reaching a maximum of a factor of 1.9 for the highest degree of interaction (mergers. While the SFR and SSFR are enhanced statistically by interactions, in many individual interacting galaxies they are not enhanced at all. Our study is based on a representative sample of nearby galaxies and should be used to place constraints on studies based on samples of galaxies at larger distances.

  4. What Determines Star Formation Rates?

    Evans, Neal John

    2017-06-01

    The relations between star formation and gas have received renewed attention. We combine studies on scales ranging from local (within 0.5 kpc) to distant galaxies to assess what factors contribute to star formation. These include studies of star forming regions in the Milky Way, the LMC, nearby galaxies with spatially resolved star formation, and integrated galaxy studies. We test whether total molecular gas or dense gas provides the best predictor of star formation rate. The star formation ``efficiency," defined as star formation rate divided by mass, spreads over a large range when the mass refers to molecular gas; the standard deviation of the log of the efficiency decreases by a factor of three when the mass of relatively dense molecular gas is used rather than the mass of all the molecular gas. We suggest ways to further develop the concept of "dense gas" to incorporate other factors, such as turbulence.

  5. Island formation without attractive interaction

    Jansen, A.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We show that adsorbates on surfaces can form islands even if there are no attractive interactions. Instead, strong repulsion between adsorbates at short distances can lead to islands, because such islands increase the entropy of the adsorbates that are not part of the islands. We suggest that this

  6. Galaxies interactions and induced star formation

    Kennicutt Jr, Robert C; Barnes, JE

    1998-01-01

    The papers that make up this volume present a comprehensive review of the field of galaxy interaction. Galaxies are dynamic forces that evolve, interact, merge, blaze and reshape. This book offers a historical perspective and studies such topics as induced star formation.

  7. Recent star formation in interacting galaxies

    Joseph, R.D.; Wright, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The subset of galaxy-galaxy interactions which have resulted in a merger are, as a class, ultraluminous IR galaxies. Their IR luminosities span a narrow range which overlaps with the most luminous Seyfert galaxies. However, in contrast with Seyfert galaxies, the available optical, IR, and radio properties of mergers show no evidence for a compact non-thermal central source, and are easily understood in terms of a burst of star formation of extraordinary intensity and spatial extent; they are 'super starbursts'. We argue that super starbursts occur in the evolution of most mergers, and discuss the implications of super starbursts for the suggestion that mergers evolve into elliptical galaxies. Finally, we note that merger-induced shocks are likely to leave the gas from both galaxies in dense molecular form which will rapidly cool, collapse, and fragment. Thus a merger might in fact be expected to result in a burst of star formation of exceptional intensity and spatial extent, i.e. a super starburst. (author)

  8. Hierarchy Formation and Self-Determination

    Stefano I. Di Domenico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined how self-determination, the subjective experience of one’s behavior as internally initiated and personally endorsed, depends on one’s standing in real-world social hierarchies. We predicted that those with the traits most relevant to status attainment would be those afforded the most opportunities to be self-determining. We examined the trait of physical attractiveness, given its documented association with social status and no known association with self-determination. First-year undergraduates living in same-sex residences rated their housemates’ social status, while an independent set of observers rated the participants’ physical attractiveness. Consistent with prediction, physically attractive individuals attained the highest levels of social status; in turn, those who attained the highest levels of social status experienced the highest levels of self-determination. These findings provide new insights into self-determination as an inherently relational phenomenon and specifically highlight the formative influence of social status on people’s capacities for self-determination.

  9. Neutron star formation and the weak interaction

    Burrows, A.

    1986-01-01

    The only known direct diagnostic of the central event is its neutrino emission. The imprint of the entire internal evolution is stamped on the spectrum, mix of flavors, luminosities, and features of the accompanying neutrino burst. Detection and scrutiny of this neutrino signal will test theories concerning stellar collapse, type II supernovae, and the formation of neutron stars in ways impossible by other means. Despite the fact that an incredible 3x10 53 ergs may be emitted in neutrinos after the initiation of collapse, the very weakness of the neutrino/matter interaction that allows them to penetrate the stellar envelope and escape makes their detection at the Earth very difficult. Though neutrino astronomy is not yet a mature discipline, the physical theories of collapse have progressed to a sufficient degree that specific and detailed predictions can be made about the neutrino emissions that with future detector technology might be tested. The time seems propitious to summarize and review what is known and suspected about the neutrino signature of collapse, the potential for its detection, and how it can be used to test our ideas about the death of massive stars and the birth of neutrino stars. (orig./BBOE)

  10. Directionally independent energy gap formation due to the hyperfine interaction

    Miyashita, Seiji; Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel

    We study energy gap formation at the level-crossing point due to the hyperfine interaction. In contrast to the energy gap induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the gap induced by the hyperfine interaction is independent of the direction of the magnetic field. We also study the dynamics

  11. Apparatus and method for determining characteristics of subsurface formations

    Coates, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method for the determination of a composite parameter of the formation water in formations surrounding a borehole using capture cross section data (or the conductivity) of the formation water is described and its use for the accurate determination of characteristics such as water saturation even in shaly regions, is demonstrated. (UK)

  12. New method for determination of star formation history

    Čeponis, Marius

    2017-01-01

    A New Method for Determination of Star Formation History Without stars there would not be any life and us. Almost all elements in our bodies are made in stars. Yet we still don‘t fully understand all the processes governing formation and evolution of stellar systems. Their star formation histories really help in trying to understand these processes. In this work a new Bayesian method for determination of star formation history is proposed. This method uses photometric data of resolved stars a...

  13. New Paradigm for Plasma Crystal Formation with weak grain interaction

    Tsytovich, V.N.; Morfill, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    New results for non-linear grain screening, non-linear ion drag and non-linear collective attractions appropriate for existing experiments are used for the first time together to explain the observed phenomena of plasma condensation. Based on the physics of collective non-linear grain attraction a paradigm for plasma crystal formation is formulated according to which plasma the crystal formation is due to localization of grains in weak non-linear collective attraction wells. Nonlinearity in screening is an important feature of new paradigm and takes into account that the grain charges are large. The physical consequence of large non-linearity is the presence of relative large attraction potential well at distances several times larger then the non-linear screening radius. Calculated location of the potential well is of the order of the observed inter-grain distances in plasma crystals and the calculated deepness of the potential well determining the temperature of phase transition is close to that observed. The calculations of the deepness of the attraction collective well and the critical value of the coupling constant are performed using an assumption that the collective attraction length is larger than the non-linear screening length. The concept of collective grain interaction in complex plasmas is considered for the case where the non-linear screening is fully determining the collective attraction well

  14. Baroclinic multipole formation from heton interaction

    Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A; Carton, Xavier J

    2010-01-01

    In a two-layer quasi-geostrophic model, the interaction between two opposite-signed hetons (baroclinic vortex pairs) is studied analytically and numerically, for singular and finite-area vortices. For point vortices, using trilinear coordinates, it is shown that the possible evolutions depend on the deformation radius R d : for large R d , the layers decouple, vortices pair in each layer and their trajectories are open; for medium R d , the exchange of opposite-sign partners between layers becomes possible; for small R d , two other regimes appear: one where hetons remain unaltered during their evolution but follow open trajectories, and one where hetons occupy only a bounded subdomain of space at all times. Conditions for invariant co-rotation of the heton pair are derived and analyzed. Then, the nonlinear evolutions of finite-area heton pairs, with piecewise-constant vorticity, are computed with contour dynamics. When the central cyclonic vortex is initially aligned vertically, a transition occurs between three nonlinear regimes as layer coupling increases: for weak coupling, the vortices pair horizontally and drift away in opposite directions; for moderate layer coupling, the core vortex splits into two parts, one of which remains as a tilted columnar vortex at the center; for stronger layer coupling, each anticyclone pairs with part of the cyclone in each layer, thus forming an L-shaped dipole, a new coherent structure of two-layer flows. When the initial distance between the central and satellite vortices is increased, the velocity shear at the center decreases and the central vortex remains vertically aligned, thus forming a Z-shaped tripole, also a newly observed vortex compound. Such tripoles also compete with oscillating states, in which the core vortex periodically aligns and tilts, a regime observed when layer coupling is moderate and as vortices become closer in each layer. This Z-shaped tripole forms for various values of stratification and of initial

  15. DETERMINING STAR FORMATION RATES FOR INFRARED GALAXIES

    Rieke, G. H.; Weiner, B. J.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Donley, J. L.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Blaylock, M.; Marcillac, D.

    2009-01-01

    We show that measures of star formation rates (SFRs) for infrared galaxies using either single-band 24 μm or extinction-corrected Paα luminosities are consistent in the total infrared luminosity = L(TIR) ∼ 10 10 L sun range. MIPS 24 μm photometry can yield SFRs accurately from this luminosity upward: SFR(M sun yr -1 ) = 7.8 x 10 -10 L(24 μm, L sun ) from L(TIR) = 5x 10 9 L sun to 10 11 L sun and SFR = 7.8 x 10 -10 L(24 μm, L sun )(7.76 x 10 -11 L(24)) 0.048 for higher L(TIR). For galaxies with L(TIR) ≥ 10 10 L sun , these new expressions should provide SFRs to within 0.2 dex. For L(TIR) ≥ 10 11 L sun , we find that the SFR of infrared galaxies is significantly underestimated using extinction-corrected Paα (and presumably using any other optical or near-infrared recombination lines). As a part of this work, we constructed spectral energy distribution templates for eleven luminous and ultraluminous purely star forming infrared galaxies and over the spectral range 0.4 μm to 30 cm. We use these templates and the SINGS data to construct average templates from 5 μm to 30 cm for infrared galaxies with L(TIR) = 5x 10 9 to 10 13 L sun . All of these templates are made available online.

  16. Capturing cooperative interactions with the PSI-MI format.

    Van Roey, Kim; Orchard, Sandra; Kerrien, Samuel; Dumousseau, Marine; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Hermjakob, Henning; Gibson, Toby J

    2013-01-01

    The complex biological processes that control cellular function are mediated by intricate networks of molecular interactions. Accumulating evidence indicates that these interactions are often interdependent, thus acting cooperatively. Cooperative interactions are prevalent in and indispensible for reliable and robust control of cell regulation, as they underlie the conditional decision-making capability of large regulatory complexes. Despite an increased focus on experimental elucidation of the molecular details of cooperative binding events, as evidenced by their growing occurrence in literature, they are currently lacking from the main bioinformatics resources. One of the contributing factors to this deficiency is the lack of a computer-readable standard representation and exchange format for cooperative interaction data. To tackle this shortcoming, we added functionality to the widely used PSI-MI interchange format for molecular interaction data by defining new controlled vocabulary terms that allow annotation of different aspects of cooperativity without making structural changes to the underlying XML schema. As a result, we are able to capture cooperative interaction data in a structured format that is backward compatible with PSI-MI-based data and applications. This will facilitate the storage, exchange and analysis of cooperative interaction data, which in turn will advance experimental research on this fundamental principle in biology.

  17. Cloud Formation, Sea-Air-Land Interaction, Mozambique, Africa

    1991-01-01

    This rare depiction of the physical interactions of air land and sea in cloud formation was seen over Mozambique (12.0S, 40.5E). Moist low air, heated as it moves over land, rises and forms clouds. Even the coastal islands have enough heat to initiate the process. Once begun, the circulation is dynamic and the descending motion suppresses cloud formation on either side of the cloud stream. As clouds move inland, they rise to follow the land upslope.

  18. Jet formation in shock-heavy gas bubble interaction

    Zhi-Gang Zhai; Ting Si; Li-Yong Zou; Xi-Sheng Luo

    2013-01-01

    The influences of the acoustic impedance and shock strength on the jet formation in shock-heavy gas bubble interaction are numerically studied in this work.The process of a shock interacting with a krypton or a SF6 bubble is studied by the numerical method VAS2D.As a validation,the experiments of a SF6 bubble accelerated by a planar shock were performed.The results indicate that,due to the mismatch of acoustic impedance,the way of jet formation in heavy gas bubble with different species is diversified under the same initial condition.With respect to the same bubble,the manner of jet formation is also distinctly different under different shock strengths.The disparities of the acoustic impedance result in different effects of shock focusing in the bubble,and different behaviors of shock wave inside and outside the bubble.The analyses of the wave pattern and the pressure variation indicate that the jet formation is closely associated with the pressure perturbation.Moreover,the analysis of the vorticity deposition,and comparisons of circulation and baroclinic torque show that the baroclinic vorticity also contributes to the jet formation.It is concluded that the pressure perturbation and baroclinic vorticity deposition are the two dominant factors for the jet formation in shock-heavy gas bubble interaction.

  19. On the hadron formation time in pion-nucleus interaction

    Bravina, L.V.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    Differences in the observable characteristics of pion-nucleus interactions at high energy are investigated for two definitions of the hadron formation time. The Monte Carlo simulation of hadron-nucleus interactions and quark-gluon string model for hadron-hadron collisions are used. It is shown that the momentum spectrum of the protons in the target fragmentation region is most sensitive to the definition of the formation time. The inclusive meson and meson resonance spectra are similar in the both versions. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Structure Formation Mechanisms during Solid Ti with Molten Al Interaction

    Gurevich, L; Pronichev, D; Trunov, M

    2016-01-01

    The study discuses advantages and disadvantages of previously proposed mechanisms of the formation of structure between solid Ti and molten Al and presents a new mechanism based on the reviewed and experimental data. The previously proposed mechanisms were classified into three groups: mechanisms of precipitation, mechanisms of destruction and mechanisms of chemical interaction between intermetallics and melt. The reviewed mechanisms did not explain the formation of heterogeneous interlayer with globular aluminide particles and thin layers of pure Al, while the present study reveals variation in the solid Ti/molten Al reaction kinetics during various phases of laminated metal-intermetallic composite formation. The proposed mechanism considers formed during composite fabrication thin oxide interlayers between Ti and Al evolution and its impact on the intermetallic compound formation and explains the initial slow rate of intermetallic interlayer formation and its subsequent acceleration when the oxide foils are ruptured. (paper)

  1. The Effects of Galaxy Interactions on Star Formation

    Beverage, Aliza; Weiner, Aaron; Ramos Padilla, Andres; Ashby, Matthew; Smith, Howard A.

    2018-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are key events in galaxy evolution, and are widely thought to trigger significant increases in star formation. However, the mechanisms and timescales for these increases are still not well understood. In order to probe the effects of mergers, we undertook an investigation based on the Spitzer Interacting Galaxies Survey (SIGS), a sample of 102 nearby galaxies in 48 systems ranging from weakly interacting to near coalescence. Our study is unique in that we use both broadband photometry and a large sample of objects chosen to be statistically meaningful. Our data come from 32 broad bands ranging from the UV to far-IR, and we model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using the Code for Investigating Galaxy Emission (CIGALE) to estimate physical characteristics for each galaxy. We find marginal statistical correlations between galaxy interaction strength and dust luminosity and the distribution of dust mass as a function of heating intensity. The specific star formation rates, however, do not show any enhancement across the interaction stages. This result challenges conventional wisdom that mergers induce star formation throughout galaxy interaction.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  2. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer ...

    WINTEC

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation .... has also been noted in the case of the mutant Lys- ... we outline the theoretical method used. ... The starting point of our analysis is a high-reso-.

  3. Modeling the influence of interaction layer formation on thermal conductivity of U–Mo dispersion fuel

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hsu equation provides best thermal conductivity estimate of U–Mo dispersion fuel. • Simple model considering interaction layer formation was coupled with Hsu equation. • Interaction layer thermal conductivity is not the most important attribute. • Effective thermal conductivity is mostly influenced by interaction layer formation. • Fuel particle distribution also influences the effective thermal conductivity. - Abstract: The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new test reactor fuels to achieve the maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium–molybdenum (U–Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates or rods, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation, dispersed particle size, and volume fraction of dispersed phase in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be as important in determining the effective conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the dispersed particle distribution by minimizing interaction

  4. Analysis of pattern formation in systems with competing range interactions

    Zhao, H J; Misko, V R; Peeters, F M

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed pattern formation and identified various morphologies in a system of particles interacting through a non-monotonic potential with a competing range interaction characterized by a repulsive core (r c ) and an attractive tail (r > r c ), using molecular-dynamics simulations. Depending on parameters, the interaction potential models the inter-particle interaction in various physical systems ranging from atoms, molecules and colloids to vortices in low κ type-II superconductors and in recently discovered ‘type-1.5’ superconductors. We constructed a ‘morphology diagram’ in the plane ‘critical radius r c -density n’ and proposed a new approach to characterizing the different types of patterns. Namely, we elaborated a set of quantitative criteria in order to identify the different pattern types, using the radial distribution function (RDF), the local density function and the occupation factor. (paper)

  5. Additional aspects of facies determination of the Souza Formation

    Vasconcelos, E.C.; Mabesoone, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    By means of geochemical analysis of total sample and trace elements, x-ray and DTA investigation of the clay fractions, and microfanes study, obtained by the facies determination of the Souza Formation, some additional aspects giving evidence of the sequence of events responsable by origin, deposition and formation of sediments of this middle unit of the Rio do Peixe group were established. (Author) [pt

  6. Pattern formation of a nonlocal, anisotropic interaction model

    Burger, Martin

    2017-11-24

    We consider a class of interacting particle models with anisotropic, repulsive–attractive interaction forces whose orientations depend on an underlying tensor field. An example of this class of models is the so-called Kücken–Champod model describing the formation of fingerprint patterns. This class of models can be regarded as a generalization of a gradient flow of a nonlocal interaction potential which has a local repulsion and a long-range attraction structure. In contrast to isotropic interaction models the anisotropic forces in our class of models cannot be derived from a potential. The underlying tensor field introduces an anisotropy leading to complex patterns which do not occur in isotropic models. This anisotropy is characterized by one parameter in the model. We study the variation of this parameter, describing the transition between the isotropic and the anisotropic model, analytically and numerically. We analyze the equilibria of the corresponding mean-field partial differential equation and investigate pattern formation numerically in two dimensions by studying the dependence of the parameters in the model on the resulting patterns.

  7. Pattern formation of a nonlocal, anisotropic interaction model

    Burger, Martin; Dü ring, Bertram; Kreusser, Lisa Maria; Markowich, Peter A.; Schö nlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2017-01-01

    We consider a class of interacting particle models with anisotropic, repulsive–attractive interaction forces whose orientations depend on an underlying tensor field. An example of this class of models is the so-called Kücken–Champod model describing the formation of fingerprint patterns. This class of models can be regarded as a generalization of a gradient flow of a nonlocal interaction potential which has a local repulsion and a long-range attraction structure. In contrast to isotropic interaction models the anisotropic forces in our class of models cannot be derived from a potential. The underlying tensor field introduces an anisotropy leading to complex patterns which do not occur in isotropic models. This anisotropy is characterized by one parameter in the model. We study the variation of this parameter, describing the transition between the isotropic and the anisotropic model, analytically and numerically. We analyze the equilibria of the corresponding mean-field partial differential equation and investigate pattern formation numerically in two dimensions by studying the dependence of the parameters in the model on the resulting patterns.

  8. Using the interactive distance learning broadcast format for international audiences

    Callan, C.; Hylko, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1989, the National Environmental Technology Network (NETN) has been broadcasting interactive presentations on topics of national and international concern. Each interactive presentation covers such topics as decommissioning, environmental risk management, radioactive waste management, waste minimization, and total quality management. Course materials are provided to the attendees which feature case studies, legal and regulatory issues, and the application of existing and new technologies. The interactive presentations are broadcast by satellite and videotaped, allowing employees to participate who do not have convenient access to traditional classroom training resources. Over 8,000 professionals and students in the United States and several foreign countries have participated in the distance learning broadcast format, thus providing a proven and cost-effective method for managing educational and facility resources effectively. A case study is presented depicting why training, if neglected, can result in costly errors, and how the distance learning broadcast format can be expanded to assist regulatory officials, and even the local populace, in making cost-effective decisions. (author)

  9. Transitioning Communication Education to an Interactive Online Module Format.

    Williams, Kristine; Abd-Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2017-07-01

    The Changing Talk intervention improves nursing home staff communication by reducing elderspeak. To facilitate dissemination, interactive online modules were created, maintaining the original content. This article reports on the process of transitioning and the results of pilot testing the modules. Interactive online modules were developed, pilot tested, and the evaluated in comparison to outcomes from the classroom format training. Online participants (N = 9) demonstrated pre to posttest knowledge gain (scores improved from M = 82.4% to M = 91.2%). Rating of a staff-resident interaction showed improved recognition of elderspeak and person-centered communication after training. Online and original participants reported similar intentions to use learned skills and rated the program highly. Evidence-based interventions can be translated from traditional classroom to online format maintaining effects on increasing staff knowledge and intentions to use learned skills in practice. However, the modules should be tested in a larger and more representative sample. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(7):320-328. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Determination of heats of formation of compounds melting incongruently

    Kesler, Y.A.; Cheshnitskii, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret' yakov, Y.D.

    1985-09-01

    Of significant interest is the development of new procedures for experimental determination of heats of formation of compounds, making it possible to expand the range of substances for which the standard, well-developed methods are unacceptable. The use of hightemperature Calvet microcalorimeters offers great possibilities for this. They recently have been used to determine the most important thermodynamic characteristics of many inorganic substances. In this paper the authors consider the use of drop calorimetry, i.e., the dropping of a sample thermostated at 298/sup 0/K into a calorimeter cell kept at a preassigned temperature for the study of peritecticdecomposition reactions of compounds, to determine their heats of formation. The authors used the compounds Fe/sub 2/V/sub 4/O/sub 13/ and FeVO/sub 4/, as well as high-purity V/sub 2/O/sub 5/.

  11. Determination of formation enthalpies of incongruently fusing compounds

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Cheshnitskij, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret'yakov, Yu.D.

    1985-01-01

    Using the method of drop-calorimetry i.e. drop into the calorimeter cell being at the specified temperature of the specimen thermostated at 298 K, for studying reactions of peritectic decomposition of compounds for determining their formation enthalpies is considered. The measurements have been performed at 973 K using high temperature double microcalorimeter. The values ΔH 1 =(367.0+-2.8) kJ/mol and ΔH 2 =)343.9+-3.1) kJ/mol are obtained as a result of two series of measurements (6 experiments in each). The advantage of the described technique consists in the fact that the value of enthalpy of compound formation is obtained as a result of direct calorimetric measurements while in the e.m.f. method this value is determined as a coefficient in the Gibbs energy temperature dependence. The method is simple and does not require much time (one measurement takes 30-40 min)

  12. REE interactions with hydroxyapatite. Formation of secondary solid phases

    Seco, F.; Pablo, J. de; Bruno, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Lighter rare earth elements (REE) commonly occur in nature as the phosphate mineral monazite, while the heavier REE and Yttrium occur as the phosphate mineral xenotime, which has a similar composition, but different coordination environment of the cation. The geochemical behaviour of REE is mainly controlled by their interactions with phosphate minerals such as hydroxyapatite, Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 OH, which is a very common phosphate phase in subsurface environments. Furthermore, is a material considered to be used in a High Level Nuclear Waste repository due to its high capacity in the retention of radionuclides. The objective of this work has been to study the reaction mechanisms and thermodynamics of the interaction of La(III) and Yb(III) with hydroxyapatite as a model for general Ln(III) and Ac(III) behaviour. The surface interaction of La(III) and Yb(III) with synthetic hydroxyapatite has been investigated in batch experiments with low REE 3+ initial concentrations in constant 0.1 M NaClO 4 , at room temperature and in N 2 (g) atmosphere to avoid carbonate complex formation. The initial kinetic experiments indicated that a short contact time is needed to reach equilibrium ( 4 .nH 2 O, where a 0.83 4 .nH 2 O with 1.78 4 medium and under N 2 (g) atmosphere. The experimental data indicate that the solubility equilibria is mainly controlled by the aqueous species REE 3+ until approximately pH=5 where the formation of aqueous complexes of the form REEHPO 4 + , REEPO 4 and REE(PO 4 ) 2 3- must be considered. (authors)

  13. Determination of morphological features and molecular interactions ...

    This research focused on identifying the morphological features and molecular interactions of the Nigerian Bentonitic clays using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) characterisation technique. The SEM microstructure images indicated that the bentonite samples are generally moderately dispersive to dispersive with ...

  14. Formation of Human Subjectivity in Psychological Interactions with Nature

    S A Mudrak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the current trends in the environmental psychological research of the peculiarities of developing the subject-subjective human relationship with nature: considering human habitat environment as a set of natural objects; studying certain natural sites as psychologically attributive elements of the environment; determining the psychological meaning of the «Human Habitat Environment»; giving the analysis of the problem of the subjectivity development in human interaction with the natural objects.

  15. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION RATES AND DUST EMISSION OVER THE GALAXY INTERACTION SEQUENCE

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brassington, Nicola [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Da Cunha, Elisabete [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118, Heidelberg (Germany); Jonsson, Patrik, E-mail: llanz@head.cfa.harvard.edu [Space Exploration Technologies, 1 Rocket Road, Hawthorne, CA 90250 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 28 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared (FIR) for 31 interacting galaxies in 14 systems. The sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, which probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters at multiple wavelengths with an emphasis on the infrared bands. The subset presented in this paper consists of all galaxies for which FIR Herschel SPIRE observations are publicly available. Our SEDs combine the Herschel photometry with multi-wavelength data from Spitzer, GALEX, Swift UVOT, and 2MASS. While the shapes of the SEDs are broadly similar across our sample, strongly interacting galaxies typically have more mid-infrared emission relative to their near-infrared and FIR emission than weakly or moderately interacting galaxies. We modeled the full SEDs to derive host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), specific star formation rates (sSFRs), stellar masses, dust temperatures, dust luminosities, and dust masses. We find increases in the dust luminosity and mass, SFR, and cold (15-25 K) dust temperature as the interaction progresses from moderately to strongly interacting and between non-interacting and strongly interacting galaxies. We also find increases in the SFR between weakly and strongly interacting galaxies. In contrast, the sSFR remains unchanged across all the interaction stages. The ultraviolet photometry is crucial for constraining the age of the stellar population and the SFR, while dust mass is primarily determined by SPIRE photometry. The SFR derived from the SED modeling agrees well with rates estimated by proportionality relations that depend on infrared emission.

  16. The Formation and Evolution of Star Clusters in Interacting Galaxies

    Maji, Moupiya; Zhu, Qirong; Li, Yuexing; Charlton, Jane; Hernquist, Lars; Knebe, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Observations of globular clusters show that they have universal lognormal mass functions with a characteristic peak at ˜ 2× {10}5 {M}⊙ , but the origin of this peaked distribution is highly debated. Here we investigate the formation and evolution of star clusters (SCs) in interacting galaxies using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations performed with two different codes in order to mitigate numerical artifacts. We find that massive SCs in the range of ˜ {10}5.5{--}{10}7.5 {M}⊙ form preferentially in the highly shocked regions produced by galaxy interactions. The nascent cluster-forming clouds have high gas pressures in the range of P/k˜ {10}8{--}{10}12 {{K}} {{cm}}-3, which is ˜ {10}4{--}{10}8 times higher than the typical pressure of the interstellar medium but consistent with recent observations of a pre-super-SC cloud in the Antennae Galaxies. Furthermore, these massive SCs have quasi-lognormal initial mass functions with a peak around ˜ {10}6 {M}⊙ . The number of clusters declines with time due to destructive processes, but the shape and the peak of the mass functions do not change significantly during the course of galaxy collisions. Our results suggest that gas-rich galaxy mergers may provide a favorable environment for the formation of massive SCs such as globular clusters, and that the lognormal mass functions and the unique peak may originate from the extreme high-pressure conditions of the birth clouds and may survive the dynamical evolution.

  17. Policy interactions, risk and price formation in carbon markets

    Blyth, William; Bunn, Derek; Kettunen, Janne; Wilson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Carbon pricing is an important mechanism for providing companies with incentives to invest in carbon abatement. Price formation in carbon markets involves a complex interplay between policy targets, dynamic technology costs, and market rules. Carbon pricing may under-deliver investment due to R and D externalities, requiring additional policies which themselves affect market prices. Also, abatement costs depend on the extent of technology deployment due to learning-by-doing. This paper introduces an analytical framework based on marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves with the aim of providing an intuitive understanding of the key dynamics and risk factors in carbon markets. The framework extends the usual static MAC representation of the market to incorporate policy interactions and some technology cost dynamics. The analysis indicates that supporting large-scale deployment of mature abatement technologies suppresses the marginal cost of abatement, sometimes to zero, whilst increasing total abatement costs. However, support for early stage R and D may reduce both total abatement cost and carbon price risk. An important aspect of the analysis is in elevating risk management considerations into energy policy formation, as the results of the stochastic modelling indicate wide distributions for the emergence of carbon prices and public costs around the policy expectations. (author)

  18. Simulations of structure formation in interacting dark energy cosmologies

    Baldi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The evidence in favor of a dark energy component dominating the Universe, and driving its presently accelerated expansion, has progressively grown during the last decade of cosmological observations. If this dark energy is given by a dynamic scalar field, it may also have a direct interaction with other matter fields in the Universe, in particular with cold dark matter. Such interaction would imprint new features on the cosmological background evolution as well as on the growth of cosmic structure, like an additional long-range fifth-force between massive particles, or a variation in time of the dark matter particle mass. We present here the implementation of these new physical effects in the N-body code GADGET-2, and we discuss the outcomes of a series of high-resolution N-body simulations for a selected family of interacting dark energy models. We interestingly find, in contrast with previous claims, that the inner overdensity of dark matter halos decreases in these models with respect to ΛCDM, and consistently halo concentrations show a progressive reduction for increasing couplings. Furthermore, the coupling induces a bias in the overdensities of cold dark matter and baryons that determines a decrease of the halo baryon fraction below its cosmological value. These results go in the direction of alleviating tensions between astrophysical observations and the predictions of the ΛCDM model on small scales, thereby opening new room for coupled dark energy models as an alternative to the cosmological constant.

  19. Determination of formation enthalpies of incongruently fusing compounds

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Cheshnitskij, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret' yakov, Yu.D.

    1985-04-01

    Using the method of drop-calorimetry i.e. drop into the calorimeter cell being at the specified temperature of the specimen thermostated at 298 K, for studying reactions of peritectic decomposition of compounds for determining their formation enthalpies is considered. The measurements have been performed at 973 K using high temperature double microcalorimeter. The values ..delta..H/sub 1/=(367.0 +- 2.8) kJ/mol and ..delta..H/sub 2/=)343.9 +- 3.1) kJ/mol are obtained as a result of two series of measurements (6 experiments in each). The advantage of the described technique consists in the fact that the value of enthalpy of compound formation is obtained as a result of direct calorimetric measurements while in the e.m.f. method this value is determined as a coefficient in the Gibbs energy temperature dependence. The method is simple and does not require much time (one measurement takes 30-40 min).

  20. Determination of the free enthalpies of formation of borosilicate glasses

    Linard, Y.

    2000-01-01

    This work contributes to the study of the thermochemical properties of nuclear waste glasses. Results are used to discuss mechanisms and parameters integrated in alteration models of conditioning materials. Glass is a disordered material defined thermodynamically as a non-equilibrium state. Taking into account one order parameter to characterise its configurational state, the metastable equilibrium for the glass was considered and the main thermochemical properties were determined. Calorimetric techniques were used to measure heat capacities and formation enthalpies of borosilicate glasses (from 3 to 8 constitutive oxides). Formation Entropies were measured too, using the entropy theory of relaxation processes proposed by Adam and Gibbs (1965). The configurational entropy contribution were determined from viscosity measurements. This set of data has allowed the calculation of Gibb's free energies of dissolution of glasses in pure water. By comparison with leaching experiments, it has been demonstrated that the decreasing of the dissolution rate at high reaction progress cannot be associated to the approach of an equilibrium between the sound glass and the aqueous solution. The composition changes of the reaction area at the glass surface need to be considered too. To achieve a complete description of the thermodynamic stability, the equilibrium between hydrated de-alkalinized glass and/or the gel layer with the aqueous solution should also be evaluated. (author)

  1. Microbial communities in bentonite formations and their interactions with uranium

    López-Fernández, Margarita; Fernández-Sanfrancisco, Omar; Moreno-García, Alberto; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; Sánchez-Castro, Iván; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microbial diversity of Spanish bentonites was studied. • High number of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbes were isolated from bentonites. • Natural bentonite microbes are able to tolerate high U concentrations. • U is immobilized by the cells of the strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa BII-R8 as U(VI) phosphates. - Abstract: A reliable performance assessment of deep geological disposal of nuclear waste depends on better knowledge of radionuclide interactions with natural microbes of geological formations (granitic rock, clay, salts) used to host these disposal systems. In Spain, clay deposits from Cabo de Gata region, Almeria, are investigated for this purpose. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of two bentonite samples (BI and BII) recovered from Spanish clay deposits. The evaluation of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbial populations shows the presence of a high number of cultivable bacteria (e.g. Stenotrophomonas, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Sphingomonas, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, etc.) affiliated to three phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In addition, a pigmented yeast strain BII-R8 related to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from these formations. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of uranium for the growth of these natural isolates were found to range from 4 to 10.0 mM. For instance, strain R. mucilaginosa BII-R8 was shown to tolerate up to 8 mM of U. Flow cytometry studies indicated that the high U tolerance of this yeast isolate is a biologically mediated process. Microscopically dense intracellular and cell wall-bound precipitates were observed by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-High-Angle Annular Dark-Field (STEM-HAADF). Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) element-distribution maps showed the presence of U and P within these accumulates, indicating the ability of cells to precipitate U as U(VI) phosphate minerals. Fundamental understanding of the

  2. Microbial communities in bentonite formations and their interactions with uranium

    López-Fernández, Margarita; Fernández-Sanfrancisco, Omar; Moreno-García, Alberto; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; Sánchez-Castro, Iván; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi, E-mail: merroun@ugr.es

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Microbial diversity of Spanish bentonites was studied. • High number of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbes were isolated from bentonites. • Natural bentonite microbes are able to tolerate high U concentrations. • U is immobilized by the cells of the strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa BII-R8 as U(VI) phosphates. - Abstract: A reliable performance assessment of deep geological disposal of nuclear waste depends on better knowledge of radionuclide interactions with natural microbes of geological formations (granitic rock, clay, salts) used to host these disposal systems. In Spain, clay deposits from Cabo de Gata region, Almeria, are investigated for this purpose. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of two bentonite samples (BI and BII) recovered from Spanish clay deposits. The evaluation of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbial populations shows the presence of a high number of cultivable bacteria (e.g. Stenotrophomonas, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Sphingomonas, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, etc.) affiliated to three phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In addition, a pigmented yeast strain BII-R8 related to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from these formations. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of uranium for the growth of these natural isolates were found to range from 4 to 10.0 mM. For instance, strain R. mucilaginosa BII-R8 was shown to tolerate up to 8 mM of U. Flow cytometry studies indicated that the high U tolerance of this yeast isolate is a biologically mediated process. Microscopically dense intracellular and cell wall-bound precipitates were observed by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-High-Angle Annular Dark-Field (STEM-HAADF). Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) element-distribution maps showed the presence of U and P within these accumulates, indicating the ability of cells to precipitate U as U(VI) phosphate minerals. Fundamental understanding of the

  3. Amelogenin-cytokeratin 14 interaction in ameloblasts during enamel formation.

    Ravindranath, R M; Tam, W Y; Bringas, P; Santos, V; Fincham, A G

    2001-09-28

    The enamel protein amelogenin binds to the GlcNAc-mimicking peptide (GMp) (Ravindranath, R. M. H., Tam, W., Nguyen, P., and Fincham, A. G. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 39654-39661). The GMp motif is found in the N-terminal region of CK14, a differentiation marker for ameloblasts. The binding affinity of CK14 and amelogenin was confirmed by dosimetric binding of CK14 to recombinant amelogenin (rM179), and to the tyrosine-rich amelogenin polypeptide. The specific binding site for CK14 was identified in the amelogenin trityrosyl motif peptide (ATMP) of tyrosine-rich amelogenin polypeptide and specific interaction between CK14 and [(3)H]ATMP was confirmed by Scatchard analysis. Blocking rM179 with GlcNAc, GMp, or CK14 with ATMP abrogates the CK14-amelogenin interaction. CK14 failed to bind to ATMP when the third proline was substituted with threonine, as in some cases of human X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta or when tyrosyl residues were substituted with phenylalanine. Morphometry of developing teeth distinguished three phases of enamel formation; growth initiation phase (days 0-1), prolific growth phase (days 1-7), and growth cessation phase (post-day 7). Confocal microscopy revealed co-assembly of CK14/amelogenin in the perinuclear region of ameloblasts on day 0, migration of the co-assembled CK14/amelogenin to the apical region of the ameloblasts from day 1, reaching a peak on days 3-5, and a collapse of the co-assembly. Autoradiography with [(3)H]ATMP and [(3)H]GMp corroborated the dissociation of the co-assembly at the ameloblast Tomes' process. It is proposed that CK14 play a chaperon role for nascent amelogenin polypeptide during amelogenesis.

  4. Highly polygenic variation in environmental perception determines dauer larvae formation in growing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    James W M Green

    Full Text Available Determining how complex traits are genetically controlled is a requirement if we are to predict how they evolve and how they might respond to selection. This requires understanding how distinct, and often more simple, life history traits interact and change in response to environmental conditions. In order to begin addressing such issues, we have been analyzing the formation of the developmentally arrested dauer larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans under different conditions.We find that 18 of 22 previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting dauer larvae formation in growing populations, assayed by determining the number of dauer larvae present at food patch exhaustion, can be recovered under various environmental conditions. We also show that food patch size affects both the ability to detect QTLs and estimates of effect size, and demonstrate that an allele of nath-10 affects dauer larvae formation in growing populations. To investigate the component traits that affect dauer larvae formation in growing populations we map, using the same introgression lines, QTLs that affect dauer larvae formation in response to defined amounts of pheromone. This identifies 36 QTLs, again demonstrating the highly polygenic nature of the genetic variation underlying dauer larvae formation.These data indicate that QTLs affecting the number of dauer larvae at food exhaustion in growing populations of C. elegans are highly reproducible, and that nearly all can be explained by variation affecting dauer larvae formation in response to defined amounts of pheromone. This suggests that most variation in dauer larvae formation in growing populations is a consequence of variation in the perception of the food and pheromone environment (i.e. chemosensory variation and in the integration of these cues.

  5. Determinants, Moderators and Consequences of Organizational Interaction Orientation

    Christian Hoops

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction orientation reflects the ability of a company to interact with the individual customer and to gather information from successful interactions. Four dimensions of interaction orientation are identified in the literature: customer concept, interaction response capacity, customer empowerment and customer value management (Ramani and Kumar, 2008. This study shows that indeed a fifth dimension of interaction orientation exists and investigates the determinants, moderators and consequences of this construct. The first notable finding is that B2B companies exhibit a greater degree of interaction orientation than B2C firms. Ramani and Kumar hypothesized that in their study. We show that there are B2C industries such as financial services, whose companies also have a greater interaction orientation. This could be the reason why the authors could not prove their hypothesis. Furthermore, we examine the influence of strategic orientations on organizational performances and compare various orientations with each other.

  6. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Stolterfoht, N; Grether, M; Spieler, A; Niemann, D [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  7. Method for determining thermal neutron decay times of earth formations

    Arnold, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A method is disclosed for measuring the thermal neutron decay time of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole. A harmonically intensity modulated source of fast neutrons is used to irradiate the earth formations with fast neutrons at three different intensity modulation frequencies. The tangents of the relative phase angles of the fast neutrons and the resulting thermal neutrons at each of the three frequencies of modulation are measured. First and second approximations to the earth formation thermal neutron decay time are derived from the three tangent measurements. These approximations are then combined to derive a value for the true earth formation thermal neutron decay time

  8. Determining the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose.

    Scholl, Sarah K; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2014-11-01

    Water-solid interactions are known to play a major role in the chemical and physical stability of food materials. Despite its extensive use throughout the food industry, the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose are not well characterized. Hydrate formation in alpha-anhydrous glucose (α-AG) and hydrate loss in glucose monohydrate (GM) were studied under equilibrium conditions at various relative humidity (RH) values using saturated salt slurries for 1 y. The mechanism of hydrate formation and hydrate loss were determined through mathematical modeling of Dynamic Vapor Sorption data and Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the mechanisms. The critical temperature for hydrate loss in GM was determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The moisture sorption profiles of α-AG and GM were also studied under dynamic conditions using an AquaSorp Isotherm Generator. Hydrate formation was observed at and above 68% RH at 25 °C and the conversion of α-AG to GM can best be described as following a nucleation mechanism, however, diffusion and/or geometric contraction mechanisms were also observed by Raman spectroscopy subsequent to the coalescence of initial nucleation sites. Hydrate loss was observed to occur at and below 11% RH at 25 °C during RH storage and at 70 °C during TGA. The conversion of GM to α-AG follows nucleation and diffusion mechanisms. Hydrate formation was evident under dynamic conditions in α-AG and GM prior to deliquescence. This research is the first to report hydrate formation and loss parameters for crystalline α-AG and GM during extended storage at 25 ˚C. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  10. Three imperative action formats in Danish talk-in-interaction

    Steensig, Jakob; Heinemann, Trine

    2017-01-01

    be translated into ‘just’ in English, but they are not synonymous in Danish. The investigated actions formats are: (1) imperative+lige, which is used to perform a bilateral request, that is a request for an action that is portrayed as being part of a common project, (2) imperative+bare, which is used to grant...... permission, and (3) bare+imperative, which is used to advise the recipient to carry out a specific action as a solution to a problem. The action formats are designed to show consideration of the recipients’ benefits of the proposed actions in specific ways and they make differential claims of entitlement...

  11. Gasdynamics and star formation in interacting and merging galaxies

    Olson, K.M.; Kwan, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various parameters on the interaction of two galaxies and on the gas cloud collisions which are induced to occur are considered by examining several simulations of an interaction with different impact parameters, similar to the simulations described by Olson and Kwan (1990). The results of the present calculations are consistent with those obtained earlier by Olson and Kwan. They show that the interaction of two galaxies can lead to an increase in the rate at which gas clouds collide, and that these collisions are of sufficient kinetic energy to disrupt the clouds and prevent the buildup of a large number of massive clouds. It was found that, as the inclination of the interaction is increased, the perturbation of the cloud system is decreased. It was also found that unbound orbits produce a smaller perturbation than bound orbits, and that decreasing the mass of the perturbing galaxy decreases the perturbation. 21 refs

  12. Vision-Based Attitude and Formation Determination System, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To determine pointing and position vectors in both local and inertial coordinate frames, multi-spacecraft missions typically utilize separate attitude determination...

  13. Saffman-Taylor streamers: Mutual finger interaction in spark formation

    Luque, A.; Brau, F.; Ebert, U.

    2008-01-01

    Bunches of streamers form the early stages of sparks and lightning but theory presently concentrates on single streamers or on coarse approximations of whole breakdown trees. Here a periodic array of interacting streamer discharges in a strong homogeneous electric field is studied in density or

  14. Determination of lateral interactions between NO molecules on Rh(111)

    Hagelaar, J H A; Flipse, C F J; Jansen, A P J

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the STM was used to locally study the adsorption of NO on a Rh(111) single crystal. Three new structures were identified. At 200 K, patches of the (4 x 2)-2NO and an unreported (2 x 2)-2NO structure were found at about 0.50ML coverage. Higher exposure gave rise to a (2 x 2)-3NO structure with all molecules adsorbed in the hcp sites. At 5K, a (4 x 4)-1NO structure was observed. The large separation between the molecules can only arise from repulsive interactions over a distance of at least four times the lattice constant (11 A). Here the interaction is estimated to be of the order of ∼10K or ∼0.1 kJ/mol. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulations taking into account adsorption, diffusion and pairwise interactions between adsorbates were used to fit the lateral interaction for the next-next nearest neighbor to the patched STM topograph at 200K for 0.50ML coverage. The value was determined to be 2 kJ/mol. Using pairwise interactions only (2 x 2)-3NO structure could not be explained. It might therefore be necessary to include three-particle interactions. Recent DFT calculations support this idea by showing attractive three-particle interactions

  15. Induced star formation and colors of binary and interacting galaxies

    Smirnov, M.A.; Komberg, B.V.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1980-01-01

    The colours of 208 galaxies in pairs and groups are compared (on colour-colour diagram) with those of single galaxies of the same morphological type. Different colours of galaxies in pairs and groups can be explained if one assumes that in some of them the star formation is slowed down, while in others it is speeded up. The latter is the most conspicuous in E, SO, and Ir2 galaxies when they are accompanied by brighter spirals. The relation of abundance rate to the rate of star formation in galaxies and to the activity level of their nuclei is discussed. This relation is particularly conspicuous in the galaxies of early morphological types (E, SO, Sa) and in systems of the type Ir2 where the relative abundance of gas is significantly above the normal. It is noted that such galaxies as well as galaxies with UV excess, Seyfertlike objects, emission-line galaxies and quasars - avoid regions occupied with rich clusters and frequently occur in pairs and small groups

  16. STAR Formation Histories Across the Interacting Galaxy NGC 6872, the Largest-Known Spiral

    Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Dwek, E.; Arendt, RIchard G.; deMello, Duilia F.; Gadotti, DImitri A.; Urrutia-Viscarra, Fernanda; deOliveira, CLaudia Mendes; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    NGC6872, hereafter the Condor, is a large spiral galaxy that is interacting with its closest companion, the S0 galaxy IC 4970. The extent of the Condor provides an opportunity for detailed investigation of the impact of the interaction on the current star formation rate and its history across the galaxy, on the age and spatial distribution of its stellar population, and on the mechanism that drives the star formation activity. To address these issues we analyzed the far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (near-IR) spectral energy distribution of seventeen 10 kpc diameter regions across the galaxy, and derived their star formation history, current star formation rate, and stellar population and mass. We find that most of the star formation takes place in the extended arms, with very little star formation in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy, in contrast to what was predicted from previous numerical simulations. There is a trend of increasing star formation activity with distance from the nucleus of the galaxy, and no evidence for a recent increase in the current star formation rate due to the interaction. The nucleus itself shows no significant current star formation activity. The extent of the Condor also provides an opportunity to test the applicability of a single standard prescription for conversion of the FUV + IR (22 micrometer) intensities to a star formation rate for all regions. We find that the conversion factor differs from region to region, arising from regional differences in the stellar populations.

  17. Determination of the vacancy formation enthalpy for high purity Ni

    Lynn, K.G.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hurst, J.J.; Farrell, K.

    1979-01-01

    Positron-annihilation lifetime measurements have been made on Ni over a temperature range of 4.2 to 1700 K. We find a small change in the lifetime from 4.2 - 900 K indicating a very small thermal-expansion effect. A small precursor effect is observed before the onset of significant vacancy trapping. A monovacancy formation enthalpy of 1.54sub(+0.2)sup(-0.1) eV is extracted without taking divacancies into consideration in the analysis. No detrapping from mono-vacancies is observed even at the higher temperatures. The vacancy formation enthalpy extracted from the lifetime data is compared to values obtained by Doppler-broadening and angular-correlation techniques. (author)

  18. Determination of the vacancy formation enthalpy for high purity Ni

    Lynn, K.G.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Hurst, J.J.; Farrell, K.

    1979-01-01

    Positron-annihilation lifetime measurements have been made on Ni over a temperature range of 4.2 to 1700 K. We find a small change in the lifetime from 4.2 to 900 K indicating a very small thermal-expansion effect. A small precursor effect is observed before the onset of significant vacancy trapping. A monovacancy formation enthalpy of 1.54/sub +0.2//sup -0.1/ eV is extracted without taking divacancies into consideration in the analysis. No detrapping from mono-vacancies is observed even at the higher temperatures. The vacancy formation enthalpy extracted from the lifetime data is compared to values obtained by Doppler-broadening and angular-correlation techniques

  19. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    Luke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  20. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    Luke, Andrea [Leibniz University, Hannover (Denmark). Inst. of Thermodynamics], e-mail: ift@ift.uni-hannover.de

    2009-07-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  1. Pulsed Laser Interactions with Silicon Nano structures in Emitter Formation

    Huat, V.L.C.; Leong, C.S.; Kamaruzzaman Sopian, Saleem Hussain Zaidi

    2015-01-01

    Silicon wafer thinning is now approaching fundamental limits for wafer thickness owing to thermal expansion mismatch between Al and Si, reduced yields in wet-chemical processing as a result of fragility, and reduced optical absorption. An alternate manufacturing approach is needed to eliminate current manufacturing issues. In recent years, pulsed lasers have become readily available and costs have been significantly reduced. Pulsed laser interactions with silicon, in terms of micromachining, diffusions, and edge isolation, are well known, and have become industrial manufacturing tools. In this paper, pulsed laser interactions with silicon nano structures were identified as the most desirable solution for the fundamental limitations discussed above. Silicon nano structures have the capability for extremely high absorption that significantly reduces requirements for laser power, as well as thermal shock to the thinner wafer. Laser-assisted crystallization, in the presence of doping materials, leads to nano structure profiles that are highly desirable for sunlight absorption. The objective of this paper is the replacement of high temperature POCl_3 diffusion by laser-assisted phosphorus layers. With these improvements, complete low-temperature processing of thinner wafers was achievable with 3.7 % efficiency. Two-dimensional laser scanning was proved to be able to form uniformly annealed surfaces with higher fill factor and open-circuit voltage. (author)

  2. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  3. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-11-02

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  4. Formation of dwarf ellipticals and dwarf irregular galaxies by interaction of giant galaxies under environmental influence

    Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Debsarma, Suma; Karmakar, Pradip; Davoust, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation of gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and gas-poor, rotating dwarf elliptical galaxies following the interaction between two giant galaxies as a function of space density. The formation of dwarf galaxies is considered to depend on a random variable, the tidal index theta, an environmental parameter defined by Karachentsev et al. (2004), such that for theta less than zero, the formation of dwarf irregular galaxy is assured whereas for theta greater than zer...

  5. Model-Mapped RPA for Determining the Effective Coulomb Interaction

    Sakakibara, Hirofumi; Jang, Seung Woo; Kino, Hiori; Han, Myung Joon; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Takao

    2017-04-01

    We present a new method to obtain a model Hamiltonian from first-principles calculations. The effective interaction contained in the model is determined on the basis of random phase approximation (RPA). In contrast to previous methods such as projected RPA and constrained RPA (cRPA), the new method named "model-mapped RPA" takes into account the long-range part of the polarization effect to determine the effective interaction in the model. After discussing the problems of cRPA, we present the formulation of the model-mapped RPA, together with a numerical test for the single-band Hubbard model of HgBa2CuO4.

  6. Mechanism of SOA Formation Determines Magnitude of Radiative Effects

    Zhu, J.; Penner, J.; Lin, G.; Zhou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing states based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66 % of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34 % is internally mixed with primary soot. When compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased, due to the decrease of total aerosol surface area and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. In total, internal mixing suppresses the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared to treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of -0.05 W m-2. When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions and land use are included, the SOA forcing is -0.07 W m-2, even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing.

  7. Absolute age determination of quaternary fault and formation

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Kwang Sik; Choi, Man Sik [Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2002-04-15

    The annual ('01-'01) objective of this project is to data the fault activity for the presumed quaternary fault zones to the western part of the Ulsam fault system and southeastern coastal area near the Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant. Rb-Sr, K-Ar, OSL, C-14 and U-series disequilibrium methods were applied to the fault rocks, organic matter and quaternary formations collected from the Pyeonghae, Bogyeongsa, Yugyeri, Byegkye, Gacheon-1 and Joil outcrops of the Yangsan fault system, the Baenaegol outcrop of the Moryang fault system, the Susyongji(Madong-2), Singye, Hwalseongri, Ipsil and Wonwonsa outcrops of the Ulsan fault system and from quaternary marine terraces (Oryoo and Kwangseong sites) in the southeastern coastal area. The experimental procedure of the OSL SAR protocol was reexamined to get more reliable dating results.

  8. Pattern formation through spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model

    Alberti, Tommaso; Primavera, Leonardo; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    The Daisyworld model is based on a hypothetical planet, like the Earth, which receives the radiant energy coming from a Sun-like star, and populated by two kinds of identical plants differing by their colour: white daisies reflecting light and black daisies absorbing light. The interactions and feedbacks between the collective biota of the planet and the incoming radiation form a self-regulating system where the conditions for life are maintained. We investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model where a spatial dependency on latitude is introduced, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitude and a simple greenhouse model are included. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can generate some equilibrium patterns which can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate new equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions. The extension to spatial Daisyworld gives room to the possibility of inhomogeneous solar forcing in a curved planet, with explicit differences between poles and equator and the direct use of the heat diffusion equation. As a first approach, to describe a spherical planet, we consider the temperature T(θ,t) and the surface coverage as depending only on time and on latitude θ (-90° ≤ θ ≤ 90°). A second step is the introduction of the greenhouse effect in the model, the process by which outgoing infrared radiation is partly screened by greenhouse gases. This effect can be described by relaxing the black-body radiation hypothesis and by introducing a grayness function g(T) in the heat equation. As a third step, we consider a latitude dependence of the Earth's conductivity, χ = χ(θ). Considering these terms, using spherical coordinates and symmetry with respect to θ, the modified Daisyworld equations reduce to the

  9. Interaction of solitons and the formation of bound states in the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation

    Parra-Rivas, Pedro; Gomila, Damia; Colet, Pere; Gelens, Lendert

    2017-07-01

    Bound states, also called soliton molecules, can form as a result of the interaction between individual solitons. This interaction is mediated through the tails of each soliton that overlap with one another. When such soliton tails have spatial oscillations, locking or pinning between two solitons can occur at fixed distances related with the wavelength of these oscillations, thus forming a bound state. In this work, we study the formation and stability of various types of bound states in the Lugiato-Lefever equation by computing their interaction potential and by analyzing the properties of the oscillatory tails. Moreover, we study the effect of higher order dispersion and noise in the pump intensity on the dynamics of bound states. In doing so, we reveal that perturbations to the Lugiato-Lefever equation that maintain reversibility, such as fourth order dispersion, lead to bound states that tend to separate from one another in time when noise is added. This separation force is determined by the shape of the envelope of the interaction potential, as well as an additional Brownian ratchet effect. In systems with broken reversibility, such as third order dispersion, this ratchet effect continues to push solitons within a bound state apart. However, the force generated by the envelope of the potential is now such that it pushes the solitons towards each other, leading to a null net drift of the solitons. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  10. Absolute age determination of quaternary fault and formation

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Kwang Sik; Choi, Man Sik [Korea Basic Science Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating results for the fault rocks suggest the occurrence of recurrent fault activity around 80-95 Ma, 70 Ma, 50 Ma, 30 Ma and 23 Ma along the Yangsan fault zone. The apparent K-Ar ages tend to be older than Rb-Sr ages, probably indicating the effect of excess radiogenic Ar, which will be furthur investigated by Ar-Ar method. The OSL SAR protocol using 220 .deg. C cut-heat yields reproducible and stratigraphically consistent OSL ages ranging from 71 ka to 48 ka for beach deposits of the marine terrace No 2. The apparent OSL ages for the marine terrace No 3 range from 92 ka to 61 ka. These ages constrain the minimum age of the platform considering the underestimation effect resulted from deposition underwater. Therefore we regard the formation age of the terrace No 3 as MIS(Marine Isotopic Stage) 5c or 5e. Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating results for the fault rocks suggest the occurrence of recurrent fault activity around 40 Ma, 30 Ma and 23 Ma along the Ulsan fault zone. Relatively young (< 10 Ma) fault activities are recognized in the Oesa, Janghangri and Wonwonsa sites.

  11. Network formation determined by the diffusion process of random walkers

    Ikeda, Nobutoshi

    2008-01-01

    We studied the diffusion process of random walkers in networks formed by their traces. This model considers the rise and fall of links determined by the frequency of transports of random walkers. In order to examine the relation between the formed network and the diffusion process, a situation in which multiple random walkers start from the same vertex is investigated. The difference in diffusion rate of random walkers according to the difference in dimension of the initial lattice is very important for determining the time evolution of the networks. For example, complete subgraphs can be formed on a one-dimensional lattice while a graph with a power-law vertex degree distribution is formed on a two-dimensional lattice. We derived some formulae for predicting network changes for the 1D case, such as the time evolution of the size of nearly complete subgraphs and conditions for their collapse. The networks formed on the 2D lattice are characterized by the existence of clusters of highly connected vertices and their life time. As the life time of such clusters tends to be small, the exponent of the power-law distribution changes from γ ≅ 1-2 to γ ≅ 3

  12. The stability and formation of native proteins from unfolded monomers is increased through interactions with unrelated proteins.

    Claudia Rodríguez-Almazán

    Full Text Available The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins.

  13. Deep vein thrombus formation induced by flow reduction in mice is determined by venous side branches.

    Brandt, Moritz; Schönfelder, Tanja; Schwenk, Melanie; Becker, Christian; Jäckel, Sven; Reinhardt, Christoph; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Münzel, Thomas; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Wenzel, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between vascular wall abnormalities, inflammatory leukocytes, platelets, coagulation factors and hemorheology in the pathogenesis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is incompletely understood, requiring well defined animal models of human disease. We subjected male C57BL/6 mice to ligation of the inferior vena cava (IVC) as a flow reduction model to induce DVT. Thrombus size and weight were analyzed macroscopically and sonographically by B-mode, pulse wave (pw) Doppler and power Doppler imaging (PDI) using high frequency ultrasound. Thrombus size varied substantially between individual procedures and mice, irrespective of the flow reduction achieved by the ligature. Interestingly, PDI accurately predicted thrombus size in a very robust fashion (r2 = 0.9734, p thrombus weight (r2 = 0.5597, p thrombus formation. Occlusion of side branches prior to ligation of IVC did not increase thrombus size, probably due to patent side branches inaccessible to surgery. Venous side branches influence thrombus size in experimental DVT and might therefore prevent thrombus formation. This renders vessel anatomy and hemorheology important determinants in mouse models of DVT, which should be controlled for.

  14. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  15. Star-formation rates in the nuclei of violently interacting galaxies

    Bushouse, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Spectrophotometry has been obtained of the nuclear regions of a large sample of violently interacting spiral galaxies. The sample galaxies were chosen to include only those systems having tails, plumes, or other morphological features consistent with strong tidal interactions involving disk galaxies. The interacting galaxies are found to exhibit a wide range of nuclear optical emission-line strengths, but show a significantly higher overall level in both Hα emission-line equivalent width and luminosity than samples of field spirals observed in a similar fashion. While galaxy-galaxy interactions can lead to large nuclear star-formation bursts, this is not a ubiquitous phenomenon. A large fraction (approx.30%) of the nuclei show only weak or no detectable optical emission lines and are characterized by stellar absorption spectra of old, elliptical galaxy-like stellar populations, thus indicating little recent or continuing star-formation activity. These circumstances can occur even in instances where the nucleus of the other component has a large population of young stars. While exhaustion of a galaxy's gas supply during the later phases of interaction can account for post-burst systems, it cannot explain systems that have experienced no significant star-formation activity throughout the entire interaction process. Seyfert and low-ionization nuclei also are rare in violently interacting systems which, coupled with the large number of nuclei found to have little star-formation activity, suggests either an initial lack of near-nuclear gas or that gas is present but in inappropriate forms to support star formation or fuel nuclear activity

  16. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF KNOTS OF STAR FORMATION IN INTERACTING VERSUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Smith, Beverly J.; Olmsted, Susan; Jones, Keith [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City TN 37614 (United States); Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Struck, Curtis, E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Interacting galaxies are known to have higher global rates of star formation on average than normal galaxies, relative to their stellar masses. Using UV and IR photometry combined with new and published Hα images, we have compared the star formation rates (SFRs) of ∼700 star forming complexes in 46 nearby interacting galaxy pairs with those of regions in 39 normal spiral galaxies. The interacting galaxies have proportionally more regions with high SFRs than the spirals. The most extreme regions in the interacting systems lie at the intersections of spiral/tidal structures, where gas is expected to pile up and trigger star formation. Published Hubble Space Telescope images show unusually large and luminous star clusters in the highest luminosity regions. The SFRs of the clumps correlate with measures of the dust attenuation, consistent with the idea that regions with more interstellar gas have more star formation. For the clumps with the highest SFRs, the apparent dust attenuation is consistent with the Calzetti starburst dust attenuation law. This suggests that the high luminosity regions are dominated by a central group of young stars surrounded by a shell of clumpy interstellar gas. In contrast, the lower luminosity clumps are bright in the UV relative to Hα, suggesting either a high differential attenuation between the ionized gas and the stars, or a post-starburst population bright in the UV but faded in Hα. The fraction of the global light of the galaxies in the clumps is higher on average for the interacting galaxies than for the spirals. Thus either star formation in interacting galaxies is “clumpier” on average, or the star forming regions in interacting galaxies are more luminous, dustier, or younger on average.

  17. Determination of water saturation in subsurface earth formations adjacent well boreholes

    Scott, Hubert D.

    1982-01-01

    There is provided a method of determining the water saturation of an earth formation surrounding a well borehole, comprising the steps of: (a) bombarding the earth formation with repetitive pulses of fast neutrons which are slowed down and thereafter engage in neutron capture reactions with materials in the vicinity of the borehole; (b) obtaining by use of a germanium gamma ray detector gamma ray spectra of the materials in the vicinity of the borehole; (c) obtaining from the gamma ray spectra a measure of the relative presence of chlorine to that of hydrogen in the formation; (d) obtaining a measure of apparent formation water salinity from the measure of relative presence of chlorine to hydrogen in the formation; and (e) obtaining the water saturation of the formation utilizing the apparent formation water salinity

  18. Interactivity and Explicit Memory Formation of Consumer Undergraduate Male Students on Internet Environment

    George Bedinelli Rossi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research aims to integrate the theories of Explicit Memory and Interactivity, contributing to the theoretical development of both. We investigated whether the interactivity precedes the explicit consumer memory. Data collection was carried on by sending online questionnaire to 876 undergraduate male students, with a return of 453 valid questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling of the constructs Explicit Memory and Interactivity. The analyzes indicate that interactivity increases explicit consumer memory, filling a theoretical gap of this concept about its effects. Moreover, it is a concept related to the future, not only to the past and to present, as shown by the classical definitions. As for explicit memory, its formation results from the individual's interactions with the environment, which was not explained by classical theories. The results indicated that interactivity and explicit memory are almost independent of each other, having low correlation or almost nil.

  19. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  20. Method for the determination of clay and mica concentrations in subsurface sandstone formations through radioactive logging

    Allen, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for radioactivity well logging in a subsurface sandstone formation penetrated by a borehole. The invention relates particularly to clay and mica contents, which are determined from the natural gamma-ray activities. The natural sources of gamma radiation in the formation, are the trace elements thorium, uranium and potassium. (U.K.)

  1. Interactions of Socioeconomic Determinants, Offspring Sex Preference and Fertility Behavior

    Paul M. Sharp

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using path anaysis and the 5% PUMS data of the 1990 and 2000 censuses, this study examines 1 the correlation between Chinese-American sex preference for children and their fertility behavior, and 2 the interaction between the sex preference and its socioeconomic determinants. Of normative and non-normative factors investegated in this study, offspring sex preference is the greatest stimulus to Chinese fertility. Of socioeconomic variables, women’s educational attainment plays a primary role in depressing the impact of son preference in addition to their increasing stay in the host society. However, these two factors do not work on their husbands in the same way, demonstrating men’s inflexible attitudes toward gender roles in the family and in society. Son preference exerts positive impact on American-Chinese fertility and prevent from further decline. Yet, the influence has been diminishing since 1990 as observed in this study.

  2. A new method for determining the formation energy of a vacancy in concentrated alloys

    Kinoshita, C.; Kitajima, S.; Eguchi, T.

    1978-01-01

    The disadvantages in the conventional method which determines the formation energy of a vacancy in concentrated alloys from their kinetic behavior during annealing after quenching are pointed out, and an alternative method for overcoming these disadvantages is proposed. (Auth.)

  3. Pyoverdine and PQS Mediated Subpopulation Interactions Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Yang, Liang; Nilsson, Martin; Gjermansen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Using flow chamber-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms as model system, we show in the present study that formation of heterogeneous biofilms may occur through mechanisms that involve complex subpopulation interactions. One example of this phenomenon is expression of the iron...

  4. The Development of Interactive Mathematics Learning Material Based on Local Wisdom with .swf Format

    Abadi, M. K.; Asih, E. C. M.; Jupri, A.

    2018-05-01

    Learning materials used by students and schools in Serang district are lacking because they do not contain local wisdom content. The aim of this study is to improve the deficiencies in learning materials used by students by making interactive materials based on local wisdom content with format .swf. The method in this research is research and development (RnD) with ADDIE model. In making this interactive learning materials in accordance with the stages of the ADDIE study. The results of this study include interactive learning materials based on local wisdom. This learning material is suitable for digital students.

  5. Theoretical Substantiation of Formation of Integration Forms of Interaction of Enterprises when Developing the Innovation Policy

    Manoylenko Oleksandr V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers issues, connected with activation of innovation activity of engineering enterprises on the basis of application of integration forms of interaction. It justifies a necessity of formation of infrastructure of interaction of an enterprise when introducing innovation models of development with consideration of realisation of goals of all interested parties. The article offers a generalised scheme of organisational interaction of an enterprise in external environment and a matrix of functional provision of the integration process. The theoretical approach that is considered in the article allows increase of innovation activity of engineering enterprises and minimisation of expenditures of own resources when realising innovation policy of an enterprise.

  6. Interaction of radionuclides with argillite from the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site

    Dosch, R.G.; Lynch, A.W.

    1979-02-01

    Distribution coefficients have been determined for 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 144 Ce, 99 Tc, 152 Eu, 238 Pu, 244 Cm, and 243 Am between argillite from the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and several aqueous phases. Radionuclide concentrations in the range of 1 to 0.001 μCi/ml were used with contact times of 14, 28, and 56 days. Reaction mechanism, concentration effects, exchange capacity, equilibration times, and particle size effects were addressed in a more comprehensive study of the interaction of argillite with Cs in deionized water. The experimental parameters used in the distribution coefficient measurements were based in part on this work. The aqueous phases included a simulated groundwater with composition based on the analysis of a NTS groundwater, the same simulant and deionized water which were pre-equilibrated with powdered argillite, and a groundwater simulant with approximately the same qualitative composition of the NTS simulant, but with a higher ionic strength. A system to provide continuous pH control by CO 2 addition during equilibration of the argillite-solution mixtures was designed and assembled. Initial experiments were done with Cs and Eu and the effects of pH on their distribution coefficients are discussed

  7. An Interactive Control Algorithm Used for Equilateral Triangle Formation with Robotic Sensors

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Hongcai

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive control algorithm, called Triangle Formation Algorithm (TFA), used for three neighboring robotic sensors which are distributed randomly to self-organize into and equilateral triangle (E) formation. The algorithm is proposed based on the triangular geometry and considering the actual sensors used in robotics. In particular, the stability of the TFA, which can be executed by robotic sensors independently and asynchronously for E formation, is analyzed in details based on Lyapunov stability theory. Computer simulations are carried out for verifying the effectiveness of the TFA. The analytical results and simulation studies indicate that three neighboring robots employing conventional sensors can self-organize into E formations successfully regardless of their initial distribution using the same TFAs. PMID:24759118

  8. Method and apparatus for determining characteristics of clay-bearing formations

    Fertl, W.H.; Ruhovets, N.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to methods and apparatus for determining characteristics of clay-bearing geological formations by radioactivity well logging. In its broadest aspect, the invention comprises the steps of determining the volume of clay contained in the earth formations; determining a first property of the formations functionally related to the volume of clay; and determining a second property functionally related to the first property, the second property indicating potential clay swelling. In particular, the volume of clay is determined using electrical signals generated in response to the energy and frequency of detected radiations. The method is carried out with a well logging instrument that includes a high-resolution gamma ray spectrometer that traverses a borehole, whereby natural radiation strikes a scintillation crystal contained therein

  9. Determination of geochemical characters of insterstitial waters of pleistocene Italian clay formations

    Fontanive, A.; Gragnani, R.; Mignuzzi, C.; Spat, G.

    1985-01-01

    The geochemical characters of clay formations and of their pore water are fundamental with regards to the mobility of the radionuclides as well as to the corrosion processes on enginered barriers. Experimental researches have been carried out in different types of clay, which represent Italian formations, for the characterization of pore water. A squeezer system, which reaches 1500 Kg/cm 2 in pressure, and an analytical micro-scale methodology, for the determination of dissolved constituents in pore water, were set up. The extracted pore water ranges from 60% to 85% in relation to consolidation state of clay. The chemical composition of the extracted fluid has been checked during the squeezing. During this step the observed variations were smaller than those between the different specimens of the same sample. The comparison between the results obtained by squeezing and by a multiple washing technique, using increasing water/sediment ratios, shows that the last one does not give reliable results on the chemical composition of pore water. This is due to the presence of easily weatherable minerals and to the exchange processes between the clayey minerals and the solution. Nevertheless both these techniques have supplied complementary information about geochemical processes in water-rock interaction. The salinity of pore water ranges from 0.45 g/l to 24.5 g/l and the chemism always shows a high content of calcium-magnesium sulfate, or sodium chloride or calcium-magnesium-sulfate with sodium chloride. The correlation between geochemical composition of pore water and mineralogical composition of clay is not significant

  10. Aggresome formation is regulated by RanBPM through an interaction with HDAC6

    Louisa M. Salemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of proteasomal impairment, the build-up of damaged or misfolded proteins activates a cellular response leading to the recruitment of damaged proteins into perinuclear aggregates called aggresomes. Aggresome formation involves the retrograde transport of cargo proteins along the microtubule network and is dependent on the histone deacetylase HDAC6. Here we show that ionizing radiation (IR promotes Ran-Binding Protein M (RanBPM relocalization into discrete perinuclear foci where it co-localizes with aggresome components ubiquitin, dynein and HDAC6, suggesting that the RanBPM perinuclear clusters correspond to aggresomes. RanBPM was also recruited to aggresomes following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Strikingly, aggresome formation by HDAC6 was markedly impaired in RanBPM shRNA cells, but was restored by re-expression of RanBPM. RanBPM was found to interact with HDAC6 and to inhibit its deacetylase activity. This interaction was abrogated by a RanBPM deletion of its LisH/CTLH domain, which also prevented aggresome formation, suggesting that RanBPM promotes aggresome formation through an association with HDAC6. Our results suggest that RanBPM regulates HDAC6 activity and is a central regulator of aggresome formation.

  11. Observations and models of star formation in the tidal features of interacting galaxies

    Wallin, J.F.; Schombert, J.M.; Struck-Marcell, C.

    1990-01-01

    Multi-color surface photometry (BVri) is presented for the tidal features in a sample of interacting galaxies. Large color variations are found between the morphological components and within the individual components. The blue colors in the primary and the tidal features are most dramatic in B-V, and not in V-i, indicating that star formation instead of metallicity or age dominates the colors. Color variations between components is larger in systems shortly after interaction begins and diminishes to a very low level in systems which are merged. Photometric models for interacting systems are presented which suggest that a weak burst of star formation in the tidal features could cause the observed color distributions. Dynamical models indicate that compression occurs during the development of tidal features causing an increase in the local density by a factor of between 1.5 and 5. Assuming this density increase can be related to the star formation rate by a Schmidt law, the density increases observed in the dynamical models may be responsible for the variations in color seen in some of the interacting systems. Limitations of the dynamical models are also discussed

  12. Interaction Dynamics Determine Signaling and Output Pathway Responses

    Klement Stojanovski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of interaction dynamics in signaling pathways can shed light on pathway architecture and provide insights into targets for intervention. Here, we explored the relevance of kinetic rate constants of a key upstream osmosensor in the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol-mitogen-activated protein kinase (HOG-MAPK pathway to signaling output responses. We created mutant pairs of the Sln1-Ypd1 complex interface that caused major compensating changes in the association (kon and dissociation (koff rate constants (kinetic perturbations but only moderate changes in the overall complex affinity (Kd. Yeast cells carrying a Sln1-Ypd1 mutant pair with moderate increases in kon and koff displayed a lower threshold of HOG pathway activation than wild-type cells. Mutants with higher kon and koff rates gave rise to higher basal signaling and gene expression but impaired osmoadaptation. Thus, the kon and koff rates of the components in the Sln1 osmosensor determine proper signaling dynamics and osmoadaptation.

  13. Method for in situ determination cation exchange capacities of subsurface formations

    Fertl, W.H.; Welker, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the in situ examination of each subsurface formation penetrated by a borehole to ascertain the cation exchange capacity of such formations within a geological region. Natural γ ray logging is used to develop signals functionally related to the total γ radiation and to the potassium-40, uranium and thorium energy-band radiations. A first borehole is traversed by a potential γ ray spectrometer to provide selected measurements of natural γ radiation. Core samples are taken from the logged formation and laboratory tests performed to determine the cation exchange capacity thereof. The cation exchange capacities thus are developed then correlated with selected parameters provided by the γ ray spectrometer to establish functional relationships. Cation exchange capacities of formations in subsequent boreholes within the region are then determined in situ by use of the natural γ ray spectrometer and these established relationships. (author)

  14. Determination of microscopic interactions between actinides and humic substances

    Brunel, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Large amount of plutonium has been introduced into the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear power-plant accidents. Contaminated areas, which need a particular survey, have become a very interesting place to study and understand the plutonium behaviour in the environment. Until few years ago, it was admitted that plutonium introduced into subsurface environment is relatively immobile, owing to its low solubility in ground water and strong sorption onto rocks. However, studies of contaminated areas show that humic substances, which are ubiquitous in environment, can alter the speciation of metal ion, e.g. plutonium, and thus their migration. These humic substances are major components of the natural organic matter in soil and water as well as in geological organic deposits such as lake sediments, peats and brown coals. They are complex heterogeneous mixtures of polydisperse supra-molecules formed by biochemical and chemical reactions during the decay and transformation of plant and microbial remains. The knowledge of the impact of humic substances on the plutonium migration is required to assess their transport in natural systems. However, due to the complex and heterogeneous nature of humic substances, there are a lot of difficulties in the description of microscopic interactions. The aim of this PhD thesis is to evaluate as precisely as possible interactions between actinides and humic substances. This work is divided in two parts: on the one hand humic substances will be separated to identify each component, on the other hand the speciation of actinides with characterized humic substances will be studied. In the first part of this study, new methods are developed to study the speciation of actinides with humic substances using two kinds of mass spectrometers: an ICP-MS and a high resolution mass spectrometer using various ionization devices (ESI, APCI, DART, APPI) in order to determine all active molecules for the complexation. In the

  15. Structural determinants of the interaction between the Haemophilus influenzae Hap autotransporter and fibronectin.

    Spahich, Nicole A; Kenjale, Roma; McCann, Jessica; Meng, Guoyu; Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P; St Geme, Joseph W

    2014-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative cocco-bacillus that initiates infection by colonizing the upper respiratory tract. Hap is an H. influenzae serine protease autotransporter protein that mediates adherence, invasion and microcolony formation in assays with human epithelial cells and is presumed to facilitate the process of colonization. Additionally, Hap mediates adherence to fibronectin, laminin and collagen IV, extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that are present in the respiratory tract and are probably important targets for H. influenzae colonization. The region of Hap responsible for adherence to ECM proteins has been localized to the C-terminal 511 aa of the Hap passenger domain (HapS). In this study, we characterized the structural determinants of the interaction between HapS and fibronectin. Using defined fibronectin fragments, we established that Hap interacts with the fibronectin repeat fragment called FNIII(1-2). Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found a series of motifs in the C-terminal region of HapS that contribute to the interaction with fibronectin. Most of these motifs are located on the F1 and F3 faces of the HapS structure, suggesting that the F1 and F3 faces may be responsible for the HapS-fibronectin interaction. © 2014 The Authors.

  16. Radiative bound-state-formation cross-sections for dark matter interacting via a Yukawa potential

    Petraki, Kalliopi [LPTHE, CNRS, UMR 7589,4 Place Jussieu, F-75252, Paris (France); Nikhef,Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Postma, Marieke; Vries, Jordy de [Nikhef,Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-04-13

    We calculate the cross-sections for the radiative formation of bound states by dark matter whose interactions are described in the non-relativistic regime by a Yukawa potential. These cross-sections are important for cosmological and phenomenological studies of dark matter with long-range interactions, residing in a hidden sector, as well as for TeV-scale WIMP dark matter. We provide the leading-order contributions to the cross-sections for the dominant capture processes occurring via emission of a vector or a scalar boson. We offer a detailed inspection of their features, including their velocity dependence within and outside the Coulomb regime, and their resonance structure. For pairs of annihilating particles, we compare bound-state formation with annihilation.

  17. Formation of banded vegetation patterns resulted from interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth.

    Huang, Tousheng; Zhang, Huayong; Dai, Liming; Cong, Xuebing; Ma, Shengnan

    2018-03-01

    This research investigates the formation of banded vegetation patterns on hillslopes affected by interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth. The following two perspectives in the formation of these patterns are taken into consideration: (a) increased sediment deposition from plant interception, and (b) reduced plant biomass caused by sediment accumulation. A spatial model is proposed to describe how the interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth promote self-organization of banded vegetation patterns. Based on theoretical and numerical analyses of the proposed spatial model, vegetation bands can result from a Turing instability mechanism. The banded vegetation patterns obtained in this research resemble patterns reported in the literature. Moreover, measured by sediment dynamics, the variation of hillslope landform can be described. The model predicts how treads on hillslopes evolve with the banded patterns. Thus, we provide a quantitative interpretation for coevolution of vegetation patterns and landforms under effects of sediment redistribution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Glycosaminoglycan-sac formation in vitro. Interactions between normal and malignant cells

    Logothetou-Rella, H.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of monolayer normal human or normal rat cells with suspension Walker rat tumor cells was demonstrated cytologically, during a cocultivation period of thirty days. At ten days, Walker rat tumor cells were interiorized in the cytoplasm of the normal monolayer host cells. At twenty days, degeneration of the interiorized tumor cells followed by mucification led to glycosaminoglycan-sac formation. At thirty days, tumor nodules and protease (a,- c...

  19. Role of Acoustoelectric Interaction in the Formation of Nanoscale Periodic Structures of Adsorbed Atoms

    Peleshchak, R. M., E-mail: peleshchak@rambler.ru; Lazurchak, I. I.; Kuzyk, O. V.; Dan’kiv, O. O. [Ivan Franko Drohobych State Pedagogical University (Ukraine); Zegrya, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    The role of acoustoelectric effects in the formation of nanoscale structures of adatoms, resulting from the self-consistent interaction of adatoms with a surface acoustic wave and the electronic subsystem, is studied for the case of charged and uncharged adatoms. It is shown that an increase in the doping level of a semiconductor with donor impurities at a fixed average adatom concentration results in an increase in the critical temperature below which self-organization processes occur.

  20. Determination of Gibbs energies of formation in aqueous solution using chemical engineering tools.

    Toure, Oumar; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Standard Gibbs energies of formation are of primary importance in the field of biothermodynamics. In the absence of any directly measured values, thermodynamic calculations are required to determine the missing data. For several biochemical species, this study shows that the knowledge of the standard Gibbs energy of formation of the pure compounds (in the gaseous, solid or liquid states) enables to determine the corresponding standard Gibbs energies of formation in aqueous solutions. To do so, using chemical engineering tools (thermodynamic tables and a model enabling to predict activity coefficients, solvation Gibbs energies and pKa data), it becomes possible to determine the partial chemical potential of neutral and charged components in real metabolic conditions, even in concentrated mixtures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A computational study of soot formation in opposed-flow diffusion flame interacting with vortices

    Selvaraj, Prabhu

    2017-01-05

    The flame-vortex interaction enables the study of basic phenomena that control the coupling between combustion and turbulence. Employing a gas phase reaction mechanism considering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a two dimensional counterflow ethylene-air flame is simulated. A reduced mechanism with PAH pathways that includes until coronene and method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) has been employed to calculate the soot characteristics. Interaction of sooting flame with a prescribed decaying random velocity field is being investigated. Counterflow nonpremixed flames at low strain rate sooting conditions are considered. Effects of vortices are studied on the flame structures and its sensitivity on the soot formation characteristics. As the vortex rolls up the flame, integrated soot volume fraction is found to be larger for the air-side vortex. A detailed analysis on the flame structure and its influence on the formation of soot were carried out. The results indicate that the larger PAH species contributes to the soot formation in the airside perturbation regimes, whereas the soot formation is dominated by the soot transport in fuel-side perturbation.

  2. How memory of direct animal interactions can lead to territorial pattern formation.

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic home range analysis (MHRA) is a highly effective tool for understanding spacing patterns of animal populations. It has hitherto focused on populations where animals defend their territories by communicating indirectly, e.g. via scent marks. However, many animal populations defend their territories using direct interactions, such as ritualized aggression. To enable application of MHRA to such populations, we construct a model of direct territorial interactions, using linear stability analysis and energy methods to understand when territorial patterns may form. We show that spatial memory of past interactions is vital for pattern formation, as is memory of 'safe' places, where the animal has visited but not suffered recent territorial encounters. Additionally, the spatial range over which animals make decisions to move is key to understanding the size and shape of their resulting territories. Analysis using energy methods, on a simplified version of our system, shows that stability in the nonlinear system corresponds well to predictions of linear analysis. We also uncover a hysteresis in the process of territory formation, so that formation may depend crucially on initial space-use. Our analysis, in one dimension and two dimensions, provides mathematical groundwork required for extending MHRA to situations where territories are defended by direct encounters. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Silver nanoparticle-human hemoglobin interface: time evolution of the corona formation and interaction phenomenon

    Bhunia, A. K.; Kamilya, T.; Saha, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we have used spectroscopic and electron microscopic analysis to monitor the time evolution of the silver nanoparticles (Ag NP)-human hemoglobin (Hb) corona formation and to characterize the interaction of the Ag NPs with Hb. The time constants for surface plasmon resonance binding and reorganization are found to be 9.51 and 118.48 min, respectively. The drop of surface charge and the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter indicated the corona of Hb on the Ag NP surface. The auto correlation function is found to broaden with the increasing time of the corona formation. Surface zeta potential revealed that positively charged Hb interact electrostatically with negatively charged Ag NP surfaces. The change in α helix and β sheet depends on the corona formation time. The visualization of the Hb corona from HRTEM showed large number of Hb domains aggregate containing essentially Ag NPs and without Ag NPs. Emission study showed the tertiary deformation, energy transfer, nature of interaction and quenching under three different temperatures.

  4. Determinants of Internet Use for Interactive Learning: An Exploratory Study

    Castaño, Jonatan; Duart, Josep M.; Sancho-Vinuesa, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The use of the Internet in higher education teaching can facilitate the interactive learning process and thus improve educational outcomes. The aim of the study presented here is to explore which variables are linked to higher intensity of Internet-based interactive educational practices. The study is based on data obtained from an online survey…

  5. Ideology and Interaction: Debating Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    Collin, Ross; Street, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    In this exchange, Street and Collin debate the merits of the interaction model of literacy that Collin outlined in a recent issue of Reading Research Quarterly. Built as a complement and a counter to Street's ideological model of literacy, Collin's interaction model defines literacies as technologies that coevolve with sociocultural…

  6. Laser interaction effects of electromagnetic absorption and microstructural defects on hot-spot formation in RDX-PCTFE energetic aggregates

    Brown, Judith A; LaBarbera, Darrell A; Zikry, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Hot-spot formation in energetic aggregates subjected to dynamic pressure loading and laser irradiation has been investigated. Specialized finite-element techniques with a dislocation-density-based crystalline plasticity constitutive formulation and thermo-mechanical coupling of heat conduction, adiabatic heating, laser heating and thermal decomposition were used to predict hot-spot formation in RDX–polymer aggregates subjected to dynamic pressures and laser energies. The effects of the electromagnetic absorption coefficient coupled with void distribution and spacing, grain morphology, crystal–binder interactions and dislocation densities were analyzed to determine their influence on the time, location and mechanisms of hot-spot formation. Four different mechanisms for hot-spot initiation under dynamic laser and pressure loads were identified, which depend on the localization of plastic shear strain and laser heat absorption within the aggregate. The predictions indicate that hot-spot formation is accelerated by higher absorption coefficients and by localized plastic deformations that occur in areas of significant laser heating. (paper)

  7. Numerical study on determining formation porosity using a boron capture gamma ray technique and MCNP.

    Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Xinguang; Han, Fei; Yuan, Zhelong

    2014-12-01

    Formation porosity can be determined using the boron capture gamma ray counting ratio with a near to far detector in a pulsed neutron-gamma element logging tool. The thermal neutron distribution, boron capture gamma spectroscopy and porosity response for formations with different water salinity and wellbore diameter characteristics were simulated using the Monte Carlo method. We found that a boron lining improves the signal-to-noise ratio and that the boron capture gamma ray counting ratio has a higher sensitivity for determining porosity than total capture gamma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Saponin Interactions with Model Membrane Systems - Langmuir Monolayer Studies, Hemolysis and Formation of ISCOMs.

    de Groot, Carolin; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2016-12-01

    Saponins are used in medicine due to their pharmacological and immunological effects. To better understand interactions of saponins with model membranes and natural membranes of, for example, erythrocytes, Langmuir film balance experiments are well established. For most saponins, a strong interaction with cholesterol was demonstrated in dependence of both the aglycone part and the sugar moieties and is suggested to be correlated with a strong hemolytic activity, high toxicity, and high surface activity, as was demonstrated for the steroid saponin digitonin. In general, changes in the sugar chain or in substituents of the aglycone result in a modification of the saponin properties. A promising saponin with regard to fairly low hemolytic activity and high adjuvant effect is α -tomatine, which still shows a high affinity for cholesterol. An interaction with cholesterol and lipids has also been proven for the Quillaja saponin from the bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina. This triterpene saponin was approved in marketed vaccines as an adjuvant due to the formation of immunostimulating complexes. Immunostimulating complexes consist of a Quillaja saponin, cholesterol, phospholipids, and a corresponding antigen. Recently, another saponin from Quillaja brasiliensis was successfully tested in immunostimulating complexes, too. Based on the results of interaction studies, the formation of drug delivery systems such as immunostimulating complexes or similar self-assembled colloids is postulated for a variety of saponins. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Tolerance-based interaction: a new model targeting opinion formation and diffusion in social networks

    Alexandru Topirceanu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main motivations behind social network analysis is the quest for understanding opinion formation and diffusion. Previous models have limitations, as they typically assume opinion interaction mechanisms based on thresholds which are either fixed or evolve according to a random process that is external to the social agent. Indeed, our empirical analysis on large real-world datasets such as Twitter, Meme Tracker, and Yelp, uncovers previously unaccounted for dynamic phenomena at population-level, namely the existence of distinct opinion formation phases and social balancing. We also reveal that a phase transition from an erratic behavior to social balancing can be triggered by network topology and by the ratio of opinion sources. Consequently, in order to build a model that properly accounts for these phenomena, we propose a new (individual-level opinion interaction model based on tolerance. As opposed to the existing opinion interaction models, the new tolerance model assumes that individual’s inner willingness to accept new opinions evolves over time according to basic human traits. Finally, by employing discrete event simulation on diverse social network topologies, we validate our opinion interaction model and show that, although the network size and opinion source ratio are important, the phase transition to social balancing is mainly fostered by the democratic structure of the small-world topology.

  10. MPP1 directly interacts with flotillins in erythrocyte membrane - Possible mechanism of raft domain formation.

    Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Augoff, Katarzyna; Podkalicka, Joanna; Tabaczar, Sabina; Gajdzik-Nowak, Weronika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2017-11-01

    Flotillins are prominent, oligomeric protein components of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane raft domains and are considered to play an important structural role in lateral organization of the plasma membrane. In our previous work on erythroid membranes and giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from them we have shown that formation of functional domains (resting state rafts) depends on the presence of membrane palmitoylated protein 1 (MPP1/p55), pointing to its new physiological role. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of MPP1 function in organizing membrane domains described here, through searching for its molecular partners in RBC membrane by using different methods, led to the identification of the raft-marker proteins, flotillin 1 and flotillin 2, as hitherto unreported direct MPP1 binding-partners in the RBC membrane. These proteins are found in high molecular-weight complexes in native RBC membrane and, significantly, their presence was shown to be separate from the well-known protein 4.1-dependent interactions of MPP1 with membrane proteins. Furthermore, FLIM analysis revealed that loss of the endogenous MPP1-flotillins interactions resulted in significant changes in RBC membrane-fluidity, emphasizing the physiological importance of such interactions in vivo. Therefore, our data establish a new perspective on the role of MPP1 in erythroid cells and suggests that direct MPP1-flotillins interactions could be the major driving-force behind the formation of raft domains in RBC. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determining the Effect of Interactive Invention Instructional Strategy ...

    First Lady

    females and 94 males from six colleges of education in South Western. Nigeria which ... learner variables such as gender stereotype in physics and lack of confidence .... strategies provide opportunities for students to work in small interactive.

  12. Computational design, construction, and characterization of a set of specificity determining residues in protein-protein interactions.

    Nagao, Chioko; Izako, Nozomi; Soga, Shinji; Khan, Samia Haseeb; Kawabata, Shigeki; Shirai, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Proteins interact with different partners to perform different functions and it is important to elucidate the determinants of partner specificity in protein complex formation. Although methods for detecting specificity determining positions have been developed previously, direct experimental evidence for these amino acid residues is scarce, and the lack of information has prevented further computational studies. In this article, we constructed a dataset that is likely to exhibit specificity in protein complex formation, based on available crystal structures and several intuitive ideas about interaction profiles and functional subclasses. We then defined a "structure-based specificity determining position (sbSDP)" as a set of equivalent residues in a protein family showing a large variation in their interaction energy with different partners. We investigated sequence and structural features of sbSDPs and demonstrated that their amino acid propensities significantly differed from those of other interacting residues and that the importance of many of these residues for determining specificity had been verified experimentally. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Massive Star Clusters in Ongoing Galaxy Interactions: Clues to Cluster Formation

    Keel, William C.; Borne, Kirk D.

    2003-09-01

    We present HST WFPC2 observations, supplemented by ground-based Hα data, of the star-cluster populations in two pairs of interacting galaxies selected for being in very different kinds of encounters seen at different stages. Dynamical information and n-body simulations provide the details of encounter geometry, mass ratio, and timing. In NGC 5752/4 we are seeing a weak encounter, well past closest approach, after about 2.5×108 yr. The large spiral NGC 5754 has a normal population of disk clusters, while the fainter companion NGC 5752 exhibits a rich population of luminous clusters with a flatter luminosity function. The strong, ongoing encounter in NGC 6621/2, seen about 1.0×108 yr past closest approach between roughly equal-mass galaxies, has produced an extensive population of luminous clusters, particularly young and luminous in a small region between the two nuclei. This region is dynamically interesting, with such a strong perturbation in the velocity field that the rotation curve reverses sign. From these results, in comparison with other strongly interacting systems discussed in the literature, cluster formation requires a threshold level of perturbation, with stage of the interaction a less important factor. The location of the most active star formation in NGC 6621/2 draws attention to a possible role for the Toomre stability threshold in shaping star formation in interacting galaxies. The rich cluster populations in NGC 5752 and NGC 6621 show that direct contact between gas-rich galaxy disks is not a requirement to form luminous clusters and that they can be triggered by processes happening within a single galaxy disk (albeit triggered by external perturbations). Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  14. An Integrated Vision-Based System for Spacecraft Attitude and Topology Determination for Formation Flight Missions

    Rogers, Aaron; Anderson, Kalle; Mracek, Anna; Zenick, Ray

    2004-01-01

    With the space industry's increasing focus upon multi-spacecraft formation flight missions, the ability to precisely determine system topology and the orientation of member spacecraft relative to both inertial space and each other is becoming a critical design requirement. Topology determination in satellite systems has traditionally made use of GPS or ground uplink position data for low Earth orbits, or, alternatively, inter-satellite ranging between all formation pairs. While these techniques work, they are not ideal for extension to interplanetary missions or to large fleets of decentralized, mixed-function spacecraft. The Vision-Based Attitude and Formation Determination System (VBAFDS) represents a novel solution to both the navigation and topology determination problems with an integrated approach that combines a miniature star tracker with a suite of robust processing algorithms. By combining a single range measurement with vision data to resolve complete system topology, the VBAFDS design represents a simple, resource-efficient solution that is not constrained to certain Earth orbits or formation geometries. In this paper, analysis and design of the VBAFDS integrated guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) technology will be discussed, including hardware requirements, algorithm development, and simulation results in the context of potential mission applications.

  15. Twin solution calorimeter determines heats of formation of alloys at high temperatures

    Darby, J. B., Jr.; Kleb, R.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1968-01-01

    Calvert-type, twin liquid metal solution calorimeter determines the heats of formation of transition metal alloys at high temperatures. The twin differential calorimeter measures the small heat effects generated over extended periods of time, has maximum operating temperature of 1073 degrees K and an automatic data recording system.

  16. Determination of the shell growth direction during the formation of silica microcapsules by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    van Wijk, J.; Salari, J.W.O.; Meuldijk, J.; Klumperman, L.

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure was developed to determine the direction of silica growth during the formation of a silica shell around aqueous microdroplets in water-in-oil Pickering emulsions. Two fluorescently labeled silica precursors were added consecutively and the resulting microcapsules were visualized

  17. A charged residue at the subunit interface of PCNA promotes trimer formation by destabilizing alternate subunit interactions

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential accessory factor in DNA replication and repair, is a ring-shaped homotrimer. A novel nontrimeric structure of E113G-mutant PCNA protein is reported, which shows that this protein forms alternate subunit interactions. It is concluded that the charged side chain of Glu113 promotes normal trimer formation by destabilizing these alternate subunit interactions. Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential replication accessory factor that interacts with a variety of proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. Each monomer of PCNA has an N-terminal domain A and a C-terminal domain B. In the structure of the wild-type PCNA protein, domain A of one monomer interacts with domain B of a neighboring monomer to form a ring-shaped trimer. Glu113 is a conserved residue at the subunit interface in domain A. Two distinct X-ray crystal structures have been determined of a mutant form of PCNA with a substitution at this position (E113G) that has previously been studied because of its effect on translesion synthesis. The first structure was the expected ring-shaped trimer. The second structure was an unanticipated nontrimeric form of the protein. In this nontrimeric form, domain A of one PCNA monomer interacts with domain A of a neighboring monomer, while domain B of this monomer interacts with domain B of a different neighboring monomer. The B–B interface is stabilized by an antiparallel β-sheet and appears to be structurally similar to the A–B interface observed in the trimeric form of PCNA. The A–A interface, in contrast, is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Because the E113G substitution is located on this hydrophobic surface, the A–A interface should be less favorable in the case of the wild-type protein. This suggests that the side chain of Glu113 promotes trimer formation by destabilizing these possible alternate subunit interactions

  18. Broadening the horizon – level 2.5 of the HUPO-PSI format for molecular interactions

    Cusick Michael E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular interaction Information is a key resource in modern biomedical research. Publicly available data have previously been provided in a broad array of diverse formats, making access to this very difficult. The publication and wide implementation of the Human Proteome Organisation Proteomics Standards Initiative Molecular Interactions (HUPO PSI-MI format in 2004 was a major step towards the establishment of a single, unified format by which molecular interactions should be presented, but focused purely on protein-protein interactions. Results The HUPO-PSI has further developed the PSI-MI XML schema to enable the description of interactions between a wider range of molecular types, for example nucleic acids, chemical entities, and molecular complexes. Extensive details about each supported molecular interaction can now be captured, including the biological role of each molecule within that interaction, detailed description of interacting domains, and the kinetic parameters of the interaction. The format is supported by data management and analysis tools and has been adopted by major interaction data providers. Additionally, a simpler, tab-delimited format MITAB2.5 has been developed for the benefit of users who require only minimal information in an easy to access configuration. Conclusion The PSI-MI XML2.5 and MITAB2.5 formats have been jointly developed by interaction data producers and providers from both the academic and commercial sector, and are already widely implemented and well supported by an active development community. PSI-MI XML2.5 enables the description of highly detailed molecular interaction data and facilitates data exchange between databases and users without loss of information. MITAB2.5 is a simpler format appropriate for fast Perl parsing or loading into Microsoft Excel.

  19. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  20. INSIDE-OUT PLANET FORMATION. III. PLANET–DISK INTERACTION AT THE DEAD ZONE INNER BOUNDARY

    Hu, Xiao; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 4000 exoplanet candidates. Many of them are in systems with tightly packed inner planets. Inside-out planet formation (IOPF) has been proposed as a scenario to explain these systems. It involves sequential in situ planet formation at the local pressure maximum of a retreating dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Pebbles accumulate at this pressure trap, which builds up a pebble ring and then a planet. The planet is expected to grow in mass until it opens a gap, which helps to both truncate pebble accretion and also induce DZIB retreat that sets the location of formation of the next planet. This simple scenario may be modified if the planet undergoes significant migration from its formation location. Thus, planet–disk interactions play a crucial role in the IOPF scenario. Here we present numerical simulations that first assess the degree of migration for planets of various masses that are forming at the DZIB of an active accretion disk, where the effective viscosity is undergoing a rapid increase in the radially inward direction. We find that torques exerted on the planet by the disk tend to trap the planet at a location very close to the initial pressure maximum where it formed. We then study gap opening by these planets to assess at what mass a significant gap is created. Finally, we present a simple model for DZIB retreat due to penetration of X-rays from the star to the disk midplane. Overall, these simulations help to quantify both the mass scale of first (“Vulcan”) planet formation and the orbital separation to the location of second planet formation

  1. Direct Determination of Chitosan–Mucin Interactions Using a Single-Molecule Strategy: Comparison to Alginate–Mucin Interactions

    Kristin E. Haugstad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous chitosan possesses attractive interaction capacities with various molecular groups that can be involved in hydrogen bonds and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. In the present paper, we report on the direct determination of chitosan–mucin molecular pair interactions at various solvent conditions as compared to alginate–mucin interactions. Two chitosans of high molecular weight with different degrees of acetylation—thus possessing different solubility profiles in aqueous solution as a function of pH and two alginates with different fractions of α-guluronic acid were employed. The interaction properties were determined through a direct unbinding assay at the single-molecular pair level using an atomic force microscope. When probed against immobilized mucin, both chitosans and alginates revealed unbinding profiles characteristic of localized interactions along the polymers. The interaction capacities and estimated parameters of the energy landscapes of the pairwise chitosan–mucin and alginate–mucin interactions are discussed in view of possible contributions from various fundamental forces. Signatures arising both from an electrostatic mechanism and hydrophobic interaction are identified in the chitosan–mucin interaction properties. The molecular nature of the observed chitosan–mucin and alginate–mucin interactions indicates that force spectroscopy provides fundamental insights that can be useful in understanding the surface binding properties of other potentially mucoadhesive polymers.

  2. The Methodological Approach to Determining the Level of Formation and Provision of Enterprise Personnel Security

    Gavkalova Nataliia L.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to substantiate the methodical approach to determining the level of formation and provision of enterprise personnel security. By analyzing, systematizing and generalizing scientific achievements of many scientists, approaches to the evaluation of personnel security at the enterprise were considered, a set of indices for evaluation of personnel security was defined. There justified the urgency of creating a comprehensive approach to evaluation of personnel security that includes implementation of the following stages: defining a list of indices corresponding to the level of formation and provision of personnel security with the help of the expert evaluation method; calculating integral indices of personnel security for each component and the corresponding level by means of the taxonomic analysis; grouping enterprises by the level of formation and provision of personnel security with the use of the cluster and discriminant analysis. It is found that the implementation of this approach will allow not only determining the level of formation and provision of personnel security at the enterprise, but also developing appropriate recommendations on improving its state. Prospects for further research in this direction are evaluation of conditions for formation and provision of personnel security at the enterprise, which will enable revealing negative destabilizing factors that influence personnel security

  3. Towards a First-Principles Determination of Effective Coulomb Interactions in Correlated Electron Materials: Role of Intershell Interactions.

    Seth, Priyanka; Hansmann, Philipp; van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Vaugier, Loig; Biermann, Silke

    2017-08-04

    The determination of the effective Coulomb interactions to be used in low-energy Hamiltonians for materials with strong electronic correlations remains one of the bottlenecks for parameter-free electronic structure calculations. We propose and benchmark a scheme for determining the effective local Coulomb interactions for charge-transfer oxides and related compounds. Intershell interactions between electrons in the correlated shell and ligand orbitals are taken into account in an effective manner, leading to a reduction of the effective local interactions on the correlated shell. Our scheme resolves inconsistencies in the determination of effective interactions as obtained by standard methods for a wide range of materials, and allows for a conceptual understanding of the relation of cluster model and dynamical mean field-based electronic structure calculations.

  4. Determination of stability constants of lanthanide nitrate complex formation using a solvent extraction technique

    Andersson, S.; Ekberg, C.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Nilsson, M.; Skarnemark, G.; Eberhardt, K.

    2006-01-01

    For lanthanides and actinides, nitrate complex formation is an important factor with respect to the reprocessing of nuclear fuels and in studies that treat partitioning and transmutation/conditioning. Different techniques, including microcalorimetry, various kinds of spectroscopy, ion-exchange and solvent extraction, can be used to determine stability constants of nitrate complex formation. However, it is uncommon that all lanthanides are studied at the same time, using the same experimental conditions and technique. The strengths of the complexes are different for lanthanides and actinides, a feature that may assist in the separation of the two groups. This paper deals with nitrate complex formation of lanthanides using a solvent extraction technique. Trace amounts of radioactive isotopes of lanthanides were produced at the TRIGA Mainz research reactor and at the Institutt for Energiteknikk in Kjeller, Norway (JEEP II reactor). The extraction of lanthanide ions into an organic phase consisting of 2, 6-bis-(benzoxazolyl)-4-dodecyloxylpyridine, 2-bromodecanoic acid and tert-butyl benzene as a function of nitrate ion concentration in the aqueous phase was studied in order to estimate the stability constants of nitrate complex formation. When the nitrate ion concentration is increased in the aqueous phase, the nitrate complex formation starts to compete with the extraction of metal ions. Thus the stability constants of nitrate complex formation can be estimated by measuring the decrease in extraction and successive fitting of an appropriate model. Extraction curves for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho and Er were obtained and stability constants for their nitrate complex formation were estimated. Tb, Tm, Yb and Lu were also investigated, but no stability constants could be determined. The distribution ratios for the metal ions at low nitrate ion concentration were obtained at the same time, showing the effect of lanthanide contraction resulting in decreasing

  5. Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks

    Coolen, A C C; Rabello, S

    2009-01-01

    We analyze large systems of interacting proteins, using techniques from the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of disordered many-particle systems. Apart from protein production and removal, the most relevant microscopic processes in the proteome are complex formation and dissociation, and the microscopic degrees of freedom are the evolving concentrations of unbound proteins (in multiple post-translational states) and of protein complexes. Here we only include dimer-complexes, for mathematical simplicity, and we draw the network that describes which proteins are reaction partners from an ensemble of random graphs with an arbitrary degree distribution. We show how generating functional analysis methods can be used successfully to derive closed equations for dynamical order parameters, representing an exact macroscopic description of the complex formation and dissociation dynamics in the infinite system limit. We end this paper with a discussion of the possible routes towards solving the nontrivial order parameter equations, either exactly (in specific limits) or approximately.

  6. Bridging and bonding interactions in higher education: social capital and students’ academic and professional identity formation

    Jensen, Dorthe H.; Jetten, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that graduates’ achievements depend in important ways on their opportunities to develop an academic and a professional identity during their studies. Previous research has shown that students’ socio-economic status (SES) and social capital prior to entering university affects their ability to obtain these identities in higher education. However, what is less well understood is whether social capital that is built during university studies shapes identity development, and if so, whether the social capital gained during university years impacts on academic and professional identity differently. In a qualitative study, we interviewed 26 Danish and 11 Australian university students about their social interaction experiences, their opportunities to develop bonding capital as well as bridging capital, and their academic and professional identity. Findings show that while bonding social capital with co-students facilitated academic identity formation, such social capital does not lead to professional identity development. We also found that the development of bridging social capital with educators facilitated students’ professional identity formation. However, bonding social capital among students stood in the way of participating in bridging interaction with educators, thereby further hindering professional identity formation. Finally, while students’ parental background did not affect the perceived difficulty of forming professional identity, there was a tendency for students from lower SES backgrounds to be more likely to make internal attributions while those from higher SES backgrounds were more likely to make external attributions for the failure to develop professional identity. Results point to the importance of creating opportunities for social interaction with educators at university because this facilitates the generation of bridging social capital, which, in turn, is essential for students’ professional identity

  7. Bridging and bonding interactions in higher education: social capital and students' academic and professional identity formation.

    Jensen, Dorthe H; Jetten, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that graduates' achievements depend in important ways on their opportunities to develop an academic and a professional identity during their studies. Previous research has shown that students' socio-economic status (SES) and social capital prior to entering university affects their ability to obtain these identities in higher education. However, what is less well understood is whether social capital that is built during university studies shapes identity development, and if so, whether the social capital gained during university years impacts on academic and professional identity differently. In a qualitative study, we interviewed 26 Danish and 11 Australian university students about their social interaction experiences, their opportunities to develop bonding capital as well as bridging capital, and their academic and professional identity. Findings show that while bonding social capital with co-students facilitated academic identity formation, such social capital does not lead to professional identity development. We also found that the development of bridging social capital with educators facilitated students' professional identity formation. However, bonding social capital among students stood in the way of participating in bridging interaction with educators, thereby further hindering professional identity formation. Finally, while students' parental background did not affect the perceived difficulty of forming professional identity, there was a tendency for students from lower SES backgrounds to be more likely to make internal attributions while those from higher SES backgrounds were more likely to make external attributions for the failure to develop professional identity. Results point to the importance of creating opportunities for social interaction with educators at university because this facilitates the generation of bridging social capital, which, in turn, is essential for students' professional identity development.

  8. On the formation of spiral structure in gas discs through tidal interaction

    Sorensen, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper investigates the waves which are formed when a thin gas disc in a smooth axisymmetric potential is perturbed. The perturbation is introduced through tidal interaction with an external body moving in the plane of the disc. The model is investigated using numerical techniques which follow the formation of large-scale hyperbolic spirals. These are identified as the propagating fronts of epicyclic waves. Over an area comparable to the visual image of a galaxy the spirals change from the hyperbolic form towards an equiangular appearance. Predictions by analytical models were found to be in good agreement with the results. (author)

  9. Lithofacies cyclicity determination in the guaduas formation (Colombia using Markov chains

    Jorge Eliecer Mariño Martinez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistical embedded Markov Chain processes were used to analyze facies transitions and to determine the stacking pattern of the lithofacies of the Guaduas Formation. Twelve Lithofacies were found and characterized based on lithology and sedimentary structures in four stratigraphic sections. The findings were compared with a previous assemblage of lithofacies, interpretations of sedimentary environments, and depositional systems.  As a result, four depositional Systems were established. Through the statistical analyses of facies transitions it was found that tidal facies are prevalent in the Socota section, especially in the upper part, whereas in the Sogamoso, Umbita and Peñas de Sutatausa sections, fluvial facies are prevalent in the upper part of the sections, and follow a regressive sequence with more continental deposits around the upper part of the sections. For each of these sections the Markov Chain transition matrices illustrates a strong interaction between tidal facies and fluvial facies, specially in the Peñas de Sutatausa matrix, where facies 6, made up of tidal deposits, appears several times. From the facies model and Markov Chain analyses, it is evident that the Guaduas Formation is a cyclic sequence in which the Markov facies repetitions are consistent with the lithofacies analyses conducted in previous stratigraphic studies. The results reveal that the Markov Chain statistical process can be used to predict stratigraphy in order to correlate contiguous geologically unexplored areas in the Guaduas Formation, where much work relating to correlation and the continuity of coal beds has yet to be done.    Determinacion de la ciclicidad de las facies en la formacion Guaduas (Colombia usando las cadenas de Markov Resumen Se utilizaron los procesos estadísticos de las cadenas de Markov para analizar las transiciones de facies y para determinar el patrón de apilamiento de las litofacies de la formación Guaduas. Se encontraron y

  10. Ferrocene Orientation Determined Intramolecular Interactions Using Energy Decomposition Analysis

    Feng Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two very different quantum mechanically based energy decomposition analyses (EDA schemes are employed to study the dominant energy differences between the eclipsed and staggered ferrocene conformers. One is the extended transition state (ETS based on the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF package and the other is natural EDA (NEDA based in the General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS package. It reveals that in addition to the model (theory and basis set, the fragmentation channels more significantly affect the interaction energy terms (ΔE between the conformers. It is discovered that such an interaction energy can be absorbed into the pre-partitioned fragment channels so that to affect the interaction energies in a particular conformer of Fc. To avoid this, the present study employs a complete fragment channel—the fragments of ferrocene are individual neutral atoms. It therefore discovers that the major difference between the ferrocene conformers is due to the quantum mechanical Pauli repulsive energy and orbital attractive energy, leading to the eclipsed ferrocene the energy preferred structure. The NEDA scheme further indicates that the sum of attractive (negative polarization (POL and charge transfer (CL energies prefers the eclipsed ferrocene. The repulsive (positive deformation (DEF energy, which is dominated by the cyclopentadienyle (Cp rings, prefers the staggered ferrocene. Again, the cancellation results in a small energy residue in favour of the eclipsed ferrocene, in agreement with the ETS scheme. Further Natural Bond Orbital (NBO analysis indicates that all NBO energies, total Lewis (no Fe and lone pair (LP deletion all prefer the eclipsed Fc conformer. The most significant energy preferring the eclipsed ferrocene without cancellation is the interactions between the donor lone pairs (LP of the Fe atom and the acceptor antibond (BD* NBOs of all C–C and C–H bonds in the ligand, LP(Fe-BD*(C–C & C

  11. Determination of a modal interaction correction for narrowband fragility data

    Kana, D.D.; Pomerening, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory tests for safety equipment operation under seismic environments in nuclear power plants have typically included various motion simulations based on either successively-applied multiple narrowband waveforms or simultaneous multifrequency broadband random waveforms. However, only broadband excitations are directly applicable when equipment performance is affected by interaction between simultaneously responding modes. Therefore, a modal interaction correction factor is developed so that a narrowed response spectrum can be transformed to an approximately equivalent broadband spectrum which accounts for modal interaction effects. The approach includes study of the fragility response of a simple two-degree-of-freedom oscillator for representative narrowband and broadband excitations, and relating the two resulting fragility response spectra. It is found that multiplication of the narrowband response spectrum by an 0.7 factor produces a conservative equivalent broadband response spectrum. The results are interpreted in terms of a secondary device responding on a primary support structure, or a primary structure having two resonances. The approach is useful for updating existing test results based on narrowband spectra, developing composite spectra for similar equipment, or providing more flexibility in designing new tests, and is applicable to qualification proof test data as well as fragility data. 10 refs., 8 figs

  12. Interaction mode and nanoparticle formation of bovine serum albumin and anthocyanin in three buffer solutions

    Zhou, Rui; Dong, Xueyan; Song, Lanlan; Jing, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of interaction mode of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anthocyanin (ACN) in different solutions will help us understand the interaction mechanism and functional change of bioactive small molecule and biomacromolecule. This study investigated the binding mode, including binding constant, number of binding sites, binding force of BSA and ACN interaction in three buffer solutions of phosphate (PBS), sodium chloride (NaCl), and PBS-NaCl, using fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Formation and characteristics of BSA–ACN complex were also investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that ACN could interact with BSA at both tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues through both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force, and the same binding mode was seen in dH 2 O and three buffer solutions. The value of binding constant K was decreased as the temperature increased from 298 K to 308 K, and the decreasing degree was in the order of dH 2 O (9.0×10 4 )>NaCl (2.64×10 4 )/PBS (2.37×10 4 )>PBS-NaCl (0.88×10 4 ), which was inversely correlated with the ionic strength of the buffer solutions of PBS-NaCl>NaCl>PBS. It indicated that stability of BSA–ACN complex was affected most in dH 2 O than in three buffer solutions. The BSA and ACN interaction led to formation of BSA–ACN nanoparticles. The sizes of BSA–ACN nanoparticles in dH 2 O were smaller than that in three buffer solutions, which correlated with stronger binding force between BSA and ACN in dH 2 O than in three buffer solutions at room temperature (25 °C, 298 K). - Highlights: • We report the influences of four solutions on the BSA–ACN interaction. • We report the relationship between BSA–ACN interaction and particle size of complex. • The stability of BSA–ACN complex was affected most in dH 2 O than in buffer solutions

  13. Study on the determination of ore-formation age of primary gold ore

    Ying Junlong; Zhao Puyun; Guo Hong

    1997-01-01

    The accurate determination of gold ore-formation age and ore-source isotope composition are of important significance in the research on gold geology and prospecting. According to the summary of three year indoor and field work, the ore-formation ages and isotope compositions of some typical gold deposits were obtained: The age of gold ore of the Wuhuaaobao deposit in geo-syncline region north to the north margin of North-China paleo-land is 130-120 Ma corresponding to the Late-orogenic stage. The ore-formation age of the Saiwusu gold deposit in the southern platform region is 211 +- 15 Ma, recycling reworking of the old-land. The Hougou-Huangtuliang gold deposit located in the middle of the platform region is 243 +- 7 Ma old attributed to the regeneration ore-formation on the old-land. the age of Jiaojia-Rushan gold deposit in Eastern Shandong is 122.7 +- 3.4 Ma and 128 +- 23 Ma belonging to Yanshanian stage. The Babaoshan gold-silver deposit in Cathaysian old-land is 140 +- 5 Ma old originated from volcanic hydrothermal ore-formation

  14. Electrostatic Interactions Positively Regulate K-Ras Nanocluster Formation and Function▿

    Plowman, Sarah J.; Ariotti, Nicholas; Goodall, Andrew; Parton, Robert G.; Hancock, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The organization of Ras proteins into plasma membrane nanoclusters is essential for high-fidelity signal transmission, but whether the nanoscale enviroments of different Ras nanoclusters regulate effector interactions is unknown. We show using high-resolution spatial mapping that Raf-1 is recruited to and retained in K-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. In contrast, Raf-1 recruited to the plasma membrane by H-Ras is not retained in H-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. Similarly, upon epidermal growth factor receptor activation, Raf-1 is preferentially recruited to K-Ras-GTP and not H-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. The formation of K-Ras-GTP nanoclusters is inhibited by phosphorylation of S181 in the C-terminal polybasic domain or enhanced by blocking S181 phosphorylation, with a concomitant reduction or increase in Raf-1 plasma membrane recruitment, respectively. Phosphorylation of S181 does not, however, regulate in vivo interactions with the nanocluster scaffold galectin-3 (Gal3), indicating separate roles for the polybasic domain and Gal3 in driving K-Ras nanocluster formation. Together, these data illustrate that Ras nanocluster composition regulates effector recruitment and highlight the importance of lipid/protein nanoscale environments to the activation of signaling cascades. PMID:18458061

  15. Ising-based model of opinion formation in a complex network of interpersonal interactions

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    In our work the process of opinion formation in the human population, treated as a scale-free network, is modeled and investigated numerically. The individuals (nodes of the network) are characterized by their authorities, which influence the interpersonal interactions in the population. Hierarchical, two-level structures of interpersonal interactions and spatial localization of individuals are taken into account. The effect of the mass media, modeled as an external stimulation acting on the social network, on the process of opinion formation is investigated. It was found that in the time evolution of opinions of individuals critical phenomena occur. The first one is observed in the critical temperature of the system TC and is connected with the situation in the community, which may be described by such quantifiers as the economic status of people, unemployment or crime wave. Another critical phenomenon is connected with the influence of mass media on the population. As results from our computations, under certain circumstances the mass media can provoke critical rebuilding of opinions in the population.

  16. Natural organic matter interactions with polyamide and polysulfone membranes: Formation of conditioning film

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2015-03-31

    A conditioning film changes the physicochemical properties of the membrane surface and strongly affects subsequent fouling behavior. Results from this Atomic Force Microscopy study indicate that Natural Organic Matter (NOM) characteristics, membrane surface properties, and solution chemistry are fundamental during conditioning film formation. Repulsive forces were observed between HUM (humic-NOM) and Polyamide (PA) or Polysulfone (PS) membranes during approach in Na+ and Ca2+ solutions. However, repulsive and attractive forces were randomly recorded during BIOP (biopolymer-NOM) approach to both membranes, possibly caused by low electrostatic repulsion, hydrogen bonding, and presence of chemically/physically heterogeneous regions on membrane surfaces. During retracting, Ca2+ ions increased HUM adhesion to PA and PS membrane, indicating cation bridging/complexation as dominant interacting mechanism for this isolate. BIOP adsorption on PS and PA membrane was stronger than HUM under similar solution conditions, where hydrogen bonding would play an important role. Additionally, irrespective of solution conditions, higher adhesion energy was recorded on PS than on PA membrane for both NOM isolates, indicating membrane hydrophobicity as an important interacting factor. Results from this research will advance our understanding of conditioning film formation for NOM isolates and membranes of different physicochemical characteristics.

  17. Identifying Interactions that Determine Fragment Binding at Protein Hotspots.

    Radoux, Chris J; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Pitt, Will R; Groom, Colin R; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-05-12

    Locating a ligand-binding site is an important first step in structure-guided drug discovery, but current methods do little to suggest which interactions within a pocket are the most important for binding. Here we illustrate a method that samples atomic hotspots with simple molecular probes to produce fragment hotspot maps. These maps specifically highlight fragment-binding sites and their corresponding pharmacophores. For ligand-bound structures, they provide an intuitive visual guide within the binding site, directing medicinal chemists where to grow the molecule and alerting them to suboptimal interactions within the original hit. The fragment hotspot map calculation is validated using experimental binding positions of 21 fragments and subsequent lead molecules. The ligands are found in high scoring areas of the fragment hotspot maps, with fragment atoms having a median percentage rank of 97%. Protein kinase B and pantothenate synthetase are examined in detail. In each case, the fragment hotspot maps are able to rationalize a Free-Wilson analysis of SAR data from a fragment-based drug design project.

  18. Nano-motion dynamics are determined by surface-tethered selectin mechanokinetics and bond formation.

    Brian J Schmidt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of proteins at cellular interfaces is critical for many biological processes, from intercellular signaling to cell adhesion. For example, the selectin family of adhesion receptors plays a critical role in trafficking during inflammation and immunosurveillance. Quantitative measurements of binding rates between surface-constrained proteins elicit insight into how molecular structural details and post-translational modifications contribute to function. However, nano-scale transport effects can obfuscate measurements in experimental assays. We constructed a biophysical simulation of the motion of a rigid microsphere coated with biomolecular adhesion receptors in shearing flow undergoing thermal motion. The simulation enabled in silico investigation of the effects of kinetic force dependence, molecular deformation, grouping adhesion receptors into clusters, surface-constrained bond formation, and nano-scale vertical transport on outputs that directly map to observable motions. Simulations recreated the jerky, discrete stop-and-go motions observed in P-selectin/PSGL-1 microbead assays with physiologic ligand densities. Motion statistics tied detailed simulated motion data to experimentally reported quantities. New deductions about biomolecular function for P-selectin/PSGL-1 interactions were made. Distributing adhesive forces among P-selectin/PSGL-1 molecules closely grouped in clusters was necessary to achieve bond lifetimes observed in microbead assays. Initial, capturing bond formation effectively occurred across the entire molecular contour length. However, subsequent rebinding events were enhanced by the reduced separation distance following the initial capture. The result demonstrates that vertical transport can contribute to an enhancement in the apparent bond formation rate. A detailed analysis of in silico motions prompted the proposition of wobble autocorrelation as an indicator of two-dimensional function. Insight into two

  19. Interspecies interactions result in enhanced biofilm formation by co-cultures of bacteria isolated from a food processing environment

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Herschend, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial attachment and biofilm formation can lead to poor hygienic conditions in food processing environments. Furthermore, interactions between different bacteria may induce or promote biofilm formation. In this study, we isolated and identified a total of 687 bacterial strains from seven......-culture biofilm production with high relevance for food safety and food production facilities....

  20. X-ray and optical study on point defect formation and interaction under irradiation adn doping of KCl

    Braude, I S; Rogozyanskaya, L M [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst. Nizkikh Temperatur

    1978-08-01

    Optical and X-ray diffuse scattering methods have been applied to investigate structural changes, taking place in KCl crystals during irradiation with ..gamma..-quanta and doping with barium. It is shown that ..gamma..-irradiation of ''pure'' and doped KCl crystals mainly leads to formation of F-centers and spherical vacancy complexes. F-center concentration in irradiated addition crystals (3x10/sup -6/) has turned out to be 25% lower, than in irradiated pure ones (4x10/sup -6/), which is connected with interaction of radiation and addition defects. The type of defects, causing assymetry in the distribution of diffuse scattering has been determined. Appearance of scattering ability modulation over direction < 100 > during irradiation of KCl pure crystals has been found. Critical radius of spherical complexes formed during irradiation has been estimated, it appeared to be 2.5 a, where a is a lattice period.

  1. Determination of orbitals for use in configuration interaction calculations

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Davidson, E.R.; Ruedenberg, K.; Hinze, J.

    1978-01-01

    For a full configuration interaction (CI) calculation the choice of orbitals is completely irrelevant, i.e., the calculated wavefunction is unaffected by an arbitrary unitary transformation of the orbitals; it depends only on the space spanned by the original basis set. For most chemical systems it is not possible to realistically carry out a full CI calculation, so that specification of the orbital set is important. Even for less-than-full CI calculations, it can be shown, however, that for certain types of calculations the wavefunction is unaffected by restricted transformations among the orbital set. For example, for CI calculations based on a single configuration plus a complete set of excitations of a given type (single, double, etc.), the calculated wavefunction is independent of transformations among the set of occupied orbitals and among the set of virtual orbitals. The wavefunction does, however, depend on transformations which mix the occupied and virtual orbitals

  2. Determine point-to-point networking interactions using regular expressions

    Konstantin S. Deev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As Internet growth and becoming more popular, the number of concurrent data flows start to increasing, which makes sense in bandwidth requested. Providers and corporate customers need ability to identify point-to-point interactions. The best is to use special software and hardware implementations that distribute the load in the internals of the complex, using the principles and approaches, in particular, described in this paper. This paper represent the principles of building system, which searches for a regular expression match using computing on graphics adapter in server station. A significant computing power and capability to parallel execution on modern graphic processor allows inspection of large amounts of data through sets of rules. Using the specified characteristics can lead to increased computing power in 30…40 times compared to the same setups on the central processing unit. The potential increase in bandwidth capacity could be used in systems that provide packet analysis, firewalls and network anomaly detectors.

  3. Hsp40 interacts directly with the native state of the yeast prion protein Ure2 and inhibits formation of amyloid-like fibrils.

    Lian, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Loovers, Harriët M; Jones, Gary W; Rowling, Pamela J E; Itzhaki, Laura S; Zhou, Jun-Mei; Perrett, Sarah

    2007-04-20

    Ure2 is the protein determinant of the [URE3] prion phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and consists of a flexible N-terminal prion-determining domain and a globular C-terminal glutathione transferase-like domain. Overexpression of the type I Hsp40 member Ydj1 in yeast cells has been found to result in the loss of [URE3]. However, the mechanism of prion curing by Ydj1 remains unclear. Here we tested the effect of overexpression of Hsp40 members Ydj1, Sis1, and Apj1 and also Hsp70 co-chaperones Cpr7, Cns1, Sti1, and Fes1 in vivo and found that only Ydj1 showed a strong curing effect on [URE3]. We also investigated the interaction of Ydj1 with Ure2 in vitro. We found that Ydj1 was able to suppress formation of amyloid-like fibrils of Ure2 by delaying the process of fibril formation, as monitored by thioflavin T binding and atomic force microscopy imaging. Controls using bovine serum albumin, Sis1, or the human Hsp40 homologues Hdj1 or Hdj2 showed no significant inhibitory effect. Ydj1 was only effective when added during the lag phase of fibril formation, suggesting that it interacts with Ure2 at an early stage in fibril formation and delays the nucleation process. Using surface plasmon resonance and size exclusion chromatography, we demonstrated a direct interaction between Ydj1 and both wild type and N-terminally truncated Ure2. In contrast, Hdj2, which did not suppress fibril formation, did not show this interaction. The results suggest that Ydj1 inhibits Ure2 fibril formation by binding to the native state of Ure2, thus delaying the onset of oligomerization.

  4. Dermatopontin interacts with fibronectin, promotes fibronectin fibril formation, and enhances cell adhesion.

    Kato, Aiko; Okamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Shimada, Tatsuo; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2011-04-29

    We report that dermatopontin (DP), an abundant dermal extracellular matrix protein, is found in the fibrin clot and in the wound fluid, which comprise the provisional matrix at the initial stage of wound healing. DP was also found in the serum but at a lower concentration than that in wound fluid. DP co-localized with both fibrin and fibronectin on fibrin fibers and interacted with both proteins. Both normal fibroblast and HT1080 cell adhesion to the fibrin-fibronectin matrix were dose-dependently enhanced by DP, and the adhesion was mediated by α5β1 integrin. The cytoskeleton was more organized in the cells that adhered to the fibrin-fibronectin-DP complex. When incubated with DP, fibronectin formed an insoluble complex of fibronectin fibrils as visualized by electron microscopy. The interacting sites of fibronectin with DP were the first, thirteenth, and fourteenth type III repeats (III(1), III(13), and III(14)), with III(13) and III(14) assumed to be the major sites. The interaction between III(2-3) and III(12-14) was inhibited by DP, whereas the interaction between I(1-5) and III(12-14) was specifically and strongly enhanced by DP. Because the interaction between III(2-3) and III(12-14) is involved in forming a globular conformation of fibronectin, and that between I(1-5) and III(12-14) is required for forming fibronectin fibrils, DP promotes fibronectin fibril formation probably by changing the fibronectin conformation. These results suggest that DP has an accelerating role in fibroblast cell adhesion to the provisional matrix in the initial stage of wound healing.

  5. Formation and relaxation of quasistationary states in particle systems with power-law interactions.

    Marcos, B; Gabrielli, A; Joyce, M

    2017-09-01

    We explore the formation and relaxation of the so-called quasistationary states (QSS) for particle distributions in three dimensions interacting via an attractive radial pair potential V(r→∞)∼1/r^{γ} with γ>0, and either a soft core or hard core regularization at small r. In the first part of the paper, we generalize, for any spatial dimension d≥2, Chandrasekhar's approach for the case of gravity to obtain analytic estimates of the rate of collisional relaxation due to two-body collisions. The resultant relaxation rates indicate an essential qualitative difference depending on the integrability of the pair force at large distances: for γ>d-1, the rate diverges in the large particle number N (mean-field) limit, unless a sufficiently large soft core is present; for γsoft cores leading to the formation of QSS. We find, just as for the previously well studied case of gravity (which we also revisit), excellent agreement between the parametric dependence of the observed relaxation times and our analytic predictions. Further, as in the case of gravity, we find that the results indicate that, when large impact factors dominate, the appropriate cutoff is the size of the system (rather than, for example, the mean interparticle distance). Our results provide strong evidence that the existence of QSS is robust only for long-range interactions with a large distance behavior γinteraction.

  6. Voltammetric determination of heparin based on its interaction with ...

    ... with the linear regression equation as ∆ip″ (nA) = 360.19 C (mg/L) + 178.88 (n = 15, γ = 0.998) and the detection limit as 0.28 mg/L (3σ). The effects of coexisting substances such as metal ions, amino acids on the determination of heparin were investigated and the results showed that this method had good selectivity.

  7. Distance-based relative orbital elements determination for formation flying system

    He, Yanchao; Xu, Ming; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The present paper deals with determination of relative orbital elements based only on distance between satellites in the formation flying system, which has potential application in engineering, especially suited for rapid orbit determination required missions. A geometric simplification is performed to reduce the formation configuration in three-dimensional space to a plane. Then the equivalent actual configuration deviating from its nominal design is introduced to derive a group of autonomous linear equations on the mapping between the relative orbital elements differences and distance errors. The primary linear equations-based algorithm is initially proposed to conduct the rapid and precise determination of the relative orbital elements without the complex computation, which is further improved by least-squares method with more distance measurements taken into consideration. Numerical simulations and comparisons with traditional approaches are presented to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To assess the performance of the two proposed algorithms, accuracy validation and Monte Carlo simulations are implemented in the presence of noises of distance measurements and the leader's absolute orbital elements. It is demonstrated that the relative orbital elements determination accuracy of two approaches reaches more than 90% and even close to the actual values for the least-squares improved one. The proposed approaches can be alternates for relative orbit determination without assistance of additional facilities in engineering for their fairly high efficiency with accuracy and autonomy.

  8. FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE IN THE INFORMATIONAL FIELD OF CROSS CULTURAL INTERACTION

    Vitaly Vyacheslavovich Tomin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of foreign languages is becoming an integral feature of competitive persona-lity, ability to engage in cross-cultural communication and productive cross-cultural inte-raction, characterized by an adequate degree of tolerance and multi-ethnic competence, the ability for cross-cultural adaptation, critical thinking and creativity. However, the concept of foreign language competence has so far no clear, unambiguous definitions, thereby indicating the complexity and diversity of the phenomenon, which is an integrative, practice-oriented outcome of the wish and ability for intercultural communication. There have been mentioned a variety of requirements, conditions, principles, objectives, means and forms of foreign language competence forming, among which special attention is paid to non-traditional forms of practical training and information field in a cross-cultural interaction. There have been explained the feasibility of their application, which allows solving a complex of series of educational and teaching tasks more efficiently. There have been clarified the term «information field» in cross-cultural interaction, which is a cross-section of internally inherent in every individual «sections» of knowledge, skills, and experience, arising in certain given educational frameworks and forming a communication channel. The resultative indicators of the formation of foreign language competence and ways to improve its effectiveness are presented.

  9. Sinup, a novel Siaz-interacting nuclear protein, modulates neural plate formation in the zebrafish embryos

    Ro, Hyunju; Won, Minho; Lee, Su-Ui; Kim, Kyoon E.; Huh, Tae-Lin; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Rhee, Myungchull

    2005-01-01

    Siah, the vertebrate homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia (sina) gene, is well conserved from Drosophila to mammal and involved in ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of various target proteins. To identify cellular proteins interacting with Siah, we screened a zebrafish cDNA library with zebrafish Siah (Siaz) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid assay. We identified a cDNA encoding a novel protein composed of 145 amino acids and termed it as Sinup (Siaz-interacting-nuclear-protein). Sinup is a novel nuclear protein that binds to the highly conserved C-terminal protein-interacting domain of Siaz both in vivo and in vitro. During development, sinup transcripts are abundant from the one-cell stage to the early blastula and then markedly diminished, suggesting sinup largely exists as maternal transcripts. sinup overexpression induced lateral expansion of the neural plate and in consequence caused ectopic expression of otx-2 and hoxb1b during the late gastrula stage. In addition, the lateral/paraxial expression of wnt8 at the onset of gastrulation is suppressed by the forced expression of sinup while the expression levels of various dorso-ventral markers are unaffected. In contrast, interfering with sinup functions using sinup morpholino oligonucleotides gradually diminished the anterior neuroectoderm from the posterior region, and resulted in compete loss of hindbrain at the 3-somites stage. Our report suggests that sinup expression should be tightly regulated during early embryonic development for the proper neural plate formation

  10. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  11. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures.

    Fabiana A Caetano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell.

  12. Power-Law Kinetics and Determinant Criteria for the Preclusion of Multistationarity in Networks of Interacting Species

    Wiuf, Carsten Henrik; Feliu, Elisenda

    2013-01-01

    is derived from the determinant of the Jacobian of the species formation rate function. Using this characterization, we further derive similar determinant criteria applicable to general sets of kinetics. The criteria are conceptually simple, computationally tractable, and easily implemented. Our approach...... embraces and extends previous work on multistationarity, such as work in relation to chemical reaction networks with dynamics defined by mass-action or noncatalytic kinetics, and also work based on graphical analysis of the interaction graph associated with the system. Further, we interpret the criteria...... and how the species influence each reaction. We characterize families of so-called power-law kinetics for which the associated species formation rate function is injective within each stoichiometric class and thus the network cannot exhibit multistationarity. The criterion for power-law kinetics...

  13. Using an ACTIVE teaching format versus a standard lecture format for increasing resident interaction and knowledge achievement during noon conference: a prospective, controlled study

    2014-01-01

    Background The traditional lecture is used by many residency programs to fulfill the mandate for regular didactic sessions, despite limited evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness. Active teaching strategies have shown promise in improving medical knowledge but have been challenging to implement within the constraints of residency training. We developed and evaluated an innovative structured format for interactive teaching within the residency noon conference. Methods We developed an ACTIVE teaching format structured around the following steps: assemble (A) into groups, convey (C) learning objectives, teach (T) background information, inquire (I) through cases and questions, verify (V) understanding, and explain (E) answer choices and educate on the learning points. We conducted a prospective, controlled study of the ACTIVE teaching format versus the standard lecture format, comparing resident satisfaction, immediate knowledge achievement and long-term knowledge retention. We qualitatively assessed participating faculty members’ perspectives on the faculty development efforts and the feasibility of teaching using the ACTIVE format. Results Sixty-nine internal medicine residents participated in the study. Overall, there was an improvement in perceived engagement using the ACTIVE teaching format (4.78 vs. 3.80, P teaching format (overall absolute score increase of 11%, P = 0.04) and a trend toward improvement in long-term knowledge retention. Faculty members felt adequately prepared to use the ACTIVE teaching format, and enjoyed teaching with the ACTIVE teaching format more than the standard lecture. Conclusions A structured ACTIVE teaching format improved resident engagement and initial knowledge, and required minimal resources. The ACTIVE teaching format offers an exciting alternative to the standard lecture for resident noon conference and is easy to implement. PMID:24985781

  14. Star Formation in Hi Tails: HCG 92, HCG 100 and 6 Interacting Systems

    deMello, D. F.; Urrutia-Viscarra, F.; MendesdeOliveira, C.; Torres-Flores, S.; Carrasco, E. R.; Cypriano, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present new Gemini spectra of 14 new objects found within the HI tails of Hickson Compact Groups 92 and 100. Nine of them are GALEX Far-UV (FUV) and Near-UV (NUV) sources. The spectra confirm that these objects are members of the compact groups and have metallicities close to solar, with an average value of 12+log(O/H)approx.8.5. They have average FUV luminosities 7 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, very young ages (HI tails, NGC 2623, NGC 3079, NGC 3359, NGC 3627, NGC 3718, NGC 4656. We found 35 UV sources with ages < 100 Myr, however most of them are on average less luminous/massive than the UV sources found around HCG 92 and 100. We speculate that this might be an environmental effect and that compact groups of galaxies are more favorable to TDG formation than other interacting systems.

  15. The beginnings of the formation domestic innovation-investment entrepreneurship: interaction for the development

    Popovych M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research of the economic, social and political aspects of the formation of domestic entrepreneurship as inherent component of the innovation- investment process of the development of the economy of the Ukraine under the conditions of the market transformation. The existing ideas about the changes in the nature of competition are refined and it is opened essence and special feature of the newest tendency in the enterprise toward strengthening of partnership and cooperation. Is stated the basis of the generalized concept of interaction for the development, which is been based on the principles of co-existence, mutually-addition and reciprocal effect of competition and partnership, and also considering complimentarily of the mechanisms of action classical “invisible hand” and the second, are faster “visible hands” of market.

  16. Biofilm formation and determination of minimum biofilm eradication concentration of antibiotics in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Tassew, Dereje Damte; Mechesso, Abraham Fikru; Park, Na-Hye; Song, Ju-Beom; Shur, Joo-Woon; Park, Seung-Chun

    2017-10-20

    The study was aimed to investigate biofilm forming ability of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and to determine the minimum biofilm eradication concentrations of antibiotics. Biofilm forming ability of six strains of M. hyopneumoniae was examined using crystal violet staining on coverslips. The results demonstrated an apparent line of biofilm growth in 3 of the strains isolated from swine with confirmed cases of enzootic pneumonia. BacLight bacterial viability assay revealed that the majority of the cells were viable after 336 hr of incubation. Moreover, M. hyopneumoniae persists in the biofilm after being exposed to 10 fold higher concentration of antibiotics than the minimum inhibitory concentrations in planktonic cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of biofilm formation in M. hyopneumoniae. However, comprehensive studies on the mechanisms of biofilm formation are needed to combat swine enzootic pneumonia caused by resistant M. hyopneumoniae.

  17. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN GABBROID AND GRANITOID MAGMAS DURING FORMATION OF THE PREOBRAZHENSKY INTRUSION, EAST KAZAKHSTAN

    S. V. Khromykh

    2017-01-01

    upper rock levels. Examples of the magma interaction causing the formation of mingling structures at the middle and upper crust levels can be viewed as indicative of ‘fast’, active processes of the mantle‐crust interaction, when the mantle magmas actively drain the lithosphere and melt the substance of the lower‐middle crust. An important role is played by the temperature gradient in the sublithospheric mantle. It directly affects the degree of its melting and the volumes of basite magmas. Nonetheless, the permeability of the lithosphere is also important – the above‐described scenario is possible if the lithosphere is either thin or easily permeable due to the development of strike‐slip and extension fractures. In the Late Paleozoic, the territory of East Kazakhstan was part of the Altai collision system of hercinides. The late stages of its evolution (300–280 Ma were accompanied by large‐scale mantle and crustal magma‐ tism corresponding to the formation of the Late Palaeozoic large igneous province related to the activity of the Tarim mantle plume. The influence of the mantle plume on the lithospheric mantle led to an increase in the temperature gradient, and the lithosphere weakened by shear movements of the collapsing orogenic structure was permeable to mantle magmas, which caused the processes of mantle‐crustal interaction.

  18. Tidal interaction, star formation and chemical evolution in blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 22

    Paswan, A.; Omar, A.; Jaiswal, S.

    2018-02-01

    The optical spectroscopic and radio interferometric H I 21 cm-line observations of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 22 are presented. The Wolf-Rayet (WR) emission-line features corresponding to high ionization lines of He II λ4686 and C IV λ5808 from young massive stars are detected. The ages of two prominent star-forming regions in the galaxy are estimated as ∼10 and ∼ 4 Myr. The galaxy has non-thermal radio deficiency, which also indicates a young starburst and lack of supernovae events from the current star formation activities, consistent with the detection of WR emission-line features. A significant N/O enrichment is seen in the fainter star-forming region. The gas-phase metallicities [12 + log(O/H)] for the bright and faint regions are estimated as 7.98±0.07 and 7.46±0.09, respectively. The galaxy has a large diffuse H I envelop. The H I images reveal disturbed gas kinematics and H I clouds outside the optical extent of the galaxy, indicating recent tidal interaction or merger in the system. The results strongly indicate that Mrk 22 is undergoing a chemical and morphological evolution due to ongoing star formation, most likely triggered by a merger.

  19. Tensor representation techniques for full configuration interaction: A Fock space approach using the canonical product format.

    Böhm, Karl-Heinz; Auer, Alexander A; Espig, Mike

    2016-06-28

    In this proof-of-principle study, we apply tensor decomposition techniques to the Full Configuration Interaction (FCI) wavefunction in order to approximate the wavefunction parameters efficiently and to reduce the overall computational effort. For this purpose, the wavefunction ansatz is formulated in an occupation number vector representation that ensures antisymmetry. If the canonical product format tensor decomposition is then applied, the Hamiltonian and the wavefunction can be cast into a multilinear product form. As a consequence, the number of wavefunction parameters does not scale to the power of the number of particles (or orbitals) but depends on the rank of the approximation and linearly on the number of particles. The degree of approximation can be controlled by a single threshold for the rank reduction procedure required in the algorithm. We demonstrate that using this approximation, the FCI Hamiltonian matrix can be stored with N(5) scaling. The error of the approximation that is introduced is below Millihartree for a threshold of ϵ = 10(-4) and no convergence problems are observed solving the FCI equations iteratively in the new format. While promising conceptually, all effort of the algorithm is shifted to the required rank reduction procedure after the contraction of the Hamiltonian with the coefficient tensor. At the current state, this crucial step is the bottleneck of our approach and even for an optimistic estimate, the algorithm scales beyond N(10) and future work has to be directed towards reduction-free algorithms.

  20. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  1. Understanding Oxygen Vacancy Formation, Interaction, Transport, and Strain in SOFC Components via Combined Thermodynamics and First Principles Calculations

    Das, Tridip

    Understanding of the vacancy formation, interaction, increasing its concentration and diffusion, and controlling its chemical strain will advance the design of mixed ionic and electronic conductor (MIEC) materials via element doping and strain engineering. This is especially central to improve the performance of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), an energy conversion device for sustainable future. The oxygen vacancy concentration grows exponentially with the temperature at dilute vacancy concentration but not at higher concentration, or even decreases due to oxygen vacancy interaction and vacancy ordered phase change. This limits the ionic conductivity. Using density functional theory (DFT), we provided fundamental understanding on how oxygen vacancy interaction originates in one of the typical MIEC, La1-xSrxFeO3-delta (LSF). The vacancy interaction is determined by the interplay of the charge state of multi-valence ion (Fe), aliovalent doping (La/Sr ratio), the crystal structure, and the oxygen vacancy concentration and/or nonstoichiometry (delta). It was found excess electrons left due to the formation of a neutral oxygen vacancy get distributed to Fe directly connected to the vacancy or to the second nearest neighboring Fe, based on crystal field splitting of Fe 3d orbital in different Fe-O polyhedral coordination. The progressively larger polaron size and anisotropic shape changes with increasing Sr-content resulted in increasing oxygen vacancy interactions, as indicated by an increase in the oxygen vacancy formation energy above a critical delta threshold. This was consistent with experimental results showing that Sr-rich LSF and highly oxygen deficient compositions are prone to oxygen-vacancy-ordering-induced phase transformations, while Sr-poor and oxygen-rich LSF compositions are not. Since oxygen vacancy induced phase transformations, cause a decrease in the mobile oxygen vacancy site fraction (X), both delta and X were predicted as a function of

  2. Salmonella biofilm formation on Aspergillus niger involves cellulose--chitin interactions.

    Maria T Brandl

    Full Text Available Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose-chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens.

  3. Interactive desktop analysis of high resolution simulations: application to turbulent plume dynamics and current sheet formation

    Clyne, John; Mininni, Pablo; Norton, Alan; Rast, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The ever increasing processing capabilities of the supercomputers available to computational scientists today, combined with the need for higher and higher resolution computational grids, has resulted in deluges of simulation data. Yet the computational resources and tools required to make sense of these vast numerical outputs through subsequent analysis are often far from adequate, making such analysis of the data a painstaking, if not a hopeless, task. In this paper, we describe a new tool for the scientific investigation of massive computational datasets. This tool (VAPOR) employs data reduction, advanced visualization, and quantitative analysis operations to permit the interactive exploration of vast datasets using only a desktop PC equipped with a commodity graphics card. We describe VAPORs use in the study of two problems. The first, motivated by stellar envelope convection, investigates the hydrodynamic stability of compressible thermal starting plumes as they descend through a stratified layer of increasing density with depth. The second looks at current sheet formation in an incompressible helical magnetohydrodynamic flow to understand the early spontaneous development of quasi two-dimensional (2D) structures embedded within the 3D solution. Both of the problems were studied at sufficiently high spatial resolution, a grid of 504 2 by 2048 points for the first and 1536 3 points for the second, to overwhelm the interactive capabilities of typically available analysis resources

  4. Phase separation of a Lennard-Jones fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain: implications for the nuclear body formation near chromosomes.

    Oh, Inrok; Choi, Saehyun; Jung, YounJoon; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-08-28

    Phase separation in a biological cell nucleus occurs in a heterogeneous environment filled with a high density of chromatins and thus it is inevitably influenced by interactions with chromatins. As a model system of nuclear body formation in a cell nucleus filled with chromatins, we simulate the phase separation of a low-density Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain. The influence of the density variation of LJ particles above and below the phase boundary and the role of attractive interactions between LJ particles and polymer segments are investigated at a fixed value of strong self-interaction between LJ particles. For a density of LJ particles above the phase boundary, phase separation occurs and a dense domain of LJ particles forms irrespective of interactions with the condensed polymer chain whereas its localization relative to the polymer chain is determined by the LJ-polymer attraction strength. Especially, in the case of moderately weak attractions, the domain forms separately from the polymer chain and subsequently associates with the polymer chain. When the density is below the phase boundary, however, the formation of a dense domain is possible only when the LJ-polymer attraction is strong enough, for which the domain grows in direct contact with the interacting polymer chain. In this work, different growth behaviors of LJ particles result from the differences in the density of LJ particles and in the LJ-polymer interaction, and this work suggests that the distinct formation of activity-dependent and activity-independent nuclear bodies (NBs) in a cell nucleus may originate from the differences in the concentrations of body-specific NB components and in their interaction with chromatins.

  5. Hyperfine interaction in the Autler-Townes effect: The formation of bright, dark, and chameleon states

    Kirova, T.; Cinins, A.; Efimov, D. K.; Bruvelis, M.; Miculis, K.; Bezuglov, N. N.; Auzinsh, M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.; Ekers, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is devoted to clarifying the implications of hyperfine (HF) interaction in the formation of adiabatic (i.e., "laser-dressed") states and their expression in the Autler-Townes (AT) spectra. We first use the Morris-Shore model [J. R. Morris and B. W. Shore, Phys. Rev. A 27, 906 (1983), 10.1103/PhysRevA.27.906] to illustrate how bright and dark states are formed in a simple reference system where closely spaced energy levels are coupled to a single state with a strong laser field with the respective Rabi frequency ΩS. We then expand the simulations to realistic hyperfine level systems in Na atoms for a more general case when non-negligible HF interaction can be treated as a perturbation in the total system Hamiltonian. A numerical analysis of the adiabatic states that are formed by coupling of the 3 p3 /2 and 4 d5 /2 states by the strong laser field and probed by a weak laser field on the 3 s1 /2-3 p3 /2 transition yielded two important conclusions. Firstly, the perturbation introduced by the HF interaction leads to the observation of what we term "chameleon" states—states that change their appearance in the AT spectrum, behaving as bright states at small to moderate ΩS, and fading from the spectrum similarly to dark states when ΩS is much larger than the HF splitting of the 3 p3 /2 state. Secondly, excitation by the probe field from two different HF levels of the ground state allows one to address orthogonal sets of adiabatic states; this enables, with appropriate choice of ΩS and the involved quantum states, a selective excitation of otherwise unresolved hyperfine levels in excited electronic states.

  6. Absolute orbit determination using line-of-sight vector measurements between formation flying spacecraft

    Ou, Yangwei; Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Bin

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that absolute orbit determination can be achieved based on spacecraft formation. The relative position vectors expressed in the inertial frame are used as measurements. In this scheme, the optical camera is applied to measure the relative line-of-sight (LOS) angles, i.e., the azimuth and elevation. The LIDAR (Light radio Detecting And Ranging) or radar is used to measure the range and we assume that high-accuracy inertial attitude is available. When more deputies are included in the formation, the formation configuration is optimized from the perspective of the Fisher information theory. Considering the limitation on the field of view (FOV) of cameras, the visibility of spacecraft and the installation of cameras are investigated. In simulations, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is used to estimate the position and velocity. The results show that the navigation accuracy can be enhanced by using more deputies and the installation of cameras significantly affects the navigation performance.

  7. Atomistically determined phase-field modeling of dislocation dissociation, stacking fault formation, dislocation slip, and reactions in fcc systems

    Rezaei Mianroodi, Jaber; Svendsen, Bob

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the current work is the development of a phase field model for dislocation dissociation, slip and stacking fault formation in single crystals amenable to determination via atomistic or ab initio methods in the spirit of computational material design. The current approach is based in particular on periodic microelasticity (Wang and Jin, 2001; Bulatov and Cai, 2006; Wang and Li, 2010) to model the strongly non-local elastic interaction of dislocation lines via their (residual) strain fields. These strain fields depend in turn on phase fields which are used to parameterize the energy stored in dislocation lines and stacking faults. This energy storage is modeled here with the help of the "interface" energy concept and model of Cahn and Hilliard (1958) (see also Allen and Cahn, 1979; Wang and Li, 2010). In particular, the "homogeneous" part of this energy is related to the "rigid" (i.e., purely translational) part of the displacement of atoms across the slip plane, while the "gradient" part accounts for energy storage in those regions near the slip plane where atomic displacements deviate from being rigid, e.g., in the dislocation core. Via the attendant global energy scaling, the interface energy model facilitates an atomistic determination of the entire phase field energy as an optimal approximation of the (exact) atomistic energy; no adjustable parameters remain. For simplicity, an interatomic potential and molecular statics are employed for this purpose here; alternatively, ab initio (i.e., DFT-based) methods can be used. To illustrate the current approach, it is applied to determine the phase field free energy for fcc aluminum and copper. The identified models are then applied to modeling of dislocation dissociation, stacking fault formation, glide and dislocation reactions in these materials. As well, the tensile loading of a dislocation loop is considered. In the process, the current thermodynamic picture is compared with the classical mechanical

  8. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF FORMATION OF SOCIO-PROFESSIONAL SELF-DETERMINATION OF LEARNERS AT EDUCATION ESTABLISHMENTS

    Alla Ya. Zhurkina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article reveals the theoretical aspects in formation of socio-professional self-determination of learners in education institutions. The emphasis is on interdisciplinary links, integration approaches in the study of problems of self-determination. Materials and Methods: the article was written using a number of methods of theoretical pedagogical study, allowing mental penetration into the essence of the phenomenon under study teacher: analysis, synthesis, comparison, generalization method of investigating causal relationships. Results: the authors reveal the essence of the socio-professional self-determination and present grounds for separation of this concept out from the pyramid of the terms that characterise the description of the career choice process. The article substantiates the social orientation of the act of choosing a profession. It argues that career choice affects the future social position. Knowledge of theoretical bases of process of socioprofessional self-determination is very important for preparation of children for conscious career choices. Special attention is paid to the regularities, principles and f actors of this process. Discussion and Conclusions: giving a thorough account of internal and external factors of socio-professional self-determination, the authors propose to consider them solely in the system, with its inherent dynamics and the inextricable connection with the environment, suggest that changes in the social environment always entail changes in the system of factors. The article is concerned with the problem of contradictions of the process of formation of socio-professional self-determination. The authors highlight the leading role of pedagogical support in the process of socio-professional self-determination of a student’s personality, analyse modern approaches to the concept of pedagogical support. The authors characterize the educational support system as a professional educator focused

  9. Determination of thymine glycol residues in irradiated or oxidized DNA by formation of methylglyceric acid

    Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of DNA solutions with X-irradiation various oxidants including hydrogen peroxide plus ferrous ion, hydrogen peroxide plus copper ion and ascorbate, permanganate, or sonication in the presence of dissolved oxygen all produced varying amounts of thymine glycol residues. After denaturing the DNA with heat, the glycol residues were reduced and labeled at the 6 position with tritium- labeled sodium borohydride. Subsequent reaction with anhydrous methanolic HCl gave a quantitative yield of the methyl ester of methylglyceric acid, which was determined by thin layer chromatography. The method, developed using thymidine as a model, was used to ascertain the requirements for glycol formation in DNA. It was shown that hydroxyl radical generating systems, permanganate, X-irradiation, or sonication in presence of oxygen were required, but hydrogen peroxide in the absence of iron or copper and ascorbate was inactive. Application to determination of DNA damage in vivo is being explored

  10. On determination of enthalpies of complex formation reactions by means of temperature coefficient of complexing degree

    Povar, I.G.

    1995-01-01

    Equations describing the relation between temperature coefficient of ∂lnα/∂T complexing degree and the sum of changes in the enthalpy of complex formation of the composition M m L n δH mn multiplied by the weight coefficients k mm , are presented. A method to determine changes in the enthalpy of certain ΔH mm reactions from ∂lnα/∂T derivatives has been suggested. The best approximating equation from lnα/(T) dependence has been found. Errors of thus determined δH mm values are estimated and the results of calculation experiment for the system In 3+ -F - are provided. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Competition between intermolecular interaction and configuration entropy as the structure-determining factor for inclusion compounds

    Subbotin, O.; Belosludov, V.; Adamova, T. [Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Nikolaev Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Belosludov, R.; Kawazoe, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Kudoh, J.I. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan). Center for Northeast Asia Studies

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a newly developed method to accurately predict the thermodynamic properties of clathrate hydrates, particularly their structural phase transitions under pressure. The method is based on the theory of Van-der-Waals and Platteeuw with some modifications that include the influence of guest molecules on the host lattice. The model was used to explain the exception from the established rule that small guest molecules form structure s1 and large molecules form structure s2 hydrates. In this study, the thermodynamic properties of argon (Ar) hydrate and methane hydrate, each in both cubic structure s1 and s2 were modelled. The model showed that two competing factors play a role in the formation of inclusions, notably the intermolecular interaction of guest molecules with water molecules, and the configuration entropy. Competition of these 2 factors determines the structure of hydrate formed at different pressures. The model provides an accurate description of the thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates and how they behave under pressure. For the argon hydrates, the structural phase transition from structure s2 to s1 at high pressure was predicted, while methane hydrates were predicted to be metastable in the s2 structure. The model can be used for other inclusion compounds with the same type of composition such as clathrate silicon, zeolites, and inclusion compounds of semiconductor elements. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Mixing regime as a key factor to determine DON formation in drinking water biological treatment.

    Lu, Changqing; Li, Shuai; Gong, Song; Yuan, Shoujun; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as precursor of nitrogenous disinfection by-products formed during chlorination disinfection. The performances of biological fluidized bed (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and bio-ceramic filters (plug flow reactor, PFR) were compared in this study to investigate the influence of mixing regime on DON formation in drinking water treatment. In the shared influent, DON ranged from 0.71mgL(-1) to 1.20mgL(-1). The two biological fluidized bed reactors, named BFB1 (mechanical stirring) and BFB2 (air agitation), contained 0.12 and 0.19mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Meanwhile, the bio-ceramic reactors, labeled as BCF1 (no aeration) and BCF2 (with aeration), had 1.02 and 0.81mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Comparative results showed that the CSTR mixing regime significantly reduced DON formation. This particular reduction was further investigated in this study. The viable/total microbial biomass was determined with propidium monoazide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) and qPCR, respectively. The results of the investigation demonstrated that the microbes in BFB2 had higher viability than those in BCF2. The viable bacteria decreased more sharply than the total bacteria along the media depth in BCF2, and DON in BCF2 accumulated in the deeper media. These phenomena suggested that mixing regime determined DON formation by influencing the distribution of viable, total biomass, and ratio of viable biomass to total biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymptotics of Toeplitz determinants and the emptiness formation probability for the XY spin chain

    Franchini, Fabio; Abanov, Alexander G

    2005-01-01

    We study an asymptotic behaviour of a special correlator known as the emptiness formation probability (EFP) for the one-dimensional anisotropic XY spin-1/2 chain in a transverse magnetic field. This correlator is essentially the probability of formation of a ferromagnetic string of length n in the antiferromagnetic ground state of the chain and plays an important role in the theory of integrable models. For the XY spin chain, the correlator can be expressed as the determinant of a Toeplitz matrix and its asymptotical behaviours for n → ∞ throughout the phase diagram are obtained using known theorems and conjectures on Toeplitz determinants. We find that the decay is exponential everywhere in the phase diagram of the XY model except on the critical lines, i.e. where the spectrum is gapless. In these cases, a power-law prefactor with a universal exponent arises in addition to an exponential or Gaussian decay. The latter Gaussian behaviour holds on the critical line corresponding to the isotropic XY model, while at the critical value of the magnetic field the EFP decays exponentially. At small anisotropy one has a crossover from the Gaussian to the exponential behaviour. We study this crossover using the bosonization approach

  14. Condensed-phase biogenic-anthropogenic interactions with implications for cold cloud formation.

    Charnawskas, Joseph C; Alpert, Peter A; Lambe, Andrew T; Berkemeier, Thomas; O'Brien, Rachel E; Massoli, Paola; Onasch, Timothy B; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Moffet, Ryan C; Gilles, Mary K; Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, Douglas R; Knopf, Daniel A

    2017-08-24

    Anthropogenic and biogenic gas emissions contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). When present, soot particles from fossil fuel combustion can acquire a coating of SOA. We investigate SOA-soot biogenic-anthropogenic interactions and their impact on ice nucleation in relation to the particles' organic phase state. SOA particles were generated from the OH oxidation of naphthalene, α-pinene, longifolene, or isoprene, with or without the presence of sulfate or soot particles. Corresponding particle glass transition (T g ) and full deliquescence relative humidity (FDRH) were estimated using a numerical diffusion model. Longifolene SOA particles are solid-like and all biogenic SOA sulfate mixtures exhibit a core-shell configuration (i.e. a sulfate-rich core coated with SOA). Biogenic SOA with or without sulfate formed ice at conditions expected for homogeneous ice nucleation, in agreement with respective T g and FDRH. α-pinene SOA coated soot particles nucleated ice above the homogeneous freezing temperature with soot acting as ice nuclei (IN). At lower temperatures the α-pinene SOA coating can be semisolid, inducing ice nucleation. Naphthalene SOA coated soot particles acted as ice nuclei above and below the homogeneous freezing limit, which can be explained by the presence of a highly viscous SOA phase. Our results suggest that biogenic SOA does not play a significant role in mixed-phase cloud formation and the presence of sulfate renders this even less likely. However, anthropogenic SOA may have an enhancing effect on cloud glaciation under mixed-phase and cirrus cloud conditions compared to biogenic SOA that dominate during pre-industrial times or in pristine areas.

  15. Using an ACTIVE teaching format versus a standard lecture format for increasing resident interaction and knowledge achievement during noon conference: a prospective, controlled study

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Berlacher, Kathryn; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The traditional lecture is used by many residency programs to fulfill the mandate for regular didactic sessions, despite limited evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness. Active teaching strategies have shown promise in improving medical knowledge but have been challenging to implement within the constraints of residency training. We developed and evaluated an innovative structured format for interactive teaching within the residency noon conference. Methods We developed an ACTIVE...

  16. Perceptual Incongruity and Social Interaction as Determinants of Infants' Reaction to Novel Persons

    Greenberg, David J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A study on the effects of birth order on infants' reactions to novel persons was conducted to test the differing predictions of incongruity theory and social interaction theory. Findings indicated that infants' reactions to novel persons are determined by infants' social interaction within the family during the first year rather than by the number…

  17. Quantitative determination of heparin levels in serum with microtiter plate-format optode

    Kim, Sung Bae; Kang, Tae Young; Cha, Geun Sig; Nam, Hakhyun

    2006-01-01

    A new assay method has been developed for the quantitative determination of heparin in serum using a microtiter plate-format optode (MPO). Heparin and proton in physiological sample are favorably co-extracted into the solvent polymeric optode membrane containing both cationic lipophilic additive, tridodecylmethyl ammonium chloride (TDMAC), and proton-selective ionophore, 3-hydroxy-4-(4-nitrophenylazo)-phenyloctadecanoate (ETH 2412), resulting in the absorbance change of the membrane to varying heparin levels. The optimized MPO composition contains low polymer-to-plasticizer ratio compared to those of conventional ion-selective optodes or electrodes, i.e., poly(vinyl chloride) (20.0)/dioctylsebacate (76.3)/ETH 2412 (1.7)/TDMAC (1.0) (wt.%): it resulted in a quantitative response to heparin from 0 to 15 unit/mL in serum with high sensitivity. The heparin-protamine titration on the MPO could provide rapid and precise determination of heparin. It was shown that the heparin levels in serum sample could be determined from the rate of absorbance change over time (ΔA/Δt); this method was more effective than the direct absorbance measurement in minimizing the interferences from color and turbidity of serum samples. MPO has been developed as a high throughput and convenient disposable sensing device, and may find a wide application in the determination of polyions and charged macromolecules

  18. Pattern Formation in Langmuir Monolayers Due to Long-Range Electrostatic Interactions

    Fischer, Thomas M.; Lösche, Mathias

    A distinctive characteristic of Langmuir monolayers that bears important consequences for the physics of structure formation within membranes is the uniaxial orientation of the constituent dipolar molecules, brought about by the symmetry break which is induced by the surface of the aqueous substrate. The association of oriented molecular dipoles with the interface leads to the formation of image dipoles within the polarizeable medium - the subphase - such that the effective dipole orientation of every of the individual molecules is strictly normal to the surface, even within molecularly disordered phases. As a result, dipole-dipole repulsions play an eminently important role for the molecular interactions within the system - independent of the state of phase (while the dipole area density does of course depend on the state of phase) - and control the morphogenesis of the phase boundaries in their interplay with the one-dimensional (1D) line tension between coexisting phases. The physics of these phenomena is only now being explored and is particularly exciting for systems within a three-phase coexistence region where complete or partial wetting, as well as dewetting between the coexisting phases may be experimentally observed by applying fluorescence microscopy to the monolayer films. It is revealed that the wetting behavior depends sensitively on the details of the electrostatic interactions, in that the apparent contact angles observed at three-phase contact points depends on the sizes of the coexisting phases. This is in sharp contrast to the physics of wetting in conventional 3D systems where the contact angle is a materials property, independent of the local details. In 3D systems, this leads to Youngs equation - which has been established more than two centuries ago. We report recent progress in the understanding of this unusual and rather unexpected behavior of a quasi-2D system by reviewing recent experimental results from optical microscopy on equilibrium

  19. Formation of Tidal Captures and Gravitational Wave Inspirals in Binary-single Interactions

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first systematic study of how dynamical stellar tides and general relativistic (GR) effects affect the dynamics and outcomes of binary-single interactions. For this, we have constructed an N -body code that includes tides in the affine approximation, where stars are modeled as self-similar ellipsoidal polytropes, and GR corrections using the commonly used post-Newtonian formalism. Using this numerical formalism, we are able resolve the leading effect from tides and GR across several orders of magnitude in both stellar radius and initial target binary separation. We find that the main effect from tides is the formation of two-body tidal captures that form during the chaotic and resonant evolution of the triple system. The two stars undergoing the capture spiral in and merge. The inclusion of tides can thus lead to an increase in the stellar coalescence rate. We also develop an analytical framework for calculating the cross section of tidal inspirals between any pair of objects with similar mass. From our analytical and numerical estimates, we find that the rate of tidal inspirals relative to collisions increases as the initial semimajor axis of the target binary increases and the radius of the interacting tidal objects decreases. The largest effect is therefore found for triple systems hosting white dwarfs and neutron stars (NSs). In this case, we find the rate of highly eccentric white dwarf—NS mergers to likely be dominated by tidal inspirals. While tidal inspirals occur rarely, we note that they can give rise to a plethora of thermonuclear transients, such as Ca-rich transients.

  20. Formation of Tidal Captures and Gravitational Wave Inspirals in Binary-single Interactions

    Samsing, Johan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); MacLeod, Morgan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    We perform the first systematic study of how dynamical stellar tides and general relativistic (GR) effects affect the dynamics and outcomes of binary-single interactions. For this, we have constructed an N -body code that includes tides in the affine approximation, where stars are modeled as self-similar ellipsoidal polytropes, and GR corrections using the commonly used post-Newtonian formalism. Using this numerical formalism, we are able resolve the leading effect from tides and GR across several orders of magnitude in both stellar radius and initial target binary separation. We find that the main effect from tides is the formation of two-body tidal captures that form during the chaotic and resonant evolution of the triple system. The two stars undergoing the capture spiral in and merge. The inclusion of tides can thus lead to an increase in the stellar coalescence rate. We also develop an analytical framework for calculating the cross section of tidal inspirals between any pair of objects with similar mass. From our analytical and numerical estimates, we find that the rate of tidal inspirals relative to collisions increases as the initial semimajor axis of the target binary increases and the radius of the interacting tidal objects decreases. The largest effect is therefore found for triple systems hosting white dwarfs and neutron stars (NSs). In this case, we find the rate of highly eccentric white dwarf—NS mergers to likely be dominated by tidal inspirals. While tidal inspirals occur rarely, we note that they can give rise to a plethora of thermonuclear transients, such as Ca-rich transients.

  1. Determination of Betaine in Fructus Lycii Using Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection

    Shin, Hyun Du; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hye Yeon; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Un Yong; Yang, Dong Hyug; Han, Sang Beom; Youm, Jeong Rok

    2012-01-01

    A simple new method was developed for the determination of betaine in Fructus Lycii using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (HILIC-ELSD). Good chromatographic separation and reasonable betaine retention was achieved on a Kinetex HILIC column (2.1 x 100 mm, 2.6 μm) packed with fused-core particle. The mobile phase consisted of (A) acetonitrile and (B) 10 mM ammonium formate (pH 3.0)/acetonitrile (90/10, v/v). It was used with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/ min. The column temperature was set at 27.5 .deg. C and the injection volume was 10 μL. The ELSD drift tube temperature was 50 .deg. C and the nebulizing gas (nitrogen) pressure was 3.0 bar. Stachydrine, a zwitterionic compound, was used as an internal standard. Calibration curve over 10-250 μg/mL showed good linearity (R 2 > 0.9992) and betaine in the 70% methanol extract of Fructus Lycii was well separated from other peaks. Intra and inter-day precision ranged from 1.1 to 3.0% and from 2.4 to 5.3%, respectively, while intra- and inter-day accuracy ranged from 100.0 to 107.0% and from 94.3 to 103.9%, respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 10 μg/mL and the recoveries were in the range of 98.2-102.7%. The developed HILIC-ELSD method was successfully applied to quantitatively determine the amount of betaine in fourteen Fructus Lycii samples from different locations, demonstrating that this method is simple, rapid, and suitable for the quality control of Fructus Lycii

  2. Star-disc interaction in galactic nuclei: formation of a central stellar disc

    Panamarev, Taras; Shukirgaliyev, Bekdaulet; Meiron, Yohai; Berczik, Peter; Just, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer; Omarov, Chingis; Vilkoviskij, Emmanuil

    2018-05-01

    We perform high-resolution direct N-body simulations to study the effect of an accretion disc on stellar dynamics in an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We show that the interaction of the nuclear stellar cluster (NSC) with the gaseous accretion disc (AD) leads to formation of a stellar disc in the central part of the NSC. The accretion of stars from the stellar disc on to the super-massive black hole is balanced by the capture of stars from the NSC into the stellar disc, yielding a stationary density profile. We derive the migration time through the AD to be 3 per cent of the half-mass relaxation time of the NSC. The mass and size of the stellar disc are 0.7 per cent of the mass and 5 per cent of the influence radius of the super-massive black hole. An AD lifetime shorter than the migration time would result in a less massive nuclear stellar disc. The detection of such a stellar disc could point to past activity of the hosting galactic nucleus.

  3. Hypocretin and GABA interact in the pontine reticular formation to increase wakefulness.

    Brevig, Holly N; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-10-01

    Hypocretin-1/orexin A administered directly into the oral part of rat pontine reticular formation (PnO) causes an increase in wakefulness and extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels. The receptors in the PnO that mediate these effects have not been identified. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that the increase in wakefulness caused by administration of hypocretin-1 into the PnO occurs via activation of GABAA receptors and hypocretin receptors. Within/between subjects. University of Michigan. Twenty-three adult male Crl:CD*(SD) (Sprague Dawley) rats. Microinjection of hypocretin-1, bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist), SB-334867 (hypocretin receptor-1 antagonist), and Ringer solution (vehicle control) into the PnO. Hypocretin-1 caused a significant concentration-dependent increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. Coadministration of SB-334867 and hypocretin-1 blocked the hypocretin-1-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in both the NREM and REM phases of sleep. Coadministration of bicuculline and hypocretin-1 blocked the hypocretin-1-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREM sleep caused by hypocretin-1. The increase in wakefulness caused by administering hypocretin-1 to the PnO is mediated by hypocretin receptors and GABAA receptors in the PnO. These results show for the first time that hypocretinergic and GABAergic transmission in the PnO can interact to promote wakefulness.

  4. Solar Wind Plasma Interaction with Asteroid 16 Psyche: Implication for Formation Theories

    Fatemi, Shahab; Poppe, Andrew R.

    2018-01-01

    The asteroid 16 Psyche is a primitive metal-rich asteroid that has not yet been visited by spacecraft. Based on remote observations, Psyche is most likely composed of iron and nickel metal; however, the history of its formation and solidification is still unknown. If Psyche is a remnant core of a differentiated planetesimal exposed by collisions, it opens a unique window toward understanding the cores of the terrestrial bodies, including the Earth and Mercury. If not, it is perhaps a reaccreted rubble pile that has never melted. In the former case, Psyche may have a remanent, dipolar magnetic field; in the latter case, Psyche may have no intrinsic field, but nevertheless would be a conductive object in the solar wind. We use Advanced Modeling Infrastructure in Space Simulation (AMITIS), a three-dimensional GPU-based hybrid model of plasma that self-consistently couples the interior electromagnetic response of Psyche (i.e., magnetic diffusion) to its ambient plasma environment in order to quantify the different interactions under these two cases. The model results provide estimates for the electromagnetic environment of Psyche, showing that the magnetized case and the conductive case present very different signatures in the solar wind. These results have implications for an accurate interpretation of magnetic field observations by NASA's Discovery mission (Psyche mission) to the asteroid 16 Psyche.

  5. Numerical analysis of crust formation in molten core-concrete interaction using MPS method

    Seiichi, Koshizuka; Shoji, Matsuura; Mizue, Sekine; Yoshiaki, Oka

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional code is developed for molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method. Heat transfer is calculated without any specific correlations. A particle can be changed to a moving (fluid) or fixed (solid) particle corresponding to its enthalpy, which provide the phase change model for particles. The phase change model is verified by one-dimensional test calculations. Nucleate boiling and radiation heat transfers are considered between the core debris and the water pool. The developed code is applied to SWISS-2 experiment in which stainless steel is used as the melt material. Calculated heat flux to the water pool agrees well with the experiment, though the ablation speed in the concrete is a little slower. A stable crust is formed in a short time after water is poured in and the heat flux to the water pool rapidly decreases. MACE-M0 using corium is also analyzed. The ablation speed of concrete is slower than that of SWISS-2 because of low heat conduction in corium. An unlimited geometry is analyzed by setting the cyclic boundary condition on the sides. When the crust is broken by the decomposition gas, heat transfer to the water pool is kept high for a longer time because the crust re-formation is delayed. (author)

  6. Tiny changes in local order identify the cluster formation threshold in model fluids with competing interactions.

    Bomont, Jean-Marc; Costa, Dino; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis

    2017-06-14

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to carry out a thorough analysis of structural correlations arising in a relatively dense fluid of rigid spherical particles with prototype competing interactions (short-range attractive and long-range repulsive two-Yukawa model). As the attraction strength increases, we show that the local density of the fluid displays a tiny reversal of trend within specific ranges of interparticle distances, whereupon it decreases first and increases afterwards, passing through a local minimum. Particles involved in this trend display, accordingly, distinct behaviours: for a sufficiently weak attraction, they seem to contribute to the long-wave oscillations typically heralding the formation of patterns in such fluids; for a stronger attraction, after the reversal of the local density has occurred, they form an outer shell of neighbours stabilizing the existing aggregation seeds. Following the increment of attraction, precisely in correspondence of the local density reversal, the local peak developed in the structure factor at small wavevectors markedly rises, signalling-in agreement with recent structural criteria-the onset of a clustered state. A detailed cluster analysis of microscopic configurations fully validates this picture.

  7. Variable Persister Gene Interactions with (pppGpp for Persister Formation in Escherichia coli

    Shuang Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Persisters comprise a group of phenotypically heterogeneous metabolically quiescent bacteria with multidrug tolerance and contribute to the recalcitrance of chronic infections. Although recent work has shown that toxin-antitoxin (TA system HipAB depends on stringent response effector (pppGppin persister formation, whether other persister pathways are also dependent on stringent response has not been explored. Here we examined the relationship of (pppGpp with 15 common persister genes (dnaK, clpB, rpoS, pspF, tnaA, sucB, ssrA, smpB, recA, umuD, uvrA, hipA, mqsR, relE, dinJ using Escherichia coli as a model. By comparing the persister levels of wild type with their single gene knockout and double knockout mutants with relA, we divided their interactions into five types, namely A “dependent” (dnaK, recA, B “positive reinforcement” (rpoS, pspF, ssrA, recA, C “antagonistic” (clpB, sucB, umuD, uvrA, hipA, mqsR, relE, dinJ, D “epistasis” (clpB, rpoS, tnaA, ssrA, smpB, hipA, and E “irrelevant” (dnaK, clpB, rpoS, tnaA, sucB, smpB, umuD, uvrA, hipA, mqsR, relE, dinJ. We found that the persister gene interactions are intimately dependent on bacterial culture age, cell concentrations (diluted versus undiluted culture, and drug classifications, where the same gene may belong to different groups with varying antibiotics, culture age or cell concentrations. Together, this study represents the first attempt to systematically characterize the intricate relationships among the different mechanisms of persistence and as such provide new insights into the complexity of the persistence phenomenon at the level of persister gene network interactions.

  8. Complexometric determination: Part I - EDTA and complex formation with the Cu2+ ion

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Compounds forming very stable complexes - chelates, have a wide field of application in analytical chemistry. The most famous group of these compounds are complexons. Complexons represent organic polyaminocarbonic acids as for example ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and its salts. The EDTA molecule has six coordinative sites. It is a hexadentate ligands i.e. it has two binding nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups and it forms complexes with almost all metal ions. EDTA as a tetraprotonic acid, H4Y disociates through four steps, yielding the ions HsY-, H2Y2-, HY3- and Y4-. Which of the EDTA forms will be encountered in a solution, depends on the pH. Due to the poor solubility of EDTA in pure water, as well as in most organic solvents, the disodium salt of EDTA Na2H2Y-2H2O, under the commercial name complexon III, is utilized for analytical determinations. In water, EDTA forms soluble, stabile chelate complexes with all cations, at the molar ratio 1:1, regardless of the charge of the metal ion. In contrast to other equilibria, which are mainly defined by Le Chatellier's principle, equilibria related to metal-EDTA complex formation are also dependent on the influence of the secondary equilibria of EDTA complex formation. Complexing reactions, which are equilibrium reactions, are simultaneously influenced by the following factors: solution pH and the presence of complexing agents which may also form a stabile complex with metal ions. The secondary reaction influence may be viewed and monitored through conditional stability constants. In the first part of the paper, the reaction of the formation of the Cu2+-ion complex with EDTA is analyzed beginning from the main reaction through various influences of secondary reactions on the complex Cu2+-EDTA: pH effect, complexation effect and hydrolysis effect. The equations are given for conditional stability constants, which include equilibrium reactions under actual conditions.

  9. Formation and determination of perinaphthenyl radical and PCAH in combustion processes

    Franceschi, A [Univ., Pisa, Italy; Gerbaz, G P; Mangolini, S

    1976-09-01

    The concentration profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PCAH) and perinaphthenyl radical along a vertical flow reactor have been determined for fuel rich premixed flames of n-heptane with small fractions of other hydrocarbons, methanol, and nitrogen oxide. It has been found that there is a strict relation between the concentrations of the higher molecular weight PCAH, which are the main components of soluble fraction of soot, and the perinaphthenyl radical. The aromatic ring of the fuel supplying the reactor plays the most significant role in the formation of PCAH and perinaphthenyl radical. Furthermore their concentrations increase passing from benzene toluene and, lastly, to mesitylene, because the energy of the C(arom)--C(alif) bond is lower than that of the C(arom)--C(arom) bond. The promoting action of methanol, when added to benzene, in the formation of PCAH and perinaphthenyl radical could be explained by the increased presence of CH/sub 3/ . radicals, which, can overcome the inhibiting action of OH. radicals. The contrary happens when methanol is added to toluene, because CH/sub 3/. coming from alcohol represents only a small fraction of the overall concentration, while the oxidant activity of OH. is prevailing. Finally the strong action of NO in reducing the free radical concentration has been pointed out.

  10. Role of base damage in aberration formation: interaction of aphidicolin and x-rays

    Bender, M.A.; Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The base analog cytosine arabinoside (CA) is an inhibitor of DNA synthesis that is able to induce chromosomal aberrations not only in the DNA synthetic (S) phase of the cell cycle but in cells in the pre- (G 0 or G 1 ) and in the post-DNA-synthetic (G 2 ) phases of the cell cycle as well. Incubation of human peripheral lymphocytes in CA following either G 0 or G 2 x irradiation causes a synergistic increase in chromosomal aberration frequency. CA is believed to preferentially inhibit DNA polymerase α. It is suggested that it is inhibition of the repair of x-ray-induced base damage that is responsible for the synergistic effect on chromosomal aberration production observed with x-ray and CA treatment of human peripheral lymphocytes. It has also been observed that CA induces sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in mammalian cells when present during normal DNA replication and that it also interacts synergistically with uv in the induction of SCE. A number of other inhibitors of DNA synthesis were also tested, one, aphidicolin (APC), did produce effects similar to CA at the same concentration. Aphidicolin is a tetracyclic diterpinoid that inhibits the growth of eukaryotic cells by inhibition of DNA synthesis. This action has been shown to result from specific inhibition of DNA polymerase α, but not of polymerases β or γ. Unlike CA, it seems likely that APC inhibits by binding to and inactivating the DNA-α polymerase complex. Because both CA and APC are α polymerase inhibitors and because both interact synergistically with uv in the production of SCE, studies were conducted to determine whether APC also shares other cytogenetic properties of CA. Results to date have shown that, like CA, APC is clastogenic in both G 0 and G 2 , and it also interacts synergistically with x rays to increase chromosomal aberration production in both G 0 and G 2

  11. Heats of formation of phosphorus compounds determined by current methods of computational quantum chemistry

    Haworth, Naomi L.; Bacskay, George B.

    2002-12-01

    The heats of formation of a range of phosphorus containing molecules (P2, P4, PH, PH2, PH3, P2H2, P2H4, PO, PO2, PO3, P2O, P2O2, HPO, HPOH, H2POH, H3PO, HOPO, and HOPO2) have been determined by high level quantum chemical calculations. The equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed via density functional theory, utilizing the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) functional and basis set. Atomization energies were obtained by the application of ab initio coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations from (spin)-restricted Hartree-Fock reference states with perturbative correction for triples [CCSD(T)], in conjunction with cc-pVnZ basis sets (n=T, Q, 5) which include an extra d function on the phosphorus atoms and diffuse functions on the oxygens, as recommended by Bauschlicher [J. Phys. Chem. A 103, 11126 (1999)]. The valence correlated atomization energies were extrapolated to the complete basis limit and corrected for core-valence (CV) correlation and scalar relativistic effects, as well as for basis set superposition errors (BSSE) in the CV terms. This methodology is effectively the same as the one adopted by Bauschlicher in his study of PO, PO2, PO3, HPO, HOPO, and HOPO2. Consequently, for these molecules the results of this work closely match Bauschlicher's computed values. The theoretical heats of formation, whose accuracy is estimated as ranging from ±1.0 to ±2.5 kcal mol-1, are consistent with the available experimental data. The current set of theoretical data represent a convenient benchmark, against which the results of other computational procedures, such as G3, G3X, and G3X2, can be compared. Despite the fact that G3X2 [which is an approximation to the quadratic CI procedure QCISD(T,Full)/G3Xlarge] is a formally higher level theory than G3X, the heats of formation obtained by these two methods are found to be of comparable accuracy. Both reproduce the benchmark heats of formation on the average to within ±2 kcal mol-1 and, for these

  12. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation.

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie; Alvarez-Rueda, Nidia; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4 + /CD8 + T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4 lo CD8 hi doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. Copyright © 2016 Misme-Aucouturier et al.

  13. Acropetal Auxin Transport Inhibition Is Involved in Indeterminate But Not Determinate Nodule Formation

    Jason L. P. Ng

    2018-02-01

    require a different mechanism during the formation of determinate nodules.

  14. Why making an experiment susceptible of determining the velocity of the gravitational interaction is compulsory

    Cristea, G.

    1975-01-01

    In papers /1,2,3/, some proposals were made concerning the effecting of certain experiments apt to leading to the determination of the velocity of the gravitational interaction. This paper brings into relief the fact that this determination can only be achieved by measuring the delayed gravitational field and not by measuring the propagation velocity of the gravitational radiation that remains as yet a controversial problem, both theoretically and experimentally. The possibility is shown of the existence of a gravitational effect not unlike the Poynting-Robertson light effect; the importance is discussed of its determination both in the spatial and the astronomical fields. Certain of the proposed mechanisms for explaining the gravitational interaction are run over, their nonviability being objectively pointed out. Finally, conclusions are drawn from the presented material as to the necessity of effecting experiments for the determination of the velocity of the gravitational interaction

  15. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Corella, D.

    2009-07-01

    Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolism-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 14C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the 5G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the -1131T>C in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken. (Author) 31 refs.

  16. Determination of micelle formation of ketorolac tromethamine in aqueous media by acoustic measurements

    Savaroglu, Gokhan; Genc, Lütfi

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Value of critical micelle concentration (CMC) were detected by speed of sound and determined by an analytical method based on the Phillips definition of the CMC. Highlights: ► The aim of this study was to investigate the aggregation behaviour of KT. ► Influence of KT concentration and temperature upon volumetric properties was studied. ► CMC of KT aqueous solution was determined by using speeds of sound measurements. - Abstract: Density and speed of sound of ketorolac tromethamine in aqueous solutions have been measured as a function of concentration at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15 K. Apparent molar volumes, apparent isentropic compressibility and isentropic compressibility values have also been calculated from the experimental density and speed of sound data. Partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compressibility are obtained from fitting procedures the data on apparent molar volume, V φ , and apparent isentropic compressibility, K φ(S) . Partial molar volume, V φ 0 , and partial molar isentropic compressibility, k φ(S) 0 , are informative thermodynamic characteristics that reflect solute hydration. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was determined from speed of sound data by an analytical method based on the Phillips definition of the CMC. Using these results, it was possible to establish the solvent–drug interactions.

  17. Photoelectric method for determination of the moment of formation of an anodic spot

    Barinov, V.N.; Goncharov, V.K.; Smirnov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    In studying the problem of the effect of the amplitude and form of discharge current pulses on the time for transition from a diffuse discharge form to a contracted one and on the value of the threshold current I /SUB As/ for formation of an anodic spot, the authors used a photoelectric method for determination of the moment of appearance of the anodic spot based on determination of the spectral composition of the plasma at different moments of time after the beginning of discharge initiation. The photoelectric method can be used in studying emission processes on a cathode and also in those cases where both electrodes are made of the same material. An example shows synchronous oscillograms of I /SUB p/ (tau) and J /SUB i/ (tau) for copper electrodes. It is evident that during transition of the discharge to a contracted form with an anodic spot there was a sharp increase of the intensity of deexcitation of the ionic copper line. At the moment of extinction of the anodic spot, the amplitude values of J /SUB i/ (tau) corresponded to a level characteristic of the diffuse form of arc burning

  18. Porosity and pore size distribution determination of Tumblagooda formation sandstone by X-ray microtomography

    Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Moreira, Anderson C.

    2007-01-01

    Microstructural parameters evaluations of reservoir rocks are very important to petroleum industry. This work presents total porosity and pore size distribution measurement of a sandstone sample from the Tumblagooda formation, collected at Kalbarri National Park in Australia. Porosity and pores size distribution were determined using X-Ray microtomography and imaging techniques. For these measurements, it was employed a micro-CT (μ-CT) Skyscan system model 1172 with conical beam, operated with a 1 mm Al filter at 80 kV and 125 μA, respectively, and a 2000 x 1048 pixels CCD camera. The sample was rotated from 0 deg to 180 deg, in step of 0.5 deg. For the considered sample, this equipment provided images with 2.9 μm spatial resolution. Six hundreds 2-D images where reconstructed with the Skyscan NRecon software, which were analyzed with the aid of Imago software, developed at the Laboratory of Porous Media and Thermophysical Properties (LMPT), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in association with the Brazilian software company Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), and Petroleo Brasileiro SA (PETROBRAS) Research and Development Center (CENPES). The determined average porosity was 11.45 ±1.53 %. Ninety five percent of the porous phase refers to pores with radius ranging from 2.9 to 85.2 μm, presenting the larger frequency (7.7 %) at 11.7 μm radius. (author)

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of tizanidine and orphenadrine via ion pair complex formation using eosin Y

    Eid Manal I

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A simple, sensitive and rapid spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of two skeletal muscle relaxants namely, tizanidine hydrochloride (I and orphenadrine citrate (II in pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method is based on the formation of a binary complex between the studied drugs and eosin Y in aqueous buffered medium (pH 3.5. Under the optimum conditions, the binary complex showed absorption maxima at 545 nm for tizanidine and 542 nm for orphenadrine. The calibration plots were rectilinear over concentration range of 0.5-8 μg/mL and 1-12 μg/mL with limits of detection of 0.1 μg/mL and 0.3 μg/mL for tizanidine and orphenadrine respectively. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the complex were studied and optimized. The method was successfully applied for determination of the studied drugs in their dosage forms; and to the content uniformity test of tizanidine in tablets.

  20. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in AlnTi+ clusters and their interaction with Ar

    Torres, M. B.; Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C.; Aguilera-Granja, F.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al n Ti + [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > n c determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al n Ti + , experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al n Ti + (n = 16–21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at n c = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (n c = 21) and their neutral counterparts (n c = 20). For the Al n Ti + · Ar complexes, and for n n Ti + clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support to the experimental technique used. For n c = 21, the smallest size of endohedral Ti doped cationic clusters, the Ar binding energy decreases drastically, whereas the Ar-cluster distance increases substantially, point to Ar physisorption, as assumed by the experimentalists. Calculated Ar adsorption energies agree well with available experimental binding

  1. Acquisition of rheological and calorimetric properties of borosilicate glass to determine the free energy of formation

    Linard, Y.; Advocat, Th.

    2000-01-01

    No fundamental thermodynamic data, such as the entropy Δ f S T) and enthalpy Δ f H T) of formation are currently available for nuclear borosilicate glasses. They are necessary to assess the glass thermodynamic stability in water, one of the most important potential long-term glass alteration vectors. Three glass composition ranges were investigated: - 8 compositions ranging from a ternary B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 --Na 2 O (BSN) glass to the simulated SON 68 industrial glass for containment of high active nuclear wastes after reprocessing spent uranium oxide fuel from light water reactors. The basic BSN glass was gradually modified with the additives: Al 2 O 3 , CaO, ZrO 2 , Ce 2 O 3 , Li 2 O and Fe 2 O 3 , and non-radioactive surrogate fission product oxides. - A second using another BSN ternary glass to which Al 2 O 3 , MgO and a group of non-radioactive surrogate fission product oxides, representative of natural uranium GCR fuel, were added. - A third range consisting of various BSN ternary glass compositions. All the glass specimens were fabricated by melting the oxides, carbonates anal nitrates at 1273 to 1473 K in a platinum crucible. Experimental methods based on calorimetry and viscosimetry techniques were used to determine the heat capacity Cp of each glass composition, a necessary parameter in addition to the known heat capacities of the basic glass component oxides, for calculating Δ f S T) and Δ f S T). The heat capacity Cp was measured between 273 K and 1480 K through a combination of three experimental devices: a low-temperature adiabatic calorimeter, a differential scanning calorimeter, and an ice calorimeter. The glass configuration entropy S conf (T g ) necessary to obtain the glass entropy of formation (Eqn.(3)) was determined from tile glass rheological properties. A low-temperature viscosimeter was used to measure the strain ε of a glass specimen subjected to a given uniaxial stress σ to determine the viscosity η. A Couette viscosimeter was used to

  2. How do family physicians communicate about cardiovascular risk? Frequencies and determinants of different communication formats.

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Senn, Oliver; Wegwarth, Odette; Rosemann, Thomas; Steurer, Johann

    2011-04-05

    Patients understand information about risk better if it is communicated in numerical or visual formats (e.g. graphs) compared to verbal qualifiers only. How frequently different communication formats are used in clinical primary care settings is unknown. We collected socioeconomic and patient understanding data using questionnaires and audio-recorded consultations about cardiovascular disease risk. The frequencies of the communication formats were calculated and multivariate regression analysis of associations between communication formats, patient and general practitioner characteristics, and patient subjective understanding was performed. In 73% of 70 consultations, verbal qualifiers were used exclusively to communicate cardiovascular risk, compared to numerical (11%) and visual (16%) formats. Female GPs and female patient's gender were significantly associated with a higher use of verbal formats compared to visual formats (p=0.001 and p=0.039, respectively). Patient subjective understanding was significantly higher in visual counseling compared to verbal counseling (p=0.001). Verbal qualifiers are the most often used communication format, though recommendations favor numerical and visual formats, with visual formats resulting in better understanding than others. Also, gender is associated with the choice of communication format. Barriers against numerical and visual communication formats among GPs and patients should be studied, including gender aspects. Adequate risk communication should be integrated into physicians' education.

  3. How do family physicians communicate about cardiovascular risk? Frequencies and determinants of different communication formats

    Rosemann Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients understand information about risk better if it is communicated in numerical or visual formats (e.g. graphs compared to verbal qualifiers only. How frequently different communication formats are used in clinical primary care settings is unknown. Methods We collected socioeconomic and patient understanding data using questionnaires and audio-recorded consultations about cardiovascular disease risk. The frequencies of the communication formats were calculated and multivariate regression analysis of associations between communication formats, patient and general practitioner characteristics, and patient subjective understanding was performed. Results In 73% of 70 consultations, verbal qualifiers were used exclusively to communicate cardiovascular risk, compared to numerical (11% and visual (16% formats. Female GPs and female patient's gender were significantly associated with a higher use of verbal formats compared to visual formats (p = 0.001 and p = 0.039, respectively. Patient subjective understanding was significantly higher in visual counseling compared to verbal counseling (p = 0.001. Conclusions Verbal qualifiers are the most often used communication format, though recommendations favor numerical and visual formats, with visual formats resulting in better understanding than others. Also, gender is associated with the choice of communication format. Barriers against numerical and visual communication formats among GPs and patients should be studied, including gender aspects. Adequate risk communication should be integrated into physicians' education.

  4. The potential of the system of interpersonal interaction in the formation of adolescent autonomy

    Olga A. Dorontsova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a significant and actual issue of developing autonomy of the individual. Special attention is paid to adolescent age having high potential for developing autonomy in view of certain changes in the psychological and social sphere of the adolescents. The value of interpersonal interaction in the course of developing adolescent autonomy is shown. The approaches to the concept of interaction are analyzed, four main directions of explaining the essence of interaction are allocated: symbolical interactionism (J. Mid, social exchange (J. Homans, G. Blumer, sociodramatic touch (E. Goffman transaction analysis (E. Berne. Types of interaction, efficiency of interaction development are considered. The analysis of interpersonal interaction issues shows its communication with the categories of «relation», «communication» and «joint activity» (B.G. Ananyev, G.M. Andreyeva, S.V. Dukhnovsky, Ya.L. Kolominsky V.N. Kunitsyna, V.N. Myasishchev, B.D. Parygin, etc.. The concept of interpersonal interaction system of the autonomy causing development of adolescence in the paradigm of psychologist-teacher interaction, and also child-parent interaction is described. The advantage of psychological assistance and pedagogical support within the system of interpersonal interaction for further development of adolescent autonomy is proved. The value of cooperation as one of the types of interpersonal interaction in the course of adolescent autonomy development is shown. Mechanisms of interpersonal interaction, nature of contact in interpersonal interaction, components of a social situation are described.

  5. Particles in swimming pool filters – Does pH determine the DBP formation?

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The formation was investigated for different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination of filter particles from swimming pools at different pH-values and the toxicity was estimated. Specifically, the formation of the DBP group trihalomethanes (THMs), which is regulated in many...... or initial free chlorine concentrations the particles were chlorinated at different pH-values in the relevant range for swimming pools. THM and HAA formations were reduced by decreasing pH while HAN formation increased with decreasing pH. Based on the organic content the relative DBP formation from...

  6. The surface chemistry determines the spatio-temporal interaction dynamics of quantum dots in atherosclerotic lesions.

    Uhl, Bernd; Hirn, Stephanie; Mildner, Karina; Coletti, Raffaele; Massberg, Steffen; Reichel, Christoph A; Rehberg, Markus; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Krombach, Fritz

    2018-03-01

    To optimize the design of nanoparticles for diagnosis or therapy of vascular diseases, it is mandatory to characterize the determinants of nano-bio interactions in vascular lesions. Using ex vivo and in vivo microscopy, we analyzed the interactive behavior of quantum dots with different surface functionalizations in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice. We demonstrate that quantum dots with different surface functionalizations exhibit specific interactive behaviors with distinct molecular and cellular components of the injured vessel wall. Moreover, we show a role for fibrinogen in the regulation of the spatio-temporal interaction dynamics in atherosclerotic lesions. Our findings emphasize the relevance of surface chemistry-driven nano-bio interactions on the differential in vivo behavior of nanoparticles in diseased tissue.

  7. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self-associate form......Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P....... The specificity of adhesive interaction was localized to the amino-terminal (EC1) domain of both cadherins. Thus, EC1 domain of classic cadherins exposes two determinants responsible for nonspecific lateral and cadherin type-specific adhesive dimerization....

  8. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling interacts differentially with Ihh signaling in controlling endochondral bone and synovial joint formation.

    Mak, Kingston Kinglun; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Day, Timothy F; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Yang, Yingzi

    2006-09-01

    Both the Wnt/beta-catenin and Ihh signaling pathways play essential roles in crucial aspects of endochondral ossification: osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. To understand the genetic interaction between these two signaling pathways, we have inactivated the beta-catenin gene and upregulated Ihh signaling simultaneously in the same cells during endochondral skeletal development using beta-catenin and patched 1 floxed alleles. We uncovered previously unexpected roles of Ihh signaling in synovial joint formation and the essential function of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in regulating chondrocyte survival. More importantly, we found that Wnt and Ihh signaling interact with each other in distinct ways to control osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy, survival and synovial joint formation in the developing endochondral bone. Beta-catenin is required downstream of Ihh signaling and osterix expression for osteoblast differentiation. But in chondrocyte survival, beta-catenin is required upstream of Ihh signaling to inhibit chondrocyte apoptosis. In addition, Ihh signaling can inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy and synovial joint formation independently of beta-catenin. However, there is a strong synergistic interaction between Wnt/beta-catenin and Ihh signaling in regulating synovial joint formation.

  9. Public Issue Priority Formation: Media Agenda-Setting and Social Interaction.

    Zhu, Jian-Hua; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a mathematical model to explain the public's issue priority by integrating media agenda-setting and social interaction. Finds that the public's issue priority was influenced by both media and social interaction. (RS)

  10. Classical many-body theory with retarded interactions: Dynamical irreversibility and determinism without probabilities

    Zakharov, A.Yu., E-mail: Anatoly.Zakharov@novsu.ru; Zakharov, M.A., E-mail: ma_zakharov@list.ru

    2016-01-28

    The exact equations of motion for microscopic density of classical many-body system with account of inter-particle retarded interactions is derived. It is shown that interactions retardation leads to irreversible behavior of many-body systems. - Highlights: • A new form of equation of motion of classical many-body system is proposed. • Interactions retardation as one of the mechanisms of many-body system irreversibility. • Irreversibility and determinism without probabilities. • The possible way to microscopic foundation of thermodynamics.

  11. Interaction of Munc18c and syntaxin4 facilitates invadopodium formation and extracellular matrix invasion of tumor cells.

    Brasher, Megan I; Martynowicz, David M; Grafinger, Olivia R; Hucik, Andrea; Shanks-Skinner, Emma; Uniacke, James; Coppolino, Marc G

    2017-09-29

    Tumor cell invasion involves targeted localization of proteins required for interactions with the extracellular matrix and for proteolysis. The localization of many proteins during these cell-extracellular matrix interactions relies on membrane trafficking mediated in part by SNAREs. The SNARE protein syntaxin4 (Stx4) is involved in the formation of invasive structures called invadopodia; however, it is unclear how Stx4 function is regulated during tumor cell invasion. Munc18c is known to regulate Stx4 activity, and here we show that Munc18c is required for Stx4-mediated invadopodium formation and cell invasion. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed a physical association between Munc18c and Stx4, which was enhanced during invadopodium formation, and that a reduction in Munc18c expression decreases invadopodium formation. We also found that an N-terminal Stx4-derived peptide associates with Munc18c and inhibits endogenous interactions of Stx4 with synaptosome-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2). Furthermore, expression of the Stx4 N-terminal peptide decreased invadopodium formation and cell invasion in vitro Of note, cells expressing the Stx4 N-terminal peptide exhibited impaired trafficking of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and EGF receptor (EGFR) to the cell surface during invadopodium formation. Our findings implicate Munc18c as a regulator of Stx4-mediated trafficking of MT1-MMP and EGFR, advancing our understanding of the role of SNARE function in the localization of proteins that drive tumor cell invasion. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Determination of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Formation Rate Constants for Semi-Continuously Fed Anaerobic Digesters

    Jan Moestedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize commercial-scale biogas production, it is important to evaluate the performance of each microbial step in the anaerobic process. Hydrolysis and methanogenesis are usually the rate-limiting steps during digestion of organic waste and by-products. By measuring biogas production and methane concentrations on-line in a semi-continuously fed reactor, gas kinetics can be evaluated. In this study, the rate constants of the fermentative hydrolysis step (kc and the methanogenesis step (km were determined and evaluated in a continuously stirred tank laboratory-scale reactor treating food and slaughterhouse waste and glycerin. A process additive containing Fe2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ was supplied until day 89, after which Ni2+ was omitted. The omission resulted in a rapid decline in the methanogenesis rate constant (km to 70% of the level observed when Ni2+ was present, while kc remained unaffected. This suggests that Ni2+ mainly affects the methanogenic rather than the hydrolytic microorganisms in the system. However, no effect was initially observed when using conventional process monitoring parameters such as biogas yield and volatile fatty acid concentration. Hence, formation rate constants can reveal additional information on process performance and km can be used as a complement to conventional process monitoring tools for semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters.

  13. Spectrophotometric Determination of Terbutaline Sulphate and Tetracycline Hydrochloride via ion pair Complex Formation Using Eosin Y

    Mohamed Y. Dhamra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple, sensitive and rapid spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of terbutaline sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride drugs in pure form and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method is based on the formation of binary complexes between these drugs and eosin Y in aqueous acetate buffered medium. Under the optimum conditions, the binary complexes showed absorption maxima at 545 nm. Beer's law was rectilinear over concentration range of 0.5-10 and 5-45 μg/mL, R2 were 0.9984 and 0.9988, RSD were ≤ 0.72 and ≤ 0.19 (n=5 with average recovery % 101.42 % and 100.08 % and the average recovery values of pharmaceutical formulations 101.48 and 98.01 for above drugs respectively. The limit of detection (LOD were 0.030 and 0.613 μg/mL and limit of quantitation (LOQ were 0.103 and 2.00 μg/mL with molar absorptivity values 3.169  103 and 6.347  103 l. mol-1. cm-1 and the relative standard deviation values ≤0.720 and ≤ 0.19 for both drugs respectively. No interference was observed from the excipients that are commonly present in pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of terbutaline sulphate tablet and tetracycline hydrochloride capsule in their dosage forms.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of terbutaline sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride via ion pair complex formation using eosin y

    Dhamra, M.Y.; Sabha, T.N.A.; Ghabsha, T.S.A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of terbutaline sulphate and tetracycline hydrochloride drugs in pure form and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method is based on the formation of binary complexes between these drugs and eosin Y in aqueous acetate buffered medium. Under the optimum conditions, the binary complexes showed absorption maxima at 545 nm. Beer's law was rectilinear over concentration range of 0.5-10 and 5-45 micro g/mL, R/sub 2/ were 0.9984 and 0.9988, RSD were 0.72 and 0.19 (n=5) with average recovery 101.42 % and 100.08 % and the average recovery values of pharmaceutical formulations 101.48 and 98.01 for above drugs respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) were 0.030 and 0.613 micro g/mL and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.103 and 2.00 micro g/mL with molar absorptivity values 3.169 10/sup 3/ and 6.347 10/sup 3/l. mol/sup -1/. Cm/sup -1/ and the relative standard deviation values 0.720 and 0.19 for both drugs respectively. No interference was observed from the excipients that are commonly present in pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of terbutaline sulphate tablet and tetracycline hydrochloride capsule in their dosage forms. (author)

  15. The Determination of Essentiality as a Leading Principle of the Formation of Integrated Reporting

    Makarenko Vita Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The definition of essentiality as the leading principle of formation of integrated reporting is considered. The normative basis of essentiality in the context of integrated reporting is the International standard for integrated reporting. The principle of essentiality is that the integrated report should disclose information on issues that have a significant impact on an assessment of the organization’s ability to generate value in the short, medium, and long term periods. Essential for an integrated report is information that is capable of making changes to the organization’s value creation procedure. The definition of essentiality indicates that the essential information is the one that can change the order of assessment of any particular event. Therefore, insignificant for the integrated report is the information that cannot and does not bring such changes. The lack of a clear methodology for determining the essentiality, on the one hand, facilitates application of the principle of essentiality in specific conditions, and on the other — reduces the comparability of indicators of integrated reporting.

  16. Description of the DLC-99/HUGO package of photon interaction data in ENDF/B-V format

    Roussin, R.W.; Knight, J.R.; Hubbell, J.H.; Howerton, R.J.

    1983-12-01

    A new photon interaction data library, DLC,-99/HUGO, is described. The library was prepared by incorporating newly evaluated data from the National Bureau of Standards with that from an existing data library, DLC-7F/HPICE, which is the ENDF/B-IV photon interaction data. It contains pair and triplet cross sections, photoelectric cross sections, and atomic form factors and the corresponding coherent scattering cross sections. Evaluated data in INDF/B-V format are provided for elements Z=1 to 100. The data package, available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will be submitted to CSEWG for consideration as the ENDF/B-V Photon Interaction Library. Two computer codes, EDPHOT for selectively printing the data and COMP23 for comparing two photon interaction libraries, are also provided

  17. Apparent formation constants of Pu(IV) and Th(IV) with humic acids determined by solvent extraction method

    Sasaki, T.; Aoyama, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Takagi, I. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Kulyako, Y.; Samsonov, M.; Miyasoedov, B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). V. I. Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (GEOKHI); Moriyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2012-07-01

    Apparent formation constants of Pu(IV) and Th(IV) with two kinds of humic acids were determined in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} at 25 C using a solvent extraction method with thenoyltrifluoroacetone in xylene. The acid dissociation constants of humic acids were also measured by potentiometric titration and used as the degree of dissociation for calculating the formation constants. The effect of solution conditions, such as the pH, the initial metal and humic acid concentrations, and the ionic strength, on the formation constants was examined. The obtained data were compared with the ones in the literature. (orig.)

  18. Experimental determination of differential cross-sections of muonic neutrinos and muonic antineutrinos interactions

    Lutz, Anne-Marie.

    1975-05-01

    The experimental determination of muonic neutrinos and muonic antineutrinos differential cross-sections by the analysis of pictures taken in the CERN Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber is presented. The methods used to solve experimental difficulties (muon identification, hadronic energy determination) and the errors on the experimental distributions are explained in detail. Then, the structure functions in charge changing interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos are analyzed and interpreted in terms of parton distribution inside the nucleon [fr

  19. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis as a method of determination of formation heat of refractory compounds

    Maslov, V.M.; Neganov, A.S.; Borovinskaya, I.P.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    Determination possibility of formation heats of refractory compounds in the process of direct synthesis from elements in a special calorimeter in the combustion regime is studied. Determined are formation heats of carbides - ZrCsub(0.92), Hf Csub(0.93), TaCsub(0.86), borides - ZrB 2 , HfB 2 NbB, NbB 2 , TaB, TaB 2 , MoB and silicides - ZrSi, ZrSi 2 , MoSi 2 . The results of chemical and x-ray phase analyses of the synthesized compounds are also given. Total error of formation heat determination methods does not surpass 2.0%

  20. Improving Interactive Health Literacy Skills of Older Adults: Lessons Learned From Formative Organizational Research With Community Partners.

    Parmer, John; Furtado, Debra; Rubin, Donald L; Freimuth, Vicki; Kaley, Terry; Okundaye, Mumbi

    2015-01-01

    Meals on Wheels (MOW) organizations are ideal community partners for delivering social support relating to health information exchange for vulnerable and home-bound older adults. This article illustrates how formative organizational evaluation can be used to adapt health literacy interventions delivered by community partners. Key informant interviews and ethnographic observations were conducted as part of a formative organizational evaluation of potential community partners. The observed brevity of volunteer-client interaction led program planners to incorporate substantial emphasis on communicating with older adults into the health literacy coach training curriculum. Ethnographic observations made clear that program materials had to be portable and fit it in with the mobile nature of MOW delivery. Formative organizational research can greatly increase the chance of successful implementation of public health interventions when those interventions will be implemented in partnerships with community-based organizations in diverse settings and with varying practices.

  1. Osteoclast formation is strongly reduced both in vivo and in vitro in the absence of CD47/SIRPα-interaction

    Lundberg, Pernilla; Koskinen, Cecilia; Baldock, Paul A.; Loethgren, Hanna; Stenberg, Asa; Lerner, Ulf H.; Oldenborg, Per-Arne

    2007-01-01

    Physical interaction between the cell surface receptors CD47 and signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) was reported to regulate cell migration, phagocytosis, cytokine production, and macrophage fusion. However, it is unclear if the CD47/SIRPα-interaction can also regulate macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated formation of osteoclasts. Here, we show that functional blocking antibodies to either CD47 or SIRPα strongly reduced formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) + osteoclasts in cultures of murine hematopoietic cells, stimulated in vitro by M-CSF and RANKL. In addition, the numbers of osteoclasts formed in M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated bone marrow macrophage cultures from CD47 -/- mice were strongly reduced, and bones of CD47 -/- mice exhibited significantly reduced osteoclast numbers, as compared with wild-type controls. We conclude that the CD47/SIRPα interaction is important for M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated osteoclast formation both in vivo and in vitro, and that absence of CD47 results in decreased numbers of osteoclasts in CD47 -/- mice

  2. Historical contingency and ecological determinism interact to prime speciation in sticklebacks, Gasterosteus.

    Taylor, E B; McPhail, J D

    2000-01-01

    Historical contingency and determinism are often cast as opposing paradigms under which evolutionary diversification operates. It may be, however, that both factors act together to promote evolutionary divergence, although there are few examples of such interaction in nature. We tested phylogenetic predictions of an explicit historical model of divergence (double invasions of freshwater by marine ancestors) in sympatric species of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) where determinism has been implicated as an important factor driving evolutionary novelty. Microsatellite DNA variation at six loci revealed relatively low genetic variation in freshwater populations, supporting the hypothesis that they were derived by colonization of freshwater by more diverse marine ancestors. Phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses suggested that pairs of sympatric species have evolved multiple times, further implicating determinism as a factor in speciation. Our data also supported predictions based on the hypothesis that the evolution of sympatric species was contingent upon 'double invasions' of postglacial lakes by ancestral marine sticklebacks. Sympatric sticklebacks, therefore, provide an example of adaptive radiation by determinism contingent upon historical conditions promoting unique ecological interactions, and illustrate how contingency and determinism may interact to generate geographical variation in species diversity PMID:11133026

  3. Long term mineralogical changes in salt formations due to water and brine interactions

    Herbert, H.J.; Brewitz, W.

    1996-01-01

    Four very common long term mineralogical changes in salt formations are discussed in the view of the safety considerations for underground repositories. Two of these processes, the 'Hartsalz' and 'Carnallite' dissolution were studied in two scale in situ experiments. The results are presented and compared with the results of the geochemical modelling with the computer code EQ3/6. Furthermore the reactions leading to the formation of the gypsum cap rock on the top of the Zechstein salt formations and to the polyhalitization of anhydrite are discussed. Geological field observations and mineral assemblages agree well with the results of the geochemical modelling employing the Pitzer formalism along with the Harvie, Moller and Weare database. We conclude that once the mechanisms of the chemical reactions are well understood it becomes possible to evaluate realistically whether such processes, when encountered in the repository, are still active or whether they are finished. It also becomes possible to estimate the volume changes associated with the reactions and thus the impact of these reactions on the integrity and the geomechanical stability of the salt formation. The intimate knowledge of the reaction mechanisms of the short and long term changes in the mineralogical assemblages and the associated brine chemistry is a first prerequisite for the correct evaluation of the origin of brines. Thus, it is essential for the correct assessment of the hazards which brine inflows may pose for the safety of a repository in salt formations. (authors). 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Resonant ion-pair formation in the recombination of NO+ with electrons: Cross-section determination

    Le Padellec, A.; Djuric, N.; Al-Khalili, A.; Danared, H.; Derkatch, A. M.; Neau, A.; Popovic, D. B.; Rosen, S.; Semaniak, J.; Thomas, R.

    2001-01-01

    Resonant ion-pair formation from the collisions of NO + ions with electrons was studied using the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING at the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory of Stockholm University. The total cross section is measured for the formation of N + +O - for electron energies 8--18 eV, and the results are compared with ion-pair formation in photoionization work. A peak in the cross section is observed at 12.5 eV, with a magnitude of 8.5 x 10 -19 cm 2 . An attempt to extract the cross section for the reverse process of associative ionization is made

  5. Influence of the Interaction Between Graphite and Polar Surfaces of ZnO on the Formation of Schottky Contact

    Yatskiv, R.; Grym, J.

    2018-03-01

    We show that the interaction between graphite and polar surfaces of ZnO affects electrical properties of graphite/ZnO Schottky junctions. A strong interaction of the Zn-face with the graphite contact causes interface imperfections and results in the formation of laterally inhomogeneous Schottky contacts. On the contrary, high quality Schottky junctions form on the O-face, where the interaction is significantly weaker. Charge transport through the O-face ZnO/graphite junctions is well described by the thermionic emission model in both forward and reverse directions. We further demonstrate that the parameters of the graphite/ZnO Schottky diodes can be significantly improved when a thin layer of ZnO2 forms at the interface between graphite and ZnO after hydrogen peroxide surface treatment.

  6. Various processes occurring in strong interactions between heavy ions: Compound nucleus formation, incomplete fusion, and quasifission

    Lefort, M.

    1975-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of various deep processes occurring when two complex nuclei enter in collision. It is suggested that very deep inelastic processes may lead to either a compound nucleus or a composite system which shortly decays into two fission fragments (quasifission process). Particularly for heavy projectiles and targets, the predominant Coulomb potential inhibits the compound nucleus formation for low l waves. Then a critical angular momentum can be defined as the limit below which both processes (quasifission and compound nucleus formation) occur. For the heaviest nuclei, nearly all l waves below l) contribute to the quasifission phenomenon

  7. A new method for determining gas phase heat of formation of aromatic energetic compounds

    Keshavarz, Mohammad H. [Department of Chemistry, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr P. O. Box 83145/115 (Iran); Tehrani, Masoud K. [Department of Physics, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr P. O. Box 83145/115 (Iran)

    2007-04-15

    A new correlation is introduced for desk calculation of gas phase heat of formation of aromatic energetic compounds that contain the elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. Predicted gas phase heats of formation for 26 energetic compounds have a root mean square of deviation from experiment of 20.67 kJ/mol, which is in good agreement with respect to measured values of oxygen-lean and oxygen-rich aromatic energetic compounds. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Enabling Spacecraft Formation Flying through Position Determination, Control and Enhanced Automation Technologies

    Bristow, John; Bauer, Frank; Hartman, Kate; How, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    Formation Flying is revolutionizing the way the space community conducts science missions around the Earth and in deep space. This technological revolution will provide new, innovative ways for the community to gather scientific information, share that information between space vehicles and the ground, and expedite the human exploration of space. Once fully matured, formation flying will result in numerous sciencecraft acting as virtual platforms and sensor webs, gathering significantly more and better science data than call be collected today. To achieve this goal, key technologies must be developed including those that address the following basic questions posed by the spacecraft: Where am I? Where is the rest of the fleet? Where do I need to be? What do I have to do (and what am I able to do) to get there? The answers to these questions and the means to implement those answers will depend oil the specific mission needs and formation configuration. However, certain critical technologies are common to most formations. These technologies include high-precision position and relative-position knowledge including Global Positioning System (GPS) mid celestial navigation; high degrees of spacecraft autonomy inter-spacecraft communication capabilities; targeting and control including distributed control algorithms, and high precision control thrusters and actuators. This paper provides an overview of a selection of the current activities NASA/DoD/Industry/Academia are working to develop Formation Flying technologies as quickly as possible, the hurdles that need to be overcome to achieve our formation flying vision, and the team's approach to transfer this technology to space. It will also describe several of the formation flying testbeds, such as Orion and University Nanosatellites, that are being developed to demonstrate and validate many of these innovative sensing and formation control technologies.

  9. Spontaneous Formation of Anti-ferromagnetic Vortex Lattice in a Fast Rotating BEC with Dipole Interactions

    Yang Shijie; Feng Shiping; Wen Yuchuan; Yu Yue

    2007-01-01

    When a Bose-Einstein condensate is set to rotate, superfluid vortices will be formed, which finally condense into a vortex lattice as the rotation frequency further increases. We show that the dipole-dipole interactions renormalize the short-range interaction strength and result in a distinction between interactions of parallel-polarized atoms and interactions of antiparallel-polarized atoms. This effect may lead to a spontaneous breakdown of the rapidly rotating Bose condensate into a novel anti-ferromagnetic-like vortex lattice. The upward-polarized Bose condensate forms a vortex lattice, which is staggered against a downward-polarized vortex lattice. A phase diagram related to the coupling strength is obtained.

  10. A computational study of soot formation in opposed-flow diffusion flame interacting with vortices

    Selvaraj, Prabhu; Im, Hong G.

    2017-01-01

    ethylene-air flame is simulated. A reduced mechanism with PAH pathways that includes until coronene and method of moments with interpolative closure (MOMIC) has been employed to calculate the soot characteristics. Interaction of sooting flame with a

  11. Dipole formation by two interacting shielded monopoles in a stratified fluid

    Beckers, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Verzicco, R.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between two shielded monopolar vortices has been investigated experimentally in a nonrotating linearly stratified fluid and by full three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations. The characteristic Reynolds and Froude numbers in the experiments are approximately Re [[approximate

  12. Surface chemistry of photoluminescent F8BT conjugated polymer nanoparticles determines protein corona formation and internalization by phagocytic cells.

    Ahmad Khanbeigi, Raha; Abelha, Thais Fedatto; Woods, Arcadia; Rastoin, Olivia; Harvey, Richard D; Jones, Marie-Christine; Forbes, Ben; Green, Mark A; Collins, Helen; Dailey, Lea Ann

    2015-03-09

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles are being developed for a variety of diagnostic and theranostic applications. The conjugated polymer, F8BT, a polyfluorene derivative, was used as a model system to examine the biological behavior of conjugated polymer nanoparticle formulations stabilized with ionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate; F8BT-SDS; ∼207 nm; -31 mV) and nonionic (pegylated 12-hydroxystearate; F8BT-PEG; ∼175 nm; -5 mV) surfactants, and compared with polystyrene nanoparticles of a similar size (PS200; ∼217 nm; -40 mV). F8BT nanoparticles were as hydrophobic as PS200 (hydrophobic interaction chromatography index value: 0.96) and showed evidence of protein corona formation after incubation with serum-containing medium; however, unlike polystyrene, F8BT nanoparticles did not enrich specific proteins onto the nanoparticle surface. J774A.1 macrophage cells internalized approximately ∼20% and ∼60% of the F8BT-SDS and PS200 delivered dose (calculated by the ISDD model) in serum-supplemented and serum-free conditions, respectively, while cell association of F8BT-PEG was minimal (<5% of the delivered dose). F8BT-PEG, however, was more cytotoxic (IC50 4.5 μg cm(-2)) than F8BT-SDS or PS200. The study results highlight that F8BT surface chemistry influences the composition of the protein corona, while the properties of the conjugated polymer nanoparticle surfactant stabilizer used determine particle internalization and biocompatibility profile.

  13. Effect of gamma-radiation on direct intercellular interaction (rosette formation) between thymus macrophages and thymocytes

    Belyakov, I.M.; Yarilin, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    In experiments with mice, the effect of radiation on resette formation between thymus macrophages (Th-MPh) and thymocytes (Thc) was studied on days 1, 4, 12, 30, and 60 following gamma-irradiation with doses of 0.5, 2, 4, and 8 Gy. gamma-Irradiation with doses of above 2 Gy was shown to cause a dose-dependent inhibition of rosette formation of Th-MPh with Thc in vitro. Two types of rosette-forming Th-MPh were identified: RFMPhII with low rate of binding to Thc and RFMPhII with high rate of binding to Thc. Radiation affects mainly the RFMPhII content. The total population of rosette-forming Th-MPh was restored on day 60 mainly due to cells with low rate of rosette formation. The EC supernatant promoted rosette formation of exposed Th-MPh with Thc. The effect was maximum at early times following irradiation of Th-MPh with a dose of 4 Gy

  14. Adriamycin and derivatives interaction with the mitochondrial membrane: O2 consumption and free radicals formation

    Pollakis, G.; Goormaghtigh, E.; Delmelle, M.; Lion, Y.; Ruysschaert, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Adriamycin induces the formation of semiquinone free radicals, O(2) and OH. species, in beef heart intact mitochondria, submitochondrial particles and complex I-III containing proteoliposomes. Free radicals were detected by the use of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy with the spin trapping

  15. Interaction between sulfur and lead in toxicity, iron plaque formation and lead accumulation in rice plant.

    Yang, Junxing; Liu, Zhiyan; Wan, Xiaoming; Zheng, Guodi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Hanzhi; Guo, Lin; Wang, Xuedong; Zhou, Xiaoyong; Guo, Qingjun; Xu, Ruixiang; Zhou, Guangdong; Peters, Marc; Zhu, Guangxu; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Human activities have resulted in lead and sulfur accumulation in paddy soils in parts of southern China. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of S supply on iron plaque formation and Pb accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two Pb levels (0 and 600 mg kg(-1)), combined with four S concentrations (0, 30, 60, and 120 mg kg(-1)). Results showed that S supply significantly decreased Pb accumulation in straw and grains of rice. This result may be attributed to the enhancement of Fe plaque formation, decrease of Pb availability in soil, and increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) in rice leaves. Moderate S supply (30 mg kg(-1)) significantly increased Fe plaque formation on the root surface and in the rhizosphere, whereas excessive S supply (60 and 120 mg kg(-1)) significantly decreased the amounts of iron plaque on the root surface. Sulfur supply significantly enhanced the GSH contents in leaves of rice plants under Pb treatment. With excessive S application, the rice root acted as a more effective barrier to Pb accumulation compared with iron plaque. Excessive S supply may result in a higher monosulfide toxicity and decreased iron plaque formation on the root surface during flooded conditions. However, excessive S supply could effectively decrease Pb availability in soils and reduce Pb accumulation in rice plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of Inhibitory and Facilitatory Effects of Conditioning Trials on Long-Term Memory Formation

    Hosono, Shouhei; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn through experience and consolidate the memories into long-time storage. Conditioning parameters to induce protein synthesis-dependent long-term memory (LTM) have been the subject of extensive studies in many animals. Here we found a case in which a conditioning trial inhibits or facilitates LTM formation depending on the intervals…

  17. Bragging on Facebook: The Interaction of Content Source and Focus in Online Impression Formation.

    Scott, Graham G; Ravenscroft, Kirsty

    2017-01-01

    Warranting Theory proposes that third-party testimonials are more influential in online impression formation than target-authored statements. Individuals posting content on social media accurately convey their offline personality while endeavoring to present themselves in a positive light. In doing so, they may misjudge the psychological distance of the majority of viewers, who could view this positive self-presentation as bragging and form resultant negative impressions. In this study, we asked 136 participants to view the Facebook timelines of four female targets. Timeline content varied by source (owner- vs. friend-authored) and focus (generally positive vs. personally positive). Participants were tasked with forming impressions of targets and rating them based on attractiveness, confidence, modesty, and popularity. We found that source and focus played distinct roles in impression formation. More positive impressions were formed when owner-authored content was general, and when friend-authored content was personal. This highlights the role played by content focus in impression formation, and the potentially damaging effect of perceived bragging. These results are discussed in relation to the application of the Warranting Theory of impression formation online, and discrepancies between these results and those from related articles are examined.

  18. 3D finite compartment modeling of formation and healing of bruises may identify methods for age determination of bruises

    Stam, B.; van Gemert, M.J.C.; van Leeuwen, T.G.; Aalders, M.C.G.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating the spatial and temporal behavior of bruises may identify methods that allow accurate age determination of bruises to assess child abuse. We developed a numerical 3D model to simulate the spatial kinetics of hemoglobin and bilirubin during the formation and healing of bruises. Using this

  19. A 3-D wellbore simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) to determine the thermal diffusivity of rock-formations

    Wong-Loya, J. A.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.

    2017-06-01

    Acquiring thermophysical properties of rock-formations in geothermal systems is an essential task required for the well drilling and completion. Wellbore thermal simulators require such properties for predicting the thermal behavior of a wellbore and the formation under drilling and shut-in conditions. The estimation of static formation temperatures also needs the use of these properties for the wellbore and formation materials (drilling fluids and pipes, cements, casings, and rocks). A numerical simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) has been developed for modeling the drilling fluid circulation and shut-in processes of geothermal wellbores, and for the in-situ determination of thermal diffusivities of rocks. Bottomhole temperatures logged under shut-in conditions (BHTm), and thermophysical and transport properties of drilling fluids were used as main input data. To model the thermal disturbance and recovery processes in the wellbore and rock-formation, initial drilling fluid and static formation temperatures were used as initial and boundary conditions. WELLTHER-SIM uses these temperatures together with an initial thermal diffusivity for the rock-formation to solve the governing equations of the heat transfer model. WELLTHER-SIM was programmed using the finite volume technique to solve the heat conduction equations under 3-D and transient conditions. Thermal diffusivities of rock-formations were inversely computed by using an iterative and efficient numerical simulation, where simulated thermal recovery data sets (BHTs) were statistically compared with those temperature measurements (BHTm) logged in some geothermal wellbores. The simulator was validated using a well-documented case reported in the literature, where the thermophysical properties of the rock-formation are known with accuracy. The new numerical simulator has been successfully applied to two wellbores drilled in geothermal fields of Japan and Mexico. Details of the physical conceptual model, the numerical

  20. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes; FINAL

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-01-01

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  1. Knots Untie: Molecular Determinants Involved in Knot Formation Induced by Pseudomonas savastanoi in Woody Hosts

    Eloy Caballo-Ponce

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the molecular basis of tree diseases is lately receiving a renewed attention, especially with the emerging perception that pathogens require specific pathogenicity and virulence factors to successfully colonize woody hosts. Pathosystems involving woody plants are notoriously difficult to study, although the use of model bacterial strains together with genetically homogeneous micropropagated plant material is providing a significant impetus to our understanding of the molecular determinants leading to disease. The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi belongs to the intensively studied Pseudomonas syringae complex, and includes three pathogenic lineages causing tumorous overgrowths (knots in diverse economically relevant trees and shrubs. As it occurs with many other bacteria, pathogenicity of P. savastanoi is dependent on a type III secretion system, which is accompanied by a core set of at least 20 effector genes shared among strains isolated from olive, oleander, and ash. The induction of knots of wild-type size requires that the pathogen maintains adequate levels of diverse metabolites, including the phytohormones indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinins, as well as cyclic-di-GMP, some of which can also regulate the expression of other pathogenicity and virulence genes and participate in bacterial competitiveness. In a remarkable example of social networking, quorum sensing molecules allow for the communication among P. savastanoi and other members of the knot microbiome, while at the same time are essential for tumor formation. Additionally, a distinguishing feature of bacteria from the P. syringae complex isolated from woody organs is the possession of a 15 kb genomic island (WHOP carrying four operons and three other genes involved in degradation of phenolic compounds. Two of these operons mediate the catabolism of anthranilate and catechol and, together with another operon, are required for the induction of full-size tumors

  2. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  3. Systematic Identification of Determinants for Single-Strand Annealing-Mediated Deletion Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Maia Segura-Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To ensure genomic integrity, living organisms have evolved diverse molecular processes for sensing and repairing damaged DNA. If improperly repaired, DNA damage can give rise to different types of mutations, an important class of which are genomic structural variants (SVs. In spite of their importance for phenotypic variation and genome evolution, potential contributors to SV formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast, a highly tractable model organism, are not fully recognized. Here, we developed and applied a genome-wide assay to identify yeast gene knockout mutants associated with de novo deletion formation, in particular single-strand annealing (SSA-mediated deletion formation, in a systematic manner. In addition to genes previously linked to genome instability, our approach implicates novel genes involved in chromatin remodeling and meiosis in affecting the rate of SSA-mediated deletion formation in the presence or absence of stress conditions induced by DNA-damaging agents. We closely examined two candidate genes, the chromatin remodeling gene IOC4 and the meiosis-related gene MSH4, which when knocked-out resulted in gene expression alterations affecting genes involved in cell division and chromosome organization, as well as DNA repair and recombination, respectively. Our high-throughput approach facilitates the systematic identification of processes linked to the formation of a major class of genetic variation.

  4. Determination and Quantification of Molecular Interactions in Protein Films: A Review

    Felicia Hammann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein based films are nowadays also prepared with the aim of replacing expensive, crude oil-based polymers as environmentally friendly and renewable alternatives. The protein structure determines the ability of protein chains to form intra- and intermolecular bonds, whereas the degree of cross-linking depends on the amino acid composition and molecular weight of the protein, besides the conditions used in film preparation and processing. The functionality varies significantly depending on the type of protein and affects the resulting film quality and properties. This paper reviews the methods used in examination of molecular interactions in protein films and discusses how these intermolecular interactions can be quantified. The qualitative determination methods can be distinguished by structural analysis of solutions (electrophoretic analysis, size exclusion chromatography and analysis of solid films (spectroscopy techniques, X-ray scattering methods. To quantify molecular interactions involved, two methods were found to be the most suitable: protein film swelling and solubility. The importance of non-covalent and covalent interactions in protein films can be investigated using different solvents. The research was focused on whey protein, whereas soy protein and wheat gluten were included as further examples of proteins.

  5. Determination and Quantification of Molecular Interactions in Protein Films: A Review.

    Hammann, Felicia; Schmid, Markus

    2014-12-10

    Protein based films are nowadays also prepared with the aim of replacing expensive, crude oil-based polymers as environmentally friendly and renewable alternatives. The protein structure determines the ability of protein chains to form intra- and intermolecular bonds, whereas the degree of cross-linking depends on the amino acid composition and molecular weight of the protein, besides the conditions used in film preparation and processing. The functionality varies significantly depending on the type of protein and affects the resulting film quality and properties. This paper reviews the methods used in examination of molecular interactions in protein films and discusses how these intermolecular interactions can be quantified. The qualitative determination methods can be distinguished by structural analysis of solutions (electrophoretic analysis, size exclusion chromatography) and analysis of solid films (spectroscopy techniques, X-ray scattering methods). To quantify molecular interactions involved, two methods were found to be the most suitable: protein film swelling and solubility. The importance of non-covalent and covalent interactions in protein films can be investigated using different solvents. The research was focused on whey protein, whereas soy protein and wheat gluten were included as further examples of proteins.

  6. Notch-dependent epithelial fold determines boundary formation between developmental fields in the Drosophila antenna.

    Ku, Hui-Yu; Sun, Y Henry

    2017-07-01

    Compartment boundary formation plays an important role in development by separating adjacent developmental fields. Drosophila imaginal discs have proven valuable for studying the mechanisms of boundary formation. We studied the boundary separating the proximal A1 segment and the distal segments, defined respectively by Lim1 and Dll expression in the eye-antenna disc. Sharp segregation of the Lim1 and Dll expression domains precedes activation of Notch at the Dll/Lim1 interface. By repressing bantam miRNA and elevating the actin regulator Enable, Notch signaling then induces actomyosin-dependent apical constriction and epithelial fold. Disruption of Notch signaling or the actomyosin network reduces apical constriction and epithelial fold, so that Dll and Lim1 cells become intermingled. Our results demonstrate a new mechanism of boundary formation by actomyosin-dependent tissue folding, which provides a physical barrier to prevent mixing of cells from adjacent developmental fields.

  7. Determination of suitability of natural Polish resources for production of ceramic proppants applied in gas exploration from European shale formations

    Szymanska, Joanna; Mizera, Jaroslaw

    2017-04-01

    ). Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) enabled analysis of their chemical composition, what was compared with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results. Crystallinity of the raw compounds was established by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Characterization of loamy materials enabled evaluation of their impact on ceramic slurries preparation for further granulation and sintering. The proppants were analyzed with X-Ray Tomography to determine their shape and pore distribution. 3D models also enabled prediction of proppant settlement in the fracture. The crucial parameter as mechanical strength, that influences the integrity of created fractures (fines exceeding 1 % reduce fracture conductivity), was established during the crush tests. High roundness coefficient, uniformity and bulk density results informed about stability of the prop. Environmental proppants interaction was evaluated by turbidity and solubility in acid measurements, which reflect a threat of the proppants decay in the well. The obtained outcomes prove the utility of applied natural resources in the granules production. In consequence, the obtained proppants can be used for hydraulic fracturing in high pressure, temperature and low permeable shale formations. The granules fulfil the norms thus are prospective on a global proppants market.

  8. Palaeogeographical peculiarities of the Pabdeh Formation (Paleogene) in Iran: New evidence of global diversity-determined geological heritage

    Habibi, Tahereh; Nielsen, Jan K.; Ponedelnik, Alena A.; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-11-01

    Unique palaeogeographical peculiarities of sedimentary formations are important for geological heritage conservation and use for the purposes of tourism. The heritage value of the Pabdeh Formation (Paleocene-Oligocene) of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt in Iran has been investigated. The uniqueness of its palaeogeographical peculiarities has been assessed on the basis of the literature, field studies of three representative sections in the Fars Province (Kavar, Zanjiran, and Shahneshin sections), and comparison with the similar features known in Iran and globally. The Pabdeh Formation reflects the process of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate ramp progradation and the onset of a typical carbonate platform. The other unique features include representation of mesopelagic palaeohabitat, specific trace fossil assemblages, prehistoric bituminous artefacts (production of which was linked to the Pabdeh deposits), etc. It is established that the palaeogeographical type of geological heritage of the Pabdeh Formation is represented by all known subtypes, namely facies, palaeoecosystem, ichnological, taphonomical, event, and geoarchaeological subtypes. Their rank varies between regional and global. The very fact of co-occurrence of these subtypes determines the global importance of the entire palaeogeographical type in the case of this formation. The establishment of geopark in the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt will facilitate adequate use of the Pabdeh Formation for the purpose of geotourism development. The aesthetic properties (rocks of different colour and striped patterns of outcrops) increase the attractiveness of this geological body to visitors.

  9. Molecular determinants of the interaction between Doa1 and Hse1 involved in endosomal sorting.

    Han, Seungsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Sangho

    2014-03-28

    Yeast Doa1/Ufd3 is an adaptor protein for Cdc48 (p97 in mammal), an AAA type ATPase associated with endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation pathway and endosomal sorting into multivesicular bodies. Doa1 functions in the endosomal sorting by its association with Hse1, a component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system. The association of Doa1 with Hse1 was previously reported to be mediated between PFU domain of Doa1 and SH3 of Hse1. However, it remains unclear which residues are specifically involved in the interaction. Here we report that Doa1/PFU interacts with Hse1/SH3 with a moderate affinity of 5 μM. Asn-438 of Doa1/PFU and Trp-254 of Hse1/SH3 are found to be critical in the interaction while Phe-434, implicated in ubiquitin binding via a hydrophobic interaction, is not. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements combined with molecular docking and biochemical analysis yield the solution structure of the Doa1/PFU:Hse1/SH3 complex. Taken together, our results suggest that hydrogen bonding is a major determinant in the interaction of Doa1/PFU with Hse1/SH3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interacting star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Overmerging problem solved by cluster group formation

    Leon, Stéphane; Bergond, Gilles; Vallenari, Antonella

    1999-04-01

    We present the tidal tail distributions of a sample of candidate binary clusters located in the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). One isolated cluster, SL 268, is presented in order to study the effect of the LMC tidal field. All the candidate binary clusters show tidal tails, confirming that the pairs are formed by physically linked objects. The stellar mass in the tails covers a large range, from 1.8x 10(3) to 3x 10(4) \\msun. We derive a total mass estimate for SL 268 and SL 356. At large radii, the projected density profiles of SL 268 and SL 356 fall off as r(-gamma ) , with gamma = 2.27 and gamma =3.44, respectively. Out of 4 pairs or multiple systems, 2 are older than the theoretical survival time of binary clusters (going from a few 10(6) years to 10(8) years). A pair shows too large age difference between the components to be consistent with classical theoretical models of binary cluster formation (Fujimoto & Kumai \\cite{fujimoto97}). We refer to this as the ``overmerging'' problem. A different scenario is proposed: the formation proceeds in large molecular complexes giving birth to groups of clusters over a few 10(7) years. In these groups the expected cluster encounter rate is larger, and tidal capture has higher probability. Cluster pairs are not born together through the splitting of the parent cloud, but formed later by tidal capture. For 3 pairs, we tentatively identify the star cluster group (SCG) memberships. The SCG formation, through the recent cluster starburst triggered by the LMC-SMC encounter, in contrast with the quiescent open cluster formation in the Milky Way can be an explanation to the paucity of binary clusters observed in our Galaxy. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile}

  11. Evaluation of ultrasound-assisted in situ sorbent formation solid-phase extraction method for determination of arsenic in water, food and biological samples.

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Majidi, Behrooz; Abdi, Khosrou

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid ultrasound-assisted in situ sorbent formation solid-phase extraction (UAISFSPE) coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry detection (ET-AAS) was developed for preconcentration and determination of arsenic (As) in various samples. A small amount of cationic surfactant is dissolved in the aqueous sample containing As ions, which were complexed by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate After shaking, a little volume of hexafluorophosphate (NaPF6) as an ion-pairing agent was added into the solution by a microsyringe. Due to the interaction between surfactant and ion-pairing agent, solid particles are formed. The alkyl groups of the surfactant in the solid particles strongly interact with the hydrophobic groups of analytes and become bound. Sonication aids the dispersion of the sorbent into the sample solution and mass transfer of the analyte into the sorbent, thus reducing the extraction time. The solid particles are centrifuged, and the sedimented particles can be dissolved in an appropriate solvent to recover the absorbed analyte. After separation, total arsenic (As(III) and As(V)) was determined by ET-AAS. Several experimental parameters were investigated and optimized. A detection limit of 7 ng L(-1) with preconcentration factor of 100 and relative standard deviation for 10 replicate determinations of 0.1 µg L(-1) As(III) were 4.5% achieved. Consequently, the method was applied to the determination of arsenic in certified reference materials, water, food and biological samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Determination of equilibrium constants of formation and decomposition of 11-tungstophosphate heteropolyanion by the method of Raman spectroscopy

    Detusheva, L.G.; Khankhasaeva, S.Ts.; Yurchenko, Eh.N.; Lazarenko, T.P.; Kozhevnikov, I.V.

    1990-01-01

    Method of quantitative IR spectroscopy was used to determine equilibrium constants of formation of H x PW 11 O 39 (7-x)- (1) from H y P 2 W 21 O 71 (6-Y)- and W 10 O 32 4- at pH 2.8-4.0 and its decomposition at pH 7-8. Equilibrium constant of (1) formation in logarithmic coordinates changes linearly with growth of initial concentration of H 3 PW 12 O 40 (2) from 0.005 to 0.1 mol/l. Equilibrium constant of (1) decomposition is characterized by complex dependence on initial concentration of (2) due to proceeding of parallel reactions. Equilibrium concentrations of compounds in solutions of tungstophosphoric heteropolyacid at pH 3.25 and 7.68, calculated according to determined equilibrium constants and determined by the method of NMR on 31 P nuclei, were correlated

  13. Cr interaction in the formation of nano cluster of Y, Ti and O in bcc Fe an ab initio study

    Murali, D.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Valsakumar, M.C.; Chandra, Sharath; Sundar, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys containing highly stable fine dispersion of yttrium oxide nano particles, produced by mechanical alloying, are promising structural materials for fast fission and fusion environments. Formation of Cr depleted and O enriched Y-Ti-O nanoclusters are observed in the atom probe analysis. Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to understand the role of Cr atom interactions with other solute atoms (Y, Ti, O) and vacancies in the formation of nanocluster. The binding energy of clusters of Y-Ti-O in bcc Fe is found to be very high in the presence of vacancies. Our calculations are consistent with the atom probe observation of depletion of Cr atoms and enrichment of O atoms in the nanoclusters. (author)

  14. Gamma ray bursts from comet neutron star magnetosphere interaction, field twisting and Eparallel formation

    Colgate, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Consider the problem of a comet in a collision trajectory with a magnetized neutron star. The question addressed in this paper is whether the comet interacts strongly enough with a magnetic field such as to capture at a large radius or whether in general the comet will escape a magnetized neutron star. 6 refs., 4 figs

  15. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus ...

    Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the description of an experiment for the search of -nucleus bound state using ...

  16. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus ...

    Abstract. The question of possible existence of η-mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. An- swer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of η-nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of η-mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it.

  17. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  18. Formation of Graduates' Professional Competence in Terms of Interaction between Educational Environment and Production

    Masalimova, Alfiya R.; Ivanov, Valery G.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the professional competence creation problem declared in the article that complies with current time requirements and specialists, first of all requires facilitation of interaction of the central education chain--the educational institution, with production (that is the personnel's consumer). Thus the problem of organic…

  19. Genetic interactions between the chromosome axis-associated protein Hop1 and homologous recombination determinants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Brown, Simon David; Jarosinska, Olga Dorota; Lorenz, Alexander

    2018-03-17

    Hop1 is a component of the meiosis-specific chromosome axis and belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of HORMA domain proteins. Hop1 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes are a major factor in promoting double-strand DNA break formation and inter-homolog recombination. In budding yeast and mammals, they are also involved in a meiotic checkpoint kinase cascade monitoring the completion of double-strand DNA break repair. We used the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks a canonical synaptonemal complex to test whether Hop1 has a role beyond supporting the generation of double-strand DNA breaks and facilitating inter-homolog recombination events. We determined how mutants of homologous recombination factors genetically interact with hop1, studied the role(s) of the HORMA domain of Hop1, and characterized a bio-informatically predicted interactor of Hop1, Aho1 (SPAC688.03c). Our observations indicate that in fission yeast, Hop1 does require its HORMA domain to support wild-type levels of meiotic recombination and localization to meiotic chromatin. Furthermore, we show that hop1∆ only weakly interacts genetically with mutants of homologous recombination factors, and in fission yeast likely has no major role beyond break formation and promoting inter-homolog events. We speculate that after the evolutionary loss of the synaptonemal complex, Hop1 likely has become less important for modulating recombination outcome during meiosis in fission yeast, and that this led to a concurrent rewiring of genetic pathways controlling meiotic recombination.

  20. Computerized tomography with X-rays: an instrument in the analysis physico-chemical between formations and drilling fluids interactions

    Coelho, Marcus Vinicius Cavalcante

    1998-01-01

    In this study it is demonstrated the applicability of the Computerized Tomography technique with x-rays to evaluate the reactivity degree between various drilling fluids and argillaceous sediments (Shales and Sandstones). The research has been conducted in the Rock-Fluid Interaction Pressure Simulator (RFIPS), where the possible physico-chemical alterations can be observed through successive tomography images, which are obtained during the flow of the fluid through the samples. In addition, it was noticed the formation of mud cake in Berea Sandstones samples in the RFIPS, though the Computerized Tomography with X-rays, when utilizing drilling fluids weighted with the baryte. (author)

  1. Liquid phase formation due to solid/solid chemical interaction and its modelling: applications to zircaloy/stainless steel system

    Garcia, E.A.; Piotrkowski, R.; Denis, A.; Kovacs, J.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical interaction at high temperatures between Zircaloy (Zry) and stainless steel (SS) and the liquid phase formation due to eutectic reactions were studied. In a previous work the Zry/Inconel system was modelled assuming that the kinetics of phase growth is controlled by diffusion. The same model and the obtained Zr diffusion coefficient in the liquid phase were applied in the present work. In order to obtain an adequate description of the Zry/SS the major component of both alloys and also Cr and Ni had to be considered. (author)

  2. Columnar interactions determine horizontal propagation of recurrent network activity in neocortex

    Wester, Jason C.; Contreras, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The cortex is organized in vertical and horizontal circuits that determine the spatiotemporal properties of distributed cortical activity. Despite detailed knowledge of synaptic interactions among individual cells in the neocortex, little is known about the rules governing interactions among local populations. Here we used self-sustained recurrent activity generated in cortex, also known as up-states, in rat thalamocortical slices in vitro to understand interactions among laminar and horizontal circuits. By means of intracellular recordings and fast optical imaging with voltage sensitive dyes, we show that single thalamic inputs activate the cortical column in a preferential L4→L2/3→L5 sequence, followed by horizontal propagation with a leading front in supra and infragranular layers. To understand the laminar and columnar interactions, we used focal injections of TTX to block activity in small local populations, while preserving functional connectivity in the rest of the network. We show that L2/3 alone, without underlying L5, does not generate self-sustained activity and is inefficient propagating activity horizontally. In contrast, L5 sustains activity in the absence of L2/3 and is necessary and sufficient to propagate activity horizontally. However, loss of L2/3 delays horizontal propagation via L5. Finally, L5 amplifies activity in L2/3. Our results show for the first time that columnar interactions between supra and infragranular layers are required for the normal propagation of activity in the neocortex. Our data suggest that supra and infragranular circuits with their specific and complex set of inputs and outputs, work in tandem to determine the patterns of cortical activation observed in vivo. PMID:22514308

  3. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGH-DENSITY CORE IN TAURUS: DYNAMICAL GAS INTERACTION AT THE POSSIBLE SITE OF A MULTIPLE STAR FORMATION

    Tokuda, Kazuki; Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Saigo, Kazuya; Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Tachihara, Kengo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University, Fujimi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Machida, Masahiro N. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Tomida, Kengo, E-mail: s_k.tokuda@p.s.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Starless dense cores eventually collapse dynamically, forming protostars inside them, and the physical properties of the cores determine the nature of the forming protostars. We report ALMA observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward MC27 or L1521F, which is considered to be very close to the first protostellar core phase. We found a few starless high-density cores, one of which has a very high density of ∼10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, within a region of several hundred AU around a very low-luminosity protostar detected by Spitzer. A very compact bipolar outflow with a dynamical timescale of a few hundred years was found toward the protostar. The molecular line observation shows several cores with an arc-like structure, possibly due to the dynamical gas interaction. These complex structures revealed in the present observations suggest that the initial condition of star formation is highly dynamical in nature, which is considered to be a key factor in understanding fundamental issues of star formation such as the formation of multiple stars and the origin of the initial mass function of stars.

  4. Formation of secondary minerals in a lysimeter approach - A mineral-microbe interaction

    Schäffner, F.; Merten, D.; De Giudici, G.; Beyer, A.; Akob, D. M.; Ricci, P. C.; Küsel, K.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of large areas due to uranium mining operations poses a serious long-term environmental problem. In the Ronneburg district (eastern Thuringia, Germany), leaching of low grade uranium bearing ores (uranium content metals, especially Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn due to a residual contamination even after remediation efforts. To reveal the processes of secondary mineral precipitation in the field a laboratory lysimeter approach was set up under in situ-like conditions. Homogenized soil from the field site and pure quartz sand were used as substrates. In general, in situ measurements of redox potentials in the substrates showed highly oxidizing conditions (200-750 mV). Water was supplied to the lysimeter from below via a mariottés bottle containing contaminated groundwater from the field. Evaporation processes were allowed, providing a continuous flow of water. This led to precipitation of epsomite and probably aplowite on the top layer of substrate, similar to what is observed in field investigations. After 4 weeks, the first iron and manganese bearing secondary minerals became visible. Soil water samples were used to monitor the behaviour of metals within the lysimeter. Saturation indices (SI) for different secondary minerals were calculated with PHREEQC. The SI of goethite showed oversaturation with respect to the soil solution. SEM-EDX analyses and IR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of goethite. Geochemical data revealed that goethite formation was mainly dominated by Eh/pH processes and that heavy metals, e.g. Zn and U, could be enriched in this phase. Although Eh/pH data does not support formation of manganese minerals, Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could be isolated from field soil samples, supporting the fact that microorganisms may influence this natural attenuation process. Laser ablation ICP-MS data reveal accumulation of manganese in MOB biomass on Mn(II)-containing agar plates. Furthermore, it was possible to show the importance

  5. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Angstrom from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip......We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip...

  6. Network Formation via Anion Coordination: Crystal Structures Based on the Interplay of Non-Covalent Interactions

    Matteo Savastano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis and the structural characterization of new H2L(CF3CO22 (1 and H2L(Ph2PO42 (2 compounds containing the diprotonated form (H2L2+ of the tetrazine-based molecule 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of single crystals of these compounds showed that H2L2+ displays similar binding properties toward both anions when salt bridge interactions are taken into account. Nevertheless, the different shapes, sizes and functionalities of trifluoroacetate and diphenyl phosphate anions define quite different organization patterns leading to the peculiar crystal lattices of 1 and 2. These three-dimensional (3D architectures are self-assembled by a variety of non-covalent forces, among which prominent roles are played by fluorine–π (in 1 and anion–π (in 2 interactions.

  7. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Leamon, Robert J., E-mail: mscott@hao.ucar.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  8. Weak interactions from 1950-1960: a quantitative bibliometric study of the formation of a field

    White, D.H.; Sullivan, D.

    1986-01-01

    A quantitative technique is illustrated which uses publication statistics from a bibliography of citations in the area of weak interactions to provide a view of trends and patterns in the development of the field during the period from 1950 to 1960. An overview is given of what the physicists working in weak interactions during this period were doing as indicated by an analysis of the subjects of their papers. The dominant problems and concerns are discussed. Focus is then turned to the events surrounding the emergence of the tau/theta particle puzzle, the discovery of parity nonconservation, and the resolution offered by the V-A theory. Displaying the data from the citation index in unusual ways highlights dominant issues of the period, especially the close relationship between theory and experiment in the latter half of the decade. 64 refs., 14 figs

  9. Tidal interactions in the expanding universe - The formation of prolate systems

    Binney, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The study estimates the magnitude of the anisotropy that can be tidally induced in neighboring initially spherical protostructures, be they protogalaxies, protoclusters, or even uncollapsed density enhancements in the large-scale structure of the universe. It is shown that the linear analysis of tidal interactions developed by Peebles (1969) predicts that the anisotropy energy of a perturbation grows to first order in a small dimensionless parameter, whereas the net angular momentum acquired is of second order. A simple model is presented for the growth of anisotropy by tidal interactions during the nonlinear stage of the development of perturbations. A possible observational test is described of the alignment predicted by the model between the orientations of large-scale perturbations and the positions of neighboring density enhancements.

  10. Interaction of Supernova Blast Waves with Wind-Driven Shells: Formation of "Jets", "Bullets", "Ears", Etc.

    Gvaramadze, V. V.

    Most of middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) have a distorted and complicated appearance which cannot be explained in the framework of the Sedov-Taylor model. We consider three typical examples of such SNRs (Vela SNR, MSH15-52, G309.2-00.6) and show that their structure could be explained as a result of interaction of a supernova (SN) blast wave with the ambient medium preprocessed by the action of the SN progenitor's wind and ionized emission.

  11. Daf-2, Daf-16 and Daf-23: Genetically Interacting Genes Controlling Dauer Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    Gottlieb, S.; Ruvkun, G.

    1994-01-01

    Under conditions of high population density and low food, Caenorhabditis elegans forms an alternative third larval stage, called the dauer stage, which is resistant to desiccation and harsh environments. Genetic analysis of some dauer constitutive (Daf-c) and dauer defective (Daf-d) mutants has revealed a complex pathway that is likely to function in particular neurons and/or responding tissues. Here we analyze the genetic interactions between three genes which comprise a branch of the dauer ...

  12. Formation of complexes between hematite nanoparticles and a non-conventional galactomannan gum. Toward a better understanding on interaction processes.

    Busch, Verónica M; Loosli, Fréderic; Santagapita, Patricio R; Buera, M Pilar; Stoll, Serge

    2015-11-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of hematite nanoparticles related to their size, surface area and reactivity make them useful for many applications, as well as suitable models to study aggregation kinetics. For several applications (such as remediation of contaminated groundwater) it is crucial to maintain the stability of hematite nanoparticle suspensions in order to assure their arrival to the target place. The use of biopolymers has been proposed as a suitable environmentally friendly option to avoid nanoparticle aggregation and assure their stability. The aim of the present work was to investigate the formation of complexes between hematite nanoparticles and a non-conventional galactomannan (vinal gum--VG) obtained from Prosopis ruscifolia in order to promote hematite nanoparticle coating with a green biopolymer. Zeta potential and size of hematite nanoparticles, VG dispersions and the stability of their mixtures were investigated, as well as the influence of the biopolymer concentration and preparation method. DLS and nanoparticle tracking analysis techniques were used for determining the size and the zeta-potential of the suspensions. VG showed a polydispersed size distribution (300-475 nm Z-average diameter, 0.65 Pdi) and a negative zeta potential (between -1 and -12 mV for pH2 and 12, respectively). The aggregation of hematite nanoparticles (3.3 mg/L) was induced by the addition of VG at lower concentrations than 2mg/L (pH5.5). On the other hand, hematite nanoparticles were stabilized at concentrations of VG higher than 2 mg/L. Several phenomena between hematite nanoparticles and VG were involved: steric effects, electrostatic interactions, charge neutralization, charge inversion and polymer bridging. The process of complexation between hematite nanoparticles and the biopolymer was strongly influenced by the preparation protocols. It was concluded that the aggregation, dispersion, and stability of hematite nanoparticles depended on biopolymer

  13. The role of hydrophobic interactions for the formation of gas hydrates

    Yoon, R.H.; Wang, J.; Eriksson, J.C. [Virginia Polytech Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Center for Advanced Separation Technologies; Sum, A.K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The process of hydrate formation remains largely unexplained due to a lack of evidence for the water molecules around the hydrophobic solute such as methane, and the nucleation process leading to the clustering that induces hydrate growth. However, the water structure is known to play a major role in the mechanism for hydrate nucleation. This paper presented evidence that hydrophobic solutes promote the structuring of water. Water molecules at room temperature tend to form ice structures around the hydrocarbon chains of surfactant molecules dissolved in water. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was used in this study to measure the surface forces between thiolated gold surfaces. The purpose was to better understand the structure of the thin films of water between hydrophobic surfaces. The water molecules tended to reorganize themselves to form ordered structures, which may be related to the nucleation of hydrates. The entropy reduction associated with the ice structure can be considered as the net driving force for self-assembly. Recent studies have revealed that long-range attractive forces exist between hydrophobic surfaces, which are likely to result from structuring of the water molecules in the vicinity of the hydrophobic surfaces. Similarly, the hydrophobic nature of most gas hydrate formers may induce ordering of water molecules in the vicinity of dissolved solutes. It was concluded that the results of this study may be used to develop a new mechanism for the formation of gas hydrates, including methane. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Formation of ring-patterned nanoclusters by laser–plume interaction

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    This article reports for the first time a unique study performed to regulate the ring diameter of nanoclusters fabricated during femtosecond laser ablation of solids and a mechanism is proposed for the formation of those ring clusters. The ring nanoclusters are made out of nanoparticles with a range of 10–30 nm. Our experimental studies showed the synthesis of ring nanoclusters with random diameter distribution on metals, nonmetals, and semiconductors, such as titanium, aluminum, glasses, ceramics, graphite, and silicon. To regulate the ring size, the effects of laser parameters, such as wavelength, pulse duration, pulse energy, and repetition rate on the ring diameter are analyzed. The influence of ablated materials and the background gas on ring size is also elaborated in this article. The motion of plume species under the influence of ponderomotive force on free electrons possibly played a key role in the formation of the ring-patterned nanoclusters. This study could help to understand the fundamentals in laser ablative nanosynthesis as well as to produce nanostructures with organized ring diameter that controls the density and porosity of those 3D nanostructures.

  15. The streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1 is a significant determinant for biofilm formation by group a Streptococcus

    Oliver-Kozup Heaven A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human-specific pathogen responsible for a number of diseases characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations. During host colonization GAS-cell aggregates or microcolonies are observed in tissues. GAS biofilm, which is an in vitro equivalent of tissue microcolony, has only recently been studied and little is known about the specific surface determinants that aid biofilm formation. In this study, we demonstrate that surface-associated streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1 plays an important role in GAS biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation by M1-, M3-, M28-, and M41-type GAS strains, representing an intraspecies breadth, were analyzed spectrophotometrically following crystal violet staining, and characterized using confocal and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The M41-type strain formed the most robust biofilm under static conditions, followed by M28- and M1-type strains, while the M3-type strains analyzed here did not form biofilm under the same experimental conditions. Differences in architecture and cell-surface morphology were observed in biofilms formed by the M1- and M41-wild-type strains, accompanied by varying amounts of deposited extracellular matrix and differences in cell-to-cell junctions within each biofilm. Importantly, all Scl1-negative mutants examined showed significantly decreased ability to form biofilm in vitro. Furthermore, the Scl1 protein expressed on the surface of a heterologous host, Lactococcus lactis, was sufficient to induce biofilm formation by this organism. Conclusions Overall, this work (i identifies variations in biofilm formation capacity among pathogenically different GAS strains, (ii identifies GAS surface properties that may aid in biofilm stability and, (iii establishes that the Scl1 surface protein is an important determinant of GAS biofilm, which is sufficient to enable biofilm formation in the heterologous host

  16. Advanced multivariate data analysis to determine the root cause of trisulfide bond formation in a novel antibody–peptide fusion

    Goldrick, Stephen; Holmes, William; Bond, Nicholas J.; Lewis, Gareth; Kuiper, Marcel; Turner, Richard

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Product quality heterogeneities, such as a trisulfide bond (TSB) formation, can be influenced by multiple interacting process parameters. Identifying their root cause is a major challenge in biopharmaceutical production. To address this issue, this paper describes the novel application of advanced multivariate data analysis (MVDA) techniques to identify the process parameters influencing TSB formation in a novel recombinant antibody–peptide fusion expressed in mammalian cell culture. The screening dataset was generated with a high‐throughput (HT) micro‐bioreactor system (AmbrTM 15) using a design of experiments (DoE) approach. The complex dataset was firstly analyzed through the development of a multiple linear regression model focusing solely on the DoE inputs and identified the temperature, pH and initial nutrient feed day as important process parameters influencing this quality attribute. To further scrutinize the dataset, a partial least squares model was subsequently built incorporating both on‐line and off‐line process parameters and enabled accurate predictions of the TSB concentration at harvest. Process parameters identified by the models to promote and suppress TSB formation were implemented on five 7 L bioreactors and the resultant TSB concentrations were comparable to the model predictions. This study demonstrates the ability of MVDA to enable predictions of the key performance drivers influencing TSB formation that are valid also upon scale‐up. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2222–2234. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28500668

  17. Inoculation density and nutrient level determine the formation of mushroom-shaped structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Ghanbari, Azadeh; Dehghany, Jaber; Schwebs, Timo; Müsken, Mathias; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa often colonises immunocompromised patients and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. It exhibits resistance to many antibiotics by forming biofilms, which makes it hard to eliminate. P. aeruginosa biofilms form mushroom-shaped structures under certain circumstances. Bacterial motility and the environment affect the eventual mushroom morphology. This study provides an agent-based model for the bacterial dynamics and interactions influencing bacterial biofilm shape. Cell motility in the model relies on recently published experimental data. Our simulations show colony formation by immotile cells. Motile cells escape from a single colony by nutrient chemotaxis and hence no mushroom shape develops. A high number density of non-motile colonies leads to migration of motile cells onto the top of the colonies and formation of mushroom-shaped structures. This model proposes that the formation of mushroom-shaped structures can be predicted by parameters at the time of bacteria inoculation. Depending on nutrient levels and the initial number density of stalks, mushroom-shaped structures only form in a restricted regime. This opens the possibility of early manipulation of spatial pattern formation in bacterial colonies, using environmental factors.

  18. Inoculation density and nutrient level determine the formation of mushroom-shaped structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Ghanbari, Azadeh; Dehghany, Jaber; Schwebs, Timo; Müsken, Mathias; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-09-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa often colonises immunocompromised patients and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. It exhibits resistance to many antibiotics by forming biofilms, which makes it hard to eliminate. P. aeruginosa biofilms form mushroom-shaped structures under certain circumstances. Bacterial motility and the environment affect the eventual mushroom morphology. This study provides an agent-based model for the bacterial dynamics and interactions influencing bacterial biofilm shape. Cell motility in the model relies on recently published experimental data. Our simulations show colony formation by immotile cells. Motile cells escape from a single colony by nutrient chemotaxis and hence no mushroom shape develops. A high number density of non-motile colonies leads to migration of motile cells onto the top of the colonies and formation of mushroom-shaped structures. This model proposes that the formation of mushroom-shaped structures can be predicted by parameters at the time of bacteria inoculation. Depending on nutrient levels and the initial number density of stalks, mushroom-shaped structures only form in a restricted regime. This opens the possibility of early manipulation of spatial pattern formation in bacterial colonies, using environmental factors.

  19. Biofilm formation is determinant in tomato rhizosphere colonization by Bacillus velezensis FZB42.

    Al-Ali, Ameen; Deravel, Jovana; Krier, François; Béchet, Max; Ongena, Marc; Jacques, Philippe

    2017-10-23

    In this work, the behavior in tomato rhizosphere of Bacillus velezensis FZB42 was analyzed taking into account the surfactin production, the use of tomato roots exudate as substrates, and the biofilm formation. B. velezensis FZB42 and B. amyloliquefaciens S499 have a similar capability to colonize tomato rhizosphere. Little difference in this colonization was observed with surfactin non producing B. velezensis FZB42 mutant strains. B. velezensis is able to grow in the presence of root exudate and used preferentially sucrose, maltose, glutamic, and malic acids as carbon sources. A mutant enable to produce exopolysaccharide (EPS - ) was constructed to demonstrate the main importance of biofilm formation on rhizosphere colonization. This mutant had completely lost its ability to form biofilm whatever the substrate present in the culture medium and was unable to efficiently colonize tomato rhizosphere.

  20. Quantitative Experimental Determination of Primer-Dimer Formation Risk by Free-Solution Conjugate Electrophoresis

    Desmarais, Samantha M.; Leitner, Thomas; Barron, Annelise E.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcodes are short, unique ssDNA primers that “mark” individual biomolecules. To gain better understanding of biophysical parameters constraining primer-dimer formation between primers that incorporate barcode sequences, we have developed a capillary electrophoresis method that utilizes drag-tag-DNA conjugates to quantify dimerization risk between primer-barcode pairs. Results obtained with this unique free-solution conjugate electrophoresis (FSCE) approach are useful as quantitatively precise input data to parameterize computation models of dimerization risk. A set of fluorescently labeled, model primer-barcode conjugates were designed with complementary regions of differing lengths to quantify heterodimerization as a function of temperature. Primer-dimer cases comprised two 30-mer primers, one of which was covalently conjugated to a lab-made, chemically synthesized poly-N-methoxyethylglycine drag-tag, which reduced electrophoretic mobility of ssDNA to distinguish it from ds primer-dimers. The drag-tags also provided a shift in mobility for the dsDNA species, which allowed us to quantitate primer-dimer formation. In the experimental studies, pairs of oligonucleotide primer-barcodes with fully or partially complementary sequences were annealed, and then separated by free-solution conjugate CE at different temperatures, to assess effects on primer-dimer formation. When less than 30 out of 30 basepairs were bonded, dimerization was inversely correlated to temperature. Dimerization occurred when more than 15 consecutive basepairs formed, yet non-consecutive basepairs did not create stable dimers even when 20 out of 30 possible basepairs bonded. The use of free-solution electrophoresis in combination with a peptoid drag-tag and different fluorophores enabled precise separation of short DNA fragments to establish a new mobility shift assay for detection of primer-dimer formation. PMID:22331820

  1. Comparison of signaling interactions determining annual and perennial plant growth in response to low temperature

    Astrid eWingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature inhibits plant growth despite the fact that considerable rates of photosynthetic activity can be maintained. Instead of lower rates of photosynthesis, active inhibition of cell division and expansion is primarily responsible for reduced growth. This results in sink limitation and enables plants to accumulate carbohydrates that act as compatible solutes or are stored throughout the winter to enable re-growth in spring. Regulation of growth in response to temperature therefore requires coordination with carbon metabolism, e.g. via the signaling metabolite trehalose-6-phosphate. The phytohormones gibberellins (GA and jasmonate (JA play an important role in regulating growth in response to temperature. Growth restriction at low temperature is mainly mediated by DELLA proteins, whose degradation is promoted by GA. For annual plants, it has been shown that the GA/DELLA pathway interacts with JA signaling and C-repeat binding factor (CBF dependent cold acclimation, but these interactions have not been explored in detail for perennials. Growth regulation in response to seasonal factors is, however, particularly important in perennials, especially at high latitudes. In autumn, growth cessation in trees is caused by shortening of the daylength in interaction with phytohormone signaling. In perennial grasses seasonal differences in the sensitivity to GA may enable enhanced growth in spring. This review provides an overview of the signaling interactions that determine plant growth at low temperature and highlights gaps in our knowledge, especially concerning the seasonality of signaling responses in perennial plants.

  2. Temperature, precipitation and biotic interactions as determinants of tree seedling recruitment across the tree line ecotone.

    Tingstad, Lise; Olsen, Siri Lie; Klanderud, Kari; Vandvik, Vigdis; Ohlson, Mikael

    2015-10-01

    Seedling recruitment is a critical life history stage for trees, and successful recruitment is tightly linked to both abiotic factors and biotic interactions. In order to better understand how tree species' distributions may change in response to anticipated climate change, more knowledge of the effects of complex climate and biotic interactions is needed. We conducted a seed-sowing experiment to investigate how temperature, precipitation and biotic interactions impact recruitment of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings in southern Norway. Seeds were sown into intact vegetation and experimentally created gaps. To study the combined effects of temperature and precipitation, the experiment was replicated across 12 sites, spanning a natural climate gradient from boreal to alpine and from sub-continental to oceanic. Seedling emergence and survival were assessed 12 and 16 months after sowing, respectively, and above-ground biomass and height were determined at the end of the experiment. Interestingly, very few seedlings were detected in the boreal sites, and the highest number of seedlings emerged and established in the alpine sites, indicating that low temperature did not limit seedling recruitment. Site precipitation had an overall positive effect on seedling recruitment, especially at intermediate precipitation levels. Seedling emergence, establishment and biomass were higher in gap plots compared to intact vegetation at all temperature levels. These results suggest that biotic interactions in the form of competition may be more important than temperature as a limiting factor for tree seedling recruitment in the sub- and low-alpine zone of southern Norway.

  3. Pollutant threshold concentration determination in marine ecosystems using an ecological interaction endpoint

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Guo, Wenting; Yu, Hua; Xing, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    The threshold concentrations of pollutants are determined by extrapolating single-species effect data to community-level effects. This assumes the most sensitive endpoint of the life cycle of individuals and the species sensitivity distribution from single-species toxic effect tests, thus, ignoring the ecological interactions. The uncertainties due to this extrapolation can be partially overcome using the equilibrium point of a customized ecosystem. This method incorporates ecological interactions and integrates the effects on growth, survival, and ingestion into a single effect measure, the equilibrium point excursion in the customized ecosystem, in order to describe the toxic effects on plankton. A case study showed that the threshold concentration of copper calculated with the endpoint of the equilibrium point was 10 μg L −1 , which is significantly different from the threshold calculated with a single-species endpoint. The endpoint calculated using this method provides a more relevant measure of the ecological impact than any single individual-level endpoint. - Highlights: • Ecotoxicological effect of exposure to copper was tested on a customized ecosystem. • Equilibrium point of biomasses in the customized ecosystem was used as an endpoint. • Exposure–response relationship in a community level was built on equilibrium point. • A threshold concentration incorporating ecological interactions was derived. - The equilibrium biomass incorporating ecological interactions in a customized ecosystem was used as an endpoint to calculate the threshold concentration at a community level

  4. Protein-protein interaction site predictions with minimum covariance determinant and Mahalanobis distance.

    Qiu, Zhijun; Zhou, Bo; Yuan, Jiangfeng

    2017-11-21

    Protein-protein interaction site (PPIS) prediction must deal with the diversity of interaction sites that limits their prediction accuracy. Use of proteins with unknown or unidentified interactions can also lead to missing interfaces. Such data errors are often brought into the training dataset. In response to these two problems, we used the minimum covariance determinant (MCD) method to refine the training data to build a predictor with better performance, utilizing its ability of removing outliers. In order to predict test data in practice, a method based on Mahalanobis distance was devised to select proper test data as input for the predictor. With leave-one-validation and independent test, after the Mahalanobis distance screening, our method achieved higher performance according to Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC), although only a part of test data could be predicted. These results indicate that data refinement is an efficient approach to improve protein-protein interaction site prediction. By further optimizing our method, it is hopeful to develop predictors of better performance and wide range of application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE MIDDLE CLASS IN THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA: DETERMINANT FACTORS OF FORMATION

    Ludmila MALCOCI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The research of the middle class formation process in the Republic of Moldova is of majorimportance, as it allows to identify its main elements and the possibilities of formation under the currentconditions. The article presents the results of the sociological study on the premises of the middle classformation in the Republic of Moldova, carried out during June-September 2016. The results from thisstudy show that the society is distributed in 6 social strata that vary by socio-professional status, level ofeducation and level of wellbeing. The status inconsistency and low level of status crystallisation arecharacteristics for all strata within the conditions of dysfunctionality of logical chain: education-socialoccupational status-welfare. As per the research, the process of classes’ formation is just at the initialstage in the Republic of Moldova. The analysis of the social strata in terms of middle class criteria: highsocio professional status, high education level, high level of welfare, shows some prospects of formationof the middle class in the upper strata within the following conditions: development of wage policies;reforming tax policies by promoting the progressive taxation of income; ensuring equitable distribution ofwages according to work; elimination of corruption in power structures; improving legislation; ensuringaccess of the population to decision – making process; creating favourable conditions for development ofsmall and medium business; development of a transparent environment for the market economy; guarantyof fair conditions to population to ensure access to education and health services.

  6. Experimental determination of methane hydrate formation in the presence of ammonia

    Dong, T.B.; Wang, L.Y.; Liu, A.X.; Guo, X.Q.; Chen, G.J.; Ma, Q.L.; Li, G.W. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijng (China). State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric inclusion compounds that are created by a lattice of water molecules. The host molecule has a strong hydrogen bond and encages low molecular weight gases or volatile liquids. The guest molecules favor hydrate formation. Historically, gas hydrates have been thought to be problematic during natural gas transportation because the formed solid hydrate can block pipelines and cause tubing and casing collapse. However, the discovery of huge deposits of gas hydrates in deep-sea sediments and in permafrost has renewed interest in gas hydrates as a new energy resource. This paper discussed a study that is a part of an ongoing experimental and computational program dealing with the thermodynamics of gas hydrate formation in ammonia-water systems. The purpose of the study was to develop a new method to separate and recycle the vent gas of ammonia synthesis by forming or dissociating hydrate. The hydrate-forming conditions of methane in ammonia and water system were studied and reported in this paper with reference to the experimental apparatus and procedure. The materials and preparation of samples were also explained. The experimental results showed that the ammonia had an inhibitive effect on the hydrate formation. 26 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Using Stable Isotope Geochemistry to Determine Changing Paleohydrology and Diagenetic Alteration in the Late Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, UT USA

    Yamamura, Daigo

    The Western Interior Basin of the North America preserves one of the best sedimentary and paleontological records of the Cretaceous in the world. The Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation is a rapidly deposited fluvial sequence and preserves one of the most complete terrestrial fossil record of the North America. Such a unique deposit provides an opportunity to investigate the interaction between the physical environment and ecology. In an effort to decipher such interaction, stable isotope composition of cements in sedimentary rocks, concretions and vertebrate fossils were analyzed. Despite the difference in facies and sedimentary architecture, the isotope composition does not change significantly at 110 m from the base of the formation. Among the well-preserved cement samples, stable isotope composition indicates a significant hydrologic change within the informal Middle unit; a 6.37‰ depletion in delta13C and 3.30‰ enrichment in delta 18O occurs at 300 m above the base of the formation. The isotope values indicate that the sandstone cements below 300 m were precipitated in a mixing zone between marine and terrestrial groundwater, whereas the cements in upper units were precipitated in a terrestrial groundwater. Despite the difference in physical appearance (i.e. color and shape), the isotopic compositions of cements in concretions are similar to well-cemented sandstone bodies in similar stratigraphic positions. Isotope compositions of the host rock are similar to that of mudrock and weathered sandstone, suggesting the origin of cementing fluids for the sandstone and concretions were the same indicating that: 1) the concretions were formed in shallow groundwater and not related to the groundwater migration, or 2) all cements in upper Kaiparowits Formation are precipitated or altered during later stage groundwater migration. Average delta18Oc from each taxon show the same trend as the delta18Op stratigraphic change, suggesting delta18Oc is still useful as a

  8. Land-use change interacts with climate to determine elevational species redistribution.

    Guo, Fengyi; Lenoir, Jonathan; Bonebrake, Timothy C

    2018-04-03

    Climate change is driving global species redistribution with profound social and economic impacts. However, species movement is largely constrained by habitat availability and connectivity, of which the interaction effects with climate change remain largely unknown. Here we examine published data on 2798 elevational range shifts from 43 study sites to assess the confounding effect of land-use change on climate-driven species redistribution. We show that baseline forest cover and recent forest cover change are critical predictors in determining the magnitude of elevational range shifts. Forest loss positively interacts with baseline temperature conditions, such that forest loss in warmer regions tends to accelerate species' upslope movement. Consequently, not only climate but also habitat loss stressors and, importantly, their synergistic effects matter in forecasting species elevational redistribution, especially in the tropics where both stressors will increase the risk of net lowland biotic attrition.

  9. A new neutron interferometry approach in the determination of the neutron-electron interaction amplitude

    Ioffe, A

    2002-01-01

    A new experimental approach in the determination of the neutron-electron interaction amplitude is proposed. The main idea of this approach is to use a perfect-crystal neutron interferometer as both a sample and a device for the measurement of the extra phase shift caused by the neutron interaction with atoms of Si. Indeed, such a sample (an interferometer blade) has a well-known atomic density and is a priori perfectly aligned with respect to the crystal lattice of the interferometer crystal. This results in the minimization of systematic errors caused by sample alignment and increases the overall experimental accuracy. Some theoretic estimations and details of an experimental setup are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Determination of heat transfer coefficient for an interaction of sub-cooled gas and metal

    Sidek, Mohd Zaidi; Kamarudin, Muhammad Syahidan

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for a hot metal surface and their surrounding is one of the need be defined parameter in hot forming process. This study has been conducted to determine the HTC for an interaction between sub-cooled gas sprayed on a hot metal surface. Both experiments and finite element have been adopted in this work. Initially, the designated experiment was conducted to obtain temperature history of spray cooling process. Then, an inverse method was adopted to calculate the HTC value before we validate in a finite element simulation model. The result shows that the heat transfer coefficient for interaction of subcooled gas and hot metal surface is 1000 W/m 2 K. (paper)

  11. The cianimetalatos as model materials for studying the adsorption of H2 and interactions that determine

    Reguera, E.; Reguera, L.; Rodríguez, C.

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the work done in recent years in the IMRE and the Faculties of Chemistry and Physics at the University of Havana, in collaboration with the Applied Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology at the National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico is presented; on the synthesis, physico-chemical characterization, assessment and modeling of potentially usable as nanoporous materials cianometalatos model to study the adsorption of H2 at high densities, and interactions that determine it. The mechanisms of interaction of the hydrogen molecule with the crystal lattice and its consequences for the adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in these materials are discussed. The results have been reported in dozens of articles, published in international journals, they were presented at numerous scientific events and contributed to the preparation of several thesis, master's and Ph.D. (full text)

  12. Interactive effects of MnO2, organic matter and pH on abiotic formation of N2O from hydroxylamine in artificial soil mixtures

    Liu, Shurong; Berns, Anne E.; Vereecken, Harry; Wu, Di; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Abiotic conversion of the reactive nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitrous oxide (N2O) is a possible mechanism of N2O formation during nitrification. Previous research has demonstrated that manganese dioxide (MnO2) and organic matter (OM) content of soil as well as soil pH are important control variables of N2O formation in the soil. But until now, their combined effect on abiotic N2O formation from NH2OH has not been quantified. Here, we present results from a full-factorial experiment with artificial soil mixtures at five different levels of pH, MnO2 and OM, respectively, and quantified the interactive effects of the three variables on the NH2OH-to-N2O conversion ratio (RNH2OH-to-N2O). Furthermore, the effect of OM quality on RNH2OH-to-N2O was determined by the addition of four different organic materials with different C/N ratios to the artificial soil mixtures. The experiments revealed a strong interactive effect of soil pH, MnO2 and OM on RNH2OH-to-N2O. In general, increasing MnO2 and decreasing pH increased RNH2OH-to-N2O, while increasing OM content was associated with a decrease in RNH2OH-to-N2O. Organic matter quality also affected RNH2OH-to-N2O. However, this effect was not a function of C/N ratio, but was rather related to differences in the dominating functional groups between the different organic materials.

  13. The formation and interactions of cold and ultracold molecules: new challenges for interdisciplinary physics

    Dulieu, O [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Bat. 505, Univ Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gabbanini, C [Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici del C.N.R., Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: olivier.dulieu@lac.u-psud.fr, E-mail: carlo@ipcf.cnr.it

    2009-08-15

    Progress on research in the field of molecules at cold and ultracold temperatures is reported in this review. It covers extensively the experimental methods to produce, detect and characterize cold and ultracold molecules including association of ultracold atoms, deceleration by external fields and kinematic cooling. Confinement of molecules in different kinds of traps is also discussed. The basic theoretical issues related to the knowledge of the molecular structure, the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule mutual interactions, and to their possible manipulation and control with external fields, are reviewed. A short discussion on the broad area of applications completes the review.

  14. New insights on the spectrophotometric determination of melatonin pKa values and melatonin-βCD inclusion complex formation constant

    Zafra-Roldán, A.; Corona-Avendaño, S.; Montes-Sánchez, R.; Palomar-Pardavé, M.; Romero-Romo, M.; Ramírez-Silva, M. T.

    2018-02-01

    Using UV-Vis spectrophotometry a stability study of melatonin at different pH values was done in aqueous media, finding that at acidic pH melatonin is unstable when interacting with the environment, however it becomes stable protecting it from light and oxygen. From the UV-Vis spectra and SQUAD software, melatonin pKa values, in a completely protected aqueous medium, were estimated as 5.777 ± 0.011 and 10.201 ± 0.024. Using the same techniques, the melatonin and β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex formation constants were assessed at pH 3, 7 and 11.5, giving the values of log β = (3.07 ± 0.06), (2.94 ± 0.01) and (3.07 ± 0.06) M- 1, respectively. From the global acidity formation constants and the complexes' formation constants, the molar fractions were determined for each species of MT and MT - βCD, to build the molar fraction-[βCD]-pH 3D diagram and the molar fraction-pH 2D diagrams, where it was possible to observe the predominance of the MT species with and without βCD. A voltammetric study at pH 3, allowed obtaining a value of log β = (3.15 ± 0.01) M- 1, which corroborates that obtained through UV-Vis spectrophotometry, supporting strongly the rationale behind using simple, straightforward techniques.

  15. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    Chen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Root architecture is continuously shaped in a manner that helps plants to better adapt to the environment. Gene regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels largely controls this environmental response. Recently, RNA silencing has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling regulator and an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor, mediates auxin response during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. We proposed that FRY1 regulates lateral root development through its activity on adenosine 3,5-bisphosphate (PAP), a strong inhibitor of exoribonucleases (XRNs). Interestingly, some of the phenotypes of fry1, such as enhanced response to light in repressing hypocotyl elongation and hypersensitivity to ABA in lateral root growth, are opposite to those of another light- and ABA-signaling mutant, hy5. Here we analyzed the hy5 fry1 double mutant for root and hypocotyl growth. We found that the hy5 mutation can suppress the enhanced light sensitivity in fry1 hypocotyl elongation and restore the lateral root formation. The genetic interaction between HY5 and FRY1 indicates that HY5 and FRY1 may act in overlapping pathways that mediate light signaling and lateral root development. © 2011 Landes Bioscience.

  16. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health.

  17. Increased drop formation frequency via reduction of surfactant interactions in flow-focusing microfluidic devices.

    Josephides, Dimitris N; Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-01-27

    Glass capillary based microfluidic devices are able to create extremely uniform droplets, when formed under the dripping regime, at low setup costs due to their ease of manufacture. However, as they are rarely parallelized, simple methods to increase droplet production from a single device are sought. Surfactants used to stabilize drops in such systems often limit the maximum flow rate that highly uniform drops can be produced due to the lowering interfacial tension causing jetting. In this paper we show that by simple design changes we can limit the interactions of surfactants and maximize uniform droplet production. Three flow-focused configurations are explored: a standard glass capillary device (consisting of a single round capillary inserted into a square capillary), a nozzle fed device, and a surfactant shielding device (both consisting of two round capillaries inserted into either end of a square capillary). In principle, the maximum productivity of uniform droplets is achieved if surfactants are not present. It was found that surfactants in the standard device greatly inhibit droplet production by means of interfacial tension lowering and tip-streaming phenomena. In the nozzle fed configuration, surfactant interactions were greatly limited, yielding flow rates comparable to, but lower than, a surfactant-free system. In the surfactant shielding configuration, flow rates were equal to that of a surfactant-free system and could make uniform droplets at rates an order of magnitude above the standard surfactant system.

  18. Using Magnetic Helicity Diagnostics to Determine the Nature of Solar Active-Region Formation

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    Employing a novel nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method that self-consistently infers instantaneous free magnetic-energy and relative magnetic-helicity budgets from single photospheric vector magnetograms, we recently constructed the magnetic energy-helicity (EH) diagram of solar active regions. The EH diagram implies dominant relative helicities of left-handed or right-handed chiralities for the great majority of active regions. The amplitude (budget) of these helicities scales monotonically with the free magnetic energy. This constructive, strongly preferential accumulation of a certain sense of magnetic helicity seems to disqualify recently proposed mechanisms relying on a largely random near-surface convection for the formation of the great majority of active regions. The existing qualitative formation mechanism for these regions remains the conventional Omega-loop emergence following a buoyant ascension from the bottom of the convection zone. However, exceptions to this rule include even eruptive active regions: NOAA AR 11283 is an obvious outlier to the EH diagram, involving significant free magnetic energy with a small relative magnetic helicity. Relying on a timeseries of vector magnetograms of this region, our methodology shows nearly canceling amounts of both senses of helicity and an overall course from a weakly left-handed to a weakly right-handed structure, in the course of which a major eruption occurs. For this and similarly behaving active regions the latest near-surface formation scenario might conceivably be employed successfully. Research partially supported by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No. PIRG07-GA-2010-268245 and by the European Union Social Fund (ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  19. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  20. Determination of virulence factors and biofilm formation among isolates of vulvovaginal candidiasis

    Tapan Majumdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Under morphogenesis-inducing conditions, Candida spp. begins to undergo yeast-to-hypha switch. This shift from commensal to pathogenic state is dependent on several virulence factors. Aim: To find out whether the isolated Candida spp. were pathogens causing vulvovaginal candidiasis or mere bystanders. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study conducted on 275 symptomatic hospital patients in Tripura between August 2012 and April 2015. Subjects and Methods: Discharge was collected from patients and identified by Grams staining and wet mount test. Culturing was done in Sabouraud dextrose agar followed by speciation. To test for virulence factors, assays for adherence, plasma coagulase, phospholipase, lipase, protease, hemolysin, and biofilm formation were carried out. Statistical Analysis Used: Significance between two groups was compared using one-way analysis of variance along with Tukey test, and Chi-square 2 × 2 contingency table at 95% confidence interval. Results: Fifty-six Candida spp. could be isolated in the study which was used for further virulence tests. One hundred percent of isolates expressed adherence. Among other virulence factors, maximum virulence 25 (45% was shown through protease production. Hemolysin production and biofilm formation were the second most 22 (39% expressed virulence factors. In a comparison of virulence factors between biofilm-forming isolates and planktonic cells, significant difference was seen for plasma coagulase and hemolysin production. Conclusions: All the isolates expressed one or more virulence factors. Adherence was expressed in all isolates but highest number was observed for Candida albicans. Furthermore, C. albicans strain number was highest for protease, hemolysin and coagulase expression and biofilm formation. Candida krusei isolates were the least in number for expressing any of the virulence factors. Significantly higher number of biofilm forming isolates produced

  1. Determination of standard molar Gibbs energy of formation of Sm6UO12(s)

    Sahu, Manjulata; Dash, Smruti

    2015-01-01

    The standard molar Gibbs energies of formation of Sm 6 UO 12 (s) have been measured using an oxygen concentration cell with yttria stabilized zirconia as solid electrolyte. Δ f G o m (T) for Sm 6 UO 12 (s) has been calculated using the measured and required thermodynamic data from the literature. The calculated Gibbs energy expression in the temperature range 899 to 1127 K can be given as: Δ f G o m (Nd 6 UO 12 , s,T)/(±2.3) kJ∙ mol -1 = -6681 +1.099 (T/K) (899-1127 K)(T/K). (author)

  2. Determination of dextrose in peritoneal dialysis solution by localized surface plasmon resonance technique based on silver nanoparticles formation

    Masrournia, Mahboube; Montazarolmahdi, Maliheh; Sani, Faramarz Aliasghari

    2017-07-01

    Determination of dextrose in peritoneal dialysis with a method based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) formation was investigated. In a green chemistry method, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized in the natural polymeric matrix of gelatin. The nanoparticles were characterized with UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Absorbance signal of AgNPs could be applied to determine the various concentrations of dextrose solutions. Drop wise and ultrasonic methods were used and compared with each other. The dynamic range of methods with limit of detection and relative standard deviations were obtained. Results for real sample (peritoneal dialysis) were satisfied.

  3. Position-Sensitive Detector with Depth-of-Interaction Determination for Small Animal PET

    Fedorov, A; Kholmetsky, A L; Korzhik, M V; Lecoq, P; Lobko, A S; Missevitch, O V; Tkatchev, A

    2002-01-01

    Crystal arrays made of LSO and LuAP crystals 2x2x10 mm pixels were manufactured for evaluation of detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination capability intended for small animal positron emission tomograph. Position-sensitive LSO/LuAP phoswich DOI detector based on crystal 8x8 arrays and HAMAMATSU R5900-00-M64 position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier tube was developed and evaluated. Time resolution was found to be not worse than 1.0 ns FWHM for both layers, and spatial resolution mean value was 1.5 mm FWHM for the center of field-of-view.

  4. Price determinants of the European carbon market and interactions with energy markets

    Schumacher, Katja; Cludius, Johanna; Matthes, Felix [Oeko Institut e.V., Berlin (Germany); Diekmann, Jochen; Zaklan, Aleksandar [Deutsches Institut fuer Wirtschaftsforschung, Berlin (Germany); Schleich, Joachim [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    This report explores the determinants of short run price movements in the carbon market and their interaction with energy markets, in particular with the electricity market. Focusing on Phase 2 of the EU ETS we conduct econometric time series analysis based on continental EU and UK market data. Our findings suggest that market fundamentals have a dominant effect on the EUA price, but that non-fundamental factors may also play a role. We further found that the electricity price has a significant positive impact on the carbon price in the short run.

  5. Interactive optical trapping shows that confinement is a determinant of growth in a mixed yeast culture

    Arneborg, N.; Siegumfeldt, H.; Andersen, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    Applying a newly developed user-interactive optical trapping system, we controllably surrounded individual cells of one yeast species, Hanseniaspora uvarum, with viable cells of another yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thus creating a confinement of the former. Growth of surrounded and non......-surrounded H. uvarum cells was followed under a microscope by determining their generation time. The average generation time of surrounded H. uvarum cells was 15% higher than that of non-surrounded cells thereby showing that the confinement imposed by viable S. cerevisiae cells on H. uvarum inhibits growth...

  6. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  7. The effect of pre-plasma formation under nonlocal transport conditions for ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Holec, M.; Nikl, J.; Vranic, M.; Weber, S.

    2018-04-01

    Interaction of high-power lasers with solid targets is in general strongly affected by the limited contrast available. The laser pre-pulse ionizes the target and produces a pre-plasma which can strongly modify the interaction of the main part of the laser pulse with the target. This is of particular importance for future experiments which will use laser intensities above 1021 W cm-2 and which are subject to the limited contrast. As a consequence the main part of the laser pulse will be modified while traversing the pre-plasma, interacting with it partially. A further complication arises from the fact that the interaction of a high-power pre-pulse with solid targets very often takes place under nonlocal transport conditions, i.e. the characteristic mean-free-path of the particles and photons is larger than the characteristic scale-lengths of density and temperature. The classical diffusion treatment of radiation and heat transport in the hydrodynamic model is then insufficient for the description of the pre-pulse physics. These phenomena also strongly modify the formation of the pre-plasma which in turn affects the propagation of the main laser pulse. In this paper nonlocal radiation-hydrodynamic simulations are carried out and serve as input for subsequent kinetic simulations of ultra-high intensity laser pulses interacting with the plasma in the ultra-relativistic regime. It is shown that the results of the kinetic simulations differ considerably whether a diffusive or nonlocal transport is used for the radiation-hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis.

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis.

  9. Interaction of single and multi-layer graphene oxide with fetal bovine serum: assessing the protein corona formation

    Franqui, Lidiane Silva; Farias, Marcelo Alexandre de; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Costa, Carlos Alberto; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Martinez, Diego Stefani Teodoro, E-mail: lidiane.franqui@pos.ft.unicamp.br [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Coluci, Vitor Rafael [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: When in contact with biological systems, nanomaterials surface adsorbs biomolecules present in the biological medium, mainly proteins, yielding a molecular coating 'protein corona' which affects the biological response and toxicity of the nanomaterials. Several factors can influence the protein corona formation, such as nanomaterial physicochemical properties and the nature of biological medium. In this work, we have performed a comparative study between the single and multi-layer graphene oxide nanomaterials (SL-GO and ML-GO, respectively) after their interaction with DMEM cell culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS). Bare GOs and FBS protein corona-coated GOs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The protein corona composition was characterized by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results showed that, after interaction with FBS, GO particle size increased due to the protein corona formation. Besides, the presence of proteins also has significantly increased the dispersion stability of SLGO and ML-GO over time. Whereas the main proteins have been identified in both SL-GO and ML-GO, SL-GO has adsorbed larger amounts of proteins than ML-GO. Finally, the number of GO layers influences its interactions with FBS proteins and dispersion stability in DMEM medium. These results point out implications for in vitro cytotoxicity assessment and biomedical applications of these promising carbon nanomaterials. (author)

  10. Interaction of single and multi-layer graphene oxide with fetal bovine serum: assessing the protein corona formation

    Franqui, Lidiane Silva; Farias, Marcelo Alexandre de; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Costa, Carlos Alberto; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Martinez, Diego Stefani Teodoro; Coluci, Vitor Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Full text: When in contact with biological systems, nanomaterials surface adsorbs biomolecules present in the biological medium, mainly proteins, yielding a molecular coating 'protein corona' which affects the biological response and toxicity of the nanomaterials. Several factors can influence the protein corona formation, such as nanomaterial physicochemical properties and the nature of biological medium. In this work, we have performed a comparative study between the single and multi-layer graphene oxide nanomaterials (SL-GO and ML-GO, respectively) after their interaction with DMEM cell culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS). Bare GOs and FBS protein corona-coated GOs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The protein corona composition was characterized by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results showed that, after interaction with FBS, GO particle size increased due to the protein corona formation. Besides, the presence of proteins also has significantly increased the dispersion stability of SLGO and ML-GO over time. Whereas the main proteins have been identified in both SL-GO and ML-GO, SL-GO has adsorbed larger amounts of proteins than ML-GO. Finally, the number of GO layers influences its interactions with FBS proteins and dispersion stability in DMEM medium. These results point out implications for in vitro cytotoxicity assessment and biomedical applications of these promising carbon nanomaterials. (author)

  11. Mosquito Rasputin interacts with chikungunya virus nsP3 and determines the infection rate in Aedes albopictus.

    Fros, Jelke J; Geertsema, Corinne; Zouache, Karima; Baggen, Jim; Domeradzka, Natalia; van Leeuwen, Daniël M; Flipse, Jacky; Vlak, Just M; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2015-09-17

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus (family Togaviridae), transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes. CHIKV re-emerged in 2004 with multiple outbreaks worldwide and recently reached the Americas where it has infected over a million individuals in a rapidly expanding epidemic. While alphavirus replication is well understood in general, the specific function (s) of non-structural protein nsP3 remain elusive. CHIKV nsP3 modulates the mammalian stress response by preventing stress granule formation through sequestration of G3BP. In mosquitoes, nsP3 is a determinant of vector specificity, but its functional interaction with mosquito proteins is unclear. In this research we studied the domains required for localization of CHIKV nsP3 in insect cells and demonstrated its molecular interaction with Rasputin (Rin), the mosquito homologue of G3BP. The biological involvement of Rin in CHIKV infection was investigated in live Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. In insect cells, nsP3 localized as cytoplasmic granules, which was dependent on the central domain and the C-terminal variable region but independent of the N-terminal macrodomain. Ae. albopictus Rin displayed a diffuse, cytoplasmic localization, but was effectively sequestered into nsP3-granules upon nsP3 co-expression. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the Rin-nsP3 interaction involved the NTF2-like domain of Rin and two conserved TFGD repeats in the C-terminal variable domain of nsP3. Although in vitro silencing of Rin did not impact nsP3 localization or CHIKV replication in cell culture, Rin depletion in vivo significantly decreased the CHIKV infection rate and transmissibility in Ae.albopictus. We identified the nsP3 hypervariable C-terminal domain as a critical factor for granular localization and sequestration of mosquito Rin. Our study offers novel insight into a conserved virus-mosquito interaction at the molecular level, and reveals a strong proviral role for G3BP homologue Rin in live mosquitoes

  12. Interactions between nested sunspots. 1: The formation and breakup of a delta-type sunspot

    Gaizauskas, V.; Harvey, K. L.; Proulx, M.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate a nest of sunspots in which three ordinary bipolar pairs of sunspots are aligned collinearly. The usual spreading action of the growing regions brings two spots of leading polarity together (p-p collision) and forces the leading and trailing spots of the two interior regions to overlap inot a single penumbra (p-f collision), thus forming a delta-spot. We examine digitally processed images from the Ottawa River Solar Observatory of two related events inside the delta-spot 5 days after the p-f collision begins: the violent disruption of the f-umbra, and the formation in less than a day of an hydrogen-alpha filament. The evolutionary changes in shape, area, relative motions, and brightness that we measure for each spot in the elongated nest are more compatible with Parker's (1979a) hypothesis of a sunspot as a cluster of flux tubes held together by downdrafts than with the notion of a sunspot as a monolithic plug of magnetic flux. From chromospheric developments over the delta-spot, we show that a shearing motion along a polarity inversion is more effective than convergence for creating a chromospheric filament. We invoke the release of an instability, triggered by a sequence of processes lasting 1 day or more, to explain the disruption of the f-umbra in this delta-spot. We show that the sequence is initiated when the colliding p-f umbrae reach a critical separation around 3200 +/- 200 km. We present a descriptive model in which the reconnected magnetic fields block vertical transport of convective heat flux just beneath the photosphere. We observe the formation of an unusual type of penumbra adjacent to the f-polarity portion of this delta-spot just before its disruption. A tangential penumbral band grows out of disordered matter connected to the f-umbra. We present this as evidence for the extrusion of umbral magnetic flux by thermal plumes rising through a loosely bound umbra.

  13. Balance of Interactions Determines Optimal Survival in Multi-Species Communities.

    Anshul Choudhary

    Full Text Available We consider a multi-species community modelled as a complex network of populations, where the links are given by a random asymmetric connectivity matrix J, with fraction 1 - C of zero entries, where C reflects the over-all connectivity of the system. The non-zero elements of J are drawn from a Gaussian distribution with mean μ and standard deviation σ. The signs of the elements Jij reflect the nature of density-dependent interactions, such as predatory-prey, mutualism or competition, and their magnitudes reflect the strength of the interaction. In this study we try to uncover the broad features of the inter-species interactions that determine the global robustness of this network, as indicated by the average number of active nodes (i.e. non-extinct species in the network, and the total population, reflecting the biomass yield. We find that the network transitions from a completely extinct system to one where all nodes are active, as the mean interaction strength goes from negative to positive, with the transition getting sharper for increasing C and decreasing σ. We also find that the total population, displays distinct non-monotonic scaling behaviour with respect to the product μC, implying that survival is dependent not merely on the number of links, but rather on the combination of the sparseness of the connectivity matrix and the net interaction strength. Interestingly, in an intermediate window of positive μC, the total population is maximal, indicating that too little or too much positive interactions is detrimental to survival. Rather, the total population levels are optimal when the network has intermediate net positive connection strengths. At the local level we observe marked qualitative changes in dynamical patterns, ranging from anti-phase clusters of period 2 cycles and chaotic bands, to fixed points, under the variation of mean μ of the interaction strengths. We also study the correlation between synchronization and survival

  14. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    as well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth...... and aggregation was studied by amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show that the presence of bacteria was a prerequisite for aggregation of T. weissflogii but not of Navicula sp. Occurrences of distinct populations of free-living and attached...... bacteria depended on phytoplankton growth and aggregation dynamics. The community composition of especially attached bacteria significantly differed between the 2 algal cultures. Our study suggests that phytoplankton aggregation and vertical fluxes are closely linked to interactions between the marine...

  15. Determining the Frequency of Dry Lake Bed Formation in Semi-Arid Mongolia From Satellite Data

    Yuta Demura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Mongolian Plateau, the desert steppe, mountains, and dry lake bed surfaces may affect the process of dust storm emissions. Among these three surface types, dry lake beds are considered to contribute a substantial amount of global dust emissions and to be responsible for “hot spots” of dust outbreaks. The land cover types in the study area were broadly divided into three types, namely desert steppe, mountains, and dry lake beds, by a classification based on Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI calculated from MODIS Terra satellite images, and Digital Elevation Model (DEM. This dry lake beds extracting method using remote sensing offers a new technique for identifying dust hot spots and potential untapped groundwater in the dry lands of the Gobi region. In the study area, frequencies of dry lake bed formation were calculated during the period of 2001 to 2014. The potential dry lake area corresponded well with the length of the river network based on hydrogeological characterization (R2 = 0.77, p < 0.001. We suggest that the threshold between dry lake bed areas and the formation of ephemeral lakes in semi-arid regions is eight days of total precipitation.

  16. WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLE DARK MATTER AND FIRST STARS: SUPPRESSION OF FRAGMENTATION IN PRIMORDIAL STAR FORMATION

    Smith, Rowan J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Iocco, Fabio; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional simulations to include the effects of dark matter annihilation feedback during the collapse of primordial minihalos. We begin our simulations from cosmological initial conditions and account for dark matter annihilation in our treatment of the chemical and thermal evolution of the gas. The dark matter is modeled using an analytical density profile that responds to changes in the peak gas density. We find that the gas can collapse to high densities despite the additional energy input from the dark matter. No objects supported purely by dark matter annihilation heating are formed in our simulations. However, we find that dark matter annihilation heating has a large effect on the evolution of the gas following the formation of the first protostar. Previous simulations without dark matter annihilation found that protostellar disks around Population III stars rapidly fragmented, forming multiple protostars that underwent mergers or ejections. When dark matter annihilation is included, however, these disks become stable to radii of 1000 AU or more. In the cases where fragmentation does occur, it is a wide binary that is formed.

  17. Hydrogen determination using secondary processes of recoil proton interaction with sample material

    Muminov, V.A.; Khajdarov, R.A.; Navalikhin, L.V.; Pardaev, Eh.

    1980-01-01

    Possibilities of hydrogen content determination in different materials according to secondary processes of interaction of recoil protons(irradiation in the field of fast neutrons) with sample material resulting in the appearance of characteristic X-ray irradiation are studied. Excitated irradiation is recorded with a detector placed in the protective screen and located at a certain distance from the object analyzed and neutron source. The method is tested taking as an example analysis of bromine-containing samples (30% Br, 0.5% H) and tungsten dioxide. The determination limit of hydrogen content constitutes 0.05% at confidence coefficient of 0.9. Neutron flux constituted 10 3 neutrons/cm 2 xs, the time of measurement being 15-20 minutes, the distance from the sample to the detector being 12-15 cm [ru

  18. The genotype-environment interaction variance in rice-seed protein determination

    Ismachin, M.

    1976-01-01

    Many environmental factors influence the protein content of cereal seed. This fact procured difficulties in breeding for protein. Yield is another example on which so many environmental factors are of influence. The length of time required by the plant to reach maturity, is also affected by the environmental factors; even though its effect is not too decisive. In this investigation the genotypic variance and the genotype-environment interaction variance which contribute to the total variance or phenotypic variance was analysed, with purpose to give an idea to the breeder how selection should be made. It was found that genotype-environment interaction variance is larger than the genotypic variance in contribution to total variance of protein-seed determination or yield. In the analysis of the time required to reach maturity it was found that genotypic variance is larger than the genotype-environment interaction variance. It is therefore clear, why selection for time required to reach maturity is much easier than selection for protein or yield. Selected protein in one location may be different from that to other locations. (author)

  19. Efficient eigenvalue determination for arbitrary Pauli products based on generalized spin-spin interactions

    Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    Effective spin-spin interactions between ? qubits enable the determination of the eigenvalue of an arbitrary Pauli product of dimension N with a constant, small number of multi-qubit gates that is independent of N and encodes the eigenvalue in the measurement basis states of an extra ancilla qubit. Such interactions are available whenever qubits can be coupled to a shared harmonic oscillator, a situation that can be realized in many physical qubit implementations. For example, suitable interactions have already been realized for up to 14 qubits in ion traps. It should be possible to implement stabilizer codes for quantum error correction with a constant number of multi-qubit gates, in contrast to typical constructions with a number of two-qubit gates that increases as a function of N. The special case of finding the parity of N qubits only requires a small number of operations that is independent of N. This compares favorably to algorithms for computing the parity on conventional machines, which implies a genuine quantum advantage.

  20. Diet-gene interactions between dietary fat intake and common polymorphisms in determining lipid metabolism

    Corella, Dolores

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Current dietary guidelines for fat intake have not taken into consideration the possible genetic differences underlying the individual variability in responsiveness to dietary components. Genetic variability has been identified in humans for all the known lipid metabolim-related genes resulting in a plethora of candidate genes and genetic variants to examine in diet-gene interaction studies focused on fat consumption. Some examples of fat-gene interaction are reviewed. These include: the interaction between total intake and the 514C/T in the hepatic lipase gene promoter in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C metabolism; the interaction between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and the 75G/A polymorphism in the APOA1 gene plasma HDL-C concentrations; the interaction between PUFA and the L162V polymorphism in the PPARA gene in determining triglycerides and APOC3 concentrations; and the interaction between PUFA intake and the 1131TC in the APOA5 gene in determining triglyceride metabolism. Although hundreds of diet-gene interaction studies in lipid metabolism have been published, the level of evidence to make specific nutritional recommendations to the population is still low and more research in nutrigenetics has to be undertaken.Las recomendaciones dietéticas actuales referentes al consumo de grasas en la dieta han sido realizadas sin tener en cuenta las posibles diferencias genéticas de las personas que podrían ser las responsables de las diferentes respuestas interindividuales que frecuentemente se observan ante la misma dieta. La presencia de variabilidad genética ha sido puesta de manifiesto para todos los genes relacionados con el metabolismo lipídico, por lo que existe un ingente número de genes y de variantes genéticas para ser incluidas en los estudios sobre interacciones dieta-genotipo en el ámbito específico del consumo de grasas y aceites. Se revisarán algunos ejemplos sobre interacciones grasa

  1. Determination of the vacancy formation enthalpy in chromium by positron annihilation

    Loper, G.D.; Smedskjaer, L.C.; Chason, M.K.; Siegel, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Doppler broadening of the positron annihilation lineshape in 99.99 at. % pure chromium was measured over the temperature range 296 to 2049 0 K. The chromium sample was encapsulated in sapphire owing to its high vapor pressure near melting. Saturation-like behavior of the lineshape was observed near the melting temperature (2130 0 K). A two-state trapping model fit to the data yielded a vacancy formation enthalpy of 2.0 +- 0.2 eV. This result is discussed in relation to extant empirical relations for vacancy migration and self-diffusion in metals and to data from previous self-diffusion and annealing experiments in chromium. It is concluded that the observed vacancy ensemble is unlikely to be responsible for the measured self-diffusion behavior. The implications of the present results in terms of our understanding of mechanisms for self-diffusion in chromium and other refractory bcc metals are discussed

  2. Application of rosula-formation tests for determining man lymphocyte radiosensitivity

    Shchilik, Ts.; Krushevskij, E.; Endrzhejchak, V.

    1982-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of subpopulation of lymphocytes-T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes was studied to diagnose acute radiation disease as well as if radiosensitivity of any of them is more effective indication of irradiation as compared with absolute lymphocyte quantity. The investigations were carried on in vitro using blood of healthy men-donors at the age of 21-25. It is shown that absolute quantity of cells forming AE rosette in perapheral blood is a much better indication of irradiation as compared with absolute quantity of lymphocytes. Considerable significance of tests of rosette formation especially AE test is underlined. High test sensitivity and relative simplicity of accomplishment permit authors to recommend it for diagnostic purposes when revealing acute radiation disease including the stages of medicinal evacuation

  3. Migration rates and formation injectivity to determine containment time scales of sequestered carbon dioxide

    Burke, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide exhibits highly variable behavior over a range of reservoir pressure and temperature conditions. Because geologic sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide is targeted for subsurface injection and containment at depths ranging from approximately 3,000 to 13,000 feet, the investigation into the physical properties of this fluid can be restricted to the pressure and temperature conditions likely encountered in the sedimentary strata within this depth interval. A petrophysical based approach was developed to study the widest range of formation properties potentially encountered in sedimentary strata. Fractional porosities were varied from 5 to 95 percent, in 5-percent increments, and permeability values were varied over thirteen orders of magnitude, from 10.0 darcys down to 1.0 picodarcy.

  4. Persuasive communication about AIDS prevention: need for cognition determines the impact of message format.

    Bakker, A B

    1999-04-01

    Adolescents were classified as being high or low in need for cognition (NFC) (Cacioppo & Petty, 1982) and expressed their knowledge about AIDS, attitudes toward condom use, and perceived supportive norms after being exposed to a cartoon or a written message about safe sex. Both messages have a positive impact on knowledge and attitudes. Theoretically interesting is the finding that the cartoon message is more effective in bringing about change in attitudes and subjective norms than the written message for low-NFC adolescents, and that the written message is more effective than the cartoon message for high-NFC adolescents. These results are consistent with the theory-based prediction that a persuasive communication will be most effective when the format of the message is tailored to people's information-processing proclivities. The practical implications of the findings for AIDS education are discussed.

  5. A relationship between spinal new bone formation in ankylosing spondylitis and the sonographically determined Achilles tendon enthesophytes.

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Can, Meryem; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Keser, Gokhan; Kurum, Esra; Inal, Vedat; Yazisiz, Veli; Birlik, Merih; Emmungil, Hakan; Atagunduz, Pamir; Direskeneli, Haner; McGonagle, Dennis; Pay, Salih

    2016-03-01

    Spinal new bone formation is a major but incompletely understood manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We explored the relationship between spinal new bone formation and ultrasound (US)-determined Achilles enthesophytes to test the hypothesis that spinal new bone formation is part of a generalized enthesis bone-forming phenotype. A multicenter, case control study of 225 consecutive AS patients and 95 age/body mass index (BMI) matched healthy controls (HC) was performed. US scans of Achilles tendons and cervical and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained. All images were centrally scored by one investigator for US and one for radiographs, blinded to medical data. The relation between syndesmophytes (by modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS) and the number of syndesmophytes) and enthesophytes (with a semi-quantitative scoring of the US findings) was investigated. AS patients had significantly higher US enthesophyte scores than HCs (2.1(1.6) vs. 1.6(1.6); p = 0.004). The difference was significant in males (p = 0.001) but not in females (p = 0.5). The enthesophyte scores significantly correlated with mSASSS scores (ρ = 0.274, p gender-specific phenotype that could be a useful marker predicting of new bone formation.

  6. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes enhance electrochemical properties of titanium to determine in situ bone formation

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Webster, Thomas J [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)], E-mail: Thomas_Webster@Brown.edu

    2008-07-23

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) enhance osteoblast (bone-forming cell) calcium deposition compared to currently implanted materials (such as titanium). In this study, MWCNTs were grown out of nanopores anodized on titanium (MWCNT-Ti). The electrochemical responses of MWCNT-Ti were investigated in an attempt to ascertain if MWCNT-Ti can serve as novel in situ sensors of bone formation. For this purpose, MWCNT-Ti was subjected to a ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple and its electrochemical behavior measured. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed an enhanced redox potential for the MWCNT-Ti. These redox signals were superior to that obtained with bare unmodified Ti, which did not sense either oxidation or reduction peaks in the CVs. A further objective of this study was to investigate the redox reactions of MWCNT-Ti in a solution of extracellular components secreted by osteoblasts in vitro. It was found that MWCNT-Ti exhibited well-defined and persistent CVs, similar to the ferri/ferrocyanide redox reaction. The higher electrodic performance and electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT-Ti compared to the bare titanium observed in this study were likely due to the fact that MWCNTs enhanced direct electron transfer and facilitated double-layer effects, leading to a strong redox signal. Thus these results encourage the further study and modification of MWCNT-Ti to sense new bone growth in situ next to orthopedic implants and perhaps monitor other events (such as infection and/or harmful scar tissue formation) to improve the current clinical diagnosis of orthopedic implants.

  7. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes enhance electrochemical properties of titanium to determine in situ bone formation

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) enhance osteoblast (bone-forming cell) calcium deposition compared to currently implanted materials (such as titanium). In this study, MWCNTs were grown out of nanopores anodized on titanium (MWCNT-Ti). The electrochemical responses of MWCNT-Ti were investigated in an attempt to ascertain if MWCNT-Ti can serve as novel in situ sensors of bone formation. For this purpose, MWCNT-Ti was subjected to a ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple and its electrochemical behavior measured. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed an enhanced redox potential for the MWCNT-Ti. These redox signals were superior to that obtained with bare unmodified Ti, which did not sense either oxidation or reduction peaks in the CVs. A further objective of this study was to investigate the redox reactions of MWCNT-Ti in a solution of extracellular components secreted by osteoblasts in vitro. It was found that MWCNT-Ti exhibited well-defined and persistent CVs, similar to the ferri/ferrocyanide redox reaction. The higher electrodic performance and electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT-Ti compared to the bare titanium observed in this study were likely due to the fact that MWCNTs enhanced direct electron transfer and facilitated double-layer effects, leading to a strong redox signal. Thus these results encourage the further study and modification of MWCNT-Ti to sense new bone growth in situ next to orthopedic implants and perhaps monitor other events (such as infection and/or harmful scar tissue formation) to improve the current clinical diagnosis of orthopedic implants

  8. Interactions of triglycerides with phospholipids: Incorporation into the bilayer structure and formation of emulsions

    Hamilton, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Interactions of carbonyl 13 C-enriched triacylglycerols (TG) with phospholipid bilayers were studied by 13 C NMR spectroscopy. In spectra of DPPC vesicles with TG at 40-50 degree C, both triolein (TO) and tripalmitin (TP) had narrow carbonyl resonances, indicative of rapid motions, and chemical shifts indicative of H bonding of the TG carbonyls with solvent (H 2 O) at the aqueous interfaces of the vesicle bilayer. Below the phase transition temperature of the DPPC/TG vesicles, most phospholipid peaks broadened markedly. In DPPC vesicles with TP, the TP carbonyl peaks broadened beyond detection below the transition, whereas in vesicles with TO, the TO carbonyl peaks showed little change in line width or chemical shift and no change in the integrated intensity. These properties (extent of solubility in the PC surface, conformation, solvent accessibility, and molecular mobility) may be important for enzymatic hydrolysis and protein-mediated transfer of TG. In gel-phase DPPC, the molecular mobility of the TG depends on the nature of the TG acyl chains. In the DPPC/TG mixtures studied, attempts to incorporate TG in excess of the bilayer solubility resulted in production of emulsion particles. The significance of these results for TG metabolism is discussed

  9. The interaction of streptococcal enolase with canine plasminogen: the role of surfaces in complex formation.

    Vinod Balhara

    Full Text Available The enolase from Streptococcus pyogenes (Str enolase F137L/E363G is a homo-octamer shaped like a donut. Plasminogen (Pgn is a monomeric protein composed of seven discrete separated domains organized into a lock washer. The enolase is known to bind Pgn. In past work we searched for conditions in which the two proteins would bind to one another. The two native proteins in solution would not bind under any of the tried conditions. We found that if the structures were perturbed binding would occur. We stated that only the non-native Str enolase or Pgn would interact such that we could detect binding. We report here the results of a series of dual polarization interferometry (DPI experiments coupled with atomic force microscopy (AFM, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and fluorescence. We show that the critical condition for forming stable complexes of the two native proteins involves Str enolase binding to a surface. Surfaces that attract Str enolase are a sufficient condition for binding Pgn. Under certain conditions, Pgn adsorbed to a surface will bind Str enolase.

  10. A rapid hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic determination of glimepiride in pharmaceutical formulations

    Si Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glimepiride is one of the most widely prescribed antidiabetic drugs and contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups in its molecules, and thus could be analyzed by either reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC. In the literature, however, only reversed-phase HPLC has been reported. In this study, a simple, rapid and accurate hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of glimepiride in pharmaceutical formulations. The analytical method comprised a fast ultrasound-assisted extraction with acetonitrile as a solvent followed by HILIC separation and quantification using a Waters Spherisorb S5NH2 hydrophilic column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and aqueous acetate buffer (5.0 mM. The retention time of glimepiride increased slightly with decrease of mobile phase pH value from 6.8 to 5.8 and of acetonitrile content from 60% to 40%, indicating that both hydrophilic, ionic, and hydrophobic interactions were involved in the HILIC retention and elution mechanisms. Quantitation was carried out with a mobile phase of 40% acetonitrile and 60% aqueous acetate buffer (5.0 mM at pH 6.3, by relating the peak area of glimepiride to that of the internal standard, with a detection limit of 15.0 μg/L. UV light absorption responses at 228 nm were linear over a wide concentration range from 50.0 μg/L to 6.00 mg/L. The recoveries of the standard added to pharmaceutical tablet samples were 99.4–103.0% for glimepiride, and the relative standard deviation for the analyte was less than 1.0%. This method has been successfully applied to determine the glimepiride contents in pharmaceutical formulations.

  11. ETHNOCULTURAL IDENTITY AS A FACTOR OF FORMATION OF THE FAMILY SELF-DETERMINATION OF STUDENT’S YOUTH

    Svetlana Vasil’evna Merzljakova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the empirical study, the purpose of which is to find out the features of family self-determination of modern youth, depending on ethnocultural background (Russians, Kazakhs, Tatars, Caucasus natives. For this purpose a range of complementary methods of the research was used: theoretical and methodological literature analyses, questionnaires, psychodiagnostic methods, methods of applied statistics. The results of the empirical research indicated that the ethnocultural context leads to the formation of family self-determination of modern youth. Within the cognitive component the differences at the level of statistical significance are identified for the variables “I am a future father/ mother”, “I am the son/daughter”. Within the value-emotional component, significant differences are detected concerning to the parental family, mother, father, value of love, sex. Within the regulatory-behavioral component, significant differences are set for the elements: my past, my future, the availability of the sphere a happy family life, an active life, knowledge and creativity, the attitude to a divorce. National identity determines the significance of such marriage motives as harmonious sexual relationships, duty, communication with people, a recognition of others. Within the reflective component there are significant differences for the elements: self-image, the index of the disintegration in motivation-personal sphere. Practical implications. The obtained results will be useful in the implementation of psycho-pedagogical model of directed formation of family-determination of youth within the conditions of University educational environment.

  12. Determination of the Interaction Position of Gamma Photons in Monolithic Scintillators Using Neural Network Fitting

    Conde, P.; Iborra, A.; González, A. J.; Hernández, L.; Bellido, P.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J. P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M. J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A.; Vidal, L. F.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detectors based on monolithic scintillators, the photon interaction position needs to be estimated from the light distribution (LD) on the photodetector pixels. Due to the finite size of the scintillator volume, the symmetry of the LD is truncated everywhere except for the crystal center. This effect produces a poor estimation of the interaction positions towards the edges, an especially critical situation when linear algorithms, such as Center of Gravity (CoG), are used. When all the crystal faces are painted black, except the one in contact with the photodetector, the LD can be assumed to behave as the inverse square law, providing a simple theoretical model. Using this LD model, the interaction coordinates can be determined by means of fitting each event to a theoretical distribution. In that sense, the use of neural networks (NNs) has been shown to be an effective alternative to more traditional fitting techniques as nonlinear least squares (LS). The multilayer perceptron is one type of NN which can model non-linear functions well and can be trained to accurately generalize when presented with new data. In this work we have shown the capability of NNs to approximate the LD and provide the interaction coordinates of γ-photons with two different photodetector setups. One experimental setup was based on analog Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) and a charge division diode network, whereas the second setup was based on digital SiPMs (dSiPMs). In both experiments NNs minimized border effects. Average spatial resolutions of 1.9 ±0.2 mm and 1.7 ±0.2 mm for the entire crystal surface were obtained for the analog and dSiPMs approaches, respectively.

  13. GEOMORPHIC AND HYDROLOGIC INTERACTIONS IN THE DETERMINATION OF EQUILIBRIUM SOIL DEPTH

    Nicotina, L.; Rinaldo, A.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we propose numerical studies of the interactions between hydrology and geomorphology in the formation of the actual soil depth that drives ecologic and hydrologic processes. Sediment transport and geomorphic landscape evolution processes (i.e. erosion/deposition vs. soil production) strongly influence hydrology, carbon sequestration, soil formation and stream water chemistry. The process of rock conversion into soil originates a strong hydrologic control through the formation of the soil depth that participates to hydrologic processes, influence vegetation type and patterns and actively participate in the co-evolution mechanisms that shape the landscape. The description of spatial patterns in hydrology is usually constrained by the availability of field data, especially when dealing with quantities that are not easily measurable. In these circumstances it is deemed fundamental the capability of deriving hydrologic boundary conditions from physically based approaches. Here we aim, in a general framework, at the formulation of an integrated approach for the prediction of soil depth by mean of i) soil production models and ii) geomorphic transport laws. The processes that take place in the critical zone are driven by the extension of it and have foundamental importance over short time scales as well as on geologic time scales (i.e. as biota affects climate that drives hydrology and thus contributes on shaping the landscape). Our study aims at the investigation of the relationships between soil depth, topography and runoff production, we also address the mechanisms that bring to the development of actual patterns of soil depths which at the same time influence runoff. We use a schematic representation of the hydrologic processes that relies on the description of the topography (throuh a topographic wetness index) and the spatially variable soil depths. Such a model is applied in order to investigate the development of equilibrium soil depth patterns under

  14. Formation of resonances with final state photons in two photon interactions, and development of calorimetric techniques

    Mir, R.

    1986-07-01

    In this thesis, resonances produced in two photon interactions were investigated with the TASSO detector at PETRA. The η ' and A 2 resonances were studied in a final state of charged pions and low energy photons. The couplings of these resonances to γγ were measured: Γ γγ (η ' (958)) 5.1±0.4(stat.)±0.65(syst.) Kev, Γ γγ (A 2 (1320)) 0.90±0.27(stat.)±0.16(syst.) Kev. A search for ι(1460) and η c (2980) was initiated. Upper limits on the γγ widths of these resonances times their branching ratio to the decay channel were obtained: Γ γγ (ι→γγ) x B(ι→ρ 0 γ) γγ (η c →γγ) x B(η c →η ' π + π - ) < 2.6 keV (95% C.L.). A proportional tubes electromagnetic calorimeter operating in the proportional mode was constructed. Tower readout was incorporated. The calorimeter gave an energy resolution of σ/E = 19%/√E. Large surface, thin Gap Chambers (TGC), were developed and constructed for the OPAL hadron pole-tip-calorimeter. The TGC operate in a high gain mode. They provide large signals for both pad and strip readout, without the need for amplification. To form a hadron calorimeter, ten chambers were interlaced with 8 cm thick iron slabs between them. An energy resolution of: σ/E = 105%/√E was obtained

  15. Dissociative conceptual and quantitative problem solving outcomes across interactive engagement and traditional format introductory physics

    Mark A. McDaniel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature indicates that interactive-engagement (IE based general physics classes improve conceptual learning relative to more traditional lecture-oriented classrooms. Very little research, however, has examined quantitative problem-solving outcomes from IE based relative to traditional lecture-based physics classes. The present study included both pre- and post-course conceptual-learning assessments and a new quantitative physics problem-solving assessment that included three representative conservation of energy problems from a first-semester calculus-based college physics course. Scores for problem translation, plan coherence, solution execution, and evaluation of solution plausibility were extracted for each problem. Over 450 students in three IE-based sections and two traditional lecture sections taught at the same university during the same semester participated. As expected, the IE-based course produced more robust gains on a Force Concept Inventory than did the lecture course. By contrast, when the full sample was considered, gains in quantitative problem solving were significantly greater for lecture than IE-based physics; when students were matched on pre-test scores, there was still no advantage for IE-based physics on gains in quantitative problem solving. Further, the association between performance on the concept inventory and quantitative problem solving was minimal. These results highlight that improved conceptual understanding does not necessarily support improved quantitative physics problem solving, and that the instructional method appears to have less bearing on gains in quantitative problem solving than does the kinds of problems emphasized in the courses and homework and the overlap of these problems to those on the assessment.

  16. Advanced multivariate data analysis to determine the root cause of trisulfide bond formation in a novel antibody-peptide fusion.

    Goldrick, Stephen; Holmes, William; Bond, Nicholas J; Lewis, Gareth; Kuiper, Marcel; Turner, Richard; Farid, Suzanne S

    2017-10-01

    Product quality heterogeneities, such as a trisulfide bond (TSB) formation, can be influenced by multiple interacting process parameters. Identifying their root cause is a major challenge in biopharmaceutical production. To address this issue, this paper describes the novel application of advanced multivariate data analysis (MVDA) techniques to identify the process parameters influencing TSB formation in a novel recombinant antibody-peptide fusion expressed in mammalian cell culture. The screening dataset was generated with a high-throughput (HT) micro-bioreactor system (Ambr TM 15) using a design of experiments (DoE) approach. The complex dataset was firstly analyzed through the development of a multiple linear regression model focusing solely on the DoE inputs and identified the temperature, pH and initial nutrient feed day as important process parameters influencing this quality attribute. To further scrutinize the dataset, a partial least squares model was subsequently built incorporating both on-line and off-line process parameters and enabled accurate predictions of the TSB concentration at harvest. Process parameters identified by the models to promote and suppress TSB formation were implemented on five 7 L bioreactors and the resultant TSB concentrations were comparable to the model predictions. This study demonstrates the ability of MVDA to enable predictions of the key performance drivers influencing TSB formation that are valid also upon scale-up. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2222-2234. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Determination of the stability constants of a number of metal fluoride complexes and their rates of formation

    Hammer, R.R.

    1979-08-01

    The stability constants of the fluoride complexes of Al +3 , H 3 BO 3 , Cr +3 , Cr +6 , Fe +3 , Gd +3 , Nb +5 , UO 2 +2 , and Zr +4 were determined in 0.96 and 2.88 M HNO 3 solutions in the temperature range 25 to 60 0 C with a fluoride specific ion electrode. These data can be used to calculate the concentration of chemical species in solution and will be used to correlate solution properties with solution composition. The solubilities of some fluoride precipitates were also measured in nitric acid solutions. The rates of formation of the fluoborates, aluminum fluoride, and zirconium fluoride complexes were measured with a fluoride specific ion electrode at 25, 35, and 45 0 C. The rates of formation of all complexes, except BF 4 - , AlF +2 , and a fluoride complex with aluminum containing more than three fluorides associated with it, were too fast to measure with the instrumentation used

  18. Determination of complex formation constants by phase sensitive alternating current polarography: Cadmium-polymethacrylic acid and cadmium-polygalacturonic acid.

    Garrigosa, Anna Maria; Gusmão, Rui; Ariño, Cristina; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2007-10-15

    The use of phase sensitive alternating current polarography (ACP) for the evaluation of complex formation constants of systems where electrodic adsorption is present has been proposed. The applicability of the technique implies the previous selection of the phase angle where contribution of capacitive current is minimized. This is made using Multivariate Curve Resolution by Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) in the analysis of ACP measurements at different phase angles. The method is checked by the study of the complexation of Cd by polymethacrylic (PMA) and polygalacturonic (PGA) acids, and the optimal phase angles have been ca. -10 degrees for Cd-PMA and ca. -15 degrees for Cd-PGA systems. The goodness of phase sensitive ACP has been demonstrated comparing the determined complex formation constants with those obtained by reverse pulse polarography, a technique that minimizes the electrode adsorption effects on the measured currents.

  19. Growth and histamine formation of Morganella morganii in determining the safety and quality of inoculated and uninoculated bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix).

    Lorca, T A; Gingerich, T M; Pierson, M D; Flick, G J; Hackney, C R; Sumner, S S

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of normal microflora and Morganella morganii on histamine formation and olfactory acceptability in raw bluefish under controlled storage conditions. Fillets inoculated with and without M. morganii were stored at 5, 10, and 15 degrees C for 7 days. Microbial isolates from surface swabs were identified and screened for histidine decarboxylase activity. Olfactory acceptance was performed by an informal sensory panel. Histamine levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. While olfactory acceptance decreased, histamine concentration and bacterial counts increased. Storage temperature had a significant effect on histamine levels, bacterial counts, and olfactory acceptance of the bluefish. Inoculation with M. morganii had a positive significant effect on histamine formation for bluefish held at 10 and 15 degrees C (P bluefish.

  20. Effect of the defect-phosphorus atom complex interaction on the formation of the properties of neutron-doped silicon

    Kolesnik, L.I.; Lejferov, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation-induced defect annealing and changes in the concentration of substituting phosphorus atoms in silicon irradiated with different neutron doses have been studied by the low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) method at 4 K. Based on the PL spectrum character dependence on the fast-to-thermal neutron ration in a flux, series of lines and bands associated with the preferential formation of radiation-induced defects (within the 1.100 eV energy range) and with the presence of phosphorus impurity (1.15-1.12 eV) are identified. Some peculiarities are studied of the stage-by-stage annealing (250-500, 430-600, 600-800 deg C) of recombination-active centers (RAC) determining the radiation in the mentioned spectrum region. The relation between the RAC variations within the 1.12-1.15 eV range and the substituting phosphorus atom concentration in the 400-500 deg C temperature range is found. Activation energy of the substituting phosphorus atom concentration variation is estimated (approximately 0.5 eV). It is shown that the formation of defect-phosphorus complexes plays an important role in the formation of neutron-doped silicon properties, the presence of fast neutron in a flux being most importants

  1. ZZ DLC-15 STORM-ISRAEL, Gamma Interaction Cross-Section Library in ENDF/B Format for Transport

    1972-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Format: Data in ENDF/B file 23 format. Number of groups: energies from 1 KeV to 100 MeV; Nuclides: elements Z=1 to 100. Origin: E. Storm and H.I. Israel compilation. For use in general purpose gamma-ray transport codes. 2 - Method of solution: A discussion of the evaluation and much of the data were published in ref.1. The data are given in barns/atom for energies 1 keV to 100 MeV and for elements Z=1 to 100. The material numbers (MAT) are equal to the atomic numbers (Z). D.J. Dudziak placed the data in ENDF/B BCD format. The reaction type numbers (MT) used are consistent with those recommended in ENDF publications where possible, although several had to be assigned for the purpose. In the newer nomenclature σa(tot) and σh(tot) may be regarded as kerma factors which should be applied to the spectral flux density in a fashion consistent with the transport calculation which determined the flux density. That is, if the transport model assumes bound-electron incoherent scattering and treats secondary photons from pair production and photoelectric reactions, σa(tot) should be used to calculate Kerma. If the model assumes free-electron incoherent scattering and treats pair production and photoelectric reactions as absorption, σh(tot) should be used

  2. Spectrophotometric Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Pharmaceutical Formulations Through Ion-Pair Complex Formation

    Marothu Vamsi Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Four simple and sensitive ion-pairing spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of gemifloxacin mesylate (GFX either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The developed methods involve formation of colored chloroform extractable ion-pair complexes of the drug with safranin O (SFN O and methylene blue (MB in basic medium; Napthol blue 12BR (NB 12BR and azocaramine G (AG in acidic medium. The extracted complexes showed absorbance maxima at 525, 650, 620 and 540 nm for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively.Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 3-15, 4-20, 2-10 and 2-10 μg/mL with molar absorptivity of 2.81 × 104, 2.20 x 104, 4.02 × 104 and 4.15 × 104 L mole−1 cm−1 and relative standard deviation of 0.077, 0.104, 0.080 and 0.103% for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively. These methods have been successfully applied for the assay of drug in pharmaceutical formulations. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. Results of analysis were validated statistically and through recovery studies.

  3. Formation and distribution of sennosides in cassia angustifolia, as determined by a sensitive and specific radioimmunnoassay

    Atzorn, R.; Weiler, E.W.; Zenk, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for the quantitation of nanogram-amounts of sennoside B and related compounds in plant extracts is described. The assay makes use of (/sup 3/H)-8-glucosidorheinanthrone of high specific activity (5.2 Ci/mmol) whose synthesis is reported here. From this material, (/sup 3/H)-sennoside A and (/sup 3/H)-sennoside B have also been synthesized. The assay is applied to the analysis of sennoside formation and distribution in Cassia angustifolia VAHL. High levels of sennosides in dried leaves and fruits have been observed whereas the seed alone, as well as stems and roots, contain very little sennoside. In flowers, as much as 4-5% of the dry weight consists of sennoside B and other immunoreactive constituents. Sennosides have been found in cotyledons of three day old seedlings in concentrations comparable to that of the mature leaf. Upon dehydration, leaf levels of sennoside B rise steadily, this rise being inversely correlated with the water loss. The absolute levels of sennoside B formed this way are the same as compared to rapid drying at 60/sup 0/C.

  4. Formation and distribution of sennosides in cassia angustifolia, as determined by a sensitive and specific radioimmunnoassay

    Atzorn, R.; Weiler, E.W.; Zenk, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for the quantitation of nanogram-amounts of sennoside B and related compounds in plant extracts is described. The assay makes use of [ 3 H]-8-glucosidorheinanthrone of high specific activity (5.2 Ci/mmol) whose synthesis is reported here. From this material, [ 3 H]-sennoside A and [ 3 H]-sennoside B have also been synthesized. The assay is applied to the analysis of sennoside formation and distribution in Cassia angustifolia VAHL. High levels of sennosides in dried leaves and fruits have been observed whereas the seed alone, as well as stems and roots, contain very little sennoside. In flowers, as much as 4-5% of the dry weight consists of sennoside B and other immunoreactive constituents. Sennosides have been found in cotyledons of three day old seedlings in concentrations comparable to that of the mature leaf. Upon dehydration, leaf levels of sennoside B rise steadily, this rise being inversely correlated with the water loss. The absolute levels of sennoside B formed this way are the same as compared to rapid drying at 60 0 C. (orig.)

  5. Age determination and development of experimental methods for quaternary fault and formation

    Lee, Kwang Sik; Choi, M. S.; Kim, J. M.

    2004-02-01

    Late cretaceous to early tertiary movement ages were constrained by Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating of fault rocks near the Uljin Nuclear Power Plants. These ages are well reproducible and consistent with geologic context. Tectonic evolution of the northeastern Yeongnam massif, the site of the Uljin Nuclear Power Plants, was investigated on the basis of Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb isotopic systematics and geochemistry of precambrian basement rocks including the Hosanri Formation, Buncheon granite gneiss, biotite granite gneiss, and Hongjesa granite. The optical ages from the Suryum fault outcrop represent the younger limit of sedimentation timing because they are simply based upon the present-day water content. The lower, Qt 2 terrace at about 18m elevation is correlated with Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 5a, although its apparent optical age was consistently reported from 71 to 48 ka. Correlation of shoreline elevations indicates the correspondence of the Qt 3a terrace to MIS 5e, which is supported by stratigraphically concordant optical ages for aeolian sand dunes at the north of the Suryum site. This time scale yields an uplift rate of 0.266 m/ka, requiring the revision of conventional view that the Korean peninsula is tectonically very stable

  6. Determining Factors and Critical Periods in the Formation of Eating Habits: Results from the Habeat Project.

    Issanchou, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Eating habits form early during childhood and are likely to track until the beginning of adulthood. Thus, understanding the formation of eating habits is important. Consequently, the population targeted in the European project Habeat comprised infants and young children up to 6 years of age. Habeat mainly focused on the qualitative dimension of eating habits with a particular attention on vegetables and to a lesser extent on fruit. Food intake of young children was also studied in 2 challenging situations where overeating may occur and the relation between children's behaviour and feeding parental practices was examined. Key Messages: Habeat found evidence that breastfeeding may facilitate the consumption of vegetables and fruit and a greater variety of healthy foods in later childhood. Introduction of a variety of vegetables at the beginning of the complementary feeding period increases later acceptance of novel foods. Repeated exposure is a powerful mechanism to increase children's intake of a novel vegetable in infants and young children. Offering energy-dense snacks before or after meals should be avoided. Moreover, food should be offered to children in response to their feelings of hunger, and not used as reward for a good behaviour or for any other reason. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    Jianqiao Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  8. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics.

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-08-10

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  9. Age determination and development of experimental methods for quaternary fault and formation

    Lee, Kwang Sik; Choi, M. S.; Kim, J. M. [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2004-02-15

    Late cretaceous to early tertiary movement ages were constrained by Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating of fault rocks near the Uljin Nuclear Power Plants. These ages are well reproducible and consistent with geologic context. Tectonic evolution of the northeastern Yeongnam massif, the site of the Uljin Nuclear Power Plants, was investigated on the basis of Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb isotopic systematics and geochemistry of precambrian basement rocks including the Hosanri Formation, Buncheon granite gneiss, biotite granite gneiss, and Hongjesa granite. The optical ages from the Suryum fault outcrop represent the younger limit of sedimentation timing because they are simply based upon the present-day water content. The lower, Qt{sub 2} terrace at about 18m elevation is correlated with Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 5a, although its apparent optical age was consistently reported from 71 to 48 ka. Correlation of shoreline elevations indicates the correspondence of the Qt{sub 3a} terrace to MIS 5e, which is supported by stratigraphically concordant optical ages for aeolian sand dunes at the north of the Suryum site. This time scale yields an uplift rate of 0.266 m/ka, requiring the revision of conventional view that the Korean peninsula is tectonically very stable.

  10. Charge-mediated Fab-Fc interactions in an IgG1 antibody induce reversible self-association, cluster formation, and elevated viscosity.

    Arora, Jayant; Hu, Yue; Esfandiary, Reza; Sathish, Hasige A; Bishop, Steven M; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Weis, David D

    Concentration-dependent reversible self-association (RSA) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) poses a challenge to their pharmaceutical development as viable candidates for subcutaneous delivery. While the role of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) in initiating RSA is well-established, little evidence supports the involvement of the crystallizable fragment (Fc). In this report, a variety of biophysical tools, including hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry, are used to elucidate the protein interface of such non-covalent protein-protein interactions. Using dynamic and static light scattering combined with viscosity measurements, we find that an IgG1 mAb (mAb-J) undergoes RSA primarily through electrostatic interactions and forms a monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium. We provide the first direct experimental mapping of the interface formed between the Fab and Fc domains of an antibody at high protein concentrations. Charge distribution heterogeneity between the positively charged interface spanning complementarity-determining regions CDR3H and CDR2L in the Fab and a negatively charged region in C H 3/Fc domain mediates the RSA of mAb-J. When arginine and NaCl are added, they disrupt RSA of mAb-J and decrease the solution viscosity. Fab-Fc domain interactions between mAb monomers may promote the formation of large transient antibody complexes that ultimately cause increases in solution viscosity. Our findings illustrate how limited specific arrangements of amino-acid residues can cause mAbs to undergo RSA at high protein concentrations and how conserved regions in the Fc portion of the antibody can also play an important role in initiating weak and transient protein-protein interactions.

  11. A High Sensitivity Micro Format Chemiluminescence Enzyme Inhibition Assay for Determination of Hg(II

    Kanchanmala Deshpande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive and specific enzyme inhibition assay based on alcohol oxidase (AlOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP for determination of mercury Hg(II in water samples has been presented. This article describes the optimization and miniaturization of an enzymatic assay using a chemiluminescence reaction. The analytical performance and detection limit for determination of Hg(II was optimized in 96 well plates and further extended to 384 well plates with a 10-fold reduction in assay volume. Inhibition of the enzyme activity by dissolved Hg(II was found to be linear in the range 5–500 pg.mL−1 with 3% CVin inter-batch assay. Due to miniaturization of assay in 384 well plates, Hg(II was measurable as low as 1 pg.mL−1 within15 min. About 10-fold more specificity of the developed assay for Hg(II analysis was confirmed by challenging with interfering divalent metal ions such as cadmium Cd(II and lead Pb(II. Using the proposed assay we could successfully demonstrate that in a composite mixture of Hg(II, Cd(II and Pb(II, inhibition by each metal ion is significantly enhanced in the presence of the others. Applicability of the proposed assay for the determination of the Hg(II in spiked drinking and sea water resulted in recoveries ranging from 100–110.52%.

  12. Fibrillar Structure and Charge Determine the Interaction of Polyglutamine Protein Aggregates with the Cell Surface*

    Trevino, R. Sean; Lauckner, Jane E.; Sourigues, Yannick; Pearce, Margaret M.; Bousset, Luc; Melki, Ronald; Kopito, Ron R.

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of most neurodegenerative diseases, including transmissible diseases like prion encephalopathy, inherited disorders like Huntington disease, and sporadic diseases like Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, is intimately linked to the formation of fibrillar protein aggregates. It is becoming increasingly appreciated that prion-like intercellular transmission of protein aggregates can contribute to the stereotypical spread of disease pathology within the brain, but the mechanisms underlying the binding and uptake of protein aggregates by mammalian cells are largely uninvestigated. We have investigated the properties of polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregates that endow them with the ability to bind to mammalian cells in culture and the properties of the cell surface that facilitate such uptake. Binding and internalization of polyQ aggregates are common features of mammalian cells and depend upon both trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-resistant saturable sites on the cell surface, suggesting the involvement of cell surface proteins in this process. polyQ aggregate binding depends upon the presence of a fibrillar amyloid-like structure and does not depend upon electrostatic interaction of fibrils with the cell surface. Sequences in the huntingtin protein that flank the amyloid-forming polyQ tract also influence the extent to which aggregates are able to bind to cell surfaces. PMID:22753412

  13. A physiological model of the interaction between tissue bubbles and the formation of blood-borne bubbles under decompression

    Chappell, M A; Payne, S J

    2006-01-01

    Under decompression, bubbles can form in the human body, and these can be found both within the body tissues and the bloodstream. Mathematical models for the growth of both types of bubbles have previously been presented, but they have not been coupled together. This work thus explores the interaction between the growth of tissue and blood-borne bubbles under decompression, specifically looking at the extent to which they compete for the common resource of inert gas held in solution in the tissues. The influence of tissue bubbles is found to be significant for densities as low as 10 ml -1 for tissues which are poorly perfused. However, the effects of formation of bubbles in the blood are not found until the density of bubble production sites reaches 10 6 ml -1 . From comparison of the model predictions with experimental evidence for bubbles produced in animals and man under decompression, it is concluded that the density of tissue bubbles is likely to have a significant effect on the number of bubbles produced in the blood. However, the density of nucleation sites in the blood is unlikely to be sufficiently high in humans for the formation of bubbles in the blood to have a significant impact on the growth of the bubbles in the tissue

  14. Detrital zircon without detritus: a result of 496-Ma-old fluid-rock interaction during the gold-lode formation of Passagem, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Zeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Zircon and xenotime occur in tourmaline-rich hydrothermal pockets in the auriferous lode of Passagem de Mariana, a world-class gold deposit. Zircon grains show pristine oscillatory zoning, but many of them are altered, exhibiting porous domains filled with graphite. Uranium-Pb dating of zircon, using in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, yields ages between 3.2 and 2.65 Ga, which match those for detrital zircon of the footwall quartzite of the > 2.65-Ga-old Moeda Formation. Discordant analyses point to zircon-age resetting during the Brasiliano orogeny at ca. 500 Ma. This interpretation is supported by U-Pb dating of euhedral xenotime immediately adjacent to altered zircon within the same tourmaline pocket. The xenotime grains give a Concordia age of 496.3 ± 2.0 Ma, which is identical to that determined for monazite of a quartz-hematite vein-type deposit (i.e., jacutinga lode) in the region (Itabira), another important mineralisation style of gold. The occurrence of relatively abundant inherited detrital zircon, but absence of rock fragments in the tourmaline pocket investigated here, implies that detrital material was completely replaced by tourmaline. The graphite overprint on the altered detrital zircon attests to a reducing fluid, which was likely formed by fluid-rock interaction with carbonaceous phyllite of the Batatal Formation, the host rock of the Passagem lode.

  15. 2BC Non-Structural Protein of Enterovirus A71 Interacts with SNARE Proteins to Trigger Autolysosome Formation.

    Lai, Jeffrey K F; Sam, I-Ching; Verlhac, Pauline; Baguet, Joël; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Faure, Mathias; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2017-07-04

    Viruses have evolved unique strategies to evade or subvert autophagy machinery. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) induces autophagy during infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we report that EV-A71 triggers autolysosome formation during infection in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells to facilitate its replication. Blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion with chloroquine inhibited virus RNA replication, resulting in lower viral titres, viral RNA copies and viral proteins. Overexpression of the non-structural protein 2BC of EV-A71 induced autolysosome formation. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-affinity purification assays showed that 2BC physically and specifically interacted with a N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein, syntaxin-17 (STX17). Co-immunoprecipitation assay further showed that 2BC binds to SNARE proteins, STX17 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29). Transient knockdown of STX17, SNAP29, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B), crucial proteins in the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes) as well as the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) impaired production of infectious EV-A71 in RD cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the generation of autolysosomes triggered by the 2BC non-structural protein is important for EV-A71 replication, revealing a potential molecular pathway targeted by the virus to exploit autophagy. This study opens the possibility for the development of novel antivirals that specifically target 2BC to inhibit formation of autolysosomes during EV-A71 infection.

  16. Titration calorimetry of surfactant–drug interactions: Micelle formation and saturation studies

    Waters, Laura J.; Hussain, Talib; Parkes, Gareth M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Isothermal titration calorimetry can be used to monitor the saturation of micelles with pharmaceutical compounds. ► The number of drug molecules per micelle varies depending on the drug used and the temperature of the calorimeter. ► The change in enthalpy for the saturation of micelles with drugs can be endothermic or exothermic. ► The critical micellar concentration of an anionic surfactant (SDS) does not appear to vary in the presence of drugs. - Abstract: Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to monitor the addition of five model drugs to anionic surfactant based micelles, composed of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), through to the point at which they were saturated with drug. Analysis of the resultant data using this newly developed method has confirmed the suitability of the technique to acquire such data with saturation limits established in all cases. Values for the point at which saturation occurred ranged from 17 molecules of theophylline per micelle at T = 298 K up to 63 molecules of caffeine per micelle at 310 K. Micellar systems can be disrupted by the presence of additional chemicals, such as the drugs used in this study, therefore a separate investigation was undertaken to determine the critical micellar concentration (CMC) for SDS in the presence of each drug at T = 298 K and 310 K using ITC. In the majority of cases, there was no appreciable alteration to the CMC of SDS with drug present.

  17. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo, E-mail: leo.spyracopoulos@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K{sub D}) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K{sub D} value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k{sub off}). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k{sub off} {approx} 3,000 s{sup -1} in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k{sub off} from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k{sub off} values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s{sup -1}. The validity of line shape analysis for k{sub off} values approaching intermediate exchange ({approx}100 s{sup -1}), may be facilitated by

  18. Accuracy and precision of protein–ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-01-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein–ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K D ) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K D value of a 1:1 protein–ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125–138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of 1 H– 15 N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein–ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k off ). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k off ∼ 3,000 s −1 in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k off from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k off values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s −1 . The validity of line shape analysis for k off values approaching intermediate exchange (∼100 s −1 ), may be facilitated by more accurate K D measurements from NMR

  19. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  20. Determination of thiopurine S-methyltransferase activity by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography hyphenated with mass spectrometry.

    Pecher, Daniel; Dokupilová, Svetlana; Zelinková, Zuzana; Peppelenbosch, Maikel; Mikušová, Veronika; Mikuš, Peter

    2017-08-05

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) plays an important role in the metabolism of thiopurines used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this work a new progressive method for the determination of TPMT activity in red blood cells lysates was developed. Analysis was carried out by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) hyphenated with mass spectrometry (MS). In comparison with reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), that has been typically applied in determination of TPMT activity, the HILIC significantly improved the analytical signal provided by MS, shortened analysis time, and improved chromatographic resolution. The HILIC-HPLC-MS method was optimized and validated, providing favorable parameters of detection and quantitation limits (5.5 and 16.5pmol/mL, respectively), linearity (coefficient of determination 0.9999 in the range of 0.01-1.0nmol/mL), recovery and precision (93.25-100.37% with RSD 1.06-1.32% in the whole concentration range of QC samples). Moreover, in contrast to the conventional RP-HPLC-UV approach, the complex phenotype TPMT profiles can be reliably and without interferences monitored using the HILIC-HPLC-MS method. Such advanced monitoring can provide valuable detail information on the thiopurines (e.g. evaluating ratio of methylated and non-methylated 6-mercaptopurine) and, by that, TPMT action in biological systems before and during the therapy of IBD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerimetric determination of simvastatin in pharmaceuticals based on redox and complex formation reactions

    Basavaiah, K.; Devi, O.Z

    2008-01-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of simvastatin (SMT) in bulk drug and in tablets. The methods are based on the oxidation of SMT by a measured excess of cerium (IV) in acid medium followed by determination of unreacted oxidant by two different reaction schemes. In one procedure (method A), the residual cerium (IV) is reacted with a fixed concentration of ferroin and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. The second approach (method B) involves the reduction of the unreacted cerium (IV) with a fixed quantity of iron (II), and the resulting iron (III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance measured at 470 nm. In both methods, the amount of cerium (IV) reacted corresponds to SMT concentration. The experimental conditions for both methods were optimized. In method A, the absorbance is found to increase linearly with SMT concentration (r = 0.9995) whereas in method B, the same decreased (r = -0.9943). The systems obey Beer's law for 0.6-7.5 and 0.5-5.0 μg mL -1 for method A and method B, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 2.7 X 104 and 1.06 X 105 Lmol -1 cm -1 , respectively; and the corresponding sandel sensitivity values are 0.0153 and 0.0039 μg cm -2 , respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) are reported for both methods. Intra-day and inter-day precision, and accuracy of the methods were established as per the current ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of SMT in tablets and the results were statistically compared with those of the reference method by applying the Student's t-test and F-test. No interference was observed from the common excipients added to tablets. The accuracy and validity of the methods were further ascertained by performing recovery experiments via standard addition procedure. (author)

  2. Dll4-Notch signaling determines the formation of native arterial collateral networks and arterial function in mouse ischemia models.

    Cristofaro, Brunella; Shi, Yu; Faria, Marcella; Suchting, Steven; Leroyer, Aurelie S; Trindade, Alexandre; Duarte, Antonio; Zovein, Ann C; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Nih, Lina R; Kubis, Nathalie; Henrion, Daniel; Loufrani, Laurent; Todiras, Mihail; Schleifenbaum, Johanna; Gollasch, Maik; Zhuang, Zhen W; Simons, Michael; Eichmann, Anne; le Noble, Ferdinand

    2013-04-01

    Arteriogenesis requires growth of pre-existing arteriolar collateral networks and determines clinical outcome in arterial occlusive diseases. Factors responsible for the development of arteriolar collateral networks are poorly understood. The Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4) promotes arterial differentiation and restricts vessel branching. We hypothesized that Dll4 may act as a genetic determinant of collateral arterial networks and functional recovery in stroke and hind limb ischemia models in mice. Genetic loss- and gain-of-function approaches in mice showed that Dll4-Notch signaling restricts pial collateral artery formation by modulating arterial branching morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Adult Dll4(+/-) mice showed increased pial collateral numbers, but stroke volume upon middle cerebral artery occlusion was not reduced compared with wild-type littermates. Likewise, Dll4(+/-) mice showed reduced blood flow conductance after femoral artery occlusion, and, despite markedly increased angiogenesis, tissue ischemia was more severe. In peripheral arteries, loss of Dll4 adversely affected excitation-contraction coupling in arterial smooth muscle in response to vasopressor agents and arterial vessel wall adaption in response to increases in blood flow, collectively contributing to reduced flow reserve. We conclude that Dll4-Notch signaling modulates native collateral formation by acting on vascular branching morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Dll4 furthermore affects tissue perfusion by acting on arterial function and structure. Loss of Dll4 stimulates collateral formation and angiogenesis, but in the context of ischemic diseases such beneficial effects are overruled by adverse functional changes, demonstrating that ischemic recovery is not solely determined by collateral number but rather by vessel functionality.

  3. Dll4-Notch signaling determines the formation of native arterial collateral networks and arterial function in mouse ischemia models

    Cristofaro, Brunella; Shi, Yu; Faria, Marcella; Suchting, Steven; Leroyer, Aurelie S.; Trindade, Alexandre; Duarte, Antonio; Zovein, Ann C.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Nih, Lina R.; Kubis, Nathalie; Henrion, Daniel; Loufrani, Laurent; Todiras, Mihail; Schleifenbaum, Johanna; Gollasch, Maik; Zhuang, Zhen W.; Simons, Michael; Eichmann, Anne; le Noble, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    Arteriogenesis requires growth of pre-existing arteriolar collateral networks and determines clinical outcome in arterial occlusive diseases. Factors responsible for the development of arteriolar collateral networks are poorly understood. The Notch ligand Delta-like 4 (Dll4) promotes arterial differentiation and restricts vessel branching. We hypothesized that Dll4 may act as a genetic determinant of collateral arterial networks and functional recovery in stroke and hind limb ischemia models in mice. Genetic loss- and gain-of-function approaches in mice showed that Dll4-Notch signaling restricts pial collateral artery formation by modulating arterial branching morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Adult Dll4+/- mice showed increased pial collateral numbers, but stroke volume upon middle cerebral artery occlusion was not reduced compared with wild-type littermates. Likewise, Dll4+/- mice showed reduced blood flow conductance after femoral artery occlusion, and, despite markedly increased angiogenesis, tissue ischemia was more severe. In peripheral arteries, loss of Dll4 adversely affected excitation-contraction coupling in arterial smooth muscle in response to vasopressor agents and arterial vessel wall adaption in response to increases in blood flow, collectively contributing to reduced flow reserve. We conclude that Dll4-Notch signaling modulates native collateral formation by acting on vascular branching morphogenesis during embryogenesis. Dll4 furthermore affects tissue perfusion by acting on arterial function and structure. Loss of Dll4 stimulates collateral formation and angiogenesis, but in the context of ischemic diseases such beneficial effects are overruled by adverse functional changes, demonstrating that ischemic recovery is not solely determined by collateral number but rather by vessel functionality. PMID:23533173

  4. [Levels of bone mineral matrix organization and the mechanisms determining parameters of its formation].

    Avrunin, A S; Tikhilov, R M; Abolin, A B; Shcherbak, I G

    2005-01-01

    Authors suggest to regard bone mineral matrix as the four-level structure. The first level is represented by an internal structure of a mineral, the second--by mineral morphological structure, the third--by coplanar association of minerals, and the fourth--by macroassociation of minerals in a single complex inside each bone. The most probable mechanisms determining stability of reproduction of mineral matrix parameters on each of these levels are shown. As a result of their functioning, the variants of bone mineral matrix structures are formed that are the programmed reflection of specificity of the given site of organic structures.

  5. Interaction of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers with supported lipid bilayers and cells: hole formation and the relation to transport.

    Hong, Seungpyo; Bielinska, Anna U; Mecke, Almut; Keszler, Balazs; Beals, James L; Shi, Xiangyang; Balogh, Lajos; Orr, Bradford G; Baker, James R; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer interactions with supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid bilayers and KB and Rat2 cell membranes using atomic force microscopy (AFM), enzyme assays, flow cell cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Amine-terminated generation 7 (G7) PAMAM dendrimers (10-100 nM) were observed to form holes of 15-40 nm in diameter in aqueous, supported lipid bilayers. G5 amine-terminated dendrimers did not initiate hole formation but expanded holes at existing defects. Acetamide-terminated G5 PAMAM dendrimers did not cause hole formation in this concentration range. The interactions between PAMAM dendrimers and cell membranes were studied in vitro using KB and Rat 2 cell lines. Neither G5 amine- nor acetamide-terminated PAMAM dendrimers were cytotoxic up to a 500 nM concentration. However, the dose dependent release of the cytoplasmic proteins lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and luciferase (Luc) indicated that the presence of the amine-terminated G5 PAMAM dendrimer decreased the integrity of the cell membrane. In contrast, the presence of acetamide-terminated G5 PAMAM dendrimer had little effect on membrane integrity up to a 500 nM concentration. The induction of permeability caused by the amine-terminated dendrimers was not permanent, and leaking of cytosolic enzymes returned to normal levels upon removal of the dendrimers. The mechanism of how PAMAM dendrimers altered cells was investigated using fluorescence microscopy, LDH and Luc assays, and flow cytometry. This study revealed that (1) a hole formation mechanism is consistent with the observations of dendrimer internalization, (2) cytosolic proteins can diffuse out of the cell via these holes, and (3) dye molecules can be detected diffusing into the cell or out of the cell through the same membrane holes. Diffusion of dendrimers through holes is sufficient to explain the uptake of G5 amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers into cells and is consistent

  6. Determination of the free enthalpies of formation of borosilicate glasses; Determination des enthalpies libres de formation des verres borosilicates. Application a l'etude de l'alteration des verres de confinement de dechets radioactifs

    Linard, Y

    2000-07-01

    This work contributes to the study of the thermochemical properties of nuclear waste glasses. Results are used to discuss mechanisms and parameters integrated in alteration models of conditioning materials. Glass is a disordered material defined thermodynamically as a non-equilibrium state. Taking into account one order parameter to characterise its configurational state, the metastable equilibrium for the glass was considered and the main thermochemical properties were determined. Calorimetric techniques were used to measure heat capacities and formation enthalpies of borosilicate glasses (from 3 to 8 constitutive oxides). Formation Entropies were measured too, using the entropy theory of relaxation processes proposed by Adam and Gibbs (1965). The configurational entropy contribution were determined from viscosity measurements. This set of data has allowed the calculation of Gibb's free energies of dissolution of glasses in pure water. By comparison with leaching experiments, it has been demonstrated that the decreasing of the dissolution rate at high reaction progress cannot be associated to the approach of an equilibrium between the sound glass and the aqueous solution. The composition changes of the reaction area at the glass surface need to be considered too. To achieve a complete description of the thermodynamic stability, the equilibrium between hydrated de-alkalinized glass and/or the gel layer with the aqueous solution should also be evaluated. (author)

  7. THE FORMATION OF READINESS FOR PERSONAL SELF-DETERMINATION WITH DEVIANT TEENAGERS UNDER THE CONDITIONS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION

    Kopovaya Oksana Vladimirovna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of introduction of a practice-oriented model of a pedagogical system into the educational process of a school and a vocational school. The system stimulates the process of the formation of readiness for personal self-determination of a modern teenager as an integration of external influences on a forming personality and his or her active internal self-development. The result of the research can be used in the work of psychologists, pedagogue-psychologists, social pedagogues in institutions of general, primary professional and specialized secondary education.

  8. Colorimetric determination of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) through ion-associate complex formation.

    Amin, Alaa S; Moustafa, Moustafa E; El-Dosoky, Reham

    2009-01-01

    A simple, quick, accurate, and sensitive colorimetric method is described for the determination of sildenafil citrate (SLD). The method is based on the reaction of SLD with Congo Red, Sudan II, and Gentian Violet in buffered aqueous solutions at pH 2.5, 6.5, and 11.0, respectively, to give highly colored soluble ion-associate complex species; the colored products are quantitated colorimetrically at 523, 554, and 569 nm, respectively. The various experimental conditions were optimized. The stoichiometric ratio was found to be 1:1 for all ion associates; the calculated logarithmic stability constants were 8.51, 7.79, and 5.58, respectively. Beer's law was obeyed over the concentration range of 0.2-7.0 microg/mL, whereas the Ringbom optimum concentration range was 0.4-6.5 microg/mL. Values for molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, and detection and quantification limits were also calculated. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of SLD in Viagra tablets and in serum samples by using the technique of standard additions with mean accuracy values of 100.06 +/- 1.14, 99.87 +/- 0.70, and 99.86 +/- 0.97% for Viagra tablets and 99.88 +/- 0.60, 99.90 +/- 0.90, and 100.24 +/- 0.80% for serum samples, respectively.

  9. Structural Stereochemistry of Androstene Hormones Determines Interactions with Human Androgen, Estrogen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors

    Thomas L. Shaak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET exhibit strong biological activity that has been attributed to androgenic, estrogenic, or antiglucocorticoid activity in vivo and in vitro. This study compared DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET for their ability to activate the human AR, ER, and GR and determine the relative androgenicity, estrogenicity, and glucocorticoid activity. The results show that, at the receptor level, these androstene hormones are weak AR and even weaker ER activators. Direct androstene hormone activation of the human AR, ERα, and ERβ may not be essential for their biological function. Similarly, these hormones indirectly activated the human GR, only in the presence of high dexamethasone concentrations. These results underscore the major difference between androstene hormone interactions with these nuclear receptors and their biological effects.

  10. Molecular Determinants for Substrate Interactions with the Glycine Transporter GlyT2.

    Carland, Jane E; Thomas, Michael; Mostyn, Shannon N; Subramanian, Nandhitha; O'Mara, Megan L; Ryan, Renae M; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2018-03-21

    Transporters in the SLC6 family play key roles in regulating neurotransmission and are the targets for a wide range of therapeutics. Important insights into the transport mechanisms and the specificity of drug interactions of SLC6 transporters have been obtained from the crystal structures of a bacterial homologue of the family, LeuT Aa , and more recently the Drosophila dopamine transporter and the human serotonin transporter. However, there is disputed evidence that the bacterial leucine transporter, LeuT Aa , contains two substrate binding sites that work cooperatively in the mechanism of transport, with the binding of a second substrate being required for the release of the substrate from the primary site. An alternate proposal is that there may be low affinity binding sites that serve to direct the flow of substrates to the primary site. We have used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations of substrate interactions with a homology model of GlyT2, together with radiolabeled amino acid uptake assays and electrophysiological analysis of wild-type and mutant transporters, to provide evidence that substrate selectivity of GlyT2 is determined entirely by the primary substrate binding site and, furthermore, if a secondary site exists then it is a low affinity nonselective amino acid binding site.

  11. Pollutant threshold concentration determination in marine ecosystems using an ecological interaction endpoint.

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Guo, Wenting; Yu, Hua; Xing, Wenhui

    2015-09-01

    The threshold concentrations of pollutants are determined by extrapolating single-species effect data to community-level effects. This assumes the most sensitive endpoint of the life cycle of individuals and the species sensitivity distribution from single-species toxic effect tests, thus, ignoring the ecological interactions. The uncertainties due to this extrapolation can be partially overcome using the equilibrium point of a customized ecosystem. This method incorporates ecological interactions and integrates the effects on growth, survival, and ingestion into a single effect measure, the equilibrium point excursion in the customized ecosystem, in order to describe the toxic effects on plankton. A case study showed that the threshold concentration of copper calculated with the endpoint of the equilibrium point was 10 μg L(-1), which is significantly different from the threshold calculated with a single-species endpoint. The endpoint calculated using this method provides a more relevant measure of the ecological impact than any single individual-level endpoint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Type of litter determines the formation and properties of charred material during wildfires

    Chavez, Bruno; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Salgado, Josefa; García-Oliva, Felipe; Vega, Jose A.; Merino, Agustin

    2014-05-01

    Wildfire is one of the most important disturbances all over the World, affecting both the amount and composition of forest floor and mineral soils. In comparison with unburnt areas, wildfire-affected forest floor usually shows lower contents of labile C compounds and higher concentrations of recalcitrant aromatic forms. These changes in composition can have important impact on biogeochemical cycles and therefore ecosystem functions. Although burning of different types of litter can lead to different amount and types of pyrogenic compounds, this aspect has not been evaluated yet. The effect of wildfire on SOM composition and stability were evaluated in five major types of non-wood litter in Mediterranean ecosystems: Pinus nigra, E. arborea, P. pinaster, U. europaeus and Eucalyptus globulus. In each of these ecosystems, forest floor samples from different soil burn severities were sampled. Soil burnt severities were based on visual signs of changes in forest floor and deposition of ash. Pyrogenic carbon quality were analysed using elementary analysis, solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (FTIR) and thermal analysis (simultaneous DSC-TG). The study showed that the different types of litter influenced the formation and characteristics of charred material. They differed in the temperature at which they start to be formed, the amounts of charred compounds and in their chemical composition. The resulting charred materials from the different litter, showed an important variability in the degree of carbonitation/aromatization. Unlike the biochar obtained through pyrolysis of woody sources, which contains exclusively aromatic structures, in the charred material produced in some litter, lignin, cellulose and even cellulose persist even in the high soil burnt severity. Coinciding with increases in aromatic contents, important decreases in atomic H/C and O/C ratios were recorded. However, the values found in some

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Clouds toward the Stellar Cluster Westerlund 2: Interaction of a Jet with a Clumpy Interstellar Medium

    Asahina, Yuta; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-01-01

    The formation mechanism of CO clouds observed with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes toward the stellar cluster Westerlund 2 is studied by 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, taking into account the interstellar cooling. These molecular clouds show a peculiar shape composed of an arc-shaped cloud on one side of the TeV γ -ray source HESS J1023-575 and a linear distribution of clouds (jet clouds) on the other side. We propose that these clouds are formed by the interaction of a jet with clumps of interstellar neutral hydrogen (H i). By studying the dependence of the shape of dense cold clouds formed by shock compression and cooling on the filling factor of H i clumps, we found that the density distribution of H i clumps determines the shape of molecular clouds formed by the jet–cloud interaction: arc clouds are formed when the filling factor is large. On the other hand, when the filling factor is small, molecular clouds align with the jet. The jet propagates faster in models with small filling factors.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Clouds toward the Stellar Cluster Westerlund 2: Interaction of a Jet with a Clumpy Interstellar Medium

    Asahina, Yuta; Kawashima, Tomohisa [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Matsumoto, Ryoji, E-mail: asahina@cfca.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2017-02-20

    The formation mechanism of CO clouds observed with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes toward the stellar cluster Westerlund 2 is studied by 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, taking into account the interstellar cooling. These molecular clouds show a peculiar shape composed of an arc-shaped cloud on one side of the TeV γ -ray source HESS J1023-575 and a linear distribution of clouds (jet clouds) on the other side. We propose that these clouds are formed by the interaction of a jet with clumps of interstellar neutral hydrogen (H i). By studying the dependence of the shape of dense cold clouds formed by shock compression and cooling on the filling factor of H i clumps, we found that the density distribution of H i clumps determines the shape of molecular clouds formed by the jet–cloud interaction: arc clouds are formed when the filling factor is large. On the other hand, when the filling factor is small, molecular clouds align with the jet. The jet propagates faster in models with small filling factors.

  15. Titration ELISA as a Method to Determine the Dissociation Constant of Receptor Ligand Interaction.

    Eble, Johannes A

    2018-02-15

    The dissociation constant describes the interaction between two partners in the binding equilibrium and is a measure of their affinity. It is a crucial parameter to compare different ligands, e.g., competitive inhibitors, protein isoforms and mutants, for their binding strength to a binding partner. Dissociation constants are determined by plotting concentrations of bound versus free ligand as binding curves. In contrast, titration curves, in which a signal that is proportional to the concentration of bound ligand is plotted against the total concentration of added ligand, are much easier to record. The signal can be detected spectroscopically and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This is exemplified in a protocol for a titration ELISA that measures the binding of the snake venom-derived rhodocetin to its immobilized target domain of α2β1 integrin. Titration ELISAs are versatile and widely used. Any pair of interacting proteins can be used as immobilized receptor and soluble ligand, provided that both proteins are pure, and their concentrations are known. The difficulty so far has been to determine the dissociation constant from a titration curve. In this study, a mathematical function underlying titration curves is introduced. Without any error-prone graphical estimation of a saturation yield, this algorithm allows processing of the raw data (signal intensities at different concentrations of added ligand) directly by mathematical evaluation via non-linear regression. Thus, several titration curves can be recorded simultaneously and transformed into a set of characteristic parameters, among them the dissociation constant and the concentration of binding-active receptor, and they can be evaluated statistically. When combined with this algorithm, titration ELISAs gain the advantage of directly presenting the dissociation constant. Therefore, they may be used more efficiently in the future.

  16. Tephrostratigraphy and potassium-argon age determinations of seven volcanic ash layers in the Muddy Creek formation of southern Nevada

    Metcalf, L.A.

    1982-04-01

    Seven silicic tephra layers occur in alluvial deposits of the Muddy Creek and equivalent formations at three localities in southern Nevada. Chemical and petrographic characterization indicate the tephra were derived from seven different volcanic eruptions and do not represent any previously known tephra layers. K-Ar age determinations on minerals or glass from each layer yielded 6 to 12 m.y. ages. Discordant ages were obtained on multiple mineral phases due to incorporation of detrital contaminants. The tephra are sufficiently distinctive to constitute stratigraphic marker horizons in the Muddy Creek and equivalent formations. Derivation from the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, active 16 to 6 m.y., is highly likely for some of the tephra. The K-Ar results suggest substantial parts of the Muddy Creek Formation and equivalent basin-fill are 6 to 12 m.y., indicating basin-range faulting began prior to 12 m.y. Little tectonic deformation or physiographic change has occurrred in the past 6 m.y

  17. Formation of outflow channels on Mars: Testing the origin of Reull Vallis in Hesperia Planum by large-scale lava-ice interactions and top-down melting

    Cassanelli, James P.; Head, James W.

    2018-05-01

    The Reull Vallis outflow channel is a segmented system of fluvial valleys which originates from the volcanic plains of the Hesperia Planum region of Mars. Explanation of the formation of the Reull Vallis outflow channel by canonical catastrophic groundwater release models faces difficulties with generating sufficient hydraulic head, requiring unreasonably high aquifer permeability, and from limited recharge sources. Recent work has proposed that large-scale lava-ice interactions could serve as an alternative mechanism for outflow channel formation on the basis of predictions of regional ice sheet formation in areas that also underwent extensive contemporaneous volcanic resurfacing. Here we assess in detail the potential formation of outflow channels by large-scale lava-ice interactions through an applied case study of the Reull Vallis outflow channel system, selected for its close association with the effusive volcanic plains of the Hesperia Planum region. We first review the geomorphology of the Reull Vallis system to outline criteria that must be met by the proposed formation mechanism. We then assess local and regional lava heating and loading conditions and generate model predictions for the formation of Reull Vallis to test against the outlined geomorphic criteria. We find that successive events of large-scale lava-ice interactions that melt ice deposits, which then undergo re-deposition due to climatic mechanisms, best explains the observed geomorphic criteria, offering improvements over previously proposed formation models, particularly in the ability to supply adequate volumes of water.

  18. Experimental Determination of the Formation Enthalpy of Calcium Cobaltate from Sol–Gel Precursors

    Holgate, Tim C.; Wu, NingYu; Van Nong, Ngo

    2017-01-01

    Calcium cobaltate (Ca3Co4O9) remains one of the most promising p-type oxide materials for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion. While much progress has been made in refining our understanding of the unique structure of the material, as well as optimization of the transport properties...... as observations of its decomposition into the Ca3Co2O6 phase. The reaction enthalpy of forming Ca3Co4O9 from CaCO3 and Co3O4 sol–gel precursors was determined to be +284 (±2%) kJ/mol, leading to a standard enthalpy of Ca3Co4O9 of −3307 (±3.5%) kJ/mol....

  19. Spectrophotometric Determination of Metoprolol Tartrate in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms on Complex Formation with Cu(II

    Mustafa Cesme

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, sensitive and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the assay of metoprolol tartrate (MPT, which is based on the complexation of drug with copper(II [Cu(II] at pH 6.0, using Britton-Robinson buffer solution, to produce a blue adduct. The latter has a maximum absorbance at 675 nm and obeys Beer’s law within the concentration range 8.5-70 mg/mL. Regression analysis of the calibration data showed a good correlation coefficient (r = 0.998 with a limit of detection of 5.56 mg/mL. The proposed procedure has been successfully applied to the determination of this drug in its tablets. In addition, the spectral data and stability constant for the binuclear copper(II complex of MPT (Cu2MPT2Cl2 have been reported.

  20. Interaction cross section of 11Li + d reaction and the determination of nucleon density distribution in 11Li

    Tanihata, I.; Yoshida, K.; Suzuki, T.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction cross sections for 11 Li beams have been measured using p, d, and C targets at 800A and 400A MeV. The density distribution of the 11 Li nucleus has been determined, for the first time, combining interaction cross sections with various targets and energies. It was confirmed that only the distributions with long tails describe the observed data. (author)

  1. Differential MS2 Interaction with Food Contact Surfaces Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy and Virus Recovery.

    Shim, J; Stewart, D S; Nikolov, A D; Wasan, D T; Wang, R; Yan, R; Shieh, Y C

    2017-12-15

    Enteric viruses are recognized as major etiologies of U.S. foodborne infections. These viruses are easily transmitted via food contact surfaces. Understanding virus interactions with surfaces may facilitate the development of improved means for their removal, thus reducing transmission. Using MS2 coliphage as a virus surrogate, the strength of virus adhesion to common food processing and preparation surfaces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass was assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and virus recovery assays. The interaction forces of MS2 with various surfaces were measured from adhesion peaks in force-distance curves registered using a spherical bead probe preconjugated with MS2 particles. MS2 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) demonstrated approximately 5 times less adhesion force to glass (0.54 nN) than to PVC (2.87 nN) ( P force for PVC (∼0 nN) and consistently increased virus recovery by 19%. With direct and indirect evidence of virus adhesion, this study illustrated a two-way assessment of virus adhesion for the initial evaluation of potential means to mitigate virus adhesion to food contact surfaces. IMPORTANCE The spread of foodborne viruses is likely associated with their adhesive nature. Virus attachment on food contact surfaces has been evaluated by quantitating virus recoveries from inoculated surfaces. This study aimed to evaluate the microenvironment in which nanometer-sized viruses interact with food contact surfaces and to compare the virus adhesion differences using AFM. The virus surrogate MS2 demonstrated less adhesion force to glass than to PVC via AFM, with the force-contributing factors including the intrinsic nature and the topography of the contact surfaces. This adhesion finding is consistent with the virus recoveries, which were determined indirectly. Greater numbers of viruses were recovered from glass than from PVC, after application at the same levels. The stronger MS2 adhesion onto PVC could be interrupted by incorporating a

  2. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  3. Theoretical Grounds of Determination of the Essence of the Mechanism of Formation of the Consumption Value of a Commodity

    Shulgina Lyudmyla M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers essences of the “category”, “economic category” and “consumption value of a commodity” notions and proves the economic nature of the consumption value and offers authors’ own definition. In order to identify the essence of the “consumption value of a commodity” notion, the article systemises scientific approaches and it is considered from the point of view of the classical political economy, psychology and marketing. The article offers own definition of the consumption value of a commodity and also, on the basis of the specified notions of usefulness, quality and cost, it offers a generalised model of interaction of main factors of formation of the consumption value of a commodity. It develops a mechanism of formation of the consumption value of a commodity based on the value-oriented management and also taking into account differentiators of value and specific features of its components from the point of view of all participants of its creation.

  4. Determination of Carvedilol Enantiomers in Pharmaceutical Dosages by SBSE-HPLC Based on Diastereomer Formation.

    Taraji, Maryam; Talebpour, Zahra; Adib, Nuoshin; Karimi, Shima; Haghighi, Farideh; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-09-01

    A sensitive, selective and simple method for the simultaneous determination of carvedilol enantiomers in aqueous solution has been developed using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. This method is based on the reaction of carvedilol enantiomers with (-)-menthyl chloroformate (MCF) after extraction by the SBSE method to produce diastereomeric derivatives. The separation was achieved by use of a C18 analytical column and the influence of mobile phase composition on the enantioseparation of carvedilol was studied. The applicability of two sorptive phases, poly(methyl methacrylate/ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) (PA-EG) and polydimethylsiloxane, were tested for extraction of carvedilol enantiomers from aqueous samples. The obtained results showed excellent linear dynamic ranges and precisions for each of them. The least limit of detection for (S)- and (R)-carvedilol obtained 8 and 11 µg L(-1), respectively, using the PA-EG sorptive phase. Inter- and intra-mean recoveries were also satisfactory, ranging from 98 to 103%, with coefficient of variation in the range of 1-5% at three fortified levels using a PA-EG coated stir bar. The proposed SBSE (PA-EG)-MCF derivatization-HPLC-UV method was successfully applied to enantioselective analysis of carvedilol in water and pharmaceutical dosages, confirming the application of this method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Controlling the formation process and atomic structures of single pyrazine molecular junction by tuning the strength of the metal-molecule interaction.

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ryoji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-04-12

    The formation process and atomic structures were investigated for single pyrazine molecular junctions sandwiched by three different Au, Ag, and Cu electrodes using a mechanically controllable break junction technique in ultrahigh vacuum conditions at 300 K. We demonstrated that the formation process of the single-molecule junction crucially depended on the choice of the metal electrodes. While single-molecule junction showing two distinct conductance states were found for the Au electrodes, only the single conductance state was evident for the Ag electrodes, and there was no junction formation for the Cu electrodes. These results suggested that metal-molecule interaction dominates the formation process and probability of the single-molecule junction. In addition to the metal-molecule interaction, temperature affected the formation process of the single-molecule junction. The single pyrazine molecular junction formed between Au electrodes exhibited significant temperature dependence where the junction-formation probability was about 8% at 300 K, while there was no junction-formation at 100 K. Instead of the junction formation, an Au atomic wire was formed at the low temperature. This study provides insight into the tuning of the junction-forming process for single-molecule junctions, which is needed to construct device structures on a single molecule scale.

  6. Determination of carbofuran on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography using TSK gel amide 80 as stationary phase

    A Kurnia; LW Lim; T Takeuchi

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to environmental friendly capillary liquid chromatography was employed to investigate retention behavior of carbofuran. Aim of this research is to investigate retention behavior of carbofuran using TSK gel amide 80 as stationary phase. Several condition was conducted to investigate retention behavior of carbofuran such as comparison study of TSK gel amide 80 with other polar column, comparison study retention behavior of carbofuran on various system wavelength, water content effect in HILIC mode, effect of buffer concentration on HILIC mode, and analytical performance. Results showed that TSK gel imidazole was superior compare to other polar stationary phase on determine carbofuran, wavelength 251 and 254 nm was resulting higher absorbance for carbofuran than others, increase of water content on mobile phase was decrease the retention time, also increase buffer salt concentration was decrease the retention time and according to analysis performance that is the accuracy was 101±10,1, the LOD 0.66 ppm while LOQ 2.22 ppm. As conclusions that TSK gel amide 80 was offering good determine on carbofuran even using capillary liquid chromatography with 10 cm length of column. (author)

  7. Simultaneous determination of Hg(II)-Ag(I)-Cd(II) by conductometric titration using the formation of ternary complex

    Hayashida, Ichiro; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Taga, Mitsuhiko; Hikime, Seiichiro

    1979-01-01

    A conductometric determination of Hg(II), Ag(I) and Cd(II) was carried out by using the insoluble ternary complex formation of the metal ions with iodide ion in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). Recommended procedure is as follows; An aliquot of sample solution containing (14 -- 29) mg of Hg(II), (8 -- 16) mg of Ag(I), and (9 -- 17) mg of Cd(II) transfered into a 100 ml beaker. Add to acetate buffer and stoichiometric amounts of phen (40% ethanol-water solution). Amounts of nitrate ion which was estimated separately by other titration with 0.1 M Ag(phen) 2 complex (40% ethanol-water solution) are adjusted in the range of (4.0 -- 6.0) mM. The sample solution is titrated with 0.1 M KI standard solution at the rate of 0.20 ml/min or less. The titration curve showed three end-points corresponding to the formation of (1) Hg(phen) 2 I 2 , (2) Ag(phen)I, and (3) Cd(phen) 2 I 2 . The relative standard deviation was less than 0.8%, when the pH value was controlled at 4.0 -- 4.5 (acetate buffer) and the nitrate concentration was adjusted in the range of (4.0 -- 6.0)mM. The effect of diverse ions on the determination was also investigated in detail. (author)

  8. Studying the association complex formation of atomoxetine and fluvoxamine with eosin Y and its application in their fluorimetric determination

    Derayea, Sayed M.; Omar, Mahmoud A.; Abu-hassan, Ahmed A.

    2018-03-01

    A simple, sensitive and non-extractive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed and validated for the determination of two psychoanaleptic drugs, atomoxetine and fluvoxamine, in pure forms and pharmaceutical dosage forms. The proposed method is based on the formation of binary complexes between eosin Y and the studied drugs in the presence of a Teorell-Stenhagen buffer. The quenching of the native fluorescence of eosin Y due to complex formation with the studied drugs was measured spectrofluorimetrically at 545 nm after excitation at 302 nm. At the optimum reaction conditions, the fluorescence quenching values (ΔF) and concentrations were rectilinear over the concentration ranges of 0.2-2.2 and 0.3-2.2 µg ml-1 for atomoxetine and fluvoxamine, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in their pharmaceutical formulations with average percentage recoveries of 100.13 ± 0.66 and 99.69 ± 0.44 for atomoxetine and fluvoxamine, respectively (n = 5), without interference from common excipients.

  9. Studying the association complex formation of atomoxetine and fluvoxamine with eosin Y and its application in their fluorimetric determination.

    Derayea, Sayed M; Omar, Mahmoud A; Abu-Hassan, Ahmed A

    2018-03-01

    A simple, sensitive and non-extractive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed and validated for the determination of two psychoanaleptic drugs, atomoxetine and fluvoxamine, in pure forms and pharmaceutical dosage forms. The proposed method is based on the formation of binary complexes between eosin Y and the studied drugs in the presence of a Teorell-Stenhagen buffer. The quenching of the native fluorescence of eosin Y due to complex formation with the studied drugs was measured spectrofluorimetrically at 545 nm after excitation at 302 nm. At the optimum reaction conditions, the fluorescence quenching values (Δ F ) and concentrations were rectilinear over the concentration ranges of 0.2-2.2 and 0.3-2.2 µg ml -1 for atomoxetine and fluvoxamine, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in their pharmaceutical formulations with average percentage recoveries of 100.13 ± 0.66 and 99.69 ± 0.44 for atomoxetine and fluvoxamine, respectively ( n  = 5), without interference from common excipients.

  10. Methodology for determination of trace elements in mineral phases of iron banded formation by LA-ICP-MS

    Sousa, Denise V.M. de; Nalini Junior, Herminio A.; Sampaio, Geraldo M.S.; Abreu, Adriana T. de; Lana, Cristiano de C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the chemical composition of mineral phases of iron formation (FF), especially of trace elements, is an important tool in the understanding of the genesis of these rocks and the contribution of the phases in the composition of whole rock. Low mass fraction of such elements in the mineral phases present in this rock type requires a suitable analytical procedure. The laser ablation technique coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) has been widely used for determination of trace elements in geological samples. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop calibration curves for determination of trace elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) in mineral phases of banded iron formations by LA-ICP-MS. Several certified reference materials (CRM) were used for calibrate the equipment. The analytical conditions were checked by CRM NIST SRM 614. The results were satisfactory, since the curves showed good linearity coefficients, good accuracy and precision of results. (author)

  11. Further Aspects of Ochratoxin A-Cation Interactions: Complex Formation with Zinc Ions and a Novel Analytical Application of Ochratoxin A-Magnesium Interaction in the HPLC-FLD System

    Miklós Poór

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin produced by different Aspergillus and Penicillium species. Since its mechanism of action is not fully understood yet, it is important to gain further insight into different interactions of OTA at the molecular level. OTA is found worldwide in many foods and drinks. Moreover, it can also be detected in human and animal tissues and body fluids, as well. Therefore, the development of highly sensitive quantitative methods for the determination of OTA is of utmost importance. OTA most likely forms complexes with divalent cations, both in cells and body fluids. In the present study, the OTA-zinc interaction was investigated and compared to OTA-magnesium complex formation using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Our results show that zinc(II ion forms a two-fold higher stable complex with OTA than magnesium(II ion. In addition, based on the enhanced fluorescence emission of OTA in its magnesium-bound form, a novel RP-HPLC-fluorescence detector (FLD method was also established. Our results highlight that the application of magnesium chloride in alkaline eluents results in an approximately two-fold increase in sensitivity using the HPLC-FLD technique.

  12. Elucidating the mechanism of Cr(VI) formation upon the interaction with metal oxides during coal oxy-fuel combustion.

    Chen, Juan; Jiao, Facun; Zhang, Lian; Yao, Hong; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-15

    The thermodynamics underpinning the interaction of Cr-bearing species with basic metal oxides, i.e. K2O, Fe2O3, MgO and CaO, during the air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal have been examined. The synchrotron-based X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used for Cr speciation. For the oxides tested, Cr(VI) formation is dominated by the reduction potential of the metals. The oxides of Ca(2+) with high reduction potential favored the oxidation of Cr(III), same for K(+). The other two basic metals, Fe2O3 and MgO with lower reduction potentials reacted with Cr(III) to form the corresponding chromites at the temperatures above 600°C. Coal combustion experiments in drop-tube furnace have confirmed the rapid capture of Cr vapors, either trivalent or hexavalent, by CaO into solid ash. The existence of HCl in flue gas favored the vaporization of Cr as CrO2Cl2, which was in turn captured by CaO into chromate. Both Fe2O3 and MgO exhibited less capability on scavenging the Cr(VI) vapor. Particularly, MgO alone exhibited a low capability for capturing the vaporized Cr(III) vapors. However, its co-existence with CaO in the furnace inhibited the Cr(VI) formation. This is beneficial for minimizing the toxicity of Cr in the coal combustion-derived fly ash. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. HISTORY OF GALAXY INTERACTIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION OVER THE LAST 7 Gyr FROM GEMS

    Jogee, Shardha; Miller, Sarah H.; Penner, Kyle; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Bell, Eric F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robaina, Aday R.; Borch, Andrea; Haeussler, Boris; Jahnke, Knud; Conselice, Christopher J.; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Barazza, Fabio D.; Barden, Marco; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Peng, Chien Y.; Heymans, Catherine; McIntosh, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive estimate of the frequency of galaxy mergers and their impact on star formation over z∼ 0.24-0.80 (lookback time T b ∼ 3-7 Gyr) using ∼3600 (M≥ 1 x 10 9 M sun ) galaxies with GEMS Hubble Space Telescope, COMBO-17, and Spitzer data. Our results are as follows. (1) Among ∼790 high-mass (M≥ 2.5 x 10 10 M sun ) galaxies, the visually based merger fraction over z∼ 0.24-0.80, ranges from 9% ± 5% to 8% ± 2%. Lower limits on the major merger and minor merger fraction over this interval range from 1.1% to 3.5%, and 3.6% to 7.5%, respectively. This is the first, albeit approximate, empirical estimate of the frequency of minor mergers over the last 7 Gyr. Assuming a visibility timescale of ∼0.5 Gyr, it follows that over T b ∼ 3-7 Gyr, ∼68% of high-mass systems have undergone a merger of mass ratio >1/10, with ∼16%, 45%, and 7% of these corresponding respectively to major, minor, and ambiguous 'major or minor' mergers. The average merger rate is ∼ a few x10 -4 galaxies Gyr -1 Mpc -3 . Among ∼2840 blue-cloud galaxies of mass M≥ 1.0 x 10 9 M sun , similar results hold. (2) We compare the empirical merger fraction and merger rate for high-mass galaxies to three Λ cold dark matter-based models: halo occupation distribution models, semi-analytic models, and hydrodynamic SPH simulations. We find qualitative agreement between observations and models such that the (major+minor) merger fraction or rate from different models bracket the observations, and show a factor of 5 dispersion. Near-future improvements can now start to rule out certain merger scenarios. (3) Among ∼3698 M≥ 1.0 x 10 9 M sun galaxies, we find that the mean star formation rate (SFR) of visibly merging systems is only modestly enhanced compared to non-interacting galaxies over z∼ 0.24-0.80. Visibly merging systems only account for a small fraction ( b ∼ 3-7 Gyr. This complements the results of Wolf et al. over a shorter time interval of T b ∼ 6

  14. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    Mili Jeon

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory (tracheal system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs, Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr tyrosine kinase (TK. Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  15. Determination of neutron interaction effect and subcriticality for light water moderated UO2 lattices

    Miyoshi, Y.; Suzaki, T.; Kobayashi, I.

    1984-01-01

    From the view point of nuclear criticality safety for fuel storage, transport and processing, a series of critical experiments have been performed using a Tank-type Critical Assembly (TCA) at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The first series of experiments are concerned with the neutron interaction effects between two cores composed of BWR-type fuel rods in water. The reactivity contribution from one core to another have been measured by the water level worth method and a pulsed neutron source method. Two symmetrical rectangular cores were composed in TCA and the water gap between two cores were parametrically changed. The volume ratios of water to fuel are 1.83 and 2.48 of which lattice pitches are 1.96 cm and 2.15 cm respectively. As for the pulsed neutron experiment, Gozani's area ratio method is theoretically extended to a coupled-core system, and the applicability of this method has been studied for determination of the reactivity at a subcritical state and the coupling coefficient that represents reactivity contribution from one core to another. The object of the second series of experiment is development of the technique which determine the reactivity at a high sub-critical state. The CF-252 source driven neutron noise analysis method proposed by Mihalczo has been tested in order to examine whether it could be available for measuring the subcriticality for the light water moderated system. The tested core was water reflected annular type which consisted of 308 UO 2 fuel rods and had a void region at the core center

  16. HIGH STAR FORMATION RATES IN TURBULENT ATOMIC-DOMINATED GAS IN THE INTERACTING GALAXIES IC 2163 AND NGC 2207

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Kaufman, Michele; Bournaud, Frédéric; Juneau, Stéphanie; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Struck, Curtis; Brinks, Elias

    2016-01-01

    CO observations of the interacting galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207 are combined with HI, H α , and 24 μ m observations to study the star formation rate (SFR) surface density as a function of the gas surface density. More than half of the high-SFR regions are HI dominated. When compared to other galaxies, these HI-dominated regions have excess SFRs relative to their molecular gas surface densities but normal SFRs relative to their total gas surface densities. The HI-dominated regions are mostly located in the outer part of NGC 2207 where the HI velocity dispersion is high, 40–50 km s −1 . We suggest that the star-forming clouds in these regions have envelopes at lower densities than normal, making them predominantly atomic, and cores at higher densities than normal because of the high turbulent Mach numbers. This is consistent with theoretical predictions of a flattening in the density probability distribution function for compressive, high Mach number turbulence.

  17. Morphologic study of the effect of iron on pseudocyst formation in Trichomonas vaginalis and its interaction with human epithelial cells.

    Dias-Lopes, Geovane; Saboia-Vahia, Leonardo; Margotti, Eliane Trindade; Fernandes, Nilma de Souza; Castro, Cássia Luana de Faria; Oliveira, Francisco Odencio; Peixoto, Juliana Figueiredo; Britto, Constança; Silva, Fernando Costa E; Cuervo, Patricia; Jesus, José Batista de

    2017-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aetiological agent of human trichomoniasis, which is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases in humans. Iron is an important element for the survival of this parasite and the colonisation of the host urogenital tract. In this study, we investigated the effects of iron on parasite proliferation in the dynamics of pseudocyst formation and morphologically characterised iron depletion-induced pseudocysts. We performed structural and ultrastructural analyses using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that iron depletion (i) interrupts the proliferation of T. vaginalis, (ii) induces morphological changes in typical multiplicative trophozoites to spherical non-proliferative, non-motile pseudocysts, and (iii) induces the arrest of cell division at different stages of the cell cycle; (iv) iron is the fundamental element for the maintenance of typical trophozoite morphology; (v) pseudocysts induced by iron depletion are viable and reversible forms; and, finally, (vi) we demonstrated that pseudocysts induced by iron depletion are able to interact with human epithelial cells maintaining their spherical forms. Together, these data suggest that pseudocysts could be induced as a response to iron nutritional stress and could have a potential role in the transmission and infection of T. vaginalis.

  18. Functional Metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Interactions with Spinach Indigenous Microorganisms during Biofilm Formation

    Carter, Michelle Q.; Xue, Kai; Brandl, Maria T.; Liu, Feifei; Wu, Liyou; Louie, Jacqueline W.; Mandrell, Robert E.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) with spinach leaf indigenous microorganisms during co-colonization and establishment of a mixed biofilm on a stainless steel surface. Stainless steel surface was selected to mimic the surface of produce-processing equipment, where retention of foodborne pathogens such as EcO157 could serve as a potential source for transmission. We observed a positive effect of spinach-associated microbes on the initial attachment of EcO157, but an antagonistic effect on the EcO157 population at the later stage of biofilm formation. Metagenomic analyses of the biofilm community with the GeoChip revealed an extremely diverse community (gene richness, 23409; Shannon-Weiner index H, 9.55). Presence of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm resulted in a significant decrease in the community α-diversity (t test, Pbiofilm at 48 h (ANOVA, Pbiofilm is likely associated with its metabolic potential in utilizing spinach nutrients: the generation time of EcO157 in spinach lysates at 28°C is ∼ 38 min, which is comparable to that in rich broth. The significant decrease in the abundance of many genes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the EcO157-inoculated biofilms (t test, Pbiofilm species. PMID:22957052

  19. HIGH STAR FORMATION RATES IN TURBULENT ATOMIC-DOMINATED GAS IN THE INTERACTING GALAXIES IC 2163 AND NGC 2207

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kaufman, Michele [110 Westchester Rd, Newton, MA 02458 (United States); Bournaud, Frédéric; Juneau, Stéphanie [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Elmegreen, Debra Meloy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Struck, Curtis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Brinks, Elias, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com, E-mail: kaufmanrallis@icloud.com, E-mail: frederic.bournaud@gmail.com, E-mail: stephanie.juneau@cea.fr, E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu, E-mail: struck@iastate.edu, E-mail: e.brinks@herts.ac.uk [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-20

    CO observations of the interacting galaxies IC 2163 and NGC 2207 are combined with HI, H α , and 24 μ m observations to study the star formation rate (SFR) surface density as a function of the gas surface density. More than half of the high-SFR regions are HI dominated. When compared to other galaxies, these HI-dominated regions have excess SFRs relative to their molecular gas surface densities but normal SFRs relative to their total gas surface densities. The HI-dominated regions are mostly located in the outer part of NGC 2207 where the HI velocity dispersion is high, 40–50 km s{sup −1}. We suggest that the star-forming clouds in these regions have envelopes at lower densities than normal, making them predominantly atomic, and cores at higher densities than normal because of the high turbulent Mach numbers. This is consistent with theoretical predictions of a flattening in the density probability distribution function for compressive, high Mach number turbulence.

  20. Calcium carbonate interaction analysis in polypropylene compounds and their impact on the formation of beta crystalline phase of this polymer

    Sakahara, Rogerio M.; Hui, Wang S.

    2011-01-01

    The insertion of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) in polypropylene compound is a thoroughly known technique widely studied in the academic area and in the industry. Its wide application is due, mainly, to increase mechanical properties with low manufacturing cost. These improvements in this polymer make it more versatile and competitive compared to other expensive polymers. In this study, the incorporation of four types of CaCO3 from the same manufacturer were compared and the focus was on the size of this mineral filler. Furthermore, it was analyzed the interaction of graphitized polypropylene with maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) in the same samples. All these samples were analyzed by WAXS and SEM. The physical properties of tensile strength and impact were also analyzed. It was observed from this study that the smallest CaCO3 produced with PP-g-MA resulted in better physical properties with the formation of a crystalline phase beta, as originally studied by other authors using other raw materials. (author)

  1. Development of a System Model for Determining Optimal Personnel Interaction Strategy in a Production Industry

    B. Kareem

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing organizations have become more complex in recent time as a result of technological advances. Communication among production workers operating in an environment marked by increased organizational complexity may require planning for the economically appropriate selection of network channels/media with enhanced productivity. This paper examines traditional and modern communication channels (media and their comparative advantages over one another in their adoption in manufacturing organizations. In this framework, six media (human messengers, mobile-phones, intranet, fixed-internet, mobile-internet, and private branch exchange [PBX] phone systems were subjected to analyses using five identified network patterns (all-channel, chain, Y, wheel, and circle of interactions in manufacturing organizations. Costs, benefits, and the utility of the channels were integrated into the model and utilized to determine the most sustainable media that could enhance productivity in industry. The developed model was implemented using expert data/information collected from the plastic production industry. The results of an availability assessment showed that the enhancement of productivity could be fully achieved by utilizing mobile phones and internet networks, but when considering overall utility, only mobile phones could bring about the desired productivity with 0.59 probability. The findings suggest that the system developed is robust in revealing how productivity might be affected by means of communication among industrial workers.

  2. Interaction between physiological and cognitive determinants of emotions: experimental studies on Schachter's theory of emotions.

    Erdmann, G; Janke, W

    1978-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction between physiological arousal and situation-derived cognitions in the determination of feeling states that is proposed in Schachter's theory of emotions. The degree of bodily arousal was varied by disguised oral administration of a placebo or the sympathicomimetic agent ephedrine. The situational circumstances were varied by instructions offering cues for (a) no emotions ('neutral' control), or the feeling states called (b) 'anger', (c) 'happiness', and (d) anxiety'. The subjects were 72 male students. The dependent variables were blood pressure, heart rate, a list of bodily symptoms, and an adjective check list. The results within the 'anger' and 'happiness' condition were in accordance with Schachter's theory: depending on the type of situation, ephedrine-induced arousal either decreased or increased positive descriptions of mood. The emotional effects of the 'anxiety' condition, however, were independent of the drug-induced arousal level. Contrary to Schachter's theory, anxiety reactions occured also in a state of low physiological arousal and did not increase with increasing arousal.

  3. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of aceclofenac following azo dye formation with 4-carboxyl-2,6-dinitrobenzene diazonium ion.

    Aderibigbe, Segun A; Adegoke, Olajire A; Idowu, Olakunle S; Olaleye, Sefiu O

    2012-01-01

    The study is a description of a sensitive spectrophotometric determination of aceclofenac following azo dye formation with 4-carboxyl-2,6-dinitrobenzenediazonium ion (CDNBD). Spot test and thin layer chromatography revealed the formation of a new compound distinct from CDNBD and aceclofenac. Optimization studies established a reaction time of 5 min at 30 degrees C after vortex mixing the drug/CDNBD for 10 s. An absorption maximum of 430 nm was selected as analytical wavelength. A linear response was observed over 1.2-4.8 μg/mL of aceclofenac with a correlation coefficient of 0.9983 and the drug combined with CDNBD at stoichiometric ratio of 2 : 1. The method has a limit of detection of 0.403 μg/mL, limit of quantitation of 1.22 μg/mL and is reproducible over a three day assessment. The method gave Sandell's sensitivity of 3.279 ng/cm2. Intra- and inter-day accuracies (in terms of errors) were less than 6% while precisions were of the order of 0.03-1.89% (RSD). The developed spectrophotometric method is of equivalent accuracy (p > 0.05) with British Pharmacopoeia, 2010 potentiometric method. It has the advantages of speed, simplicity, sensitivity and more affordable instrumentation and could found application as a rapid and sensitive analytical method of aceclofenac. It is the first described method by azo dye derivatization for the analysis of aceclofenac in bulk samples and dosage forms.

  4. Determination of the enthalpy of formation of Ni-Al intermetallic compounds using differential scanning calorimetry technique

    Kubaski, Evaldo Toniolo; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani; Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The compositions Ni20Al80, Ni25Al75, Ni40Al60, Ni50Al50, Ni60Al40 and Ni75Al25 (at. %) were heated in a calibrated thermal analysis equipment. All runs were conducted at a heating rate of 10 deg C/min under a dynamic argon atmosphere. Each composition was heated until the completion of the corresponding exothermic reaction responsible for intermetallic compound formation, and, also heated to 1480 deg C. The products obtained were characterized using X ray diffraction in order to identify the intermetallic compounds that were synthesized. Moreover, the results were evaluated using variance analysis. As a result, enthalpies of formation of Ni 2 Al 3 and Ni 3 Al compounds were determined by means of this methodology. Experimental values were 167 kJ/mol and 93 kJ/mol for Ni 2 Al 3 and Ni 3 Al, respectively. The former is 18% lower than the value found on literature, while the latter is 6% greater. (author)

  5. Method for determining scan timing based on analysis of formation process of the time-density curve

    Yamaguchi, Isao; Ishida, Tomokazu; Kidoya, Eiji; Higashimura, Kyoji; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    A strict determination of scan timing is needed for dynamic multi-phase scanning and 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) by multi-detector row CT (MDCT). In the present study, contrast media arrival time (T AR ) was measured in the abdominal aorta at the bifurcation of the celiac artery for confirmation of circulatory differences in patients. In addition, we analyzed the process of formation of the time-density curve (TDC) and examined factors that affect the time to peak aortic enhancement (T PA ). Mean T AR was 15.57±3.75 s. TDCs were plotted for each duration of injection. The rising portions of TDCs were superimposed on one another. TDCs with longer injection durations were piled up upon one another. Rise angle was approximately constant in response to each flow rate. Rise time (T R ) showed a good correlation with injection duration (T ID ). T R was 1.01 T ID (R 2 =0.994) in the phantom study and 0.94 T lD -0.60 (R 2 =0.988) in the clinical study. In conclusion, for the selection of optimal scan timing it is useful to determine T R at a given point and to determine the time from T AR . (author)

  6. Investigations on the formation of mercuric thiotungstate and pH-metric determination of the thiotungstate anion

    Prasad, S [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1981-10-01

    The reaction between mercuric and thiotungstate ions has been followed by means of direct and reverse pH and conductometric titrations in aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic media. The end-points obtained from the sharp inflectons in titration curves occur when molecular ratio of Hg/sup 2 +/ : WS/sub 4//sup 2 -/ is 1 : 1 and correspond to the formation and precipitation of normal mercuric thiotungstate HgS.WS/sub 3/ in the neighbourhood of pH 4.5. The precipitation of this compound has been found to be almost quantitative and the accuracy and reproducibility of the electrometric results are excellent even at low concentrations (1 x 10/sup -3/ M) of the reactants. The pH titrations offer a simple, rapid and accurate method for the determination of the thiotungstate anion as mercuric thiotungstate.

  7. Preparation of americium metal of high purity and determination of the heat of formation of the hydrated trivalent americium ion

    Spirlet, J.C.

    1975-10-01

    In order to redetermine some physical and chemical properties of americium metal, several grams of Am-241 have been prepared by two independent methods: lanthanum reduction of the oxide and thermal dissociation of the intermetallic compound Pt 5 Am. After its separation from excess lanthanum or alloy constituent by evaporation, americium metal was further purified by sublimation at 1100 deg C and 10 -6 Torr. Irrespective of the method of preparation, the americium samples displayed the same d.h.c.p. crystal structure. As determined by vacuum hot extraction, the oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen contents are equal to or smaller than 250, 50 and 20 ppm, respectively. The heats of solution of americium metal (d.c.h.p. structure) in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions have been measured at 298.15+-0.05K. The standard enthalpy of formation of Am 3+ (aq) is obtained as -616.7+-1.2 kJ mol -1 [fr

  8. Investigations on the formation of mercuric thiotungstate and pH-metric determination of the thiotungstate anion

    Prasad, S.

    1981-01-01

    The reaction between mercuric and thiotungstate ions has been followed by means of direct and reverse pH and conductometric titrations in aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic media. The end-points obtained from the sharp inflectons in titration curves occur when molecular ratio of Hg 2+ : WS 4 2- is 1 : 1 and correspond to the formation and precipitation of normal mercuric thiotungstate HgS.WS 3 in the neighbourhood of pH 4.5. The precipitation of this compound has been found to be almost quantitative and the accuracy and reproducibility of the electrometric results are excellent even at low concentrations (1 x 10 -3 M) of the reactants. The pH titrations offer a simple, rapid and accurate method for the determination of the thiotungstate anion as mercuric thiotungstate. (Author) [pt

  9. Determination of the saturation magnetization, anisotropy field, mean field interaction, and switching field distribution for nanocrystalline hard magnets

    McCallum, R. William

    2005-01-01

    For a uniaxial nanocrystalline magnetic material, the determination of the saturation magnetization, M s , requires measurements of the magnetization at fields which exceed the anisotropy field. For a typical RE-Tm compound, where RE=rare earth and Tm=transition metal, this may require fields above 7 T if the approach to saturation law is used. However for an isotropic material composed of a random distribution of non-interacting uniaxial grains, both M s and the anisotropy filed, H a , may be determined by fitting the Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model (Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. 240 (1948) 599) to the reversible part of the demagnetization curve in the first quadrant. Furthermore, using the mean field interaction model of Callen, Liu and Cullen [2], a quantitative measure of the interaction strength for interacting particles may be determined. In conjunction with an analytical fit to the first quadrant demagnetization curve of the SW model, this allows M s , H a and the mean field interaction constant of a nanocrystalline magnet to be determined from measurements below 5 T. Furthermore, comparison of the model solution for the reversible magnetization with experimental data in the 2nd and 3rd quadrants allows the accurate determination of the switching field distribution. In many cases the hysteresis loop may be accurately described by a normal distribution of switching fields

  10. Interactive Highlighting for Just-in-Time Formative Assessment during Whole-Class Instruction: Effects on Vocabulary Learning and Reading Comprehension

    Ponce, Héctor R.; Mayer, Richard E.; Figueroa, Verónica A.; López, Mario J.

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of a software that supports formative assessment in real-time of learners' vocabulary knowledge through an interactive highlighting method. Students in a classroom are given a passage on their computer screen and asked to highlight the words they do not understand. This information is summarized on the…

  11. Ethnic differentials in the timing of family formation: A case study of the complex interaction between ethnicity, socioeconomic level, and marriage market pressure

    Heather Booth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic differentials in the timing of family formation in Fiji cannot be adequately explained by hypotheses commonly used to explain differentials in fertility behaviour, namely the norms, characteristics, minority group and interaction hypotheses. The norms hypothesis explains a large part of the differentials, but socio-economic factors and changing norms are increasingly involved. The interaction hypothesis is partially operational but cannot explain decreasing age at marriage among lower socio-economic groups. A more comprehensive approach incorporates the counterbalancing effects of modernisation and marriage market imbalances arising from fertility transition. This approach also allows for true interactions between norms, socio-economic characteristics and demographic behaviour.

  12. Double-Bottom Chaotic Map Particle Swarm Optimization Based on Chi-Square Test to Determine Gene-Gene Interactions

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Gene-gene interaction studies focus on the investigation of the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes for disease susceptibility. Statistical methods are widely used to search for a good model of gene-gene interaction for disease analysis, and the previously determined models have successfully explained the effects between SNPs and diseases. However, the huge numbers of potential combinations of SNP genotypes limit the use of statistical methods for analysing high-order interaction, and finding an available high-order model of gene-gene interaction remains a challenge. In this study, an improved particle swarm optimization with double-bottom chaotic maps (DBM-PSO) was applied to assist statistical methods in the analysis of associated variations to disease susceptibility. A big data set was simulated using the published genotype frequencies of 26 SNPs amongst eight genes for breast cancer. Results showed that the proposed DBM-PSO successfully determined two- to six-order models of gene-gene interaction for the risk association with breast cancer (odds ratio > 1.0; P value <0.05). Analysis results supported that the proposed DBM-PSO can identify good models and provide higher chi-square values than conventional PSO. This study indicates that DBM-PSO is a robust and precise algorithm for determination of gene-gene interaction models for breast cancer. PMID:24895547

  13. An inverse method for determining the interaction force between the probe and sample using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Chang, Win-Jin; Fang, Te-Hua

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a means for calculating the interaction force during the scanning process using a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe. The determination of the interaction force in the scanning system is regarded as an inverse vibration problem. The conjugate gradient method is applied to treat the inverse problem using available displacement measurements. The results show that the conjugate gradient method is less sensitive to measurement errors and prior information on the functional form of quality was not required. Furthermore, the initial guesses for the interaction force can be arbitrarily chosen for the iteration process

  14. Characteristics of the interaction of calcium with casein submicelles as determined by analytical affinity chromatography

    Jang, H.D.; Swaisgood, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    Interaction of calcium with casein submicelles was investigated in CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers and with synthetic milk salt solutions using the technique of analytical affinity chromatography. Micelles that had been prepared by size exclusion chromatography with glycerolpropyl controlled-pore glass from fresh raw skim milk that had never been cooled, were dialyzed at room temperature against calcium-free imidazole buffer, pH 6.7. Resulting submicelles were covalently immobilized on succinamidopropyl controlled-pore glass (300-nm pore size). Using 45Ca to monitor the elution retardation, the affinity of free Ca2+ and calcium salt species was determined at temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees C and pH 6.0 to 7.5. Increasing the pH in this range or increasing the temperature strengthened the binding of calcium to submicelles, similar to previous observations with individual caseins. However, the enthalpy change obtained from the temperature dependence was considerably greater than that reported for alpha s1- and beta-caseins. Furthermore, the elution profiles for 45Ca in milk salt solutions were decidedly different from those in CaCl2 or calcium phosphate buffers and the affinities were also greater. For example, at pH 6.7 and 30 degrees C the average dissociation constant for the submicelle-calcium complex is 0.074 mM for CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers, vs 0.016 mM for the milk salt solution. The asymmetric frontal boundaries and higher average affinities observed with milk salts may be due to binding of calcium salts with greater affinity in addition to the binding of free Ca2+ in these solutions

  15. [Determination of melamine and ammeline in eggs and meat using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography].

    Li, Yanzhao; Hao, Weiqiang; Wang, Yubo; Chen, Qiang; Li, Jinchun; Sun, Xiaoli

    2012-07-01

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) method for the determination of melamine and its degradation product ammeline in eggs and meat has been developed. The separation was carried out on a ZIC-HILIC column with 3 mmol/L NH4H2PO4 (pH 6.9)-acetonitrile (20: 80, v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, and detected at 220 nm. Compared with the reversed-phase liquid chromatography, this method can avoid the use of ion pair reagents and thus simplify the composition of mobile phase. Under the above chromatographic conditions, melamine and ammeline had good peak shapes and moderate retention times. Good separation between these compounds and the substances that were naturally contained in the samples can be achieved. For the sample preparation, the analytes were first extracted with 0.1% phosphoric acid due to the basicity of melamine and ammeline. Then, metaphosphoric acid and acetonitrile were used to remove proteins and saccharides by precipitation. After the filtration and removal of acetonitrile by rotary evaporation under vacuum, the filtrate was cleaned-up by solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique in which a cation exchange column was used. The SPE column was activated by using methanol and 0.1% phosphoric acid. A solution of 5% ammonia methanol was chosen as eluent. The residues obtained from the eluant by evaporating the solvent were resolved in the mobile phase. It was found that there was a good linear relationship between concentration and detector response within the range of 0.4-40 mg/L. The limits of detection were 2 mg/kg for both melamine and ammeline. The average recoveries were between 80% and 105% in the spiked range of 2-10 mg/kg. The relative standard deviations were not more than 10%. The solutions of melamine and ammeline were stable in a month. The established method can be used in practice to determine melamine and ammeline simultaneously in egg and meat samples.

  16. Functional metagenomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 interactions with spinach indigenous microorganisms during biofilm formation.

    Michelle Q Carter

    Full Text Available The increase in foodborne outbreaks worldwide attributed to fresh fruit and vegetables suggests that produce may serve as an ecological niche for enteric pathogens. Here we examined the interaction of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157 with spinach leaf indigenous microorganisms during co-colonization and establishment of a mixed biofilm on a stainless steel surface. Stainless steel surface was selected to mimic the surface of produce-processing equipment, where retention of foodborne pathogens such as EcO157 could serve as a potential source for transmission. We observed a positive effect of spinach-associated microbes on the initial attachment of EcO157, but an antagonistic effect on the EcO157 population at the later stage of biofilm formation. Metagenomic analyses of the biofilm community with the GeoChip revealed an extremely diverse community (gene richness, 23409; Shannon-Weiner index H, 9.55. Presence of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm resulted in a significant decrease in the community α-diversity (t test, P<0.05, indicating a putative competition between the pathogen and indigenous spinach microbes. The decrease in the β-diversity of the EcO157-inoculated biofilm at 48 h (ANOVA, P<0.05 suggested a convergent shift in functional composition in response to EcO157 invasion. The success of EcO157 in the mixed biofilm is likely associated with its metabolic potential in utilizing spinach nutrients: the generation time of EcO157 in spinach lysates at 28°C is ~ 38 min, which is comparable to that in rich broth. The significant decrease in the abundance of many genes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the EcO157-inoculated biofilms (t test, P<0.05 further support our conclusion that competition for essential macronutrients is likely the primary interaction between the EcO157 and indigenous spinach-biofilm species.

  17. Inhibition of HCV replication by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4 through interaction with HCV NS5B and alteration of lipid droplet formation.

    In-Woo Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3'x RNA element within the HCV 3' untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3' X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4, a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  18. Interactions Between Snow-Adapted Organisms, Minerals and Snow in a Mars-Analog Environment, and Implications for the Possible Formation of Mineral Biosignatures

    Hausrath, E.; Bartlett, C. L.; Garcia, A. H.; Tschauner, O. D.; Murray, A. E.; Raymond, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that icy environments on bodies such as Mars, Europa, and Enceladus may be important potential habitats in our solar system. Life in icy environments faces many challenges, including water limitation, temperature extremes, and nutrient limitation. Understanding how life has adapted to withstand these challenges on Earth may help understand potential life on other icy worlds, and understanding the interactions of such life with minerals may help shed light on the detection of possible mineral biosignatures. Snow environments, being particularly nutrient limited, may require specific adaptations by the microbiota living there. Previous observations have suggested that associated minerals and microorganisms play an important role in snow algae micronutrient acquisition. Here, in order to interpret micronutrient uptake by snow algae, and potential formation of mineral biosignatures, we present observations of interactions between snow algae and associated microorganisms and minerals in both natural, Mars-analog environments, and laboratory experiments. Samples of snow, dust, snow algae, and microorganisms were collected from Mount Anderson Ridge, CA. Some samples were DAPI-stained and analyzed by epifluorescent microscopy, and others were freeze-dried and examined by scanning electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Xenic cultures of the snow alga Chloromonas brevispina were also grown under Fe-limiting conditions with and without the Fe-containing mineral nontronite to determine impacts of the mineral on algal growth. Observations from epifluorescent microscopy show bacteria closely associated with the snow algae, consistent with a potential role in micronutrient acquisition. Particles are also present on the algal cell walls, and synchrotron-XRD and XRF observations indicate that they are Fe-rich, and may therefore be a micronutrient source. Laboratory experiments indicated

  19. Confirmation of vanadium complex formation using electrospray mass spectrometry and determination of vanadium speciation by sample stacking capillary electrophoresis

    Chen Zuliang; Owens, Gary; Naidu, Ravendra

    2007-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV detection was used to determine vanadium species. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) were investigated to determine whether these ligands formed stable anionic complexes with vanadium. Of all the ligands studied HEDTA was the most suitable ligand because it gave the largest UV response with reasonable migration time. Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) was used to confirm the formation of [VO 2 (HEDTA)] 2- and [VO(HEDTA)] 1- in solution. An electrolyte containing 25 mM phosphate, 0.25 mM tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) at pH 5.5 was optimum for the separation of these anionic vanadium complexes. Sample stacking techniques, including large-volume sample stacking (LVSS) and field-amplified sample injection (FASI), were tested to improve the sensitivity. Best sensitivity was obtained using FASI, with detection limits of 0.001 μM, equivalent to 0.4 μg L -1 , for [VO 2 (HEDTA)] 2- and 0.01 μM, equivalent to 3.4 μg L -1 for [VO(HEDTA)] 1- . The utility of the method for the speciation of V(IV) and V(V) was demonstrated using ground water samples

  20. Confirmation of vanadium complex formation using electrospray mass spectrometry and determination of vanadium speciation by sample stacking capillary electrophoresis

    Chen Zuliang [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)]. E-mail: zuliang.chen@unisa.edu.au; Owens, Gary [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Naidu, Ravendra [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of Environments, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2007-02-28

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV detection was used to determine vanadium species. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) were investigated to determine whether these ligands formed stable anionic complexes with vanadium. Of all the ligands studied HEDTA was the most suitable ligand because it gave the largest UV response with reasonable migration time. Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) was used to confirm the formation of [VO{sub 2}(HEDTA)]{sup 2-} and [VO(HEDTA)]{sup 1-} in solution. An electrolyte containing 25 mM phosphate, 0.25 mM tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) at pH 5.5 was optimum for the separation of these anionic vanadium complexes. Sample stacking techniques, including large-volume sample stacking (LVSS) and field-amplified sample injection (FASI), were tested to improve the sensitivity. Best sensitivity was obtained using FASI, with detection limits of 0.001 {mu}M, equivalent to 0.4 {mu}g L{sup -1}, for [VO{sub 2}(HEDTA)]{sup 2-} and 0.01 {mu}M, equivalent to 3.4 {mu}g L{sup -1} for [VO(HEDTA)]{sup 1-}. The utility of the method for the speciation of V(IV) and V(V) was demonstrated using ground water samples.

  1. Determination of clemastine hydrogen fumarate, desloratadine, losartan potassium and moxepril HCl through binary complex formation with eosin

    Soad S. Abd El-Hay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been established for the determination of clemastine hydrogen fumarate (I, desloratadine (II, losartan potassium(III and moxepril HCl(IV based on binary complex formation with eosin. The method does not involve solvent extraction through the use of a non-ionic surfactant (methylcellulose. The color of the produced complex was measured at 552, 549 nm for (I, (II while was measured at 540 nm for (III and (IV. Appropriate conditions were established for the color reaction between eosin and the studied drugs to obtain maximum sensitivity. Under the proposed conditions, the method is applicable over concentration range of 1.25–11.25, 0.31–2.81, 2.5–20 and 1.25–15 μg/ml for (I, (II, (III and (IV, respectively. The molar absorptivity (ε, sandell sensitivity, detection (LOD and quantitation limits (LOQ are calculated. Unlike other reported ion-pair techniques, the suggested methods have the advantage of being applicable for the determination of the four drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms without prior extraction with excellent recoveries.

  2. Determination of formation heterogeneity at a range of scales using novel multi-electrode resistivity scanning techniques

    Williams, G.M.; Jackson, P.D.; Ward, R.S.; Sen, M.A.; Meldrum, P.; Lovell, M.

    1991-01-01

    The traditional method of measuring ground resistivity involves passing a current through two outer electrodes, measuring the potential developed across two electrodes in between, and applying Ohm's Law. In the RESCAN system developed by the British Geological Survey, each electrode can be electronically selected and controlled by software to either pass current or measure potential. Thousands of electrodes can be attached to the system either in 2-D surface arrays or along special plastic covered probes driven vertically into the ground or emplaced in boreholes. Under computer control, the resistivity distribution within the emplaced array can be determined automatically with unprecedented detail and speed, and may be displayed as an image. So far, the RESCAN system has been applied at the meso-scale in monitoring the radial migration of an electrolyte introduced into a recharge well in an unconsolidated aquifer; and CORSCAN at the micro-scale on drill cores to evaluate spatial variability in physical properties. The RESCAN technique has considerable potential for determining formation heterogeneity at different scales and provides a basis for developing stochastic models of groundwater and solute flow in heterogeneous systems. 13 figs.; 1 tab.; 12 refs

  3. Cell-cell interactions of isolated and cultured oligodendrocytes: formation of linear occluding junctions and expression of peculiar intramembrane particles.

    Massa, P T; Szuchet, S; Mugnaini, E

    1984-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes were isolated from lamb brain. Freshly isolated cells and cultured cells, either 1- to 4-day-old unattached or 1- to 5-week-old attached, were examined by thin section and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Freeze-fracture of freshly isolated oligodendrocytes showed globular and elongated intramembrane particles similar to those previously described in oligodendrocytes in situ. Enrichment of these particles was seen at sites of inter-oligodendrocyte contact. Numerous gap junctions and scattered linear tight junctional arrays were apparent. Gap junctions were connected to blebs of astrocytic plasma membrane sheared off during isolation, whereas tight junctions were facing extracellular space or blebs of oligodendrocytic plasma membrane. Thin sections of cultured, unattached oligodendrocytes showed rounded cell bodies touching one another at points without forming specialized cell junctions. Cells plated on polylysine-coated aclar dishes attached, emanated numerous, pleomorphic processes, and expressed galactocerebroside and myelin basic protein, characteristic markers for oligodendrocytes. Thin sections showed typical oligodendrocyte ultrastructure but also intermediate filaments not present in unattached cultures. Freeze-fracture showed intramembrane particles similar to but more numerous, and with a different fracture face repartition, than those seen in oligodendrocytes, freshly isolated or in situ. Gap junctions were small and rare. Apposed oligodendrocyte plasma membrane formed linear tight junctions which became more numerous with time in culture. Thus, cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from ovine brains develop and maintain features characteristic of mature oligodendrocytes in situ and can be used to explore formation and maintenance of tight junctions and possibly other classes of cell-cell interactions important in the process of myelination.

  4. Interactions between 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and ascorbate in autophagosome formation during the heat stress response in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Cheng, Fei; Yin, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2016-03-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-CPs) function in the removal of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides but their precise roles in the induction of autophagy have not been characterized. Here we show that heat stress, which is known to induce oxidative stress, leads to the simultaneous accumulation of transcripts encoding 2-CPs and autophagy proteins, as well as autophagosomes, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Virus-induced gene silencing of the tomato peroxiredoxin genes 2-CP1, 2-CP2, and 2-CP1/2 resulted in an increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress. Silencing 2-CP2 or 2-CP1/2 increased the levels of transcripts associated with ascorbate biosynthesis but had no effect on the glutathione pool in the absence of stress. However, the heat-induced accumulation of transcripts associated with the water-water cycle was compromised by the loss of 2-CP1/2 functions. The transcript levels of autophagy-related genes ATG5 and ATG7 were higher in plants with impaired 2-CP1/2 functions, and the formation of autophagosomes increased, together with an accumulation of oxidized and insoluble proteins. Silencing of ATG5 or ATG7 increased the levels of 2-CP transcripts and protein but decreased heat stress tolerance. These results demonstrate that 2-CPs fulfil a pivotal role in heat stress tolerance in tomato, via interactions with ascorbate-dependent pathways and autophagy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  5. Air-sea interaction and formation of the Asian summer monsoon onset vortex over the Bay of Bengal

    Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Mao, Jiangyu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, P.O. Box 9804, Beijing (China); Guan, Yue [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, P.O. Box 9804, Beijing (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yan, Jinghui [China Meteorological Administration, National Climate Center, Beijing (China)

    2012-01-15

    In spring over the southern Bay of Bengal (BOB), a vortex commonly develops, followed by the Asian summer monsoon onset. An analysis of relevant data and a case study reveals that the BOB monsoon onset vortex is formed as a consequence of air-sea interaction over BOB, which is modulated by Tibetan Plateau forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast over the South Asian area during the spring season. Tibetan Plateau forcing in spring generates a prevailing cold northwesterly over India in the lower troposphere. Strong surface sensible heating is then released, forming a prominent surface cyclone with a strong southwesterly along the coastal ocean in northwestern BOB. This southwesterly induces a local offshore current and upwelling, resulting in cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The southwesterly, together with the near-equatorial westerly, also results in a surface anticyclone with descending air over most of BOB and a cyclone with ascending air over the southern part of BOB. In the eastern part of central BOB, where sky is clear, surface wind is weak, and ocean mixed layer is shallow, intense solar radiation and low energy loss due to weak surface latent and sensible heat fluxes act onto a thin ocean layer, resulting in the development of a unique BOB warm pool in spring. Near the surface, water vapor is transferred from northern BOB and other regions to southeastern BOB, where surface sensible heating is relatively high. The atmospheric available potential energy is generated and converted to kinetic energy, thereby resulting in vortex formation. The vortex then intensifies and moves northward, where SST is higher and surface sensible heating is stronger. Meanwhile, the zonal-mean kinetic energy is converted to eddy kinetic energy in the area east of the vortex, and the vortex turns eastward. Eventually, southwesterly sweeps over eastern BOB and merges with the subtropical westerly, leading to the onset of the Asian summer monsoon. (orig.)

  6. The perceived interactivity of top global brand websites and its determinants

    Voorveld, H.A.M.; Neijens, P.C.; Smit, E.G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent reviews of the online advertising literature revealed that interactivity was one of the key topics in that field (Ha 2008; Kim and McMillan, 2008). Three main streams of research can be distinguished in the website interactivity literature. First, several researchers have written about the

  7. SPITZER ANALYSIS OF H II REGION COMPLEXES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS: DETERMINING A SUITABLE MONOCHROMATIC OBSCURED STAR FORMATION INDICATOR

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Babler, B.; Bracker, S.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Misselt, K.; Bolatto, A. D.; Carlson, L. R.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 A) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ∼10 to ∼400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (∼70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ∼ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ∼220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the

  8. Parent-child mediated learning interactions as determinants of cognitive modifiability: recent research and future directions.

    Tzuriel, D

    1999-05-01

    The main objectives of this article are to describe the effects of mediated learning experience (MLE) strategies in mother-child interactions on the child's cognitive modifiability, the effects of distal factors (e.g., socioeconomic status, mother's intelligence, child's personality) on MLE interactions, and the effects of situational variables on MLE processes. Methodological aspects of measurement of MLE interactions and of cognitive modifiability, using a dynamic assessment approach, are discussed. Studies with infants showed that the quality of mother-infant MLE interactions predict later cognitive functioning and that MLE patterns and children's cognitive performance change as a result of intervention programs. Studies with preschool and school-aged children showed that MLE interactions predict cognitive modifiability and that distal factors predict MLE interactions but not the child's cognitive modifiability. The child's cognitive modifiability was predicted by MLE interactions in a structured but not in a free-play situation. Mediation for transcendence (e.g., teaching rules and generalizations) appeared to be the strongest predictor of children's cognitive modifiability. Discussion of future research includes the consideration of a holistic transactional approach, which refers to MLE processes, personality, and motivational-affective factors, the cultural context of mediation, perception of the whole family as a mediational unit, and the "mediational normative scripts."

  9. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic–biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    L. Kleinman

    2016-02-01

    et al. (2012 and Shilling et al. (2013 to determine if anthropogenic–biogenic (A–B interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ΔOA in the data subset having high ΔCO and high ΔBio was several-fold greater than in other subsets. Part of this difference is consistent with a synergistic interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors and part to an independent linear dependence of ΔOA on precursors. The highest values of ΔO3, along with high temperatures, clear skies, and poor ventilation, also occurred in the high ΔCO–high ΔBio data set. A complicated mix of A–B interactions can result. After taking into account linear effects as predicted from low concentration data, an A–B enhancement of OA by a factor of 1.2 to 1.5 is estimated.

  10. The subfamily-specific interaction between Kv2.1 and Kv6.4 subunits is determined by interactions between the N- and C-termini.

    Elke Bocksteins

    Full Text Available The "silent" voltage-gated potassium (KvS channel subunit Kv6.4 does not form electrically functional homotetramers at the plasma membrane but assembles with Kv2.1 subunits, generating functional Kv2.1/Kv6.4 heterotetramers. The N-terminal T1 domain determines the subfamily-specific assembly of Kv1-4 subunits by preventing interactions between subunits that belong to different subfamilies. For Kv6.4, yeast-two-hybrid experiments showed an interaction of the Kv6.4 N-terminus with the Kv2.1 N-terminus, but unexpectedly also with the Kv3.1 N-terminus. We confirmed this interaction by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP using N-terminal Kv3.1 and Kv6.4 fragments. However, full-length Kv3.1 and Kv6.4 subunits do not form heterotetramers at the plasma membrane. Therefore, additional interactions between the Kv6.4 and Kv2.1 subunits should be important in the Kv2.1/Kv6.4 subfamily-specificity. Using FRET and co-IP approaches with N- and C-terminal fragments we observed that the Kv6.4 C-terminus physically interacts with the Kv2.1 N-terminus but not with the Kv3.1 N-terminus. The N-terminal amino acid sequence CDD which is conserved between Kv2 and KvS subunits appeared to be a key determinant since charge reversals with arginine substitutions abolished the interaction between the N-terminus of Kv2.1 and the C-terminus of both Kv2.1 and Kv6.4. In addition, the Kv6.4(CKv3.1 chimera in which the C-terminus of Kv6.4 was replaced by the corresponding domain of Kv3.1, disrupted the assembly with Kv2.1. These results indicate that the subfamily-specific Kv2.1/Kv6.4 heterotetramerization is determined by interactions between Kv2.1 and Kv6.4 that involve both the N- and C-termini in which the conserved N-terminal CDD sequence plays a key role.

  11. Determination of anti-canine IgG using a continuous filtration/dissolution system based on the formation of a high-molecular size immunocomplex.

    Reyes, F D; Arce, C; Moreno, A; Fernández Romero, J M; Luque de Castro, M D

    2001-10-31

    A method for the determination of monoclonal antibody anti-canine-IgG based on a continuous filtration/dissolution system is presented as prototype for further developments. The basis of the system is the continuous formation of a high-molecular immunocomplex, which is temporally retained on a microfilter located prior to the detector. The immunochemical method consists of the development of a sandwich type heterogeneous non-competitive reaction to yield a high molecular immunocomplex, as a result of the affinity interaction between streptavidin and biotincanine IgG and the immunoreaction between canine IgG and mAb anti-canine IgG, which occurs in solution. Goat anti-mouse IgG labelled with peroxidase is used as tracer. The extension of the immunoreaction is monitored fluorimetrically via the condensation product between 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of the peroxidase retained on the filter. The method provides a dynamic range from 10(-4) to 500 mug l(-1) with an IC(50) of 0.554 mug 1(-1) (for a biotin-IgG dilution of 1:250, chi(2)=0.6085, r(2)=0.9991, n=14) and a precision, expressed as R.S.D.%, lower than 4.7%. After modifications, the method here proposed can be extended for monitoring analytes of interest in the agrochemical, food and environmental areas, as far as permitted by the availability to produce the corresponding monoclonal antibody.

  12. Dietary fat and gut microbiota interactions determine diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Kübeck, Raphaela; Bonet-Ripoll, Catalina; Hoffmann, Christina; Walker, Alesia; Müller, Veronika Maria; Schüppel, Valentina Luise; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Scholz, Birgit; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Daniel, Hannelore; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas; Klingenspor, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Gut microbiota may promote positive energy balance; however, germfree mice can be either resistant or susceptible to diet-induced obesity (DIO) depending on the type of dietary intervention. We here sought to identify the dietary constituents that determine the susceptibility to body fat accretion in germfree (GF) mice. GF and specific pathogen free (SPF) male C57BL/6N mice were fed high-fat diets either based on lard or palm oil for 4 wks. Mice were metabolically characterized at the end of the feeding trial. FT-ICR-MS and UPLC-TOF-MS were used for cecal as well as hepatic metabolite profiling and cecal bile acids quantification, respectively. Hepatic gene expression was examined by qRT-PCR and cecal gut microbiota of SPF mice was analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. GF mice, but not SPF mice, were completely DIO resistant when fed a cholesterol-rich lard-based high-fat diet, whereas on a cholesterol-free palm oil-based high-fat diet, DIO was independent of gut microbiota. In GF lard-fed mice, DIO resistance was conveyed by increased energy expenditure, preferential carbohydrate oxidation, and increased fecal fat and energy excretion. Cecal metabolite profiling revealed a shift in bile acid and steroid metabolites in these lean mice, with a significant rise in 17β-estradiol, which is known to stimulate energy expenditure and interfere with bile acid metabolism. Decreased cecal bile acid levels were associated with decreased hepatic expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis. These metabolic adaptations were largely attenuated in GF mice fed the palm-oil based high-fat diet. We propose that an interaction of gut microbiota and cholesterol metabolism is essential for fat accretion in normal SPF mice fed cholesterol-rich lard as the main dietary fat source. This is supported by a positive correlation between bile acid levels and specific bacteria of the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes ) as a characteristic feature of normal SPF mice

  13. The masculinity paradox: facial masculinity and beardedness interact to determine women's ratings of men's facial attractiveness.

    Dixson, B J W; Sulikowski, D; Gouda-Vossos, A; Rantala, M J; Brooks, R C

    2016-11-01

    In many species, male secondary sexual traits have evolved via female choice as they confer indirect (i.e. genetic) benefits or direct benefits such as enhanced fertility or survival. In humans, the role of men's characteristically masculine androgen-dependent facial traits in determining men's attractiveness has presented an enduring paradox in studies of human mate preferences. Male-typical facial features such as a pronounced brow ridge and a more robust jawline may signal underlying health, whereas beards may signal men's age and masculine social dominance. However, masculine faces are judged as more attractive for short-term relationships over less masculine faces, whereas beards are judged as more attractive than clean-shaven faces for long-term relationships. Why such divergent effects occur between preferences for two sexually dimorphic traits remains unresolved. In this study, we used computer graphic manipulation to morph male faces varying in facial hair from clean-shaven, light stubble, heavy stubble and full beards to appear more (+25% and +50%) or less (-25% and -50%) masculine. Women (N = 8520) were assigned to treatments wherein they rated these stimuli for physical attractiveness in general, for a short-term liaison or a long-term relationship. Results showed a significant interaction between beardedness and masculinity on attractiveness ratings. Masculinized and, to an even greater extent, feminized faces were less attractive than unmanipulated faces when all were clean-shaven, and stubble and beards dampened the polarizing effects of extreme masculinity and femininity. Relationship context also had effects on ratings, with facial hair enhancing long-term, and not short-term, attractiveness. Effects of facial masculinization appear to have been due to small differences in the relative attractiveness of each masculinity level under the three treatment conditions and not to any change in the order of their attractiveness. Our findings suggest that

  14. Energetics of the interaction of the antitumour agent titanocene dichloride with glycine: enthalpy of formation of [Ti(η5-C5H5)2(OOCCH2NH3)2]Cl2

    Nunes, Paulo M.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2004-01-01

    The standard molar enthalpy of formation of [Ti(η 5 -C 5 H 5 ) 2 (OOCCH 2 NH 3 ) 2 ]Cl 2 in the crystalline state, at T=298.15 K, was determined as Δ f H m 0 {[Ti(η 5 -C 5 H 5 ) 2 (OOCCH 2 NH 3 ) 2 ]Cl 2 , cr}=-(1447.6 ± 8.1) kJ · mol -1 , by reaction-solution calorimetry. A discussion of the energetics of the direct interaction of the antitumour agent Ti(η 5 -C 5 H 5 ) 2 Cl 2 with glycine is also presented

  15. INTERACT

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  16. The effect of interactions between a bacterial strain isolated from drinking water and a pathogen surrogate on biofilms formation diverged under static vs flow conditions.

    Dai, D; Raskin, L; Xi, C

    2017-12-01

    Interactions with water bacteria affect the incorporation of pathogens into biofilms and thus pathogen control in drinking water systems. This study was to examine the impact of static vs flow conditions on interactions between a pathogen and a water bacterium on pathogen biofilm formation under laboratory settings. A pathogen surrogate Escherichia coli and a drinking water isolate Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was selected for this study. Biofilm growth was examined under two distinct conditions, in flow cells with continuous medium supply vs in static microtitre plates with batch culture. E. coli biofilm was greatly stimulated (c. 2-1000 times faster) with the presence of S. maltophilia in flow cells, but surprisingly inhibited (c. 65-95% less biomass) in microtitre plates. These divergent effects were explained through various aspects including surface attachment, cellular growth, extracellular signals and autoaggregation. Interactions with the same water bacterium resulted in different effects on E. coli biofilm formation when culture conditions changed from static to flow. This study highlights the complexity of species interactions on biofilm formation and suggests that environmental conditions such as the flow regime can be taken into consideration for the management of microbial contamination in drinking water systems. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Stellar formation

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  18. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Leenaers, A., E-mail: aleenaer@sckcen.be [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V. [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Detavernier, C. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK• CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% {sup 235}U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL–matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium–Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)–matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  19. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  20. Interaction of amines with native aluminium oxide layers in non-aqueous environment: Application to the understanding of the formation of epoxy-amine/metal interphases

    Mercier, D.; Rouchaud, J.-C.; Barthes-Labrousse, M.-G.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction of propylamine (PA), 1,2-diaminoethane (DAE) or 3-aminomethyl-3,5,5-trimethylcyclohexylamine (isophorone diamine, IPDA) with native aluminium oxide layers in non-aqueous environment has been studied using time-resolved inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The formation of several surface complexes has been evidenced. Monodentate and bidentate metal-bond surface complexes (MBSC) result from interactions between the amine terminations of the molecule and aluminium cations by donation of the N lone electron pair to the metal ion (Lewis-like mechanism leading to O-Al...N bonds). Monodentate and bidentate hydrogen-bond surface complexes (HBSC) are due to interaction of the amino group with surface hydroxyl groups by protonation of the amine termination (Bronsted-like mechanism leading to the formation of Al-OH...N bonds) or interaction with carbonaceous contamination (C x O y H z ...N bonds). Diamines can also form mixed complexes with one amino group forming an O-Al...N bond and the other group forming an Al-OH...N or C x O y H z ...N bond. Al-OH...N and C x O y H z ...N bonds are less stable under vacuum than O-Al...N bonds, leading to partial desorption of the DAE molecules in vacuum and modification of the interaction modes. Only DAE and IPDA can lead to partial dissolution of the aluminium native (hydr)oxide films. A detailed mechanism of dissolution has been proposed based on the formation of mononuclear bidentate (chelate) MBSC by ligand exchange between the terminal η 1 -OH and bridged μ 2 -OH surface sites and the amino terminations of the molecule. The detachment of this complex from the surface is likely to be the precursor step to the formation of the interphase in epoxy-amine/metal systems

  1. Providing Formative Assessment to Students Solving Multipath Engineering Problems with Complex Arrangements of Interacting Parts: An Intelligent Tutor Approach

    Steif, Paul S.; Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak

    2016-01-01

    Problems faced by engineering students involve multiple pathways to solution. Students rarely receive effective formative feedback on handwritten homework. This paper examines the potential for computer-based formative assessment of student solutions to multipath engineering problems. In particular, an intelligent tutor approach is adopted and…

  2. Determination and significance of the Mn(II) Zero-Field Splitting (ZFS) interaction in the geochemistry of travertines

    Montegrossi, G. [Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), via G. La Pira 4, I-50121, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: giordano@geo.unifi.it; Di Benedetto, F. [Museo di Storia Naturale, Universita di Firenze, via G. La Pira 4, I-50121, Florence (Italy); Minissale, A. [Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), via G. La Pira 4, I-50121, Florence (Italy); Paladini, M. [Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), via G. La Pira 4, I-50121, Florence (Italy); Pardi, L.A. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, CNR, via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Romanelli, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Firenze, via della Lastruccia 3, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Romei, F. [Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e Genetica, Universita di Firenze, Via Romana 17, I-50100 Florence (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    An analytical approach, based on the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of Mn(II) in travertines, has been developed in order to obtain relevant information about the local inhomogeneity of calcite and about the thermodynamic conditions which control the formation of travertine deposits. This information is crucial to constrain the precipitation of travertine under different geochemical contexts. An empirical correlation between the spectral features and the zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction has been established through numerical simulations of EPR spectra. The variability of the investigated parameters and the applicability of the method have been tested on several travertines from Central Italy.

  3. Determination and significance of the Mn(II) Zero-Field Splitting (ZFS) interaction in the geochemistry of travertines

    Montegrossi, G.; Di Benedetto, F.; Minissale, A.; Paladini, M.; Pardi, L.A.; Romanelli, M.; Romei, F.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical approach, based on the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of Mn(II) in travertines, has been developed in order to obtain relevant information about the local inhomogeneity of calcite and about the thermodynamic conditions which control the formation of travertine deposits. This information is crucial to constrain the precipitation of travertine under different geochemical contexts. An empirical correlation between the spectral features and the zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction has been established through numerical simulations of EPR spectra. The variability of the investigated parameters and the applicability of the method have been tested on several travertines from Central Italy

  4. Intracellular amyloid formation in muscle cells of Aβ-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: determinants and physiological role in copper detoxification

    Bush Ashley I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid β-peptide is a ubiquitous peptide, which is prone to aggregate forming soluble toxic oligomers and insoluble less-toxic aggregates. The intrinsic and external/environmental factors that determine Aβ aggregation in vivo are poorly understood, as well as the cellular meaning of this process itself. Genetic data as well as cell biological and biochemical evidence strongly support the hypothesis that Aβ is a major player in the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, it is also known that Aβ is involved in Inclusion Body Myositis, a common myopathy of the elderly in which the peptide accumulates intracellularly. Results In the present work, we found that intracellular Aβ aggregation in muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing Aβ peptide is affected by two single amino acid substitutions, E22G (Arctic and V18A (NIC. Both variations show decrease intracellular amyloidogenesis compared to wild type Aβ. We show that intracellular amyloid aggregation of wild type Aβ is accelerated by Cu2+ and diminished by copper chelators. Moreover, we demonstrate through toxicity and behavioral assays that Aβ-transgenic worms display a higher tolerance to Cu2+ toxic effects and that this resistance may be linked to the formation of amyloid aggregates. Conclusion Our data show that intracellular Aβ amyloid aggregates may trap excess of free Cu2+ buffering its cytotoxic effects and that accelerated intracellular Aβ aggregation may be part of a cell protective mechanism.

  5. 1D chain formation by coadsorption of Pb and Bi on Cu(001): Determination using low energy electron diffraction

    Kabiruzzaman, Md; Ahmed, Rezwan; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Mizuno, Seigi

    2017-10-01

    Coadsorption of two heavy metals, Pb and Bi, on Cu(001) at room temperature has been studied using low energy electron diffraction (LEED). c(4 × 4), c(2 × 2), and c(9√{ 2}×√{ 2}) phases are obtained at different coverages; here, we have determined the best-fit structure of c(4 × 4) phase. This structure can be described as a 1D substitutional chain arrangement of Pb and Bi atoms between the Cu rows along the [110] direction. The unit cell in the two-dimensional (2D) surface consists of one Bi atom, two Pb atoms, and four Cu atoms with one vacancy at the center. The optimal structure parameters demonstrate that Bi atoms are located at fourfold-hollow sites and that Pb atoms are laterally displaced by 0.78 Å from the fourfold-hollow site toward the vacancy. The reasons for the formation of the c(4 × 4) structure upon deposition of Pb and Bi on Cu(001) are discussed in comparison with a similar structure formed by the individual adsorption of Pb on the same substrate.

  6. Application of 1H NMR spectroscopy for determination of the interaction energy of cells with the water medium

    Turov, V.V.; Gorbik, S.P.; Chujko, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of bound water layers and the values of interface energy (γ s ) in live cell suspensions of bread yeast are determined by the method of 1 H NMR with the application of the liquid phase freezing technique. The concentrations of intracellular and extracellular bound water are determined. In terms of the dependence of γ s on the concentration of extracellular water, the energy of the intercellular interaction is determined as 109 J/g of dried cellular mass. In the cell suspension, a phase transition of the sol-gel type is registered. It is observed for the cell mass concentration equal to 10-12 mass%

  7. Titanium embedded cage structure formation in Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters and their interaction with Ar

    Torres, M. B., E-mail: begonia@ubu.es [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de Burgos, 09006 Burgos (Spain); Vega, A.; Balbás, L. C. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Aguilera-Granja, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidad de San Luis Potosí, 78000 San Luis de Potosí (Mexico)

    2014-05-07

    Recently, Ar physisorption was used as a structural probe for the location of the Ti dopant atom in aluminium cluster cations, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} [Lang et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 22, 1508 (2011)]. As an experiment result, the lack of Ar complexes for n > n{sub c} determines the cluster size for which the Ti atom is located inside of an Al cage. To elucidate the decisive factors for the formation of endohedrally Al{sub n}Ti{sup +}, experimentalists proposed detailed computational studies as indispensable. In this work, we investigated, using the density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of singly titanium doped cationic clusters, Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} (n = 16–21) as well as the adsorption of an Ar atom on them. The first endohedral doped cluster, with Ti encapsulated in a fcc-like cage skeleton, appears at n{sub c} = 21, which is the critical number consistent with the exohedral-endohedral transition experimentally observed. At this critical size the non-crystalline icosahedral growth pattern, related to the pure aluminium clusters, with the Ti atom in the surface, changes into a endohedral fcc-like pattern. The map of structural isomers, relative energy differences, second energy differences, and structural parameters were determined and analyzed. Moreover, we show the critical size depends on the net charge of the cluster, being different for the cationic clusters (n{sub c} = 21) and their neutral counterparts (n{sub c} = 20). For the Al {sub n} Ti {sup +} · Ar complexes, and for n < 21, the preferred Ar adsorption site is on top of the exohedral Ti atom, with adsorption energy in very good agreement with the experimental value. Instead, for n = 21, the Ar adsorption occurs on the top an Al atom with very low absorption energy. For all sizes the geometry of the Al{sub n}Ti{sup +} clusters keeps unaltered in the Ar-cluster complexes. This fact indicates that Ar adsorption does not influence the cluster structure, providing support

  8. Toward a Deterministic Model of Planetary Formation VI: Dynamical Interaction and Coagulation of Multiple Rocky Embryos and Super-Earth Systems around Solar Type Stars

    Ida, S.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2010-01-01

    Radial velocity and transit surveys indicate that solar-type stars bear super-Earths, with mass and period up to ~ 20 M_E and a few months, are more common than those with Jupiter-mass gas giants. In many cases, these super-Earths are members of multiple-planet systems in which their mutual dynamical interaction has influenced their formation and evolution. In this paper, we modify an existing numerical population synthesis scheme to take into account protoplanetary embryos' interaction with ...

  9. The possibility to determine a constant of spin-orbit interaction by scanning tunneling microscopy method

    Khotkevich, N.V.; Kolesnichenko, Yu.A.; Vovk, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    The electron tunneling from the quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with the spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states is studied in the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier. The influence of the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons by a single magnetic defect on the tunnel current is analyzed. Analytic formulas for the conductance of a tunnel point-contact as a function of its distance from the defect are obtained. It is shown that the analysis of the local magnetization density around the defect by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows finding the constant of spin orbit interaction.

  10. Establishment of a quantitative ELISA capable of determining peptide - MHC class I interaction

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Kristensen, N; Blicher, T

    2002-01-01

    dependent manner. Here, we exploit the availability of these molecules to generate a quantitative ELISA-based assay capable of measuring the affinity of the interaction between peptide and MHC-I. This assay is simple and sensitive, and one can easily envisage that the necessary reagents, standards......Many different assays for measuring peptide-MHC interactions have been suggested over the years. Yet, there is no generally accepted standard method available. We have recently generated preoxidized recombinant MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) which can be purified to homogeneity under denaturing...

  11. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta ...

  12. M3 muscarinic receptor interaction with phospholipase C beta3 determines its signaling efficiency

    Kan, W.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.; Burroughs, M.; Faibis, G.; Malik, S.; Tall, G.G.; Smrcka, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) enzymes are activated by G protein-coupled receptors through receptor-catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange on Galphabetagamma heterotrimers containing Gq family G proteins. Here we report evidence for a direct interaction between M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R) and

  13. Social Interaction Determinants of South African Reading Literacy Achievement: Evidence from PrePIRLS 2011

    Bergbauer, Annika; van Staden, Surette

    2018-01-01

    This study identifies factors predicting reading literacy achievement among Grade 4 students in South Africa by utilizing Vygotsky's social interaction theory. The study draws on the preProgress in International Reading Literacy Study (prePIRLS) 2011 data, which places South African Grade 4 students' results below the international centre point of…

  14. Determinants of Mobile Wireless Technology for Promoting Interactivity in Lecture Sessions: An Empirical Analysis

    Gan, Chin Lay; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify adoption factors of mobile wireless technology to increase interactivity between lecturers and students during lectures. A theoretical framework to ascertain lecturers' intentions to use mobile wireless technology during lectures (dependent variable) is proposed with seven independent variables. The…

  15. Density dependence and microevolution interactively determine effects of phenology mismatch on population dynamics

    Reed, T.; Gienapp, P.; Visser, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle events in plants and animals are typically adaptively tuned to anticipate predictable seasonal changes in environmental conditions or resources. Climate change is expected to affect the temporal component of species’ interactions, e.g. by creating a mismatch between a predator's breeding

  16. Establishment of a quantitative ELISA capable of determining peptide - MHC class I interaction

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Kristensen, N; Blicher, T

    2002-01-01

    dependent manner. Here, we exploit the availability of these molecules to generate a quantitative ELISA-based assay capable of measuring the affinity of the interaction between peptide and MHC-I. This assay is simple and sensitive, and one can easily envisage that the necessary reagents, standards...

  17. Soil inoculation method determines the strength of plant-soil interactions

    Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Ruijten, M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that interactions between plants and biotic components of the soil influence plant productivity and plant community composition. Many plant–soil feedback experiments start from inoculating relatively small amounts of natural soil to sterilized bulk soil. These soil

  18. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice

    Wilting, [No Value; Movig, KL; Moolenaar, M; Hekster, YA; Brouwers, [No Value; Heerdink, ER; Nolen, WA; Egberts, AC

    Objective: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as

  19. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    Chen, Hao; Xiong, Liming

    2011-01-01

    has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling

  20. Formation of Anhydrite due to Interaction Between Water Soluble CO2 (aq) and Calcite Mineral During Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    In the Low Salinity based EOR method, formation and migration of fines have proved to have profound effect on the displacement efficiency of residual oil. Salinity variations of injected brines have also been shown to affect oil recovery for WAG-CO2 processes. But the effect of fines in EOR during...... simulations were conducted over a temperature range of 50°C to 250°C and a pressure range of 5 bars to 500 bars. The amounts of fines formation taking place for different LSWAG-CO2 processes were correlated to the described oil recovery. It is observed that significant amounts of fines formation can take...... with the available SO42- ions. The salinity and composition of brines present in pore space shows direct correlation with the amount of fines produced during CO2 injection. With increase in temperature and pressure, the amount fines formation increased significantly. The described oil recovery for different LSWAG...

  1. Interaction of the ginsenosides with κ-casein and their effects on amyloid fibril formation by the protein: Multi-spectroscopic approaches.

    Chen, Fanbo; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Miao; Yin, Jianyuan; Meng, Qin; Bu, Fengquan; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Jihua

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of the ginsenosides (GS) including ginsenoside Rg1, Rb1 and Re with κ-casein and the effects of GS inhibiting amyloid fibril formation by κ-casein have been investigated in vitro by fluorescence and ultraviolet spectra. Results showed that Rg1 and Rb1 had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on reduced and carboxymethylated κ-casein (RCMκ-CN) fibril formation, while Re resulted in an increase in the rate of fibril formation. The enhancement in RLS intensity was attributed to the formation of new complex between GS and RCMκ-CN, and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were assayed. The steady-state ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra had also been tested to observe if the ground-state complex formed, and it showed the same result as RLS spectra. The binding constants and the number of binding sites between GS and RCMκ-CN at different temperatures had been evaluated from relevant fluorescence data. According to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between RCMκ-CN and GS was calculated. The fluorescence lifetime of RCMκ-CN was longer in the presence of GS than in absence of GS, which was evident that the hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the binding of GS to RCMκ-CN. From the results of synchronous fluorescence, it could be deduced that the polarity around RCMκ-CN Trp97 residue decreased and the hydrophobicity increased after addition of Rg1 or Rb1. Based on all the above results, it is explained that Rg1 and Rb1 inhibited amyloid fibril formation by κ-casein because the molecular spatial conformation and physical property of κ-casein changed causing by the complex formation between GS and κ-casein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Systematics of interaction and strong absorption radii determined from heavy-ion elastic scattering

    Birkelund, J.R.; Huizenga, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods for determining the strong absorption radius for light and intermediate mass nuclei are discussed. It is found that this determination in terms of the half-density radii of the target and projectile is more accurate over the whole range of available data than the other simple parametrizations. 62 references

  3. VIS/NIR Spectroscopy to determine the spatial variation of the weathering degree in Paleogene clay soil - London Clay Formation

    Nasser, Mohammed; Gibson, Andy, ,, Dr; Koor, Nick, ,, Dr; Gale, Professor Andy; Huggett, Jenny, ,, Dr; Branch, Steve

    2017-04-01

    The London Clay Formation (LCF) which underlies much of South-East England is hugely important as a construction medium. However, its geotechnical performance (shear strength, compressive strength, shrink-swell behaviour, etc. ) is greatly affected by its degree of weathering. Despite this importance, little attention has been focussed on a robust method to define and measure its degree of weathering. This is perhaps a result of a well-known colour change from bluish-grey to brown that accompanies 'weathering' and considered to be the result of oxidisation (Chandler and Apted 1988). Through wide experience, this definition is normally effective, but it is perhaps subjective and reliant on the experience of the investigator and the ability to observe samples or exposures. More objective investigation, typically using SEM is not normally economically feasible or expedient for construction works. We propose a simple, robust method to characterise the degree of weathering in the LCF using reflective or Visible-Near-InfraRed-Spectroscopy (VNIRS). 24 samples were extracted from 2 boreholes drilled in the Hampstead area of London to depths of 12 m within the uppermost Claygate Member of the LCF. VNIRS spectra (350-2500 nm) were measured from all samples and compared with XRD, XRF, SEM and PSD results on the same samples. Results show increased magnitude of absorption features related to clay mineralogy around 1400, 1900 and 2200 nm to a depth of 5 m beneath ground level. Beneath this depth, the absorption features show little variation. SEM analyses show corresponding changes in the degradation of pyrite crystals and individual clay (illite/smectite). These preliminary results show that there is a good potential for VNIRS spectroscopy to determine the variation of weathering in the LCF.

  4. Ecological multiplex interactions determine the role of species for parasite spread amplification.

    Stella, Massimo; Selakovic, Sanja; Antonioni, Alberto; Andreazzi, Cecilia

    2018-04-23

    Despite their potential interplay, multiple routes of many disease transmissions are often investigated separately. As an unifying framework for understanding parasite spread through interdependent transmission paths, we present the 'ecomultiplex' model, where the multiple transmission paths among a diverse community of interacting hosts are represented as a spatially explicit multiplex network. We adopt this framework for designing and testing potential control strategies for T. cruzi spread in two empirical host communities. We show that the ecomultiplex model is an efficient and low data-demanding method to identify which species enhances parasite spread and should thus be a target for control strategies. We also find that the interplay between predator-prey and host-parasite interactions leads to a phenomenon of parasite amplification, in which top predators facilitate T. cruzi spread, offering a mechanistic interpretation of previous empirical findings. Our approach can provide novel insights in understanding and controlling parasite spreading in real-world complex systems. © 2018, Stella et al.

  5. Determination of the interaction parameter and topological scaling features of symmetric star polymers in dilute solution

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Beaucage, Peter; Ramachandran, Ramnath; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Star polymers provide model architectures to understand the dynamic and rheological effects of chain confinement for a range of complex topological structures like branched polymers, colloids, and micelles. It is important to describe the structure of such macromolecular topologies using small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering to facilitate understanding of their structure-property relationships. Modeling of scattering from linear, Gaussian polymers, such as in the melt, has applied the random phase approximation using the Debye polymer scattering function. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter can be obtained using neutron scattering by this method. Gaussian scaling no longer applies for more complicated chain topologies or when chains are in good solvents. For symmetric star polymers, chain scaling can differ from ν=0.5(df=2) due to excluded volume, steric interaction between arms, and enhanced density due to branching. Further, correlation between arms in a symmetric star leads to an interference term in the scattering function first described by Benoit for Gaussian chains. In this work, a scattering function is derived which accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers as well as the polymer-solvent interaction parameter for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension using a hybrid Unified scattering function. The approach is demonstrated for linear, four-arm and eight-arm polyisoprene stars in deuterated p-xylene.

  6. Determination of the interaction parameter and topological scaling features of symmetric star polymers in dilute solution

    Rai, Durgesh K.

    2015-07-15

    Star polymers provide model architectures to understand the dynamic and rheological effects of chain confinement for a range of complex topological structures like branched polymers, colloids, and micelles. It is important to describe the structure of such macromolecular topologies using small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering to facilitate understanding of their structure-property relationships. Modeling of scattering from linear, Gaussian polymers, such as in the melt, has applied the random phase approximation using the Debye polymer scattering function. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter can be obtained using neutron scattering by this method. Gaussian scaling no longer applies for more complicated chain topologies or when chains are in good solvents. For symmetric star polymers, chain scaling can differ from ν=0.5(df=2) due to excluded volume, steric interaction between arms, and enhanced density due to branching. Further, correlation between arms in a symmetric star leads to an interference term in the scattering function first described by Benoit for Gaussian chains. In this work, a scattering function is derived which accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers as well as the polymer-solvent interaction parameter for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension using a hybrid Unified scattering function. The approach is demonstrated for linear, four-arm and eight-arm polyisoprene stars in deuterated p-xylene.

  7. Formations hybrides et interactions en ligne du point de vue de l'enseignant : pratiques, représentations, évolutions Blended learning and online interaction from the teacher's perspective: practice, representation and evolution

    Christian Degache

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Les formations hybrides sont de plus en plus nombreuses dans le domaine des langues mais ne sont, une fois créées, pas toujours stables dans le temps. Devant ce constat, nous avons fait l'hypothèse, qui est au fondement du présent article, que ces évolutions sont liées au déroulement des interactions qui ont effectivement eu lieu dans le cadre de ces formations. Pour vérifier notre hypothèse, nous avons mené des entretiens, basés sur des questionnaires hétéro-administrés, avec 15 concepteurs de formations en langues pour spécialistes d'autres disciplines (Lansad conçues dans le cadre du projet Flodi. L'analyse des données ainsi obtenues a permis d'identifier les pratiques d'interaction, les représentations des concepteurs et les évolutions de formations hybrides. Elle montre que l'interaction effective est bien un facteur déterminant pour leur évolution. Par ailleurs, l'observation des évolutions passées, présentes ou futures nous a permis de distinguer quatre tendances des formations hybrides en langues : introductive (des Tice, optimisatrice, réorganisatrice et collaborative.Language training increasingly uses blended learning systems. One can state that the latter, once they are set up, often continue to be modified. We argue that these modifications are due to the interaction during the related training sessions. To verify our hypothesis we interviewed 15 designers of blended learning systems in the field of languages for specialists of other disciplines which are part of the Flodi-project, filling out questionnaires while interviewing them. An analysis of the data reveals interactional habits, course designers' representations, as well as past and foreseen modifications of the blended learning systems. The results show that interactions during training sessions did influence the evolution of the system. Moreover, we were able to distinguish between four tendencies of past, present and future modification of the

  8. Contribution to the study of sulfur trioxide formation and determination of the sulfuric acid dew point in boiler plants

    Mueller, H.

    1983-11-01

    This paper analyzes chemical reaction kinetics of the formation of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid in combustion air and flue gas of steam generators. Formulae for sulfuric acid equilibrium reactions according to Wahnschaffe (W. Grimm, 1972) and R. Hasse, H.W. Borgmann (1962) are presented. Theoretical acid dew point, combustion parameters with influence on the dew point temperature and formation of sulfates are further discussed. Sulfur trioxide formation at temperatures above 1,000 C as a non-equilibrium reaction is outlined as another variant of chemical reactions. A graphic evaluation is made of dew point conditions in brown coal dust fired, and heating oil fired steam generators. (11 refs.)

  9. Determination of an effective scoring function for RNA-RNA interactions with a physics-based double-iterative method.

    Yan, Yumeng; Wen, Zeyu; Zhang, Di; Huang, Sheng-You

    2018-05-18

    RNA-RNA interactions play fundamental roles in gene and cell regulation. Therefore, accurate prediction of RNA-RNA interactions is critical to determine their complex structures and understand the molecular mechanism of the interactions. Here, we have developed a physics-based double-iterative strategy to determine the effective potentials for RNA-RNA interactions based on a training set of 97 diverse RNA-RNA complexes. The double-iterative strategy circumvented the reference state problem in knowledge-based scoring functions by updating the potentials through iteration and also overcame the decoy-dependent limitation in previous iterative methods by constructing the decoys iteratively. The derived scoring function, which is referred to as DITScoreRR, was evaluated on an RNA-RNA docking benchmark of 60 test cases and compared with three other scoring functions. It was shown that for bound docking, our scoring function DITScoreRR obtained the excellent success rates of 90% and 98.3% in binding mode predictions when the top 1 and 10 predictions were considered, compared to 63.3% and 71.7% for van der Waals interactions, 45.0% and 65.0% for ITScorePP, and 11.7% and 26.7% for ZDOCK 2.1, respectively. For unbound docking, DITScoreRR achieved the good success rates of 53.3% and 71.7% in binding mode predictions when the top 1 and 10 predictions were considered, compared to 13.3% and 28.3% for van der Waals interactions, 11.7% and 26.7% for our ITScorePP, and 3.3% and 6.7% for ZDOCK 2.1, respectively. DITScoreRR also performed significantly better in ranking decoys and obtained significantly higher score-RMSD correlations than the other three scoring functions. DITScoreRR will be of great value for the prediction and design of RNA structures and RNA-RNA complexes.

  10. The Effectiveness of Using Interactive Multimedia Based on Motion Graphic in Concept Mastering Enhancement and Fashion Designing Skill in Digital Format

    Winwin Wiana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This research is related to the effort to design a more representative learning system to improve the learning result of digital fashion design, through the development of interactive multimedia based on motion graphic. This research is aimed to know the effect of interactive multimedia application based on motion graphic to increase the mastery of the concept and skill of the students to making fashion designing in digital format. The research method used is quasi experiment with research design of Nonequivalent Control Group Design. The lectures are conducted in two different classes, namely class A as the Experimental Class and class B as the Control Class. From the calculation result after interpreted using Normalize Gain, there is an increase of higher learning result in student with interactive learning based on motion graphic, compared with student achievement on conventional learning. In this research, interactive multimedia learning based on motion graphic is effective toward the improvement of student learning in concept mastering indicator and on the aspect of making fashion design in digital format.

  11. 3D Structure and Interaction of p24β and p24δ Golgi Dynamics Domains: Implication for p24 Complex Formation and Cargo Transport.

    Nagae, Masamichi; Hirata, Tetsuya; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Theiler, Romina; Fujita, Morihisa; Kinoshita, Taroh; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-10-09

    The p24 family consists of four subfamilies (p24α, p24β, p24γ, and p24δ), and the proteins are thought to form hetero-oligomeric complexes for efficient transport of cargo proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. The proteins possess a conserved luminal Golgi dynamics (GOLD) domain, whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we present structural and biochemical studies of p24β1 and p24δ1 GOLD domains. Use of GOLD domain-deleted mutants revealed that the GOLD domain of p24δ1 is required for proper p24 hetero-oligomeric complex formation and efficient transport of GPI-anchored proteins. The p24β1 and p24δ1 GOLD domains share a common β-sandwich fold with a characteristic intrasheet disulfide bond. The GOLD domain of p24δ1 crystallized as dimers, allowing the analysis of a homophilic interaction site. Surface plasmon resonance and solution NMR analyses revealed that p24β1 and p24δ1 GOLD domains interact weakly (K d = ~10 -4 M). Bi-protein titration provided interaction site maps. We propose that the heterophilic interaction of p24 GOLD domains contributes to the formation of the p24 hetero-oligomeric complex and to efficient cargo transport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  13. Study of liquid phase formation kinetics due to solid/solid chemical interaction and its model. Application to the Zircaloy/Inconel

    Garcia, E.A.; Denis, A.

    1990-01-01

    A description is made of the chemical interaction between Inconel spacing grids and the Zircaloy of the sheaths. Experiments performed at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C with base Zircaloy and with a previously formed layer of ZrO 2 , show that the kinetics is parabolic. The difference between both types of experiments is that the oxide layer delays the initiation of the Inconel-Zry interaction. A model is presented, for the description of the solid/solid interaction, which leads to the formation of eutectic that is liquid at the experiment temperature. Also a model, which represents the oxide layer dissolution and predicts the instant in which it disappears completely, is presented. (Author) [es

  14. Brca2 C-terminus interacts with Rad51 and contributes to nuclear forcus formation in double-strand break repair of DNA

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Syuto, Bunei; Hashizume, Kazuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    In humans and mice, the interaction between the breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2, and Rad51 recombinase is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination, the failure of this process can predispose to cancer. Cells with mutated Brca2 are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and exhibit defective DNA repair. Using yeast and mammalian two-hybrid assays, we demonstrate that canine Rad51 protein interacts specifically with the C-terminus of canine Brca2. In support of the biological significance of this interaction, we found that radiation-induced focus formation of Rad51 in COS-7 cells was compromised by forced expression of the C-terminus of canine Brca2. A similar result was obtained for the murine C-terminus. These data suggest that the C-terminal domain of canine Brca2 functions to bind Rad51 and that this domain contributes to the IR-induced assembly of the Rad51 complex in vivo. (author)

  15. Solid oxide galvanic cell for determination of Gibbs energy of formation of Tb6UO12(s)

    Sahu, Manjulata; Dash, Smruti

    2013-01-01

    Citrate-nitrate combustion method was used to synthesise Tb 6 UO 12 (s). Gibbs energy of formation of Tb 6 UO 12 (s) was measured using solid oxide galvanic cell in the temperature range 957-1175 K. (author)

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by bento(a)pyrene ex vivo

    Schults, Marten A.; Chiu, Roland K.; Nagle, Peter; Kleinjans, J C; van Schooten, Frederik Jan; Godschalk, Roger W.

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification

  17. Quantitative determination of trigonelline in mouse serum by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-MS/MS analysis: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Szczesny, Damian; Bartosińska, Ewa; Jacyna, Julia; Patejko, Małgorzata; Siluk, Danuta; Kaliszan, Roman

    2018-02-01

    Trigonelline is a pyridine alkaloid found in fenugreek seeds and coffee beans. Most of the previous studies are concerned with the quantification of trigonelline along with other constituents in coffee herbs or beverages. Only a few have focused on its determination in animal or human tissues by applying different modes of HPLC with UV or MS detection. The aim of the study was to develop and validate a fast and simple method for trigonelline determination in serum by the use of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with ESI-MS/MS detection. Separation of trigonelline was achieved on a Kinetex HILIC column operated at 35°C with acetonitrile-ammonium formate (10 mm, pH = 3) buffer mixture (55:45, v/v) as the mobile phase. The developed method was successfully applied to determine trigonelline concentration in mouse serum after intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg. The developed assay is sensitive (limit of detection = 1.5 ng/mL, limit of quantification = 5.0 ng/mL) and linear in a concentration range from 5.0 to 250.0 ng/mL. Sample preparation is limited to deproteinization, centrifugation and filtration. The application of the HILIC mode of chromatography with MS detection and selection of deuterated trigonelline as internal standard allowed a rapid and precise method of trigonelline quantification to be to developed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Species distribution models contribute to determine the effect of climate and interspecific interactions in moving hybrid zones.

    Engler, J O; Rödder, D; Elle, O; Hochkirch, A; Secondi, J

    2013-11-01

    Climate is a major factor delimiting species' distributions. However, biotic interactions may also be prominent in shaping geographical ranges, especially for parapatric species forming hybrid zones. Determining the relative effect of each factor and their interaction of the contact zone location has been difficult due to the lack of broad scale environmental data. Recent developments in species distribution modelling (SDM) now allow disentangling the relative contributions of climate and species' interactions in hybrid zones and their responses to future climate change. We investigated the moving hybrid zone between the breeding ranges of two parapatric passerines in Europe. We conducted SDMs representing the climatic conditions during the breeding season. Our results show a large mismatch between the realized and potential distributions of the two species, suggesting that interspecific interactions, not climate, account for the present location of the contact zone. The SDM scenarios show that the southerly distributed species, Hippolais polyglotta, might lose large parts of its southern distribution under climate change, but a similar gain of novel habitat along the hybrid zone seems unlikely, because interactions with the other species (H. icterina) constrain its range expansion. Thus, whenever biotic interactions limit range expansion, species may become 'trapped' if range loss due to climate change is faster than the movement of the contact zone. An increasing number of moving hybrid zones are being reported, but the proximate causes of movement often remain unclear. In a global context of climate change, we call for more interest in their interactions with climate change. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Female versus male biological identities of nanoparticles determine the interaction with immune cells in fish

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Murugadoss, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Biomolecule decoration of nanoparticles provides a corona that modulates how the nanoparticles interact with biological milieus. The corona composition has proved to reflect the differences in the repertoire of proteins to which the nanoparticles are exposed, and as a result the same nanoparticles...... and myeloid populations of the blood cells preferentially accumulated the nanoparticles with a female biological identity, irrespective of the sex of the fish from which the cells were obtained. The concept of repertoire differences in the corona proteome therefore deserves further attention, as various...

  20. The same number of optimized parameters scheme for determining intermolecular interaction energies

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Eriksen, Janus Juul

    2015-01-01

    We propose the Same Number Of Optimized Parameters (SNOOP) scheme as an alternative to the counterpoise method for treating basis set superposition errors in calculations of intermolecular interaction energies. The key point of the SNOOP scheme is to enforce that the number of optimized wave...... as numerically. Numerical results for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled-cluster with single, double, and approximate triple excitations (CCSD(T)) show that the SNOOP scheme in general outperforms the uncorrected and counterpoise approaches. Furthermore, we show that SNOOP...

  1. An evaluation framework for multimodal interaction determining quality aspects and modality choice

    Wechsung, Ina

    2014-01-01

    This book presents (1) an exhaustive and empirically validated taxonomy of quality aspects of multimodal interaction as well as respective measurement methods, (2) a validated questionnaire specifically tailored to the evaluation of multimodal systems and covering most of the taxonomy‘s quality aspects, (3) insights on how the quality perceptions of multimodal systems relate to the quality perceptions of its individual components, (4) a set of empirically tested factors which influence modality choice, and (5) models regarding the relationship of the perceived quality of a modality and the actual usage of a modality.

  2. USAGE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES FOR DETERMINATION OF LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS AND FIBRIN POLYMERIZATION SITES WITHIN FIBRINOGEN AND FIBRIN MOLECULES AND THEIR APPLICATION IN TEST--SYSTEMS FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND THE THREAT OF THROMBUS FORMATION

    E. V. Lugovskoi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown by monoclonal antibodies that B?N-region of fibrin desA molecule (B?1-53 comprises the polymerization site including the peptide bond B?14-15. This site participates in the second stage of fibrin polymerization — lateral association of protofibrils. In the B?15-53 fragment was also found the site called «C», which together with the site «A» participate in the first stage of polymerization — the protofibrils formation. The model of the primary intermolecular interaction of fibrin was designed. It was found by monoclonal antibodies II-4d the site («c» in the N-terminal half of ? chain of the fibrin D-region. This site participates in the protofibrils formation and is complement to site «C» as we assume. We have discovered two neoantigenic determinants. One of these determinants exposes within the coiledcoil fragment B?126-135 of fibrin as a result of fibrinopeptide A splitting off from fibrinogen by thrombin. The structural rearrangements discovered in this site of the fibrin molecule are necessary for the following protofibrils lateral association. The second neoantigenic determinant is localized in the fragment B?134-190 of D-dimer formed after plasmin degradation of fibrin stabilized by FXIIIa. We have obtained the fibrin-specific monoclonal antibodie FnI-3C to the first determinant and D-dimer-specific mAb III-3b to the second one. Three monoclonal antibodies were obtained against the ?C-region of fibrin(ogen molecule. It has been experimentally shown by of one of them that ?C-domains is connected with the fibrinopeptides B in fibrinogen and fibrin desA molecules, but removes from the core of the molecules after fibrinopeptides B splitting off by thrombin. Two other monoclonal antibodies specifically inhibit the fibrin polymerization by blocking two unknown polymerization sites within the ?C-region. The test-systems for the soluble fibrin and D-dimer quantification in human blood plasma were designed on the basis of

  3. Application Design Of Interactive Multimedia Development Based Motion Graphic On Making Fashion Design Learning In Digital Format

    Winwin Wiana

    2017-01-01

    This study is a research and development aimed at developing multimedia interactive learning based animation as an effort to improve student learning motivation in learning Fashion Design Technology apart from this study also aims to design a learning program courses Fashion Design Technology with a focus on optimizing the use of interactive media in learning process. From this study showed 1 A preliminary study found that the problems faced by students when studying Fashion Design Technology...

  4. Potentiometric Determination of Phytic Acid and Investigations of Phytate Interactions with Some Metal Ions.

    Marolt, Gregor; Pihlar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Determination of correct amount (concentration) of phytic acid is of vital importance when dealing with protonation and/or metal complexation equilibria. A novel approach for precise and reliable assay of phytic acid, based on the difference between end points by potentiometric titration, has been presented. Twelve phytic acid protons are classified into three groups of acidity, which enables detection of 2 to 3 distinct equivalent points (EPs) depending on experimental conditions, e.g. counter-ion concentration. Using the differences between individual EPs enables correct phytate determination as well as identification of potential contamination and/or determination of initial protonation degree. Impact of uncertainty of phytate amount on the calculation of protonation constants has been evaluated using computer simulation program (Hyperquad2013). With the analysis of titration curves different binding sites on phytate ligand have been proposed for complexation of Ca2+ and Fe3+ ions.

  5. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  6. The determination of the enthalpy of formation and the enthalpy increment of Cd0.5 Te0.5 by Calvet calorimetry

    Agarwal, R.; Venugopal, V.; Sood, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    In the present study the enthalpy of formation of Cd 0.5 Te 0.5 compound at 785 K were determined from the two elements by direct reaction calorimetry using two different types of set-ups. The enthalpy increment values were measured by drop technique in Calvet calorimetry. (author). 3 refs., 4 tabs

  7. DETERMINATION OF POSSIBLE REASONS OF DEFECT FORMATION «MICROPITTING» IN HARD-ALLOY WIRE DRAWING INSTRUMENT IN WIRE DRAWING PROCESS

    T. P. Kurenkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is determined that during operation a hard wear along with uniform attrition occurs in working canal of die because of welding of metal particles to the material of die, what results in formation of separate microholes, their enlargement and further defect creation of type “micropitting of hard alloy”.

  8. Spectrophotometric Determination of 6-Propyl-2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceutical Formulations Based on Prussian Blue Complex Formation: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Experiment

    Zakrzewski, Robert; Skowron, Monika; Ciesielski, Witold; Rembisz, Zaneta

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory experiment challenges students to determine 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) based on Prussian blue complex formation. Prussian blue is formed by ferricyanide and Fe(II) ions which are generated in situ from Fe(III) ions reduced by PTU. The absorbance of this product was measured at a wavelength of 840 nm, after a reaction time of 30…

  9. Intracellular calcium levels determine differential modulation of allosteric interactions within G protein-coupled receptor heteromers.

    Navarro, Gemma; Aguinaga, David; Moreno, Estefania; Hradsky, Johannes; Reddy, Pasham P; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, Michael R; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-11-20

    The pharmacological significance of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer is well established and it is being considered as an important target for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the physiological factors that control its distinctive biochemical properties are still unknown. We demonstrate that different intracellular Ca2+ levels exert a differential modulation of A2AR-D2R heteromer-mediated adenylyl-cyclase and MAPK signaling in striatal cells. This depends on the ability of low and high Ca2+ levels to promote a selective interaction of the heteromer with the neuronal Ca2+-binding proteins NCS-1 and calneuron-1, respectively. These Ca2+-binding proteins differentially modulate allosteric interactions within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, which constitutes a unique cellular device that integrates extracellular (adenosine and dopamine) and intracellular (Ca+2) signals to produce a specific functional response.

  10. The mean and variance of environmental temperature interact to determine physiological tolerance and fitness.

    Bozinovic, Francisco; Bastías, Daniel A; Boher, Francisca; Clavijo-Baquet, Sabrina; Estay, Sergio A; Angilletta, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Global climate change poses one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Most analyses of the potential biological impacts have focused on changes in mean temperature, but changes in thermal variance will also impact organisms and populations. We assessed the combined effects of the mean and variance of temperature on thermal tolerances, organismal survival, and population growth in Drosophila melanogaster. Because the performance of ectotherms relates nonlinearly to temperature, we predicted that responses to thermal variation (±0° or ±5°C) would depend on the mean temperature (17° or 24°C). Consistent with our prediction, thermal variation enhanced the rate of population growth (r(max)) at a low mean temperature but depressed this rate at a high mean temperature. The interactive effect on fitness occurred despite the fact that flies improved their heat and cold tolerances through acclimation to thermal conditions. Flies exposed to a high mean and a high variance of temperature recovered from heat coma faster and survived heat exposure better than did flies that developed at other conditions. Relatively high survival following heat exposure was associated with low survival following cold exposure. Recovery from chill coma was affected primarily by the mean temperature; flies acclimated to a low mean temperature recovered much faster than did flies acclimated to a high mean temperature. To develop more realistic predictions about the biological impacts of climate change, one must consider the interactions between the mean environmental temperature and the variance of environmental temperature.

  11. Contribution of the Receptor/Ligand Interaction Between CD44 and Osteopontin to Formation of Breast Cancer Metastases

    2001-07-01

    mismatch repair gene Pms2 reduces the number of intestinal tumors as compared to mice with targeted deletion of this gene [27]. In contrast, deletion of the...Liskay. 1998. Enhanced intestinal adenomatous polyp formation in Pms2 "/;Min mice. Cancer Res. 58:1087-1089. 19 Weber et al. 28. Wilson, C.L., K.J

  12. EBooks as PDF Files, in EPub Format or as Interactive IBooks? Digital Books in Physics Lessons of Secondary Education

    Lohr, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the different capabilities of ebooks in the pdf, epub and ibook format in science teaching evaluated at the BG/BRG Schwechat. Over the recent years the school equipped with 100 personal computers and 28 iPads has become one of the leading e-learning schools in Austria. iPads show their advantages in the context of blended…

  13. Formation of hybrid gold nanoparticle network aggregates by specific host-guest interactions in a turbulent flow reactor

    Weinhart-Mejia, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    A multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) was used to investigate the formation of hybrid gold nanoparticle network aggregates under highly turbulent flow conditions. To form aggregates, gold nanoparticles were functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (CD) and mixed with adamantyl (Ad)-terminated

  14. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid have distinct membrane locations and lipid interactions as determined by X-ray diffraction.

    Sherratt, Samuel C R; Mason, R Preston

    2018-01-31

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) differentially influence lipid oxidation, signal transduction, fluidity, and cholesterol domain formation, potentially due in part to distinct membrane interactions. We used small angle X-ray diffraction to evaluate the EPA and DHA effects on membrane structure. Membrane vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and cholesterol (C) (0.3C:POPC mole ratio) were prepared and treated with vehicle, EPA, or DHA (1:10 mol ratio to POPC). Electron density profiles generated from the diffraction data showed that EPA increased membrane hydrocarbon core electron density over a broad area, up to ± 20 Å from the membrane center, indicating an energetically favorable extended orientation for EPA likely stabilized by van der Waals interactions. By contrast, DHA increased electron density in the phospholipid head group region starting at ± 12 Å from the membrane center, presumably due to DHA-surface interactions, with coincident reduction in electron density in the membrane hydrocarbon core centered ± 7-9 Å from the membrane center. The membrane width (d-space) decreased by 5 Å in the presence of vehicle as the temperature increased from 10 °C to 30 °C due to increased acyl chain trans-gauche isomerizations, which was unaffected by addition of EPA or DHA. The influence of DHA on membrane structure was modulated by temperature changes while the interactions of EPA were unaffected. The contrasting EPA and DHA effects on membrane structure indicate distinct molecular locations and orientations that may contribute to observed differences in biological activity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactions between abiotic filters, landscape structure and species traits as determinants of dairy farmland plant diversity

    Lomba, A.; Bunce, R.G.H.; Jongman, R.H.G.; Moreira, F.; Honrado, J.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining farmland biodiversity in Europe under scenarios of agricultural intensification is a keystone challenge of nature conservation. The recruitment of species from the regional pool to local landscape mosaics and individual patches is known to be determined by multi-scale ecological filters.

  16. The Determinants of Negative Maternal Parenting Behaviours: Maternal, Child, and Paternal Characteristics and Their Interaction

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C.; Zuroff, David C.; Koestner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study tested Belsky's determinants of parenting, namely maternal characteristics, child characteristics, and contextual issues, namely the mother's perception of the husband as a father, husband, and person. Three hundred and seventy-nine mothers first investigated by Sears, Maccoby, and Levin completed a standardised interview to assess…

  17. Multiplicative interaction of functional inflammasome genetic variants in determining the risk of gout.

    McKinney, Cushla; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Topless, Ruth K; Day, Richard O; Kannangara, Diluk Rw; Williams, Kenneth M; Janssen, Matthijs; Jansen, Timothy L; Joosten, Leo A; Radstake, Timothy R; Riches, Philip L; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Lioté, Frederic; So, Alexander; Merriman, Tony R

    2015-10-13

    The acute gout flare results from a localised self-limiting innate immune response to monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposited in joints in hyperuricaemic individuals. Activation of the caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 8 (CARD8) NOD-like receptor pyrin-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome by MSU crystals and production of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is central to acute gouty arthritis. However very little is known about genetic control of the innate immune response involved in acute gouty arthritis. Therefore our aim was to test functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants in the toll-like receptor (TLR)-inflammasome-IL-1β axis for association with gout. 1,494 gout cases of European and 863 gout cases of New Zealand (NZ) Polynesian (Māori and Pacific Island) ancestry were included. Gout was diagnosed by the 1977 ARA gout classification criteria. There were 1,030 Polynesian controls and 10,942 European controls including from the publicly-available Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) and Framingham Heart (FHS) studies. The ten SNPs were either genotyped by Sequenom MassArray or by Affymetrix SNP array or imputed in the ARIC and FHS datasets. Allelic association was done by logistic regression adjusting by age and sex with European and Polynesian data combined by meta-analysis. Sample sets were pooled for multiplicative interaction analysis, which was also adjusted by sample set. Eleven SNPs were tested in the TLR2, CD14, IL1B, CARD8, NLRP3, MYD88, P2RX7, DAPK1 and TNXIP genes. Nominally significant (P gout were detected at CARD8 rs2043211 (OR = 1.12, P = 0.007), IL1B rs1143623 (OR = 1.10, P = 0.020) and CD14 rs2569190 (OR = 1.08; P = 0.036). There was significant multiplicative interaction between CARD8 and IL1B (P = 0.005), with the IL1B risk genotype amplifying the risk effect of CARD8. There is evidence for association of gout with functional variants in CARD8, IL1B and CD14. The gout-associated allele of IL1B increases

  18. WWC Review of the Report "Interactive Online Learning on Campus: Testing MOOCs and Other Platforms in Hybrid Formats in the University System of Maryland." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the 2014 study, "Interactive Online Learning on Campus: Testing MOOCs and Other Platforms in Hybrid Formats in the University System of Maryland," researchers examined the impact of using hybrid forms of interactive online learning in seven undergraduate courses across seven universities in Maryland. Hybrid forms of interactive online…

  19. Determination of standard molar enthalpies of formation of SrMoO4 micro/nano structures

    Guo, Yunxiao; Fan, Gaochao; Huang, Zaiyin; Sun, Jilong; Wang, Lude; Wang, Tenghui; Chen, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of thermochemical cycle between the nano and bulk reaction systems. Highlights: ► A thermochemical cycle was designed. ► Relationship of standard molar enthalpies of formation between micro/nano and bulk SrMoO 4 was gained. ► Microcalorimetry was used as a supplementary technology. ► Standard molar enthalpies of formation of the synthesized micro/nano SrMoO 4 were obtained. ► This novel approach can be used to other micro/nano materials. - Abstract: SrMoO 4 micro/nano structures were prepared by a simple reverse microemulsion method and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). In order to associate standard molar enthalpies of formation of nano SrMoO 4 with bulk SrMoO 4 , the relationship of them was obtained through designing a thermochemical cycle according to thermodynamic potential function method. Combined with microcalorimetry, the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the synthesized micro/nano SrMoO 4 at 298.15 K were gained in this paper. And the variation of standard molar enthalpies of formation of micro/nano SrMoO 4 with different morphologies and sizes was discussed.

  20. Flow environment and matrix structure interact to determine spatial competition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Nadell, Carey D; Ricaurte, Deirdre; Yan, Jing; Drescher, Knut; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-01-13

    Bacteria often live in biofilms, which are microbial communities surrounded by a secreted extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that hydrodynamic flow and matrix organization interact to shape competitive dynamics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Irrespective of initial frequency, in competition with matrix mutants, wild-type cells always increase in relative abundance in planar microfluidic devices under simple flow regimes. By contrast, in microenvironments with complex, irregular flow profiles - which are common in natural environments - wild-type matrix-producing and isogenic non-producing strains can coexist. This result stems from local obstruction of flow by wild-type matrix producers, which generates regions of near-zero shear that allow matrix mutants to locally accumulate. Our findings connect the evolutionary stability of matrix production with the hydrodynamics and spatial structure of the surrounding environment, providing a potential explanation for the variation in biofilm matrix secretion observed among bacteria in natural environments.