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Sample records for formation dead sea

  1. Sinkhole formation and subsidence along the Dead Sea coast, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechieli, Yoseph; Abelson, Meir; Baer, Gideon

    2016-05-01

    More than 4,000 sinkholes have formed since the 1980s within a 60-km-long and 1-km-wide strip along the western coast of the Dead Sea (DS) in Israel. Their formation rate accelerated in recent years to >400 sinkholes per year. They cluster mostly in specific sites up to 1,000 m long and 200 m wide, which align parallel to the general direction of the fault systems associated with the DS Rift. The abrupt appearance of the sinkholes reflects changes to the groundwater regime around the shrinking DS. The eastward retreat of the shoreline and the lake-level drop (1 m/year in recent years) cause an eastward and downward migration of the fresh/saline groundwater interface. Consequently, a subsurface salt layer, which was previously enveloped by saline groundwater, is gradually being invaded and submerged by relatively fresh groundwater, and cavities form due to the rapid dissolution of the salt. Collapse of the overlying sediments into these cavities results in sinkholes at the surface. An association between sinkhole sites and land subsidence is revealed by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. On a broad scale (hundreds of meters), subsidence occurs due to compaction of fine-grained sediments as groundwater levels decline along the retreating DS shoreline. At smaller scales (tens of meters), subsidence appears above subsurface cavities in association with the sinkholes, serving in many cases as sinkhole precursors, a few weeks to more than a year before their actual appearance at the surface. This paper overviews the processes of sinkhole formation and their relation to land subsidence.

  2. Dead sea water intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Khademi, Floris; Brooks, Rebecca; Maayan, Channa; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Wexler, Isaiah D

    2012-08-01

    Near drowning in the Dead Sea is associated with both respiratory manifestations and severe electrolyte abnormalities. It is often difficult to distinguish between the contributions of sea water aspiration or ingestion to clinical manifestations. We present a unique case of accidental ingestion of a large amount of Dead Sea water through a gastrostomy tube in which a patient with familial dysautonomia presented with severe electrolyte disturbances. Forced diuresis with large amounts of intravenous fluids resulted in clinical and biochemical improvement. Full recovery was achieved after 2 days of treatment.

  3. The Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, and also one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth with a salinity of about 300 parts-per-thousand (nine times greater than ocean salinity). It is located on the border between Jordan and Israel, and is fed by the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is located in the Dead Sea Rift, formed as a result of the Arabian tectonic plate moving northward away from the African Plate. The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water, consisting of approximately 53% magnesium chloride, 37% potassium chloride and 8% sodium chloride. In the early part of the 20th century, the Dead Sea began to attract interest from chemists who deduced that the Sea was a natural deposit of potash and bromine. From the Dead Sea brine, Israel and Jordan produce 3.8 million tons potash, 200,000 tons elemental bromine, 45,000 tons caustic soda, 25, 000 tons magnesium metal, and sodium chloride. Both countries use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining

  4. The Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, and also one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth with a salinity of about 300 parts-per-thousand (nine times greater than ocean salinity). It is located on the border between Jordan and Israel, and is fed by the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is located in the Dead Sea Rift, formed as a result of the Arabian tectonic plate moving northward away from the African Plate. The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water, consisting of approximately 53% magnesium chloride, 37% potassium chloride and 8% sodium chloride. In the early part of the 20th century, the Dead Sea began to attract interest from chemists who deduced that the Sea was a natural deposit of potash and bromine. From the Dead Sea brine, Israel and Jordan produce 3.8 million tons potash, 200,000 tons elemental bromine, 45,000 tons caustic soda, 25, 000 tons magnesium metal, and sodium chloride. Both countries use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining

  5. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms.

  6. Dead sea asphalts: historical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A.

    1978-05-01

    Asphalts are present in the Dead Sea basin in three forms: (1) huge blocks, up to 100 tons in weight, composed of extremely pure (>99.99%) solid asphalt occasionally found floating on the lake, (2) veins, seepages, and cavity and fissure fillings in Lower Cretaceous to Holocene rocks, and (3) ozocerite veins on the eastern shore of the lake. Dead Sea asphalts probably have been documented over a longer period of time than any other hydrocarbon deposit--from antiquity to the 19th century. Major uses of asphalt from the Dead Sea have been as an ingredient in the embalming process, for medicinal purposes, for fumigation, and for agriculture. The first known war for control of a hydrocarbon deposit was in the Dead Sea area in 312 B.C. between the Seleucid Syrians and the Nabatean Arabs who lived around the lake. Surface manifestations of asphalt are linked closely to tectonic activity. In the lake itself, the asphalt is associated with diapirs During certain historic periods, tectonic and diapiric activity caused frequent liberation to the Dead Sea surface of semiliquid asphalt associated with large amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas. When the tectonic activity was attenuated, as in the 19th and 20th centuries, the rate of asphalt seepage to the bottom sediments of the Dead Sea was much slower and the asphalt solidified on the lake bottom. The release of asphalt to the surface became much more sporadic, and may have resulted in part from earthquakes. Thus, future asphalt prospecting in the Dead Sea area should be conducted along the boundaries of diapirs or their associated faults.

  7. Isotopically heavy carbon in C21 to C25 regular isoprenoids in halite-rich deposits from the Sdm Formation, Dead Sea, Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Grice, K.; Schouten, S.; Nissenbaum, A.; Charrach, J.

    1998-01-01

    A series of Miocene/Pliocene halite deposits (with extremely low organic carbon contents) from the Sdom Formation (Dead Sea Basin, Israel) have been studied. Distributions and contents of biomarkers have been determined using GC MS and irm-GCMS analyses, respectively. The hydrocarbon fractions cons

  8. Vertical Mixing in the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertman, Isaac; Ozer, Tal; Katsenelson, Boris; Lensky, Nadav

    2015-04-01

    For hundreds of years, the Dead Sea was characterized by a stable haline stratification, supported by runoff. The penetration of the winter convection was limited to an upper mixed layer (UML) of about 30-50 m. Below the UML, a stable halocline prevented the mixing. As a result of the runoff reduction, the UML salinity increased and the gravitational stability diminished. During the winter of 1978-1979, the sea water overturned, ending the long-term stable hydrological regime. Since 1979, the haline stratification structure reoccurred twice after extremely rainy winters, in 1980-82 and 1992-1995. In other years, the sea was entirely mixed by winter thermal convection ( which occurs from November to March ) and had a seasonal pycnocline beneath the UML during summer. Profiles of temperature and quasi-salinity (density anomaly from 1000 kg/m3 for the chosen reference temperature of 32° C) during the last 19 years, show the formation of summer ``overturning halocline'' beneath the UML, and the thermocline that supports the stable stratification. Another warm and saline layer is formed also during the summer period near the bottom. This layer spreads from the southern part of the sea, where end-brine is discharged to the sea from the Israeli and Jordanian salt plants' evaporation ponds. The end-brine has extremely high salinity (˜ 350 g/kg) and, in spite of the high temperatures ( ˜ 45° C), high density (1350 kg/m^3), it therefore spreads as a gravitational current in the Dead Sea deep basin. Estimation of the density ratio (Rρ) for the Dead Sea water (where measurements of water salinity is quite difficult) was done using quasi-salinity (σ32) and potential temperature (θ): Rρ= [α(partialθ/partial z)]/[β(partial σ32/partial z)], where α and β are temperature expansion and quasi-salinity contraction coefficients respectively. The values of α and β for the Dead Sea water were defined from water samples collected during 2008. The Rρ values confirm that

  9. Raising the dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea canal? Hydro-economics and governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Rosenberg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven decades of extractions have dramatically reduced Jordan River flows, lowered the Dead Sea level, opened sink holes, and caused other environmental problems. The fix Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinians propose would build an expensive multipurpose canal from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinated water. This paper compares the Red-Dead project to alternatives that may also raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the Jordan-Israel-Palestinian inter-tied water systems show two restoration alternatives are more economically viable than the proposed Red-Dead project. Many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country can together increase economic benefits and reliably deliver up to 900 MCM/year to the Dead Sea. Similarly, a smaller Red-Dead project that only generates hydropower can deliver large flows to the Dead Sea when the sale price of generated electricity is sufficiently high. However, for all restoration options, net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as flows to the Dead Sea increase. This finding suggests (i each country has no individual incentive to return water to the Dead Sea, and (ii outside institutions that seek to raise the Dead must also offer countries direct incentives to deliver water to the Sea besides building the countries new infrastructure.

  10. Raising the Dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea project? Hydro-economics and governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D. E.

    2011-04-01

    Seven decades of extractions have dramatically reduced Jordan River flows, lowered the Dead Sea level, opened sink holes, and caused other environmental problems. The fix Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinians propose would build an expensive multipurpose conveyance project from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinate water. This paper compares the Red-Dead project to alternatives that may also raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the Jordan-Israel-Palestinian inter-tied water systems show two restoration alternatives are more economically viable than the proposed Red-Dead project. Many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country can together increase economic benefits and reliably deliver up to 900 MCM yr-1 to the Dead Sea. Similarly, a smaller Red-Dead project that only generates hydropower can deliver large flows to the Dead Sea when the sale price of generated electricity is sufficiently high. However, for all restoration options, net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as flows to the Dead Sea increase. This finding suggests (i) each country has no individual incentive to return water to the Dead Sea, and (ii) outside institutions that seek to raise the Dead must also offer countries direct incentives to deliver water to the Sea besides building the countries new infrastructure.

  11. Raising the dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea canal? Hydro-economics and governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Seven decades of extractions have dramatically reduced Jordan River flows, lowered the Dead Sea level, opened sink holes, and caused other environmental problems. The fix Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinians propose would build an expensive multipurpose canal from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinated water. This paper compares the Red-Dead project to alternatives that may also raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the Jordan-Israel-Palestinian inter-tied water systems show two restoration alternatives are more economically viable than the proposed Red-Dead project. Many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country can together increase economic benefits and reliably deliver up to 900 MCM/year to the Dead Sea. Similarly, a smaller Red-Dead project that only generates hydropower can deliver large flows to the Dead Sea when the sale price of generated electricity is sufficiently high. However, for all restoration options, net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as flows to the Dead Sea increase. This finding suggests (i) each country has no individual incentive to return water to the Dead Sea, and (ii) outside institutions that seek to raise the Dead must also offer countries direct incentives to deliver water to the Sea besides building the countries new infrastructure.

  12. Raising the Dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea project? Hydro-economics and governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Rosenberg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Seven decades of extractions have dramatically reduced Jordan River flows, lowered the Dead Sea level, opened sink holes, and caused other environmental problems. The fix Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinians propose would build an expensive multipurpose conveyance project from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinate water. This paper compares the Red-Dead project to alternatives that may also raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the Jordan-Israel-Palestinian inter-tied water systems show two restoration alternatives are more economically viable than the proposed Red-Dead project. Many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country can together increase economic benefits and reliably deliver up to 900 MCM yr−1 to the Dead Sea. Similarly, a smaller Red-Dead project that only generates hydropower can deliver large flows to the Dead Sea when the sale price of generated electricity is sufficiently high. However, for all restoration options, net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as flows to the Dead Sea increase. This finding suggests (i each country has no individual incentive to return water to the Dead Sea, and (ii outside institutions that seek to raise the Dead must also offer countries direct incentives to deliver water to the Sea besides building the countries new infrastructure.

  13. Dead sea transform fault system reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Garfunkel, Zvi; Kagan, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    The Dead Sea transform is an active plate boundary connecting the Red Sea seafloor spreading system to the Arabian-Eurasian continental collision zone. Its geology and geophysics provide a natural laboratory for investigation of the surficial, crustal and mantle processes occurring along transtensional and transpressional transform fault domains on a lithospheric scale and related to continental breakup. There have been many detailed and disciplinary studies of the Dead Sea transform fault zone during the last?20 years and this book brings them together.This book is an updated comprehensive coverage of the knowledge, based on recent studies of the tectonics, structure, geophysics, volcanism, active tectonics, sedimentology and paleo and modern climate of the Dead Sea transform fault zone. It puts together all this new information and knowledge in a coherent fashion.

  14. Asymmetry and basin migration in the dead sea rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, I.; Freund, R.

    1981-12-01

    The Dead Sea depression sensu stricto, forms the deepest continental part of the Dead Sea rift, a transfer which separates the Levanthine and Arabian plates. It is occupied by three distinct sedimentary bodies, deposited in basins whose depocenters are displaced northward with time. They are: the continental red beds of the Hazeva Formation (Miocene), the Bira-Lido-Gesher marls and the exceptionally thick rocksalt of the Sedom Formation (Pliocene—Early Pleistocene), and the successive Amora, Lisan and Dead Sea evaporites and clastics (Early Pleistocene—Recent). Lengthwise and crosswise asymmetries of these sedimentary basins and their respective depocenters are due to: leftlateral shear combined with anticlockwise rotation of the Arabian (eastern) plate; steeper faulting of the crustal eastern margin than of the western sedimentary margin, and modification of depositional pattern by twice filling up of basins, by Hazeva red beds during Late Miocene pause of shear and by Sedom rocksalt during Pliocene marine ingression.

  15. Fungal life in the dead sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The waters of the Dead Sea currently contain about 348 g/l salts (2 M Mg(2+), 0.5 M Ca(2+), 1.5 M Na(+), 0.2 M K(+), 6.5 M Cl(-), 0.1 M Br(-)). The pH is about 6.0. After rainy winters the surface waters become diluted, triggering development of microbial blooms. The 1980 and 1992 blooms were dominated by the unicellular green alga Dunaliella and red Archaea. At least 70 species (in 26 genera) of Oomycota (Chromista), Mucoromycotina, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota (Fungi) were isolated from near-shore localities and offshore stations, including from deep waters. Aspergillus and Eurotium were most often recovered. Aspergillus terreus, A. sydowii, A. versicolor, Eurotium herbariorum, Penicillium westlingii, Cladosporium cladosporioides, C. sphaerospermum, C. ramnotellum, and C. halotolerans probably form the stable core of the community. The species Gymnascella marismortui may be endemic. Mycelia of Dead Sea isolates of A. versicolor and Chaetomium globosum remained viable for up to 8 weeks in Dead Sea water; mycelia of other species survived for many weeks in 50% Dead Sea water. Many isolates showed a very high tolerance to magnesium salts. There is no direct proof that fungi contribute to the heterotrophic activity in the Dead Sea, but fungi may be present at least locally and temporarily, and their enzymatic activities such as amylase, protease, and cellulase may play a role in the lake's ecosystem.

  16. Micro-facies of Dead Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Ina; Schwab, Markus J.; Brauer, Achim; Frank, Ute; Dulski, Peter; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Enzel, Yehouda; Waldmann, Nicolas; Ariztegui, Daniel; Drilling Party, Dsddp

    2013-04-01

    Lacustrine sediments infilling the Dead Sea basin (DSB) provide a rare opportunity to trace changing climates in the eastern Mediterranean-Levant region throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. In this context, high-resolution investigation of changes in sediment micro- facies allow deciphering short-term climatic fluctuations and changing environmental conditions in the Levant. The Dead Sea is a terminal lake with one of the largest drainage areas in the Levant, located in the Mediterranean climate zone and influenced also by the Saharo-Arabian deserts. Due to drastic climatic changes in this region, an exceptionally large variety of lacustrine sediments has been deposited in the DSB. These sediments, partially the results of changing lake levels, primarily represent changes in precipitation (e.g. Enzel et al., 2008). Evaporites (halite and gypsum) reflect dry climatic conditions during interglacials, while alternated aragonite-detritus (AAD) is deposited during glacial lake level high-stands. Here we present the first micro-facies inventory of a ~450 m long sediment profile from the deepest part of the northern DSB (ICDP site 5017-1, ~300 m water depth). The sediment record comprises the last two glacial-interglacial cycles, with mainly AAD facies in the upper part of the Amora Formation (penultimate glacial) and the last glacial Lisan Formation. The last interglacial Samra and the Holocene Zeelim Formations are predominantly characterized by thick bedded halite deposits, intercalated by partly laminated detrital marl sequences. Representative sections of the different facies types have been analyzed for micro-facies on petrographic thin sections, supported by high-resolution µXRF element scanning, magnetic susceptibility measurements and microscopic fluorescence analysis. Furthermore, Holocene sediments retrieved at the deep basin core site have been compared to their shallow-water counterpart at the western margin of the lake (core DSEn; Migowski et al., 2004

  17. Combined U-decay Series and Oxygen Isotope Dating of a Mid-Pleistocene Lacustrine Sequence: The Amora Formation, Dead Sea Basin, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfstein, A.; Haase-Schramm, A.; Waldmann, N.; Kolodny, Y.; Stein, M.

    2007-12-01

    Dating of mid-Pleistocene carbonate sediments is challenged by the lack of suitable absolute radiometric methods. Here, we present a combined approach that utilized the U and Th isotopes with floating δ18O stratigraphy and paleomagnetic constraints, and established a high-resolution chronology of the mid to upper Pleistocene Lake Amora in the Dead Sea basin. The application of the δ18O record as a floating chronometer is based on the correlation found between δ18O values of synchronously deposited upper-Pleistocene and Holocene lake sediments, East Mediterranean foraminifers and Judean Mountains speleothems (Kolodny et al., 2005). The lacustrine Amora Formation consists of laminated aragonite and detritus, Ca-sulfate minerals, halite and clastic units. The sediments were depsoited in the lacustrine environment of the paleo-Dead Sea basin and were later uplifted and tilted by the rising Sedom diapir, exposing ~330 m of the formation on the eastern flanks of Mt. Sedom. δ18O values range between 6.0 and -1.0‰, shifting periodically between glacial and interglacial sequences throughout the sedimentary section, marking corresponding shifts in the global marine records. Paleomagnetic data indicate the entire section was deposited after the 780 ka Matuyama-Brunhes magnetic transition. Data compilation renders the age of the base of the exposed Amora Fm. to be ~750 to 700 ka BP (MIS 18 to 17), and the age of its capping sediments to be between ~200 and 130 ka BP (MIS 6 and the transition to MIS 5). Climatic-limnologic shifts throughout the sedimentation period are recorded by the lithological, chemical and isotopical properties of the sediments, and are correlated to global and regional events. A prominent ~6 meter thick salt layer precipitated during MIS 11 (~400 ka BP) and marks a significant lake level decline. The only other time a similar salt unit precipitated from the Dead Sea basin lakes during last ~750 ka, was before ~10 ka (Pleistocene-Holocene transition

  18. Cl-37 in the Dead Sea system - preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiller, M.; Nissenbaum, A. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Kaufmann, R.S. [Department of Geology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Long, A. [Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AR (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This study presents the first set of {delta}{sup 37}Cl measurements in the Dead Sea environment. {delta}{sup 37}Cl values for the meromictic (long term stratified) Dead Sea water column prior to its complete overturn in 1979 were -0.47per thousand SMOC for the UWM (Upper Water Mass) and +0.55per thousand SMOC for the LWM (Lower Water Mass). The {delta}{sup 37}Cl values for the pre-overturn Dead Sea cannot be explained by the prevailing model on the evolution of the Dead Sea during the last few centuries and require corroboration by more measurements. The 1979 overturn wiped out almost completely the isotopic differences between the UWM and LWM. Even so, Cl isotope data could be used to decipher physical processes related to the overturn such as incomplete homogenization of the deep water mass. Inputs into the lake, comprising freshwaters (springs and the Jordan River) and saline springs gave a range of -0.37per thousand to +1.0per thousand with the freshwater sources being more enriched in {delta}{sup 37}Cl. Based on the {delta}{sup 37}Cl measurements of the End-Brine (the effluent from Dead Sea evaporation ponds) and of recent Dead Sea halite, the Cl isotopic composition of the originating brines have been estimated. They gave a narrow isotopic spread, +0.01per thousand and +0.07per thousand and fall within the same range with Dead Sea pore water (+0.13per thousand) and with the post-overturn Dead Sea (-0.03per thousand and +0.16per thousand). Rock salt from Mount Sdom gave a value of -0.59per thousand indicating its formation at the last stages of halite deposition from evaporating sea water. The hypersaline En Ashlag spring gave a depleted {delta}{sup 37}Cl value of -0.32per thousand, corresponding to a residual brine formed in the very latest stages (including bishofite deposition) of seawater evaporation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Survival of filamentous fungi in hypersaline Dead Sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Papo, T; Oren, A; Wasser, S P; Nevo, E

    2003-02-01

    A variety of filamentous fungi have recently been isolated from the Dead Sea (340 g/L total dissolved salts). To assess the extent to which such fungi can survive for prolonged periods in Dead Sea water, we examined the survival of both spores and mycelia in undiluted Dead Sea water and in Dead Sea water diluted to different degrees with distilled water. Mycelia of Aspergillus versicolor and Chaetomium globosum strains isolated from the Dead Sea remained viable for up to 8 weeks in undiluted Dead Sea water. Four Dead Sea isolates (A. versicolor, Eurotium herbariorum, Gymnascella marismortui, and C. globosum) retained their viability in Dead Sea water diluted to 80% during the 12 weeks of the experiment. Mycelia of all species survived for the full term of the experiment in Dead Sea water diluted to 50% and 10% of its original salinity. Comparison of the survival of Dead Sea species and closely related isolates obtained from other locations showed prolonged viability of the strains obtained from the Dead Sea. Spores of isolates obtained from the terrestrial shore of the Dead Sea generally proved less tolerant to suspension in undiluted Dead Sea water than spores of species isolated from the water column. Spores of the species isolated from the control sites had lost their viability in undiluted Dead Sea water within 12 weeks. However, with the exception of Emericella spores, which showed poor survival, a substantial fraction of the spores of Dead Sea fungal isolates remained viable for that period. The difference in survival rate between spores and mycelia of isolates of the same species points to the existence of adapted halotolerant and/or halophilic fungi in the Dead Sea.

  20. Fire and brimstone: the microbially mediated formation of elemental sulfur nodules from an isotope and major element study in the paleo-Dead Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Bishop

    Full Text Available We present coupled sulfur and oxygen isotope data from sulfur nodules and surrounding gypsum, as well as iron and manganese concentration data, from the Lisan Formation near the Dead Sea (Israel. The sulfur isotope composition in the nodules ranges between -9 and -11‰, 27 to 29‰ lighter than the surrounding gypsum, while the oxygen isotope composition of the gypsum is constant around 24‰. The constant sulfur isotope composition of the nodule is consistent with formation in an 'open system'. Iron concentrations in the gypsum increase toward the nodule, while manganese concentrations decrease, suggesting a redox boundary at the nodule-gypsum interface during aqueous phase diagenesis. We propose that sulfur nodules in the Lisan Formation are generated through bacterial sulfate reduction, which terminates at elemental sulfur. We speculate that the sulfate-saturated pore fluids, coupled with the low availability of an electron donor, terminates the trithionate pathway before the final two-electron reduction, producing thionites, which then disproportionate to form abundant elemental sulfur.

  1. Fire and brimstone: the microbially mediated formation of elemental sulfur nodules from an isotope and major element study in the paleo-Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tom; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Sivan, Orit

    2013-01-01

    We present coupled sulfur and oxygen isotope data from sulfur nodules and surrounding gypsum, as well as iron and manganese concentration data, from the Lisan Formation near the Dead Sea (Israel). The sulfur isotope composition in the nodules ranges between -9 and -11‰, 27 to 29‰ lighter than the surrounding gypsum, while the oxygen isotope composition of the gypsum is constant around 24‰. The constant sulfur isotope composition of the nodule is consistent with formation in an 'open system'. Iron concentrations in the gypsum increase toward the nodule, while manganese concentrations decrease, suggesting a redox boundary at the nodule-gypsum interface during aqueous phase diagenesis. We propose that sulfur nodules in the Lisan Formation are generated through bacterial sulfate reduction, which terminates at elemental sulfur. We speculate that the sulfate-saturated pore fluids, coupled with the low availability of an electron donor, terminates the trithionate pathway before the final two-electron reduction, producing thionites, which then disproportionate to form abundant elemental sulfur.

  2. Dead Sea Minerals loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, Alberto; Kubowicz, Stephan; Alderighi, Michele; Bartoli, Cristina; Piras, Anna Maria; Schmid, Ruth; Chiellini, Federica

    2011-10-15

    Therapeutic properties of Dead Sea Water (DSW) in the treatment of skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and photo aging UV damaged skin have been well established. DSW is in fact rich in minerals such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, zinc and strontium which are known to exploit anti-inflammatory effects and to promote skin barrier recovery. In order to develop a Dead Sea Minerals (DSM) based drug delivery system for topical therapy of skin diseases, polymeric nanoparticles based on Poly (maleic anhydride-alt-butyl vinyl ether) 5% grafted with monomethoxy poly(ethyleneglycol) 2000 MW (PEG) and 95% grafted with 2-methoxyethanol (VAM41-PEG) loaded with DSM were prepared by means of a combined miniemulsion/solvent evaporation process. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized in terms of dimension, morphology, biocompatibility, salt content and release. Cytocompatible spherical nanoparticles possessing an average diameter of about 300 nm, a time controlled drug release profile and a high formulation yield were obtained.

  3. Floating asphalt blocks of the Dead Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot, Israel); Aizenshtat, Z.; Goldberg, M.

    1980-01-01

    Large blocks of mineral matter free (less than 0.1%) asphalt are occasionally found floating on the surface of the Dead Sea. Chemical, spectroscopic and isotopic data are given for the asphalt. The source of the asphalt is not accurately known, but presumably it represents mobilization of heavy viscous asphaltic masses at depth below the lake bottom into the floor of the lake. It may be released to the surface by earth tremors.

  4. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions.

  5. Potential Evaporite Biomarkers from the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Penny A.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Allen, Carlton C.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    The Dead Sea is located on the northern branch of the African-Levant Rift systems. The rift system, according to one model, was formed by a series of strike slip faults, initially forming approximately two million years ago. The Dead Sea is an evaporite basin that receives freshwater from springs and from the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is different from other evaporite basins, such as the Great Salt Lake, in that it possesses high concentrations of magnesium and has an average pH of 6.1. The dominant cation in the Great Salt Lake is sodium, and the pH is 7.7. Calcium concentrations are also higher in the Dead Sea than in the Great Salt Lake. Both basins are similar in that the dominant anion is chlorine and the salinity levels are approximately 20 %. Other common cations that have been identified from the waters of the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake include sodium and potassium. A variety of Archea, Bacteria, and a single genus of a green algal, Dunaliella, has been described from the Dead Sea. Earlier studies concentrated on microbial identification and analysis of their unique physiology that allows them to survive in this type of extreme environment. Potential microbial fossilization processes, microbial fossils, and the metallic ions associated with fossilization have not been studied thoroughly. The present study is restricted to identifying probable microbial morphologies and associated metallic ions. XRD (X Ray Diffraction) analysis indicates the presence of halite, quartz, and orthoclase feldspar. In addition to these minerals, other workers have reported potassium chloride, magnesium bromide, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, and calcium sulfate. Halite, calcium sulfate, and orthoclase were examined in this report for the presence of microbes, microbially induced deposits or microbial alteration. Neither the gypsum nor the orthoclase surfaces possesses any obvious indications of microbial life or fossilization. The sand-sized orthoclase particles are

  6. Air chemistry over the Dead Sea: Observations and Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, M.; Tas, E.; Obrist, D.; Marveev, V.; Peleg, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea which lies between Israel and Jordan is the deepest place on the planet with a negative elevation of 424 m below sea level. Because it is situated in isolated water shed with much higher evaporation rates relative to water inflow, its salinity is 10 times greater (numbers??) than normal ocean water. Emissions of bromine into the air in the form of reactive bromine species (RBS) are responsible for unique chemistry found only during the spring season over the Arctic Ocean and the stratosphere over Antarctica. Measurements of chemical and meteorological parameters took place at the Dead Sea during a series of studies between 1997 and 2010. Initially, the sensitivity of RBS formation to both meteorological and anthropogenic parameters was investigated using measurement-based simulations. The results show that RBS formation at the Dead Sea occurs efficiently via both aerosol-induced chemistry and direct bromine release from the Dead Sea water. Aerosol-induced RBS formation was found to be active when the measured relative humidity (RH) was higher than ~30%. Direct release of bromine from the seawater appears to occur efficiently only when wind speeds are below ~2m/s. Anthropogenic NO2 and sulfate aerosols significantly enhance RBS formation at the Dead Sea at times when aerosol chemistry is active. This appears to occur via the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 on sulfate aerosols. However, above a threshold level of NO2, inhibition of RBS production can occur. This threshold NO2 level is highly dependent on several variables, including RBS levels and concentrations of sulfate aerosols. Overall, direct bromine release from the seawater appears to be more efficient than aerosol-induced RBS formation, but at times when measured RH exceed ~30%, extremely high BrO formation can occur via aerosol-induced chemistry. The second part of the study included simulations to examine the effects of RBS on atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) that occur in

  7. Modelling chemistry over the Dead Sea: bromine and ozone chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smoydzin, L.; Glasow, R

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of O3 and BrO concentrations over the Dead Sea indicate that Ozone Depletion Events (ODEs), widely known to happen in polar regions, are also likely to occur over the Dead Sea due to the very high bromine content of the Dead Sea water. However, we show that BrO and O3 levels as they are detected cannot solely be explained by high Br levels in the Dead Sea water and the release of gas phase halogen...

  8. A receiver function study across the Dead Sea Basin (DSB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, A.; Asch, G.; Hofstetter, R.; Kind, R.; Weber, M.

    2008-12-01

    Beginning in September 2006, a temporary network of 30 broadband and 45 short-period seismic stations has been set up on both sides of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB). During one and a half year of successful operation, data were continuously recorded in the field at 100 Hz and 200 Hz sample frequency for the broadband and short-period seismic stations, respectively. The raw data were converted to miniseed format and archived as full seed volume in the GEOFON data center of the GFZ. In the present work, the Receiver Function Method has been applied to the three component passive source data to investigate seismic discontinuities from the crust down to the upper mantle. Unusual negative phases at about 1s delay time have been observed at several stations in the Dead Sea region on the top of the assumed salt diapir. First preliminary receiver function analysis reveals a crustal thickness of about 30 -35 km in the investigated area and possibly low-velocity layer beneath the Moho. It also shows a basin which is possibly filled with salt about 10 km thick beneath the Lisan peninsula (Dead Sea).

  9. Modelling chemistry over the Dead Sea: bromine and ozone chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of O3 and BrO concentrations over the Dead Sea indicate that Ozone Depletion Events (ODEs, widely known to happen in polar regions, are also occuring over the Dead Sea due to the very high bromine content of the Dead Sea water. However, we show that BrO and O3 levels as they are detected cannot solely be explained by high Br levels in the Dead Sea water and the release of gas phase halogen species out of sea borne aerosol particles and their conversion to reactive halogen species. It is likely that other sources for reactive halogen compounds are needed to explain the observed concentrations for BrO and O3. To explain the chemical mechanism taking place over the Dead Sea leading to BrO levels of several pmol/mol we used the one-dimensional model MISTRA which calculates microphysics, meteorology, gas and aerosol phase chemistry. We performed pseudo Lagrangian studies by letting the model column first move over the desert which surrounds the Dead Sea region and then let it move over the Dead Sea itself. To include an additional source for gas phase halogen compounds, gas exchange between the Dead Sea water and the atmosphere is treated explicitly. Model calculations indicate that this process has to be included to explain the measurements.

  10. Organic geochemistry of Dead Sea sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A.; Baedecker, M.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1972-01-01

    Four stations in the Dead Sea (representing two shallow oxidizing and two deep reducing environments) were analyzed. The total organic carbon content of the sediment ranged from 0.23 to 0.40 percent. Hydrocarbons, fatty acids, amino acids, humic acids and chlorins were separated and characterized. Of special significance were the following findings: (1) the presence of the isoprenoid hydrocarbons (phytane and pristane) as well as phytanic acid, phytol and dihydrophytol, all thought to be derived from a phosphatidyl glycerophosphate lipid present in halophilic bacteria which populate the water column; (2) a high abundance of unsaturated C-18 fatty acids; (3) presence of apparently unaltered chlorophyll a in the chlorins isolated, but absence of chlorophyll b; and (4) low concentration of humic and fulvic acids in the oxidizing shallow sediments as compared to their concentration in the deeper reducing sediments. It is apparent that the hypersaline environment is conducive for preservation of the organic matter under reducing conditions but not under oxidizing conditions. In the latter case, the organic matter of the sediment is rapidly converted into an insoluble, non-extractable complex.

  11. Extreme flood events in the Dead Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, Marieke; Ben Dor, Yoav; Schwab, Markus J.; Neugebauer, Ina; Plessen, Birgit; Tjallingii, Rik; Erel, Yigal; Enzel, Yehouda; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline, terminal lake located within the Dead Sea basin at the lowest continental elevation on Earth (~425 m below mean sea level). Extreme hydro-meteorological events in terms of flash floods occur regularly during the wet season in the Dead Sea basin and adjacent mountain ranges. However, little is known about the impact of these extreme floods on the sedimentary dynamics in the Dead Sea and possible links to long-term climate changes. The trilateral research project PALEX (Paleoclimate in the Eastern Mediterranean Region - Levante: Paleohydrology and Extreme Flood Events) was recently initiated within the framework of the DFG priority program 1006 ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) to investigate extreme flood events in the Dead Sea basin during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. Within the ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) the ~455 m long sediment core 5017-1 was recovered from the northern Dead Sea basin. Previously published results (Neugebauer et al., 2014, 2015) have demonstrated the occurrence of extreme flood events represented in the sediments as thick graded detrital layers during Late Holocene dry phases. Based on these results we will apply a comprehensive analytical approach including microfacies analyses, μXRF element scanning, and stable isotope geochemistry to different time intervals of core 5017-1. Particularly, we aim to investigate the structure and composition of detrital layers in order to decipher sediment transport mechanisms and the provenance of the flood-triggered sediments. The overarching goal is to establish a high-resolution extreme flood time series for the Dead Sea basin on the basis of a previously established radiocarbon and U-Th chronology (Torfstein et al., 2015; Neugebauer et al., 2014) and to study a possible link between the frequency and magnitude of extreme flood events and the long-term climate trend. Neugebauer I, Brauer A, Schwab MJ, et al. (2014) Lithology of

  12. The microbiology and biogeochemistry of the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, A

    1975-06-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline water body. Its total dissolved salts content is on the average 322.6 gm/liter. The dominant cation is Mg (40.7 gm/liter), followed by Na (39.2 gm/liter), Ca (17 gm/liter) and K (7 gm/liter). The major anion is Cl (212 gm/liter), followed by Br (5 gm/liter); SO4 and HCO3, are very minor. The lake contains a limited variety of microorganisms and no higher organisms. The number of recorded species is very low, but the total biomass is reasonably high (about 10(5) bacteria/ml and 10(4) algal cells/ml). The indigenous flora is comprised mainly of obligate halophylic bacteria, such as the pink, pleomorphicHalobacterium sp., aSarcina-like coccus, and the facultative halophilic green alga,Dunaliella. Sulfate reducers can be isolated from bottom sediments. Recently a unique obligate magnesiophile bacteria was isolated from Dead Sea sediment. Several of the Dead Sea organisms possess unusual properties. TheHalobacterium sp. has extremely high intercellular K(+) concentration (up to 4.8M) and extraordinary specificity for K(+) over Na. TheDunaliella has very high intracellular concentration of glycerol (up to 2.1M). The microorganisms exert marked influence on some biogeochemical processes occurring in the lake, such as the control of the sulfur cycle and the formation and diagenesis of organic matter in the sediments. The Dead Sea is an excellent example of the development of two different mechanisms for adjusting to a hostile environment. The algae adjust to the high salinity by developing a mechanism for the exclusion of salts from the intracellular fluid and using glycerol for osmotic regulation. On the other hand, the bacteria adapt to the environment by adjusting their internal inorganic ionic strength, but not composition, to that of the medium. The problem of population dynamics and limiting factors for algal and bacterial productivity are discussed in view of the total absence of zooplankton and other consumers other than bacteria.

  13. Teleseismic traveltimes residuals across the Dead Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, A.; Dorbath, C.

    2014-12-01

    New findings of the structure of the Dead Sea sedimentary basin and its eastern and western bordering regions are obtained by P and PKP wave relative traveltime residuals of 644 teleseisms, as recorded by the Dead Sea Integrated Research portable seismic network in the Dead Sea basin and its neighboring regions. The Lisan Peninsula is characterized by relatively small teleseismic traveltime residuals of about 0.14 s, in the latitude range of 31.22°-31.37° and at the longitude of 35.50°, slowly decreasing toward the west. The largest teleseismic traveltime residuals are in the southern Dead Sea basin, south of the Lisan Peninsula in the latitude range of 31.05°-31.15° and along longitude 35.45° and continuing southward toward the Amaziahu Fault, reaching values of 0.4-0.5 s. There is a small positive residual at the Amaziahu Fault and a small negative residual south of it probably marking the southern end of the Dead Sea basin. East and west of the Dead Sea basin the mean teleseismic traveltime residuals are negative with overall averages of -0.35 s and -0.45 s, respectively. Using the teleseismic residuals, we estimate the horizontal dimensions of the Lisan salt diapir to be 23 km × 13 km at its widest and a maximal thickness of about 7.2 km. The thickness of the Mount Sodom salt diapir is estimated as 6.2 km.

  14. The therapeutic effects of Dead Sea mineral-based skincare

    OpenAIRE

    Mallia, Alistair

    2010-01-01

    Dead Sea mineral-based skincare can be considered a unique part of the 'Sea' cosmetic trend. The sea as a natural source of healing is quite an old concept. In 1750 Richard Russel presented his thesis on the Therapeutic effect of seawater at Oxford. And in 1869 the term thalassotherapy or 'bringing together the sea and medicine' was coined by the French physican La Bonardier d'Arachon

  15. Comprehensive Measurements of Wind Systems at the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jutta; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Kalthoff, Norbert; Wieser, Andreas; Alpert, Pinhas; Lati, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique place on earth. It is located at the lowest point of the Jordan Rift valley and its water level is currently at -429 m above mean sea level (amsl). To the West the Judean Mountains (up to 1000 m amsl) and to the East the Moab mountains (up to 1300 m amsl) confine the north-south oriented valley. The whole region is located in a transition zone of semi-arid to arid climate conditions and together with the steep orography, this forms a quite complex and unique environment. The Virtual Institute DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE) is an international project funded by the German Helmholtz Association and was established to study coupled atmospheric, hydrological, and lithospheric processes in the changing environment of the Dead Sea. Previous studies showed that the valley's atmosphere is often governed by periodic wind systems (Bitan, 1974), but most of the studies were limited to ground measurements and could therefore not resolve the three dimensional development and evolution of these wind systems. Performed airborne measurements found three distinct layers above the Dead Sea (Levin, 2005). Two layers are directly affected by the Dead Sea and the third is the commonly observed marine boundary layer over Israel. In the framework of DESERVE a field campaign with the mobile observatory KITcube was conducted to study the three dimensional structure of atmospheric processes at the Dead Sea in 2014. The combination of several in-situ and remote sensing instruments allows temporally and spatially high-resolution measurements in an atmospheric volume of about 10x10x10 km3. With this data set, the development and evolution of typical local wind systems, as well as the impact of regional scale wind conditions on the valley's atmosphere could be analyzed. The frequent development of a nocturnal drainage flow with wind velocities of over 10 m s-1, the typical lake breeze during the day, its onset and vertical extension as well as strong downslope winds

  16. Tourism development challenges on the Dead Sea shore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendt Jan A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea along with Jerusalem belongs to one of the most well-known spots visited by tourists in Israel. Because of many factors, such as the water level of the Dead Sea at a depth of 430 m b.s.l. (in 2015, average salinity of 26%, hot springs and many healing salts located there, it is a unique tourist attraction on a global level. Its attractiveness is heightened by its proximity to other sites of interest, such as the Jewish fortress at Masada, Jericho, Qumran, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found, as well as Petra, Madaba and Al-Karak on the Jordanian side of the Dead Sea. High salinity and a microclimate create perfect conditions for the development of health resorts and medical tourism. Extracting healing salts from its waters for the needs of the chemical industry is important for both the economy and medical tourism. However, as a consequence of the agricultural and urban use of the waters of the River Jordan, which flows into the Dead Sea, a persistent decrease in the lake water level has been observed over the last century. This has created a number of economic and political issues. The problems which still have to be resolved are associated with the Red Sea-Dead Sea Conduit (Canal, the division of Jordan’s water resources, conservation of the unique reservoir of the Dead Sea and the threat of hindering the development of tourism within the region. The presentation of these issues is the main aim of this research paper. The study is based on the analysis of changes in tourism flows, results of research studies and the prognosis of changes in the water level of the Dead Sea. It presents an assessment of the effects of this phenomenon on the tourist economy. At the current level of tourism flows within the region, the tourist capacity of local beaches will be exceeded in areas where the most popular tourist resorts are located. Increased expenditure on development of tourism infrastructure in the coastal zone can also be observed

  17. Monitoring the Dead Sea Region by Multi-Parameter Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, A.; Weber, M. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Asch, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Dead Sea Region is an exceptional ecosystem whose seismic activity has influenced all facets of the development, from ground water availability to human evolution. Israelis, Palestinians and Jordanians living in the Dead Sea region are exposed to severe earthquake hazard. Repeatedly large earthquakes (e.g. 1927, magnitude 6.0; (Ambraseys, 2009)) shook the whole Dead Sea region proving that earthquake hazard knows no borders and damaging seismic events can strike anytime. Combined with the high vulnerability of cities in the region and with the enormous concentration of historical values this natural hazard results in an extreme earthquake risk. Thus, an integration of earthquake parameters at all scales (size and time) and their combination with data of infrastructure are needed with the specific aim of providing a state-of-the-art seismic hazard assessment for the Dead Sea region as well as a first quantitative estimate of vulnerability and risk. A strong motivation for our research is the lack of reliable multi-parameter ground-based geophysical information on earthquakes in the Dead Sea region. The proposed set up of a number of observatories with on-line data access will enable to derive the present-day seismicity and deformation pattern in the Dead Sea region. The first multi-parameter stations were installed in Jordan, Israel and Palestine for long-time monitoring. All partners will jointly use these locations. All stations will have an open data policy, with the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany) providing the hard and software for real-time data transmission via satellite to Germany, where all partners can access the data via standard data protocols.

  18. Water input requirements of the rapidly shrinking Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Ghazleh, Shahrazad; Hartmann, Jens; Jansen, Nils; Kempe, Stephan

    2009-05-01

    The deepest point on Earth, the Dead Sea level, has been dropping alarmingly since 1978 by 0.7 m/a on average due to the accelerating water consumption in the Jordan catchment and stood in 2008 at 420 m below sea level. In this study, a terrain model of the surface area and water volume of the Dead Sea was developed from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data using ArcGIS. The model shows that the lake shrinks on average by 4 km(2)/a in area and by 0.47 km(3)/a in volume, amounting to a cumulative loss of 14 km(3) in the last 30 years. The receding level leaves almost annually erosional terraces, recorded here for the first time by Differential Global Positioning System field surveys. The terrace altitudes were correlated among the different profiles and dated to specific years of the lake level regression, illustrating the tight correlation between the morphology of the terrace sequence and the receding lake level. Our volume-level model described here and previous work on groundwater inflow suggest that the projected Dead Sea-Red Sea channel or the Mediterranean-Dead Sea channel must have a carrying capacity of >0.9 km(3)/a in order to slowly re-fill the lake to its former level and to create a sustainable system of electricity generation and freshwater production by desalinization. Moreover, such a channel will maintain tourism and potash industry on both sides of the Dead Sea and reduce the natural hazard caused by the recession.

  19. New perspectives on interdisciplinary earth science at the Dead Sea: The DESERVE project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottmeier, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Kottmeier@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann von Helmholtz Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Agnon, Amotz [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel); Al-Halbouni, Djamil [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Alpert, Pinhas [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo (Israel); Corsmeier, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann von Helmholtz Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Dahm, Torsten [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Eshel, Adam [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo (Israel); Geyer, Stefan [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH — UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Haas, Michael; Holohan, Eoghan [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Kalthoff, Norbert [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann von Helmholtz Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kishcha, Pavel [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo (Israel); Krawczyk, Charlotte [Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Lati, Joseph [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo (Israel); Laronne, Jonathan B. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva (Israel); Lott, Friederike [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann von Helmholtz Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mallast, Ulf; Merz, Ralf [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH — UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Metzger, Jutta [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann von Helmholtz Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mohsen, Ayman [An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine (Country Unknown); and others

    2016-02-15

    satellite image analysis and to geophysical surveys (e.g. shear-wave reflections) has enabled a more detailed characterization of sinkhole morphology and temporal development and the possible subsurface controls thereon. All the above listed efforts and scientific results take place with the interdisciplinary education of young scientists. They are invited to attend joint thematic workshops and winter schools as well as to participate in field experiments. - Graphical abstract: New perspectives on interdisciplinary earth science at the Dead Sea: the DESERVE project. Christoph Kottmeier, Amotz Agnon et al. - Highlights: • An interdisciplinary effort of Earth Sciences in the Dead Sea region is undertaken. • An observation network to monitor long time variability is installed. • Fieldwork and modeling studies on coupled environmental processes • Innovative measurement techniques are applied for the first time to the Dead Sea. • New insights into sinkhole formation, flashflood genesis, and complex wind systems.

  20. Piecing Together the Past: The Dead Sea Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Eugene; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Illustrates the astonishing coordination of archaeological and scholarly activities surrounding the Dead Sea Scrolls. First discovered by Bedouin nomads in 1947, the Scrolls consist of a few complete manuscripts and over 80,000 fragments. Discusses the early Christian sect that produced the Scrolls, and provides current perspectives on the…

  1. Stress tensor and focal mechanisms in the Dead Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, A.; Dorbath, C.; Dorbath, L.; Braeuer, B.; Weber, M.

    2016-04-01

    We use the recorded seismicity, confined to the Dead Sea basin and its boundaries, by the Dead Sea Integrated Research (DESIRE) portable seismic network and the Israel and Jordan permanent seismic networks for studying the mechanisms of earthquakes in the Dead Sea basin. The observed seismicity in the Dead Sea basin is divided into nine regions according to the spatial distribution of the earthquakes and the known tectonic features. The large number of recording stations and the adequate station distribution allowed the reliable determinations of 494 earthquake focal mechanisms. For each region, based on the inversion of the observed polarities of the earthquakes, we determine the focal mechanisms and the associated stress tensor. For 159 earthquakes, out of the 494 focal mechanisms, we could determine compatible fault planes. On the eastern side, the focal mechanisms are mainly strike-slip mechanism with nodal planes in the N-S and E-W directions. The azimuths of the stress axes are well constrained presenting minimal variability in the inversion of the data, which is in agreement with the Eastern Boundary fault on the east side of the Dead Sea basin and what we had expected from the regional geodynamics. However, larger variabilities of the azimuthal and dip angles are observed on the western side of the basin. Due to the wider range of azimuths of the fault planes, we observe the switching of σ1 and σ2 or the switching of σ2 and σ3 as major horizontal stress directions. This observed switching of stress axes allows having dip-slip and normal mechanisms in a region that is dominated by strike-slip motion.

  2. 77 FR 64373 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times,'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times... the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice...

  3. 78 FR 24462 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times... the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice...

  4. 78 FR 62354 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-18

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times'' ACTION... exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice was corrected...

  5. 78 FR 16565 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times'' ACTION... exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice was corrected...

  6. Physical and chemical characterization of Dead Sea mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khlaifat, Abdelaziz, E-mail: abdelaziz.khlaifat@me.weatherford.com [Weatherford Oil Tool Middle East Ltd., P.O. Box 4627, Dubai (United Arab Emirates); Al-Khashman, Omar [Department of Environmental Engineering, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Ma' an, P.O. Box 20 (Jordan); Qutob, Hani [Weatherford Oil Tool Middle East Ltd., P.O. Box 4627, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-05-15

    A laboratory analysis was performed to determine the physical and chemical properties of 24 Dead Sea mud samples collected from three different locations on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. Several analytical techniques were used to determine the chemical and mineralogical compositions of those samples including atomic absorption spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Physical parameters such as specific gravity, Atterberg limits, grain size, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, pH and electrical conductivity were also studied. The main focus of the work was to document mud characteristics and to study the interrelation between physical and chemical properties. The mud samples were quite rich in minerals. Strontium was the most abundant trace element in the samples (range: 410-810 ppm) followed by barium (range: 155-380 ppm), vanadium (range: 209-264 ppm) and lead (range: 108-114 ppm). There were significant differences in the elemental contents of mud samples collected from different locations.

  7. Stratigraphy, climate and downhole logging data - an example from the ICDP Dead Sea deep drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coianiz, Lisa; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Lazar, Michael

    2017-04-01

    During the late Quaternary a series of lakes occupied the Dead Sea tectonic basin. The sediments that accumulated within these lakes preserved the environmental history (tectonic and climatic) of the basin and its vicinity. Most of the information on these lakes was deduced from exposures along the marginal terraces of the modern Dead Sea, e.g. the exposures of the last glacial Lake Lisan and Holocene Dead Sea. The International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) project conducted in the Dead Sea during 2010-2011 recovered several cores that were drilled in the deep depocenter of the lake (water depth of 300 m) and at the margin (depth of 3 m offshore Ein Gedi spa). New high resolution logging data combined with a detailed lithological description and published age models for the deep 5017-1-A borehole were used to establish a sequence stratigraphic framework for the Lakes Amora, Samra, Lisan and Zeelim strata. This study presents a stratigraphic timescale for reconstructing the last ca 225 ka. It provides a context within which the timing of key sequence surfaces identified in the distal part of the basin can be mapped on a regional and stratigraphic time frame. In addition, it permitted the examination of depositional system tracts and related driving mechanisms controlling their formation. The sequence stratigraphic model developed for the Northern Dead Sea Basin is based on the identification of sequence bounding surfaces including: sequence boundary (SB), transgressive surface (TS) and maximum flooding surface (MFS). They enabled the division of depositional sequences into a Lowstand systems tracts (LST), Transgressive systems tracts (TST) and Highstand systems tracts (HST), which can be interpreted in terms of relative lake level changes. The analysis presented here show that system tract stacking patterns defined for the distal 5017-1-A borehole can be correlated to the proximal part of the basin, and widely support the claim that changes in relative lake

  8. Space Radar Image of Jerusalem and the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This space radar image shows the area surrounding the Dead Sea along the West Bank between Israel and Jordan. This region is of major cultural and historical importance to millions of Muslims, Jews and Christians who consider it the Holy Land. The yellow area at the top of the image is the city of Jericho. A portion of the Dead Sea is shown as the large black area at the top right side of the image. The Jordan River is the white line at the top of the image which flows into the Dead Sea. Jerusalem, which lies in the Judaean Hill Country, is the bright, yellowish area shown along the left center of the image. Just below and to the right of Jerusalem is the town of Bethlehem. The city of Hebron is the white, yellowish area near the bottom of the image. The area around Jerusalem has a history of more than 2,000 years of settlement and scientists are hoping to use these data to unveil more about this region's past. The Jordan River Valley is part of an active fault and rift system that extends from southern Turkey and connects with the east African rift zone. This fault system has produced major earthquakes throughout history and some scientists theorize that an earthquake may have caused the fall of Jericho's walls. The Dead Sea basin is formed by active earthquake faulting and contains the lowest place on the Earth's surface at about 400 meters (1,300 feet) below sea level. It was in caves along the northern shore of the Dead Sea that the Dead Sea Scrolls were found in 1947. The blue and green areas are generally regions of undeveloped hills and the dark green areas are the smooth lowlands of the Jordan River valley. This image is 73 kilometers by 45 kilometers (45 miles by 28 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 35.4 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; green is L-band, horizontally

  9. Seasonal variations of halite saturation in the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Ido; Arnon, Ali; Lensky, Nadav G.

    2016-09-01

    Hypersaline lakes and seas were common in the past, precipitating thick evaporitic salt deposits. The only modern analogue for the paleolimnology of deep salt-saturated aquatic environments exists in the Dead Sea. In this study, we present new insights from the Dead Sea on the role of seasonal thermohaline stratification and water balance on the seasonal and depth variations of the degree of saturation of halite (salt) and the rate of halite growth along the water column. We developed methodologies to accurately determine the empirical degree of halite saturation of the lake based on high accuracy densitometry, and to quantify halite growth rate along the water column. During summer, the epilimnion is undersaturated and halite is dissolved, whereas during winter the entire water column is supersaturated and crystallizes halite. This result is not trivial because the variations in the water balance suggest the opposite; summer is associated with higher loss of water by evaporation from the lake compared to the winter. Hence, the thermal effect overcomes the hydrological balance effect and thus governs the seasonal saturation cycle. The hypolimnion is supersaturated with respect to halite and crystallizes throughout the year, with higher super saturation and higher crystallization rates during winter. During summer, simultaneous opposing environments coexist—an undersaturated epilimnion that dissolves halite and a supersaturated hypolimnion that crystallizes halite, which results in focusing of halite deposits in the deep hypolimnetic parts of the evaporitic basins and thinning the shallow epilimnetic deposits.

  10. Seismic zonation of the Dead Sea Transform Fault area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Papadimitriou

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea Transform Fault constitutes the northwestern boundary of the Arabian plate, accommodating the plate’s lateral movement relative to the African plate. A complete and homogeneous catalogue of historical earthquakes has been compiled and used in the subdivision of the fault area into the following segments: 1 Araba segment, which extends along Wadi Araba and the southernmost part of the Dead Sea (29.5°-31.3°N and trends SSW-NNE with scarce historical and instrumental seismicity; 2 Jordan-valley segment, which extends along the central and northern parts of the Dead Sea and the Jordan valley to the Huleh depression (31.3°-33.1° N and trends S-N with moderate historical seismicity; 3 Beqa’a segment, which extends along the western margin of the Beqa’a valley in Lebanon (33.1°-34.5°N and trends SSW-NNE with strong historical seismicity; 4 El-Ghab segment, which extends along the eastern flank of the coastal mountain range of Syria (34.5°-35.8°N and trends S-N with moderate historical seismicity; 5 Karasu segment, which extends along the Karasu valley in SE Turkey (35.8°-37.3°N and trends SSW-NNE, exhibiting the strongest historical seismicity of the area. Probabilities for the generation of strong (M > 6.0 earthquakes in these segments during the next decade are given, by the application of the regional time and magnitude predictable model.

  11. Lithology of the long sediment record recovered by the ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Ina; Brauer, Achim; Schwab, Markus J.; Waldmann, Nicolas D.; Enzel, Yehouda; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Torfstein, Adi; Frank, Ute; Dulski, Peter; Agnon, Amotz; Ariztegui, Daniel; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Goldstein, Steven L.; Stein, Mordechai

    2014-10-01

    The sedimentary sections that were deposited from the Holocene Dead Sea and its Pleistocene precursors are excellent archives of the climatic, environmental and seismic history of the Levant region. Yet, most of the previous work has been carried out on sequences of lacustrine sediments exposed at the margins of the present-day Dead Sea, which were deposited only when the lake surface level rose above these terraces (e.g. during the Last Glacial period) and typically are discontinuous due to major lake level variations in the past. Continuous sedimentation can only be expected in the deepest part of the basin and, therefore, a deep drilling has been accomplished in the northern basin of the Dead Sea during winter of 2010-2011 within the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) in the framework of the ICDP program. Approximately 720 m of sediment cores have been retrieved from two deep and several short boreholes. The longest profile (5017-1), revealed at a water depth of ˜300 m, reaches 455 m below the lake floor (blf, i.e. to ˜1175 m below global mean sea level) and comprises approximately the last 220-240 ka. The record covers the upper part of the Amora (penultimate glacial), the Last Interglacial Samra, the Last Glacial Lisan and the Holocene Ze'elim Formations and, therewith, two entire glacial-interglacial cycles. Thereby, for the first time, consecutive sediments deposited during the MIS 6/5, 5/4 and 2/1 transitions were recovered from the Dead Sea basin, which are not represented in sediments outcropping on the present-day lake shores. In this paper, we present essential lithological data including continuous magnetic susceptibility and geochemical scanning data and the basic stratigraphy including first chronological data of the long profile (5017-1) from the deep basin. The results presented here (a) focus on the correlation of the deep basin deposits with main on-shore stratigraphic units, thus providing a unique comprehensive stratigraphic framework for

  12. Currents in the Dead Sea: Lagrangian and Eulerian observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Tal; Gertman, Isaac; Katsenelson, Boris; Bodzin, Raanan; Lensly, Nadav

    2015-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a terminal hypersaline lake located in the lowest surface on Earth (currently -429 m bsl). The physical properties of the brine are significantly different than in common marine systems: the DS brine density is ~1.24 gr/cc and its viscosity ~3 times higher than marine systems. We present observational data on wind and currents in the Dead Sea. The observation setup includes a few fixed (Eulerian) stations which are equipped with wind meter and current meter profiler that covers the entire water column (ADCP). Thermal stratification is continuously measured in some of the stations using a thermistor chain. Lagrangian drifters that record the shallow water currents were released in liner array of single drifters between the fixed stations, and also in triplets (15 m triangle). The results include the measured time series data of wind (atmospheric forcing) and the measured current profiles from the fixed stations. Data of the Lagrangian drifters is presented as trajectories along with vector time series. Quality control check included comparison of drifter data and ADCP data whenever the drifters passed by the fixed stations; a very good agreement was found between the different measuring approaches. We discuss the following issues : (i) the relation between the wind and current data, (ii) the Lagrangian trajectories and transport aspects.

  13. Tetrapyrroles and associated compounds in Dead Sea asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizenshtat, Z. (Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Israel); Dinur, D.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1979-01-01

    Metallo- and free porphyrins (1000 to 1500 ppM) isolated from asphalts occurring as huge blocks floating in the northern part of the Dead Sea, have been analyzed by visible-uv (v-uv) spectrophotometry and by mass spectrometry. The concentration of vanadyl porphyrins in the asphalts exceeds by far that of the Ni-porphyrins, despite the l:3 V/Ni ratio found in the total asphalt sample. The free porphyrins resemble those from the Uinta Basin (USA) gilsonite and contain a mixture of homologous Aetio- and deoxyphyllo-erythroaetioporphyrins (DPEP). The non-porphyrin fraction of the asphalt showed an identical aliphatic, hydrocarbon distribution with that of heavy crude oil from the same area. The more polar fraction associated with the porphyrins was compared with the polar fraction of the previously described ozokerite from the Dead Sea area. From high-resolution MS, IR, v-uv and NMR spectra, combined with hydrolysis and GLC analysis, it is suggested that even-numbered (C/sub 12/, C/sub 16/, C/sub 18/, C/sub 18/ /sub 1/, C/sub 22/) fatty acids are associated with the asphaltic porphyrins, probably in the triglyceride form.

  14. 3D Imaging of Dead Sea Area Using Weighted Multipath Summation: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemer Keydar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of sinkholes along the Dead Sea is caused by the rapid decline of the Dead Sea level, as a possible result of human extensive activity. According to one of the geological models, the sinkholes in several sites are clustered along a narrow coastal strip developing along lineaments representing faults in NNW direction. In order to understand the relationship between a developing sinkhole and its tectonic environment, a high-resolution (HR three-dimensional (3D seismic reflection survey was carried out at the western shoreline of the Dead Sea. A recently developed 3D imaging approach was applied to this 3D dataset. Imaging of subsurface is performed by a spatial summation of seismic waves along time surfaces using recently proposed multipath summation with proper weights. The multipath summation is performed by stacking the target waves along all possible time surfaces having a common apex at the given point. This approach does not require any explicit information on parameters since the involved multipath summation is performed for all possible parameters values within a wide specified range. The results from processed 3D time volume show subhorizontal coherent reflectors at approximate depth of 50–80 m which incline on closer location to the exposed sinkhole and suggest a possible linkage between revealed fault and the sinkholes.

  15. [Hydrolytic activity of microorganisms of the Dead Sea coastal ecosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbanets', L D; Matseliukh, O V; Avdiiuk, K V; Hudzenko, O V; Nidialkova, N A; Romanovs'ka, V O; Tashirev, O B

    2014-01-01

    All strains tested are characterized by proteolytic (caseinolytic) activity, while elastase one was revealed only in two Gracilibacillus strains 6T2 and 7Tl. The activity was high enough (23.1 and 34.7 E/Ml, respectively). These values are at the level of bacterial producers which are described in literature: Bacillus mesentericus 316 M (6 E/Ml), Bacillus thuringiensis IMB B-7324 (50-55 E/Ml). The ability of two strains tested to synthesize enzyme, active against elastine, is important, so far as microbial enzyme may be perspective for using in medicine: elastases are able to dissociation of elastin fibres of connective tissues. These two strains display also fibrinolytic activity, however it was insignificant. Six of eight strains studied manifested alpha-amylase activity (0.01 - 1.173 E/Ml). It was shown that no strains, isolated from the Dead Sea costal ecosystems are able to manifest alpha-L-rhamnosidase activity.

  16. Safety evaluation of traces of nickel and chrome in cosmetics: The case of Dead Sea mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'or, Ze'evi; Halicz, Ludwik; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Russo, Matteo Zanotti; Robino, Federica; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Metal impurities such as nickel and chrome are present in natural ingredients-containing cosmetic products. These traces are unavoidable due to the ubiquitous nature of these elements. Dead Sea mud is a popular natural ingredient of cosmetic products in which nickel and chrome residues are likely to occur. To analyze the potential systemic and local toxicity of Dead Sea mud taking into consideration Dead Sea muds' natural content of nickel and chrome. The following endpoints were evaluated: (Regulation No. 1223/20, 21/12/2009) systemic and (SCCS's Notes of Guidance) local toxicity of topical application of Dead Sea mud; health reports during the last five years of commercial marketing of Dead Sea mud. Following exposure to Dead Sea mud, MoS (margin of safety) calculations for nickel and chrome indicate no toxicological concern for systemic toxicity. Skin sensitization is also not to be expected by exposure of normal healthy skin to Dead Sea mud. Topical application, however, is not recommended for already nickel-or chrome-sensitized persons. As risk assessment of impurities present in cosmetics may be a difficult exercise, the case of Dead Sea mud is taken here as an example of a natural material that may contain traces of unavoidable metals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 75 FR 7536 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Words That... hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Words...

  18. 77 FR 36329 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Dead Sea Scrolls & The...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Dead Sea Scrolls & The Bible Ancient... April 15, 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Dead Sea...

  19. Climatotherapy at the dead sea for pediatric-onset psoriasis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Amitai, Dan; David, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Climatotherapy at the Dead Sea is highly effective and safe for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris in adults. We examine the efficacy and safety of climatotherapy at the Dead Sea in children with psoriasis vulgaris. More than 75% improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index was noted in 35.3% of the patients. None of the patients had side effects.

  20. Hypersaline Subsurface Microbial Communities from the Dead Sea Viewed from Their Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.; Ionescu, D.; Ariztegui, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) is an international research initiative aiming to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental and paleoseismic history of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) in the Levantine region. Within this framework, analysis of microbial communities intend to qualify the extent of life in this extreme environment, the factors allowing its development and their contribution to the sedimentary and geochemical record. The extreme chemistry of the Dead Sea prevents the use of common in situ imaging techniques leaving little information on the general activity of the subsurface biosphere. Cloning and metagenomic techniques have however been implemented at different levels of a 457 m deep core. Results suggest a differential development or survival of the microbial community along the sedimentary column. Reasons for such distribution remain unclear but cannot only be imparted to salinity. Poorly known communities (e.g. Candidate Divisions MSBL1 and KB1) with strong potential for adaptations to anoxic hypersaline environments are recovered in some intervals. Halobacteria classes generally dominate the assemblages. Metagenomic data allowed characterizing their presence in two evaporitic facies of the core (aragonite at 2.7 m and gypsum at 90.6 m below lake floor), where they exhibit both salt-in and salt-out strategies to cope with the high salinities of the Dead Sea. Metabolisms are also adapted to the high heavy metal concentrations and low nutrient availability in the sediment. Although more work is needed in order to infer the impact of these microorganisms on the sediment and element cycles, indices of methanogenesis, fermentation and sulfate reducing activity imply influence on the carbon and sulfur cycle of the Dead Sea subsurface. This is highlighted by traces of microbial degradation of organic matter viewed under SEM, and by the formation of euhedral Fe-S mineralizations as a result of reduction of sulfur. Overall, this work calls for the importance

  1. Measurement-based modeling of bromine-induced oxidation of mercury above the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs outside the polar regions – driven by high levels of reactive bromine species (RBS – were observed recently in the warm Dead Sea boundary layer. Efficient oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM under temperate conditions by RBS was unexpected considering that the thermal back dissociation reaction of HgBr, a proposed key mechanism, is more than 2.5 orders of magnitude higher under Dead Sea temperatures compared with polar temperatures. The goal of this study was to improve understanding of RBS-mercury interactions using numerical simulations based on a comprehensive measurement campaign performed at the Dead Sea during summer 2009.

    Results demonstrate a high efficiency and central role of BrOx (i.e., Br + BrO for AMDEs at the Dead Sea, with relative contributions for GEM depletion of more than ~90 %. BrO was found to be the dominant oxidant with relative contribution above 80 %. Best agreement between simulations and observations was achieved by applying rate constants for kHg+Br and kHg+BrO of 2.7×10−13 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and 1.5 × 10−13 cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively – indicating that kHg+BrO is higher than most reported values and that BrO is a more efficient oxidant than Br in the ozone-rich atmosphere (i.e., for [BrO]/[Br] >2. This further explains why the efficiency of GEM oxidation by reactive bromine species at the Dead Sea doesn't critically depend on Br and, therefore, is comparable to the efficiency in polar regions even under much higher temperatures. These findings also support the hypothesis identified in a previous study, that Br-induced GEM depletion can be important above oceans in the mid-latitudes and tropics. In the presence of anthropogenic NO2, RBS activity can lead to enhanced NO3

  2. Measurement-based modeling of bromine-induced oxidation of mercury above the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, E.; Obrist, D.; Peleg, M.; Matveev, V.; Faïn, X.; Asaf, D.; Luria, M.

    2011-08-01

    Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) outside the polar regions - driven by high levels of reactive bromine species (RBS) - were observed recently in the warm Dead Sea boundary layer. Efficient oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) under temperate conditions by RBS was unexpected considering that the thermal back dissociation reaction of HgBr, a proposed key mechanism, is more than 2.5 orders of magnitude higher under Dead Sea temperatures compared with polar temperatures. The goal of this study was to improve understanding of RBS-mercury interactions using numerical simulations based on a comprehensive measurement campaign performed at the Dead Sea during summer 2009. Results demonstrate a high efficiency and central role of BrOx (i.e., Br + BrO) for AMDEs at the Dead Sea, with relative contributions for GEM depletion of more than ~90 %. BrO was found to be the dominant oxidant with relative contribution above 80 %. Best agreement between simulations and observations was achieved by applying rate constants for kHg+Br and kHg+BrO of 2.7×10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and 1.5 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively - indicating that kHg+BrO is higher than most reported values and that BrO is a more efficient oxidant than Br in the ozone-rich atmosphere (i.e., for [BrO]/[Br] >2). This further explains why the efficiency of GEM oxidation by reactive bromine species at the Dead Sea doesn't critically depend on Br and, therefore, is comparable to the efficiency in polar regions even under much higher temperatures. These findings also support the hypothesis identified in a previous study, that Br-induced GEM depletion can be important above oceans in the mid-latitudes and tropics. In the presence of anthropogenic NO2, RBS activity can lead to enhanced NO3 formation, which then causes significant nighttime GEM depletion.

  3. Formation of circumbinary planets in a dead zone

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Rebecca G; Alexander, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Circumbinary planets have been observed at orbital radii where binary perturbations may have significant effects on the gas disk structure, on planetesimal velocity dispersion, and on the coupling between turbulence and planetesimals. Here, we note that the impact of all of these effects on planet formation is qualitatively altered if the circumbinary disk structure is layered, with a non-turbulent midplane layer (dead zone) and strongly turbulent surface layers. For close binaries, we find that the dead zone typically extends from a radius close to the inner disk edge up to a radius of around 10-20 au from the centre of mass of the binary. The peak in the surface density occurs within the dead zone, far from the inner disk edge, close to the snow line, and may act as a trap for aerodynamically coupled solids. We suggest that circumbinary planet formation may be easier near this preferential location than for disks around single stars. However, dead zones around wide binaries are less likely and hence planet ...

  4. Deciphering The Fall And Rise Of The Dead Sea In Relation To Solar Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.

    2005-03-01

    Solar Forcing on closed seas and Lakes is space time dependent. The Cipher of the Dead Sea level variation since 1200 BC is solved in the context of millenium and Wolf-Gleissberg solar cycles time scales. It is found that the pattern of Dead Sea level variation follows the pattern of major millenium solar cycles. The 70 m rise of Dead Sea around 1AD is due to the forcing of the maximum millenium major solar cycle. Although the pattern of the Dead Sea level variation is almost identical to major solar cycles pattern between 1100 and 1980 AD, there is a dating problem of the Dead Sea time series around 1100-1300 AD that time. A discrepancy that should be corrected for the solar and Dead Sea series to fit. Detailed level variations of the Dead Sea level for the past 200 years are solved in terms of the 80-120 years solar Wolf-Gliessberg magnetic cycles. Solar induced climate changes do happen at the turning points of those cycles. Those end-start and maximum turning points are coincident with the change in the solar rotation rate due to the presence of weak solar cycles. Such weak cycles occur in series of few cycles between the end and start of those Wolf-Gleissberg cycles. Another one or two weak r solar cycle occur following the maximum of those Wolf-Gleissberg cycles. Weak cycles induce drop in the energy budget emitted from the sun and reaching the Earth thus causing solar induced climate change. An 8 meter sudden rise of Dead Sea occur prior 1900 AD due to positive solar forcing of the second cycle of the weak cycles series on the Dead Sea. The same second weak cycle induced negative solar forcing on Lake Chad. The first weak solar cycle forced Lake Victoria to rise abruptly in 1878. The maximum turning point of the solar Wolf-Gleissberg cycle induced negative forcing on both the Aral Sea and the Dead Sea causing their shrinkage to an alarming reduced area ever since. On the other hand, few years delayed positive forcing caused Lake Chad and the Equatorial

  5. Self-accelerated development of salt karst during flash floods along the Dead Sea Coast, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Yoav; Lensky, Nadav; Dente, Elad; Shviro, Maayan; Arav, Reuma; Gavrieli, Ittai; Yechieli, Yoseph; Abelson, Meir; Lutzky, Hallel; Filin, Sagi; Haviv, Itai; Baer, Gidon

    2016-01-01

    We document and analyze the rapid development of a real-time karst system within the subsurface salt layers of the Ze'elim Fan, Dead Sea, Israel by a multidisciplinary study that combines interferometric synthetic aperture radar and light detection and ranging measurements, sinkhole mapping, time-lapse camera monitoring, groundwater level measurements and chemical and isotopic analyses of surface runoff and groundwater. The >1 m/yr drop of Dead Sea water level and the subsequent change in the adjacent groundwater system since the 1960s resulted in flushing of the coastal aquifer by fresh groundwater, subsurface salt dissolution, gradual land subsidence and formation of sinkholes. Since 2010 this process accelerated dramatically as flash floods at the Ze'elim Fan were drained by newly formed sinkholes. During and immediately after these flood events the dissolution rates of the subsurface salt layer increased dramatically, the overlying ground surface subsided, a large number of sinkholes developed over short time periods (hours to days), and salt-saturated water resurged downstream. Groundwater flow velocities increased by more than 2 orders of magnitudes compared to previously measured velocities along the Dead Sea. The process is self-accelerating as salt dissolution enhances subsidence and sinkhole formation, which in turn increase the ponding areas of flood water and generate additional draining conduits to the subsurface. The rapid terrain response is predominantly due to the highly soluble salt. It is enhanced by the shallow depth of the salt layer, the low competence of the newly exposed unconsolidated overburden and the moderate topographic gradients of the Ze'elim Fan.

  6. Digital topography and bathymetry of the area of the Dead Sea Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John K.

    1996-12-01

    The Dead Sea Depression occupies the central part of that segment of the Syrian-African rift extending from the mountains of southern Lebanon to the Arava Valley north of the Gulf of Aqaba on the Red Sea. The lowest continental feature in the world, it encloses the Dead Sea, whose surface now lies at about -409 m. This shrunken sea consists of a shallow southern basin occupied by evaporation pans, and a northern basin, 50 km in length by 13-17 km in width, with a flat floor some -731 m below MSL. The depression is asymmetric, with the mountains to the east being up to 500 m higher. The closed depression has two outlets, one at 60.5 m altitude into the Mediterranean via the Jezreel Valley near Afula, and a second into the Red Sea at about 200 m altitude in the Arava Valley. A digital terrain model (DTM), based upon the local 1:50,000 scale topographic maps and modern bathymetric surveys, gives elevations to decimeter resolution on a grid with 25 m spacing. When visualized as shaded relief or in coloured hypsometric format, the DTM graphically shows the overall morphology and its many features. These include the local tectonics, from the major boundary faults to the associated subsidiary faults and lineaments, and their possible relationships with the incised canyons offshore. Also clearly visible are the volcanic cones on the Golan heights, the coast-paralleling kurkar ridges, and the halokinetic disruptions to the deep offshore topography. The DTM was used to compute a hypsometric curve for the closed depression from -731 m to +60 m. The maximum area and volume of a lake extending to the Afula 'spillway' would be 5985 km 2 and 1602 km 3, respectively. Inflection points were observed at -715 m, where the Dead Sea's flat bottom meets its steep flanks, at -385 m where the northern basin meets the flat floor of the southern basin and surrounding plain, at -228 with the step up to the basin of the Sea of Galilee, and at Mediterranean sea level.

  7. Modeling radium distribution in coastal aquifers during sea level changes: The Dead Sea case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Yael; Yechieli, Yoseph; Voss, Clifford I.; Starinsky, Abraham; Weinstein, Yishai

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach to studying the behavior of radium isotopes in a coastal aquifer. In order to simulate radium isotope distributions in the dynamic flow field of the Dead Sea aquifer, a multi-species density dependent flow model (SUTRA-MS) was used. Field data show that the activity of 226Ra decreases from 140 to 60 dpm/L upon entering the aquifer from the Dead Sea, and then further decreases linearly due to mixing with Ra-poor fresh water. On the other hand, an increase is observed in the activity of the shorter-lived isotopes (up to 52 dpm/L 224Ra and 31 dpm/L 223Ra), which are relatively low in Dead Sea water (up to 2.5 dpm/L 224Ra and 0.5 dpm/L 223Ra). The activities of the short lived radium isotopes also decrease with decreasing salinity, which is due to the effect of salinity on the adsorption of radium. The relationship between 224Ra and salinity suggests that the adsorption partition coefficient (K) is linearly related to salinity. Simulations of the steady-state conditions, show that the distance where equilibrium activity is attained for each radium isotope is affected by the isotope half-life, K and the groundwater velocity, resulting in a longer distance for the long-lived radium isotopes. K affects the radium distribution in transient conditions, especially that of the long-lived radium isotopes. The transient conditions in the Dead Sea system, with a 1 m/yr lake level drop, together with the radium field data, constrains K to be relatively low (226Ra cannot be explained by adsorption, and it is better explained by removal via coprecipitation, probably with barite or celestine.

  8. Overview of the geophysical studies in the Dead Sea coastal area related to evaporite karst and recent sinkhole development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail G. Ezersky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 80s, a progressively increasing number of sinkholes appeared along the Dead Sea coastal line. It has been found that their appearance is strongly correlating with the lowering of the Dead Sea level taking place with the rate of approximately 1 m/yr. Location of areas affected by sinkhole development corresponds to location of the salt formation deposited during the latest Pleistocene, when the Lake Lisan receded to later become the Dead Sea. Water flowing to the Dead Sea from adjacent and underlying aquifers dissolves salt and creates caverns that cause ground subsidence and consequent formation of sinkholes. Before subsidence, these caverns are not visible on the surface but can be investigated with surface geophysical methods. For that, we applied Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR, Transient Electromagnetic (TEM Seismic refraction and reflection, Multichannel Analysis of Surface waves (MASW, microgravity and magnetic surveys and their combinations. Our geophysical results allowed us to locate the salt formation and to detect caverns in salt thus contributing to better understanding sinkhole development mechanisms. Comparison of sinkhole appearance along the western DS shore derived from the recent database (2017 shows that predictions made on the base of geophysical data (2005-2008 are now confirmed thus demonstrating efficiency of our study. In this paper, we briefly present a summary of up to date knowledge of the geology and hydrogeology of Dead Sea basin, of the physical properties of the salt rock and the most popular models explaining mechanisms of sinkhole development. We also share our experience gained during geophysical studies carried out in the framework of national and international research projects in this area for the last 20 years.

  9. Local earthquake tomography model for the southern Dead Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuer, B.; Asch, G.; Hofstetter, R.; Haberland, Ch.; Jaser, D.; El-Kelani, R.; Weber, M.

    2012-04-01

    Local earthquake data from a dense temporary seismological network in the southern Dead Sea area have been analyzed within the project DESIRE (Dead Sea Integrated Research Project). Local earthquakes are used for the first precise image of the distribution of the P velocity and the vp/vs ratios. 65 stations registered 655 local events within 18 months of observation time. A subset of 530 well locatable events with 26,730 P- and S-arrival times was used to calculate a tomographic model for the vp and vp/vs distribution. Since the study area is at first order two-dimensional, a gradual approach was chosen, which compromised a 2-D inversion followed by a 3-D inversion. The sedimentary basin fill, clearly imaged through high vp/vs ratios and low vp, shows an asymmetric structure with a vertical eastern boundary and an inclined western boundary. Within the basin fill the Lisan salt diapir is imaged through low vp/vs ratios. Below the basin fill the pre-basin sediments and the reworked crust, indicated by low P velocities and low vp/vs ratios, form a 10 km wide body between 12 and 18 km depth with vertical boundaries. No indications are found for a significant change of the P velocity structure in NS direction. Meanwhile, the change of the vp/vs ratios from high to low values varies in NS direction. This change, interpreted as the lower boundary of the basin fill, is reached already at 10 km depth in the area of the Boqeq fault, but not until 14 km depth below the Lisan peninsula. This difference is most likely related to different amounts of faulting at the transverse normal faults. North of the Boqeq fault the seismic activity between 3 and 15 km depth is mostly related to the fluid containing basin sediments. South of the Boqeq fault the seismic events occur between 12 and 18 km depth, and thus within the pre-basin sediments and the underlying crust.

  10. Analysis of the November 1999 Dead Sea Calibration Shots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A J; Myers, S; Mayeda, K; Walter, W

    2000-07-21

    In November 1999 three chemical explosions were conducted in the Dead Sea for the purposes of calibrating the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These shots were organized and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel (GII). Large chemical explosions are the most valuable form of ground truth as the location, depth and origin time are very well known. We focus on the two largest shots (M{sub w} {ge} 3.6) and performed several types of analysis of the regional recordings and travel times of these shots. These data provide valuable new information about the region and offer an opportunity to test monitoring strategies. A crustal and uppermost mantle velocity model was inferred from the travel times of the regional phases: Pn, Pg and Sg. This effort utilized a grid search method to find suitable models of the structure. Results indicate that the crust is relatively thin (32 km) with lower than average crustal velocities (mean V{sub P} = 6.1-6.2 km/s). We located each shot treating the other shot as a calibration explosion. Locations were computed using both station static corrections and kriged correction surfaces. Results show that the locations with static corrections can be better or worse than the locations without corrections. However, the locations with kriged correction surfaces are consistently better than those without corrections or with static corrections because kriging properly accounts for residual statistics. Measures of the S-wave coda for regional events provide a stable estimate of event size (moment magnitude, M{sub w}) and the event source spectrum. S-wave coda envelope amplitudes were calibrated to moments estimated from long-period waveform modeling. We measured moment and body-wave magnitudes and source spectra for many events in the region. The Dead Sea shots show spectral peaking associated with shallow events. Finally, analysis of regional broadband recordings from the Saudi

  11. Rheology of Dead Sea shampoo containing the antidandruff climbazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, B; Mohameed, H A

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the effect of the antidandruff climbazole on the rheology of hair shampoo containing Dead Sea (DS) salt was investigated. The presence of either DS salt or the climbazole led to increase in the shampoo viscosity. An optimum concentration was found where the viscosity of shampoo was maximum. In the absence of DS salt, the viscosity of hair shampoo increased with increasing the climbazole concentration to reach a maximum value at 1.0 wt%. Further addition of climbazole decreased the viscosity of shampoo. Adjusting the pH of the shampoo at 5.5 and 5.0 shifted the optimum climbazole concentration (corresponds to maximum viscosity) to 0.8 wt% and led to increase in the viscosity of shampoo. On the other hand, the addition of climbazole to the shampoo containing DS salt resulted in a decrease in shampoo viscosity. This decrease of shampoo viscosity became more pronounced with increasing the climbazole and/or DS salt concentrations. By controlling the pH of shampoo, an optimum formula of shampoo comprising both climbazole and DS salt and having maximum viscosity was obtained.

  12. Natural Oxidation of Bromide to Bromine in Evaporated Dead Sea Brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrieli, Ittai; Golan, Rotem; Lazar, Boaz; Baer, Gidi; Zakon, Yevgeni; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2016-04-01

    Highly evaporated Dead Sea brines are found in isolated sinkholes along the Dead Sea. Many of these brines reach densities of over 1.3 kg/L and pHDead Sea brine that drain into the sinkholes. The low pH and the reddish to brownish hue of these brines were an enigma until recently. Despite the rather high total alkalinity (TA) of the Dead Sea (3.826 mmol/kg) the pH of the Dead Sea brine is known to be slightly acidic with a value of ~6.3. In comparison, seawater with the same alkalinity would have a pH value well above 8.3, meaning that H+ activity is 100 fold lower than that of Dead Sea brine. In the present work we assess the apparent dissociation constant value of boric acid (K`B) for the Dead Sea brine and use it to explain the brine's low pH value. We then show that pH decreases further as the brine evaporates and salinity increases. Finally we explain the reddish hue of the hypersaline brines in the sinkholes as due to the presence of dissolved bromine. The latter is the product of oxidation of dissolved bromide, a process that is enabled by the low pH of the hypersaline brines and their high bromide concentration.

  13. A First Record of Obligate Halophilic Aspergilli from the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Nazareth, Sarita; Gonsalves, Valerie; Nayak, Shweta

    2011-01-01

    The isolation of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the Dead Sea and the range of salt tolerance of halophilic fungi isolated, are reported here for the first time. The mycobiota of the Dead Sea isolated in this study, was dominated by Aspergillus and Penicillium species; Cladosporium were found in lesser numbers. All three genera were obtained from the water sample; however, Aspergillus was the only genus obtained from the sediment. There was significant difference in growth of each isolate...

  14. Microbial and Chemical Characterization of Underwater Fresh Water Springs in the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Danny Ionescu; Christian Siebert; Lubos Polerecky; Yaniv Y Munwes; Christian Lott; Stefan Häusler; Mina Bižić-Ionescu; Christian Quast; Jörg Peplies; Frank Oliver Glöckner; Alban Ramette; Tino Rödiger; Thorsten Dittmar; Aharon Oren; Stefan Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Due to its extreme salinity and high Mg concentration the Dead Sea is characterized by a very low density of cells most of which are Archaea. We discovered several underwater fresh to brackish water springs in the Dead Sea harboring dense microbial communities. We provide the first characterization of these communities, discuss their possible origin, hydrochemical environment, energetic resources and the putative biogeochemical pathways they are mediating. Pyrosequencing of the 16...

  15. Haloactinomyces albus gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hangxian; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Xiu; Li, Qinyuan; Jiang, Chenglin; Jiang, Yi; Wei, Xiaomin

    2017-01-10

    A novel halophilic, filamentous actinomycete strain, designated AFM 10258T, was isolated from a sediment sample collected from Dead Sea of Israel. The isolate grew with 10-35% NaCl and did not grow without NaCl. The isolate formed white aerial mycelium and long spore chains, and two spores were separated by sterile mycelium. The spores were non-motile, spherical and rugose-surfaced. The isolate contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and galactose and arabinose as the major whole-cell sugars. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and three unknown phospholipids. Major fatty acids were anteiso-C17:0, iso-C16:0 and iso-C15:0. MK-9(H4) was the predominant menaquinone and the DNA G+C content was 62.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain AFM 10258T shared low sequence similarity with the closely related representatives of the families Pseudonocardiaceae (below 94.47%) and Actinopolysporaceae (below 93.76%). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain AFM 10258T formed a robust clade with members of the family Actinopolysporaceae. On the basis of analysis of phenotypic, chemical and molecular characteristics, strain AFM 10258T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus , for which the name Haloactinomyces albus gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is AFM 10258T (=DSM 45977T = CGMCC 4.7115T).

  16. Amino acid signatures of salinity on an environmental scale with a focus on the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2010-09-01

    The increase of the acidic nature of proteins as an adaptation to hypersalinity has been well documented within halophile isolates. Here we explore the effect of salinity on amino acid preference on an environmental scale. Via pyrosequencing, we have obtained two distinct metagenomic data sets from the Dead Sea, one from a 1992 archaeal bloom and one from the modern Dead Sea. Our data, along with metagenomes from environments representing a range of salinities, show a strong linear correlation (R(2) = 0.97) between the salinity of an environment and the ratio of acidic to basic amino acids encoded by its inhabitants. Using the amino acid composition of putative protein-encoding reads and the results of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we differentiate recovered sequences representing microorganisms indigenous to the Dead Sea from lateral gene transfer events and foreign DNA. Our methods demonstrate lateral gene transfer events between a halophilic archaeon and relatives of the thermophilic bacterial genus Thermotoga and suggest the presence of indigenous Dead Sea representatives from 10 traditionally non-hyperhalophilic bacterial lineages. The work suggests the possibility that amino acid bias of hypersaline environments might be preservable in fossil DNA or fossil amino acids, serving as a proxy for the salinity of an ancient environment. Finally, both the amino acid profile of the 2007 Dead Sea metagenome and the V9 amplicon library support the conclusion that the dominant microorganism inhabiting the Dead Sea is most closely related to a thus far uncultured relative of an alkaliphilic haloarchaeon.

  17. Microbial and chemical characterization of underwater fresh water springs in the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Danny; Siebert, Christian; Polerecky, Lubos; Munwes, Yaniv Y; Lott, Christian; Häusler, Stefan; Bižić-Ionescu, Mina; Quast, Christian; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ramette, Alban; Rödiger, Tino; Dittmar, Thorsten; Oren, Aharon; Geyer, Stefan; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Sauter, Martin; Licha, Tobias; Laronne, Jonathan B; de Beer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Due to its extreme salinity and high Mg concentration the Dead Sea is characterized by a very low density of cells most of which are Archaea. We discovered several underwater fresh to brackish water springs in the Dead Sea harboring dense microbial communities. We provide the first characterization of these communities, discuss their possible origin, hydrochemical environment, energetic resources and the putative biogeochemical pathways they are mediating. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and community fingerprinting methods showed that the spring community originates from the Dead Sea sediments and not from the aquifer. Furthermore, it suggested that there is a dense Archaeal community in the shoreline pore water of the lake. Sequences of bacterial sulfate reducers, nitrifiers iron oxidizers and iron reducers were identified as well. Analysis of white and green biofilms suggested that sulfide oxidation through chemolitotrophy and phototrophy is highly significant. Hyperspectral analysis showed a tight association between abundant green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria in the green biofilms. Together, our findings show that the Dead Sea floor harbors diverse microbial communities, part of which is not known from other hypersaline environments. Analysis of the water's chemistry shows evidence of microbial activity along the path and suggests that the springs supply nitrogen, phosphorus and organic matter to the microbial communities in the Dead Sea. The underwater springs are a newly recognized water source for the Dead Sea. Their input of microorganisms and nutrients needs to be considered in the assessment of possible impact of dilution events of the lake surface waters, such as those that will occur in the future due to the intended establishment of the Red Sea-Dead Sea water conduit.

  18. Comparative community genomics in the Dead Sea: an increasingly extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodaker, Idan; Sharon, Itai; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Feingersch, Roi; Shmoish, Michael; Andreishcheva, Ekaterina; Sogin, Mitchell L; Rosenberg, Mira; Maguire, Michael E; Belkin, Shimshon; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2010-03-01

    Owing to the extreme salinity ( approximately 10 times saltier than the oceans), near toxic magnesium levels (approximately 2.0 M Mg(2+)), the dominance of divalent cations, acidic pH (6.0) and high-absorbed radiation flux rates, the Dead Sea represents a unique and harsh ecosystem. Measures of microbial presence (microscopy, pigments and lipids) indicate that during rare bloom events after exceptionally rainy seasons, the microbial communities can reach high densities. However, most of the time, when the Dead Sea level is declining and halite is precipitating from the water column, it is difficult to reliably measure the presence of microorganisms and their activities. Although a number of halophilic Archaea have been previously isolated from the Dead Sea, polar lipid analyses of biomass collected during Dead Sea blooms suggested that these isolates were not the major components of the microbial community of these blooms. In this study, in an effort to characterize the perennial microbial community of the Dead Sea and compare it with bloom assemblages, we performed metagenomic analyses of concentrated biomass from hundreds of liters of brine and of microbial material from the last massive Dead Sea bloom. The difference between the two conditions was reflected in community composition and diversity, in which the bloom was different and less diverse from the residual brine population. The distributional patterns of microbial genes suggested Dead Sea community trends in mono- and divalent cation metabolisms as well as in transposable elements. This may indicate possible mechanisms and pathways enabling these microbes to survive in such a harsh environment.

  19. Should the Dead Sea Be Sustainable?: Investigating Environmental Issues Using a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Cheston Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Many students leave the environmental science classroom with misconceptions centered on the availability of natural resources such as water. This article presents a case study where students assume the roles of various stakeholders and articulate their position on whether or not to pipe water from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. Additionally,…

  20. Should the Dead Sea Be Sustainable?: Investigating Environmental Issues Using a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Cheston Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Many students leave the environmental science classroom with misconceptions centered on the availability of natural resources such as water. This article presents a case study where students assume the roles of various stakeholders and articulate their position on whether or not to pipe water from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. Additionally,…

  1. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Tas, E.; M. Peleg; D. U. Pedersen; Matveev, V; A. Pour Biazar; Luria, M.

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS) chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. Th...

  2. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    A. Pour Biazar; Matveev, V; D. U. Pedersen; M. Peleg; Tas, E.; Luria, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS) chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the ...

  3. Low levels of toxic elements in Dead Sea black mud and mud-derived cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Ahmad; Pingitore, Nicholas E

    2009-08-01

    Natural muds used as or in cosmetics may expose consumers to toxic metals and elements via absorption through the skin, inhalation of the dried product, or ingestion (by children). Despite the extensive therapeutic and cosmetic use of the Dead Sea muds, there apparently has been no assessment of the levels of such toxic elements as Pb, As, or Cd in the mud and mud-based products. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of eight toxic elements in samples collected from three black mud deposits (Lisan Marl, Pleistocene age) on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea in Jordan revealed no special enrichment of toxic elements in the mud. A similar analysis of 16 different commercial Dead Sea mud cosmetics, including packaged mud, likewise revealed no toxic elements at elevated levels of concern. From a toxic element standpoint, the Dead Sea black muds and derivative products appear to be safe for the consumer. Whatever the therapeutic benefits of the mud, our comparison of the elemental fingerprints of the consumer products with those of the field samples revealed one disturbing aspect: Dead Sea black mud should not be a significant component of such items as hand creams, body lotions, shampoo, and moisturizer.

  4. Energy Balance, Evapo-transpiration and Dew deposition in the Dead Sea Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jutta; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique place on earth. It is a terminal hypersaline lake, located at the lowest point on earth with a lake level of currently -429 m above mean sea level (amsl). It is located in a transition zone of semiarid to arid climate conditions, which makes it highly sensible to climate change (Alpert1997, Smiatek2011). The Virtual Institute DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE) is an international project funded by the German Helmholtz Association and was established to study coupled atmospheric hydrological, and lithospheric processes in the changing environment of the Dead Sea. At the moment the most prominent environmental change is the lake level decline of approximately 1 m / year due to anthropogenic interferences (Gertman, 2002). This leads to noticeable changes in the fractions of the existing terrestrial surfaces - water, bare soil and vegetated areas - in the valley. Thus, the partitioning of the net radiation in the valley changes as well. To thoroughly study the atmospheric and hydrological processes in the Dead Sea valley, which are driven by the energy balance components, sound data of the energy fluxes of the different surfaces are necessary. Before DESERVE no long-term monitoring network simultaneously measuring the energy balance components of the different surfaces in the Dead Sea valley was available. Therefore, three energy balance stations were installed at three characteristic sites at the coast-line, over bare soil, and within vegetation, measuring all energy balance components by using the eddy covariance method. The results show, that the partitioning of the energy into sensible and latent heat flux on a diurnal scale is totally different at the three sites. This results in gradients between the sites, which are e.g. responsible for the typical diurnal wind systems at the Dead Sea. Furthermore, driving forces of evapo-transpiration at the sites were identified and a detailed analysis of the daily evaporation and dew deposition rates

  5. [The Dead Sea--a unique resort for patients suffering from joint diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenik, Shaul; Flusser, Daniel; Codish, Shlomi; Abu-Shakra, Mahmoud

    2010-03-01

    The Dead Sea area is an excellent and unique resort for patients suffering from a wide range of inflammatory and non-inflammatory joint diseases. Factors contributing to the beneficial effect are the high concentration of salts and minerals in the Dead Sea water and in the water from springs in the area, medical mud, and the unique climatic conditions including high barometric pressure, relative low humidity and high temperatures. This review describes the various balneotherapy modalities and the existing body of research describing their utility. Balneotherapy significantly improves most patients' conditions and in some cases leads to complete remission of several months duration. Although of importance, balneotherapy is not curative. An important advantage of balneotherapy is the lack of serious adverse effects, and, in contrast to some physicians' beliefs, the scarcity of contraindications for therapy at the Dead Sea area.

  6. Early Maritime Activity on the Dead Sea: Bitumen Harvesting and the Possible Use of Reed Watercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, Asaf; Galili, Ehud; Hadas, Gideon; Klein, Micha

    2015-04-01

    Most studies of ancient maritime activity on the Dead Sea focus on the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine periods, for which a rich body of archaeological and historic data exists. However, finds of Dead Sea bitumen at distant prehistoric sites and an anchor dating to the seventh century BC indicate that maritime activity on the lake preceded the Greek and Roman periods, and raise questions regarding this activity's origins and nature. By linking the exploitation of Dead Sea bitumen with the use of watercraft, and through consideration of a broader early maritime record of the ancient Near East, this study pushes back the dating of this activity on the lake and suggests the nature of its watercraft.

  7. Using palynology to re-assess the Dead Sea laminated sediments - Indeed varves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Merino, Lourdes; Leroy, Suzanne A. G.; Eshel, Amram; Epshtein, Valentina; Belmaker, Reuven; Bookman, Revital

    2016-05-01

    Lacustrine laminated sediments are often varves representing annual rhythmic deposition. The Dead Sea high-stand laminated sections consist of mm-scale alternating detrital and authigenic aragonite laminae. Previous studies assumed these laminae were varves deposited seasonally. However, this assumption has never been robustly validated. Here we report an examination of the seasonal deposition of detrital-aragonite couplets from two well-known Late Holocene laminated sections at the Ze'elim fan-delta using palynology and grain-size distribution analyses. These analyses are complemented by the study of contemporary flash-flood samples and multivariate statistical analysis. Because transport affects the pollen preservation state, well-preserved (mostly) air-borne transported pollen was analysed separately from badly-preserved pollen and fungal spores, which are more indicative of water transport and reworking from soils. Our results indicate that (i) both detrital and aragonite laminae were deposited during the rainy season; (ii) aragonite laminae have significantly lower reworked and fungal spore concentrations than detrital and flash-flood samples; and (iii) detrital laminae are composed of recycling of local and distal sources, with coarser particles that were initially deposited in the Dead Sea watershed and later transported via run-off to the lake. This is in line with previous carbon balance studies that showed that aragonite precipitation occurs after the massive input of TCO2 associated with run-off episodes. Consequently, at least for the Holocene Ze'elim Formation, laminated sediments cannot be considered as varves. Older Quaternary laminated sequences should be re-evaluated.

  8. Challenges to estimate surface- and groundwater flow in arid regions: the Dead Sea catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Christian; Rödiger, Tino; Mallast, Ulf; Gräbe, Agnes; Guttman, Joseph; Laronne, Jonathan B; Storz-Peretz, Yael; Greenman, Anat; Salameh, Elias; Al-Raggad, Marwan; Vachtman, Dina; Ben Zvi, Arie; Ionescu, Danny; Brenner, Asher; Merz, Ralf; Geyer, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    The overall aim of the this study, which was conducted within the framework of the multilateral IWRM project SUMAR, was to expand the scientific basement to quantify surface- and groundwater fluxes towards the hypersaline Dead Sea. The flux significance for the arid vicinity around the Dead Sea is decisive not only for a sustainable management in terms of water availability for future generations but also for the resilience of the unique ecosystems along its coast. Coping with different challenges interdisciplinary methods like (i) hydrogeochemical fingerprinting, (ii) satellite and airborne-based thermal remote sensing, (iii) direct measurement with gauging station in ephemeral wadis and a first multilateral gauging station at the river Jordan, (iv) hydro-bio-geochemical approach at submarine and shore springs along the Dead Sea and (v) hydro(geo)logical modelling contributed to the overall aim. As primary results, we deduce that the following: (i) Within the drainage basins of the Dead Sea, the total mean annual precipitation amounts to 300 mm a(−1) west and to 179 mm a(−1) east of the lake, respectively. (ii) The total mean annual runoff volumes from side wadis (except the Jordan River) entering the Dead Sea is approximately 58–66 × 10(6) m(3) a(−1) (western wadis: 7–15 × 10(6) m(3) a(−1); eastern wadis: 51 × 10(6) m(3) a(−1)). (iii) The modelled groundwater discharge from the upper Cretaceous aquifers in both flanks of the Dead Sea towards the lake amounts to 177 × 10(6) m(3) a(−1). (iv) An unexpected abundance of life in submarine springs exists, which in turn explains microbial moderated geo-bio-chemical processes in the Dead Sea sediments, affecting the highly variable chemical composition of on- and offshore spring waters.The results of this work show a promising enhancement of describing and modelling the Dead Sea basin as a whole.

  9. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Dead Sea Rift Basins of Israel and Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James; Ten Brink, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Following its middle Miocene inception, numerous basins of varying lengths and depths developed along the Dead Sea fault zone, a large continental transform plate boundary. The modern day left-lateral fault zone has an accumulated left-lateral offset of 105 to 110 km (65 to 68 mi). The deepest basin along the fault zone, the Lake Lisan or Dead Sea basin, reaches depths of 7.5 to 8.5 km (24,500 ft to 28,000 ft), and shows evidence of hydrocarbons. The basins are compartmentalized by normal faulting associated with rapid basin subsidence and, where present, domal uplift accompanying synrift salt withdrawal.

  10. Seismicity as a key to Understanding the Dead Sea Transform Fault - Results From a Temporary Dense Seismic Network in the Southern Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuer, B.; Weber, M. H.; Asch, G.; Haberland, C. A.; Hofstetter, A.; El-Kelani, R.; Darwish, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge of the seismicity distribution gives a great contribution to understand the processes at transform faults. The analysis of the regional network catalog (Begin & Steinitz, 2005) could not produce a clear image of the distribution of the seismicity. Furthermore, the seismic energy release over the 20 years suggests a continuous decrease of the seismic activity. Therefore, a very dense (station distance 2 - 5km) local seismological network was operated in the southern Dead Sea area within the framework of the international project DESIRE (Dead Sea Integrated Research Project). During its operation time more than 500 local events were registered, which is about five times more than previously estimated. These events give a detailed picture of the distribution of seismicity. The mainly microseismic activity is generally concentrated on the eastern and western faults limiting the Dead Sea basin (DSB). Most of the seismic events occurred in the uppermost 15 km, while the overall depth limit was at 30km. One of the dominant features observed in the dataset was a cluster of 115 earthquakes, occurring in February 2007. For precise relative locations of the events in the cluster Double-Difference location HypoDD (Waldhauser 2001) procedure was applied. We observe a vertical distribution of the events in the cluster. Very shallow events are found in the center of the study area. They are related to activity of the Lisan salt dome beneath that area. Furthermore, the local events were used to refine the picture of the P- and S- wave velocity distribution.

  11. Chemical evolution of saline waters in the Jordan-Dead Sea transform and in adjoining areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Geyer, Stefan; Flexer, Akiva

    2007-06-01

    The Ca Mg relationship in groundwaters strongly points to the overall dolomitization and local albitization. The Mg/Ca ratios reveal two trends by which saline waters develop: increase of Mg/Ca ratio by evaporation and decreasing Mg/Ca ratios due to dolomitization and albitization. Br/Cl vs. Na/Cl ratios demonstrate that albitization does not play a major role which leaves dolomitization to be the main source for decreasing Mg/Ca ratios in saline waters. In the eastern and southern Region of Lake Kinneret, salinization occurs by mixing with a Ca/Mg molar ratio 1 dominates, which developed by the albitization of plagioclase in abundant mafic volcanics and the dolomitization of limestones. The most saline groundwater of the Tabgha-, Fuliya-, and Tiberias clusters could be regional derivatives of at least two mother brines: in diluted form one is represented by Ha’On water, the other is a Na-rich brine of the Zemah type. Additionally, a deep-seated Ca-dominant brine may ascend along the fractures on the western side of Lake Kinneret, which is absent on the eastern side. Groundwaters of the Lower Jordan Valley are chemically different on both sides of the Jordan River, indicating that the exchange of water is insignificant. All saline waters from the Dead Sea and its surroundings represent a complex mixture of brines, and precipitation and local dissolution of halite and gypsum. Many wells of the Arava/Araba Valley pump groundwater from the Upper Cretaceous limestone aquifer, the origin of the water is actually from the Lower Cretaceous Kurnub Group sandstones. Groundwater drawn from the Quaternary alluvial fill either originates from Kurnub Group sandstones (Eilat 108, Yaalon 117) or from altered limestones of the Judea Group. The origin of these waters is from floods flowing through wadis incised into calcareous formations of the Judea Group. On the other hand, as a result of step-faulting, hydraulic contact is locally established between the Kurnub- and the Judea

  12. Geophysical analysis of the recent sinkhole trend at Ghor-Haditha (Dead Sea, Jordan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerlynck, Christian; Bodet, Ludovic; Galibert, Pierre-Yves; Boucher, Marie; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah

    2013-04-01

    For essentially the last 30 year the water level of the Dead Sea has highly dropped. One of the major associated facts is sinkhole occurrences along the shoreline both in Jordan and Israel. As the principal invoked mechanism, many studies have concluded that sinkhole formation results from the dissolution of a previously immersed salt layer, progressively in contact with fresh to brackish water. In Jordan, the triggering of this phenomenon could also be the result of particular tectonic settings, associated with the Jordan-Dead Sea transform fault system. At Ghor Haditha (south-est Jordan), the consequences have been dramatic for farmers with the shrinking of temporary available lands and industry with the closing of at least one factory. The shallow material in this area is heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers of alluvial-colluvial origin, over a salty substratum, whose precise depth and thickness are yet partially hypothesized. Between 2005 and 2008, a multi-method high-resolution geophysical survey was performed, approximately over a 1 km2 area at Ghor Haditha, associating mainly electromagnetic soundings, magnetic resonance soundings (MRS), and seismic profiling, ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography. At the same time, this specific area was the location of a dramatic evolution of sinkhole occurences, regularly followed by geodetic measurements. Over the 3 years period, about 120 TEM (Transient ElectroMagnetic) soundings allow to map precisely the depth of the conductive layers below the resistive overburden. Two conductive layer are then revealed, the latter showing the lowest resistivity below 1 Ohm.m corresponding to the saline substratum. Several MRS (3 in 2005, repeated in 2007 and 12 additional soundings) show an east-west hydraulic gradient towards the Dead. However, the main sinkhole trend coincides with both: - a clear low transmissivity axis determined from MRS measurements; - the western side of a

  13. The effects of possible contamination on the radiocarbon dating of the Dead Sea Scrolls I : Castor oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, KL; van der Plicht, J; Cryer, FH; Doudna, G; Cross, FM; Strugnell, J; Rasmussen, Kaare L.; Cryer, Frederick H.; Cross, Frank M.

    2001-01-01

    Some fragments of the Dead Sea Scroll manuscripts were contaminated with castor oil in the late 1950s. We have conducted experiments in order to establish if the AAA pretreatment cleaning procedures conducted on Dead Sea Scroll manuscript samples in the last two dating series (Bonani et al. 1992; Ju

  14. Provisional, Primordial and Preexistent Temples in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The Bible itself indicates that there is a prehistory to the Solomonic temple: It existed in a portable version during the wilderness years in the shape of the Tabernacle, and that in turn was built after a model shown to Moses on Mt. Sinai by God himself. It is no wonder that the Dead Sea Scroll...

  15. Microenvironments of reduced salinity harbour biofilms in Dead Sea underwater springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häusler, S.; Noriega-Ortega, B.E.; Polerecky, L.; Meyer, V.; de Beer, D.; Ionescu, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline lake where only few types of organisms can grow. Recently, abundant and diverse microbial life was discovered in biofilms covering rocks and permeable sediments around underwater freshwater springs and seeps. We used a newly developed salinity mini-sensor (spatial resol

  16. First results from a temporary seismological network in the Southern Dead Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuer, B.; Asch, G.; Hofstetter, A.; Haberland, C.; Darwish, J.; El-Kelani, R.; Weber, M.

    2008-12-01

    Within the framework of the international project DESIRE (Dead Sea Integrated Research Project) a local seismological network was operated in the Southern Dead Sea area as a co-operation between the GFZ Germany, GII Israel, NRA Jordan and An-Najah National Univer-sity Palestine. From October 2006 to March 2008 about 65 short period (38) and broadband (27) instruments recorded continuously the seismicity of the Dead Sea basin. This investiga-tion aims in studying the deeper structure of the Dead Sea area based on the distribution of the local seismicity. About 500 local events have been recorded and more than 300 have been processed up to now. A dominant feature in this first part of the dataset we found a cluster of 78 earthquakes, occurring in February 2007, including multiplets. We determined a 1D-reference model of P- and S-velocities using Velest (Kissling et al., 1994). The model shows a high velocity increase between 6 and 10 km depth. This could be related to a prominent reflector found in the results of the wide angle reflection experiment in the area in 2006 (Mechie et al., 2008). The station corrections suggest a 2D structure with the basin in the middle and the shoulders on the east and west. Additionally the results are compared with receiver function and magnetotelluric studies, part of the DESIRE project.

  17. Archaeal populations in two distinct sedimentary facies of the subsurface of the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C; Ionescu, D; Ariztegui, D

    2014-10-01

    Archaeal metabolism was studied in aragonitic and gypsum facies of the Dead Sea subsurface using high-throughput DNA sequencing. We show that the communities are well adapted to the peculiar environment of the Dead Sea subsurface. They harbor the necessary genes to deal with osmotic pressure using high- and low-salt-in strategies, and to cope with unusually high concentrations of heavy metals. Methanogenesis was identified for the first time in the Dead Sea and appears to be an important metabolism in the aragonite sediment. Fermentation of residual organic matter, probably performed by some members of the Halobacteria class is common to both types of sediments. The latter group represents more than 95% of the taxonomically identifiable Archaea in the metagenome of the gypsum sediment. The potential for sulfur reduction has also been revealed and is associated in the sediment with EPS degradation and Fe-S mineralization as revealed by SEM imaging. Overall, we show that distinct communities of Archaea are associated with the two different facies of the Dead Sea, and are adapted to the harsh chemistry of its subsurface, in different ways.

  18. Provenance studies on Dead Sea scrolls parchment by means of quantitative micro-XRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Timo; Rabin, Ira; Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Kanngiesser, Birgit; Malzer, Wolfgang; Kindzorra, Emanuel; Hahn, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we address the question of the provenance and origin of the Dead Sea Scrolls manuscripts. A characteristic low ratio of chlorine to bromine, corresponding to that of the Dead Sea water, may serve as an indicator for local production. For this aim we developed a non-destructive procedure to determine the Cl/Br ratio in the parchment of these manuscripts. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) measurements of a large number of parchment and leather fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls were analyzed with a routine we developed based on fundamental parameter quantification. This routine takes into account the absorption of the collagen matrix and the influence of the different sample thicknesses. To calculate the representative Cl/Br ratio for each fragment, we investigated the lateral homogeneity and determined the total mass deposition using the intensity of the inelastically scattered, characteristic tube radiation. The distribution of the Cl/Br ratios thus obtained from the μ-XRF measurements make it possible to distinguish fragments whose origin lies within the Dead Sea region from those produced in other locations.

  19. Opening of Dead Sea Scrolls Archive Underlines Problems That Can Complicate Access to Research Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Ellen K.

    1991-01-01

    The Huntington Library (California) decision to make generally accessible, for the first time, copies of photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls, previously tightly controlled by a small group of editors, is hailed as breaking a scholarly monopoly over an important intellectual resource, reaffirming the mission of the research library and the…

  20. Paradigm Agreement and Literature Obsolescence: A Comparative Study in the Literature of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisey, Terry M.

    1988-01-01

    This study used bibliometric reference analysis to compare archaeological and critical papers from the Dead Sea Scrolls literature. Data were gathered on the age of reference, the dates of the scientific (archaeological) research front, and form of publication. The significance of these findings for literature obsolescence is discussed. (50…

  1. Focal mechanisms in the southern Dead Sea basin and related structural elements based on seismological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, A.; Dorbath, C.; Dorbath, L.

    2014-12-01

    A dense temporary local seismological network was operated from 10/2006 to 3/2008 in the southern Dead Sea basin also outside the basin within the framework of the DESIRE (DEad Sea Integrated REsearch) project, providing many recordings of local earthquakes. We used the recordings of DESIRE and also the recordings of the permanent networks of Israel Seismic Network, Israel, and Jordan Seismic Observatory, Jordan. We determined high quality focal plane solutions of 490 events, using at least 6 stations (normally >10 stations) with a good station distribution around the epicenters. In the southern Dead Sea basin and adjacent regions there are several clusters of earthquakes. Most of the activity occurred along the eastern bordering fault of the basin, in the Lisan Peninsula and just south and north of it. Along the eastern and western bordering faults we observe mainly strike slip mechanism, probably supporting the left lateral motion along the Dead Sea fault. The nodal planes of many of focal mechanisms inside the basin are parallel to the transverse faults crossing the basin, i.e., Bokek and Ein-Gedi faults, and also parallel to faults that border the Lisan Peninsula on the north-western and south-western sides.

  2. The 1170 and 1202 CE Dead Sea Rift earthquakes and long-term magnitude distribution of the Dead Sea Fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, S.E.; Avni, R.

    2009-01-01

    In combination with the historical record, paleoseismic investigations have provided a record of large earthquakes in the Dead Sea Rift that extends back over 1500 years. Analysis of macroseismic effects can help refine magnitude estimates for large historical events. In this study we consider the detailed intensity distributions for two large events, in 1170 CE and 1202 CE, as determined from careful reinterpretation of available historical accounts, using the 1927 Jericho earthquake as a guide in their interpretation. In the absence of an intensity attenuation relationship for the Dead Sea region, we use the 1927 Jericho earthquake to develop a preliminary relationship based on a modification of the relationships developed in other regions. Using this relation, we estimate M7.6 for the 1202 earthquake and M6.6 for the 1170 earthquake. The uncertainties for both estimates are large and difficult to quantify with precision. The large uncertainties illustrate the critical need to develop a regional intensity attenuation relation. We further consider the distribution of magnitudes in the historic record and show that it is consistent with a b-value distribution with a b-value of 1. Considering the entire Dead Sea Rift zone, we show that the seismic moment release rate over the past 1500 years is sufficient, within the uncertainties of the data, to account for the plate tectonic strain rate along the plate boundary. The results reveal that an earthquake of M7.8 is expected within the zone on average every 1000 years. ?? 2011 Science From Israel/LPPLtd.

  3. New perspectives on interdisciplinary earth science at the Dead Sea: The DESERVE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottmeier, Christoph; Agnon, Amotz; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Alpert, Pinhas; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Dahm, Torsten; Eshel, Adam; Geyer, Stefan; Haas, Michael; Holohan, Eoghan; Kalthoff, Norbert; Kishcha, Pavel; Krawczyk, Charlotte; Lati, Joseph; Laronne, Jonathan B; Lott, Friederike; Mallast, Ulf; Merz, Ralf; Metzger, Jutta; Mohsen, Ayman; Morin, Efrat; Nied, Manuela; Rödiger, Tino; Salameh, Elias; Sawarieh, Ali; Shannak, Benbella; Siebert, Christian; Weber, Michael

    2016-02-15

    The Dead Sea region has faced substantial environmental challenges in recent decades, including water resource scarcity, ~1m annual decreases in the water level, sinkhole development, ascending-brine freshwater pollution, and seismic disturbance risks. Natural processes are significantly affected by human interference as well as by climate change and tectonic developments over the long term. To get a deep understanding of processes and their interactions, innovative scientific approaches that integrate disciplinary research and education are required. The research project DESERVE (Helmholtz Virtual Institute Dead Sea Research Venue) addresses these challenges in an interdisciplinary approach that includes geophysics, hydrology, and meteorology. The project is implemented by a consortium of scientific institutions in neighboring countries of the Dead Sea (Israel, Jordan, Palestine Territories) and participating German Helmholtz Centres (KIT, GFZ, UFZ). A new monitoring network of meteorological, hydrological, and seismic/geodynamic stations has been established, and extensive field research and numerical simulations have been undertaken. For the first time, innovative measurement and modeling techniques have been applied to the extreme conditions of the Dead Sea and its surroundings. The preliminary results show the potential of these methods. First time ever performed eddy covariance measurements give insight into the governing factors of Dead Sea evaporation. High-resolution bathymetric investigations reveal a strong correlation between submarine springs and neo-tectonic patterns. Based on detailed studies of stratigraphy and borehole information, the extension of the subsurface drainage basin of the Dead Sea is now reliably estimated. Originality has been achieved in monitoring flash floods in an arid basin at its outlet and simultaneously in tributaries, supplemented by spatio-temporal rainfall data. Low-altitude, high resolution photogrammetry, allied to

  4. Optically stimulated luminescence of natural NaCl mineral from Dead Sea exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman L, J.; Cruz Z, E. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Pina L, Y. I. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Marcazzo, J., E-mail: jesus.roman@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco - UNICEN, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2016-10-15

    Luminescence properties such as radioluminescence, thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence have been studied on natural sodium chloride (NaCl) for dosimetric purposes in retrospective dosimetry (Timar-Gabor et al., 2013; Druzhyna et al., 2016). In this work, the optically stimulated luminescence (Cw-OSL) emissions of natural salt minerals, collected from Dead Sea in summer of 2015, were studied. The Cw-OSL dose response of natural salt was analyzed in the range between 0.2 and 10 Gy gamma dose of {sup 60}Co. Samples exposed at 3 Gy exhibited good repeatability with a variation coefficient of 4.6%. The thermal stability of the Cw-OSL response was analyzed to different temperatures from 50 up to 250 degrees Celsius using a heating rate of 5 degrees Celsius. The results showed that the natural Dead Sea salt minerals could be applied as natural dosimeter of gamma radiation. (Author)

  5. The material variance of the Dead Sea Scrolls: On texts and artefacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eibert Tigchelaar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available What does a sacred text look like? Are religious books materially different from other books? Does materiality matter? This article deals with three different aspects of material variance attested amongst the Dead Sea Scrolls, Ancient Jewish religious text fragments, of which were found in the Judean Desert. I suggest that the substitution of the ancient Hebrew script by the everyday Aramaic script, also for Torah and other religious texts, was intentional and programmatic: it enabled the broader diffusion of scriptures in Hellenistic and Roman Judea. The preponderant use of parchment for religious texts rather than papyrus may be a marker of identity. The many small scrolls which contained only small parts of specific religious books (Genesis, Psalms may have been produced as religious artefacts which express identity in the period when Judaism developed into a religion of the book. Keywords: Dead Sea Scrolls; Judaism; Manuscripts

  6. Continuous CO2 escape from the hypersaline Dead Sea caused by aragonite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Rotem; Lazar, Boaz; Wurgaft, Eyal; Lensky, Nadav; Ganor, Jiwchar; Gavrieli, Ittai

    2017-06-01

    Chemical precipitation of CaCO3 occurs in diverse marine and lacustrine environments. In the hypersaline Ca-chloride lakes that have been occupying the Dead Sea basin since the late Pleistocene, CaCO3 precipitated, mostly as aragonite. The aragonite sediments precipitated mainly during periods of high lake level stands as a result of mixing of bicarbonate-rich freshwater runoff with Dead Sea brine, that is Ca-rich and have high Mg/Ca ratio. During periods of arid conditions with limited freshwater inflow, water level declined, salinity increased and gypsum and halite became the dominant evaporitic minerals to precipitate. The present study investigates the carbon cycle of the Dead Sea under the current limited water and bicarbonate supply to the brine, representing periods of extremely arid conditions. The decrease of inflows to the Dead Sea in recent years stems mainly from diversion of freshwater from the drainage basin and results in dramatic water level decline and massive halite precipitation. During 2013-2014, bi-monthly depth profiles of total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its isotopic composition (δ13C) were conducted in the Dead Sea, from surface down to the bottom of the lake (290 m). Mass balance calculations conducted for the period 1993-2013 show that while inventories of conservative ions such as Mg2+ remained constant, the net DIC inventory of the lake decreased by ∼10%. DIC supply to the lake during this period, however, amounted to ∼10% of lake's inventory indicating that during 20 years, the lake lost ∼20% of its 1993s inventory. Compilation of historical data with our data shows that during the past two decades the lake's low DIC (∼1 mmol kg-1) and very high PCO2 (1800 ppm V) remained relatively constant, suggesting that a quasi-steady-state situation prevails. In spite of the surprisingly stable DIC and CO2 concentrations, during this 20 year period δ13CDIC increased significantly, from 1.4‰ to 2.7‰. An isotopic

  7. A first record of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the dead sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, Sarita; Gonsalves, Valerie; Nayak, Shweta

    2012-03-01

    The isolation of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the Dead Sea and the range of salt tolerance of halophilic fungi isolated, are reported here for the first time. The mycobiota of the Dead Sea isolated in this study, was dominated by Aspergillus and Penicillium species; Cladosporium were found in lesser numbers. All three genera were obtained from the water sample; however, Aspergillus was the only genus obtained from the sediment. There was significant difference in growth of each isolate at different salt concentrations and intraspecies analysis revealed dissimilarity in response of strains to different salt concentrations in the growth medium The isolates were euryhaline, with halotolerance up to 20-25% solar salt, Aspergillus and Penicillium species showing a higher level of halotolerance, as compared to that of Cladosporium. Halophilic fungi were found in greater numbers in the sediment sample as compared to that in the water sample. Penicillium and Cladosporium species were exclusively facultative halophiles, while some species of Aspergillus were facultative halophiles. All the obligate halophiles isolated, belonged to the genus Aspergillus and were identified as A. penicillioides and A unguis, the latter being a first record of the species from the Dead Sea.

  8. Measurement-based modelling of bromine-induced oxidation of mercury above the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, E.; Obrist, D.; Peleg, M.; Matveev, V.; Faïn, X.; Asaf, D.; Luria, M.

    2012-03-01

    Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) outside the polar region - driven by high levels of gaseous Br and BrO (i.e., BrOx) - were observed recently in the warm Dead Sea boundary layer. The efficient oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) under temperate conditions by BrOx was unexpected considering that the thermal back dissociation reaction of HgBr is about 2.5 orders of magnitude higher under Dead Sea temperatures compared to polar temperatures, and hence was expected to significantly slow down GEM oxidation under warm temperatures. The goal of this modelling study was to improve understanding of the interaction of reactive bromine and mercury during Dead Sea AMDEs using numerical simulations based on a comprehensive measurement campaign in summer 2009. Our analysis is focused on daytime AMDE when chemical processes dominate concentration changes. Best agreements between simulations and observations were achieved using rate constants for kHg+Br and kHg+BrO of 2.7 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and 1.5 × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively. Our model also predicted that a rate constant kHg+BrO of 5.0 × 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 may be considered as a minimum, which is higher than most reported values. These rate constants suggest that BrO could be a more efficient oxidant than Br in the troposphere as long as [Br]/[BrO] ratios are smaller than ~0.2 to 0.5. Under Dead Sea conditions, these kinetics demonstrate a high efficiency and central role of BrOx for AMDEs, with relative contributions to GEM depletion of more than ~90%. Unexpectedly, BrO was found to be the dominant oxidant with relative contributions above 80%. The strong contribution of BrO could explain why the efficiency of GEM oxidation at the Dead Sea does not critically depend on Br and, therefore, is comparable to that in cold polar regions. In order to confirm the suggested kinetics, additional studies, particularly for temperature-dependence of rate constants, are required.

  9. Measurement-based modelling of bromine-induced oxidation of mercury above the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs outside the polar region – driven by high levels of gaseous Br and BrO (i.e., BrOx – were observed recently in the warm Dead Sea boundary layer. The efficient oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM under temperate conditions by BrOx was unexpected considering that the thermal back dissociation reaction of HgBr is about 2.5 orders of magnitude higher under Dead Sea temperatures compared to polar temperatures, and hence was expected to significantly slow down GEM oxidation under warm temperatures. The goal of this modelling study was to improve understanding of the interaction of reactive bromine and mercury during Dead Sea AMDEs using numerical simulations based on a comprehensive measurement campaign in summer 2009.

    Our analysis is focused on daytime AMDE when chemical processes dominate concentration changes. Best agreements between simulations and observations were achieved using rate constants for kHg+Br and kHg+BrO of 2.7 × 10−13 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and 1.5 × 10−13 cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively. Our model also predicted that a rate constant kHg+BrO of 5.0 × 10−14 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 may be considered as a minimum, which is higher than most reported values. These rate constants suggest that BrO could be a more efficient oxidant than Br in the troposphere as long as [Br]/[BrO] ratios are smaller than ~0.2 to 0.5. Under Dead Sea conditions, these kinetics demonstrate a high efficiency and central role of BrOx for AMDEs, with relative contributions to GEM depletion of more than ~90%. Unexpectedly, BrO was found to be the dominant oxidant with relative contributions above 80%. The strong contribution of BrO could explain why the efficiency of GEM

  10. Crustal structure of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) from a receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, A.; Asch, G.; Mechie, J.; Kind, R.; Hofstetter, R.; Weber, M.; Stiller, M.; Abu-Ayyash, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Dead Sea Transform (DST) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault that accommodates the relative motion between the African and Arabian plates, connecting a region of extension in the Red Sea to the Taurus collision zone in Turkey over a length of about 1100 km. The Dead Sea Basin (DSB) is one of the largest basins along the DST. The DSB is a morphotectonic depression along the DST, divided into a northern and a southern sub-basin, separated by the Lisan salt diapir. We report on a receiver function study of the crust within the multidisciplinary geophysical project, DEad Sea Integrated REsearch (DESIRE), to study the crustal structure of the DSB. A temporary seismic network was operated on both sides of the DSB between 2006 October and 2008 April. The aperture of the network is approximately 60 km in the E-W direction crossing the DSB on the Lisan peninsula and about 100 km in the N-S direction. Analysis of receiver functions from the DESIRE temporary network indicates that Moho depths vary between 30 and 38 km beneath the area. These Moho depth estimates are consistent with results of near-vertical incidence and wide-angle controlled-source techniques. Receiver functions reveal an additional discontinuity in the lower crust, but only in the DSB and west of it. This leads to the conclusion that the internal crustal structure east and west of the DSB is different at the present-day. However, if the 107 km left-lateral movement along the DST is taken into account, then the region beneath the DESIRE array where no lower crustal discontinuity is observed would have lain about 18 Ma ago immediately adjacent to the region under the previous DESERT array west of the DST where no lower crustal discontinuity is recognized.

  11. New constraints on seismic anisotropy along the Dead Sea transform fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, A.; Rumpker, G.; Asch, G.

    2009-12-01

    We study seismic anisotropy along the Dead Sea Transform fault (DST) by shear-wave splitting analysis of SKS and SKKS waveforms recorded at a dense network of broad-band and short-period stations of the DESIRE experiment. The DST accommodates the relative motion between Africa and Arabia through a sinistral strike-slip motion. The Dead Sea is a pull-apart basin formed along the DST as a result of stepwise fault-normal displacement. The DESIRE array of stations cover this portion of the DST. We measured the splitting parameters (delay times between the fast and slow components of the shear wave and fast polarization direction) in different period bands. We observed consistent fast polarization directions varying from N14W to N19E at different stations and delay times ranging between 1.0 and 2.5 s. Our preliminary examination reveals that the splitting parameters do not exhibit significant frequency dependence. However, we observe variations in the splitting parameters (mostly delay times) along an E-W profile crossing the DST, with smaller delay times in the middle of the profile, within the surface exposure of the DST shear zone, and with two lobes of relatively large delay times on both sides of the central region. The fast polarization directions along this profile change from a dominant NNW trend in the western side of the DST to a general N-S orientation in the central part and a dominant NNE trend to the east. Waveform modeling is required to infer the lateral and depth variations of the strength and orientation of anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle from these observations. We will also complement our results with the data from the DESERT experiment to provide an overall pattern of seismic anisotropy and structural fabric beneath the DST and surrounding regions from the north of the Dead Sea down to the Red sea.

  12. Unraveling rift margin evolution and escarpment development ages along the Dead Sea fault using cosmogenic burial ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmon, A.; Fink, D.; Davis, M.; Niedermann, S.; Rood, D.; Frumkin, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Dead Sea fault (DSF) is one of the most active plate boundaries in the world. Understanding the Quaternary history and sediments of the DSF requires investigation into the Neogene development of this plate boundary. DSF lateral motion preceded significant extension and rift morphology by ~ 10 Ma. Sediments of the Sedom Formation, dated here between 5.0 ± 0.5 Ma and 6.2- 2.1+ inf Ma, yielded extremely low 10Be concentrations and 26Al is absent. These reflect the antiquity of the sediments, deposited in the Sedom Lagoon, which evolved in a subdued landscape and was connected to the Mediterranean Sea. The base of the overlying Amora Formation, deposited in the terminal Amora Lake which developed under increasing relief that promoted escarpment incision, was dated at 3.3- 0.8+ 0.9 Ma. Burial ages of fluvial sediments within caves (3.4 ± 0.2 Ma and 3.6 ± 0.4 Ma) represent the timing of initial incision. Initial DSF topography coincides with the earliest Red Sea MORB's and the East Anatolian fault initiation. These suggest a change in the relative Arabian-African plate motion. This change introduced the rifting component to the DSF followed by a significant subsidence, margin uplift, and a reorganization of relief and drainage pattern in the region resulting in the topographic framework observed today.

  13. Paleostress analysis of the Cretaceous rocks in the eastern margin of the Dead Sea transform, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dead Sea transform, the; Diabat, Jordan A. A.; Atallah, M.; Salih, M. R.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents the first paleostress results from fault-slip data on Cretaceous limestone at the eastern rim of the Dead Sea transform (DST) in Jordan. Stress inversion of fault-slip data is performed using an improved right dieder method, followed by rotational optimization (Delvaux, TENSOR Program). The orientation of the principal stress axes ( σ1, σ2 and σ3) and the ratio of the principal stress differences ( R) show two main paleostress fields marking two main stress regimes, strike-slip and extensional. The first is characterized by NNW-SSE compression and ENE-WSW extension and related to Middle Miocene-Recent sinistral movement along the Dead Sea transform and the opening of the Red Sea. The second paleostress field is a WNW-ESE compression and NNE-SSW extension restricted to the northern part of the investigated area. This stress field could be associated with the development of the Syrian Arc fold belt which started during the Turonian, or it may be due to an anticlockwise rotation of the first stress field.

  14. Annual dynamics of halite precipitation in the Dead Sea: In situ observations and their geological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Ido; enzel, Yehouda; Lensky, Nadav G.

    2017-04-01

    Layered halite sequences deposited in deep basins throughout the geological record. However, analogues of such sequences are commonly studied in sallow environments. Here we study active precipitation of halite layers from the only modern analog for deep, halite-precipitating basin, the hypersaline Dead Sea. In situ observations in the Dead Sea link seasonal thermohaline stratification, halite saturation, and the characteristics of the actively forming halite layers. The spatiotemporal evolution of halite precipitation in the Dead Sea was characterized by means of monthly observations of the i) lake thermohaline stratification (temperature, salinity, and density), ii) degree of halite saturation, and iii) textural evolution of the active halite deposits. We present the observed relationships between textural characteristics of layered halite deposits (i.e. grain size, consolidation, and roughness) and the degree of saturation, which in turn reflected the limnology and hydro-climatology. The lakefloor is divided into two principle environments: A deep, hypolimnetic and a shallow, epilimnetic lakefloor. In the deeper hypolimnetic lakefloor halite continuously precipitates with seasonal variations: (a) during summer, consolidated coarse halite crystals form rough surfaces under slight super-saturation. (b) During winter, unconsolidated, fine halite crystals form smooth seafloor deposits under high supersaturation. The observations also emphasize the thought regarding seasonal alternation of halite crystallization mechanism. The shallow epilimnetic lake floor is highly influenced by the seasonal temperature variations, and by intensive summer dissolution of part of the previous year's halite deposit which results in thin sequences with annual unconformities. This emphasizes the control of temperature seasonality on the precipitated halite layers characteristics. In addition, precipitation of halite in the hypolimnetic floor, on the expense of the dissolution of the

  15. Detailed seismicity analysis revealing the dynamics of the southern Dead Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuer, B.; Asch, G.; Hofstetter, R.; Haberland, Ch.; Jaser, D.; El-Kelani, R.; Weber, M.

    2014-10-01

    Within the framework of the international DESIRE (DEad Sea Integrated REsearch) project, a dense temporary local seismological network was operated in the southern Dead Sea area. During 18 recording months, 648 events were detected. Based on an already published tomography study clustering, focal mechanisms, statistics and the distribution of the microseismicity in relation to the velocity models from the tomography are analysed. The determined b value of 0.74 leads to a relatively high risk of large earthquakes compared to the moderate microseismic activity. The distribution of the seismicity indicates an asymmetric basin with a vertical strike-slip fault forming the eastern boundary of the basin, and an inclined western boundary, made up of strike-slip and normal faults. Furthermore, significant differences between the area north and south of the Bokek fault were observed. South of the Bokek fault, the western boundary is inactive while the entire seismicity occurs on the eastern boundary and below the basin-fill sediments. The largest events occurred here, and their focal mechanisms represent the northwards transform motion of the Arabian plate along the Dead Sea Transform. The vertical extension of the spatial and temporal cluster from February 2007 is interpreted as being related to the locking of the region around the Bokek fault. North of the Bokek fault similar seismic activity occurs on both boundaries most notably within the basin-fill sediments, displaying mainly small events with strike-slip mechanism and normal faulting in EW direction. Therefore, we suggest that the Bokek fault forms the border between the single transform fault and the pull-apart basin with two active border faults.

  16. Determination of optimal dead sea salt content in a cosmetic emulsion using rheology and stability measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A; Bsoul, Abeer

    2008-01-01

    Dead Sea mud and salts are known for their therapeutic and cosmetic properties. The presence of Dead Sea (DS) salts in different types of cosmetics has affected the stability and the flow properties of the finished products. In this study, an attempt was made to find the optimum Dead Sea salt content in a cosmetic emulsion (model of body cream) using both rheology and stability measurements. The rheological properties were tested during a four-month storage period at three different storage temperatures: 8 degrees C, room temperature, and 45 degrees C. In addition to rheological measurements and centrifuge tests, the conductivities of the emulsion samples were also determined. The centrifuge tests showed that the cream samples containing more than 0.25 wt% of DS salt showed phase separation. The addition of DS salt to the cosmetic emulsion led to two maxima in the emulsion viscosity at salt contents of 0.07 wt% and 0.15 wt%. However, the emulsion samples containing 0.15% of DS salt was considered the optimum sample since it contained the maximum amount of salt and exhibited the maximum viscosity at all tested conditions. It was found that the viscosity of the emulsion is increased with storage time and storage temperature. This behavior was accompanied by a decrease in conductivity. This behavior was explained by water evaporation from the emulsion. However, it has been shown that the presence of DS salt in the cosmetic emulsion significantly reduces the rate of water evaporation. The conductivity measurements reflect the rate of water evaporation, and the presence of DS salt reduces the rate of conductivity. Conductivity is observed to decrease with storage time and temperature.

  17. [Resistance of microorganisms of coastal ecosystems of the Dead Sea to extremal factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskaia, V A; Avdeeva, L V; Gladka, G V; Pritula, I R; Kharkhota, M A; Tashirev, A B

    2013-01-01

    Such extreme factors as UV radiation, high temperature and salinity, and also the small amount of accessible water have an influence on microorganisms of coastal ecosystems of the Dead Sea. Resistance to these factors of the microorganisms isolated from ecosystems of this region (vertical steep gorge around the Dead Sea, clay-salt plain and black highly mineralized muds) is studied. Aerobic, chemoorganotrophic, thermotolerant, moderately halophilic bacteria which, according to their morphological and physiological properties, are similar to species Gracilibacillus halotolerans, Salimicrobium album and genus Caryophanon have been isolated from these ecosystems. All strains grew at 0-10% of NaCl in the medium (one strain--at 15% of NaCl), in the range of 30-50 degrees C. Resistance to UV radiation has been revealed in all the investigated bacteria Lethal doses of UV (LD90 and LD99.99) for spore-forming strains of genus Gracilibacillus were 100-170 and 1100-1500 J/m2, respectively; for strain Salimicrobium 6t1 (does not form spores)--70 and 400 J/m2; for the strain lt4 (genus Caryophanon), forming filamentous (or trychomes)--150 and 1400 J/m2. Some strains of genus Gracilibacillus had strong antagonistic effect on conditionally pathogenic test cultures Staphylococcus aureus 209p and Candida albicans UCM Y-690. It is conceivable that resistance of microorganisms of coastal ecosystems of the Dead Sea to extreme factors was generated under the influence of abiotic (physical and chemical) factors typical of this region.

  18. Numerical simulation of the thermomechanical processes resulting in the major pull-apart basins at the Dead Sea Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Alexey Petrunin; Stephan V. Sobolev; Z. Garfunkel; [Child, Sir Josiah, bart.] 

    2004-01-01

    The continental transform boundary between the Arabian and African plates marked by the Dead Sea Transform (DST) accommodated ca 105 km of relative transform displacement during the last 15-20 Myr. The strike-slip deformation resulted in a string of the pull-apart basins along the DST, with up to 10 km thick sedimentary cover. The reconstruction of the pre-DST basement topography indicates that there was a crystalline basement high close to the DST trace between the Red Sea and the Dead Sea, ...

  19. Provisional, Primordial and Preexistent Temples in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The Bible itself indicates that there is a prehistory to the Solomonic temple: It existed in a portable version during the wilderness years in the shape of the Tabernacle, and that in turn was built after a model shown to Moses on Mt. Sinai by God himself. It is no wonder that the Dead Sea Scrolls...... give several examples of temple and priesthood being in existence before their Mosaic manifestation on earth: Going back through the Patriarchal age, we see priestly footprints; peeking into heaven, we find the temple there – and going back to the very moment of creation, we learn that it was already...

  20. Private health insurance policies in Israel: a report on the 2012 Dead Sea Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Nun, Gabi

    2013-06-27

    The private health insurance (commercial and supplementary health insurance) sector has undergone a revolutionary transformation in recent years, both in the number of individuals who own private plans, and in the financial scope of these plans. With these developments in the background, leaders of the Israeli healthcare system convened in December 2012 at the Dead Sea for a discussion on "Private healthcare insurance plans in Israel: Developments, concerns, and directions for a solution". This meeting report summarizes the main issues discussed at the conference.

  1. Anatomy of the Dead Sea transform: Does it reflect continuous changes in plate motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, U.S.; Rybakov, M.; Al-Zoubi, A. S.; Hassouneh, M.; Frieslander, U.; Batayneh, A.T.; Goldschmidt, V.; Daoud, M.N.; Rotstein, Y.; Hall, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    A new gravity map of the southern half of the Dead Sea transform offers the first regional view of the anatomy of this plate boundary. Interpreted together with auxiliary seismic and well data, the map reveals a string of subsurface basins of widely varying size, shape, and depth along the plate boundary and relatively short (25-55 km) and discontinuous fault segments. We argue that this structure is a result of continuous small changes in relative plate motion. However, several segments must have ruptured simultaneously to produce the inferred maximum magnitude of historical earthquakes.

  2. The text-critical and exegetical value of the Dead Sea Scrolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Cook

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will analyse a number of Dead Sea manuscripts and/or fragments in order to determine their linguistic and exegetical value. The article will, firstly, address textual material that is largely in agreement with the Massoretic Text – 1QIsaa is a case in point. Secondly, fragmentsthat are seemingly less relevant will be discussed. The less helpful fragments from the Biblical books Proverbs and Job are taken as examples. Finally, highly significant textual differences, such as a fragment from Genesis 1 and one from the complicated books of Jeremiah, will be evaluated.

  3. Magnetic character of a large continental transform: an aeromagnetic survey of the Dead Sea Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Rybakov, Michael; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah S.; Rotstein, Yair

    2007-01-01

    New high-resolution airborne magnetic (HRAM) data along a 120-km-long section of the Dead Sea Transform in southern Jordan and Israel shed light on the shallow structure of the fault zone and on the kinematics of the plate boundary. Despite infrequent seismic activity and only intermittent surface exposure, the fault is delineated clearly on a map of the first vertical derivative of the magnetic intensity, indicating that the source of the magnetic anomaly is shallow. The fault is manifested by a 10–20 nT negative anomaly in areas where the fault cuts through magnetic basement and by a

  4. Intrabasin paleoearthquake and quiescence correlation of the late Holocene Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Elisa; Stein, Mordechai; Agnon, Amotz; Neumann, Frank

    2011-04-01

    A comprehensive multisite paleoseismic archive of the late Holocene Dead Sea basin (past 2500 years) is established by constructing two age-depth chronological models of two sedimentary sections exposed at the retreating shores of the modern Dead Sea. Two new paleoseismic study sites studied are the Ein Feshkha Nature Reserve outcrop located at the northern part of the basin and close to an active underwater transverse fault and the east Ze'elim Gully outcrop at the southern part of the basin. Age-depth regression models are calculated for these sections based on atmospheric radiocarbon ages of short-lived organic debris calibrated with a Bayesian model. The uncertainties on individual model ages are smaller than 100 years. The new chronological records are compared to a laminae-counting study of the Ein Gedi core (Migowski et al., 2004) located at the central Dead Sea basin. The Ein Feshkha outcrop yielded the largest number of seismites in the studied time interval (n = 52), while lower numbers of seismites are recovered from the Ze'elim outcrop and Ein Gedi core (n = 15 and 36, respectively). The seismites show no strong dependence on the limnological-sedimentological conditions in the particular sampling sites (they coappear in both shallow and deep water environments and in different sedimentary facies). During time intervals when the chronologies are comparable it appears that the number of seismites is significantly larger in the northern part of the basin (Ein Gedi and Ein Feshkha). Seismic quiescence intervals are apparent at all three sites from 2nd-4th century A.D. and at 500-150 B.C. at Ze'elim and Ein Gedi. Several synchronous seismites appear in all sections (termed here the intrabasin seismites (IBS)). Among them: 1927, 1293, 1202/1212, 749, 551, 419, and 33 A.D. and 31 and mid-2nd century B.C. The recurrence time of the IBS from the 2nd century B.C. to the 14th century A.D. is ˜200 years, compared with ˜100 years for all earthquakes. On a diagram

  5. The Paleoclimate of the Dead Sea Basin from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the late glacial paleoclimate of the Southern Levant. A study of delta 13C and delta 18O in carbonates...derived from carbon and oxygen isotopes provide insight into the paleoclimate of the Southern Levant. The period from 20-14.6 kya was dry and cool, with...organic matter into the basin. The results of this study agree with other studies based on paleolake levels, pollen levels and paleoclimate studies from the Dead Sea Basin.

  6. High-resolution temperature sensing in the Dead Sea using fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, A.; Lensky, N. G.; Selker, J. S.

    2014-02-01

    The thermal stratification of the Dead Sea was observed in high spatial and temporal resolution by means of fiber-optics temperature sensing. The aim of the research was to employ the novel high-resolution profiler in studying the dynamics of the thermal structure of the Dead Sea and the related processes including the investigation of the metalimnion fluctuations. The 18 cm resolution profiling system was placed vertically through the water column supported by a buoy 450 m from shore, from 2 m above to 53 m below the water surface (just above the local seafloor), covering the entire seasonal upper layer (the metalimnion had an average depth of ˜20 m). Temperature profiles were recorded every 5 min. The May to July 2012 data set allowed quantitative investigation of the thermal morphology dynamics, including objective definitions of key locations within the metalimnion based on the temperature depth profile and its first and second depth derivatives. Analysis of the fluctuation of the defined metalimnion locations showed strong anticorrelation to measured sea level fluctuations. The slope of the sea level versus metalimnion depth was found to be related to the density ratio of the upper layer and the underlying main water body, according to the prediction of a two-layer model. The heat content of the entire water column was calculated by integrating the temperature profiles. The vertically integrated apparent heat content was seen to vary by 50% in a few hours. These fluctuations were not correlated to the atmospheric heat fluxes, nor to the momentum transfer, but were highly correlated to the metalimnion and the sea level fluctuations (r = 0.84). The instantaneous apparent heat flux was 3 orders of magnitude larger than that delivered by radiation, with no direct correlation to the frequency of radiation and wind in the lake. This suggests that the source of the momentary heat flux is lateral advection due to internal waves (with no direct relation to the diurnal

  7. Jet formation at the sea ice edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltham, D. L.; Heorton, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    The sea ice edge presents a region of many feedback processes between the atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, which are inadequately represented in current climate models. Here we focus on on-ice atmospheric and oceanic flows at the sea ice edge. Mesoscale jet formation due to the Coriolis effect is well understood over sharp changes in surface roughness such as coastlines. This sharp change in surface roughness is experienced by the atmosphere flowing over, and ocean flowing under, a compacted sea ice edge. We have studied a dynamic sea ice edge responding to atmospheric and oceanic jet formation. The shape and strength of atmospheric and oceanic jets during on-ice flows is calculated from existing studies of the sea ice edge and prescribed to idealised models of the sea ice edge. An idealised analytical model of sea ice drift is developed and compared to a sea ice climate model (the CICE model) run on an idealised domain. The response of the CICE model to jet formation is tested at various resolutions. We find that the formation of atmospheric jets during on-ice winds at the sea ice edge increases the wind speed parallel to the sea ice edge and results in the formation of a sea ice edge jet. The modelled sea ice edge jet is in agreement with an observed jet although more observations are needed for validation. The increase in ice drift speed is dependent upon the angle between the ice edge and wind and can result in a 40% increase in ice transport along the sea ice edge. The possibility of oceanic jet formation during on-ice currents and the resultant effect upon the sea ice edge is less conclusive. Observations and climate model data of the polar oceans has been analysed to show areas of likely atmospheric jet formation, with the Fram Strait being of particular interest.

  8. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Furthermore, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area, and for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has a great potential to affect the RBS activity in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  9. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pour Biazar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Further, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations, and for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has the potential to greatly affect the RBS activity in areas under anthropogenic influence, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  10. Comparison of intranasal hypertonic dead sea saline spray and intranasal aqueous triamcinolone spray in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordray, Scott; Harjo, Jim B; Miner, Linda

    2005-07-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids are well known to be efficacious in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Nasal irrigation with saline, including hypertonic saline, has long been recommended for the treatment of sinonasal disease, and it has been shown to have a positive effect on the physiology of the nasal mucosa. Until now, no study of the clinical efficacy of intranasal hypertonic Dead Sea saline as a monotherapy for seasonal allergic rhinitis has been reported. We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled comparison of intranasal hypertonic Dead Sea saline spray and intranasal aqueous triamcinolone spray in 15 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Results were based on a 7-day regimen. Based on Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire scores, clinically and statistically significant (p Dead Sea saline solution can be an effective alternative in mild-to-moderate allergic rhinitis, particularly with respect to nasal and eye symptoms. The hypertonicity of the Dead Sea solution may have a positive effect on the physiology of the nasal mucosa by improving mucociliary clearance. In addition, the dominant cation in the Dead Sea solution--magnesium--probably exerts anti-inflammatory effects on the nasal mucosa and on the systemic immune response.

  11. The Northern end of the Dead Sea Basin: Geometry from reflection seismic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, A. S.; Heinrichs, T.; Qabbani, I.; ten Brink, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recently released reflection seismic lines from the Eastern side of the Jordan River north of the Dead Sea were interpreted by using borehole data and incorporated with the previously published seismic lines of the eastern side of the Jordan River. For the first time, the lines from the eastern side of the Jordan River were combined with the published reflection seismic lines from the western side of the Jordan River. In the complete cross sections, the inner deep basin is strongly asymmetric toward the Jericho Fault supporting the interpretation of this segment of the fault as the long-lived and presently active part of the Dead Sea Transform. There is no indication for a shift of the depocenter toward a hypothetical eastern major fault with time, as recently suggested. Rather, the north-eastern margin of the deep basin takes the form of a large flexure, modestly faulted. In the N-S-section along its depocenter, the floor of the basin at its northern end appears to deepen continuously by roughly 0.5??km over 10??km distance, without evidence of a transverse fault. The asymmetric and gently-dipping shape of the basin can be explained by models in which the basin is located outside the area of overlap between en-echelon strike-slip faults. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Scale-free distribution of Dead Sea sinkholes--observations and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Yizhaq, Hezi; Raz, Eli; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    There are currently more than 5500 sinkholes along the Dead Sea in Israel. These were formed due to dissolution of subsurface salt layers as a result of the replacement of hypersaline groundwater by fresh brackish groundwater. This process was associated with a sharp decline in the Dead Sea level, currently more than one meter per year, resulting in a lower water table that has allowed the intrusion of fresher brackish water. We studied the distribution of the sinkholes sizes and found that it is scale-free with a power-law exponent close to 2. We constructed a stochastic cellular automata model to understand the observed scale-free behavior and the growth of the sinkholes area in time. The model consists of a lower salt layer and an upper soil layer in which cavities that develop in the lower layer lead to collapses in the upper layer. The model reproduces the observed power-law distribution without entailing the threshold behavior commonly associated with criticality.

  13. Microenvironments of reduced salinity harbour biofilms in Dead Sea underwater springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Stefan; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; Polerecky, Lubos; Meyer, Volker; de Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline lake where only few types of organisms can grow. Recently, abundant and diverse microbial life was discovered in biofilms covering rocks and permeable sediments around underwater freshwater springs and seeps. We used a newly developed salinity mini-sensor (spatial resolution 300 μm) to investigate the salinity environment around these biofilms in a flume that simulates an underwater spring. Compared with the hypersaline bulk water, salinity at the sediment surface decreased to zero at seeping velocities of 7 cm s(-1). At similar flow velocities, salinity above rocks decreased to 100-200 g L(-1) at a distance of 300 μm from the surface. This depended on the position on the rock, and coincided with locations of natural biofilms. The salinity reduction substantially diminished at flow velocities of 3.5 cm s(-1). We suggest that locally decreased salinity due to freshwater input is one of the main factors that make areas around underwater freshwater springs and seeps in the Dead Sea more favourable for life. However, due to frequent fluctuations in the freshwater flow, the locally decreased salinity is unstable. Therefore, microorganisms that inhabit these environments must be capable of withstanding large and rapid salinity fluctuations.

  14. Sedimentary and structural controls on seismogenic slumping within mass transport deposits from the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Weinberger, R.; Levi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Comparatively little work has been undertaken on how sedimentary environments and facies changes can influence detailed structural development in slump sheets associated with mass transport deposits (MTDs). The nature of downslope deformation at the leading edge of MTDs is currently debated in terms of frontally emergent, frontally confined and open-toed models. An opportunity to study and address these issues occurs within the Dead Sea Basin, where six individual slump sheets (S1-S6) form MTDs in the Late Pleistocene Lisan Formation. All six slumps, which are separated from one another by undeformed beds, are traced towards the NE for up to 1 km, and each shows a change in sedimentary facies from detrital-rich in the SW, to more aragonite-rich in the NE. The detrital-rich facies is sourced predominantly from the rift margin 1.5 km further SW, while the aragonite-rich facies represents evaporitic precipitation in the hyper saline Lake Lisan. The stacked system of MTDs translates downslope towards the NE and follows a pre-determined sequence controlled by the sedimentary facies. Each individual slump roots downwards into underlying detrital-rich layers and displays a greater detrital content towards the SW, which is marked by increasing folding, while increasing aragonite content towards the NE is associated with more discrete thrusts. The MTDs thin downslope towards the NE, until they pass laterally into undeformed beds at the toe. The amount of contraction also reduces downslope from a maximum of 50% to < 10% at the toe, where upright folds form diffuse 'open-toed' systems. We suggest that MTDs are triggered by seismic events, facilitated by detrital-rich horizons, and controlled by palaeoslope orientation. The frequency of individual failures is partially controlled by local environmental influences linked to detrital input and should therefore be used with some caution in more general palaeoseismic studies. We demonstrate that MTDs display 'open toes' where

  15. Multiple sensor tracking of submarine groundwater discharge: concept study along the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Christian; Mallast, Ulf; Rödiger, Tino; Ionescu, Danny; Schwonke, Friedhelm; Hall, John K.; Sade, Aharon R.; Pohl, Thomas; Merkel, Broder

    2014-05-01

    As a result of the continuously declining water level of the Dead Sea, vast areas of its former lakebed are exposed. That unconsolidated sequence of clay minerals and evaporates (e.g. aragonite, gypsum, halite) generally reacts as aquiclude - preventing direct drainage of the surrounding mountain freshwater aquifers. The high density differences between the hypersaline Dead Sea (1.24 g/cm3) and the approaching fresh water generates a flat dipping and stable Ghyben-Herzberg interface. However, a network of open fissures and cracks enables these freshwaters to regionally penetrate both, aquiclude and interface and to finally enter the Dead Sea on- and offshore. These offshore springs, also termed sublake groundwater discharge (SGD), are neither qualitatively nor quantitatively analysed yet. This is the reason why it is one of the most doubtful variables in existing balances of the lake's water budget and strongly requires improvement. To disclose pathways from the feeding mountain aquifers to the springs, intense hydrochemical and microbial investigations were carried out both, onshore and submarine. The waters have their origin in a variety of hard rock aquifers of Cretaceous age. After draining into the Dead Sea sediments, waters carry the easily soluble components (gypsum, halite) and the abundant organic matter, erodes and transports the hardly soluble minerals (clay and aragonite) and admix with briny pore water, respectively, which are all hosted in the sediment body. Diving campaigns allowed to map at least parts of the submarine spring cluster and to correlate their locations with neo-tectonic patterns. However, comprehensive mapping solely by divers is unfeasible due to the complexity and density of spring locations. The subsurface morphology is characterised by craters, walls, gullies and cones, occasionally nested and intensely anastomosed. To comprehensively understand reasons for specific discharge locations and their shapes, high-precision and high

  16. Possible connection between large volcanic eruptions and level rise episodes in the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, R.; Filin, S.; Avni, Y.; Rosenfeld, D.; Marco, S.

    2014-12-01

    The June 1991 Pinatubo volcanic eruption perturbed the atmosphere, triggering short-term worldwide changes in climate. The following winter was anomalously wet in the Levant, with a ~2-meter increase in the Dead Sea level that created a morphological terrace along the lake's shore. Given the global effects of volcanogenic aerosols, we tested the hypothesis that the 1991-92 shore terrace is a modern analogue to the linkage between past volcanic eruptions and a sequence of shore terraces in the Dead Sea Basin. Analysis of precipitation series from Jerusalem showed a significant positive correlation between the Dust Veil Index (DVI) of the modern eruptions and annual rainfall. The DVI was found to explain nearly 50% of the variability in the annual rainfall, such that greater DVI means more rainfall. Other factors that may affect the annual rainfall in the region as the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and the North Atlantic oscillations (NAO) were incorporated along with the DVI in a linear multiple regression model. It was found that the NAO did not contribute anything except for increased noise, but the added SOI increased the explained variability of rainfall to more than 60%. Volcanic eruptions with a VEI of 6, as in the Pinatubo, occurred about once a century during the Holocene and the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This occurrence is similar to the frequency of shore terrace build-up during the Lake Lisan desiccation. Sixteen shore terraces, detected using airborne laser scanning data, were interpreted as indicating short-term level rises due to episodes of enhanced precipitation and runoff during the dramatic drop in Lake Lisan's (palaeo-Dead Sea) level at the end of the LGM. The terraces were compared with a time series of volcanogenic sulfate from the GISP2 record, and similar numbers of sulfate concentration peaks and terraces were found. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between SO4 concentration peaks and the terraces heights. This

  17. U-series and oxygen isotope chronology of the mid-Pleistocene Lake Amora (Dead Sea basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfstein, Adi; Haase-Schramm, Alexandra; Waldmann, Nicolas; Kolodny, Yehoshua; Stein, Mordechai

    2009-05-01

    This study establishes for the first time the chronology and limnological history of Lake Amora (Dead Sea basin, Israel), whose deposits (the Amora Formation) comprise one of the longest exposed lacustrine records of the Pleistocene time. The Amora Formation consists of sequences of laminated primary aragonite and silty-detritus, Ca-sulfate minerals, halite and clastic units. This sedimentary sequence was uplifted and tilted by the rising Sedom salt diapir, exposing ˜320 m of sediments on the eastern flanks of Mt. Sedom (the Arubotaim Cave (AC) section). The chronology of the AC section is based on U-disequilibrium dating ( 230Th- 234U and 234U- 238U ages) combined with floating δ18O stratigraphy and paleomagnetic constraints. The determination of the 230Th- 234U ages required significant corrections to account for detrital Th and U. These corrections were performed on individual samples and on suites of samples from several stratigraphic horizons. The most reliable corrected ages were used to construct an age-elevation model that was further tuned to the oxygen isotope record of east Mediterranean foraminifers (based on the long-term similarity between the sea and lake oxygen isotope archives). The combined U-series- δ18O age-elevation model indicates that the (exposed) Amora sequence was deposited between ˜740 and 70 ka, covering seven glacial-interglacial cycles (Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 18 to 5). Taking the last glacial Lake Lisan and the Holocene Dead Sea lacustrine systems as analogs of the depositional-limnological environment of Lake Amora, the latter oscillated between wet (glacial) and more arid (interglacial) conditions, represented by sequences of primary evaporites (aragonite and gypsum that require enhanced supply of freshwater to the lakes) and clastic sediments, respectively. The lake evolved from a stage of rapid shifts between high and low-stand conditions during ˜740 to 550 ka to a sabkha-like environment that existed (at the AC site

  18. Evaporation estimates from the Dead Sea and their implications on its water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroud, Ibrahim M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea (DS) is a terminal hypersaline water body situated in the deepest part of the Jordan Valley. There is a growing interest in linking the DS to the open seas due to severe water shortages in the area and the serious geological and environmental hazards to its vicinity caused by the rapid level drop of the DS. A key issue in linking the DS with the open seas would be an accurate determination of evaporation rates. There exist large uncertainties of evaporation estimates from the DS due to the complex feedback mechanisms between meteorological forcings and thermophysical properties of hypersaline solutions. Numerous methods have been used to estimate current and historical (pre-1960) evaporation rates, with estimates differing by ˜100%. Evaporation from the DS is usually deduced indirectly using energy, water balance, or pan methods with uncertainty in many parameters. Accumulated errors resulting from these uncertainties are usually pooled into the estimates of evaporation rates. In this paper, a physically based method with minimum empirical parameters is used to evaluate historical and current evaporation estimates from the DS. The more likely figures for historical and current evaporation rates from the DS were 1,500-1,600 and 1,200-1,250 mm per annum, respectively. Results obtained are congruent with field observations and with more elaborate procedures.

  19. Consequences of the anthropogenic alterations along the Jordanian Dead Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closson, Damien; Abou Karaki, Najib

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a terminal lake located over the Jordan - Dead Sea transform fault. At around 428 m bsl, it is the lowest emerged place on Earth. Since the 1960s, the over-exploitation of the water resources in the catchment area has lead to lower the level at an increasing pace. In 2014, it is upper than 1m/year. In the last 50 years, a 50 by 15 km slice of brine, around 33 m thick, has disappeared. With a salinity ten times greater than the average ocean water, the lake and its underground lateral extensions act as a high density layer over which the fresh groundwater is in hydrostatic equilibrium. The slope of the interface between saline and fresh waters is ten times shallower than normally expected near the ocean. According to a number of wells, in some places, the water table does not drop at the same speed than the Dead Sea. There, the head difference is constantly increasing. The fresh groundwater moves rapidly towards the lake to compensate for the imbalance. The most conspicuous consequence is the proliferation of thousands of sinkholes and wide shallow subsidence. In parallel, in the last two decades, industrial and touristic developments have taken place along the coast. Hence, such a dynamic environment provides a unique test bed to study Human-Earth interaction in the Anthropocene. As an example, numerous ground collapses are distributed along lineaments whose orientations fit with the main structural directions. This observation highlights the role of conduit played by underground discontinuities, such as faults and fractures. Very rapid underground water circulation explains the appearance of vegetation (Tamarisk) in unexpected places such as the northern tip of the Lisan peninsula and an "aborted" hectometer-scale landslide. The reactivation of a paleo-channel located below a 38 M salt evaporation pond of the Arab Potash Company, Lisan area, Jordan, provides an example for the implementation of an Early warning System. Time series analysis of high

  20. Improving safety behaviour and accident rates of professional drivers: the Dead Sea project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calé, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim of the Dead Sea project to change and improve traffic safety behaviour and lower the accident rates of professional drivers by applying principles and techniques known from social and traffic psychology. All interventions were based on a sample of 48 workers from one company. Extensive changes in attitudes were obtained by manipulating the workers' behaviour and causing them to publicly represent positive safety attitudes and values. The results show significant improvements in safety behaviour and reductions of accident rates. In spite of the fact that only a small minority of the workers in this plant directly participated in the programme, many others were influenced and improved their safety behaviour on the road. Therefore, the employed method seems to be not only effective but also very cost efficient.

  1. Genomic adaptations of the halophilic Dead Sea filamentous fungus Eurotium rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Weig, Alfons R; Riley, Robert; Peršoh, Derek; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lipzen, Anna; Wasser, Solomon P; Rambold, Gerhard; Grigoriev, Igor V; Nevo, Eviatar

    2014-05-09

    The Dead Sea is one of the most hypersaline habitats on Earth. The fungus Eurotium rubrum (Eurotiomycetes) is among the few species able to survive there. Here we highlight its adaptive strategies, based on genome analysis and transcriptome profiling. The 26.2 Mb genome of E. rubrum shows, for example, gains in gene families related to stress response and losses with regard to transport processes. Transcriptome analyses under different salt growth conditions revealed, among other things differentially expressed genes encoding ion and metabolite transporters. Our findings suggest that long-term adaptation to salinity requires cellular and metabolic responses that differ from short-term osmotic stress signalling. The transcriptional response indicates that halophilic E. rubrum actively counteracts the salinity stress. Many of its genes encode for proteins with a significantly higher proportion of acidic amino acid residues. This trait is characteristic of the halophilic prokaryotes as well, supporting the theory of convergent evolution under extreme hypersaline stress.

  2. Asphalts, heavy oils, ozocerite and gases in the Dead Sea basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A.; Goldberg, M.

    1980-10-01

    Solid, liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons occur throughout the Dead Sea Basin (Israel and Jordan) both in surface exposures and in drillings. The unaltered asphalts and heavy oils are characterized by very high sulfur content (ca. 11%) low content of n-paraffins, pristane to phytane ratio of 0.5 and by containing almost exclusively VO-porphyrins. The distribution of n-paraffins in samples from deep sources shows a smooth envelope maximizing at C/sub 15-20/. Surface and shallow samples show clear evidence of biodegradation. The ozokerite, known only from the east side of the basin, is composed primarily of long chain n-paraffins with a maximum at C/sub 39/. The gases known from the southern margin of the basin are composed mostly of methane. Two hypotheses concerning the source for the bitumens are discussed. Refs.

  3. Shallow lithological structure across the Dead Sea Transform derived from geophysical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, J.; Munoz, G.; Ritter, O.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Ryberg, T.; Weckmann, U.; Weber, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the DEad SEa Rift Transect (DESERT) project a 150 km magnetotelluric profile consisting of 154 sites was carried out across the Dead Sea Transform. The resistivity model presented shows conductive structures in the western section of the study area terminating abruptly at the Arava Fault. For a more detailed analysis we performed a joint interpretation of the resistivity model with a P wave velocity model from a partially coincident seismic experiment. The technique used is a statistical correlation of resistivity and velocity values in parameter space. Regions of high probability of a coexisting pair of values for the two parameters are mapped back into the spatial domain, illustrating the geographical location of lithological classes. In this study, four regions of enhanced probability have been identified, and are remapped as four lithological classes. This technique confirms the Arava Fault marks the boundary of a highly conductive lithological class down to a depth of ???3 km. That the fault acts as an impermeable barrier to fluid flow is unusual for large fault zone, which often exhibit a fault zone characterized by high conductivity and low seismic velocity. At greater depths it is possible to resolve the Precambrian basement into two classes characterized by vastly different resistivity values but similar seismic velocities. The boundary between these classes is approximately coincident with the Al Quweira Fault, with higher resistivities observed east of the fault. This is interpreted as evidence for the original deformation along the DST originally taking place at the Al Quweira Fault, before being shifted to the Arava Fault. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in extremely steep salinity gradients formed by freshwater springs emerging into the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Stefan; Weber, Miriam; Siebert, Christian; Holtappels, Moritz; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; De Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-12-01

    Abundant microbial mats, recently discovered in underwater freshwater springs in the hypersaline Dead Sea, are mostly dominated by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. We investigated the source of sulfide and the activity of these communities. Isotopic analysis of sulfide and sulfate in the spring water showed a fractionation of 39-50‰ indicative of active sulfate reduction. Sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in the spring sediment (Dead Sea water are responsible for the abundant microbial biomass around the springs. The springs flow is highly variable and accordingly the local salinities. We speculate that the development of microbial mats dominated by either Sulfurimonas/Sulfurovum-like or Thiobacillus/Acidithiobacillus-like sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, results from different mean salinities in the microenvironment of the mats. SRR of up to 10 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) detected in the Dead Sea sediment are surprisingly higher than in the less saline springs. While this shows the presence of an extremely halophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria community in the Dead Sea sediments, it also suggests that extensive salinity fluctuations limit these communities in the springs due to increased energetic demands for osmoregulation.

  5. Dynamics and persistence of Dead Sea microbial populations as shown by high-throughput sequencing of rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2012-04-01

    16S rRNA amplicon libraries from a haloarchaeal bloom in the hypersaline Dead Sea in 1992 were analyzed together with the 2007 residual population and simulated blooms in experimental mesocosms. Significant population shifts were observed during the bloom, and surprisingly a signature from the bloom was retained 15 years later.

  6. Spatial distribution of diatom and cyanobacterial mats in the Dead Sea is determined by response to rapid salinity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Stefan; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacteria and diatom mats are ubiquitous in hypersaline environments but have never been observed in the Dead Sea, one of the most hypersaline lakes on Earth. Here we report the discovery of phototrophic microbial mats at underwater freshwater seeps in the Dead Sea. These mats are either dominated by diatoms or unicellular cyanobacteria and are spatially separated. Using in situ and ex situ O2 microsensor measurements we show that these organisms are photosynthetically active in their natural habitat. The diatoms, which are phylogenetically associated to the Navicula genus, grew in culture at salinities up to 40 % Dead Sea water (DSW) (14 % total dissolved salts, TDS). The unicellular cyanobacteria belong to the extremely halotolerant Euhalothece genus and grew at salinities up to 70 % DSW (24.5 % TDS). As suggested by a variable O2 penetration depth measured in situ, the organisms are exposed to drastic salinity fluctuations ranging from brackish to DSW salinity within minutes to hours. We could demonstrate that both phototrophs are able to withstand such extreme short-term fluctuations. Nevertheless, while the diatoms recover better from rapid fluctuations, the cyanobacteria cope better with long-term exposure to DSW. We conclude that the main reason for the development of these microbial mats is a local dilution of the hypersaline Dead Sea to levels allowing growth. Their spatial distribution in the seeping areas is a result of different recovery rates from short or long-term fluctuation in salinity.

  7. [Book Review] The Dead Sea, the lake and its setting, edited by T. Niemi, Z. Ben-Avraham, J. Gat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri

    1998-01-01

    Review of The Dead Sea, the Lake and its Setting. Tina M. Niemi, Zvi Ben-Avraham, and Joel R. Gat (Editors). Oxford Monographs on Geology and Geophysics No. 36. Oxford University Press, N.Y. 286 pp. ISBN 0-19-508703-8, 1997. $75.

  8. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  9. Natural versus human control on subsurface salt dissolution and development of thousands of sinkholes along the Dead Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Meir; Yechieli, Yoseph; Baer, Gidon; Lapid, Gil; Behar, Nicole; Calvo, Ran; Rosensaft, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    One of the most hazardous results of the human-induced Dead Sea (DS) shrinkage is the formation of more than 6000 sinkholes over the last 25 years. The DS shrinkage caused eastward retreat of underground brine replaced by fresh groundwater, which in turn dissolved a subsurface salt layer, to generate cavities and collapse sinkholes. The areal growth rate of sinkhole clusters is considered the most pertinent proxy for sinkholes development. Analysis of light detection and ranging, digital elevation models, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar allows translation of the areal growth rate to a salt dissolution rate of the salt layer, revealing two peaks in the history of the salt dissolution rate. These peaks cannot be attributed to the decline of the DS level. Instead, we show that they are related to long-term variations of precipitation in the groundwater source region, the Judea Mountains, and the delayed response of the aquifer system between the mountains and the DS rift. This response is documented by groundwater levels and salinity variations. We thus conclude that while the DS level decline is the major trigger for sinkholes formation, the rainfall variations more than 30 km to the west dominate their evolution rate. The influence of increasing rainfall in the Judea Mountains reaches the DS at a typical time lag of 4 years, and the resulting increase in the salt dissolution rate lags by a total time of 5-6 years.

  10. The Dynamics of Halite Precipitation in the Dead Sea: Seasonal and Spatial Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensky, Nadav G.; Sirota, Ido; Arnon, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a deep hypersaline terminal lake that actively precipitates halite as a response to the negative water balance of the lake (evaporation > inflows). From mass balance consideration, a uniform ~3 m thick halite sequence is expected to cover the lake floor following the ~30 m level drop; however such a massive layer does not exist in the shallow water. In this talk we present new insights on the dynamics of halite precipitation and dissolution in a seasonally stratified lake, based on field observations. In situ monthly observations include the depth profile of the following: (i) halite precipitation rate, (ii) temperature, (iii) salinity, (iv) halite saturation, and (v) underwater photography of the sea floor and the water column - documentation of active halite precipitation/dissolution. We found a clear relation between the thermohaline stratification of the water column and halite precipitation/dissolution. The epilimnion experiences seasonal dissolution/precipitation cycle, while the hypolimnion continuously precipitates halite. We discuss the seasonal variations of the atmospheric forcing - the heat and water fluxes, and the response of the lake - thermohaline stratification and the precipitation/dissolution of halite along the water column and lake floor. We also discuss the role of diapycnal flux on the precipitation of halite and the salt fluxes. Geological implications on the lateral extent and thickness variations of evaporitic layers in evaporitic environments are also discussed.

  11. Living and dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages from bathyal environment in the Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Letizia; Frezza, Virgilio; Ingrassia, Michela; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Martorelli, Eleonora

    2016-04-01

    The western Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), located about 30 km away from the Italian Peninsula, is composed of three volcanic islands (Ponza, Palmarola and Zannone). Sedimentological and micropaleontological characterization of the infralittoral and circalittoral zones in the Pontine Archipelago was already been studied, whereas it is lacking for deeper environments. The present study shows the preliminary micropaleontological results carried out on samples collected in the bathyal zone (at 500 mwd) in the Ventotene basin. Sediment samples, high resolution multibeam bathymetry, biological and video data were acquired in order to characterise both the morphological and biological features of study area, during the research cruise "BOLLE 2014" carried out on June 2014 aboard to the R/V Urania. Sediment samples were collected with a multi-corer, that allowed sampling of the upper decimetre of the sediments column. Successively, each core was sliced horizontally every 1 cm from the top to the bottom. For micropaleontological analyses, all samples were stained with Rose Bengal to distinguish living and dead assemblages. For each interval of the core all living specimens and 200 dead benthic foraminifera were classified and counted. Diversity index (α-Fisher, Shannon indices) and Faunal Density (specimens/gr) were calculated to define the structure of the assemblage. A variable number of living benthic foraminifera (Rose Bengal-stained) were found in all core-intervals (7-155 tests), with the Faunal Density ranging from 3 to 82 specimens/gr. A total of 77 species are recognised from living benthic foraminiferal assemblages, with a range of 4-31 species found in each core-interval. The α-Fisher index ranges between 3.88 and 43.45, whereas Shannon index shows a more limited variability (1.28-2.92). Among the living foraminifera, calcareous imperforate tests are very abundant, with percentages ranging between 33.3 and 100%; perforate species are subordinate

  12. Clustering and interpretation of local earthquake tomography models in the southern Dead Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Klaus; Braeuer, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea transform (DST) marks the boundary between the Arabian and the African plates. Ongoing left-lateral relative plate motion and strike-slip deformation started in the Early Miocene (20 MA) and produced a total shift of 107 km until presence. The Dead Sea basin (DSB) located in the central part of the DST is one of the largest pull-apart basins in the world. It was formed from step-over of different fault strands at a major segment boundary of the transform fault system. The basin development was accompanied by deposition of clastics and evaporites and subsequent salt diapirism. Ongoing deformation within the basin and activity of the boundary faults are indicated by increased seismicity. The internal architecture of the DSB and the crustal structure around the DST were subject of several large scientific projects carried out since 2000. Here we report on a local earthquake tomography study from the southern DSB. In 2006-2008, a dense seismic network consisting of 65 stations was operated for 18 months in the southern part of the DSB and surrounding regions. Altogether 530 well-constrained seismic events with 13,970 P- and 12,760 S-wave arrival times were used for a travel time inversion for Vp, Vp/Vs velocity structure and seismicity distribution. The work flow included 1D inversion, 2.5D and 3D tomography, and resolution analysis. We demonstrate a possible strategy how several tomographic models such as Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs can be integrated for a combined lithological interpretation. We analyzed the tomographic models derived by 2.5D inversion using neural network clustering techniques. The method allows us to identify major lithologies by their petrophysical signatures. Remapping the clusters into the subsurface reveals the distribution of basin sediments, prebasin sedimentary rocks, and crystalline basement. The DSB shows an asymmetric structure with thickness variation from 5 km in the west to 13 km in the east. Most importantly, a well-defined body

  13. The evolution of the 87Sr/86Sr in the Dead Sea brine: from the Sedom lagoon to Sahara dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Mordechai

    2016-04-01

    The history of water-bodies in the Dead Sea brines commenced with the intrusion of the Sedom lagoon, possibly in the late Neogene and continued with the development of hypersaline and freshwater lakes (e.g. the modern Dead Sea and Sea of Galilee). 87Sr/86Sr ratios in these water-bodies decreased over the past ~ 5-6 Ma from 0.7087-0.7084 in salts deposited in the Sedom lagoon to ~ 0.7080 in modern Dead Sea brine. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the salts deposited from Sedom lagoon are significantly lower than those of the contemporaneous late Miocene seawater (~0.709). This difference was attributed to modification of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Sedom lagoon solution by influx of Ca-chloride brines. The brines, in turn were formed by dolomitization of marine limestones of the DSR Cretaceous wall rocks (87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7075) by the ingressing evaporated seawaters (Stein et al., 2000). After the disconnection of the Sedom lagoon from the open sea freshwater filled the lakes that occupied the Dead Sea basin. The freshwater influx modified the strontium isotope and chemical composition of the brine and provided bicarbonate and sulfate to the lake that led the precipitation of primary aragonite and gypsum. Freshwater that currently enter the lake are characterize by 87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7081, significantly higher than the Cretaceous carbonates. Settled dust that deposits on the Judea Mountains is composed of calcite and quartz grains and is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ~ 0.7084. It appears that significant amounts of the strontium that entered the lakes with the freshwater originated from dissolution of the dust calcites. Large amounts of dust were transported from the Sahara desert to the Dead Sea watershed during glacial periods when the Sahara was dry and sea-level was low. The source of the detrital calcites however, is not known. They could be derived from dry paleo-lakes in the Sahara that were previously filled by waters that retained the required strontium isotope

  14. The tectonic framework of a complex pull-apart basin: Seismic reflection observations in the Sea of Galilee, Dead Sea transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, S.; Garfunkel, Z.; Ben-Gai, Y.; Reznikov, M.; Rotstein, Y.; Gvirtzman, H.

    2002-01-01

    A multi-channel seismic reflection survey consisting of 20 lines with a total length of 180 km was conducted in the Sea of Galilee. The data provide new insights into the Pliocene-Quaternary evolution of the Kinarot-Beit-Shean pull-apart basin (KBSB) along the Dead Sea transform. Two distinct zones are defined beneath the lake: (1) a graben that underlies most of the lake, bounded by steep north-south longitudinal strike-slip faults and (2) shallow pre-rift units underlying the northwestern wider part of the lake. We suggest that before approximately 4 Ma, the KBSB grew due to northward movement of the Korazim Plateau and by crustal stretching along the rift axis. Since the Pliocene (??? 4 Ma), lateral slip has been transferred from the southern segment of the basin's western marginal fault to normal faults in the Galilee, and to the eastern margin of the Korazim Plateau by the newly formed, Almagor fault, which makes a restraining bend along the transform. N-S lithospheric stretching below the KBSB has diminished and the Korazim Plateau has changed from being a detached block to a compressional saddle. A phase of rapid subsidence, and formation of a half-graben structure in the northern part of the basin approximately 1 Ma ago was coeval with major deformation in areas adjacent to the KBSB, indicating major reorganization of the plate boundary in the region. Currently, most transform motions are probably taken up along a single fault on the eastern side of the KBSB, implying that the main trough under the Sea of Galilee is in a late stage of growth as a pull-apart. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Unravelling environmental conditions during the Holocene in the Dead Sea region using multiple archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambeau, Claire; van Leeuwen, Jacqueline; van der Knaap, Pim; Gobet, Erika

    2016-04-01

    For the most arid parts of the Southern Levant (roughly corresponding to modern Jordan, Israel and Palestine), environmental reconstructions are impeded by the limited number of archives, and the frequent contradictions between individual palaeoenvironmental records. The Southern Levant is characterised by steep climate gradients; local conditions presently range from arid to dry Mediterranean, with limits that may have fluctuated during the Holocene. This further complicates the determination of site-specific past environmental conditions. Understanding past climate and environmental evolution through time, at a local level, is however crucial to compare these with societal evolution during the Holocene, which features major cultural developments such as cereal cultivation, animal domestication, water management, as well as times of preferential settlement growth or site abandonment. This contribution proposes to examine the different archives available for the Dead Sea region, paying special attention to the most recent pollen data obtained from the area. It will particularly critically compare local to regional-scale information, and try to decipher the main evolutions of environmental conditions during the Holocene in arid and semi-arid Southern Levant.

  16. Salt diapirs in the Dead Sea basin and their relationship to Quaternary extensional tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, A.; ten Brink, U.S.

    2001-01-01

    Regional extension of a brittle overburden and underlying salt causes differential loading that is thought to initiate the rise of reactive diapirs below and through regions of thin overburden. We present a modern example of a large salt diapir in the Dead Sea pull-apart basin, the Lisan diapir, which we believe was formed during the Quaternary due to basin transtension and subsidence. Using newly released seismic data that are correlated to several deep wells, we determine the size of the diapir to be 13 x 10 km. its maximum depth 7.2 km. and its roof 125 m below the surface. From seismic stratigraphy, we infer that the diapir started rising during the early to middle Pleistocene as this section of the basin underwater rapid subsidence and significant extension of the overburden. During the middle to late Pleistocene, the diapir pierced through the extensionally thinned overburden, as indicated by rim synclines, which attest to rapid salt withdrawal from the surrounding regions. Slight positive topography above the diapir and shallow folded horizons indicate that it is still rising intermittently. The smaller Sedom diapir, exposed along the western bounding fault of the basin is presently rising and forms a 200 m-high ridge. Its initiation is explained by localized E-W extension due monoclinal draping over the edge of a rapidly subsiding basin during the early to middle Pleistocene, and its continued rise by lateral squeezing due to continued rotation of the Amazyahu diagonal fault. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-11-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ(13) CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed ((34) ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment.

  18. Effect of formulation variables on the physical properties and stability of Dead Sea mud masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Sawsan; Hamed, Saja; Alkhatib, Hatim S

    2015-01-01

    The physical stability of Dead Sea mud mask formulations under different conditions and their rheological properties were evaluated as a function of the type and level of thickeners, level of the humectant, incorporation of ethanol, and mode of mud treatment. Formulations were evaluated in terms of visual appearance, pH, moisture content, spreadability, extrudability, separation, rate of drying at 32 degrees C, and rheological properties. Prepared mud formulations and over-the-shelf products showed viscoplastic shear thinning behavior; satisfactory rheological behavior was observed with formulations containing a total concentration of thickeners less than 10% (w/w). Casson and Herschel-Bulkley models were found the most suitable to describe the rheological data of the prepared formulations. Thickener incorporation decreased phase separation and improved formulation stability. Bentonite incorporation in the mud prevented color changes during stability studies while glycerin improved spreadability. Addition of 5% (w/w) ethanol improved mud extrudability, slightly increased percent separation, accelerated drying at 32 degrees C, and decreased viscosity and yield stress values. Different mud treatment techniques did not cause a clear behavioral change in the final mud preparation. B10G and K5B5G were labeled as "best formulas" based on having satisfactory physical and aesthetic criteria investigated in this study, while other formulations failed in one or more of the tests we have performed.

  19. Quantifying degradation of collagen in ancient manuscripts: the case of the Dead Sea Temple Scroll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, R; Bertinetti, L; Rabin, I; Fratzl, P; Masic, A

    2013-10-07

    Since their discovery in the late 1940s, the Dead Sea Scrolls, some 900 ancient Jewish texts, have never stopped attracting the attention of scholars and the broad public alike, because they were created towards the end of the Second Temple period and the "time of Christ". Most of the work on them has been dedicated to the information contained in the scrolls' text, leaving physical aspects of the writing materials unexamined. They are, however, crucial for both historical insight and preservation of the scrolls. Although scientific analysis requires handling, it is essential to establish the state of degradation of these valued documents. Polarized Raman Spectroscopy (PRS) is a powerful tool for obtaining information on both the composition and the level of disorder of molecular units. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and non-destructive methodology that allows a quantification of the disorder (that can be related to the degradation) of protein molecular units in collagen fibers. Not restricted to collagen, this method can be applied also to other protein-based fibrous materials such as ancient silk, wool or hair. We used PRS to quantify the degradation of the collagen fibers in a number of fragments of the Temple Scroll (11Q19a). We found that collagen fibers degrade heterogeneously, with the ones on the surface more degraded than those in the core.

  20. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  1. Late Quaternary environmental and human events at En Gedi, reflected by the geology and archaeology of the Moringa Cave (Dead Sea area, Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Sorin; Porat, Roi; Davidovich, Uri; Eshel, Hanan; Lauritzen, Stein-Erik; Frumkin, Amos

    2007-09-01

    The Moringa Cave within Pleistocene sediments in the En Gedi area of the Dead Sea Fault Escarpment contains a sequence of various Pleistocene lacustrine deposits associated with higher-than-today lake levels at the Dead Sea basin. In addition it contains Chalcolithic remains and 5th century BC burials attributed to the Persian period, cemented and covered by Late Holocene travertine flowstone. These deposits represent a chain of Late Pleistocene and Holocene interconnected environmental and human events, echoing broader scale regional and global climate events. A major shift between depositional environments is associated with the rapid fall of Lake Lisan level during the latest Pleistocene. This exposed the sediments, providing for cave formation processes sometime between the latest Pleistocene (ca. 15 ka) and the Middle Holocene (ca. 4500 BC), eventually leading to human use of the cave. The Chalcolithic use of the cave can be related to a relatively moist desert environment, probably related to a shift in the location of the northern boundary of the Saharo-Arabian desert belt. The travertine layer was U-Th dated 2.46 ± 0.10 to 2.10 ± 0.04 ka, in agreement with the archaeological finds from the Persian period. Together with the inner consistency of the dating results, this strongly supports the reliability of the radiometric ages. The 2.46-2.10 ka travertine deposition within the presently dry cave suggests a higher recharge of the Judean Desert aquifer, correlative to a rising Dead Sea towards the end of the 1st millennium BC. This suggests a relatively moist local and regional climate facilitating human habitation of the desert.

  2. Crustal metamorphic fluid flux beneath the Dead Sea Basin: Constraints from 2D and 3D magnetotelluric modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meqbel, Naser; Weckmann, Ute; Muñoz, Gerard; Ritter, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    We report on a study to explore the deep electrical conductivity structure of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) using magnetotelluric (MT) data collected along a transect across the DSB where the left lateral strike slip Dead Sea transform fault (DST) splits into two fault strands forming one of the largest pull-apart basins of the world. A very pronounced feature of our 2D inversion model is a deep, sub-vertical conductive zone beneath the DSB. The conductor extends through the entire crust and is sandwiched between highly resistive structures associated with Precambrian rocks of the basin flanks. The high electrical conductivity could be attributed to fluids released by dehydration of the uppermost mantle beneath the DSB, possibly in combination with fluids released by mid to low grade metamorphism in the lower crust and generation of hydrous minerals in the middle crust through retrograde metamorphism. Similar high conductivity zones associated with fluids have been reported from other large fault systems. The presence of fluids and hydrous minerals in the middle and lower crust could explain the required low friction coefficient of the DST along the eastern boundary of the Dead Sea basin and the high subsidence rate of basin sediments. 3D inversion models confirm the existence of a sub-vertical high conductivity structure underneath the DSB but its expression is far less pronounced. Instead, the 3D inversion model suggests a deepening of the conductive DSB sediments off-profile towards the south, reaching a maximum depth of approximately 12 km, which is consistent with other geophysical observations. At shallower levels, the 3D inversion model reveals salt diapirism as an upwelling of highly resistive structures, localized underneath the Al-Lisan Peninsula. The 3D model furthermore contains an E-W elongated conductive structure to the north-east of the Dead Sea basin. More MT data with better spatial coverage are required, however, to fully constrain the robustness of

  3. Anthropogenic-enhanced erosion following the Neolithic Revolution in the Southern Levant: Records from the Dead Sea deep drilling core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Waldmann, Nicolas; Nadel, Dani; Marco, Shmuel

    2017-04-01

    In addition to tectonics and climatic changes, humans have exerted a significant impact on surface erosion over timescales ranging from years to centuries. However, such kind of impact over millennial timescales remains unsubstantiated. The Dead Sea drainage basin offers a rare combination of well-documented substantial climate change, intense tectonics and abundant archaeological evidence for past human activity in the Southern Levant. It serves as a natural laboratory for understanding how sedimentation rates in a deep basin are related to climate change, tectonics, and anthropogenic impacts on the landscape. Here we show how basin-wide erosion rates are recorded by thicknesses of rhythmic detritus laminae and clastic sediment accumulation rates in a long core retrieved by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project in the Dead Sea depocenter. During the last 11.5 kyr the average detrital accumulation rate is 3-4 times that during the last two glacial cycles (MIS 7c-2), and the average thickness of detritus laminae in the last 11.6 kyr is 4.5 times that between 21.7 and 11.6 ka, implying an increased erosion rate on the surrounding slopes during the Holocene. We estimate that this intensified erosion is incompatible with tectonic and climatic regimes during the corresponding time interval and further propose a close association with the Neolithic Revolution in the Levant (beginning at 11.5 ka). We thus suggest that human impact on the landscape was the primary driver causing the intensified erosion and that the Dead Sea sedimentary record serves as a reliable recorder of this impact since the Neolithic Revolution.

  4. Impact of paleoclimate on the distribution of microbial communities in the subsurface sediment of the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C; Ionescu, D; Ariztegui, D

    2015-11-01

    A long sedimentary core has been recently retrieved from the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) within the framework of the ICDP-sponsored Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project. Contrasting climatic intervals were evident by distinctive lithological facies such as laminated aragonitic muds and evaporites. A geomicrobiological investigation was conducted in representative sediments of this core. To identify the microbial assemblages present in the sediments and their evolution with changing depositional environments through time, the diversity of the 16S rRNA gene was analyzed in gypsum, aragonitic laminae, and halite samples. The subsurface microbial community was largely dominated by the Euryarchaeota phylum (Archaea). Within the latter, Halobacteriaceae members were ubiquitous, probably favored by their 'high salt-in' osmotic adaptation which also makes them one of the rare inhabitants of the modern Dead Sea. Bacterial community members were scarce, emphasizing that the 'low salt-in' strategy is less suitable in this environment. Substantial differences in assemblages are observed between aragonitic sediments and gypsum-halite ones, independently of the depth and salinity. The aragonite sample, deposited during humid periods when the lake was stratified, consists mostly of the archaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 Candidate Divisions. This consortium probably relies on compatible solutes supplied from the lake by halotolerant species present in these more favorable periods. In contrast, members of the Halobacteriaceae were the sole habitants of the gypsum-halite sediments which result from a holomictic lake. Although the biomass is low, these variations in the observed subsurface microbial populations appear to be controlled by biological conditions in the water column at the time of sedimentation, and subsequently by the presence or absence of stratification and dilution in the lake. As the latter are controlled by climatic changes, our data suggest a relationship between local

  5. Anatomy of the dead sea transform from lithospheric to microscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M.; Abu-Ayyash, K.; Abueladas, A.; Agnon, A.; Alasonati-Tasarova, Z.; Al-Zubi, H.; Babeyko, A.; Bartov, Y.; Bauer, K.; Becken, M.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Bock, G.; Bohnhoff, M.; Bribach, J.; Dulski, P.; Ebbing, J.; El-Kelani, R.; Forster, A.; Forster, H.-J.; Frieslander, U.; Garfunkel, Z.; Goetze, H.J.; Haak, V.; Haberland, C.; Hassouneh, M.; Helwig, S.; Hofstetter, A.; Hoffmann-Rotrie, A.; Jackel, K.H.; Janssen, C.; Jaser, D.; Kesten, D.; Khatib, M.; Kind, R.; Koch, O.; Koulakov, I.; Laske, Gabi; Maercklin, N.; Masarweh, R.; Masri, A.; Matar, A.; Mechie, J.; Meqbel, N.; Plessen, B.; Moller, P.; Mohsen, A.; Oberhansli, R.; Oreshin, S.; Petrunin, A.; Qabbani, I.; Rabba, I.; Ritter, O.; Romer, R.L.; Rumpker, G.; Rybakov, M.; Ryberg, T.; Saul, J.; Scherbaum, F.; Schmidt, S.; Schulze, A.; Sobolev, S.V.; Stiller, M.; Stromeyer, D.; Tarawneh, K.; Trela, C.; Weckmann, U.; Wetzel, U.; Wylegalla, K.

    2009-01-01

    Fault zones are the locations where motion of tectonic plates, often associated with earthquakes, is accommodated. Despite a rapid increase in the understanding of faults in the last decades, our knowledge of their geometry, petrophysical properties, and controlling processes remains incomplete. The central questions addressed here in our study of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East are as follows: (1) What are the structure and kinematics of a large fault zone? (2) What controls its structure and kinematics? (3) How does the DST compare to other plate boundary fault zones? The DST has accommodated a total of 105 km of leftlateral transform motion between the African and Arabian plates since early Miocene (???20 Ma). The DST segment between the Dead Sea and the Red Sea, called the Arava/ Araba Fault (AF), is studied here using a multidisciplinary and multiscale approach from the ??m to the plate tectonic scale. We observe that under the DST a narrow, subvertical zone cuts through crust and lithosphere. First, from west to east the crustal thickness increases smoothly from 26 to 39 km, and a subhorizontal lower crustal reflector is detected east of the AF. Second, several faults exist in the upper crust in a 40 km wide zone centered on the AF, but none have kilometer-size zones of decreased seismic velocities or zones of high electrical conductivities in the upper crust expected for large damage zones. Third, the AF is the main branch of the DST system, even though it has accommodated only a part (up to 60 km) of the overall 105 km of sinistral plate motion. Fourth, the AF acts as a barrier to fluids to a depth of 4 km, and the lithology changes abruptly across it. Fifth, in the top few hundred meters of the AF a locally transpressional regime is observed in a 100-300 m wide zone of deformed and displaced material, bordered by subparallel faults forming a positive flower structure. Other segments of the AF have a transtensional character with small pull

  6. Lower crustal flow and the role of shear in basin subsidence: An example from the Dead Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoubi, A.; ten Brink, U.

    2002-01-01

    We interpret large-scale subsidence (5-6 km depth) with little attendant brittle deformation in the southern Dead Sea basin, a large pull-apart basin along the Dead Sea transform plate boundary, to indicate lower crustal thinning due to lower crustal flow. Along-axis flow within the lower crust could be induced by the reduction of overburden pressure in the central Dead Sea basin, where brittle extensional deformation is observed. Using a channel flow approximation, we estimate that lower crustal flow would occur within the time frame of basin subsidence if the viscosity is ??? 7 ?? 1019 - 1 ?? 1021 Pa s, a value compatible with the normal heat flow in the region. Lower crustal viscosity due to the strain rate associated with basin extension is estimated to be similar to or smaller than the viscosity required for a channel flow. However, the viscosity under the basin may be reduced to 5 ?? 1017 - 5 ?? 1019 Pa s by the enhanced strain rate due to lateral shear along the transform plate boundary. Thus, lower crustal flow facilitated by shear may be a viable mechanism to enlarge basins and modify other topographic features even in the absence of underlying thermal anomalies. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Survival dynamics of cystic fibrosis-related Gram-negative bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia) in Dead Sea and Atlantic Ocean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteinberg, Michal; Kis-Papo, Tamar; Millar, Beverley C; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Moore, John E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=6) and Burkholderia cenocepacia (n=4) were inoculated in marine brines from the Dead Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and their survival was monitored over a 1 month duration. In Dead Sea samples, all P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia isolates were non-detectable by culture following 24 h incubation, including the non-selective enrichment samples. In the Atlantic Ocean brine, over a 1 month period, mean P. aeruginosa counts decreased by only 0.25 log10 units and mean B. cenocepacia counts decreased by approximately 4 log10 units (10,000 cfu/ml). This study demonstrated that Dead Sea brine exerted a lethal effect within 24 h on planktonic P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia. Thus, the Dead Sea effectively purges these organisms from its environment on a daily basis.

  8. Metals in edible fish from Vistula River and Dead Vistula River channel, Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowska, Barbara; Falandysz, Jerzy; Jarzyńska, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    Metals including Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were determined in muscle tissue of 12 fish species by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and cold vapour-atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS). Fish were collected from Vistula River at lower course and Dead Vistula River channel in south of Baltic Sea in Poland. The fish species examined include Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus), Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius), Bull-rout (Myoxocephalus scorpius), Tench (Tinca tinca), Bream (Abramis brama), Burbot (Lota lot), Perch (Perca perca), Roach (Rutilus rutilus), Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), Pikeperch (Stizostediun lucioperca), Brown salmon (Salmo trutta m. Trutta) and Eel (Anguilla anguilla). The median values of metal concentrations in fresh muscle tissue of 11 fish species varied as follows: Al < 0.5-60; Ba < 0.05-0.31; Ca 120-1800; Cd < 0.05-0.096; Co < 0.10; Cr < 0.10-0.50; Cu < 0.15-0.77; Fe 1.5-21; Hg 0.0058-0.65; K 1800-4200; Mg 130-560; Mn 0.12-0.59; Na 350-840; Ni < 0.2-0.31; Pb < 0.75; Sr 0.079-2.9; Zn 3.3-23 μg/g fresh weight. The Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) values calculated in this study for Cd and Hg from muscles of fish species collected from Vistula River were low in the range of 0.4 for Hg and 0.8 for Cd.

  9. Saccharopolyspora griseoalba sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingying; Wei, Xiaomin; Chen, Xiu; Jiang, Yi; Xue, Quanhong; Lai, Hangxian; Jiang, Chenglin

    2016-12-01

    A novel halotolerant actinomycete, designated strain AFM 10238(T), was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Dead Sea of Israel. The isolate grew at 15-45 °C, pH 6-12 and with 0-15 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain AFM 10238(T) contains meso-diaminopimelic acid as cell wall diamino acid, and galactose and arabinose as the whole cell sugars. The major polar lipids are phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol. Major fatty acids are iso-C16:0, iso-C17:0, iso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0 and C17:1 ω8c. MK-9(H4) is the predominant menaquinone and the DNA G + C content is 72.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain AFM10238(T) belongs to the genus Saccharopolyspora. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain AFM 10238(T) and its close neighbours, Saccharopolyspora halophila YIM 90500(T) , Saccharopolyspora spinosa DSM 44228(T), Saccharopolyspora dendranthemae KLBMP 1305(T) and Saccharopolyspora cebuensis DSM 45019(T) were 98.2, 97.2, 97.1 and 97.0 %, respectively. Sequence similarities to other type strains of this genus were below 97 %. DNA-DNA relatedness data, together with phenotypic and chemotaxonomic differences, clearly distinguished the isolate from its close neighbours. On the basis of the data from this polyphasic analysis, a novel species Saccharopolyspora griseoalba sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AFM 10238(T) (= DSM 46,663 = CGMCC 4.7124).

  10. Geochemical characterisation of gases along the dead sea rift: Evidences of mantle-co2 degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguaggiato, C.; Censi, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Zuddas, P.

    2016-06-01

    The Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system, where a lateral displacement between the African and Arabian plates occurs, is characterised by anomalous heat flux in the Israeli area close to the border with Syria and Jordan. The concentration of He and CO2, and isotopic composition of He and total dissolved inorganic carbon were studied in cold and thermal waters collected along the DST, in order to investigate the source of volatiles and their relationship with the tectonic framework of the DST. The waters with higher temperature (up to 57.2 °C) are characterised by higher amounts of CO2 and helium (up to 55.72 and 1.91 ∗ 10- 2 cc l- 1, respectively). Helium isotopic data (R/Ra from 0.11 to 2.14) and 4He/20Ne ratios (0.41-106.86) show the presence of deep-deriving fluids consisting of a variable mixture of mantle and crust end-members, with the former reaching up to 35%. Carbon isotope signature of total dissolved carbon from hot waters falls within the range of magmatic values, suggesting the delivery of deep-seated CO2. The geographical distribution of helium isotopic data and isotopic carbon (CO2) values coupled with (CO2/3He ratios) indicate a larger contribution of mantle-derived fluids affecting the northern part of the investigated area, where the waters reach the highest temperature. These evidences suggest the occurrence of a favourable tectonic framework, including a Moho discontinuity up-rise and/or the presence of a deep fault system coupled with the recent magmatic activity recognised in the northern part of Israel.

  11. Amycolatopsis flava sp. nov., a halophilic actinomycete isolated from Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaomin; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Xiu; Jiang, Yi; Lai, Hangxian

    2015-10-01

    A novel halophilic, filamentous actinomycete, designated strain AFM 10111(T), was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Dead Sea of Israel and its taxonomic position was established by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The isolate grew at 20-35 °C, pH 5-12 and with 1-30 % NaCl. The substrate mycelium is white or yellow, well developed, branched and fragments into squarish, rod-like elements. The isolate contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as cell-wall diamino acid, and arabinose and galactose as whole-cell sugars. The major menaquinone was MK-9(H4). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and one unidentified phospholipid. Major fatty acids were iso-C16:0, iso-C16:1 H, C17:1 ω6c. The DNA G + C content was 67.7 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain AFM 10111(T) belongs to the genus Amycolatopsis, and formed a distinct clade with Amycolatopsis marina CGMCC 4.3568(T) and Amycolatopsis palatopharyngis CGMCC 4.1729(T), with the sequence similarity 98.4 and 98.6 %. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the strain AFM 10111(T) and A. marina CGMCC 4.3568(T) and A. palatopharyngis CGMCC 4.1729(T) were 46.9 ± 3.08 and 49.4 ± 1.25 %. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data indicate that strain AFM 10111(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amycolatopsis, for which the name Amycolatopsis flava sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AFM 10111(T) (= DSM 46658(T) = CGMCC 4.7123(T)).

  12. Faulted Ancient Aqueduct and Successive Displacements along the Dead Sea Fault in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbeinat, R.; Meghraoui, M.; Gomez, F.; van der Woerd, J.; Layyous, I.; Al-Ghazzi, R.; Barazangi, M.

    2003-04-01

    We conducted a combined study in archeoseismology with detailed descriptions and mapping with a total station of a faulted ancient aqueduct, and in paleoseismology with a 15-m-long and 3.5-m-deep trench near the aqueduct and across the fault. Micro-topographic surveys and trenching show that the fault offsets left-laterally an ancient aqueduct which is repeatedly fractured and younger than BC 410. Projecting the aqueduct walls into the north-south striking DSF displays a total left-lateral displacement of 13.6 ±0.2 m between the two blocks of the faulted aqueduct. Moreover, the northern warped wall shows a deflection (with cracks and brecciated travertines below) that amount 4.3 m and can be considered as a minimum for the first left-lateral displacement. The aqueduct also displays at least two kinds of building stones suggesting rebuilding episodes. Using radiocarbon dating of faulted young alluvial deposits we document the occurrence of three large earthquakes in the past 2200 years (between BC 150 - AD 750, between AD 700 - 1030 and between AD 990 - 1210). The most recent faulting event may correspond to the well-documented large earthquake of AD 1170 for which we estimate Mw = 7.3 - 7.5. Our study provides the timing of late Holocene earthquakes and constrains the 6.9 ± 1.2 mm/yr. slip rate of the Dead Sea transform fault in northwestern Syria (the Missyaf fault segment). Reports of large earthquakes and their associated damage in the Middle East are frequently reported during the Greek, Hebrew, Assyrian, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic times. The ˜830 years of seismic quiescence along the Missyaf fault segment implies that a large earthquake is overdue and may result in a major catastrophe to the population centres of Syria and Lebanon.

  13. Rheological characterization of hair shampoo in the presence of dead sea salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, B; Mohameed, H A; Sa'id, M; Snobar, T

    2004-02-01

    In Jordan, a growing industry has been established to produce different types of Dead Sea (DS) cosmetics that have DS salt (contains mainly NaCl, KCl, and MgCl(2)) in their formulas. In this work, the effect of DS salt on the rheology of hair shampoo containing the sodium lauryl ether sulfate as a main active matter was studied. The effects of DS salt and active matter concentration, and the temperature and time of salt mixing, on the rheological properties of hair shampoo were investigated. The salt-free shampoo showed a Newtonian behavior at 'low active matter' (LAM) and shear thinning at 'high active matter' (HAM). The presence of DS salt changed the rheological behavior of LAM shampoo from Newtonian (for the salt-free shampoo) to shear thinning. On the other hand, the behavior of HAM shampoo switched from shear thinning to Newtonian behavior in the presence of high concentration of DS salt. The addition of DS salt increased the apparent viscosity of shampoo to reach a maximum value that corresponded to a salt concentration of 1.5 wt.%. Further addition of DS salt led to a decrease in the shampoo viscosity to reach a value less than that of the salt-free sample at high salt concentration. Changing the mixing temperature (25-45 degrees C) and mixing time (15-120 min) of DS salt with shampoo has no significant influence on the rheological behavior. However, the mixing process increased the apparent viscosity of salt-free shampoo. The power law model fitted well the flow curves of hair shampoo with and without DS salt.

  14. Distinctive diamagnetic fabrics in dolostones evolved at fault cores, the Dead Sea Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D.; Weinberger, R.; Eyal, Y.; Feinstein, S.; Harlavan, Y.; Levi, T.

    2015-08-01

    We resolve the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) axes along fault planes, cores and damage zones in rocks that crop out next to the Dead Sea Transform (DST) plate boundary. We measured 261 samples of mainly diamagnetic dolostones that were collected from 15 stations. To test the possible effect of the iron content on the AMS we analyzed the Fe concentrations of the samples in different rock phases. Dolostones with mean magnetic susceptibility value lower than -4 × 10-6 SI and iron content less than ∼1000 ppm are suitable for diamagnetic AMS-based strain analysis. The dolostones along fault planes display AMS fabrics that significantly deviate from the primary "sedimentary fabric". The characteristics of these fabrics include well-grouped, sub-horizontal, minimum principal AMS axes (k3) and sub-vertical magnetic foliations commonly defined by maximum and intermediate principal AMS axes (k1 and k2 axes, respectively). These fabrics are distinctive along fault planes located tens of kilometers apart, with strikes ranging between NNW-SSE and NNE-SSW and different senses of motion. The obtained magnetic foliations (k1-k2) are sub-parallel (within ∼20°) to the fault planes. Based on rock magnetic and geochemical analyses, we interpret the AMS fabrics as the product of both shape and crystallographic anisotropy of the dolostones. Preferred shape alignment evolves due to mechanical rotation of subordinate particles and rock fragments at the fault core. Preferred crystallographic orientation results from elevated frictional heating (>300 °C) during faulting, which enhances c-axes alignment in the cement-supported dolomite breccia due to crystal-plastic processes. The penetrative deformation within fault zones resulted from the local, fault-related strain field and does not reflect the regional strain field. The analyzed AMS fabrics together with fault-plane kinematics provide valuable information on faulting characteristics in the uppermost crust.

  15. Constraining the shear zone along the Dead Sea transform fault in the crust and upper mantle using seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Ayoub; Rümpker, Georg; Asch, Günter; Desire Group

    2010-05-01

    We study seismic anisotropy along the Dead Sea Transform fault (DST) by shear-wave splitting analysis of SKS and SKKS waveforms recorded at a dense network of broad-band and short-period stations of the DESIRE experiment. The DST accommodates the relative motion between Africa and Arabia through a sinistral strike-slip motion. The Dead Sea is a pull-apart basin formed along the DST as a result of stepwise fault-normal displacement. The DESIRE array of stations cover this portion of the DST. We measured the splitting parameters (delay times between the fast and slow components of the shear wave and fast polarization direction) in different period bands. We observed consistent fast polarization directions varying from N14W to N19E at different stations and delay times ranging between 1.0 and 2.5 s. Our preliminary examination reveals that the splitting parameters do not exhibit significant frequency dependence. However, we observe variations in the splitting parameters (mostly delay times) along an E-W profile crossing the DST, with smaller delay times in the middle of the profile, within the surface exposure of the DST shear zone, and with two lobes of relatively large delay times on both sides of the central region. The fast polarization directions along this profile change from a dominant NNW trend in the western side of the DST to a general N-S orientation in the central part and a dominant NNE trend to the east. Waveform modeling is required to infer the lateral and depth variations of the strength and orientation of anisotropy in the crust and upper mantle from these observations. We will also complement our results with the data from the DESERT experiment to provide an overall pattern of seismic anisotropy and structural fabric beneath the DST and surrounding regions from the north of the Dead Sea down to the Red sea.

  16. Effect of low altitude at the Dead Sea on exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise in cystic fibrosis patients with moderate to severe lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bareket; Nini, Asaph; Zigel, Levana; Yahav, Yaacov; Aviram, Micha; Rivlin, Joseph; Bentur, Lea; Avital, Avraham; Dotan, Raffy; Blau, Hannah

    2006-03-01

    Oxygen supplementation may improve exercise tolerance and the physiological response to exercise in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Elevated barometric pressure at low altitude is a simple means of increasing the quantity of inspired oxygen. Our objectives were to examine the effect of natural oxygen enrichment (at the Dead Sea, 396 m below sea level) on exercise capacity, and the physiological responses to maximal and submaximal exercise in CF patients. Patients were tested twice: at sea level (barometric pressure, 754 +/- 6 mmHg, mean +/- SD), and at the Dead Sea (barometric pressure, 791 +/- 3 mmHg), in a randomized crossover design. We studied 14 CF patients (6 females, 8 males), aged 15-45 years, with moderate to severe lung disease (mean forced expired volume in 1 sec = 50.0 +/- 11.2% predicted). Tests at each site included resting spirometry, anthropometry, a graded submaximal exercise test, a maximal exercise test on a treadmill, and a 6-min walk test. Tests were performed in identical order at both sites. Tests at the Dead Sea were performed 72 hr after arrival. No differences between sites were observed in lung function at rest. Peak oxygen consumption was significantly improved at the Dead Sea compared with sea level (1.68 +/- 0.73 vs. 1.57 +/- 0.74 l/min, respectively, P = 0.05), along with an improvement in the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (41.2 +/- 6.3 vs. 46.1 +/- 7.1, respectively, P Dead Sea compared with sea level at all exercise intensities (P Dead Sea area may have physiological benefits for CF patients with moderate to severe lung disease.

  17. The ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project: An overview and the potential for high-resolution records of floods and droughts in the Levant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, I.; Brauer, A.; Schwab, M. J.; Frank, U.; Dulski, P.; Waldmann, N.; Enzel, Y.; Ariztegui, D.; Hadzhiivanova, E.; Dsddp Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution sedimentary records are essential for a detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of the Levant, which is tightly related to the origin, dispersal and evolution of modern human civilisations. Holocene and late Pleistocene sediments of the Dead Sea are unique archives of the climatic, environmental and tectonic history of the Levant and hence a focus of research. Therefore, during winter of 2010-11 an ICDP-drilling project in the Dead Sea (DSDDP) recovered approximately 720 metres of sediment cores from two deep and several short boreholes with the longest core located in the deepest part of the northern basin reaching 456 m below the lake-floor (at ~710 m below mean lake level). Based on initial geophysical and geochemical analyses of this core, we estimate the record to comprise ca the last 200 ka including the Zeelim (Holocene), Lisan (last Glacial) (Stein, 2001) and Samra (last Interglacial; Waldmann et al., 2009) formations and the later part of the penultimate Glacial (Amora Fm.; Torfstein et al., 2009). Magnetic susceptibility values strongly fluctuate during Interglacial periods, but remain constantly lower in Glacial intervals. Deposition of sediments in the Dead Sea basin is strongly related to precipitation (Enzel et al., 2008) favouring sedimentation of alternated detrital clay and authigenic aragonite during wetter intervals and evaporites (e.g., halite and gypsum) in times of increased aridity and lower lake stands. Detailed initial facies analyses focused on two intervals in the deep core: 1) the upper Lisan Formation from ca 17 to 15 ka BP, and 2) the upper Zeelim Formation from ca 4 to 2 ka BP. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, µXRF element scanning and thin section microscopy allow high-resolution analyses at sub-annual timescales. These combined micro-facies analyses demonstrate the great potential for depicting small-scale variability of climate and even single droughts or flood events. Enzel et al., 2008. Global and

  18. Salt facies and budgets as environmental indicators in the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Yael; Goldstein, Steven L.; Stein, Mordechai; Garcia-Veigas, Javier; Levy, Elan J.; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-04-01

    Deep drilling in the Dead Sea reveals thick sections of halite that precipitated during the last three interglacials, when lake levels were low. Pore water and halite fluid inclusions show an increase in Mg concentration and a decrease in Na/Cl ratio during precipitation of halite, both during the last interglacial and the beginning of the Holocene. A mass balance based on the thickness of the halite layers and the changes in the chemical composition of the brine has been developed in order to calculate the change in the lake levels. Results indicate a drastic decrease in fresh water input, with the average discharge at 30% and 50% of the modern over thousands of years during the last interglacial and early Holocene, respectively. However, packages of detritus alternating with the halite indicate wetter episodes over intervals of centuries to a few millennia with conditions similar to the present-day, as well as more severe conditions with ~10% of the modern discharge over periods of decades to a few centuries. The different facies of halite in the core are well preserved. The lake level calculation based on the salt budget shows that although the lake level decreased drastically, the lake was always >100 m depth, and the absence of significant halite dissolution supports this conclusion. Thus, the halite reflects deep-water facies. There are two main halite crystal types. Small cumulate crystals that are formed on the lake surface, which alternate with bottom-growth crystals with relatively scarce fluid inclusion bands. The frequency of the crystal alternation varies between seasonal and multi-year changes and reflects the hydrological and limnological regime. The small cumulate crystals require that the lake surface was supersaturated with respect to halite, indicating high evaporation and possibly a thermally stratified water column. The bottom-growth crystals are formed only when it is not disturbed by the "rain" of cumulate crystals, with a lower degree of

  19. Inside-Out Planet Formation. III. Planet-disk interaction at the dead zone inner boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Xiao; Tan, Jonathan C; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 4000 exoplanet candidates. Many are in systems with tightly packed inner planets. Inside-Out Planet Formation (IOPF) has been proposed to explain these systems. It involves sequential in situ planet formation at the local pressure maximum of a retreating dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Pebbles accumulate at this pressure trap, which builds up a ring, and then a planet. The planet is expected to grow until it opens a gap, which helps to both truncate pebble accretion and induce DZIB retreat that sets the location of formation of the next planet. This simple scenario may be modified if the planet migrates significantly from its formation location. Thus planet-disk interactions play a crucial role in the IOPF scenario. We present numerical simulations that first assess migration of planets of various masses that are forming at the DZIB of an active accretion disk, where the effective viscosity rapidly increases in the radially inward direction. We find that the disk's...

  20. Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, Ehrhardt; Nissen, Hans-Peter; Bremgartner, Markus; Urquhart, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Magnesium salts, the prevalent minerals in Dead Sea water, are known to exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory diseases. We examined the efficacy of bathing atopic subjects in a salt rich in magnesium chloride from deep layers of the Dead Sea (Mavena(R) Dermaline Mg(46) Dead Sea salt, Mavena AG, Belp, Switzerland). Volunteers with atopic dry skin submerged one forearm for 15 min in a bath solution containing 5% Dead Sea salt. The second arm was submerged in tap water as control. Before the study and at weeks 1-6, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin roughness, and skin redness were determined. We found one subgroup with a normal and one subgroup with an elevated TEWL before the study. Bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution significantly improved skin barrier function compared with the tap water-treated control forearm in the subgroup with elevated basal TEWL. Skin hydration was enhanced on the forearm treated with the Dead Sea salt in each group, which means the treatment moisturized the skin. Skin roughness and redness of the skin as a marker for inflammation were significantly reduced after bathing in the salt solution. This demonstrates that bathing in the salt solution was well tolerated, improved skin barrier function, enhanced stratum corneum hydration, and reduced skin roughness and inflammation. We suggest that the favorable effects of bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution are most likely related to the high magnesium content. Magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation, and enhance permeability barrier repair.

  1. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullkötter, Jürgen; Spiro, Baruch; Nissenbaum, Arie

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. Oils from six different wells, and asphalts from wells, outcrops, and a floating block from the Dead Sea all have very similar sterane and triterpane patterns. They all lack rearranged steranes (diasteranes) indicating a carbonate source matrix and compare reasonably well with a sample of Upper Cretaceous bituminous chalk from Nebi Musa. The main difference between the oils and the asphalts is a significantly higher triaromatic to mono- plus triaromatic steroid hydrocarbon ratio in the former. This is explained as a result of rapid subsidence and heating of their source rock close to the deep parts of the Dead Sea graben. The oils thus were generated in the more deeply buried source rock blocks under the graben fill, whereas the asphalts either originate from an immature source rock section closer to the graben rims or represent an earlier phase of generation and expulsion. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerisation of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. Care should be taken when using only sterane isomerisation to assess the maturity of hydrocarbons from carbonate rocks and of carbonate-derived oils.

  2. Characterization of seepage surfaces from Space-borne radar interferometry stacking techniques, Southern Dead Sea area, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessari, Giulia; Closson, Damien; Abou Karaki, Najib; Atzori, Simone; Fiaschi, Simone; Floris, Mario; Pasquali, Paolo; Riccardi, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a terminal lake located in a pull-apart basin of the Dead Sea Transform fault zone. It is the lowest emerged place on Earth at about -428 m bsl. Since the 1960s, the over-pumping of its tributaries leads to a decrease in the water level. Eventually, it became more pronounced decades after decades. In 2014, it is more than 1m/year. The overall drop is around 33 m. With salinity ten times greater than the ocean water one, the lake body and its underground lateral extensions act as a high density layer over which the fresh ground waters are in hydrostatic equilibrium. The slope of the interface between saline and fresh waters is ten times shallower than normally expected near the ocean. According to a number of wells along the Jordanian Dead Sea coast, the water table level does not drop at the same speed than the Dead Sea. An increasingly important gradient is constantly being created along the coastal zone. In many places, the fresh ground waters move very rapidly towards the base level to compensate for the imbalance. This statement is supported by a body of observations: a) appearance of vegetation (Tamarisk) in arid areas (precipitation: 50 to 70 mm/year) dominated by salt deposits such as the Lisan peninsula; b) presence of submarine circular collapses visible along the coast. Their diameters decreasing with distance from the shore line; c) appearances of springs and recurring landslides along the coast. With the exception of the submarine features, all these elements are located in the land strip that emerged progressively from the 1960s, 33 m in elevation, ranging from a few decameters up to several kilometers wide. In many places, the surface is characterized by superficial seepages causing subtle to very pronounced subsidence, and sinkholes. In this contribution, we show that advanced differential radar interferometry techniques applied to ERS, ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed images stacks are able to underscore the most affected places. The mapping

  3. Inter-comparison of the solar UVB, UVA and global radiation clearness and UV indices for Beer Sheva and Neve Zohar (Dead Sea), Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudish, A.I. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel). Solar Energy Laboratory; Dead Sea Research Center, Neve Zohar (Israel); Lyubansky, V.; Ianetz, A. [Israel Meteorological Service, Bet Dagan (Israel). Research Development Div.; Evseev, E.G. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel). Solar Energy Laboratory

    2005-07-01

    An inter-comparison of the clearness indices for the solar UVB, UVA and global radiation for Beer Sheva and Neve Zohar (Dead Sea) are presented utilizing radiation data measured from January 1995 through December 2001 for which there is a one-to-one correspondence between the measurements, viz., any day for which a hourly value for one of the sites was missing is rejected and not included in the analysis for that particular radiation type. Beer Sheva is located ca. 65 km to the west and is approximately 700 m above Neve Zohar, which is located on the western shore of the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea is the lowest terrestrial point on the earth, approximately 400 m below mean sea level. The relative magnitudes of the global, UVB and UVA radiation intensities at the two sites can be attributed to the enhanced scattering at the Dead Sea due to the longer optical path length the solar radiation must traverse at the Dead Sea. The degree of attenuation due to scattering phenomena is inversely proportional to the wavelength raised to some power and, consequently, it is greatest for UVB and very small for global radiation. The UVB and UVA solar constants were determined from the extraterrestrial radiation values tabulated by Froehlich and Wehrli [Spectral distribution of solar irradiance from 25000 nm to 250nm, in: M. Iqbal, An introduction to solar radiation, Academic Press, New York, 1981, Appendix C, pp. 380-381]. The clearness indices for global and UVA radiation were of similar magnitude, whereas those for UVB radiation were of two orders of magnitude smaller. In addition, the monthly average hourly UV Index at both sites has also been determined and an inter-comparison of the values has been performed for all available hourly values from January 1995 through August 2002 for both sites. It is observed that the monthly average hourly UV Index values at the Dead Sea are never in the extreme range. (author)

  4. Analysis of regional travel time data from the November 1999 dead sea explosions observed in Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A; Abdullah, M S; Ar-Rajehi, A; Al-Khalifah, T; Al-Amri, M S; Al-Haddad, M S; Al-Arifi, N

    2000-04-19

    Two large chemical explosions were detonated in the Dead Sea in order to calibrate seismic travel times and improve location accuracy for the International Monitoring System (IMS) to monitor a Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These explosions provided calibration data for regional seismic networks in the Middle East. In this paper we report analysis of seismic data from these shots as recorded by two seismic networks run by King Saud University (KSU) and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Saudi Arabia. The shots were well observed in the distance range 180-480 km mostly to the south of the Dead Sea in the Gulf of Aqaba region of northwestern Saudi Arabia. An average one-dimensional velocity model for the paths was inferred from the travel times of the regional phases Pn, Pg and Sg. Short-period Sn phases were not observed. The velocity model features a thin crust (crustal thickness 26-30 km) and low velocities (average P-wave velocity 5.8-6.0 km/s), consistent with the extensional tectonics of the region and previous studies.

  5. Communicating mega-projects in the face of uncertainties: Israeli mass media treatment of the Dead Sea Water Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischhendler, Itay; Cohen-Blankshtain, Galit; Shuali, Yoav; Boykoff, Max

    2015-10-01

    Given the potential for uncertainties to influence mega-projects, this study examines how mega-projects are deliberated in the public arena. The paper traces the strategies used to promote the Dead Sea Water Canal. Findings show that the Dead Sea mega-project was encumbered by ample uncertainties. Treatment of uncertainties in early coverage was dominated by economics and raised primarily by politicians, while more contemporary media discourses have been dominated by ecological uncertainties voiced by environmental non-governmental organizations. This change in uncertainty type is explained by the changing nature of the project and by shifts in societal values over time. The study also reveals that 'uncertainty reduction' and to a lesser degree, 'project cancellation', are still the strategies most often used to address uncertainties. Statistical analysis indicates that although uncertainties and strategies are significantly correlated, there may be other intervening variables that affect this correlation. This research also therefore contributes to wider and ongoing considerations of uncertainty in the public arena through various media representational practices.

  6. Evidence for 830 years of seismic quiescence from palaeoseismology, archaeoseismology and historical seismicity along the Dead Sea fault in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha; Gomez, Francisco; Sbeinati, Reda; Van der Woerd, Jerome; Mouty, Michel; Darkal, Abdul Nasser; Radwan, Youssef; Layyous, Ihsan; Al Najjar, Haithem; Darawcheh, Ryad; Hijazi, Fouad; Al-Ghazzi, Riad; Barazangi, Muawia

    2003-05-01

    The long historical record of earthquakes, the physical effects on ancient building structures and the palaeoseismology provide a unique opportunity for an interdisciplinary tectonic analysis along a major plate boundary and a realistic evaluation of the seismic hazard assessment in the Middle East. We demonstrate with micro-topographic surveys and trenching that the Dead Sea fault (DSF) offsets left-laterally by 13.6±0.2 m a repeatedly fractured ancient Roman aqueduct (older than AD 70 and younger than AD 30). Carbon-14 dating of faulted young alluvial deposits documents the occurrence of three large earthquakes in the past 2000 years between AD 100 and 750, between AD 700 and 1030 and between AD 990 and 1210. Our study provides the timing of late Holocene earthquakes and constrains the 6.9±0.1 mm/yr slip rate of the Dead Sea transform fault in northwestern Syria along the Missyaf segment. The antepenultimate and most recent faulting events may be correlated with the AD 115 and AD 1170 large earthquakes for which we estimate Mw=7.3-7.5. The ˜830 yr of seismic quiescence along the Missyaf fault segment implies that a large earthquake is overdue and may result in a major catastrophe to the population centres of Syria and Lebanon.

  7. A step forward in understanding step-overs: the case of the Dead Sea Fault in northern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Neta; Granot, Roi; Hamiel, Yariv

    2017-04-01

    The rotational deformation field around step-overs between segments of strike-slip faults is poorly resolved. Vertical-axis paleomagnetic rotations can be used to characterize the deformation field, and together with mechanical modeling, can provide constraints on the characteristics of the adjacent fault segments. The northern Dead Sea Fault, a major segmented sinistral transform fault that straddles the boundary between the Arabian Plate and Sinai Subplate, offers an appropriate tectonic setting for our detailed mechanical and paleomagnetic investigation. We examine the paleomagnetic vertical-axis rotations of Neogene-Pleistocene basalt outcrops surrounding a right step-over between two prominent segments of the fault: the Jordan Gorge section and the Hula East Boundary Fault. Results from 20 new paleomagnetic sites reveal significant (>20˚) counterclockwise rotations within the step-over and small clockwise rotations in the vicinity. Sites located further (>2.5 km) away from the step-over generally experience negligible to minor rotations. Finally, we construct a mechanical model guided by the observed rotational field that allows us to characterize the structural, mechanical and kinematic behavior of the Dead Sea Fault in northern Israel.

  8. Thermal impacts of magmatic intrusions on dolomitization processes in the Tiberias Basin, Jordan-Dead Sea Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltzer, Nora; Möller, Peter; Inbar, Nimrod; Siebert, Christian; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Al-Raggad, Marwan; Magri, Fabien

    2017-04-01

    The Tiberias Basin (TB) is located within the Jordan-Dead Sea Transform and is bordered to the west by the Lower Galilee (Israel), where Pliocene basalts cover an area of 35 km2. Hydrochemical analyses highlight that two types of brines exist around Lake Tiberias (LT) (Mandel 1965; Möller et al. 2009): (1) Along the eastern side of LT, brine is characterized by Mg/Ca>1, which resulted from evaporation of seawater during the Late Miocene, whereas (2) along the western side of the lake, brine is characterized by Mg/CaMandel S. (1965). Hydrogeological Investigations of the areas surrounding Lake Tiberias. Water Planning for Israel. Volumes 1-2 210 p. Möller P., Siebert C., Geyer S., Inbar N., Rosenthal E., Flexer A., Zilberbrand M. (2012). Relationship of brines in the Kinnarot Basin, Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley. Geofluids, 12(2), 166-181. Möller P., Rosenthal E., Geyer S. (2009). Characterization of aquifer environments by major and minor elements and stable isotopes of sulfate In: Hoetzel H., Möller P., Rosenthal E. (Eds) Water of the Jordan Balley. Pp. 83-122.

  9. Planetesimal formation via sweep-up growth at the inner edge of dead zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drążkowska, J.; Windmark, F.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The early stages of planet formation are still not well understood. Coagulation models have revealed numerous obstacles to the dust growth, such as the bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift barriers. Gas drag causes rapid loss, and turbulence leads to generally destructive collisions between the dust aggregates. Aims: We study the interplay between dust coagulation and drift to determine the conditions in protoplanetary disk that support the formation of planetesimals. We focus on planetesimal formation via sweep-up and investigate whether it can take place in a realistic protoplanetary disk. Methods: We have developed a new numerical model that resolves the spatial distribution of dust in the radial and vertical dimensions. The model uses representative particles approach to follow the dust evolution in a protoplanetary disk. The coagulation and fragmentation of solids is taken into account in the Monte Carlo method. A collision model adopting the mass transfer effect, which can occur for different-sized dust aggregate collisions, is implemented. We focus on a protoplanetary disk that includes a pressure bump caused by a steep decline of turbulent viscosity around the snow line. Results: Our results show that high enough resolution of the vertical disk structure in dust coagulation codes is needed to obtain adequately short growth timescales, especially in the case of a low turbulence region. We find that a sharp radial variation in the turbulence strength at the inner edge of dead zone promotes planetesimal formation in several ways. It provides a pressure bump that efficiently prevents the dust from drifting inwards. It also causes a radial variation in the size of aggregates at which growth barriers occur, favoring the growth of large aggregates by sweeping up of small particles. In our model, by employing an ad hoc α viscosity change near the snow line, it is possible to grow planetesimals by incremental growth on timescales of approximately 105

  10. Resumed Activity of the Dead Sea Ca-Cl Brine and the Northward Migration of the Levant Rain System Upon the MIS5/4 Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, N.; Starinsky, A.; Stein, M.

    2004-12-01

    Terminal lakes in the arid and semi-arid region of the Dead Sea basin expanded significantly or contracted and dried up depending on the way the hydrological system is reacting to the regional and global climate during the late Pleistocene-Holocene periods. We reconstructed the precipitation and hydrological history of the drainage area of the Dead Sea basin during the transition from the last Interglacial (MIS5) to the last Glacial period (MIS4). Thus, the lakes are considered as a large rain gauges and faithful monitors of the regional hydrological-climate system. Our assessment is based on lithological, mineralogical, isotopic and chemical evidence stored in the sedimentary-limnological record of Samra (Amora) and Lisan lakes that filled the Dead Sea basin during the late Pleistocene. Deposition of CaCO3 as authigenic aragonite or calcite from the lakes depends on the relative contribution of the ancient Dead Sea Ca-Cl brine to the lake waters. During the uppermost Pleistocene time (approximately 120-80 ka) mainly authigenic calcite was deposited in the lake suggesting minor contribution of the Ca-Cl brine relative to the freshwater input. The transition from the last Interglacial to last Glacial periods (the MIS5/4 transition at approximately 70 ka) was marked by resumed activity of freshwater springs in the vicinity of the Dead Sea (depositing travertines) and enhanced activity of the Ca-Cl brines, leading to precipitation of salt and authigenic aragonite. The MIS5/4 freshwater-brine change was associated with a regional migration of rainstorms to the north of the Negev desert. Since then, during the past 70 ka rainstorms were mostly limited to the drainage area of the Jordan River and Dead Sea shoulders.

  11. Sinkholes, subsidence and subrosion on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea as revealed by a close-range photogrammetric survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Saberi, Leila; Alrshdan, Hussam; Sawarieh, Ali; Closson, Damien; Walter, Thomas R.; Dahm, Torsten

    2017-05-01

    Ground subsidence and sinkhole collapse are phenomena affecting regions of karst geology worldwide. The rapid development of such phenomena around the Dead Sea in the last four decades poses a major geological hazard to the local population, agriculture and industry. Nonetheless many aspects of this hazard are still incompletely described and understood, especially on the eastern Dead Sea shore. In this work, we present a first low altitude (tectonic faults. The estimated minimum volume loss of this subsided zone is 1.83 ṡ 106 m3 with an average subsidence rate of 0.21 m yr-1 over the last 25 years. Sinkholes in the surveyed area are localized mainly within this depression. The sinkholes are commonly elliptically shaped (mean eccentricity 1.31) and clustered (nearest neighbor ratio 0.69). Their morphologies and orientations depend on the type of sediment they form in: in mud, sinkholes have a low depth to diameter ratio (0.14) and a long-axis azimuth of NNE-NE. In alluvium, sinkholes have a higher ratio (0.4) and are orientated NNW-N. From field work, we identify actively evolving artesian springs and channelized, sediment-laden groundwater flows that appear locally in the main depression. Consequently, subrosion, i.e. subsurface mechanical erosion, is identified as a key physical process, in addition to dissolution, behind the subsidence and sinkhole hazard. Furthermore, satellite image analysis links the development of the sinuous depression and sinkhole formation at Ghor Al-Haditha to preferential groundwater flow paths along ancient and current wadi riverbeds.

  12. Salinization forced anoxia in the Sea of Aral, the Dead Sea and the Urmia Lake: a temporal feature of the salt lakes development under the Global Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushev, Evgeniy; Ghaffari, Peygham; Zavialov, Petr; Kurbaniyazov, Abilgazi

    2016-04-01

    The Sea of Aral is undergone a process of its volume decrease and salinization started about 30 years ago. In the remained now lake in the former deepest part of the Sea the salinity increased from about 8 PSU in 1990 to 120 PSU in the surface layer, and 240 PSU in the bottom layer in 2015. On top of an increase of salinity, there was formed a sulfidic zone in the bottom layer, that was separated from the upper layer by an extremely strong halocline (more than 50 PSU in 100 cm). The reason of this halocline might be an influx of the heavy high salinity water formed in summer in the shallower part of the Aral Sea to the bottom layer of the deeper part of the Sea through a strait between them. The similar processes could take place in the Urmia Lake, where salinity increased from 120 PSU in 2000 to about 350-400 PSU in 2015. This lake also consists from a shallow and deep parts connected by a channel in the dam, and where there was also reported anoxia. And finally, the Dead Sea demonstrates a further development happened after the shallower Southern part of the Sea was totally evaporated. After 1993 the vertical mixing started to occur down to the bottom layer, and the lake regime changed from meromictic to monomictic, that resulted in aeration of the bottom layer. In this work we compare interannual changes of the main salinity components in the 3 water bodies and analyze results of the vertical chemical structure of the Sea of Aral studied in 2015.

  13. Changes in quality of groundwater with seasonal fluctuations: an example from Ghor Sari area, southern Dead Sea coastal aquifers, Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The demand for water resources in the area south of the Dead Sea due to continued development, especially at the Arab Potash Company (APC) for production and domestic purposes necessitates that water quality in the area be monitored and evaluated based on the local geology and hydrogeology. The objective of this paper is to monitor seasonal fluctuations of groundwater and to determine how fluctuation in the water levels will affect the groundwater quality. Groundwater levels were found to be influenced by rainfall and pumping of water from the wells for domestic and industrial use. Twenty water samples were collected from different wells and analyzed for major chemical constituents both in pre- and post-seasons to determine the quality variation. Chemical constituents are significantly increased after post-season recharge. According to the overall assessment of the area, water quality was found to be useful for drinking, irrigation and industry.

  14. Biogeographical diversity of leaf-associated microbial communities from salt-secreting Tamarix trees of the Dead Sea region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvit-Raz, Noga; Finkel, Omri M; Al-Deeb, Taghleb M; Malkawi, Hanan I; Hindiyeh, Muna Y; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Belkin, Shimshon

    2012-02-01

    The leaves of Tamarix, a salt-secreting desert tree, form an extreme niche that harbors a unique microbial community. In view of the global distribution of this tree, its island-like phyllosphere is highly suitable for studying microbial diversity along geographical gradients. Here we present an analysis of microbial community diversity using leaf surface samples collected at six different sites, on both sides of the Dead Sea, over a period of one year. Biodiversity analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed a significant degree of bacterial community similarity within trees sampled at the same site, much higher than the similarity between trees from different geographical locations. Statistical analysis indicated that the degree of similarity was negatively correlated with the distance between sampling sites, and that a weak correlation existed between diversity and leaf pH.

  15. Characterizing a large shear-zone with seismic and magnetotelluric methods: The case of the Dead Sea Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maercklin, N.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Haberland, C.; Ritter, O.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M.; Weckmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic tomography, imaging of seismic scatterers, and magnetotelluric soundings reveal a sharp lithologic contrast along a ???10 km long segment of the Arava Fault (AF), a prominent fault of the southern Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East. Low seismic velocities and resistivities occur on its western side and higher values east of it, and the boundary between the two units coincides partly with a seismic scattering image. At 1-4 km depth the boundary is offset to the east of the AF surface trace, suggesting that at least two fault strands exist, and that slip occurred on multiple strands throughout the margin's history. A westward fault jump, possibly associated with straightening of a fault bend, explains both our observations and the narrow fault zone observed by others. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rullkoetter, J.; Spiro, B.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerization of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. 41 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Two recent but temporally distinct outbreaks of cutaneous leishmaniasis among foreign workers in the Dead-Sea area of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, I M; Geith, E; Schönian, G; Kanani, K A

    2009-07-01

    Two temporally distinct outbreaks of human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), as well as scattered cases of the disease, have recently been observed close to the Dead Sea, in Jordan. Each of the two outbreaks, which occurred in 2004/2005 and 2007/2008, involved a group of foreign workers who were deployed within otherwise uninhabited locations. During each outbreak, about 20% of the workers were found infected with the causative parasite. In the earlier outbreak, 61 workers were found to have skin lesions like those of CL and all but three were confirmed by culture and/or the examination of smears (40 cases) or, in the case of 18 (86%) of the 21 suspected cases found smear- and culture-negative, by PCR. In the second outbreak, the cases were only identified from their clinical manifestations and their response to antileishmanial treatment (cryotherapy). Leishmania major was identified as the cause of the 2004/2005 outbreak and some sporadic cases that occurred, in 2004, along the shores of the Dead Sea. The burrows of potential reservoir hosts were found close to the outbreak locations, frequently under the chenopod Seidlitzia rosmarinus. The two outbreaks emphasise the continuing problem posed by the CL focus in the Mid Jordan Valley and its impact on humans who move into the area. Curiously, an investigation on the socio-economic conditions of the workers during the outbreaks identified a group of 48 workers who were living in air-conditioned rooms during the 2007/2008 outbreak, among whom no CL cases were found. In contrast, 26 of a neighbouring group of 124 workers, who were all living in non-air-conditioned rooms, developed CL lesions. The role of air conditioning, and of other factors and measures, in the prevention of the transmission of the causative parasites of CL merits further investigation and the attention of the local health authorities.

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of pull-apart basins: implications for the tectonics of the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Rafael; ten Brink, Uri S.; Lin, Jian

    1995-01-01

    We model the three-dimensional (3-D) crustal deformation in a deep pull-apart basin as a result of relative plate motion along a transform system and compare the results to the tectonics of the Dead Sea Basin. The brittle upper crust is modeled by a boundary element technique as an elastic block, broken by two en echelon semi-infinite vertical faults. The deformation is caused by a horizontal displacement that is imposed everywhere at the bottom of the block except in a stress-free “shear zone” in the vicinity of the fault zone. The bottom displacement represents the regional relative plate motion. Results show that the basin deformation depends critically on the width of the shear zone and on the amount of overlap between basin-bounding faults. As the width of the shear zone increases, the depth of the basin decreases, the rotation around a vertical axis near the fault tips decreases, and the basin shape (the distribution of subsidence normalized by the maximum subsidence) becomes broader. In contrast, two-dimensional plane stress modeling predicts a basin shape that is independent of the width of the shear zone. Our models also predict full-graben profiles within the overlapped region between bounding faults and half-graben shapes elsewhere. Increasing overlap also decreases uplift near the fault tips and rotation of blocks within the basin. We suggest that the observed structure of the Dead Sea Basin can be described by a 3-D model having a large overlap (more than 30 km) that probably increased as the basin evolved as a result of a stable shear motion that was distributed laterally over 20 to 40 km.

  19. Crustal metamorphic fluid flux beneath the Dead Sea Basin: constraints from 2-D and 3-D magnetotelluric modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meqbel, Naser; Weckmann, Ute; Muñoz, Gerard; Ritter, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    We report on a study to explore the deep electrical conductivity structure of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) using magnetotelluric (MT) data collected along a transect across the DSB where the left lateral strike-slip Dead Sea transform (DST) fault splits into two fault strands forming one of the largest pull-apart basins of the world. A very pronounced feature of our 2-D inversion model is a deep, subvertical conductive zone beneath the DSB. The conductor extends through the entire crust and is sandwiched between highly resistive structures associated with Precambrian rocks of the basin flanks. The high electrical conductivity could be attributed to fluids released by dehydration of the uppermost mantle beneath the DSB, possibly in combination with fluids released by mid- to low-grade metamorphism in the lower crust and generation of hydrous minerals in the middle crust through retrograde metamorphism. Similar high conductivity zones associated with fluids have been reported from other large fault systems. The presence of fluids and hydrous minerals in the middle and lower crust could explain the required low friction coefficient of the DST along the eastern boundary of the DSB and the high subsidence rate of basin sediments. 3-D inversion models confirm the existence of a subvertical high conductivity structure underneath the DSB but its expression is far less pronounced. Instead, the 3-D inversion model suggests a deepening of the conductive DSB sediments off-profile towards the south, reaching a maximum depth of approximately 12 km, which is consistent with other geophysical observations. At shallower levels, the 3-D inversion model reveals salt diapirism as an upwelling of highly resistive structures, localized underneath the Al-Lisan Peninsula. The 3-D model furthermore contains an E-W elongated conductive structure to the northeast of the DSB. More MT data with better spatial coverage are required, however, to fully constrain the robustness of the above

  20. Traces of microbial activity in the deep sediment of the Dead Sea: How is life influencing the sedimentary record of this hypersaline lake ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Camille; Ebert, Yael; Kiro, Yael; Stein, Mordechai; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    As part of the ICDP-sponsored Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP), a multi-disciplinary study has been carried out to understand the influence that microbial communities can have on the Dead Sea sedimentary record. Organic matter (lipids) and DNA extraction have been performed along the main core retrieved from the center of the modern Dead Sea. They revealed different associations of microbial communities, influenced by changing climatic and limnological regimes during sedimentation. Moreover, imaging and chemical characterization of authigenic iron-sulfur minerals have revealed the unexpected presence of an active sulfur cycle in the sediment. In particular, their morphology and Fe/S ratios are coherent with incomplete sulfate reduction, limited by sulfur reduction, and often resulting in the preservation of greigite. In glacial period intervals, pyritization may be complete, indicating full sulfate reduction probably allowed by significant accumulation of organic matter in the alternating aragonite and detritus (aad) facies. The DSDDP core provides a unique opportunity to investigate deep diagenetic processes and to assess the role of microbial activity in the Dead Sea hypersaline sediment. Our study shows that this microbial activity influences the carbon and sulfur phases, as well as magnetic fractions, potentially affecting proxies used for paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF POSSIBLE CONTAMINATION ON THE RADIOCARBON DATING OF THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS II : EMPIRICAL METHODS TO REMOVE CASTOR OIL AND SUGGESTIONS FOR REDATING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; van der Plicht, Johannes; Doudna, Gregory; Nielsen, Frederik; Hojrup, Peter; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Pedersen, Carl Th; Højrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    While kept at the Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem, many Dead Sea Scroll fragments were exposed to castor oil by the original team of editors in the course of cleaning the parchments. Castor oil must be regarded as a serious contaminant in relation to radiocarbon dating. If modern castor oil is

  2. Beauty is not only Skin Deep: the Dead Sea features and Cosmetics/La belleza no está sólo en la superficie de la piel: características del Mar Muerto y los cosméticos

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Harari

    2012-01-01

    .... Dead Sea cosmetics - or cosmetics arguing being from this place and containing Dead Sea water or minerals - are also know worldwide but still controversies take place in the medical milieu regarding...

  3. Geometry and subsidence history of the Dead Sea basin: A case for fluid-induced mid-crustal shear zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, U.S.; Flores, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Pull-apart basins are narrow zones of crustal extension bounded by strike-slip faults that can serve as analogs to the early stages of crustal rifting. We use seismic tomography, 2-D ray tracing, gravity modeling, and subsidence analysis to study crustal extension of the Dead Sea basin (DSB), a large and long-lived pull-apart basin along the Dead Sea transform (DST). The basin gradually shallows southward for 50 km from the only significant transverse normal fault. Stratigraphic relationships there indicate basin elongation with time. The basin is deepest (8-8.5 km) and widest (???15 km) under the Lisan about 40 km north of the transverse fault. Farther north, basin depth is ambiguous, but is 3 km deep immediately north of the lake. The underlying pre-basin sedimentary layer thickens gradually from 2 to 3 km under the southern edge of the DSB to 3-4 km under the northern end of the lake and 5-6 km farther north. Crystalline basement is ???11 km deep under the deepest part of the basin. The upper crust under the basin has lower P wave velocity than in the surrounding regions, which is interpreted to reflect elevated pore fluids there. Within data resolution, the lower crust below ???18 km and the Moho are not affected by basin development. The subsidence rate was several hundreds of m/m.y. since the development of the DST ???17 Ma, similar to other basins along the DST, but subsidence rate has accelerated by an order of magnitude during the Pleistocene, which allowed the accumulation of 4 km of sediment. We propose that the rapid subsidence and perhaps elongation of the DSB are due to the development of inter-connected mid-crustal ductile shear zones caused by alteration of feldspar to muscovite in the presence of pore fluids. This alteration resulted in a significant strength decrease and viscous creep. We propose a similar cause to the enigmatic rapid subsidence of the North Sea at the onset the North Atlantic mantle plume. Thus, we propose that aqueous fluid flux

  4. Response of a coastal hydrogeological system to a rapid decline in sea level; the case of Zuqim springs - The largest discharge area along the Dead Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Avihu; Yechieli, Yoseph; Galili, Udi

    2016-05-01

    The almost instantaneous response of a natural on-shore groundwater system to an extremely rapid drop in the level of an adjacent lake is described in this study. The study is focused on the Zuqim (Feshcha) spring complex located on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea, which exhibits a drop of tens of meters in its water level over the last few decades. In this exceptional "field lab", fluctuations and trends in the flow regime are recognized, as well as the contemporaneous geochemical variations. Lithological facies variations have a pronounced effect on the underground flow regime. The following main processes were recognized: (a) slight shifting of the long-standing springs eastward, following the retreating shore; (b) extension of the hydrologic system southward without significant change in the total discharge of the entire spring complex. The new seepages are characterized by high variability in salinity; and (c) continuous refreshing of the spring water as a result of prolonged flushing of old trapped brines. The water of the Zuqim springs lie on mixing lines between two local brine types and diluted brine of the Lisan Lake - the precursor of the Dead Sea. Based on our findings, future development processes in the spring complex are predicted, which is essential because of their impact on the endemic ecosystem that relies on this water. In addition, continuation of the rapid drop in lake level is expected to cause intensification of erosional processes, such as deepening of flow gullies. Shifting of the entire hydrological system southward and migration along with the retreating shore is also expected to continue, as well as the continuous decrease in the water salinity.

  5. [Types of injuries among victims and dead persons after sea accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskiĭ, Iu N; Manuĭlov, V M; Matveev, R P

    2010-11-01

    The traumas received by victims in the largest sea catastrophes and accidents, connected with case (hull) damage, overturning and flooding of courts from 1983 to 2010 are considered. It is established that principal views of damages at rescued and victims are sharp hypothermia of light and moderate severity, combined mechanic-cold and mechanic-burn-chemical traumas, drowning. The analysis of the received combined traumas reveals prevalence of heavy damages among the rescued victims in the sea catastrophes and accidents. The size and structure of sanitary losses depends on weight of accident, remoteness from coast, weather conditions, speed of flooding of a vessel, readiness of forces of rescue and the beginning of carrying out of a rescue operation, training of crew and passengers.

  6. Isolation and identification of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from emus from the Ein Gedi oasis by the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amnon, Inbar; Shkoda, Irina; Lapin, Ekaterina; Raibstein, Israel; Rosenbluth, Ezra; Nagar, Sagit; Perk, Shimon; Bellaiche, Michel; Davidson, Irit

    2011-09-01

    An avian influenza virus (AIV), A/Emu/Israel/552/2010/(H5N1), was isolated from a dead emu that was found in the Ein Gedi oasis near the Dead Sea. The virus molecular characterization was performed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR using AIV subtype-specific primers. The virus was of high pathogenicity, according to its intravenous pathogenicity index of 2.85 and the nucleotide sequencing at the cleavage site of the hemagglutinin gene, GERRRKKR, which is typical for highly pathogenic chicken influenza A viruses.

  7. Morphotectonics of Kid drainage basin, Southeastern Sinai: A landscape evolution coeval to Gulf of Aqaba - Dead Sea rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Ahmed; Shawky, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    The Pleistocene fluvio-tectonic conditions have shaped the landscapes of Sinai Peninsula through development of small sedimentary traps following preexisting lineaments. In the Gulf of Aqaba region, orientation of these lineaments with respect to the Pleistocene stress field develops strike-slip simple and dip-slip pure extensional shear models that induced rifting of the Gulf of Aqaba - Dead Sea fault system. The Beida and Nabq grabens are two major rift-related depressions at the southwestern coast of the Gulf of Aqaba region. Both grabens are landscapes that received alluvial sediments of the Kid drainage basin (KDB), which is one of the largest drainage systems in the western region of the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp. The Beida graben is formed at a horse tail structure next to Abiad and Kid faults, while the Nabq graben is a pull-apart structure formed as onshore continuation of the Dakar deep. The geometry and origin of these landscapes are the intrinsic themes of this study to investigate the morphotectonic evolution of the KDB terrain within the tectonic framework of the Gulf of Aqaba - Dead Sea rift. The hanging terraces and canyons being at higher elevations on the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp; and the accumulation of younger alluvial fans, talus cones and bajada on its footslope indicate that the KDB landscape is basically shaped; and evolutionary modified by hinterland uplifting of the Gulf of Aqaba region. Hence, two morphotectonic evolution periods of the KDB terrain coincide with the early NE- and late NNE-trending extensional Pleistocene axes. The early period started with deposition of the older alluvial fan sediments that emerged at the outlet of KDB, and partially buried the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp. Subsequent hinterland uplifting revived the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp with development of hanging alluvial and bed-rock terraces; and the older alluvial fan sediments are uplifted on the footwall of southward-dipping normal faults whose hanging

  8. High-resolution InSAR constraints on flood-related subsidence and evaporite dissolution along the Dead Sea shores: Interplay between hydrology and rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shviro, Maayan; Haviv, Itai; Baer, Gidon

    2017-09-01

    Sinkhole generation and land subsidence are commonly attributed to dissolution of subsurface layers by under-saturated groundwater and formation of cavities. Along the Dead Sea (DS) shorelines, this process also involves seasonal flash floods that are drained into the subsurface by existing and newly formed sinkholes. We quantify the contribution of flash-floods to salt dissolution and land subsidence using high-resolution interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Subsidence rates during a 3-year period (2012-2015) were calculated from 57 COSMO SkyMed X-band interferograms bracketing major flood events and intra-flood periods in 21 sinkhole sites. The sites are located within channels and alluvial fans along the western shores of the Dead Sea, Israel. The observed subsidence reaches maximum rates of 2.5 mm/day, accumulating in specific sites to 500 mm/year. In most of the sinkhole sites a gradual increase in the annual subsidence rate is observed during the 3-year study period. Three different modes of response to floods were observed: (1) sites where floodwater is not directly channeled into sinkholes do not respond to floods; (2) sites adjacent to active channels with sinkholes are unaffected by specific floods but their subsidence rates increase gradually from early winter to mid-summer, and decay gradually until the following winter; and (3) sites in active channels with sinkholes are characterized by an abrupt increase in subsidence rates immediately after each flood (by a factor of up to 20) and by a subsequent quasi-exponential subsidence decay over periods of several months. In these latter sites, subsidence rates after each flood are temporally correlated with alternating groundwater levels in adjacent boreholes. The rapid rise in groundwater head following floods increases the hydraulic gradient of the under-saturated groundwater and hence also the groundwater discharge and the dissolution rate of the subsurface salt layer. A subsequent quasi

  9. Implications of S1 tephra findings in Dead Sea and Tayma palaeolake sediments for marine reservoir age estimation and palaeoclimate synchronisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Ina; Wulf, Sabine; Schwab, Markus J.; Serb, Johanna; Plessen, Birgit; Appelt, Oona; Brauer, Achim

    2017-08-01

    Here we report on the first findings of a cryptotephra in the Holocene lacustrine sediment records of the Dead Sea and Tayma palaeolake (NW Arabian Peninsula). The major element glass composition of this rhyolitic tephra is identical to the distal 'S1' tephra layer identified in the Yammoûneh palaeolake (Lebanon), in a marine sediment record from the SE Levantine basin and in the Sodmein Cave archaeological site in Egypt. The S1 tephra corresponds to the early Holocene 'Dikkartın' dome eruption of the Erciyes Dağ volcano in central Anatolia (Turkey) and has been dated in the marine record at 8830 ± 140 cal yr BP. We present new age estimates of the S1 tephra based on radiocarbon dating of terrestrial plant remains and pollen concentrates revealing ages of 8939 ± 83 cal yr BP in the Dead Sea sediments and 9041 ± 254 cal yr BP in Tayma. The precise date from the Dead Sea allows refining the early Holocene marine reservoir age in the SE Levantine Sea to ca. 320 ± 50 years. Synchronisation of marine and terrestrial palaeoclimate records in the eastern Mediterranean region using the S1 tephra further suggests a time-transgressive expansion of the early Holocene humid period.

  10. The cooling and moistening effect on the formation of sea fog in the Huanghai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian; ZHOU Faxiu

    2006-01-01

    With the sea surface observations from ICOADS for the years 1960~2002, the conditions of cooling, evaporation and water vapor transportation are analyzed and compared for the formation of seasonal sea fog in April-July in the Huanghai Sea. It is found that sea surface cooling is always existent during the fog seasons while sea surface evaporation only appears in April-June in the Huanghai Sea. Local evaporation alone is not sufficient to form fogs though it may lead to light ones. Water vapor transported from the low-latitudes accomplished by specific synoptic systems is the most important condition for sea fog formation. In general, the moistening effect is more important than the cooling one.

  11. Controls on the pH of hyper-saline lakes - A lesson from the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Rotem; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The pH of aqueous environments is determined by the dominant buffer systems of the water, defined operationally as total alkalinity (TA). The major buffer systems in the modern ocean are carbonic and boric acids of which the species bicarbonate, carbonate and borate make up about 77%, 19% and 4% of the TA, respectively. During the course of seawater evaporation (e.g. lagoons) the residual brine loses considerable portion of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and carbonate alkalinity (CA) already at the early stages of evaporation. DIC and CA decrease due to massive precipitation of CaCO3, while total boron (TB) increases conservatively, turning borate to the dominant alkalinity species in marine derived brines. In the present work we assess the apparent dissociation constant value of boric acid (KB‧) in saline and hypersaline waters, using the Dead Sea (DS) as a case study. We explain the DS low pH (∼6.3) and the effect of the boric and carbonic acid pK‧-s on the behavior of the brine's buffer system, including the pH increase that results from brine dilution.

  12. 3D micro-XRF for cultural heritage objects: new analysis strategies for the investigation of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Wolff, Timo; Hahn, Oliver; Rabin, Ira; Lühl, Lars; Pagels, Marcel; Malzer, Wolfgang; Kanngiesser, Birgit

    2011-08-15

    A combination of 3D micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (3D micro-XRF) and micro-XRF was utilized for the investigation of a small collection of highly heterogeneous, partly degraded Dead Sea Scroll parchment samples from known excavation sites. The quantitative combination of the two techniques proves to be suitable for the identification of reliable marker elements which may be used for classification and provenance studies. With 3D micro-XRF, the three-dimensional nature, i.e. the depth-resolved elemental composition as well as density variations, of the samples was investigated and bromine could be identified as a suitable marker element. It is shown through a comparison of quantitative and semiquantitative values for the bromine content derived using both techniques that, for elements which are homogeneously distributed in the sample matrix, quantification with micro-XRF using a one-layer model is feasible. Thus, the possibility for routine provenance studies using portable micro-XRF instrumentation on a vast amount of samples, even on site, is obtained through this work.

  13. Technique based on LED multispectral imaging and multivariate analysis for monitoring the conservation state of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Emilio; Manfredi, Marcello; Zerbinati, Orfeo; Robotti, Elisa; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Gosetti, Fabio; Bearman, Greg; France, Fenella; Shor, Pnina

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this project is the development of a noninvasive technique based on LED multispectral imaging (MSI) for monitoring the conservation state of the Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) collection. It is well-known that changes in the parchment reflectance drive the transition of the scrolls from legible to illegible. Capitalizing on this fact, we will use spectral imaging to detect changes in the reflectance before they become visible to the human eye. The technique uses multivariate analysis and statistical process control theory. The present study was carried out on a "sample" parchment of calfskin. The monitoring of the surface of a commercial modern parchment aged consecutively for 2 h and 6 h at 80 °C and 50% relative humidity (ASTM) was performed at the Imaging Lab of the Library of Congress (Washington, DC, U.S.A.). MSI is here carried out in the vis-NIR range limited to 1 μm, with a number of bands of 13 and bandwidths that range from about 10 nm in UV to 40 nm in IR. Results showed that we could detect and locate changing pixels, on the basis of reflectance changes, after only a few "hours" of aging.

  14. The DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa functions in embryonic mitotic progression in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M

    2011-06-01

    Vasa is a broadly conserved ATP-dependent RNA helicase that functions in the germ line of organisms from cnidarians to mammals. Curiously, Vasa is also present in the somatic cells of many animals and functions as a regulator of multipotent cells. Here, we report a mitotic function of Vasa revealed in the sea urchin embryo. We found that Vasa protein is present in all blastomeres of the early embryo and that its abundance oscillates with the cell cycle. Vasa associates with the spindle and the separating sister chromatids at metaphase, and then quickly disappears after telophase. Inhibition of Vasa protein synthesis interferes with proper chromosome segregation, arrests cells at M-phase, and delays overall cell cycle progression. Cdk activity is necessary for the proper localization of Vasa, implying that Vasa is involved in the cyclin-dependent cell cycle network, and Vasa is required for the efficient translation of cyclinB mRNA. Our results suggest an evolutionarily conserved role of Vasa that is independent of its function in germ line determination.

  15. Quaternary tectonic activity in NW Jordan: Insights for a new model of transpression-transtension along the southern Dead Sea Transform Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Awabdeh, M.; Pérez-Peña, J. V.; Azañón, J. M.; Booth-Rea, G.; Abed, A.; Atallah, M.; Galve, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Dead Sea Transform Fault (DSTF) constitutes the transform plate boundary between the African and Arabian plates. The southern part of this fault has been traditionally divided into two main segments, the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) and the Jordan Valley Fault (JVF), connected through the Dead Sea continental pull-apart basin. Active tectonic studies in NW Jordan have traditionally focused on these DSTF structures and have neglected other prominent structures in the region, such as the Amman Hallabat Structure (AHS) and Shueib Structure (SHS) fault systems, which have been considered inactive since the Cretaceous. However, some recent studies have suggested a possible local reactivation of the southern parts of these structures. In this work, we carried out a detailed geological study of the NE Dead Sea Basin to analyze the Quaternary activity of the AHS and SHS based on field observations and structural analyses. Our findings have revealed that the AHS and SHS structures present clear Quaternary activity and accommodate a small part of the deformation of the southern DSTF. In the Quaternary, the southwestern part of the AHS has acted as the northernmost continuation of the WAF, whereas the SHS has acted as a transfer fault associated with NW-SE normal faults with low to moderate throws (meters to decameters) that connect this structure to the JVF. These NW-SE normal faults constitute the northeastern border of the Dead Sea depression (Jericho Valley). They produce a topographic front and separate the sediments of the Jordan Valley in the hanging wall from the Mesozoic sedimentary sequence located in the footwall.

  16. Relationships between lake-level changes and water and salt budgets in the Dead Sea during extreme aridities in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Yael; Goldstein, Steven L.; Garcia-Veigas, Javier; Levy, Elan; Kushnir, Yochanan; Stein, Mordechai; Lazar, Boaz

    2017-04-01

    Thick halite intervals recovered by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project cores show evidence for severely arid climatic conditions in the eastern Mediterranean during the last three interglacials. In particular, the core interval corresponding to the peak of the last interglacial (Marine Isotope Stage 5e or MIS 5e) contains ∼30 m of salt over 85 m of core length, making this the driest known period in that region during the late Quaternary. This study reconstructs Dead Sea lake levels during the salt deposition intervals, based on water and salt budgets derived from the Dead Sea brine composition and the amount of salt in the core. Modern water and salt budgets indicate that halite precipitates only during declining lake levels, while the amount of dissolved Na+ and Cl- accumulates during wetter intervals. Based on the compositions of Dead Sea brines from pore waters and halite fluid inclusions, we estimate that ∼12-16 cm of halite precipitated per meter of lake-level drop. During periods of halite precipitation, the Mg2+ concentration increases and the Na+/Cl- ratio decreases in the lake. Our calculations indicate major lake-level drops of ∼170 m from lake levels of 320 and 310 m below sea level (mbsl) down to lake levels of ∼490 and ∼480 mbsl, during MIS 5e and the Holocene, respectively. These lake levels are much lower than typical interglacial lake levels of around 400 mbsl. These lake-level drops occurred as a result of major decreases in average fresh water runoff, to ∼40% of the modern value (pre-1964, before major fresh water diversions), reflecting severe droughts during which annual precipitation in Jerusalem was lower than 350 mm/y, compared to ∼600 mm/y today. Nevertheless, even during salt intervals, the changes in halite facies and the occurrence of alternating periods of halite and detritus in the Dead Sea core stratigraphy reflect fluctuations between drier and wetter conditions around our estimated average. The halite intervals include

  17. A note on the correlation between geophysical observations and seismicity in the Arava/(Araba) Valley at the southern part of the Dead Sea fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakov, M.; Shapira, A.; Al-Zoubi, A.; ten Brink, U.; Hofstetter, R.; Kraeva, N.; Feldman, L.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the earthquakes in the Arava Valley, a 150-km section of the Dead Sea Transform, is compared for the first time with the local subsurface geological features derived from geophysical and geological data. Gravity data suggested that the Gharandal, Timna, and Elat basins were filled by low-density young sediments. These features were confirmed by seismic reflection profiles and high-resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) survey. The HRAM survey delineated the trace of the Dead Sea Transform (DST), which separates magnetic anomalies in the eastern and western parts of the valley, and revealed the occurrence of the unknown deep magmatics. Overall, the earthquake activity appears to be strongly related to the Dead Sea Transform. However, on a local scale, there is no apparent correlation between the seismicity and the mapped fault segments comprising the DST fault system. Absence of the correlation may be a result of insufficient accuracy of the earthquake localization and/or the inclined fault plane. However, in spite of such inaccuracy, it is clearly observed that the large clusters of the low-magnitude earthquakes coincide well with the sedimentary basins. Two pronounced clusters appear to coincide with the subsurface magmatics. We assume that the subsurface geology predetermines areas of stress accumulation and earthquakes. These areas can be the end of faults, or fault jogs, which sometimes create basins. Magmatism can also be affected by the stress field and predetermine the stress and earthquakes' allocation. ?? 2007 Science From Israel/LPPLtd.

  18. Long-term monitoring of the Dead Sea level and brine physico-chemical parameters “from 1987 to 2008”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlaifat, Abdelaziz; Hogan, Michael; Phillips, Gary; Nawayseh, Khalid; Amira, Jamal; Talafeha, Emad

    2010-05-01

    The Dead Sea brine quality was assessed in order to provide scientific basis for researchers' needs. Four times a month, brine samples were collected from the Arab Potash Company (APC) point of intake and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters in the laboratory over 22 years, and Dead Sea surface temperature and level were measured during each sampling. The mean density values for the collected samples during the last 22 years ranged from 1.2040 g/cm 3 in 1992 to 1.2393 g/cm 3 in 2007, with an average value of 1.2376 g/cm 3. The brine salinity values ranged from 293.6 in 1992 to 339.3 g/l in 2008 with an average value of 337.73 g/l. The ionic dominance observed was Cl - > Mg ++ > Na + > Ca ++ > K +. The results showed that diluting the Dead Sea brine affects both magnesium and sodium chlorides significantly because of their high solubilities in fresh water and their large reserves.

  19. Planet formation bursts at the borders of the dead zone in 2D numerical simulations of circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lyra, W; Zsom, A; Klahr, H; Piskunov, N

    2009-01-01

    As accretion in protoplanetary disks is enabled by turbulent viscosity, the border between active and inactive (dead) zones constitutes a location where there is an abrupt change in the accretion flow. The gas accumulation that ensues triggers the Rossby wave instability, that in turn saturates into anticyclonic vortices. It was suggested that the trapping of solids within them leads to a burst of planet formation on very short timescales. We perform two-dimensional global simulations of the dynamics of gas and solids in a non-magnetized thin protoplanetary disk with the Pencil Code. We use multiple particle species of radius 1, 10, 30, and 100 cm, solving for the particles' gravitational interaction by a particle-mesh method. The dead zone is modeled as a region of low viscosity. Adiabatic and locally isothermal equations of state are used. We find that the Rossby wave instability is triggered under a variety of conditions, thus making vortex formation a robust process. Inside the vortices, fast accumulation...

  20. Improved marine reservoir age estimation and palaeoclimate synchronisation of the early Holocene Levantine/NW-Arabian region based on identification of the S1 tephra in Dead Sea and Tayma palaeolake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Ina; Wulf, Sabine; Schwab, Markus J.; Serb, Johanna; Plessen, Birgit; Appelt, Oona; Brauer, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Due to a lack of tephras identified in marine and terrestrial palaeoclimate records from the Levantine-Arabian area, this region is still not sufficiently connected to the eastern Mediterranean tephrostratigraphical lattice. Here we report on the first finding of cryptotephra in the Holocene lacustrine sediment records of the Dead Sea and the Tayma palaeolake (NW Arabian Peninsula). The major elemental chemistry of the rhyolitic glass shards proves this tephra identical to the distal 'S1 tephra' identified in the Yammoûneh palaeolake, Lebanon (Develle et al, 2009), in a marine sediment record from the SE Levantine basin (Hamann et al., 2010) and in the Sodmein Cave archaeological site in Egypt (Barton et al., 2015). The 'S1 tephra', most likely corresponding to the early Holocene 'Dikkartın' dome eruption of the Erciyes Daǧ volcano in central Anatolia, Turkey, has been dated in the marine record at 8830 ± 140 cal yr BP. We present new age estimates of the 'S1 tephra' based on radiocarbon dating of terrestrial plant remains (Migowski et al., 2004) and pollen concentrates (Dinies et al., 2015), which reveal modelled ages of 8939 ± 83 cal yr BP in the Dead Sea sediments and 9041 ± 254 cal yr BP in Tayma. This allows the estimation of an early Holocene marine reservoir age of ca. 320 years in the SE Levantine Sea. The timing of the volcanic eruption during the early Holocene humid period, which led to the formation of sapropel S1 in the Mediterranean Sea, and the identification of the 'S1 tephra' more than 1200 km to the south are crucial for the synchronisation of marine and terrestrial palaeoclimate records in the eastern Mediterranean region. References: Barton et al., 2015. The role of cryptotephra in refining the chronology of Late Pleistocene human evolution and cultural change in North Africa. Quaternary Sci. Rev. 118, 151-169. Develle et al., 2009. Early Holocene volcanic ash fallout in the Yammoûneh lacustrine basin (Lebanon): Tephrochronological

  1. Monitoring of sinkholes and subsidence affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea through Synthetic Aperture Radar data and last generation Sentinel-1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessari, Giulia; Riccardi, Paolo; Lecci, Daniele; Pasquali, Paolo; Floris, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Since the mid-1980s the coast of the Dead Sea is affected by sinkholes occurring over and around the emerged mud and salt flats. Strong subsidence and landslides also affect some segments of the coast. Nowadays, several thousands of sinkholes attest that the degradation of the Dead Sea coast is worsening. Furthermore, soil deformations are interesting the main streets running along both the Israeli and Jordanian sides of the Dead Sea. These hazards are due to the dramatic dropping of the Dead Sea level, characterized by an increasing rate from about 60 cm/yr in the 1970s up to 1 m/yr in the 2000s, which provokes a lowering of the fresh-saline groundwater interface, replacing the hypersaline groundwater with fresh water and causing a consequent erosion of the subsurface salt layers. Subsidence, sinkholes, river erosion and landslides damage bridges, roads, dikes, houses, factories worsening this ongoing disaster. One of the most emblematic effects is the catastrophic collapse of a 12-km newly constructed dyke, located on the Lisan Peninsula (Jordan), occurred in 2000. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques and Advanced stacking DInSAR techniques (A-DInSAR) were applied to investigate sinkholes and subsidence affecting the Jordanian coast of the Dead Sea. The use of SAR data already proof to be efficient on the risk management of the area, allowing to identify a vulnerable portion of an Israeli highway, averting a possible collapse. Deformation analysis has been focused on the Ghor Al Haditha area and Lisan peninsula, located in the South-Eastern part of the lake coast. The availability of a huge database of SAR data, since the beginning of the 90s, allowed to observe the evolution of the displacements which are damaging this area. Furthermore, last generation Sentinel-1 data, acquired by the ESA mission, were processed to obtain information about the recent evolution of the subsidence and sinkholes affecting the study area, from

  2. Late Holocene Paleoseismic Timing and Slip History Along the Missyaf Segment of the Dead Sea Fault in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui, M.; Gomez, F.; Sbeinati, R.; Van der Woerd, J.; Mouty, M.; Hijazi, F.; Darkal, A.; Darawcheh, R.; Radwan, Y.; Al-Najjar, H.; Layous, I.; Al-Ghazzi, R.; Barazangi, M.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the timing of Holocene earthquakes and related slip rate along the main segment of the Dead Sea fault south of the Ghab pull-apart basin in western Syria. The 60-70 km long Missyaf segment consists of a single fault branch of the north-south trending left-lateral fault at the plate boundary between Africa and Arabia. The late Quaternary tectonic activity along the fault is characterized by (1) deflected streams with consistent left-lateral displacements of different sizes (50 to 300 m), and (2) evidence of large shutter-ridge structures and small pull-apart basins. Microtopographic surveys and trenching across the fault at two sites document the size and timing of paleoseismic events and the related faulting behavior. Near El Harif village, the fault cut across a Roman aqueduct (younger than 22 AD) and induces 10.5 ±0.1 m of left-lateral displacement. Nearby trench-excavations and test pits exhibit the fault with the shear zone affecting a succession of young alluvial deposits of a terrace meander. Radiocarbon dating of the faulting events with vertical displacements reveal the occurrence of a large seismic event prior to 408-380 BC, a penultimate event between 22 - 979 AD and the most recent event between 979 - 1255 AD. The two most recent events being most likely responsible for the Roman aqueduct total displacement, it implies an average coseismic left-lateral movement of 5 m and a slip rate of about 5 mm/yr. The correlation with the historical seismicity catalogue suggests that the most recent faulting event may correspond to the well documented large earthquake of 1170 AD.

  3. Late Holocene Paleoseismic Timing and Slip Rate Along The Missyaf Segment of The Dead Sea Fault In Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui, M.; Gomez, F.; Sbeinati, R.; van der Woerd, J.; Mouty, M.; Darkal, A.; Darawcheh, R.; Radwan, Y.; Al-Ghazzi, R.; Barazangi, M.

    We investigate the timing of Holocene earthquakes and related slip rate along the main segment of the Dead Sea fault south of the Ghab pull-apart basin in western Syria. The 60-70 km long Missyaf segment consists of a single fault branch of the north-south trending left-lateral fault at the plate boundary between Africa and Arabia. The late Quaternary tectonic activity along the fault is characterized by (1) deflected streams with consistent left-lateral displacements of different sizes (50 to 300 m), and (2) ev- idence of large shutter-ridge structures and small pull-apart basins. Microtopographic surveys and trenching across the fault at two sites document the size and timing of paleoseismic events and the related faulting behaviour. Near El Harif village, the fault cut across a Roman aqueduct (younger than 22 AD) and induces 13.6 s0.1 m of left-´ lateral displacement. Nearby trench-excavations and test pits exhibit the fault with the shear zone affecting a succession of young alluvial deposits of a terrace meander. First radiocarbon dating of the faulting events with vertical displacements reveal the occur- rence of a large seismic event prior to 348 BC - 810 BC, a penultimate event between 650 - 1152 AD and the most recent event between 979 - 1255 AD. The two most re- cent events being most likely responsible for the Roman aqueduct total displacement, it implies a coseismic left-lateral movement of 6.8 m per event at this location and a slip rate of about 6 - 7 mm/yr for the last 2000 years. The correlation with the histor- ical seismicity catalogue suggests that the most recent faulting event may correspond to the well documented large earthquake of 1170 AD for which we estimate Mw = 7.3 - 7.5.

  4. Understanding processes that generate flash floods in the arid Judean Desert to the Dead Sea - a measurement network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Hanna; Rödiger, Tino; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Geyer, Stefan; Merz, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods in (semi-) arid regions are fascinating in their suddenness and can be harmful for humans, infrastructure, industry and tourism. Generated within minutes, an early warning system is essential. A hydrological model is required to quantify flash floods. Current models to predict flash floods are often based on simplified concepts and/or on concepts which were developed for humid regions. To more closely relate such models to local conditions, processes within catchments where flash floods occur require consideration. In this study we present a monitoring approach to decipher different flash flood generating processes in the ephemeral Wadi Arugot on the western side of the Dead Sea. To understand rainfall input a dense rain gauge network was installed. Locations of rain gauges were chosen based on land use, slope and soil cover. The spatiotemporal variation of rain intensity will also be available from radar backscatter. Level pressure sensors located at the outlet of major tributaries have been deployed to analyze in which part of the catchment water is generated. To identify the importance of soil moisture preconditions, two cosmic ray sensors have been deployed. At the outlet of the Arugot water is sampled and level is monitored. To more accurately determine water discharge, water velocity is measured using portable radar velocimetry. A first analysis of flash flood processes will be presented following the FLEX-Topo concept .(Savenije, 2010), where each landscape type is represented using an individual hydrological model according to the processes within the three hydrological response units: plateau, desert and outlet. References: Savenije, H. H. G.: HESS Opinions "Topography driven conceptual modelling (FLEX-Topo)", Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 2681-2692, doi:10.5194/hess-14-2681-2010, 2010.

  5. Live-dead agreement of benthic communities under pressure by chronic oil pollution in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Paolo G.; Tomašových, Adam; Stachowitsch, Michael; Filippova, Nadezhda; Steger, Jan; Zuschin, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Mismatch between the richness or species composition of a death assemblage (DA) and the local living assemblage (LA) is typically attributed to natural post-mortem processes, particularly preservational bias. Recent research, however, suggests that live-dead (LD) agreement is significantly lower in anthropogenically disturbed settings. This reflects the so-called "compositional inertia" of DAs to recent environmental change, i.e., DAs still capture earlier community states not affected by such disturbance. The inertia to changing ecological conditions should be particularly likely under conditions of anthropogenic modification because the rapidity of many human-driven changes is unprecedented in natural systems. Our research tests this hypothesis by evaluating the agreement between the LA and DA in benthic communities around the Zakum oil field in the Southern Arabian Sea, off the coast of the United Arab Emirates. This is an area of intense oil extraction, with almost 800 offshore oil and gas platforms and 25 major terminals, but no studies on the related impacts are widely available. This approach also sheds light on chronic pollution in tropical settings, an underrepresented topic in the literature. The size fraction between 2 and 5 mm was sorted for living molluscs and empty shells, which were then segregated to morphospecies and identified. The agreement was evaluated in terms of fidelity of species richness, evenness, and rank-order agreement. Compositional fidelity was also evaluated by multivariate analysis. The communities are dominated by bivalves. Polyplacophorans and scaphopods are occasionally present. Gastropod abundance is marginal compared to the bivalves, although their contribution is more significant when species diversity is taken into consideration. Moreover, the living assemblage in the studied size range was particularly poor in terms of species abundance.

  6. A new autotuning algorithm for PID controllers using dead-beat format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, R; Patranabis, D

    2001-01-01

    A novel algorithm for PID controllers based on dead-beat control and fuzzy inference mechanism is presented in this paper. The proposition is an extension of the work by the authors where the PI form of the algorithm was presented. The inclusion of the derivative term makes the method suitable for application in all types of processes including the ones having high rate disturbances. The proposed algorithm seems to be a complete and generalized PID autotuner as can be seen by the simulated and experimental results. In all the cases the method shows substantial improvement over the controller tuned with Ziegler Nichol's formula and the PI controller proposed in R. Bandyopadhyay, D. Patranabis, A fuzzy logic based PI autotuner, ISA Transactions 37 (1998) 227-235.

  7. The Star Formation Histories of Disk Galaxies: the Live, the Dead, and the Undead

    CERN Document Server

    Oemler, Augustus; Gladders, Michael D; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca M; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    We reexamine the systematic properties of local galaxy populations, using published surveys of star formation, structure, and gas content. After recalibrating star formation measures, we are able to reliably measure specific star formation rates well below the "main sequence" of star formation vs mass. We find an unexpectedly large population of galaxies with star formation rates intermediate between vigorously star-forming main sequence galaxies and passive galaxies, and with gas content disproportionately high for their star formation rates. Several lines of evidence suggest that these quiescent galaxies form a distinct population rather than a low star formation tail of the main sequence. We demonstrate that a tight main sequence, evolving with epoch, is a natural outcome of most histories of star formation and has little astrophysical significance, but that the quiescent population requires additional astrophysics to explain its properties. Using a simple model for disk evolution based on the observed dep...

  8. The Isle of The Dead Benchmark, the Sydney, Fort Denison Tide Gauge and the Ipcc Ar5 Chapter 13 Sea Levels Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Albert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper revisits the Isle of the Dead benchmark and the Sydney, Fort Denison tide gauge to confirm that long term, high quality tide gauges are acceleration free, consistently to the analysis of key sites suggesting the sea levels are not sharply raising following the carbon dioxide emissions. The paper also discusses the flaws of the IPCC AR5 Chapter13 Sea levels. The time history of the relative rate of rise computed by linear fitting of the data locally collected by tide gauges is the best parameter to assess the effect of global warming providing length and quality requirements are satisfied. There is no reason to search for less reliable alternative methods because the climate models predicted different trends. The Global Positioning System (GPS inferred vertical tide gauge velocity suffers of significant inaccuracies. Larger inaccuracies are provided by the satellite altimetry Global Mean Sea Level (GMSL that is a computation and not a measurement.

  9. Shelf-to-basin iron shuttling enhances vivianite formation in deep Baltic Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia is a growing and persistent problem largely attributable to enhanced terrestrial nutrient (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) loading. Recent studies suggest phosphorus removal through burial of iron (II) phosphates, putatively vivianite, plays an important role in nutrient cycling in the Baltic Sea - the world's largest anthropogenic dead zone - yet the dynamics of iron (II) phosphate formation are poorly constrained. To address this, a reactive-transport model was used to reconstruct the diagenetic and depositional history of sediments in the Fårö basin, a deep anoxic and sulphidic region of the Baltic Sea where iron (II) phosphates have been observed. Simulations demonstrate that transport of iron from shelf sediments to deep basins enhances vivianite formation while sulphide concentrations are low, but that pyrite forms preferentially over vivianite when sulphate reduction intensifies due to elevated organic loading. Episodic reoxygenation events, associated with major inflows of oxic waters, encourage the retention of iron oxyhydroxides and iron-bound phosphorus in sediments, increasing vivianite precipitation as a result. Results suggest that artificial reoxygenation of the Baltic Sea bottom waters could sequester up to 3% of the annual external phosphorus loads as iron (II) phosphates, but this is negligible when compared to potential internal phosphorus loads due to dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides when low oxygen conditions prevail. Thus, enhancing vivianite formation through artificial reoxygenation of deep waters is not a viable engineering solution to eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. Finally, simulations suggest that regions with limited sulphate reduction and hypoxic intervals, such as eutrophic estuaries, could act as important phosphorus sinks by sequestering vivianite. This could potentially alleviate eutrophication in shelf and slope environments.

  10. Expression of a kinase-dead form of CPK33 involved in florigen complex formation causes delayed flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Nozomi; Endo, Motomu; Araki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of flowering time is crucial for reproductive success of plants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein is a central component of florigen and forms a ternary complex with 14-3-3 and FD, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, in the shoot apex and promotes flowering. This complex formation requires phosphorylation of threonine residue at position 282 of FD. A calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK33 is responsible for the phosphorylation. However, possibly due to functional redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases, impact of the loss of CPK33 reported in the previous study was rather limited. Here, we report that expression of a kinase-dead form of CPK33 caused a clear delayed-flowering phenotype, supporting for an important role of CPK33 in florigen function through FD phosphorylation.

  11. Contamination status and accumulation profiles of organotins in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoko; Takahashi, Shin; Agusa, Tetsuro; Thomas, Nancy J; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2008-04-01

    Organotin compounds (OTs) including mono- to tri-butyltins, -phenyltins, and -octyltins were determined in the liver of adult sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, and Alaska in the USA and Kamchatka, Russia. Total concentrations of OTs in sea otters from California ranged from 34 to 4100ng/g on a wet weight basis. The order of concentrations of OTs in sea otters was total butyltins>total octyltins> or = total phenyltins. Elevated concentrations of butyltins (BTs) were found in some otters classified under 'infectious-disease' mortality category. Concentrations of BTs in few of these otters were close to or above the threshold levels for adverse health effects. Total butyltin concentrations decreased significantly in the livers of California sea otters since the 1990s. Based on the concentrations of organotins in sea otters collected from 1992 to 2002, the half-lives of tributyltin and total butyltins in sea otters were estimated to be approximately three years.

  12. The evolution of the Dead Sea brine during the last 220 ky as revealed by porewater Cl-, Na+ and δ18O in ICDP deep core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Boaz; Levy, Elan J.; Sivan, Orit; Yechieli, Joseph; Antler, Gilad; Gavrieli, Ittai; Stein, Mordechai

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition of pore brines extracted from 456 m long core drilled by the ICDP during 2011 in the deep basin (water depth of 300 m) of the Dead Sea provides a history of the evolution of the Dead Sea brine during the last 220 ky. The vertical profiles of chloride (Cl-) sodium (Na+) and oxygen isotopes (δ18O) in the core show that during that period the bottom water mass (hypolimnion) of the lake was always hyper-saline and its salinity did not dropped below ~70 % of that of the modern Dead Sea. The lake underwent three major hyper-arid periods that lasted altogether about 30 ky and deposited ~150 m of halite and gypsum. These periods were the last two interglacials and the postglacial till present. During the last glacial and particularly during MIS2 (~31-17 ka BP) the salinity of the lake dropped substantially due to excess input of freshwater as indicated by the decrease in Cl- and Na+ of the hypolimnion. The δ18O at the same period increased to maximum of ~7‰ (3‰ higher than today). The variations in Na+ and Cl- during the "freshening" period suggest that halite dissolution, probably due to the rise of mount Sedom diapir, "buffered" the brine from further drop in salinity. The dilution of the brine was slow and lasted more than 10 ky probably due to continuous turbulent mixing of the hypolimnion with the less saline high δ18O epilimnetic brine that underwent "normal" evaporation. The low δ18O during high salinity -halite deposition- periods is attributed to "reversed" behavior of δ18O during evaporation of high salinity brine. Massive precipitation of halite during the last 10 ky decreased sharply the Na+/Cl- ratio of the Dead Sea from ~0.7 to its present value of ~0.2. A similar low value was reached during the last interglacial, at ~120 ky. Both periods mark the most mature evaporative state of the lake during the last 220 ky.

  13. Planetesimal formation via sweep-up growth at the inner edge of dead zones

    CERN Document Server

    Drazkowska, J; Dullemond, C P

    2013-01-01

    The early stages of planet formation are still not well understood. Coagulation models have revealed numerous obstacles to the dust growth, such as the bouncing, fragmentation and radial drift barriers. We study the interplay between dust coagulation and drift in order to determine the conditions in protoplanetary disk that support the formation of planetesimals. We focus on planetesimal formation via sweep-up and investigate whether it can take place in a realistic protoplanetary disk. We have developed a new numerical model that resolves spatial distribution of dust in the radial and vertical dimension. The model uses representative particles approach to follow the dust evolution in protoplanetary disk. The coagulation and fragmentation of solids is taken into account using Monte Carlo method. A collision model adopting the mass transfer effect, that can occur for different-sized dust aggregate collisions, is implemented. We focus on a protoplanetary disk including a pressure bump caused by a steep decline ...

  14. Modelling sea ice formation in the Terra Nova Bay polynya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansiviero, M.; Morales Maqueda, M. Á.; Fusco, G.; Aulicino, G.; Flocco, D.; Budillon, G.

    2017-02-01

    Antarctic sea ice is constantly exported from the shore by strong near surface winds that open leads and large polynyas in the pack ice. The latter, known as wind-driven polynyas, are responsible for significant water mass modification due to the high salt flux into the ocean associated with enhanced ice growth. In this article, we focus on the wind-driven Terra Nova Bay (TNB) polynya, in the western Ross Sea. Brine rejected during sea ice formation processes that occur in the TNB polynya densifies the water column leading to the formation of the most characteristic water mass of the Ross Sea, the High Salinity Shelf Water (HSSW). This water mass, in turn, takes part in the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass of the world ocean, which plays a major role in the global meridional overturning circulation, thus affecting the global climate system. A simple coupled sea ice-ocean model has been developed to simulate the seasonal cycle of sea ice formation and export within a polynya. The sea ice model accounts for both thermal and mechanical ice processes. The oceanic circulation is described by a one-and-a-half layer, reduced gravity model. The domain resolution is 1 km × 1 km, which is sufficient to represent the salient features of the coastline geometry, notably the Drygalski Ice Tongue. The model is forced by a combination of Era Interim reanalysis and in-situ data from automatic weather stations, and also by a climatological oceanic dataset developed from in situ hydrographic observations. The sensitivity of the polynya to the atmospheric forcing is well reproduced by the model when atmospheric in situ measurements are combined with reanalysis data. Merging the two datasets allows us to capture in detail the strength and the spatial distribution of the katabatic winds that often drive the opening of the polynya. The model resolves fairly accurately the sea ice drift and sea ice production rates in the TNB polynya, leading to

  15. Temporal and Spatial Scales of Labrador Sea Water Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Labrador Sea Water is an intermediate water found at the same density and depth range in the North Atlantic as the Mediterranean water. It is formed by convection from the sea surface to depths greather than 2 km in winter in the Western Labrador Sea. The processes leading to deep convection begin with the formation of a 200 km scale cyclonic circulation about denser than average upper layer water in the Western Labrador Sea. This circulation pattern is hypothesized to be driven by an ocean/atmosphere heat exchange that has its maximum in this region. By early March, if deep convection is taking place, one sees that this body of denser upper waters penetrates to the top of the deep temperature/salinity maximum marking the core of the North Atlantic Deep Water. We note that the horizontal scale of this body is still 100-200 km normal to the coastline.

  16. The Structure and Formation Mechanism of a Sea Fog Event over the Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jingtian; LI Pengyuan; FU Gang; ZHANG Wei; GAO Shanhong; ZHANG Suping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a heavy sea fog event occurring over the Yellow Sea on 11 April 2004 was investigated based upon obser-vational and modeling analyses. From the observational analyses, this sea fog event is a typical advection cooling case. Sea surface temperature (SST) and specific humidity (SH) show strong gradients from south to north, in which warm water is located in the south and consequently, moisture is larger in the south than in the north due to evaporation processes. After fog formation, evaporation process provides more moisture into the air and further contributes to fog evolution. The sea fog event was reproduced by the Re-gional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) reasonably. The roles of important physical processes such as radiation, turbulence as well as atmospheric stratification in sea fog’s structure and its formation mechanisms were analyzed using the model results. The roles of long wave radiation cooling, turbulence as well as atmospheric stratification were analyzed based on the modeling results. It is found that the long wave radiative cooling at the fog top plays an important role in cooling down the fog layer through turbulence mixing. The fog top cooling can overpower warming from the surface. Sea fog develops upward with the aid of turbulence. The buoyancy term,i.e., the unstable layer, contributes to the generation of TKE in the fog region. However, the temperature inversion layer prevents fog from growing upward.

  17. Tectonic isolation of the Levant basin offshore Galilee-Lebanon effects of the Dead Sea fault plate boundary on the Levant continental margin, eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, U.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Lazar, M.; Hüebscher, C.

    2006-11-01

    The continental margin of the central Levant, offshore northern Israel and southern Lebanon is characterized by a sharp continental-oceanic crustal transition, exhibited on the bathymetry as a steep continental slope. At the base of the slope a narrow zone of faulting deforms the upper Messinian-recent sedimentary sequence. Further into the basin no major deformations are observed. However, onland a restraining bend along the Dead Sea fault plate boundary results in the formation of the Lebanon and anti-Lebanon mountain ranges, which exhibit a large positive isostatic anomaly not compensated at depth. All these geologic features follow a NNE-SSW trend. A dense network of multi-channel and single-channel seismic profiles, covering 5000 km of ship-track offshore northern Israel and southern Lebanon, was analyzed for the purpose of characterizing the continental margin. Additional seismic surveys covering the area between the Levant margin and the Cyprean arc were examined. Data were then incorporated with magnetic, gravity and earthquake measurements to reveal the deep crustal structure of the area and integrated with bathymetry data to describe the behavior of the young sedimentary basin fill. Results indicate that the Levant basin, offshore northern Israel and southern Lebanon (up to Beirut) is more-or-less unaffected by the intense tectonic deformation occurring onland. The transition between the deformed area onland and the undeformed Levant basin occurs along the base of the continental slope. Along the base, the upper Messinian-recent sedimentary sequence is cut by two sets of faults: shallow growth faults resulting from salt tectonics and high angle faults, marking the surface expression of a deeper crustal discontinuity - the marine extension of the Carmel fault zone. The central Levant continental margin is being reactivated by transpressional faulting of the marine continuation of the Carmel fault, at the base of the continental slope. This fault system

  18. Sand ripples under sea waves. Part 4. Tile ripple formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Pieter C.; Blondeaux, P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the formation of small-scale three-dimensional bedforms due to interactions of an erodible bed with a sea wave that obliquely approaches the coast, being partially reflected at the beach. In this case the trajectories of fluid particles at the top of the bottom boundary layer are

  19. Calibration of commercial microwave link derived- rainfall and its relevance to flash flood occurrence in the Dead Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Adam; Alpert, Pinhas; Raich, Roi; Laronne, Jonathan; Merz, Ralf; Geyer, Stefan; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods are a common phenomenon in arid and semi-arid areas such as the Dead Sea. These floods are generated due to a combination of short lasting, yet intense rainfall and typical low infiltration rates. The rare flow events in ephemeral rivers have significant importance in the replenishment of groundwater via transmission losses and in sustaining the vivid ecology of drylands. In some cases, flash floods cause severe damage to infrastructure as well as to private property, constituting a threat to human life. The temporal variation of rainfall intensity is the main driver generating the majority of flash floods in the Judean Desert, hence its monitoring is crucial in this area as in other remote arid areas worldwide. Cellular communication towers are profusely located. Commercial Microwave Links (CML) attenuation data obtained by cellular companies can be used for environmental monitoring. Rain is one of the most effective meteorological phenomena to attenuate a CML signal which, unlike radar backscatter, relates to near-surface conditions and is, therefore, suitable for surface hydrology. A 16 km CML crosses the Wadi Ze'elim drainage basin (~250 square kilometers), at the outlet of which the discharge is calculated using the Manning formula. The hydrometric data include accurate longitudinal and cross sectional measurements, water level and importantly mean water surface velocity when present during a flash flood. The latter is first-ever obtained in desert flash floods by portable, radar-based surface velocimetry. Acquisition of water velocity data is essential to avoid assuming a constant roughness coefficient, thereby more accurately calculating water discharge. Calibrating the CML-rain intensity, derived from the International Telecommunication Union (ITU)'s power law, is necessary to correlate the surface hydrologic response to the link. Our calibration approach is as follows: all the Israel Meteorological Service C-band radar cells over the CML

  20. Removing Regional Trends in Microgravity in Complex Environments: Testing on 3D Model and Field Investigations in the Eastern Dead Sea Coast (Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Zoubi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity investigations are now recognized as a powerful tool for subsurface imaging and especially for the localization of underground karsts. However numerous natural (geological, technical, and environmental factors interfere with microgravity survey processing and interpretation. One of natural factors that causes the most disturbance in complex geological environments is the influence of regional trends. In the Dead Sea coastal areas the influence of regional trends can exceed residual gravity effects by some tenfold. Many widely applied methods are unable to remove regional trends with sufficient accuracy. We tested number of transformation methods (including computing gravity field derivatives, self-adjusting and adaptive filtering, Fourier series, wavelet, and other procedures on a 3D model (complicated by randomly distributed noise, and field investigations were carried out in Ghor Al-Haditha (the eastern side of the Dead Sea in Jordan. We show that the most effective methods for regional trend removal (at least for the theoretical and field cases here are the bilinear saddle and local polynomial regressions. Application of these methods made it possible to detect the anomalous gravity effect from buried targets in the theoretical model and to extract the local gravity anomaly at the Ghor Al-Haditha site. The local anomaly was utilized for 3D gravity modeling to construct a physical-geological model (PGM.

  1. Short-scale variations of shear-wave splitting across the Dead Sea basin: Evidence for the effects of sedimentary fill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Ayoub; Rümpker, Georg; Weber, Michael; Asch, Günter

    2011-02-01

    We examine shear-wave splitting of SKS waveforms collected by a temporary array of 68 stations in the region of the Dead Sea basin. The observed splitting parameters exhibit systematic variations along a dense, EW-trending 60 km profile across the basin. The delay times vary significantly between 1.0 and 2.8 seconds with smaller values in the very center of the profile. The fast polarizations are oriented more-or-less parallel to the strike of the Dead Sea transform fault and vary between -10 and 20 degrees with respect to North. Finite-frequency waveform modeling reveals that the source-region of the small-scale lateral variations is likely located within the crust. The modeling further shows that purely isotropic velocity variations affect shear-wave splitting: To a large degree, the observed variations of splitting parameters can be explained by the sedimentary fill of the basin and its low isotropic seismic velocities, whereas the mantle is uniformly anisotropic. Our study indicates that precaution must be taken when interpreting short-scale lateral variations of shear wave splitting in terms of anisotropic structures in the crust or upper mantle.

  2. The measurement and analysis of normal incidence solar UVB radiation and its application to the photoclimatherapy protocol for psoriasis at the Dead Sea, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Avraham I; Harari, Marco; Evseev, Efim G

    2011-01-01

    The broad-band normal incidence UVB beam radiation has been measured at Neve Zohar, Dead Sea basin, using a prototype tracking instrument composed of a Model 501A UV-Biometer mounted on an Eppley Solar Tracker Model St-1. The diffuse and beam fraction of the solar global UVB radiation have been determined using the concurrently measured solar global UVB radiation. The diffuse fraction was observed to exceed 80% throughout the year. The application of the results of these measurements to the possible revision of the photoclimatherapy protocol for psoriasis patients at the Dead Sea medical spas is now under investigation. The suggested revision would enable the sun-exposure treatment protocol to take advantage of the very high diffuse fraction by allowing the patient to receive the daily dose of UVB radiation without direct exposure to the sun, viz. receive the diffuse UVB radiation under a sunshade. This would require an increase in sun-exposure time intervals, as the UVB radiation intensity beneath a sunshade is less than that on an exposed surface.

  3. Significant immediate and long-term improvement in quality of life and disease coping in patients with vitiligo after group climatotherapy at the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Christian; Smythe, Jim W; Spencer, Jennifer D; Hasse, Sybille; Panske, Angela; Chiuchiarelli, Giorgia; Schallreuter, Karin U

    2011-03-01

    Quality of life in patients with vitiligo is impaired. This study explored the immediate effect of 20 days of climatotherapy at the Dead Sea on quality of life, coping with the disease, general well-being and individual stress levels in a group of 71 patients with vitiligo and 42 matched controls. The long-term effect was assessed after 12 months in 33/71 patients and 12/42 controls. Study instruments were Dermatology Life Quality Index, Beck Depression Inventory and the Adjustment to Chronic Skin Disorders Questionnaire. Stress measurements were based on cortisol and β-endorphin concentrations in saliva samples. Quality of life was significantly improved at day 20 at the Dead Sea compared with day 1, and this was still significant after 12 months. Moreover, social anxiety/avoidance, anxious-depressive mood and helplessness as measured by the Adjustment to Chronic Skin Disorders Questionnaire were significantly reduced. There was no difference in levels of cortisol and β-endorphin between patients and controls, indicating that stress per se is not a significant contributor in vitiligo. In conclusion, therapy in patient groups offers an effective tool for long-lasting improvement in quality of life and patients' well-being.

  4. Seismic imaging of deep low-velocity zone beneath the Dead Sea basin and transform fault: Implications for strain localization and crustal rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, U.S.; Al-Zoubi, A. S.; Flores, C.H.; Rotstein, Y.; Qabbani, I.; Harder, S.H.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2006-01-01

    New seismic observations from the Dead Sea basin (DSB), a large pull-apart basin along the Dead Sea transform (DST) plate boundary, show a low velocity zone extending to a depth of 18 km under the basin. The lower crust and Moho are not perturbed. These observations are incompatible with the current view of mid-crustal strength at low temperatures and with support of the basin's negative load by a rigid elastic plate. Strain softening in the middle crust is invoked to explain the isostatic compensation and the rapid subsidence of the basin during the Pleistocene. Whether the deformation is influenced by the presence of fluids and by a long history of seismic activity on the DST, and what the exact softening mechanism is, remain open questions. The uplift surrounding the DST also appears to be an upper crustal phenomenon but its relationship to a mid-crustal strength minimum is less clear. The shear deformation associated with the transform plate boundary motion appears, on the other hand, to cut throughout the entire crust. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Subsidence and conversion of the Dead Sea basin to an inland erosion base level in the early middle Miocene as inferred from geomorphological analysis of its ancient western fluvial outlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Oded; Zilberman, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    The first major subsidence of the Dead Sea pull-apart basin (DSB) is evidenced by the thick Hufeira Member of the terrestrial Hazeva Formation. The age of the Hufeira Member and the conversion of the DSB to an inland erosion base level are not well constrained. For this purpose we studied the effect of the evolving basin on its ancient fluvial outlet to the Arad-Be'er Sheva Valley (ABSV), which served as a Miocene corridor between the embryonic DSB region in the east and the Mediterranean Sea in the west. We mapped and analyzed the morphostratigraphy of four series of rock-cut erosion surfaces (from top to bottom: the Barir, Kuseifa, Ar'ara, and Shemen surfaces). They are manifested in the east as fluvial erosion surfaces, capped by conglomerates, passing laterally westward to marine wave-cut surfaces, capped by a shallow marine limestone of the early middle Miocene Ziqlag Formation. The age of these surfaces is constrained to the early middle Miocene (Langhian) based on morphostratigraphy correlation with the Ziqlag Formation. Paleogeographic reconstruction of the two higher and older surfaces reveals transverse valleys, which drained the DSB region and crossed the present route of the regional water divide. These transverse valleys were presumably the western outlets to the Mediterranean Sea of the newly subsiding basin. Precambrian components in the assemblage of the clasts that cover the Kuseifa surface were not found in the Hufeira Member and thus reflect an ongoing post-Hufeira exumation of the DSB drainage basin. Hence, this early middle Miocene surface postdates the Hufeira Member, assigning an age of late early Miocene to the first major subsidence of the DSB. The two lower and younger surfaces represent local drainage systems confined to the ABSV. This transition from regional to local drainage system marks the establishment of the present regional water divide and the conversion of the DSB to an inland erosion base level during the early middle Miocene.

  6. An example of aerosol pattern variability over bright surface using high resolution MODIS MAIAC: The eastern and western areas of the Dead Sea and environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Lee; Alpert, Pinhas; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie; Chudnovsky, Alexandra

    2017-09-01

    The extreme rate of evaporation of the Dead Sea (DS) has serious implications for the surrounding area, including atmospheric conditions. This study analyzes the aerosol properties over the western and eastern parts of the DS during the year 2013, using MAIAC (Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction) for MODIS, which retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD) data at a resolution of 1 km. The main goal of the study is to evaluate MAIAC over the study area and determine, for the first time, the prevailing aerosol spatial patterns. First, the MAIAC-derived AOD data was compared with data from three nearby AERONET sites (Nes Ziona - an urban site, and Sede Boker and Masada - two arid sites), and with the conventional Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) retrievals for the same days and locations, on a monthly basis throughout 2013. For the urban site, the correlation coefficient (r) for DT/DB products showed better performance than MAIAC (r = 0.80, 0.75, and 0.64 respectively) year-round. However, in the arid zones, MAIAC showed better correspondence to AERONET sites than the conventional retrievals (r = 0.58-0.60 and 0.48-0.50 respectively). We investigated the difference in AOD levels, and its variability, between the Dead Sea coasts on a seasonal basis and calculated monthly/seasonal AOD averages for presenting AOD patterns over arid zones. Thus, we demonstrated that aerosol concentrations show a strong preference for the western coast, particularly during the summer season. This preference, is most likely a result of local anthropogenic emissions combined with the typical seasonal synoptic conditions, the Mediterranean Sea breeze, and the region complex topography. Our results also indicate that a large industrial zone showed higher AOD levels compared to an adjacent reference-site, i.e., 13% during the winter season.

  7. Storm surges formation in the White and Barents Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, Victor; Dobrolyubov, Sergey; Korablina, Anastasia; Myslenkov, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of storm surges in the Arctic seas are of high priority in Russia due to the active development of offshore oil and gas, construction of facilities in the coastal zone, as well as for the safety of navigation. It is important to study the variability of surges, to predict this phenomena and subsequent economic losses, thus including such information into the Russian Arctic Development Program 2020. Surges in the White and Barents Seas are caused mainly by deep cyclones of two types: "diving" from the north (88% of all cyclones) and western. The average height of the storm surges in the White Sea is 0.6-0.9 m. An average duration of storm surges is about 80 hours. Mathematical modeling is used to analyze the characteristics of storm surges formation in the Dvina Bay of the White Sea, and in the Varandey village on the Barents Sea coast. Calculating storm surge heights in the White and Barents seas is performed using the ADCIRC model on an unstructured grid with a step from 20 km in the Barents Sea to 100 m in the White Sea. Unstructured grids allowed keeping small features of the coastline of the White and Barents seas, small islands and shallow banks, and assessing their impact on the development and transformation of wind-generated waves. The ADCIRC model used data of wind field reanalysis CFSv2. The storm surges were simulated for the time period from 1979 to 2010 and included scenarios with / without direct atmospheric pressure forcing, waves and tides. Numerical experiments have revealed distribution of storm surges in channels of the Northern Dvina River delta. The storm surges spreads in the model from the north-north-west of the Dvina Bay. As storm surge moves from the wellhead to the seaside estuary of the Northern Dvina (district Solombala), its height increases from 0.5 to 2 m. We also found a non-linear interaction of the surge and tide during the phase of surge destruction. This phenomenon is the highest in the period of low water, and the

  8. How Dead are Dead Galaxies? Mid-Infrared Fluxes of Quiescent Galaxies at Redshift 0.3Star Formation Rates and Dust Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; vanDokkum, Pieter; Brammer, Gabriel; DaCunha, Elisabete; FoersterSchreiber, Natascha M.; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Pacifici, Camilla; Skelton, Rosalind E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rates of quiescent galaxies at high redshift (0.3 star formation rates for quiescent galaxies (sSFR approx. 10(exp -12)/yr. However, SED fitting can miss star formation if it is hidden behind high dust obscuration and ionizing radiation is re-emitted in the mid-infrared. It is therefore fundamental to measure the dust-obscured SFRs with a mid-IR indicator. We stack the MIPS-24 micron images of quiescent objects in five redshift bins centered on z = 0.5, 0.9, 1.2, 1.7, 2.2 and perform aperture photometry. Including direct 24 micron detections, we find sSFR approx. 10(exp -11.9) × (1 + z)(sup 4)/yr. These values are higher than those indicated by SED fitting, but at each redshift they are 20-40 times lower than those of typical star forming galaxies. The true SFRs of quiescent galaxies might be even lower, as we show that the mid-IR fluxes can be due to processes unrelated to ongoing star formation, such as cirrus dust heated by old stellar populations and circumstellar dust. Our measurements show that star formation quenching is very efficient at every redshift. The measured SFR values are at z > 1.5 marginally consistent with the ones expected from gas recycling (assuming that mass loss from evolved stars refuels star formation) and well above that at lower redshifts.

  9. Dead-ice environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Kötlujökull transports considerable amounts of supraglacial debris at its snout because of frontal oscillations with frequent ice advances followed by ice-margin stagnation. Kötlujökull provides suitable conditions of studying dead-ice melting and landscape formation in a debris-charged lowland...... glacier environment. The scientific challenges are to answer the key questions. What are the conditions for dead-ice formation? From which sources does the sediment cover originate? Which melting and reworking processes act in the ice-cored moraines? What is the rate of de-icing in the ice-cored moraines...... and conclusions on dead-ice melting and landscape formation from Kötlujökull. Processes and landform-sediment associations are linked to the current climate and glacier–volcano interaction....

  10. Study of the factors affecting the karst volume assessment in the Dead Sea sinkhole problem using microgravity field analysis and 3-D modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Eppelbaum

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of sinkholes have appeared in the Dead Sea (DS coastal area in Israel and Jordan during two last decades. The sinkhole development is recently associated with the buried evaporation karst at the depth of 25–50 m from earth's surface caused by the drop of the DS level at the rate of 0.8–1.0 m/yr. Drop in the Dead Sea level has changed hydrogeological conditions in the subsurface and caused surface to collapse. The pre-existing cavern was detected using microgravity mapping in the Nahal Hever South site where seven sinkholes of 1–2 m diameter had been opened. About 5000 gravity stations were observed in the area of 200×200 m2 by the use of Scintrex CG-3M AutoGrav gravimeter. Besides the conventional set of corrections applied in microgravity investigations, a correction for a strong gravity horizontal gradient (DS Transform Zone negative gravity anomaly influence was inserted. As a result, residual gravity anomaly of –(0.08÷0.14 mGal was revealed. The gravity field analysis was supported by resistivity measurements. We applied the Emigma 7.8 gravity software to create the 3-D physical-geological models of the sinkholes development area. The modeling was confirmed by application of the GSFC program developed especially for 3-D combined gravity-magnetic modeling in complicated environments. Computed numerous gravity models verified an effective applicability of the microgravity technology for detection of karst cavities and estimation of their physical-geological parameters. A volume of the karst was approximately estimated as 35 000 m3. The visual analysis of large sinkhole clusters have been forming at the microgravity anomaly site, confirmed the results of microgravity mapping and 3-D modeling.

  11. Incision of alluvial channels in response to a continuous base level fall: Field characterization, modeling, and validation along the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moshe, L.; Haviv, I.; Enzel, Y.; Zilberman, E.; Matmon, A.

    2008-01-01

    The dramatic lake level drop of the Dead Sea during the twentieth century (˜ 30 m) provides a field-scale experiment in transport-limited incision of gravel-bed channels in response to quasi-continuous base level fall at approximately constant rate. We apply a one-dimensional numerical incision model based on a linear diffusion equation to seven ephemeral channels draining into the Dead Sea. The model inputs include the measured twentieth century lake level curve, annual shoreline location (i.e., annual channel lengthening following the lake level drop), reconstructed longitudinal profiles of each of the channels based on mapped and surveyed terraces, and the current profiles of the active channels. The model parameters included the diffusion coefficient and the upstream-derived sediment flux. Both were first calibrated using a set of longitudinal profiles of known ages and then validated using additional sets of longitudinal profiles. The maximum at-station total incision observed at each of the studied channels was significantly less then the total lake level drop and varied in response to both drainage area and lake bathymetry. The model applied predicted degradation rates and the pattern of degradation with high accuracy. This suggests that sediment flux in the modeled channels is indeed linearly dependent on slope. Further support for this linear dependency is provided by a linear correlation between the diffusion coefficient and the mean annual rain volume over each basin (a proxy for discharge). The model presented could be a valuable tool for planning in rapid base level fall environments where incision may risk infrastructure.

  12. Hydroclimatic variability in the Levant during the early last glacial (∼ 117–75 ka derived from micro-facies analyses of deep Dead Sea sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Neugebauer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The new sediment record from the deep Dead Sea basin (ICDP core 5017-1 provides a unique archive for hydroclimatic variability in the Levant. Here, we present high-resolution sediment facies analysis and elemental composition by μXRF scanning of core 5017-1 to trace lake levels and responses of the regional hydroclimatology during the time interval from ca 117–75 ka, i.e. the transition between the last interglacial and the onset of the last glaciation. We distinguished six major micro-facies types and interpreted these and their alterations in the core in terms of relative lake level changes. The two end-member facies for highest and lowest lake levels are (a up to several meters thick, greenish sediments of alternating aragonite and detrital marl laminae (aad and (b thick halite facies, respectively. Intermediate lake levels are characterised by detrital marls with varying amounts of aragonite, gypsum or halite, reflecting lower-amplitude, shorter-term variability. Two intervals of pronounced lake level drops occurred at ∼110–108 ± 5 and ∼93–87 ± 7 ka. They likely coincide with stadial conditions in the central Mediterranean (Melisey I and II pollen zones in Monticchio and low global sea levels during MIS 5d and 5b. However, our data do not support the current hypothesis of an almost complete desiccation of the Dead Sea during the earlier of these lake level low stands based on a recovered gravel layer. Based on new petrographic analyses, we propose that, although it was a low stand, this well-sorted gravel layer may be a vestige of a thick turbidite that has been washed out during drilling rather than an in-situ beach deposit. Two intervals of higher lake stands at ∼108–93 ± 6 and ∼87–75 ± 7 ka correspond to interstadial conditions in the central Mediterranean, i.e. pollen zones St. Germain I and II in Monticchio, and GI 24 + 23 and 21 in Greenland, as well as to sapropels S4 and S3 in the Mediterranean Sea. These

  13. The 11th Century Collapse of Aqaba on the North Coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Fault System, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Tina; Allison, Alivia; Rucker, John

    2010-05-01

    The city of Aqaba is situated at the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba along the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform Fault. Based both on the historical accounts and archaeological excavations, it is clear that earthquakes have played a significant role in the history of the region. The early Islamic city of Ayla was probably founded around 650 A.D., suffered some damage as a result of the 748 A.D. earthquake, and saw extensive reconstruction around the beginning of the Abbasid period (Whitcomb, 1994). Among other evidence of earthquake destruction at the Islamic city of Ayla is the leaning city Sea wall. Stratified pottery collections from our February 2009 excavation of the buttress of the city wall of Ayla strongly suggest a date for revetment construction in the early 11th Century. Based on the fact that the most recent pottery from sealed loci inside the buttress wall is late Abbasid - Fatimid and the absence of handmade pottery often found in the abandonment phases, the buttress was likely constructed after liquefaction damage from the 1033 earthquake. Damage from distant source earthquakes (748 and 1033) in the ancient city was repaired in antiquity. The destruction and loss of life (accounts claim that all but 12 residents who had been out fishing were killed) caused by the 1068 earthquake may account for the relative ease with which Baldwin I of Jerusalem took over when he arrived with a small retinue in 1116 A.D. Paleoseismic trenches in the modern city of Aqaba indicate that at least two earthquakes have occurred after deposits dated to 1045-1278 A.D. A preliminary analysis of the stratigraphy in new trenches in the Taba sabkha north of Aqaba shows at least three separate faulting events, with the most recent event located at a depth of 70 cm below the ground surface. This finding supports the initial ground penetrating radar survey conducted at the southern end of the Taba sabkha by Abueladas (2005). These data document a long period of quiescence

  14. Seasonal Hypoxia of Amursky Bay in the Japan Sea: Formation and Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Ya. Tishchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on detailed hydrological and hydrochemical surveys carried out in each of the four seasons of 2008, Amursky Bay in the north west quadrant of the Japan Sea was found to experience seasonal hypoxia. The primary process of hypoxia formation is a microbiological degradation of the ¡§excess¡¨ amount of diatoms under rather low photosynthetic active radiation in bottom layer and weak water dynamics. The microbiological decay of dead diatoms under light deficient conditions intensively consumes dissolved oxygen and produces phosphates, ammonium, silicates, and dissolved inorganic carbon. Existence of a phytoplankton ¡§excess¡¨ is caused by phytoplankton bloom resulting from nutrient pulses into Amursky Bay. There are two main sources of these nutrients: the waste waters of Vladivostok city and discharge from Razdolnaya River. The river delivers more than two times the amount of nutrients than the waste waters of Vladivostok. It is suggested that the phytoplankton ¡§excess¡¨ might be caused by an enhanced supply of nutrients delivered into the surface layer resulting from the increased discharge of the river on a short time scale. Our data suggest that hypoxia is seasonal, with a peak at the end of summer. The upwelling of the Japan Sea water in the beginning of the fall season and its advection across the shelf is the primary process by which the hypoxia is destroyed. During the winter, strong vertical mixing due to termohaline convection makes the water column uniform and brings more oxygen into the water along with high primary production under the ice. Thus, during the winter season, the ecosystem of Amursky Bay recovers completely.

  15. PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON EFFICACY OF MECHANICAL OBLITERATION OF DEAD SPACE FOLLOWING AXILLARY CLEARANCE FOR CARCINOMA BREAST IN REDUCING THE INCIDENCE OF SEROMA FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Murugiah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Seroma formation and its sequelae including infection, flap necrosis, delayed wound healing and patient discomfort form one of most commonly encountered complication following mastectomy and axillary dissection. Mechanical closure of dead space by flap fixation is a simple surgical procedure that eliminates dead space after mastectomy by decreasing the movement of flap over chest wall and thereby reducing the exudate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of mechanical closure of dead space after mastectomy in prevention of seroma formation. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 patients of carcinoma breast who underwent modified radical mastectomy in Department of General Surgery, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, during the period from March 2016 to August 2016, were included, randomised into two groups based on inpatient number. 42 patients with odd IP number in conventional simple wound closure (Group A and 38 patients with even IP number in flap fixation (Group B. Patients were evaluated for day 1 drain volume, total drain volume, drain removal day, seroma and wound complications. RESULTS Of the 80 women, 42 women with mean age 48 ± 8 years belongs to group A and 38 women with mean age 46 ± 7 years belongs to group B. Average size of the tumour at presentation was 3.4 cm. 36 (45% women presented with stage IIA disease and 44 (55% with stage IIB disease. Drain volume in first postoperative day varied from 100 to 200 mL with average of 170 mL in group A and 163 mL in group B. There was no statistically significant difference in the drain volume in first postoperative day (p>0.05. The average total drain volume in the postoperative period in group A was 1426 mL and 932 mL in group B. P value was found to be significant (0.05. One patient developed wound complication (cellulitis vs. none in group B. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of wound complications in both groups. CONCLUSION The

  16. Dead Man or Dead Hand?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringe, Wolf-Georg

    and potential takeover bids. Recent Delaware case-law suggests that the most extreme, ‘dead hand’ version of such clauses might violate directors’ fiduciary duties. This short article develops some initial thoughts on the phenomenon and evaluates how the new poison pills would be handled under European takeover...

  17. Histological evaluation of the healing properties of Dead Sea black mud on full-thickness excision cutaneous wounds in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-al-Basal, Mariam A

    2012-04-01

    Dead Sea (DS) mud and salts are known for their therapeutic and cosmetic properties. Previous studies confirmed their efficacy in treating the more frequent skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the wound healing potential of natural and compounded skin-care product (facial mask) of DS black mud in BALB/c mice. Two full-thickness excision round wounds were created on the dorsum region of mouse. Each wound of mice test group were treated topically with 50 microL of 0.1% natural or compounded DS black mud or 50 microL of 0.2% nitrofurazone once a day for 2 consecutive days and the mice control group were left untreated. Healing was assessed by measuring the granulation tissue weight and percentage of wound contraction at day 3, 7, 14 and 21 after wounding. In addition to period of epithelialization and histological evaluation of the regenerated wound area at day 7 and 14 after wounding. Results revealed that DS black mud accelerate wound healing process by enhancing granulation, wound contraction, epithelialization, angiogenesis and collagen deposition. This may be due to high content of minerals and trace elements that possibly act as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant with enhancement effect on cell proliferation, migration and fibroblast cellular activity. However, the healing property of DS black mud compounded in skin-care product was greater than that of natural black mud, when compared to reference drug, nitrofurazone.

  18. Different routes to the same ending: comparing the N-glycosylation processes of Haloferax volcanii and Haloarcula marismortui, two halophilic archaea from the Dead Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Eichler, Jerry

    2011-09-01

    Recent insight into the N-glycosylation pathway of the haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii, is helping to bridge the gap between our limited understanding of the archaeal version of this universal post-translational modification and the better-described eukaryal and bacterial processes. To delineate as yet undefined steps of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, a comparative approach was taken with the initial characterization of N-glycosylation in Haloarcula marismortui, a second haloarchaeon also originating from the Dead Sea. While both species decorate the reporter glycoprotein, the S-layer glycoprotein, with the same N-linked pentasaccharide and employ dolichol phosphate as lipid glycan carrier, species-specific differences in the two N-glycosylation pathways exist. Specifically, Har. marismortui first assembles the complete pentasaccharide on dolichol phosphate and only then transfers the glycan to the target protein, as in the bacterial N-glycosylation pathway. In contrast, Hfx. volcanii initially transfers the first four pentasaccharide subunits from a common dolichol phosphate carrier to the target protein and only then delivers the final pentasaccharide subunit from a distinct dolichol phosphate to the N-linked tetrasaccharide, reminiscent of what occurs in eukaryal N-glycosylation. This study further indicates the extraordinary diversity of N-glycosylation pathways in Archaea, as compared with the relatively conserved parallel processes in Eukarya and Bacteria.

  19. Evidence for ground-rupturing earthquakes on the Northern Wadi Araba fault at the archaeological site of Qasr Tilah, Dead Sea Transform fault system, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeremy M.; Niemi, Tina M.; Atallah, Mohammad

    2006-10-01

    The archaeological site of Qasr Tilah, in the Wadi Araba, Jordan is located on the northern Wadi Araba fault segment of the Dead Sea Transform. The site contains a Roman-period fort, a late Byzantine Early Umayyad birkeh (water reservoir) and aqueduct, and agricultural fields. The birkeh and aqueduct are left-laterally offset by coseismic slip across the northern Wadi Araba fault. Using paleoseismic and archaeological evidence collected from a trench excavated across the fault zone, we identified evidence for four ground-rupturing earthquakes. Radiocarbon dating from key stratigraphic horizons and relative dating using potsherds constrains the dates of the four earthquakes from the sixth to the nineteenth centuries. Individual earthquakes were dated to the seventh, ninth and eleventh centuries. The fault strand that slipped during the most recent event (MRE) extends to just below the modern ground surface and juxtaposes alluvial-fan sediments that lack in datable material with the modern ground surface, thus preventing us from dating the MRE except to constrain the event to post-eleventh century. These data suggest that the historical earthquakes of 634 or 659/660, 873, 1068, and 1546 probably ruptured this fault segment.

  20. Different routes to the same ending: comparing the N-glycosylation processes of Haloferax volcanii and Haloarcula marismortui, two halophilic archaea from the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Eichler, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent insight into the N-glycosylation pathway of the haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii, is helping to bridge the gap between our limited understanding of the archaeal version of this universal post-translational modification and the better-described eukaryal and bacterial processes. To delineate as yet undefined steps of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway, a comparative approach was taken with the initial characterization of N-glycosylation in Haloarcula marismortui, a second haloarchaeon also originating from the Dead Sea. While both species decorate the reporter glycoprotein, the S-layer glycoprotein, with the same N-linked pentasaccharide and employ dolichol phosphate as lipid glycan carrier, species-specific differences in the two N-glycosylation pathways exist. Specifically, Har. marismortui first assembles the complete pentasaccharide on dolichol phosphate and only then transfers the glycan to the target protein, as in the bacterial N-glycosylation pathway. In contrast, Hfx. volcanii initially transfers the first four pentasaccharide subunits from a common dolichol phosphate carrier to the target protein and only then delivers the final pentasaccharide subunit from a distinct dolichol phosphate to the N-linked tetrasaccharide, reminiscent of what occurs in eukaryal N-glycosylation. This study further indicates the extraordinary diversity of N-glycosylation pathways in Archaea, as compared with the relatively conserved parallel processes in Eukarya and Bacteria. PMID:21815949

  1. Fleeing to Fault Zones: Incorporating Syrian Refugees into Earthquake Risk Analysis along the East Anatolian and Dead Sea Rift Fault Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B.; Paradise, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    The influx of millions of Syrian refugees into Turkey has rapidly changed the population distribution along the Dead Sea Rift and East Anatolian Fault zones. In contrast to other countries in the Middle East where refugees are accommodated in camp environments, the majority of displaced individuals in Turkey are integrated into cities, towns, and villages—placing stress on urban settings and increasing potential exposure to strong shaking. Yet, displaced populations are not traditionally captured in data sources used in earthquake risk analysis or loss estimations. Accordingly, we present a district-level analysis assessing the spatial overlap of earthquake hazards and refugee locations in southeastern Turkey to determine how migration patterns are altering seismic risk in the region. Using migration estimates from the U.S. Humanitarian Information Unit, we create three district-level population scenarios that combine official population statistics, refugee camp populations, and low, median, and high bounds for integrated refugee populations. We perform probabilistic seismic hazard analysis alongside these population scenarios to map spatial variations in seismic risk between 2011 and late 2015. Our results show a significant relative southward increase of seismic risk for this period due to refugee migration. Additionally, we calculate earthquake fatalities for simulated earthquakes using a semi-empirical loss estimation technique to determine degree of under-estimation resulting from forgoing migration data in loss modeling. We find that including refugee populations increased casualties by 11-12% using median population estimates, and upwards of 20% using high population estimates. These results communicate the ongoing importance of placing environmental hazards in their appropriate regional and temporal context which unites physical, political, cultural, and socio-economic landscapes. Keywords: Earthquakes, Hazards, Loss-Estimation, Syrian Crisis, Migration

  2. Imaged brine inclusions in young sea ice—Shape, distribution and formation timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, R.J.; Else, B.G.T.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Liquid inclusions in sea ice are variable and dependent on the myriad of physical conditions of the atmosphere– sea ice environment in which the sea ice was grown, and whether or not melting processes affected the sea ice. In that light, there exist relatively few observations and resultant...... quantification of the morphology and vertical dis- tribution of brine inclusions in sea ice. Using a magnetic (3.0 T) resonance (MR) imager using constructive inter- ference steady state gradient echo sequence, we show that it is possible to image brine channels and pockets in an 18.5 cm young sea ice core...... in three-dimensions in only four and a half minutes following core storage at − 20 °C. We present a three-dimensional image of a brine drainage channel feature in a young sea ice core, give the phys- ical context for its formation by presenting the physical conditions of the atmosphere and water/sea ice...

  3. A DEAD box protein is required for formation of a hidden break in Arabidopsis chloroplast 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kenji; Ashida, Hiroki; Ogawa, Taro; Yokota, Akiho

    2010-09-01

    In plant chloroplasts, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the large subunit of the ribosome undergoes post-maturation fragmentation processing. This processing consists of site-specific cleavage that generates gapped, discontinuous rRNA molecules. However, the molecular mechanism underlying introduction of the gap structure (the 'hidden break') is poorly understood. Here, we found that the DEAD box protein RH39 plays a key role in introduction of the hidden break into the 23S rRNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Genetic screening for an Arabidopsis plant with a drastically reduced level of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase identified an RH39 mutant. The levels of other chloroplast-encoded photosynthetic proteins were also severely reduced. The reductions were not due to a failure of transcription, but rather inefficiency in translation. RNA gel blotting revealed incomplete fragmentation of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts during maturation. In vitro analysis with recombinant RH39 suggested that the protein binds to the adjacent sequence upstream of the hidden break site to exert its function. We propose a molecular mechanism for the RH39-mediated fragmentation processing of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts.

  4. DEAD-box helicase DDX27 regulates 3′ end formation of ribosomal 47S RNA and stably associates with the PeBoW-complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellner, Markus; Rohrmoser, Michaela [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Forné, Ignasi [Adolf Butenandt Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Schillerstr. 44, Munich 80336 (Germany); Voss, Kirsten; Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Gruber-Eber, Anita [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Kremmer, Elisabeth [Institute of Molecular Immunology, Helmholtz Center Munich, Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Imhof, Axel [Adolf Butenandt Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Schillerstr. 44, Munich 80336 (Germany); Eick, Dirk, E-mail: eick@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    PeBoW, a trimeric complex consisting of pescadillo (Pes1), block of proliferation (Bop1), and the WD repeat protein 12 (WDR12), is essential for processing and maturation of mammalian 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNAs. Applying a mass spectrometric analysis, we identified the DEAD-box helicase DDX27 as stably associated factor of the PeBoW-complex. DDX27 interacts with the PeBoW-complex via an evolutionary conserved F×F motif in the N-terminal domain and is recruited to the nucleolus via its basic C-terminal domain. This recruitment is RNA-dependent and occurs independently of the PeBoW-complex. Interestingly, knockdown of DDX27, but not of Pes1, induces the accumulation of an extended form of the primary 47S rRNA. We conclude that DDX27 can interact specifically with the Pes1 and Bop1 but fulfils critical function(s) for proper 3′ end formation of 47S rRNA independently of the PeBoW-complex. - Highlights: • DEAD-box helicase DDX27 is a new constituent of the PeBoW-complex. • The N-terminal F×F motif of DDX27 interacts with the PeBoW components Pes1 and Bop1. • Nucleolar anchoring of DDX27 via its basic C-terminal domain is RNA dependent. • Knockdown of DDX27 induces a specific defect in 3′ end formation of 47S rRNA.

  5. Formation and spreading of Arabian Sea high-salinity water mass

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Prasad, T.G.

    The formation and seasonal spreading of the Arabian Sea High-Salinity Water (ASHSW) mass were studied based on the monthly mean climatology of temperature and salinity in the Arabian Sea, north of the equator and west of 80 degrees E, on a 2 degrees...

  6. Tri-Millennial History of Earthquake Offsets of Tell Ateret on the Dead Sea Fault: a perfect time-predictable behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, S.; Agnon, A.; Ellenblum, R.

    2010-12-01

    The abundance of archaeological sites and historical documentation along the Dead Sea Fault (DSF) enables a higher resolution for dating of a tectonically active region. The site of Ateret (Jordan Gorge, north Israel), settled since Stone Age, displays abundant well dated walls that were repeatedly offset since the Early Bronze Age to 1759AD. The dated ruptures enable a kinematic reconstruction of this plate boundary, separating between the Arabia and the Sinai tectonic-plates. We have recently unearthed three consecutive offsets that supplement our published data to constrain a five-event catalogue spanning three millennia. The new catalog, totaling five events, sheds light on the distribution of slip in time and space. The archaeologic slip-rate obtained for the last 3 kyr is in perfect agreement with the 5 kyr value known form paleoseismic trenching. The average slip rate, 3 mm/yr, is ~60% of the GPS determined relative plate velocity. The discrepancy between the archaeologically measured slip and the GPS determined velocity is accommodated by diffuse off-fault deformation and possibly by elasticity. Examining the size distribution of detected slip events indicates that a uniform slip model is not compatible with the Jordan Gorge earthquake history: the largest/smallest slip ratio is ≥5. The complexity apparent in the catalog seems to stem from the nearby branching of the plate boundary, as suggested from the two latest events of 1202 AD and 1759 AD, each ruptured a different branch. The archaeologic data supplemented by allegedly dubious historical catalogs generate a perfect time-predictable model for three thousand years ending in the 1950’s. At that time we should have seen an earthquake rupture whilst the instrumental catalog is devoid of such an event. The 1837 AD M7 rupture of a yet smaller branch of the fault can explain the deviation from the model, highlighting the role of branching in generating complex behavior. Slip history at Tel Ateret

  7. Study on method of actinomycetes isolation from Dead Sea%死海嗜盐耐盐放线菌分离方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任海柯; 来航线; 王晨霞; 韦小敏

    2012-01-01

    【Objective】 The study was to explore an optimal method of actinomycetes isolation from Dead Sea,so as to improve the isolation of actinomycetes from soil with high salt concentration.【Method】 Actinomycete counts and numbers of actinomycete species were analyzed from three aspects:sample pre-treatments,cultural media and salt concentrations of media.Nine pre-treatments,including chemical,physical and accumulation culture methods,three types of cultural media,ISP5,HV and CMKA,and three salt concentrations of each medium(150,225,300 g/L) were tested.【Result】 ① For sample pre-treatments,numbers of actinomycete species isolated from the chemical+physical pre-treated sample were apparently higher than that from others,whereas species numbers isolated from the accumulation cultured sample were the least on three media.② With all of the three salt concentrations,numbers of actinomycete species and actinomycete counts isolated from soil samples both led a trend:CMKA〉HV〉ISP5.③ On three media,numbers of actinomycete species isolated from samples showed:300 g/L〉225 g/L〉150 g/L,while actinomycete counts showed:150 g/L〉225 g/L〉300 g/L.【Conclusion】 Pretreating soil samples with chemical+physical method and using 225 g/L salt concentration CMKA medium is the best way to isolate actinomycetes from Dead Sea.%【目的】探讨死海高盐地区分离嗜盐耐盐放线菌的最佳方法,为高盐地区放线菌的分离提供理论依据。【方法】采用物理方法(微波)、化学方法(加入孢子活化剂)、富集培养法及3种方法的组合共计9种方法,对死海地区土样进行预处理,然后在3种复合盐含量(150,225,300g/L)及不同培养基(ISP5、CMKA、HV)条件下,研究复合盐含量及培养基对分离放线菌种类和数量的影响,并筛选嗜盐耐盐放线菌的最佳分离方法。【结果】①在3种培养基上,对土样采用9种方法进行预处理,其中物理+化学

  8. Percolation blockage: A process that enables melt pond formation on first year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, Chris; Golden, Kenneth M.; Perovich, Donald K.; Skyllingstad, Eric; Arnsten, Alexandra; Stwertka, Carolyn; Wright, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Melt pond formation atop Arctic sea ice is a primary control of shortwave energy balance in the Arctic Ocean. During late spring and summer, the ponds determine sea ice albedo and how much solar radiation is transmitted into the upper ocean through the sea ice. The initial formation of ponds requires that melt water be retained above sea level on the ice surface. Both theory and observations, however, show that first year sea ice is so highly porous prior to the formation of melt ponds that multiday retention of water above hydraulic equilibrium should not be possible. Here we present results of percolation experiments that identify and directly demonstrate a mechanism allowing melt pond formation. The infiltration of fresh water into the pore structure of sea ice is responsible for blocking percolation pathways with ice, sealing the ice against water percolation, and allowing water to pool above sea level. We demonstrate that this mechanism is dependent on fresh water availability, known to be predominantly from snowmelt, and ice temperature at melt onset. We argue that the blockage process has the potential to exert significant control over interannual variability in ice albedo. Finally, we suggest that incorporating the mechanism into models would enhance their physical realism. Full treatment would be complex. We provide a simple temperature threshold-based scheme that may be used to incorporate percolation blockage behavior into existing model frameworks.

  9. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  10. Formation of Barents Sea Branch Water in the north-eastern Barents Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidar S. Lien

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Barents Sea throughflow accounts for approximately half of the Atlantic Water advection to the Arctic Ocean, while the other half flows through Fram Strait. Within the Barents Sea, the Atlantic Water undergoes considerable modifications before entering the Arctic Ocean through the St. Anna Trough. While the inflow area in the south-western Barents Sea is regularly monitored, oceanographic data from the outflow area to the north-east are very scarce. Here, we use conductivity, temperature and depth data from August/September 2008 to describe in detail the water masses present in the downstream area of the Barents Sea, their spatial distribution and transformations. Both Cold Deep Water, formed locally through winter convection and ice-freezing processes, and Atlantic Water, modified mainly through atmospheric cooling, contribute directly to the Barents Sea Branch Water. As a consequence, it consists of a dense core characterized by a temperature and salinity maximum associated with the Atlantic Water, in addition to the colder, less saline and less dense core commonly referred to as the Barents Sea Branch Water core. The denser core likely constitutes a substantial part of the total flow, and it is more saline and considerably denser than the Fram Strait branch as observed within the St. Anna Trough. Despite the recent warming of the Barents Sea, the Barents Sea Branch Water is denser than observed in the 1990s, and the bottom water observed in the St. Anna Trough matches the potential density at 2000 m depth in the Arctic Ocean.

  11. Slip rate determination along the Southern Dead Sea fault: optically stimulated luminescence, 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide, and 14C ages brought face to face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Beon, Maryline; Jaiswal, Manoj; Kunz, Alexander; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Burr, George; Klinger, Yann; Moumani, Khaled; Chen, Yue-Gau; Abdelghafoor, Mohammed; Suppe, John

    2014-05-01

    Active tectonics studies are often limited by difficulties in accurately and precisely dating Late Quaternary alluvial deposits that commonly lack organic matter or date beyond the 14C dating limit. This is illustrated at a site called Fidan, in arid southern Jordan, where a series of alluvial fans are laterally offset by the southern Dead Sea fault. Geodetic, geomorphic and geologic studies converge to a fault slip rate of 5 ± 2 mm/a. Yet, Late Pleistocene slip rate at Fidan cover a wide range due to the dispersion of 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) ages. The maximum slip rate since ~100 ka is up to a value of 11 mm/a, possibly suggesting significant variations in fault activity with time. In order to reduce the uncertainty on the Late Pleistocene slip rate and draw further conclusions regarding the fault seismic behavior, we implement complementary dating using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques on both quartz and K-feldspar minerals and using 14C when possible. OSL measurements include a newly developed technique called post-infra-red infra-red stimulated luminescence at 290°C (pIR290). We extensively sampled surface levels F2 and F4, digging ~50-cm deep pits into the geomorphic surfaces. Annual dose rates were determined in the laboratory from both geochemical analysis of the sediment and gamma-ray spectrometry. Due to sediment heterogeneity, we consider gamma-ray spectrometry as more reliable because it is based on a larger volume of sediment. Quartz OSL ages and preliminary pIR290 results on K-feldspars give consistent Early Holocene ages of 9-14 ka for F2, also in agreement with a 14C age of 13 ka from a landsnail shell. 10Be CRN exposure ages on F2 were significantly older, with 37 ± 4 ka, probably due to inheritance. On F4, 10Be CRN exposure ages showed a scattered distribution, from ~50 ka to ~120 ka, with most samples comprised in the mean interval of 87 ± 26 ka. Quartz OSL ages from 5 locations on F4 are comprised between 32 ± 3

  12. Sandy berm and beach-ridge formation in relation to extreme sea-levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette; Clemmensen, Lars B; Kroon, Aart

    2013-01-01

    The formation of berms and their transformation into beach ridges in a micro-tidal environment is coupled to wave run-up and overtopping during extreme sea levels. A straight-forward comparison between extreme sea levels due to storm-surges and active berm levels is impossible in the semi......-enclosed bays along the Baltic Sea. Quite often, the maximum water levels do not coincide with the maximum intensity of the wave driven processes because of seiches in the Baltic. In this paper, we look into the joined distribution of extreme water levels and high-energetic wave conditions at Feddet, a sandy...... of extreme sea level events is identified using thirty-three well described extreme events throughout a period of 15 years. Analysis of the meteorological conditions during these events revealed that berm formation only occurred during 20% of all extreme events when onshore winds, high-energy wave action...

  13. Modern processes controlling the sea bed sediment formation in Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanyuk, I.; Dmitrievsky, A.; Shapovalov, S.; Chaikina, O.; Akivis, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Barents Sea is one of the key regions for understanding of the postglacial history of the climate and circulation of the World Ocean. There are the limits of warm North Atlantic waters penetration to the Arctic and a zone of interaction between Atlantic and Arctic waters. The Barents Se's limits are the deep Norwegian Sea in the West, the Spitsbergen Island and the Franz Josef Land and the deep Nansen trough in the North, the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the East and the North shore of Europe in the South. An analysis of Eurasian-Arctic continental margin shows correspondence between the rift systems of the shelf with those of the ocean. This relation can be observed in the central Arctic region. All the rift systems underlying the sediment basin are expressed in the sea bed relief as spacious and extensive graben valleys burnished by lobes. Two transverse trenches cross both shelf and continental slope, namely the Medvezhinsky trench between Norway and Spitsbergen in the West and the Franz Victoria trench between Spitsbergen and the Franz Josef Land in the North. The Barents and the Kara Seas are connected by the Kara Gate Strait and wide transverse trough of Saint Anna in the North-West. The recent assessment of the eolian solid sediment supply to the Barents Sea is about 0.904 tons. The Barents Sea as a whole should be considered as "starving" in terms of its feeding with solid sediment matter. Observations show the considerable part of the sea bottom to be free of Holocene sediment cover. The more ancient Quaternary units or bedrock can be seen at the bottom surface. This phenomenon is the most typical for arches of relatively shallow elevations. Thick accumulations of new sediments are connected with fjords. The amount of sea ice delivered from the Barents Sea to the Arctic Ocean is 35 km3 a year. This value should be added by iceberg delivery from the North island of Novaya Zemlya, the Franz Josef Land, the Spitsbergen Island and North Norway but most of

  14. Heat and salt transfer associated with formation of sea-ice

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, J E

    2011-01-01

    The transient state of sea-ice formation due to a given constant drop in surface temperature, and the associated change in sea-water salinity due to salt rejection, has been investigated theoretically by the heat balance integral method. The water temperature is taken to be constant. Ice, water and salt were assumed to coexist in thermodynamic equilibrium at the ice—water interface, and the analysis is valid for small temperature perturbations. The ice growth rate is found to be considerably ...

  15. Estimation of the impact of prevailing weather conditions on the occurrence of oil-contaminated dead birds on the German North Sea coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrastansky, Alena [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)], E-mail: alena.chrastansky@gkss.de; Callies, Ulrich [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.callies@gkss.de; Fleet, David M. [Schleswig-Holstein Agency for Coastal Defence, National Park and Marine Conservation, Schlossgarten 1, 25832 Toenning (Germany)], E-mail: david.fleet@lkn.landsh.de

    2009-01-15

    Chronic oil pollution by illegal oil dumping in the North Sea is difficult to quantify. Beached, oil-contaminated sea birds, however, may be used as an indirect indicator. Reconstructing the drift of oil slicks and sea bird corpses in the southern North Sea for the period 1992-2003 by means of a two-dimensional numerical transport model driven by re-analysed weather data, we show with an example of two common sea bird species that the variability observed within the number of corpses registered during beached bird surveys for the German coast primarily reflects the inter-annual variability of prevailing weather conditions. This should be taken into account when interpreting the data. We propose normalisation of beached bird survey data based on numerical drift simulations to improve the recognition of trends in the level of chronic oil pollution. - Prevailing weather conditions have a significant impact on the occurrence of beached oil-contaminated sea birds.

  16. On the Impacts of Different Surface Forcing Regimes for Deep Water Formation in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josey, S.; Tsimplis, M.; Gomis, D.; Ruiz, S.; Marcos, M.; Somot, S.

    2009-04-01

    Deep water formation is known to occur at 3 major sites (the Gulf of Lions, Adriatic and Aegean Seas) in the Mediterranean basin. However, the role played by air-sea interaction in setting the frequency and strength of formation events (including major transient episodes such as that experienced in the Aegean sea in the early 1990s) is not well understood. We will explore this relationship using air-sea heat, freshwater and density flux fields, including output from downscaled versions (HIPOCAS and ARPERA) of the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses. The downscaled fields reveal small scale forcing features (including jet-like structures over the dense water formation sites) that are not present in the coarser resolution reanalysis datasets. They also show greater variability in the forcing of the Aegean and the Gulf of Lions than the Adriatic Sea. The differences between the forcing distributions of the Aegean and Adriatic will be discussed in detail and will be advanced as a potential cause for variations in frequency of dense water formation in these two regions.

  17. Estimation of the impact of prevailing weather conditions on the occurrence of oil-contaminated dead birds on the German North Sea coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastansky, Alena; Callies, Ulrich; Fleet, David M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic oil pollution by illegal oil dumping in the North Sea is difficult to quantify. Beached, oil-contaminated sea birds, however, may be used as an indirect indicator. Reconstructing the drift of oil slicks and sea bird corpses in the southern North Sea for the period 1992-2003 by means of a two-dimensional numerical transport model driven by re-analysed weather data, we show with an example of two common sea bird species that the variability observed within the number of corpses registered during beached bird surveys for the German coast primarily reflects the inter-annual variability of prevailing weather conditions. This should be taken into account when interpreting the data. We propose normalisation of beached bird survey data based on numerical drift simulations to improve the recognition of trends in the level of chronic oil pollution.

  18. A sensitivity study of the dense shelf water formation in the Okhotsk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Y.; Hasumi, H.; Nakamura, T.

    2010-11-01

    Sensitivity of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation to tidal mixing around the Kuril Straits, wind stress, and river runoff in the Okhotsk Sea is examined by an ice-ocean coupled model. Horizontal resolution of the model is set to 3-8 km in the northern Okhotsk Sea for well resolving the coastal polynyas which is believed to be the principal region of DSW formation. The model shows a good performance in terms of sea ice production and the consequent DSW formation. DSW is also found to be formed in the offshore region apart from the coastal polynya. DSW is defined independently for each experiment such that it identifies the water influenced by brine. By introducing such definition the sensitivity of the DSW formation is assessed separately for change of density and that of formation rate. The density of DSW exhibits high sensitivity to all the elements considered herein, while its formation rate is sensitive only to winds. Winds affect the DSW formation rate mainly by influencing that occurs in the offshore region.

  19. The role of sulfate aerosol in the formation of cloudiness over the sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloyan, A. E.; Yermakov, A. N.; Arutyunyan, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the impact of sulfate aerosols on cloudiness formation over the sea in the middle troposphere and the involvement of these particles in the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the lower stratosphere. The first of these problems is solved using a combined model of moist convection and the formation of cloudiness and sulfate aerosols in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the sea, incorporating natural emissions of sulfur-containing compounds. We have found that a significant source of condensation nuclei in the troposphere is the photochemical transformation of biogenic dimethyl sulfide (in addition to NaCl). The results of numerical experiments indicate that the absence of sulfate aerosols hinders the cloudiness formation over the sea in the middle and upper troposphere. The problem of sulfate aerosol involvement in the formation of supercooled ternary solutions (STSs) (PSC Type Ib) in the lower stratosphere is solved using a mathematical model of global transport of multicomponent gas pollutants and aerosols in the atmosphere. Using the combined model, numerical experiments were performed for the winter season in both hemispheres. Sulfate aerosols were found to really participate in the formation of STS particles. Without their participation, the formation of STS particles in the lower stratosphere would be hindered. We present the results of numerical calculations and discuss the distribution of concentrations of gaseous nitric and sulfuric acids, as well as mass concentrations of these components in STS particles.

  20. Drastic changes in the Nordic Seas oceanic circulation and deepwater formation in a Pliocene context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contoux, Camille; Zhang, Zhongshi; De Schepper, Stijn; Li, Camille; Nisancioglu, Kerim; Risebrobakken, Bjorg

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic Seas are a major area of deepwater formation, thus playing a crucial role in the global oceanic circulation. In the recent years a cooling and freshening of the Norwegian Sea has been observed (Blindheim et al., 2000), highlighting potential changes in this area linked to climate change. Here, we use climate simulations of the mid-Pliocene warm period with the NorESM-L model. This period is considered to be the last interval when Earth experienced temperatures higher than today for a sustained period of time, in equilibrium with CO2 concentrations similar to present-day and a reduced Greenland Ice Sheet. We find that oceanic circulation in the Nordic Seas is drastically modified. The strength of the East Greenland Current is reduced, which implies less Arctic water going to the North Atlantic from the west of the Fram strait, which creates a compensating outflow current from the east of the Fram Strait to the North Atlantic along the Voring plateau (coast of Norway). The Norwegian Atlantic current is shifted westward, meaning that there is increased Atlantic water influence in the Greenland Sea, which becomes much warmer, and increased Arctic influence along Norway, which becomes colder than present. Circulation becomes anticyclonic instead of cyclonic. Circulation in the subpolar gyre is strongly reduced, together with deepwater formation on average both in the Irminger Sea and the Nordic Seas. Convection sites in the Nordic Seas shift from the eastern part to the western part. Sensitivity experiments show that these changes are not reproduced in other Pliocene contexts, such as when CO2 is low (280 ppm) or when Barents Sea is turned to land, suggesting that the ultimate driver of these changes is higher CO2. When Barents Sea is land, which was the reality of the Pliocene, circulation and sea-surface temperature show a good agreement with reconstructions from marine proxies (De Schepper et al., 2015). This means that NorESM-L is able to properly

  1. Spurious sea ice formation caused by oscillatory ocean tracer advection schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughten, Kaitlin A.; Galton-Fenzi, Benjamin K.; Meissner, Katrin J.; England, Matthew H.; Brassington, Gary B.; Colberg, Frank; Hattermann, Tore; Debernard, Jens B.

    2017-08-01

    Tracer advection schemes used by ocean models are susceptible to artificial oscillations: a form of numerical error whereby the advected field alternates between overshooting and undershooting the exact solution, producing false extrema. Here we show that these oscillations have undesirable interactions with a coupled sea ice model. When oscillations cause the near-surface ocean temperature to fall below the freezing point, sea ice forms for no reason other than numerical error. This spurious sea ice formation has significant and wide-ranging impacts on Southern Ocean simulations, including the disappearance of coastal polynyas, stratification of the water column, erosion of Winter Water, and upwelling of warm Circumpolar Deep Water. This significantly limits the model's suitability for coupled ocean-ice and climate studies. Using the terrain-following-coordinate ocean model ROMS (Regional Ocean Modelling System) coupled to the sea ice model CICE (Community Ice CodE) on a circumpolar Antarctic domain, we compare the performance of three different tracer advection schemes, as well as two levels of parameterised diffusion and the addition of flux limiters to prevent numerical oscillations. The upwind third-order advection scheme performs better than the centered fourth-order and Akima fourth-order advection schemes, with far fewer incidents of spurious sea ice formation. The latter two schemes are less problematic with higher parameterised diffusion, although some supercooling artifacts persist. Spurious supercooling was eliminated by adding flux limiters to the upwind third-order scheme. We present this comparison as evidence of the problematic nature of oscillatory advection schemes in sea ice formation regions, and urge other ocean/sea-ice modellers to exercise caution when using such schemes.

  2. Formation, prevention and breaking of sea water in crude oil emulsions, chocolate mousses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridie, A.L.; Wanders, T.H.; Zegveld, W.; Van Der Hiejde, H.B.

    1980-12-01

    During the combating of oil spills, the handling of stable sea water in crude oil emulsions called chocolate mousses is often a major problem. A recent laboratory study of the formation and properties of such emulsions revealed the key roles played by asphaltenes and crystallized wax in their stability. A chemical additive, designated LA 1834, was found to be effective in preventing the formation of mousses.

  3. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as “open-sea convection”. It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts. PMID:23874425

  4. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J M; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G F; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  5. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tamburini

    Full Text Available The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  6. Acoustic Investigations of Gas and Gas Hydrate Formations, Offshore Southwestern Black Sea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, H. M.; Dondurur, D.; Ozel, O.; Atgin, O.; Sinayuc, C.; Merey, S.; Parlaktuna, M.; Cifci, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Black Sea is a large intercontinental back-arc basin with relatively high sedimentation rate. The basin was formed as two different sub-basins divided by Mid-Black Sea Ridge. The ridge is completely buried today and the Black Sea became a single basin in the early Miocene that is currently anoxic. Recent acoustic investigations in the Black Sea indicate potential for gas hydrate formation and gas venting. A total of 2500 km multichannel seismic, Chirp sub-bottom profiler and multibeam bathymetry data were collected during three different expeditions in 2010 and 2012 along the southwestern margin of the Black Sea. Box core sediment samples were collected for gas cromatography analysis. Wide spread BSRs and multiple BSRs are observed in the seismic profiles and may be categorized into two different types: cross-cutting BSRs (transecting sedimentary strata) and amplitude BSRs (enhanced reflections). Both types mimic the seabed reflection with polarity reversal. Some undulations of the BSR are observed along seismic profiles probably caused by local pressure and/or temperature changes. Shallow gas sources and chimney vents are clearly indicated by bright reflection anomalies in the seismic data. Gas cromatography results indicate the presence of methane and various components of heavy hydrocarbons, including Hexane. These observations suggest that the gas forming hydrate in the southwestern Black Sea may originate from deeper thermogenic hydrocarbon sources. * This study is supported by 2214-A programme of The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBITAK).

  7. How dead are dead galaxies? Mid-Infrared fluxes of quiescent galaxies at redshift 0.3 < z < 2.5: implications for star formation rates and dust heating

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Brammer, Gabriel; da Cunha, Elisabete; Schreiber, Natascha M Forster; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine E; Lundgren, Britt; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Pacifici, Camilla; Skelton, Rosalind E

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the star formation rates of quiescent galaxies at high redshift (0.3 1.5 marginally consistent with the ones expected from gas recycling (assuming that mass loss from evolved stars refuels star formation) and well above that at lower redshifts.

  8. Modes of sedimentary basin formation in the north-eastern Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Randell; Starostenko, Vitaly; Sydorenko, Grygoriy; Yegorova, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    The Greater Caucasus and Black Sea sedimentary basins developed in a Mesozoic back-arc setting, the former older than the latter (Jurassic v. Cretaceous). Compressional shortening of the former and accompanying ongoing development of marginal basin depocentres in the north-eastern Black Sea - which is closely tied to the formation of the Crimea-Greater Caucasus orogen - is a Cenozoic phenomenon, starting in the Eocene and proceeding until the present day. Recently, the sedimentary basin/crust/lithosphere geometry of the study area has been characterised across a range of scales using regional seismic reflection profiling, long-offset refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling and local earthquake tomography. These provide a new integrated image of the present-day crustal structure and sedimentary basin architecture of the northern margin of the eastern Black Sea, north across the Azov Sea and provide evidence of the deeper expression of sedimentary basins and the processes controlling the geometry of their inversion during the Cenozoic. It is inferred that the Greater Caucasus paleo-Basin, lying stratigraphically below the Black Sea and younger sedimentary successions, extends further to the west than previously known. This basin has significant thickness in the area between the Azov and Black seas and probably forms the deeper core of the Crimea-Caucasus inversion zone. The Crimea-Greater Caucasus orogenic belt is the expression of "basin inversion" of the Jurassic Greater Caucasus paleo-Basin, the degree of inversion of which varies along strike. The Greater Caucasus foredeep basins - Indolo-Kuban and Sorokin-Tuapse troughs -represent syn-inversional marginal troughs to the main inversion zone. The Shatsky Ridge - the northern flank of the main East Black Sea Basin - may also be mainly a syn-inversional structure, underlain by a blind thrust zone expressed as a northward dipping zone of seismicity on the northern margin of the eastern Black Sea.

  9. The Last Interglacial Labrador Sea: A Pervasive Millennial Oscillation In Surface Water Conditions Without Labrador Sea Water Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.

    A multi-proxy approach was developed to document secular to millenial changes of potential density in surface, mesopelagic, and bottom waters of the Labrador Sea, thus allowing to reconstruct situations when winter convection with intermediate or deep water formation occurred in the basin. This approach relies on dinocyst-transfer functions providing estimates of sea-surface temperature and salinity that are used to calibrate past-relationships between oxygen 18 contents in calcite and potential density gradients. The oxygen isotope compositions of epipelagic (Globigerina bul- loides), deeper-dwelling (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, left coiling), and benthic (Uvigerina peregrina and Cibicides wuellerstorfi) foraminifera, then allow to extrap- olate density gradients between the corresponding water layers. This approach has been tested in surface sediments in reference to modern hydrographic conditions at several sites from the NW North Atlantic, then used to reconstruct past conditions from high resolution studies of cores raised from the southern Greenland Rise (off Cape Farewell). Results indicate that the modern-like regime established during the early Holocene and full developed after 7 ka only. It is marked by weak density gradi- ents between the surface and intermediate water masses, allowing winter convection down to a lower pycnocline between intermediate and deep-water masses, thus the formation of intermediate Labrador Sea Water (LSW). Contrasting with the middle to late Holocene situation, since the last interglacial and throughout the last climatic cycle, a single and dense water mass seems to have occupied the water column below a generally low-density surface water layer, thus preventing deep convection. There- fore, the production of LSW seems to be feature specific to the present interglacial interval that could soon cease to exist, due to global warming, as suggested by recent ocean model experiments and by the fact that it never occurred during the

  10. Morphogenetic mechanisms of coelom formation in the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Margaret S; Collins, Steve; Raff, Rudolf A

    2009-01-01

    Indirect development via a feeding pluteus larva represents the ancestral mode of sea urchin development. However, some sea urchin species exhibit a derived form of development, called direct development, in which features of the feeding larva are replaced by accelerated development of the adult. A major difference between these two developmental modes is the timing of the formation of the left coelom and initiation of adult development. These processes occur much earlier in developmental and absolute time in direct developers and may be underlain by changes in morphogenetic processes. In this study, we explore whether differences in the cellular mechanisms responsible for the development of the left coelom and adult structures are associated with the change in the timing of their formation in the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma. We present evidence that left coelom formation in H. erythrogramma, which differs in major aspects of coelom formation in indirect developers, is not a result of cell division. Further, we demonstrate that subsequent development of adult structures requires cell division.

  11. The Spontaneous Formation of a Space-Filling Lattice of Large-Amplitude Vortices throughout the "Dead Zone" of a Protoplanetary Disk and the Role of the Lattice in Star and Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, P. S.; Jiang, C.; Pei, S.; Hassanzadeh, P.

    2012-12-01

    The annular region of a protoplanetary disk, approximately 5 - 12 AU from the protostar and within 1 or 2 pressure scale heights of the mid-plane, has too low a temperature to significantly ionize hydrogen gas and therefore to destabilize the near-Keplerian flow via the magneto-hydrodynamic instability (MRI). Because it is assumed that Keplerian flow is linearly stable and that no hydrodynamic features can arise spontaneously within this region and thereby aid in star formation by transporting angular momentum and energy radially, this region is known as the "dead zone". Here we show that the pronouncement of this region as "dead" is premature (to paraphrase Mark Twain). Baroclinic critical layers can occur in rotating, vertically-stratified, uni-directional shear flows such as that in a protoplanetary disk. They are special cases of neutrally stable eigenmodes. Baroclinic critical layers have logarithmic singularities in density and vertical velocity. They differ from barotropic critical layers associated with Kelvin's cats-eyes in constant-density, unidirectional shear flows, which form at locations where the shear flow velocity matches the eigenmode's phase speed and have singularities only in stream-wise velocities. Baroclinic critical layers are easily excited with no special tuning of parameters by perturbations from vortices or waves. Unlike barotropic critical layers the amplitudes of baroclinic layers become large by drawing energy from the background shear. In the case of protoplanetary disk, energy is extracted from the huge reservoir of kinetic energy in the near-Keplerian shear. The large vertical velocities in the critical layers, coupled with the Coriolis parameter create large-amplitude vortex layers. These layers often roll-up into large coherent vortices. The baroclinic critical layers' growth and roll-up are robust: they form in cylindrical and Cartesian geometries, in Boussinesq fluids and ideal gases, and in flows with uniform and non

  12. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  13. Overflow dynamics and bottom water formation in the western Ross Sea: Influence of tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Danilov, S.; Hellmer, H. H.; SchröTer, J.

    2010-10-01

    The tidal impact on overflow dynamics and bottom water production in the western Ross Sea is studied with the Finite Element Ocean Model, which allows embedding a mesh with 0.5 km resolution in a coarse resolution (30 km) setup without nesting. The simulated overflow properties inside and downstream of the western Ross Sea are described. The overflow exhibits pronounced variability at both daily and spring-neap tidal time scales in the western Ross Sea. Tides increase mixing over both the outer shelf and upper slope there. Plume jets are shaped by tidal currents at a bathymetric bend west of the Drygalski Trough mouth, descending rapidly and supplying the bottom water. A fraction of shelf water remains over the shelf and propagates westward from the Ross Sea, but it does not contribute significantly to bottom water formation because of energetic mixing over the upper slope. Compared to a simulation without tidal forcing, tides (with the major K1 and O1 constituents) increase the outflow rate over the continental slope off Cape Adare by about 70%. A set of sensitivity experiments show that the rate of bottom water production is not a monotonic function of the tidal currents amplitude. Tidal forcing with intermediate strength leads to the most efficient bottom water formation.

  14. Calcium phosphate formation from sea urchin - (brissus latecarinatus) via modified mechano-chemical (ultrasonic) conversion method

    OpenAIRE

    R. Samur; Ozyegin, L.; D. Agaogullari; F. N. Oktar; Agathopoulos, S.; Kalkandelen, C.; I. Duman; B. Ben-Nissan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to produce apatite structures, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and fluorapatite (FA), from precursor calcium phosphates of biological origin, namely from sea urchin, with mechano-chemical stirring and hot-plating conversion method. The produced materials were heat treated at 800 °C for 4 hours. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies were conducted. Calcium phosphate phases were developed. The SEM images showed the formation of micro to nano-powders. The e...

  15. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM CURRENT I. BAROTROPIC CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, Princeton Ocean Model (POM) was used to study the formation of the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC) in the barotropic case. Monthly averaged wind stress and the inflow/outflow transports in January were used in the numerical simulation which reproduced the SCSWC. The effects of wind stress and inflow/outflow were studied separately. Numerical experiments showed that the Kuroshio intrusion through the Luzon Strait and the slope shelf in the northern SCS are necessary conditions for the formation of the SCSWC. In a flat bottom topography experiment, the wind stress driven northeast current in the northern SCS is a compensatory current.

  16. Live and Dead Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehman; Jackson, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the consequences of a distinction between `live' and `dead' network nodes; `live' nodes are able to acquire new links whereas `dead' nodes are static. We develop an analytically soluble growing network model incorporating this distinction and show that it can provide a q...

  17. WATER MASS FORMATION IN THE SOUTH INDIAN OCEAN BY AIR-SEA FLUXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Feng

    2004-01-01

    Indian Central Water (ICW) and Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) formation rates are estimated from two air-sea flux products, the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) and the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) climatology. The ICW formation is estimated to be 8 Sv (1 Sv = 106m3·s-1) from both products, with more contributions from freshwater flux. From the COADS product, the SAMW formation rate is estimated to be 31 Sv in the potential density range of 26.5-26.9σθ, with also a significant contribution from freshwater flux. However, the SAMW formation rate estimated from the SOC product is much smaller, which may be due to bias of the SOC heat flux. Poorer quality of the flux products in the Southern Ocean may also contribute to the difference.

  18. On the nature of rainfall in dry climate: Space-time patterns of convective rain cells over the Dead Sea region and their relations with synoptic state and flash flood generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belachsen, Idit; Marra, Francesco; Peleg, Nadav; Morin, Efrat

    2017-04-01

    Space-time patterns of rainfall are important climatic characteristics that influence runoff generation and flash flood magnitude. Their derivation requires high-resolution measurements to adequately represent the rainfall distribution, and is best provided by remote sensing tools. This need is further emphasized in dry climate regions, where rainfall is scarce and, often, local and highly variable. Our research is focused on understanding the nature of rainfall events in the dry Dead Sea region (Eastern Mediterranean) by identifying and characterizing the spatial structure and the dynamics of convective storm cores (known as rain cells). To do so, we take advantage of 25 years of corrected and gauge-adjusted weather radar data. A statistical analysis of convective rain-cells spatial and temporal characteristics was performed with respect to synoptic pattern, geographical location, and flash flood generation. Rain cells were extracted from radar data using a cell segmentation method and a tracking algorithm and were divided into rain events. A total of 10,500 rain cells, 2650 cell tracks and 424 rain events were elicited. Rain cell properties, such as mean areal and maximal rain intensity, area, life span, direction and speed, were derived. Rain events were clustered, according to several ERA-Interim atmospheric parameters, and associated with three main synoptic patterns: Cyprus Low, Low to the East of the study region and Active Red Sea Trough. The first two originate from the Mediterranean Sea, while the third is an extension of the African monsoon. On average, the convective rain cells in the region are 90 km2 in size, moving from West to East in 13 ms-1 and living 18 minutes. Several significant differences between rain cells of the various synoptic types were observed. In particular, Active Red Sea Trough rain cells are characterized by higher rain intensities and lower speeds, suggesting a higher flooding potential for small catchments. The north

  19. Calcium phosphate formation from sea urchin - (brissus latecarinatus via modified mechano-chemical (ultrasonic conversion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Samur

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to produce apatite structures, such as hydroxyapatite (HA and fluorapatite (FA, from precursor calcium phosphates of biological origin, namely from sea urchin, with mechano-chemical stirring and hot-plating conversion method. The produced materials were heat treated at 800 °C for 4 hours. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies were conducted. Calcium phosphate phases were developed. The SEM images showed the formation of micro to nano-powders. The experimental results suggest that sea urchin, Brissus latecarinatus skeleton could be an alternative source for the production of various mono or biphasic calcium phosphates with simple and economic mechano-chemical (ultrasonic conversion method.

  20. Millennial-scale oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Raj

    2015-11-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasiperiodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the North Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal-scale small-amplitude oscillations and a large-amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually, an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection and polar warming. The unstable convective state relaxes back to the small-amplitude oscillations from where the process repeats in a self-sustained manner. Freshwater pulses mimicking Heinrich events cause the oscillations to be grouped into packets of progressively weaker fluctuations, as observed in proxy records. Modulation of this stable oscillation mechanism by freshwater and insolation variations could account for the distribution and pacing of D-O and Bond events. Physical aspects of the system such as sea ice extent and oceanic advective flow rates could determine the characteristic 1500 year time scale of D-O events. The model results with respect to the structure of the water column in the Nordic seas during stadial and interstadial phases are in agreement with paleoproxy observations.

  1. Rhodolith formation induced by reef erosion in the Red Sea, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, W. E.; Rasser, M.

    1996-09-01

    Along the northwestern margin of Safaga Island (Northern Bay of Safaga, Red Sea, Egypt) a small fringing reef (several hundred meters long, up to 2 m high) and small patch reefs are developed due to the local current regime which is favorable for coral growth. Corals and reef rock are encrusted by coralline algae, predominantly by branched Lithophyllum kotschyanum. Owing to destructional processes dominated by sea urchin activities, fragmentation of (1) corals, (2) reef rock, and (3) coralline algae takes place resulting in the formation of almost mono-specific, branched Lithophyllum kotschyanum rhodoliths. Rhodolith formation takes place in various reef environments: (1) in depressions on the reef flat where ellipsoidal rhodoliths develop, with interlocking and fusing branches leading to a coralline algal framework; (2) in discharge channels where smaller elongated rhodoliths occur; (3) in leeward positions between reef flat and seagrass meadows, where a dense belt of spheroidal to ellipsoidal rhodoliths is formed; scattered rhodoliths occur in adjacent seagrass beds. The formation and preservation of rhodoliths requires a complex interplay of destruction, growth, transportation, movement, and stabilization.

  2. Modulational instability in crossing sea states: a possible mechanism for the formation of freak waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M

    2006-01-13

    Here we consider a simple weakly nonlinear model that describes the interaction of two-wave systems in deep water with two different directions of propagation. Under the hypothesis that both sea systems are narrow banded, we derive from the Zakharov equation two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Given a single unstable plane wave, here we show that the introduction of a second plane wave, propagating in a different direction, can result in an increase of the instability growth rates and enlargement of the instability region. We discuss these results in the context of the formation of rogue waves.

  3. High wind speeds prevent formation of a distinct bacterioneuston community in the sea-surface microlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlff, Janina; Stolle, Christian; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Ribas-Ribas, Mariana; Hodapp, Dorothee; Wurl, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) at the boundary between atmosphere and hydrosphere represents a demanding habitat for bacteria. Wind speed is a crucial but poorly studied factor for its physical integrity. Increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, as suggested for future climate scenarios, may particularly act on this habitat at the air-sea interface. We investigated the effect of increasing wind speeds and different pCO2 levels on SML microbial communities in a wind-wave tunnel, which offered the advantage of low spatial and temporal variability. We found that enrichment of bacteria in the SML occurred solely at a U10 wind speed of ≤5.6 m s-1 in the tunnel and ≤4.1 m s-1 in the Baltic Sea. High pCO2 levels further intensified the bacterial enrichment in the SML during low wind speed. In addition, low wind speed and pCO2 induced the formation of a distinctive bacterial community as revealed by 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and influenced the presence or absence of individual taxonomic units within the SML. We conclude that physical stability of the SML below a system-specific wind speed threshold induces specific bacterial communities in the SML entailing strong implications for ecosystem functioning by wind-driven impacts on habitat properties, gas exchange and matter cycling processes. © FEMS 2017.

  4. Use of 2D Multi Electrodes Resistivity Imagining for Sinkholes Hazard Assessment along the Eastern Part of the Dead Sea, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah S.   Al-Zoubi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinkholes and subsidence are natural phenomena can be occurred in shallow geology sediments at different regions in the world. Sinkholes assessment is one of the most difficult near subsurface investigations. Geophysical prospecting is appropriate method to determine environmental and geotechnical problems. 2D multi electrodes resistivity imagining with Wenner-Schulmberge array was conducted within active sinkholes area. The objective of the survey is to detect features combined with sinkhole formation like zone of weakness, cavities and fractures. Soil in the study area contains alluvial, conglomerate and silty clay which represent good target for resistivity survey. The interpretation of resistivity data along the profiles show different model of the resistivity variation in active sinkhole zones compared with inactive zones in the study area. The deformation in the layer continuity and the direct contact between high resistive and low resistive layers can appear only in the subsidence area or active sinkhole zones.

  5. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  6. The world's largest macroalgal bloom in the Yellow Sea, China: Formation and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyan; Keesing, John K.; He, Peimin; Wang, Zongling; Shi, Yajun; Wang, Yujue

    2013-09-01

    The world's largest trans-regional macroalgal blooms during 2008-2012 occurred in the Yellow Sea, China. This review addresses the causes, development and future challenges in this unique case. Satellite imagery and field observations showed that the macroalgal blooms in the Yellow Sea originated from the coast of Jiangsu province and that favorable geographic and oceanographic conditions brought the green macroalgae from the coast offshore. Optimal temperature, light, nutrients and wind contributed to the formation and transport of the massive bloom north into the Yellow Sea and its deposition onshore along the coast of Shandong province. Morphological and genetic evidence demonstrated that the species involved was Ulva prolifera, a fouling green commonly found growing on structures provided by facilities of Porphyra aquaculture. Large scale Porphyra aquaculture (covering >20,000 ha) along the Jiangsu coast thus hypothetically provided a nursery bed for the original biomass of U. prolifera. Porphyra growers remove U. prolifera from the mariculture rafts, and the cleaning releases about 5000 wet weight tonnes of green algae into the water column along the coast of Jiangsu province; the biomass then is dispersed by hydrographic forcing, and takes advantage of rather high nutrient supply and suitable temperatures to grow to impressive levels. Certain biological traits of U. prolifera —efficient photosynthesis, rapid growth rates, high capacity for nutrient uptake, and diverse reproductive systems— allowed growth of the original 5000 tonnes of U. prolifera biomass into more than one million tonnes of biomass in just two months. The proliferation of U. prolifera in the Yellow Sea resulted from a complex contingency of circumstances, including human activity (eutrophication by release of nutrients from wastewater, agriculture, and aquaculture), natural geographic and hydrodynamic conditions (current, wind) and the key organism's biological attributes. Better

  7. The influence of sea-level changes on tropical coastal lowlands; the Pleistocene Coropina Formation, Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Th. E.; de Kramer, R.; de Boer, P. L.; Langereis, C.; Sew-A-Tjon, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Pleistocene Coropina Formation largely constitutes the Old Coastal Plain of Suriname. It is exposed fully only in open-pit bauxite mines in the central coastal plain as part of the unconsolidated overburden of Paleocene-Eocene bauxites. This study deals with the stratigraphy, sedimentology and chronology of this formation, and is based on a study in the recently closed Lelydorp-III bauxite mine operated by N.V. BHP Billiton Maatschappij Suriname. The Coropina Formation consists of the Para and Lelydorp Members. We present a detailed lithological subdivision of these members. In the Para Member, four units are discerned which are grouped in two transgressive cycles, both ranging upward from terrestrial towards chenier and coastal mudflat deposits reflecting glacio-eustatic sea-level changes. The sandy sediments represent fluviatile and beach-bar (chenier) deposits, and were supplied by rivers from the Precambrian basement and to a lesser extent by westward longshore coastal drift. Clays, largely derived from the Amazon River and transported alongshore over the shelf, were deposited in extensive coastal mudflats. The Lelydorp Member, also comprising four units, represents a depositional system that is closely comparable to the recent Suriname coastal setting, i.e., a lateral and vertical alternation of mudflat and chenier deposits formed over a period characterised by more or less constant sea level. Palaeomagnetic data indicate a dominantly reversed magnetic polarity in the Para Member, whereas the Lelydorp Member shows a normal magnetic polarity with a minor reversed polarity overprint. The reversed polarities of the Para Member exclude a Brunhes Chron (0.78-0.0 Ma) age, and thus assign it to the Matuyama Chron (2.58-0.78 Ma). This implies that the Coropina Formation is much older than hitherto assumed, and that one or more (long-term) hiatuses are not recognizable in the lithological succession.

  8. Cassiopidae gastropods, influence of Tethys Sea of the Romualdo Formation (Aptian-Albian), Araripe Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Priscilla Albuquerque; Cassab, Rita de Cassia Tardin; Barreto, Alcina Magnólia Franca

    2016-10-01

    The Cassiopidae family belongs to a group of gastropods of the Tethyan Realm, whose origin and dispersion are related a transgression of the Tethys Sea during the Early Cretaceous. The Romualdo Formation in the Araripe Basin, located in Northeast Brazil, presents fossil assemblages with echinoids, bivalves and cassiopid gastropods, indicating a marine sedimentation at the top of the formation. This research reveals three new species of this fauna: Gymnentome (Craginia) beurleni sp. nov., 'Pseudomesalia' ('Pseudomesalia') mennessieri sp. nov and 'Pseudomesalia' ('Pseudomesalia') santanensis sp. nov. We also review two other species: Craginia araripensisBeurlen, 1964 and Gymnentome romualdoiBeurlen, 1964, which we reclassify taxonomically as Paraglauconia (Diglauconia) araripensis and Gymnentome (Gymnentome) romualdoi, respectively; Paraglauconia (Diglauconia) lyrica Maury, 1936 and Gymnentome (Gymnentome) carregozica Maury, 1936 were the first recorded species in the Araripe Basin. The occurrence of these cassiopid gastropod fauna in other basins, such as Sergipe, Potiguar and Parnaíba, indicate the influence of waters coming from the north through the Tethys Sea in the Aptian-Albian and in the marginal continental basins of the Brazilian Northeast.

  9. The Dead State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Gaggioli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for the selection of the dead state for exergy analysis, guidance that is especially important in applications to energy-conversion and materials processing plant engineering, and to ecology. First, the general definition of the dead state is provided, based on the concept of ‘the available energy of a body’ as originally presented by Gibbs. Gibbs ‘body’ can be any overall system, no matter how complex and a crucial point is that there is no need to include or have a ‘reference environment.’ On this groundwork, criteria underlying the selection of the appropriate dead state for a variety of practical engineering systems are referred to; while these cases are not exhaustive, they provide examples of the rationale for selection of an appropriate dead state for any case. Finally, the implications and relevance of the dead state on applications of exergy considerations to the issues of ecology and sustainability are discussed.

  10. Modelling of sea floor spreading initiation and rifted continental margin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymms, V. J.; Isimm Team

    2003-04-01

    Recent observations of depth dependent (heterogeneous) stretching where upper crustal extension is much less than that of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle at both non-volcanic and volcanic margins plus the discovery of broad domains of exhumed continental mantle at non-volcanic rifted margins are not predicted by existing quantitative models of rifted margin formation which are usually based on intra-continental rift models subjected to very large stretching factors. New conceptual and quantitative models of rifted margin formation are required. Observations and continuum mechanics suggest that the dominant process responsible for rifted continental margin formation is sea-floor spreading of the young ocean ridge, rather than pre-breakup intra-continental rifting. Simple fluid flow models of ocean ridge processes using analytical iso-viscous corner-flow demonstrate that the divergent motion of the upwelling mantle beneath the ocean ridge, when viewed in the reference frame of the young continental margin, shows oceanward flow of the lower continental crust and lithospheric mantle of the young rifted margin giving rise to depth dependent stretching as observed. Single-phase fluid-models have been developed to model the initiation of sea-floor spreading and the thermal, stretching and thinning evolution of the young rifted continental margin. Finite element fluid-flow modelling incorporating the evolving temperature dependent viscosity field on the fluid flow also show depth dependent stretching of the young continental margin. Two-phase flow models of ocean ridges incorporating the transport of both solid matrix and melt fluid (Spiegelman &Reynolds 1999) predict the divergent motion of the asthenosphere and lithosphere matrix, and the focusing of basaltic melt into the narrow axial zone spreading centre at ocean ridges. We are adapting two-phase flow models for application to the initiation of sea-floor spreading and rifted continental margin formation. i

  11. Boundary layer new particle formation over East Antarctic sea ice – possible Hg-driven nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol observations above the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice are scarce. Measurements of aerosols and atmospheric composition were made in East Antarctic pack ice on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis during the spring of 2012. One particle formation event was observed during the 32 days of observations. This event occurred on the only day to exhibit extended periods of global irradiance in excess of 600 W m−2. Within the single air mass influencing the measurements, number concentrations of particles larger than 3 nm (CN3 reached almost 7700 cm−3 within a few hours of clouds clearing, and grew at rates of 5.6 nm h−1. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were in the range of those measured at other Antarctic locations at 0.2–1.1 ± 0.1 cm−3 s−1. Our investigations into the nucleation chemistry found that there were insufficient precursor concentrations for known halogen or organic chemistry to explain the nucleation event. Modelling studies utilising known sulfuric acid nucleation schemes could not simultaneously reproduce both particle formation or growth rates. Surprising correlations with total gaseous mercury (TGM were found that, together with other data, suggest a mercury-driven photochemical nucleation mechanism may be responsible for aerosol nucleation. Given the very low vapour pressures of the mercury species involved, this nucleation chemistry is likely only possible where pre-existing aerosol concentrations are low and both TGM concentrations and solar radiation levels are relatively high (∼ 1.5 ng m−3 and ≥ 600 W m−2, respectively, such as those observed in the Antarctic sea ice boundary layer in this study or in the global free troposphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere.

  12. Mechanism of formation of low level jets in the South China Sea during spring and summer of 1998

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the formation of the low-level jet (LLJ) over the South China Sea during spring and summer of 1998 was analyzed through using the assimilated grid data provided by the South China Sea monsoon experiment (SCSMEX). More analyses were emphasized on a heavy rainfall process in the Zhujiang Delta area between 8th and 10th June 1998 in which a LLJ played a key role. Furthermore, the MM5 meso-scale model was utilized in studying the effects of the weather systems on the LLJ. The results showed that the kinetic energy associated with the LLJ transferred upward when the LLJ formed, which results in the fact that the big velocity of the LLJ expanded upward to higher level. Simulation verifies that a synoptic-scale low pressure in the low troposphere of the west of South China moved toward the east, with a low-troposphere synoptic-scale high pressure in the western Pacific moving toward the west. In this process, the approach of both systems leads to the reinforcement of pressure gradient force between them, making the kinetic energy needed by the formation of the LLJ increase. Through this process the LLJ formed and developed over the South China Sea between the low and high pressures. Because the formation of the LLJ indicates the enhancement of summer monsoon in the South China Sea, the mechanism responsible for formation of the LLJ could be used in explaining an enhancement of summer monsoon in the South China Sea.

  13. Distribution,formation and evolution of sand ridges on the East China Sea shelf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the integrated results of multiple data types including MBES (Multi-Beam Echo Sounding) and historical topography maps,the LSR (Linear Sand Ridges) on the ECS (East China Sea) shelf are identified,divided into subareas,and classified.The distribution of sand ridge crests is also established.The strikes of the LSR on the ECS shelf fall in a normal distribution with the center point being 155° azimuth with additional peak points at 125°,130°,140°,and 180° azimuth.The distribution of the ECS shelf sand ridges is congested in the central area,sparse in the south and north ends,divergent and bifurcated in the eastern area,and densely convergent in the western area.The LSR are divided into seven subzones according to the strikes and distribution of the sand ridges;estuary mouth ridges and open shelf sand ridges are identified and marked out.The high amplitude change of sea level resulting from the glacial-interglacial cycle is the main cause of the vast development of sand ridges on the ECS shelf.Abundant sediments on the shelf carried by the PYR (Paleo-Yangtze River) are the material source for the LSR formation,and the negative seafloor topography influences the strikes of LSR.Based on the effects of LSR distribution,change of sea level,and the simulation of ancient tidal currents,the evolution of the LSR on the ECS shelf is divided into four main stages:Stage Ⅰ before 14.5 ka BP,Stage Ⅱ between 12 and 14 ka BP,Stage Ⅲ from 1.5 to 9.5 ka BP,and Stage Ⅳ after 9 ka BP.

  14. Endurance exercise immediately before sea diving reduces bubble formation in scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Olivier; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Vallee, Nicolas; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have observed that a single bout of exercise can reduce the formation of circulating bubbles on decompression but, according to different authors, several hours delay were considered necessary between the end of exercise and the beginning of the dive. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single bout of exercise taken immediately before a dive on bubble formation. 24 trained divers performed open-sea dives to 30 msw depth for 30 min followed by a 3 min stop at 3 msw, under two conditions: (1) a control dive without exercise before (No-Ex), (2) an experimental condition in which subjects performed an exercise before diving (Ex). In the Ex condition, divers began running on a treadmill for 45 min at a speed corresponding to their own ventilatory threshold 1 h before immersion. Body weight, total body fluid volume, core temperature, and volume of consumed water were measured. Circulating bubbles were graded according to the Spencer scale using a precordial Doppler every 30 min for 90 min after surfacing. A single sub-maximal exercise performed immediately before immersion significantly reduces bubble grades (p bubble formation.

  15. Effects of sinking of salt rejected during formation of sea ice on results of an ocean-atmosphere-sea ice climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, P. B.; Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.

    We show that results of an ocean-atmosphere-sea-ice model are sensitive to the treatment of salt rejected during formation of sea ice. In our Control simulation, we place all rejected salt in the top ocean-model level. In the Plume simulation, we instantaneously mix rejected salt into the subsurface ocean, to a maximum depth which depends on local density gradients. This mimics the effects of subgrid-scale convection of rejected salt. The results of the Plume simulation are more realistic than those of the Control simulation: the spatial pattern of simulated salinities (especially in the Southern Ocean), deep-ocean temperatures, simulated sea-ice extents and surface air temperatures all agree better with observations. A similar pair of simulations using horizontal tracer diffusion instead of the Gent-McWilliams eddy parameterization show similar changes due to instantaneous mixing of rejected salt.

  16. Morphological diversity of blastula formation and gastrulation in temnopleurid sea urchins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Kitazawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryos of temnopleurid sea urchins exhibit species-specific morphologies. While Temnopleurus toreumaticus has a wrinkled blastula and then invaginates continuously at gastrulation, others have a smooth blastula and their invagination is stepwise. We studied blastula and gastrula formation in four temnopleurids using light and scanning electron microscopy to clarify the mechanisms producing these differences. Unlike T. toreumaticus, blastomeres of mid-blastulae in T. reevesii, T. hardwickii and Mespilia globulus formed pseudopods. Before primary mesenchyme cells ingressed, embryos developed an area of orbicular cells in the vegetal plate. The cells surrounding the orbicular cells extended pseudopods toward the orbicular cell area in three Temnopleurus species. In T. toreumaticus, the extracellular matrix was well-developed and developed a hole-like structure that was not formed in others. Gastrulation of T. reevesii, T. hardwickii and M. globulus was stepwise, suggesting that differences of gastrulation are caused by all or some of the following factors: change of cell shape, rearrangement, pushing up and towing of cells. We conclude that (1 many aspects of early morphogenesis differ even among very closely related sea urchins with indirect development and (2 many of these differences may be caused by the cell shape and structure of blastomeres or by differences in extracellular matrix composition.

  17. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM CURRENT Ⅱ. BAROCLINIC CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 方国洪; 施心慧

    2001-01-01

    In this part, Levitus' climatological temperature and salinity are incorporated in the numerical model developed in Part I. Diagnostic and prognostic experiment on the thermohaline circulation were conducted. The smooth Levitus' data do not include any information on the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC), so it is not in the model-produced diagnostic thermohaline circulation. Although the SCSWC does not appear in the wind-driven circulation in the barotropic case, it appears in the prognostic wind-driven circulation in the baroclinic case. This implies that the differing circulation pat-terns between barotropic case and bareclinic case are due to the stratification. The prognostic thermohaline circulation with wind stress and inflow/outflow transports at open boundaries are also discussed. Coupling of density and dynamic forces makes the circulation pattern more complicated, Even though the stratification is not always a direct cause of the formation of the SCSWC, it is at least an indirect cause.

  18. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE SOUTH CHINA SEA WARM CURRENT II. BAROCLINIC CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 方国洪; 施心慧

    2001-01-01

    In this part, Levitus' climatological temperature and salinity are incorporated in the numerical model developed in Part I. Diagnostic and prognostic experiment on the thermohaline circulation were conducted. The smooth Levitus' data do not include any information on the South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC), so it is not in the model-produced diagnostic thermohaline circulation. Although the SCSWC does not appear in the wind-driven circulation in the barotropic case, it appears in the prognostic wind-driven circulation in the baroclinic case. This implies that the differing circulation patterns between barotropic case and baroclinic case are due to the stratification. The prognostic thermohaline circulation with wind stress and inflow/outflow transports at open boundaries are also discussed. Coupling of density and dynamic forces makes the circulation pattern more complicated. Even though the stratification is not always a direct cause of the formation of the SCSWC, it is at least an indirect cause.``

  19. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  20. Orphans in the Dead Sea Scrolls

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-12

    Aug 12, 2016 ... of early Judaism, this raises two sets of questions that merit closer examination. .... texts that were written in Hebrew and can be associated with the sectarian ..... in the latter has a vowel indicator but lacks the conjunction of.

  1. Orphans in the Dead Sea Scrolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon R. Kotzé

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the literary references to orphans in writings amongst the Qumran texts that were written in Hebrew and can be associated with the sectarian Qumran movement. The study focuses on passages where forms of the word יתום are used. These include the Damascus Document (CD 6:16–17, Hodayot (1QHa 13:22 and Barkhi Nafshia (4Q434 1 i 2. The investigation concludes that the references to orphans in these passages do not have the same rhetorical functions. In CD 6, the wordings of authoritative scriptures are adapted to portray orphans and widows as the victims of wrongdoing. In 1QHa and 4Q434, however, orphans are mentioned in hymns that praise the Lord’s positive treatment of needy people

  2. An Arabidopsis ATP-dependent, DEAD-box RNA helicase loses activity upon iosAsp formation but is restored by Protein Isoaspartyl Methltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT RNA HELICASE75 (AtPRH75) demonstrated an ATP-dependent, RNA duplex unwinding capacity and an ATP-independent, RNA duplex reforming ability. It is known to accumulate isoAsp, but the consequences of isoAsp formation in AtPRH75 are unknown. Duplex unwinding was abolished by ...

  3. Diagenesis and porosity reduction in the Late Cretaceous Wyandot Formation, offshore Nova Scotia : a comparison with Norwegian North Sea chalks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ings, S.J.; MacRae, R.A.; Pe-Piper, G. [Saint Mary' s Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Shimeld, J.W. [Natural Resources Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada, Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    2005-09-01

    Chalk is an attractive reservoir target for hydrocarbon exploration because even deep sea-buried chalk has the ability to preserve porosities of up to 40 per cent. The preservation of primary porosity is related to diagenesis, resedimentation, over-pressuring and hydrocarbon saturation. In the past 3 decades, large oil and gas discoveries have been made in chalk units in the North Sea, Texas, Colorado and the offshore Scotian Shelf in eastern Canada. Chalks of the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation on the Scotian Shelf have preserved porosities up to 30 per cent and are the reservoir for a small gas and oil discovery in the Primrose N-50 exploration well. The Wyandot Formation extends about 500 km along the length of the margin and consists mostly of limestone with major chalk intervals. It is largely understudied, despite its potential as a hydrocarbon reservoir or seal. In this study, conventional core samples of Wyandot Formation chalk recovered from both the Primrose A-41 and Eagle D-21 wells were analyzed. The depositional history, diagenesis and porosity-reducing mechanisms within the Formation were clarified through scanning electron microscopy, oxygen and carbon isotope analysis, wireline logs and porosity data. The porosity history of North Sea chalks was then compared with that of the Wyandot Formation. It was determined that the Wyandot chalks are in situ pelagic deposits, compared to the allochthonous North Sea chalks. The dominant mechanisms of porosity reduction in the Wyandot chalks are mechanical compaction and dissolution. It is possible that North Sea type allochthonous reservoirs exist in distal locations on the Scotian Slope because large volumes of Wyandot chalk have been eroded on part of the Scotian Shelf. Therefore, further exploration is warranted to provide a better understanding of the sedimentology and porosity distribution of the in situ Wyandot Formation. 20 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  4. Seven deadly radiometry mistakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyak, Paul R.

    2012-10-01

    Radiometry mistakes are made throughout industry and academia with many of them being a result of misapplication of fundamental principles. Since we are all, in one way or another, students of Professor Bill Wolfe, this paper continues his example to educate at every opportunity and mitigate propagation of these errors. Based on the author's observations, the top "seven deadly" radiometry mistakes are described with explanations and examples of the proper applications and interjections of Bill's teaching concepts and wit.

  5. Canadian Ice Service Arctic Regional Sea Ice Charts in SIGRID-3 Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) produces digital Arctic regional sea ice charts for marine navigation, climate research, and input to the Global Digital Sea Ice Data...

  6. Characteristics and Formation Mechanism of Polygonal Faults in Qiongdongnan Basin,Northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Qiliang; Wu Shiguo; Yao Genshun; LI Fuliang

    2009-01-01

    Based on high-resolution 3D seismic data,we document the polygonal faults within the Miocene Meishan (梅山) Formation and Huangliu (黄流) Formation of the Qiongdongnan (琼东南)basin,northern South China Sea.Within the seismic section and time coherent slice,densely distributed extensional faults with small throw and polygonal shape were identified in map view.The orientation of the polygonal faults is almost isotropic,indicating a non-tectonic origin.The deformation is clearly layer-bounded,with horizontal extension of 11.2% to 16%,and 13.2% on average.The distribution of polygonal faults shows a negative correlation with that of gas chimneys.The development of polygonal faults may be triggered by over-pressure pore fluid which is restricted in the fine-grained sediments of bathyal facies when the sediments is compacted by the burden above.The polygonal faults developed to balance the volumetric contraction and restricted extension.The product of hydrocarbon in the Meishan Formation may have contributed to the development of the polygonal faults.In the study area,it was thought that the petroleum system of the Neogene post-rift sequence is disadvantageous because of poor migration pathway.However,the discovery of polygonal faults In the Miocene strata,which may play an important role on the fluid migra-tion,may change this view.A new model of the petroleum system for the study area is proposed.

  7. Global view of sea-ice production in polynyas and its linkage to dense/bottom water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Kay I.; Nihashi, Sohey; Iwamoto, Katsushi

    2016-12-01

    Global overturning circulation is driven by density differences. Saline water rejected during sea-ice formation in polynyas is the main source of dense water, and thus sea-ice production is a key factor in the overturning circulation. Due to difficulties associated with in situ observation, sea-ice production and its interannual variability have not been well understood until recently. Methods to estimate sea-ice production on large scales have been developed using heat flux calculations based on satellite microwave radiometer data. Using these methods, we present the mapping of sea-ice production with the same definition and scale globally, and review the polynya ice production and its relationship with dense/bottom water. The mapping demonstrates that ice production rate is high in Antarctic coastal polynyas, in contrast to Arctic coastal polynyas. This is consistent with the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass which occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean. The Ross Ice Shelf polynya has by far the highest ice production in the Southern Hemisphere. The Cape Darnley polynya (65°E-69°E) is found to be the second highest production area and recent observations revealed that this is the missing (fourth) source of AABW. In the region off the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT), the third source of AABW, sea-ice production decreased by as much as 40 %, due to the MGT calving in early 2010, resulting in a significant decrease in AABW production. The Okhotsk Northwestern polynya exhibits the highest ice production in the Northern Hemisphere, and the resultant dense water formation leads to overturning in the North Pacific, extending to the intermediate layer. Estimates of its ice production show a significant decrease over the past 30-50 years, likely causing the weakening of the North Pacific overturning. These regions demonstrate the strong linkage between variabilities of sea-ice production and bottom/intermediate water formation. The

  8. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    OpenAIRE

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence t...

  9. On the formation of a conservation hotspot for juvenile North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Dana K.

    2009-12-01

    This research examined the incorporation of highly productive regions within the marine system. I combined historical conservation literature, remotely sensed oceanography, ship based surveys, satellite tagged animals, and statistical models to explore an integrated approach to the identification of key oceanic regions that require incorporation into current marine conservation strategies. In my first chapter, I undertook a literature review of the term "hotspot", one of the most common ways by which scientists ascribe conservation prioritization in the marine and terrestrial systems. My results showed that marine literature has identified important areas of biodiversity and productivity (i.e. high primary production that results in trophic linkages and species aggregations) are in need of protection from human threats. However, current non-governmental organizations focus primarily on biodiversity, thus missing important areas of productivity for marine conservation. In my second chapter, I demonstrated how remotely sensed oceanography, ship-based surveys, and satellite tagged animals can help to identify the formation of such a "productivity hotspot". Specifically, I examined the connection between physical forcing (surface winds and vertical Ekman upwelling), sea-surface temperature, primary production (chlorophyll-a concentrations), retentive features of fronts and dynamic height, and prey abundance (red crabs) in the spatial and temporal concentration of the critically endangered North Pacific juvenile loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) within its foraging habitat off the Pacific coast of Baja California. Finally, in my third chapter, I identified habitat selection of loggerheads to better understand the species preference within suitable habitat. I sampled several environmental variables (depth, sea-surface temperature, and chlorophyll- a) within 'preferred' versus 'avoided' turtle habitat. Results from a generalized additive model showed the statistical

  10. Effects of Physical and Biochemical Factors on Formation of Hypoxic Water in the Western Interior Parts of the Ariake Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitani, Tetsuhiro; Seguchi, Masahiro; Koriyama, Masumi

    In the present study, the formation situation and effects of physical and biochemical factors on formation of hypoxic water which has bad influence on the ecosystem and fishery in the interior parts of the Ariake Sea were investigated on the base of observation data and two-layer box model. Formation time rate of hypoxic water was high in the western parts with high COD and mud content. And hypoxic water was occurred and expanded at neap tide with the formation of density stratification. However, the expansions of its formation area were different every each time. Moreover, DO consumption rate in the bottom layer of the study area strongly influenced the formation or not of hypoxic water in consumption with the other physical and biochemical factors.

  11. Late Pliocene climate change 3.4-2.3 Ma: paleoceanographic record from the Yabuta Formation, Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Kitamura, A.; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Watanabe, M. E.; Kamiya, T.

    1994-01-01

    Late Pliocene paleoceanographic changes in the Sea of Japan between 3.4 and2.3 Ma were investigated through study of molluscs, diatoms, and ostracodes from the Yabuta Formation in Toyama Prefecture. The period 3.4-2.7 Ma was characterized by relatively high sea level and cool water benthic faunas. A progressive paleoceanographic shift towards colder oceanic conditions and lower sea level occurred beginning near 2.7 Ma, intenifying about 2.5 Ma, when important changes in ostracode and molluscan faunas occurred. Between 2.7 and 2.3 Ma, eight glacial events can be inferred based on drops in sea level of 50-60 m and increasing proportions of cold, shallow water ostracode species whose modern ecology and zoogeography indicate colder winter water temperatures (3-4??C). The glacial events between 2.5 and 2.3 Ma were the most intense. Preliminary interpretation of the faunal and oceanographic events of the Yabuta Formation suggests that they correspond to Northern Hemispheric cooling also known from North Atlantic deep-sea oxygen isotope, IRD, and planktic foraminiferal records, North Pacific diatom and radiolarian record, and the Chinese loess sequences. The eight glacial events may record a 41,000-yr obliquity cycle which characterized other late Pliocene climate proxy records. Inferred sea level drops near 2.5-2.3 Ma of about 50-60 m provide direct evidence from an ocean margin setting that supports deep sea oxygen isotopic evidence indicating major changes in global ice volume changes. ?? 1994.

  12. Evidence of Last Interglacial sea-level oscillations and recent tectonism in the Late Pleistocene Falmouth Formation of Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrivanek, A.; Dutton, A.; Stemann, T.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and rates of sea-level change during Marine Isotope Stage 5e (MIS 5e) are poorly constrained. Across the Caribbean, many MIS 5e reefs are exposed above modern sea level, and have been studied extensively to understand sea level and ice sheet dynamics during an interglacial climate. This study investigates potential evidence for sub-orbital sea-level oscillations in the limestone Falmouth Formation from the northern and southwestern coastlines of Jamaica, a tectonically active island on the northern boundary of the Caribbean Plate. Vertical exposures of MIS 5e reefs contain multiple facies transitions that are sometimes associated with sharp unconformities. Outcrops at East Rio Bueno contain a distinct change in coral taxonomy from an assemblage of in situ Montastraea spp., Siderastrea and Diploria sp. encrusted by coralline algae, next to a repeated succession of Porites furcata, Acropora cervicornis, coralline algae and Porites astreoides, to in situ P. furcata. This is overlain by a fining-upwards sequence of coral rubble, a laterally persistent layer of small in situ Siderastrea and a ~1-m thick caprock. Near Oracabessa, a unit dominated by Acropora palmata clearly transitions into in situ Montastraea spp., Siderastrea, Colpophyllia natans, and Diploria sp. overlain by A. cervicornis. An abrupt vertical displacement of the sequence, indicating faulting, was observed at Oracabessa. Along the south coast, transitions in coral assemblages were also noted upsection. Common facies observed include in situ A. palmata and/or rubble, with a trend of reduction in algal encrustation upsection, capped by head corals and a regressive beach unit. The structure and composition of reefs preserved in the Falmouth Formation provide detailed information about sea-level behavior during MIS 5e, that will be used to test the hypothesis that sub-orbital sea-level oscillations occurred during the MIS 5e highstand. Evidence of tectonic activity along portions of the northern

  13. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-11-10

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  14. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  15. Formation of methane fields in the Golubaya bay of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Study of formation of methane fields in water environments is essential for search of oil and gas in bottom sediments of the aquatories [Egorov et al., 2008]. Methane acts as a tracer of various biogeochemical processes in freshwater and marine waters as well. Moreover, in recent years estimation of methane emission is one of tasks of current climate research because of high contribution of methane in the greenhouse effect [Bazhin, 2000]. The Black Sea is the largest methane reservoir in the world [Lein, Ivanov, 2005]. The Golubaya Bay of the Black Sea acts as a peculiar model of formation and variability of methane fields in the marine environment. The main purpose of our study is to identify factors that influence the high methane saturation in the aerobic coastal waters. Data collection took place in the Golubaya and the Gelendzhikskaya bays and in the Ashamba River since 1999 to 2013. Water samples were analyzed by the head-space method with further gas chromatographic determination of methane concentrations [Bolshakov, Egorov, 1987]. Methane saturation in the Golubaya Bay waters exceeds the equilibrium with the atmosphere value 10-100 times. According to the simultaneous measurements of methane in two bays in different seasons, methane saturation in the Golubaya Bay is higher than in the Gelendzhikskaya Bay. The smaller bottom depth and accordingly the larger biological productivity in the Golubaya Bay may be the reason of it. Microbial production of methane in aerobic waters of the bay is associated with zone of zooplankton concentration and products of its vital activity [Lein, Ivanov, 2009]. It is known that formation of methane is intense in periodically flooded soils where anaerobic conditions are formed. That causes development of methanogenic bacteria [Alekseev et al., 1978]. Distribution of methane in marine and river waters illustrates that the river runoff and groundwater supply are some of the sources of high methane saturation in the Golubaya Bay

  16. Blood platelet-derived microparticles release and bubble formation after an open-sea air dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Gempp, Emmanuel; Ignatescu, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    Bubble-induced platelet aggregation offers an index for evaluating decompression severity in humans and in a rat model of decompression sickness. Endothelial cells, blood platelets, or leukocytes shed microparticles (MP) upon activation and during cell apoptosis. The aim was to study blood platelet MP (PMP) release and bubble formation after a scuba-air dive in field conditions. Healthy, experienced divers were assigned to 1 experimental group (n = 10) with an open-sea air dive to 30 msw for 30 min and 1 control group (n = 5) during head-out water immersion for the same period. Bubble grades were monitored with a pulsed doppler according to Kissman Integrated Severity Score (KISS). Blood samples for platelet count (PC) and PMP (annexin V and CD41) were taken 1 h before and after exposure in both groups. The result showed a decrease in post-dive PC compared with pre-dive values in experimental group with no significant change in the control group. We observed a significant increase in PMP values after the dive while no change was revealed in the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between the PMP values after the dive and the KISS bubble score. The present study highlighted a relationship between the post-dive decrease in PC, platelet MP release, and bubble formation. Release of platelet MPs could reflect bubble-induced platelet aggregation and could play a key role in alteration of the coagulation. Further studies must investigate endothelial and leukocyte MP release in the same field conditions.

  17. Formation of fine sediment deposit from a flash flood river in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoll, Manel; Gracia, Vicenç; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Guillén, Jorge; Espino, Manuel; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    We identify the mechanisms controlling fine deposits on the inner-shelf in front of the Besòs River, in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. This river is characterized by a flash flood regime discharging large amounts of water (more than 20 times the mean water discharge) and sediment in very short periods lasting from hours to few days. Numerical model output was compared with bottom sediment observations and used to characterize the multiple spatial and temporal scales involved in offshore sediment deposit formation. A high-resolution (50 m grid size) coupled hydrodynamic-wave-sediment transport model was applied to the initial stages of the sediment dispersal after a storm-related flood event. After the flood, sediment accumulation was predominantly confined to an area near the coastline as a result of preferential deposition during the final stage of the storm. Subsequent reworking occurred due to wave-induced bottom shear stress that resuspended fine materials, with seaward flow exporting them toward the midshelf. Wave characteristics, sediment availability, and shelf circulation determined the transport after the reworking and the final sediment deposition location. One year simulations of the regional area revealed a prevalent southwestward average flow with increased intensity downstream. The circulation pattern was consistent with the observed fine deposit depocenter being shifted southward from the river mouth. At the southern edge, bathymetry controlled the fine deposition by inducing near-bottom flow convergence enhancing bottom shear stress. According to the short-term and long-term analyses, a seasonal pattern in the fine deposit formation is expected.

  18. Formation and remediation of drill-cutting piles in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, I.; de Leeuw, B.; Conniff, P.

    2002-01-01

    Drill cuttings generated during borehole excavation have been routinely dumped into the North Sea, where they now represent a significant environmental hazard owing to contamination by oil residues and heavy metals. In-situ measurements of the structure of drill-cutting piles are relatively poor owing to the difficulty of accessing water depths of 60-180 m. In an effort to understand how drill-cutting piles are formed, laboratory-scale experiments were undertaken to investigate how granular material, poured into a tank of water, spreads along a rigid horizontal wall. The laboratory study examined how the pile radius varied as a function of particle size (90 µm to 3 mm), source height above the wall, particle volume flux and volume deposited. A model of drill-cutting pile formation is developed by combining descriptions of descent as a plume and propagation along the wall as a gravity current. Satisfactory agreement is obtained between experimental measurements and model predictions, which are applied to interpret available field data. The implications of this research for drill-cutting pile remediation are discussed. The model indicates that when natural bioremediation has broken down a 5-cm layer of a drill-cutting pile, only 50-100% of the pile area (or 75-95% of the pile volume) requires treatment.

  19. Biogenic methane production in formation waters from a large gas field in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Neil D; Sherry, Angela; Larter, Stephen R; Erdmann, Michael; Leyris, Juliette; Liengen, Turid; Beeder, Janiche; Head, Ian M

    2009-05-01

    Methanogenesis was investigated in formation waters from a North Sea oil rimmed gas accumulation containing biodegraded oil, which has not been subject to seawater injection. Activity and growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens was measured but acetoclastic methanogenesis was not detected. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens showed activity between 40 and 80 degrees C with a temperature optimum (ca. 70 degrees C) consistent with in situ reservoir temperatures. They were also active over a broad salinity range, up to and consistent with the high salinity of the waters (90 g l(-1)). These findings suggest the methanogens are indigenous to the reservoir. The conversion of H(2) and CO(2) to CH(4) in methanogenic enrichments was enhanced by the addition of inorganic nutrients and was correlated with cell growth. Addition of yeast extract also stimulated methanogenesis. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from enrichment cultures were closely related to Methanothermobacter spp. which have been identified in other high-temperature petroleum reservoirs. It has recently been suggested that methanogenic oil degradation may be a major factor in the development of the world's heavy oils and represent a significant and ongoing process in conventional deposits. Although an oil-degrading methanogenic consortium was not enriched from these samples the presence and activity of communities of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea was demonstrated. Stimulation of methanogenesis by addition of nutrients suggests that in situ methanogenic biodegradation of oil could be harnessed to enhance recovery of stranded energy assets from such petroleum systems.

  20. Formation and evolution of the modem warm current system in the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea since the last deglaciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tiegang; NAN Qingyun; JIANG Bo; SUN Rongtao; ZHANG Deyu; LI Qing

    2009-01-01

    To reconstruct the formation and evolution process of the warm current system within the East China Sea (ECS) and the Yellow Sea (YS) since the last deglaciation, the paleoceangraphic records in core DGKS9603, core CSH1 and core YSDPI02, which were retrieved from the mainstream of the Kuroshio Current (KC), the edge of the modem Tsushima Warm Current (TWC) and muddy region under cold waters accreted with the Yellow Sea Warm Current (YSWC) respectively, were synthetically analyzed. The results indicate that the formation and evolution of the modem warm current system in the ECS and the YS has been accompanied by the development of the KC and impulse rising of the sea level since the last deglaciation. The influence of the KC on the Okinawa Trough had enhanced since 16 cal kyr BE and synchronously the modem TWC began to develop with the rising of sea level and finally formed at about 8.5 cal kyr BP. The KC had experienced two weakening process during the Heinrich event 1 and the Younger Drays event from 16 to 8.5 cal kyr BP. The period of 7-6 cal kyr BP was the strongest stage of the KC and the TWC since the last deglaciation. The YSWC has appeared at about 6.4 cal kyr BP. Thus,the warm current system of the ECS and the YS has ultimately formed. The weakness of the KC,indicated by the occurrence of Pulleniatina minimum event (PME) during the period from 5.3 to 2.8 cal kyr BE caused the main stream of the TWC to shift eastward to the Pacific Ocean around about 3 cal kyr BP. The process resulted in the intruding of continent shelf cold water mass with rich nutrients. Synchronously, the strength of the YSWC was relatively weak and the related cold water body was active at the early-mid stage of its appearance against the PME background, which resulted in the quick formation of muddy deposit system in the southeastern YS. The strength of the warm current system in the ECS and the YS has enhanced evidently, and approached to the modern condition gradually since 3 cal kyr

  1. The Dead Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Phillips

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monsters have always enjoyed a significant presence in the human imagination, and religion was instrumental in replacing the physical horror they engendered with that of a moral threat. Zombies, however, are amoral – their motivation purely instinctive and arbitrary, yet they are, perhaps, the most loathed of all contemporary monsters. One explanation for this lies in the theory of the uncanny valley, proposed by robotics engineer Masahiro Mori. According to the theory, we reserve our greatest fears for those things which seem most human, yet are not – such as dead bodies. Such a reaction is most likely a survival mechanism to protect us from danger and disease – a mechanism even more essential when the dead rise up and walk. From their beginnings zombies have reflected western societies’ greatest fears – be they of revolutionary Haitians, women, or communists. In recent years the rise in the popularity of the zombie in films, books and television series reflects our fears for the planet, the economy, and of death itself

  2. The influence of climate change on the intensity of ice gouging at the Kara Sea bottom by hummocky formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodov, Stanislav; Arkhipov, Vasily; Kokin, Osip; Natalia, Shabanova

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice as a zonal factor is an important passive and active relief-forming agent in the coastal-shelf zone of the Arctic and other freezing seas. The most dangerous process in relation to the hydrotechnical facilities is ice gouging - destructive mechanical impact of the ice of the ground, connected with the dynamics of the ice cover, formation of hummocks and stamukhas under the influence of hydrometeorologic factors and of the relief of the coastal-shelf zone. Underestimation of the ice gouging intensity can lead to damage of the engineering facilities, while excessive deepening increases the expenses of the construction. Finding the optimal variant and, by this, decreasing the risks of extreme situations is a relevant task of the science and practice. This task is complicated by the fact that the oil and gas infrastructure within the coastal and shelf areas of the freezing seas is currently being developed in the conditions of global climate change. In the present work, several results of the repeated sounding of bottom ice gouging microrelief within the area of the underwater pipeline crossing of the Baydaratskaya Bay, Kara Sea, are presented. Based on the results of the monitoring, as well as the analysis of literature sources and modeling it has been established that under the conditions of climate warming and sea ice reduction, the zone of the most intensive ice gouging is shifted landwards, on shallower water areas.

  3. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Postlethwaite

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model. The modeled tidal amplitudes are compared with tide gauge data and sea ice extent is compared with satellite data. Including tides in the model is found to have little impact on overall sea ice extent but is found to delay freeze up and hasten the onset of melting in tidally active coastal regions. The impact that including tides in the model has on the salt budget is investigated and found to be regionally dependent. The vertically integrated salt budget is dominated by lateral advection. This increases significantly when tides are included in the model in the Pechora Sea and around Svalbard where tides are strong. Tides increase the salt flux from sea ice by 50% in the Pechora and White Seas but have little impact elsewhere. This study suggests that the interaction between ocean tides and sea ice should not be neglected when modeling the Arctic.

  4. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. Postlethwaite

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model. The modeled tidal amplitudes are compared with tide gauge data and sea ice extent is compared with satellite data. Including tides in the model is found to have little impact on overall sea ice extent but is found to delay freeze up and hasten the onset of melting in tidally active coastal regions. The impact that including tides in the model has on the salt budget is investigated and found to be regionally dependent. The vertically integrated salt budget is dominated by lateral advection. This increases significantly when tides are included in the model in the Pechora Sea and around Svalbard where tides are strong. Tides increase the salt flux from sea ice by 50% in the Pechora and White Seas but have little impact elsewhere. This study suggests that the interaction between ocean tides and sea ice should not be neglected when modeling the Arctic.

  5. Modeling the barrier-layer formation in the South-Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Durand, F.; Shankar, D.; DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Blanke, B.; Madec, G.

    by two complementary processes, the arrival of low-salinity surface waters that are cooled en route to the SEAS and downwelling of waters mostly local to the SEAS in the subsurface layers. The surface waters are partly of Bay-of-Bengal origin...

  6. Summer and Fall Sea Ice Processes in the Amundsen Sea: Bottom melting, surface flooding and snow ice formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, S. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Weissling, B.; Elder, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    Two ice mass balance buoys were deployed on the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, ice pack near January 1, 2011. Below freezing air and snow temperatures and sea ice and seawater temperatures at the freezing point at this time indicated that summer melt had not yet commenced. Over the next two months, however, while snow depths changed by less than 0.1m, ice thickness decreased, from bottom melting, by 0.9-1.0m. As snow temperature records did not show temperatures ever reaching the melting point, no surface melt was recorded during the summer period and the small snow depth changes were presumed to occur by consolidation or wind scouring. Water temperatures above the freezing point caused the observed bottom melting from mid January to late February. During the ice loss periods, progressive flooding by sea water at the base of the snow pack was recorded by temperature sensors, showing an increase in the depth of flooded snow pack of 0.4m by the end of the summer period in late February. We hypothesize that progressive flooding of the surface snow pack gives a mechanism for nutrient replenishment in these upper layers, and continuous high algal growth can therefore occur in the flooded snow layer during summer. An underice radiometer recorded light transmission through the ice and snow at selective wavelengths sensitive to chlorophyll. These radiometric results will be presented to examine this algal growth hypothesis. This flooded layer then refroze from the top down into snow ice as air temperatures dropped during March and April, showing that the layer had refrozen as snow ice on the top surface of the ice. Refreezing of the flooded layer gives an ice growth mechanism at the end of summer of 0.2 m to 0.4m of new ice growth over the majority of the ice pack. The snow ice growth in areas covered with pack ice gives salt fluxes commensurate with new ice growth in the autumn expansion of the ice edge over open water. These high salt fluxes therefore represent a marked

  7. On contribution of horizontal and intra-layer convection to the formation of the Baltic Sea cold intermediate layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Chubarenko

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal cascades down the coastal slopes and intra-layer convection are considered as the two additional mechanisms contributing to the Baltic Sea cold intermediate layer (CIL formation along with conventional seasonal vertical mixing. Field measurements are presented, reporting for the first time the possibility of denser water formation and cascading from the Baltic Sea underwater slopes, which take place under fall and winter cooling conditions and deliver waters into intermediate layer of salinity stratified deep-sea area. The presence in spring within the CIL of water with temperature below that of maximum density (Tmd and that at the local surface in winter time allows tracing its formation: it is argued that the source of the coldest waters of the Baltic CIL is early spring (March–April cascading, arising due to heating of water before reaching the Tmd. Fast increase of the open water heat content during further spring heating indicates that horizontal exchange rather than direct solar heating is responsible for that. When the surface is covered with water, heated above the Tmd, the conditions within the CIL become favorable for intralayer convection due to the presence of waters of Tmd in intermediate layer, which can explain its well-known features – the observed increase of its salinity and deepening with time.

  8. Calcareous microfossil biostratigraphy of the uppermost cenozoic formations distributed in the coast of the Japan Sea (Part 1). Niigata area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tokiyuki; Takayama, Toshiaki; Kato, Michio; Kudo, Tetsuro

    1987-05-01

    Eleven calcareous nannofossil biohorizons were established in the Quaternary sequences at six sites drilled in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean during DSDP-IPOD Leg 94. Correlation of these biohorizons with the magnetostratigraphy was established and ages of all datums were estimated. As the results, the applicability to the Japan Sea sedimentary basin was confirmed. The Nishiyama and Haizume formations distributed in the Oginome area, near the type locality of the Hashizume Formation in Niigata district were surveyed as the representative formation of the uppermost Cenozoic formation distributed in the coast of the Japan Sea; and five calcareous nannofossil biohorizons were recognized. Based on the above results of DSDP-IPOD, the middle Nishiyama through the Hashizume formations were Peistocene in age and could be correlated with interval between the Olduvai and Jaramillo events of the magnetostratigraphy. This age assignment agreed neither with magnetostratigraphic interpretations nor with fission track datings which were obtained in the Oguni area 25 km south of the present area. (23 refs, 11 figs)

  9. THE RELATION OF EXERCISE TO BUBBLE FORMATION IN ANIMALS DECOMPRESSED TO SEA LEVEL FROM HIGH BAROMETRIC PRESSURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M; Berg, W E; Whitaker, D M; Twitty, V C

    1945-01-20

    1. Bullfrogs (Rana catesbiana) and rats have been subjected to high barometric pressures and studied for bubble formation on subsequent decompression to sea level. Pressures varying from 3 to 60 pounds per square inch, in excess of atmospheric pressure, were used. 2. Muscular activity after decompression is necessary for bubble formation in bullfrogs after pressure treatment throughout the above range. Anesthetized frogs remained bubble-free following decompression. Rats compressed at 15 to 45 pounds per square inch likewise did not contain bubbles unless exercised on return to sea level. 3. Bubbles form without voluntary muscular activity in anesthetized rats previously subjected to pressure of 60 pounds per square inch. Small movements involved in breathing and other vital activities are believed sufficient to initiate bubbles in the presence of very high supersaturations of N(2). 4. Bubbles appear (with exercise) in rats previously compressed at 15 pounds per square inch, and in bullfrogs subjected to pressure at levels as low as 3 pounds per square inch above atmospheric pressure. The percentage drop in pressure necessary for bubble formation is less in compressed animals than in those decompressed from sea level to simulated altitudes. 5. The action of exercise on bubble formation in compressed frogs and rats is attributed to mechanical factors associated with muscular activity, combined with the high supersaturation of N(2). CO(2) probably is not greatly involved, since its concentration does not reach supersatuation, as it does at high altitude. 6. Anoxia following decompression from high barometric pressures has no observable facilitating effect on bubble formation.

  10. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for ice formation in Arctic clouds (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was –42.2±0.3°C. Our results suggest that immersion freezing of these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses would not be important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in polar clouds or to the formation of sea ice. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  11. Authigenic carbonates from newly discovered active cold seeps on the northwestern slope of the South China Sea: Constraints on fluid sources, formation environments, and seepage dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qianyong; Hu, Yu; Feng, Dong; Peckmann, Jörn; Chen, Linying; Yang, Shengxiong; Liang, Jinqiang; Tao, Jun; Chen, Duofu

    2017-06-01

    Authigenic carbonates recovered from two newly discovered active cold seeps on the northwestern slope of the South China Sea have been studied using petrography, mineralogy, stable carbon and oxygen isotopic, as well as trace element compositions, together with AMS 14C ages of shells of seep-dwelling bivalves to unravel fluid sources, formation conditions, and seepage dynamics. The two seeps (ROV1 and ROV2), referred to as 'Haima seeps' herein, are approximately 7 kilometers apart, and are typified by abundant carbonate rocks represented bycrusts and nodules. Aragonite and high-Mg calcite are the main carbonate minerals. Based on low δ13Ccarbonate values ranging from -43.0‰ to -27.5‰ (V-PDB) methane is apparently the predominant carbon source of seep carbonates. The corresponding δ18O values, varying from 2.5‰ to 5.8‰ (V-PDB), mostly are higher than calculated values representing precipitation in equilibrium with seawater (2.5‰ to 3.8‰), which probably reflects past destabilization of locally abundant gas hydrates. In addition, we found that carbonates with bivalve shells are generally aragonite-dominated, and bear no barium enrichment but uranium enrichments, reflecting shallow formation depths close to the seafloor. In contrast, carbonate crusts without bivalve shells and nodules contain more calcite, and are characterized by major molybdenum enrichment and different degrees of barium enrichment, agreeing with precipitation at greater depth under strictly anoxic conditions. AMS 14C ages suggest that a major episode of carbonate precipitation occurred between 6.1 ka and 5.1 ka BP at the Haima seeps, followed by a possibly subordinate episode from approximately 3.9 ka to 2.9 ka BP. The common occurrence of dead bivalves at both sites indicates that chemosynthesis-based communities flourished to a greater extent in the past, probably reflecting a decline of seepage activity in recent times. Overall, these results confirm that authigenic carbonates from

  12. Sea Ice Charts of the Russian Arctic in Gridded Format, 1933-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) in St. Petersburg, Russia, produces sea ice charts for safety of navigation in the polar regions and for other...

  13. National Ice Center Arctic Sea Ice Charts and Climatologies in Gridded Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. National Ice Center (NIC) is an inter-agency sea ice analysis and forecasting center comprised of the Department of Commerce/NOAA, the Department of...

  14. Dense water formation and BiOS-induced variability in the Adriatic Sea simulated using an ocean regional circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunić, Natalija; Vilibić, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka; Somot, Samuel; Sevault, Florence

    2016-08-01

    A performance analysis of the NEMOMED8 ocean regional circulation model was undertaken for the Adriatic Sea during the period of 1961-2012, focusing on two mechanisms, dense water formation (DWF) and the Adriatic-Ionian Bimodal Oscillating System (BiOS), which drive interannual and decadal variability in the basin. The model was verified based on sea surface temperature and sea surface height satellite measurements and long-term in situ observations from several key areas. The model qualitatively reproduces basin-scale processes: thermohaline-driven cyclonic circulation and freshwater surface outflow along the western Adriatic coast, dense water dynamics, and the inflow of Ionian and Levantine waters to the Adriatic. Positive temperature and salinity biases are reported; the latter are particularly large along the eastern part of the basin, presumably because of the inappropriate introduction of eastern Adriatic rivers into the model. The highest warm temperature biases in the vertical direction were found in dense-water-collecting depressions in the Adriatic, indicating either an inappropriate quantification of DWF processes or temperature overestimation of modelled dense water. The decadal variability in the thermohaline properties is reproduced better than interannual variability, which is considerably underestimated. The DWF rates are qualitatively well reproduced by the model, being larger when preconditioned by higher basin-wide salinities. Anticyclonic circulation in the northern Ionian Sea was modelled only during the Eastern Mediterranean Transient. No other reversals of circulation that could be linked to BiOS-driven changes were modelled.

  15. Bubble Formation and Modification in the Sea and its Meteorological Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchard, D. C.; Woodcock, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    It is believed that the vast majority of the airborne salt nuclei arise from bursting bubbles at the air—sea water interface. Four natural mechanisms for the production of these bubbles have been studied. These are whitecaps, rain, snow and supersaturation of the surface waters of the sea due to spring warming. The bubble spectra from whitecaps and snowflakes have been measured and semi-quantitative and qualitative observations have been made on the bubble spectrum produced by raindrops...

  16. MAPPING SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS ON THE EASTERN RED SEA COAST IN JORDAN USING GEOELECTRICAL TECHNIQUES: GEOLOGICAL AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batayneh Awni T.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available During 2006, geoelectrical measurements using the vertical electrical sounding (VES method were conducted on the eastern Red Sea coast in Jordan, using the SYSCAL-R2 resistivity instrument.
    The objectives of the study were (i to evaluate the possibility of mapping of Quaternary sediments medium in areas where little is known about the subsurface geology and to infer shallow geological
    structure from the electrical interpretation, and (ii to identify formations that may present fresh aquifer waters, and subsequently to estimate the relationship between groundwater resources and geological structures. Data collected at 47 locations were interpreted first with curve matching techniques, using theoretically calculated master curves, in conjunction with the auxiliary curves. The initial earth
    models were second checked and reinterpreted using a 1-D inversion program (i.e., RESIX-IP in order to obtain final earth models. The final layer parameters (thicknesses and resistivities were then
    pieced together along survey lines to make electrical cross sections. Resistivity measurements show a dominant trend of decreasing resistivity (thus increasing salinity with depth and westward toward
    the Red Sea. Accordingly, three zones with different resistivity values were detected, corresponding to three different bearing formations: (i a water-bearing formation in the west containing Red Sea saltwater; (ii a transition zone of clay and clayey sand thick formation; (iii stratas saturated with fresh groundwater in the east disturbed by the presence of clay and clayey sand horizons. Deep borehole (131 m drilled in the northwestern part of the study area for groundwater investigation, has
    confirmed the findings of the resistivity survey.

  17. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for cloud formation in the Arctic (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was −42.2±0.3°C. Our results indicated that these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses are not important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in sea ice or polar clouds. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  18. Critical mechanisms for the formation of extreme arctic sea-ice extent in the summers of 2007 and 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Behnjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, Bing; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-01

    Along with significant changes in the Arctic climate system, the largest year-to-year variation in sea-ice extent (SIE) has occurred in the Laptev, East Siberian, and Chukchi seas (defined here as the area of focus, AOF), among which the two highly contrasting extreme events were observed in the summers of 2007 and 1996 during the period 1979-2012. Although most efforts have been devoted to understanding the 2007 low, a contrasting high September SIE in 1996 might share some related but opposing forcing mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms for the formation of these two extremes and quantitatively estimate the cloud-radiation-water vapor feedback to the sea-ice-concentration (SIC) variation utilizing satellite-observed sea-ice products and the NASA MERRA reanalysis. The low SIE in 2007 was associated with a persistent anticyclone over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia, which induced anomalous southerly winds. Ample warm and moist air from the North Pacific was transported to the AOF and resulted in positive anomalies of cloud fraction (CF), precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface LWnet (down-up), total surface energy and temperature. In contrast, the high SIE event in 1996 was associated with a persistent low pressure over the central Arctic coupled with high pressure along the Eastern Arctic coasts, which generated anomalous northerly winds and resulted in negative anomalies of above mentioned atmospheric parameters. In addition to their immediate impacts on sea ice reduction, CF, PWV and radiation can interplay to lead to a positive feedback loop among them, which plays a critical role in reinforcing sea ice to a great low value in 2007. During the summer of 2007, the minimum SIC is 31 % below the climatic mean, while the maximum CF, LWnet and PWV can be up to 15 %, 20 Wm-2, and 4 kg m-3 above. The high anti-correlations (-0.79, -0.61, -0.61) between the SIC and CF, PWV, and LWnet indicate that CF, PWV and LW radiation

  19. The Right to be Dead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Jakob Borrits; Troyer, John Eric

    2017-01-01

    of argument by simultaneously examining how dead body disposal and digital data disposal increasingly overlaps. In November 2015 the Future Cemetery announced its first international design competition: Future Dead: Designing Disposal for Both Dead Bodies and Digital Data (www.futurecemetery.org) and we...... illustrate our essay design arguments through the competition’s history and results. In our paper we argue that designing future cemeteries should focus on how spaces such as Arnos Vale represent a transitional hybrid space. A merger of the Victorian past with the digital present, in order to create a new......-mortem handling of their exponentially increased digital data. The European Union Court of Justice ruled that a person has a Right to be Forgotten on the world wide web. The Future Cemetery asks: Does a person have the Right to be Dead on this information superhighway? Our essay pursues these specific lines...

  20. And the Dead Remain Behind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In most cultures the dead and their living relatives are held in a dialogic relationship. The dead have made it clear, while living, what they expect from their descendants. The living, for their part, wish to honour the tombs of their ancestors; at the least, to keep the graves of the recent dead from disrepair. Despite the strictures, the living can fail their responsibilities, for example, by migration to foreign countries. The peripatetic Chinese are one of the few cultures able to overcome the dilemma of the wanderer or the exile. With the help of a priest, an Australian Chinese migrant may summon the soul of an ancestor from an Asian grave to a Melbourne temple, where the spirit, though removed from its earthly vessel, will rest and remain at peace. Amongst cultures in which such practices are not culturally appropriate, to fail to honour the family dead can be exquisitely painful. Violence is the cause of most failure.

  1. Formation of turbid ice during autumn freeze-up in the Kara Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional (vertical) model is used to estimate the mass of ice-rafted sediment in turbid sea ice on the shallow Kara Sea shelf during autumn freeze-up. Sediment is entrained into the ice through aggregation with frazil ice crystals that are diffused downwards by wind-generated turbulence. Data from local meteorological stations are used to force the model, while water stratification and sediment concentrations from the area are used to initiate the model. Model results indicate a 0.2 ...

  2. Selective incorporation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during sea ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Susan; Vähätalo, Anssi V.; Stedmon, Colin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the incorporation of DOM from seawater into b2 day-old sea ice in tanks filled with seawater alone or amended with DOM extracted from the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris. Optical properties, including chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption and fluorescence, as well...

  3. Changes in the composition and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter during sea ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Stedmon, Colin A.; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

    2015-01-01

    . Amino acid-like FDOM and an unknown FDOM component, only previously found in Antarctic brines, were associated with biological activity and possibly extracellular polymeric substances in sea ice. An additional long-term (226-228 d) bioassay experiment with seawater collected from the mesocosm experiment...

  4. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 201

  5. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 201

  6. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June

  7. Formation Mechanism for the Anomalous Anticyclonic Circulation over Northeast Asia and the Japan Sea in Boreal Winter 1997/98 and the Spring of 1998

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai; LIU Qinyu; ZHENG Jian

    2013-01-01

    A robust anomalous anticyclonic circulation (AAC) was observed over Northeast Asia and the Japan Sea in boreal winter 1997/98 and over the Japan Sea in spring 1998.The formation mechanism is investigated.On the background of the vertically sheared winter monsoonal flow,anomalous rainfall in the tropical Indo-Western Pacific warm pool excited a wave train towards East Asia in the upper troposphere during boreal winter of 1997/98.The AAC over Northeast Asia and the Japan Sea is part of the wave train of equivalent barotropic structure.The AAC over the Japan Sea persisted from winter to spring and even intensified in spring 1998.The diagnostic calculations show that the vorticity and temperature fluxes by synoptic eddies are an important mechanism for the AAC over the Japan Sea in spring 1998.

  8. Conodonts, stratigraphy, and relative sea-level changes of the tribes hill formation (lower ordovician, east-central New York)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landing, E.D.; Westrop, S.R.; Knox, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Tremadocian onlap is recorded by the Tribes Hill Formation. The formation is a lower Lower Ordovician (upper conodont Fauna B Interval(?)- Rossodus manitouensis Zone) depositional sequence that unconformably overlies the Upper Cambrian Little Falls Formation. Depositional environments and stratigraphy indicate that the Tribes Hill was deposited on a wave-, not tide-, dominated shelf and that a uniform, 'layer-cake' stratigraphy is present. The deepening-shoaling sequence of the Tribes Hill includes the: 1) Sprakers Member (new; peritidal carbonate and overlying tempestite limestone and shale); 2) Van Wie Member (new; subtidal shale and limestone); 3) Wolf Hollow Member (revised; massive carbonates with thrombolitic cap); and 4) Canyon Road Member (new; glauconitic limestone and overlying evaporitic dolostone). The shoaling half-cycle of the Tribes Hill is older than a shoaling event in western Newfoundland, and suggests epeirogenic factors in earliest Ordovician sea-level change in east Laurentia. Conodont and trilobite biofacies track lithofacies, and Rossodus manitouensis Zone conodonts and Bellefontia Biofacies trilobites appear in the distal, middle Tribes Hill Formation. Twenty-four conodont species are illustrated. Ansella? protoserrata new species, lapetognathus sprakersi new species, Leukorhinion ambonodes new genus and species, and Laurentoscandodus new genus are described.

  9. Microfabric analysis of Mn-carbonate laminae deposition and Mn-sulfide formation in the Gotland Deep, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ian T.; Kemp, Alan E. S.

    2002-05-01

    The manganese carbonate deposits of the anoxic Littorina sediments of the Gotland Deep have been commonly related to the periodic renewal of deep water by inflowing saline water from the North Sea. The use of scanning electron microscopy-based techniques allows identification of small-scale sedimentary and geochemical features associated with Mn-carbonate laminae, which has significant implications for models of Mn-carbonate formation. Varves occurring in the Littorina sequence contain up to four laminae that may be placed in a seasonal cycle, and kutnahorite laminae occur within varves only as a winter-early spring deposit. This kutnahorite laminae seasonality is in agreement with the seasonal distribution of major Baltic inflow events recorded in historical records, and a direct causal link between inflows and kutnahorite deposition is implied. Benthic foraminifera tests are found to be heavily encrusted in kutnahorite, implying that benthic recolonization during oxidation events occurs concurrently with kutnahorite formation. The relatively common occurrence of small (50 to 100 μm) hexagonal γ-Mn-sulfide pseudomorphs, associated with 13% of kutnahorite laminae studied, is reported in Gotland Deep sediments for the first time. Although Mn-sulfide crystals are not usually preserved in the sediment, the discovery of Mn-sulfide pseudomorphs suggests that initial formation of Mn-sulfide in the Gotland Deep may occur much more commonly during the process of kutnahorite formation than previous reports of Mn-sulfide occurrence have implied.

  10. Evaluation of CO2 migration and formation storage capacity in the Dalders formations, Baltic Sea - Preliminary analysis by means of models of increasing complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Auli; Yang, Zhibing; Tian, Liang; Jung, Byeongju; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Joodaki, Saba; Pasquali, Riccardo; O'Neill, Nick; Vernon, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present preliminary data analysis and modeling of CO2 injection into selected parts of the Dalders Monocline and Dalders Structure, formations situated under the Baltic Sea and of potential interest for CO2 geological storage. The approach taken is to use models of increasing complexity successively, thereby increasing the confidence and reliability of the predictions. The objective is to get order-of-magnitude estimates of the behavior of the formations during potential industrial scale CO2 injection and subsequent storage periods. The focus has been in regions with best cap-rock characteristics, according to the present knowledge. Data has been compiled from various sources available, such as boreholes within the region. As the first approximation we use analytical solutions, in order to get an initial estimate the CO2 injection rates that can be used without causing unacceptable pressure increases. These preliminary values are then used as basis for more detailed numerical analyses with TOUGH2/TOUGH2-MP (e.g. Zhang et al, 2008) simulator and vertical equilibrium based (e.g. Gasda et al, 2009) models. With the numerical models the variations in material properties, formation thickness etc., as well as more processes such as CO2 dissolution can also be taken into account. The presentation discusses results from these preliminary analyses in terms of estimated storage capacity, CO2 and pressure plume extent caused by various injection scenarios, as well as CO2 travel time after the end of the injection. The effect of factors such as number of injection wells and the positioning of these, the effect of formation properties and the boundary conditions are discussed as are the benefits and disadvantages of the various modeling approaches used. References: Gasda S.E. et al, 2009. Computational Geosciences 13, 469-481. Zhang et al, 2008. Report LBNL-315E, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  11. Resurrecting Dead-water Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Mercier, Matthieu; Dauxois, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    We revisit experimental studies performed by Ekman on dead-water using modern techniques in order to present new insights on this peculiar phenomenon. We extend its description to more general situations such as a three-layer fluid or a linearly stratified fluid in presence of a pycnocline, showing the robustness of dead-water phenomenon. We observe large amplitude nonlinear internal waves which are coupled to the boat dynamics, and we emphasize that the modeling of the wave-induced drag requires more analysis, taking into account nonlinear effects.

  12. Past storminess recorded in the internal architecture of coastal formations of Estonia in the NE Baltic Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõnisson, Hannes; Vilumaa, Kadri; Kont, Are; Sugita, Shinya; Rosentau, Alar; Muru, Merle; Anderson, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 50 years, storminess has increased in northern Europe because of the changes in cyclonic activity. The cyclone season in the Baltic Sea area has shifted from autumn to winter; this has led to intensification of shore processes (erosion, sediment transport and accumulation) and has increased pressure to the economy (land use, coastal protection measures) of the coastal regions in the Baltic states. Therefore, studing the effects of such changes on shore processes in the past is critical for prediction of the future changes along the Baltic coasts. Beach ridge plains are found worldwide, where cyclones and storm surges affect accumulation forms. These sandy shores are highly susceptible to erosion. Due to the isostatic uplift on the NE coast of the Baltic Sea, the signs of major past events are well-preserved in the internal architecture of old coastal formations (dune ridge-swale complexes). Wave-eroded scarps in beach deposits are visible in subsurface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) records, indicating the past high-energy events. Several study areas and transects were selected on the NW coast of Estonia, using high-resolution topographic maps (LiDAR). Shore-normal subsurface surveys have been conducted with a digital GSSI SIR-3000 georadar with a 270 MHz antenna at each transect. Interpretation of GPR facies was based on hand auger and window sampler coring, which provided accurate depths of key stratigraphic boundaries and bounding surfaces. Several samples for luminescence and 14C dating were collected to determine the approximate chronology of the coastal formations along the Estonian coast. We have found that changes in storminess, including the periods of high and low intensity of storms in late Holocene, are clearly reflected in the internal patterns of ancient coastal formations. The sections with small ridges with short seaward-dipped layers (interface between wave-built and aeolian deposits) in deeper horizons are probably formed during

  13. Geo-mechanical consequences of large scale fluid storage in the Utsira formation in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangen, Magnus; Gasda, Sarah; Bjørnarå, Tore

    2016-04-01

    The Utsira formation in the North Sea is a more than 400 km long formation of Pliocene sand with a thickness in the range from 50m to 350m. The porosity of the Utsira formation is estimated to 35% and the permeability is of the order Darcy (1e-12 m2). This formation is being considered as a possible site for large scale CO2 storage, because of its large storage capacity and good permeability. In this work we look at the geo-mechanical implications of injecting "large'' volumes of fluid in the Utsira formation. Our modelling is based on Biot's poro-elasticity in combination with one-phase and two phase flow. We compare the pressure build-up from injection of brine with the pressure build-up from from injection of supercritical CO2. Well placement and near well modelling is not a part of the modelling. We study four different injection scenarios over 25 years, which have injection rates: 1 Mt/year, 10 Mt/year, 100 Mt/year and 1000 Mt/year. We observe that the pressure plume scales with the injection rate, which is the same behaviour as with Theis solution for pressure build-up. A particular concern is the mechanical properties of the Utsira sand and the cap rock. The cap rock is a Quaternary shale with a Young's modulus measured to 0.25 GPa and a Poisson ratio 0.25. A Young's modulus for the Utsira sand, which can be used to model expansion of the formation, is not measured. It is reasonable to assume that the loose sand has a low Young's modulus. We have tested low values of the Young's modulus for the sand and we get considerable mechanical expansion of the Utsira formation, even in the case of low pressure build-up from the fluid injection. Almost all the surface (seabed) uplift is linked to mechanical expansion of the sand. The strain of the Utsira formation and related surface uplift can be estimated with simple 1D models. Vertical 1D models apply because of the large lateral extent of the pressure plume compared to the thickness of the formation. The limits of

  14. PEDAGOGICAL DESIGNING OF THE PROCESS OF FORMATION OF READINESS OF MILITARY SEAMEN TO COUNTER PIRATES AND TERRORISTS AT SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varlamov S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern conditions, in accordance with the decision of the UN, warships of the coalition of states, which includes the Russian Federation, carry out tasks for the protection of navigation and for escorting ships in the areas endangered by pirates of the oceans. Training ships of the Navy to perform tasks of combat duty in the areas of increased activity of pirates to ensure the safety of navigation of civil transport vessels not only involves the decision of problems of staffing the crew with necessary staff, logistical support, and targeted development of the high readiness of the sailors to successful implementation of such specific combat missions. This kind of organizing and educational activities should be organized based on the experience of pedagogical designing of the military-pedagogical process. Instructional design is an objective necessity of development of subjects of military-pedagogical and educational activities of the projective imagination, thinking, efficient way of doing it. The author considers the instructional design of formation of readiness of military seamen to counter pirates and terrorists at sea as an innovative phenomenon that connects pedagogical theory and innovative practice aimed at comprehensive training of the personnel of the fighting ships for the upcoming operation. The article explains target program of development of readiness of military seamen to counter pirates and terrorists at sea. The author's target program contains six separate and interrelated modules, which will allow crew members to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to create a high level of preparedness for the forthcoming military - professional activity in the sea

  15. Venting formation fluids from deep-sea boreholes in a ridge flank setting: ODP Sites 1025 and 1026

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Jannasch, Hans W.; Kastner, Miriam; Plant, Josh N.; Decarlo, Eric H.; Lebon, Geoff

    2004-08-01

    During ODP Leg 168, two of ten boreholes, ODP Holes 1025C and 1026B, were cased through the sediment section, penetrated basaltic crust that is overpressured, and sealed. In 1999 and 2000 the seals were removed, allowing crustal formation fluids to vent and be sampled. The composition of these fluids is compared to those of basal deep-sea pore waters, which have been the basis for estimating geochemical fluxes from low-temperature ridge flank hydrothermal systems. Estimates for the composition of the major ions in formation fluids based on basal pore waters are within 5% of the values measured in borehole fluids. Similar comparisons for minor and trace elements are not as good; some are reactive in the sediment section, resulting in large uncertainties in the pore water extrapolation, while others are influenced by a variety of contaminants, including steel, grease, drilling muds, and basal sediment. Evidence for contamination includes high dissolved and particulate concentrations of several metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb) and measurable changes in concentration during the past four years in response to reaction with basal sediment. This new confidence in estimating the primary composition of formation fluids, coupled with advances in thermodynamic and kinetic models, reveals the possibility of anhydrite precipitation in ridge flank hydrothermal systems at temperatures of ˜70°C. Such new insights allow us to address the timing and conditions under which seawater-crustal reactions occur, leading to more accurate models of crustal evolution.

  16. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    KAUST Repository

    Calbet, Albert

    2015-06-11

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation.

  17. Pyritization processes and greigite formation in the advancing sulfidization front in the Upper Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neretin, LN; Bottcher, ME; Jørgensen, BB

    2004-01-01

    Pyritization in late Pleistocene sediments of the Black Sea is driven by sulfide formed during anaerobic methane oxidation. A sulfidization front is formed by the opposing gradients of sulfide and dissolved iron. The sulfidization processes are controlled by the diffusion flux of sulfide from above...... and by the solid reactive iron content. Two processes of diffusion-limited pyrite formation were identified. The first process includes pyrite precipitation with the accumulation of iron sulfide precursors with the average chemical composition of FeSn (n = 1.10-1.29), including greigite. Elemental sulfur...... and polysulfides, formed from H,S by a reductive dissolution of Fe(Ill)-containing minerals, serve as intermediates to convert iron sulfides into pyrite. In the second process, a "direct" pyrite precipitation occurs through prolonged exposure of iron-containing minerals to dissolved sulfide. Methane-driven sulfate...

  18. Barrier layer in the northeastern South China Sea and its formation mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Robust evidence for the barrier layer (BL) in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS) (16°-25°N, 112°-124°E) is presented. The occurrence rate of the BL peaks in the autumn (45.7%) and then the summer (31.1%) and the spring (23.3%), sequently. It is estimated that the annual occurrence rate of the BL reaches about 40.0% in the central northeastern SCS (18°-22°N, 112°-120°E) and the Luzon Strait. Stratification-formed (Rain-formed) mechanism is the major factor responsible for the occurrence of the BL in the northeastern SCS in the spring (the summer and autumn), respectively. The rainfall observation from TRMM provides reliable evidence for the latter.

  19. From few to many: observing the formation of a Fermi sea one atom at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, A N; Zürn, G; Murmann, S; Brouzos, I; Lompe, T; Jochim, S

    2013-10-25

    Knowing when a physical system has reached sufficient size for its macroscopic properties to be well described by many-body theory is difficult. We investigated the crossover from few- to many-body physics by studying quasi-one-dimensional systems of ultracold atoms consisting of a single impurity interacting with an increasing number of identical fermions. We measured the interaction energy of such a system as a function of the number of majority atoms for different strengths of the interparticle interaction. As we increased the number of majority atoms one by one, we observed fast convergence of the normalized interaction energy toward a many-body limit calculated for a single impurity immersed in a Fermi sea of majority particles.

  20. From nanoparticles via microtemplates and milliparticles to deep-sea nodules: biogenically driven mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hong; Schloßmacher, Ute; Wang, Shun-Feng; Schröder, Heinz C.; Wiens, Matthias; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2012-06-01

    Deep-sea minerals in polymetallic nodules and seamount Co-rich crusts are not only formed by mineralization but also by biologically driven processes involving microorganisms (biomineralization). Within the polymetallic nodules, free-living and biofilm-forming bacteria provide the matrix for manganese deposition, and in seamount Co-rich crusts, coccolithophores represent the dominant organisms that act as bio-seeds for an initial manganese deposition. These (bio)minerals are economically important: manganese is an important alloying component and cobalt forms part of special steels in addition to being used, along with other rare metals, in plasma screens, hard-disk magnets and hybrid car motors. Recent progress in our understanding of the participation of the organic matrices in the enrichment of these metals might provide the basis for feasibility studies of biotechnological applications.

  1. Role of Sea Level Fluctuation on the Formation of Organic-Carbon-Rich Sediments in the Chihsian Formation in Sangzhi Area, Western Hunan Province%海平面变化在湖南西部桑植地区栖霞组富有机碳沉积物形成中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦恒叶; 汪建国; 遇昊; 黄宝华

    2013-01-01

    The Middle Permian Chihsian Formation in Sangzhi area in western Hunan Province shows remarkable cyclicity, where organic matter cycles also occurred. The study of origin of organic matter accumulation in the Chihsian Formation helps understand the role of sea level fluctuation on the formation of organic-carbon-rich sediments. Using a cycle as the study interval, based on the study of pyrite morphology and geochemical parameters, such as TOC, δ34S, DOP and trace elements, we find out that the variation of ocean surface water primary productivity parameters, such as Ba, Ni, Cu and Zn, are consistent with TOC contents, suggesting organic matter accumulation was controlled by primary productivity. The redox condition in bottom water is related to primary productivity. The ultimate origin for the organic matter accumulation should be the high-frequency sea level fluctuatioa Rapid sea level rising brought rich nutrients, flourishing surface water biologic productivity. The decomposition of organic matter from dead body demanded more oxygen concentration, resulting in dysoxic-anoxic environment in bottom water.%湖南西部桑植地区中二叠统栖霞组地层旋回性明显,有机质也呈周期性变化.研究其有机质聚集堆积控制因素将有助于理解海平面变化在富有机碳沉积物形成过程中的作用.选择其中一个旋回作为研究目的层段,通过黄铁矿形态以及地球化学参数有机碳TOC、硫同位素、DOP以及微量元素的研究发现,初级生产力参数Ba、Ni、Cu和Zn的变化与TOC含量的变化一致,有机质聚集堆积主要受海洋表层初级生产力的控制,底部水体氧化还原条件与初级生产力有关.有机质的堆积最终归因于高频相对海平面变化,海平面快速上升带来丰富的营养物质,提高海洋表层生物生产力,海底有机质的分解消耗大量氧气,氧需求量的增加形成底部水体贫氧厌氧环境.

  2. Sea-level change and free gas occurrence influencing a submarine landslide and pockmark formation and distribution in deepwater Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboulot, V.; Cattaneo, A.; Sultan, N.; Garziglia, S.; Ker, S.; Imbert, P.; Voisset, M.

    2013-08-01

    A series of pockmarks observed at the seabed matches well the perimeter of a large submarine landslide, called NG1, located on the outer shelf and continental slope of the Eastern Gulf of Guinea. NG1 extends over 200 km2, is covered by a 120-m thick sedimentary layer which tapers downslope, and has an internal structure clearly identified in 3D seismic data consisting of three adjacent units on the upper continental slope. The pockmarks above NG1 have a diameter of several tens of meters and reveal distinct origins: (1) linked to >500 m deep fluid reservoirs, (2) rooted in NG1 internal discontinuities between NG1 units, and (3) well above NG1, superficially rooted in a regional conformity (D40), which marks the lowest sea level of the Marine Isotope Stage 6. The regional stratigraphic pattern of the study area is composed of muddy sedimentary sequences separated by correlative conformities and transgressive condensed units of coarser grain size. Mud-confined coarser-grained units constitute transient gas reservoirs favoring lateral gas migration and formation of pockmarks rooted in the condensed units. The buried NG1 landslide modifies the layered structure of the sedimentary column providing (1) overall, a barrier to fluid migration, and (2) localized pathways for fluid migration. The triggering factor for the formation of pockmarks above NG1 can be the variation of hydrostatic pressure driven by relative sea-level fall during Marine Isotopic Stages 6 and 2 and consequent gas exsolution and fluid flow. We anticipate our result to be a starting point for understanding the role of gas seeps on climate change worldwide. Furthermore, gas release intensifies during lowstands with relevant implication on global warming after ice ages.

  3. Lower miocene larger foraminifera and petroleum potential of the Tai Formation, Mergui Group, Andaman Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polachan, Songpope; Racey, Andrew

    Tertiary larger foraminifera are recorded for the first time from Thailand. The fauna studied is restricted mainly to the reefal carbonate of the Tai Formation, which rests unconformably on the pre-Late Eocene quartz-chlorite schist basement in the Central High region of the Mergui Basin. The formation is broadly correlatable with the Peutu Formation of the North Sumatra Basin. The Tai Formation can be divided into three units at the type locality; a basal unit of interbedded anhydrite, dolomite, shale and sandstone; a middle unit of coral/algal reefal limestones, and an upper unit of calcarenites interbedded with silty shales and sandstones. The middle and upper units have yielded a fauna comprising; Lepidocyclina (Nephrolepidina) japonica, Spiroclypeus yabeii, Cycloclypeus eidae, Cycloclypeus sp. A, Heterostegina sp. A, Lepidocyclina (N) sp. A, Miogypsina sp. A, and Miogypsinoides sp. L. (N) japonica and Miogypsinoides sp. can range up into the Middle Miocene (Lower Tf) whilst C. eidae can range down into the Upper Oligocene (Lower Te). The fauna is typical of the Indo-West Pacific Miocene faunal province of Adams (1970) and shows closer affinities to the faunas of Indonesia than those of India-Pakistan.

  4. Accessing the Impact of Sea-Salt Emissions on Aerosol Chemical Formation and Deposition Over Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q.; Wang, X.; Liu, Y.; Wu, D.; Chan, P. W.; Fan, S.; Feng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) emissions have a significant impact on aerosol pollution and haze formation in the coastal areas. In this study, Models-3/CMAQ modeling system was utilized to access the impact of SSA emissions on aerosol chemical formation and deposition over Pearl River Delta (PRD), China in July 2006. More SSAs were transported inland from the open-ocean under the southeast wind in summertime. Two experiments (with and without SSA emissions in the CMAQ model) were set up to compare the modeling results with each other. The results showed that the increase of sulfate concentrations were more attributable to the primary emissions of coarse SO42- particles in SSA, while the increase of nitrate concentrations were more attributable to secondary chemical formations, known as the mechanisms of chloride depletion in SSA. In the coastal areas, 17.62 % of SO42-, 26.6% of NO3- and 38.2% of PM10 were attributed to SSA emissions, while those portions were less than 1% in the inland areas. The increases of PM10 and its components due to SSA emissions resulted in higher deposition fluxes over PRD, particularly in the coastal areas, except for the wet deposition of nitrate. Nitrate was more sensitive to SSA emissions in chemical formations than sulfate and dry deposition of aerosol was also more sensitive than that for wet deposition. Process analysis of sulfate and nitrate was applied to find out the difference of physical and chemical mechanisms between Guangzhou (the inland areas) and Zhuhai (the coastal areas). The negative contributions of dry deposition process to both sulfate and nitrate concentrations increased if SSA emissions were taken into account in the model, especially for Zhuhai. The negative contributions of cloud process also increased due to cloud scavenging and wet deposition process. In the coastal area, the gas-to-particle conversions became more active with high contributions of aerosol process to nitrate concentrations.

  5. Authigenic albite formation due to water-rock interactions - Case study: Magnus oilfield (UK, Northern North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nana; Fu, Yunjiao; Schulz, Hans-Martin; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this contribution to test whether organic-inorganic interactions could induce the formation of authigenic albite. This concept and related results are being compared with modelling scenarios which are purely based on inorganic geochemical reactions. In order to unravel the pathway of authigenic albite formation, this paper presents results of a multidisciplinary study from imaging, geochemistry, mineralogy, and hydrogeochemical modelling. The Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield (UK, North Sea) were chosen as a test site. Albite occurs with 4-18 wt.% in the Magnus sandstones and its contents vary with depth. However, albite contents increase with increasing K-feldspar contents and decreasing grain size. It occurs in three forms: (1) as lamellae in perthite, (2) as overgrowth on/in corroded feldspar, and, (3) as cloudy replacing albite patches in K-feldspar. The albite overgrowth has the highest chemical purity (100% albite) whilst albite lamellae and replacing albite patches are slightly less pure (containing 1-4% anorthite). Albite appears non-altered, and has a euhedral morphology and dull cathodoluminescence. It commonly co-occurs with corroded K-feldspar grains. The precipitation of diagenetic albite in the Magnus sandstones is attributed to deep burial 80 Ma ago and may have continued until today at temperatures between 90-120 °C. The results of hydrogeochemical modelling offer two possible pathways for the authigenic albite formation: (1) Dissolution of unstable minerals (such as kaolinite and chalcedony) coupled to reduction of ferric iron minerals by products generated during oil generation, migration and degradation; (2) Dissolution of non-end member feldspar, such as K-feldspar with 10% albite, coupled to illite formation can account for trace amounts of albite due to an elevated Na+/K+ activity ratio in the pore water.

  6. FAQ: West Nile Virus and Dead Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Public Service Videos West Nile Virus & Dead Birds Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... dead bird sightings to local authorities. How do birds get infected with West Nile virus? West Nile ...

  7. Relationship between Formation of Zhongyebei Basin and Spreading of Southwest Subbasin, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Hongfang; Zhou Di; Qiu Yan

    2009-01-01

    The Zhongyebei (中业北) basin (ZYBB) is an NE-striking,narrow and small sedimentary basin superimposing the southern 1/2 segment of the proposed spreading axes of the SW subbasin of the South China Sea (SCS).More than 4 500 m strata were identified in the Zhongyebei basin,including the Paleogene lower structure layer and the Neogene upper structure layer.The SW subbasin of the South China Sea has been regarded as an oceanic basin opened by seafloor spreading,as evidenced by the fiat and deep (> 4 000 m mostly) seafloor with linear magnetic anomalies,and by the shallow Moho depth of < 12 km as estimated from gravity modeling.The classic model of seafloor spreading predicts that sediments on the oceanic crust are younger and thinner towards the spreading axes.But in the southwestern segment of the SW subbasin,contradictions appear.Firstly,the thick sedimentation in the ZYBB is along the proposed spreading axes.Secondly,the sediments are thinner (500-1 500 m) and younger away from the proposed spreading axes.Thirdly,geological elements of the two sides of spreading axes develop asymmetrically in the southwestern SW subbasin.Two models,the early opening model and the limited modeling model,are suggested for resolving this paradox.The former suggests that the opening of the SW subbasin was in Late Eocene and earlier than the oldest sediment in the ZYBB.The latter proposes that the opening of the SW subbasin was limited to its northeastern portion,and did not extend to the southwest portion.The ZYBB is a rift basin survived from the spreading but subjected to severe syn-spreading magmatic disturbance.The SW subbasin and the ZYBB of the SCS provide a unique opportunity for studying the structural evolution and dynamic mechanism at the tip of a propagating seafloor spreading.Both models have unresolved questions,and further studies are needed.

  8. Observations of new particle formation events in the south-eastern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Plauškaitė

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation and growth were observed at a coastal site (Preila station, Lithuania during 1997 and 2000-2002. The total amountof data analysed covers 291 one-day periods, 45 (15% of which were long-term, new particle formation days. Short-term nucleationevents (from a few minutes to one hour and long-term events (from one to eight hours were identified. The mean particlegrowth rate, condensation sink and condensable vapour source rate during nucleation events were 3.9 nm h-1, 1.45 × 10-3 cm-3 s-1 and 7.5 × 104 cm-3 s-1 respectively.The average formation rate J10 was 0.4 cm-3 s-1. The nucleation events were accompaniedmainly by air masses transported from the north (43% and north-west (19%. Meteorological parameters and trace gas (O3, SO2,NO2 concentrations were also analysed. It was found that nucleation events are related to high levels of solar radiation.

  9. Formation and syn-rifting process of the Wan'an Basin,South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Caili; YAO Yongjian; WU Shiguo; DONG Dongdong

    2013-01-01

    Based on seismic and drilling data,we calculated tectonic subsidence amounts and rates of the Wan'an Basin by backstripping.The genetic mechanism and syn-rifting process of the basin were analyzed in combination with the regional geological setting.The results reveal that the basin syn-rifted in the Eocene and early Miocene under the control of the dextral strike-slip Wan'an Fault Zone.The transtensional/extentional stresses along this fault zone may be attributed to seafloor spreading of the South China Sea (SCS) in multiple episodes.Extensive basal faults and some small initial rifts in the early Paleogene can be related to southeastward extrusion and clockwise rotation of the Indochina Block.During the Oligocene,the nearly N-S directed spreading of the SCS derived the transtensional stresses in a roughly NW-SE orientation.The basin subsided rapidly in the middle and north to form two major subsidence centers.In the early Miocene,the SCS spread again in a nearly NW-SE direction,resulting in rapid subsidence in the southern basin continuous extending until the period ~ 16.3 Ma.

  10. Seasonal variation and formation mechanism of the South China Sea warm water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秦玉; 王东晓; 贾英来; 杨海军; 孙即霖; 杜岩

    2002-01-01

    -- The South China Sea warm water (SCSWW) is identified as the warm water body with temperature no less than 28C. There are three stages in the seasonal variation of the SCSWW. The SCSWW expands rapidly and deepens quickly in the developing stage. The warm water thickness decreases near the coast of Vietnam and increases near Palawan Island in the steady stage. The SCSWW flinches southward while its thickness off Palawan Island remains no less than 50 m in the flinching stage. The maximum thickness of the SCSWW is always located near the southeastern SCS. The seasonal variation of the SCSWW has a close relationship with seasonal variation of the thermocline. According to the analysis of the numerical experiment results from the Princeton Ocean Model (POM),the mechanism of the seasonal variation of the SCSWW can be interpreted as: ( 1 ) in the developing stage, the rapidly expanding and thickening feature of the SCSWW is mainly due to buoyancy flux effect (67% contribution). The weak wind and anticyclonic wind stress curl (22% contribution) present an environment which facilitates the accumulation of warm water; (2) in the steady stage, the decrease feature near the Vietnam coast and increase eature in southeast of the SCSWW thickness are mainly caused by wind stress (70% contribution); (3) in the flinching stage, the thickness reduction of the SCSWW is mainly due to upwelling and enhanced turbulent mixing caused by wind stress accounts for 60% ).

  11. Formation of Criteria of Assessment of Infrastructure Projects of Sea Ports Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logutova Tamara G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of criteria, by which assessment of tender offers of projects of state-private partnership in the port industry is carried out, includes a small but capacious set of indicators of financial and economic efficiency and qualification level of contenders. However, the study of foreign methods of assessment of projects in sea ports and domestic experience of carrying out tenders in other industries shows that a more clear division of assessment of both tender offers and contenders is rational. The article uses some methods and approaches to scientific study – generalisation, systematisation and analysis of foreign and domestic experience of carrying out tenders and acts of law. In the result the article forms a scheme of assessment of tender offers and investors and also offers an algorithm of calculation of the integral tender assessment, based on division of tender criteria by four groups: technical and economic, financial (for a tender offer, financial and investment, and organisational (for investors. The offered aspects of improvement of methods of tender selection of projects, realised in the port industry with the help of the mechanism of state-private partnership, would facilitate a more balanced and optimal selection of the best offer not only from the point of view of its content, but also the characteristic of the investor that proposes it. On the other hand, the use of the common, successfully tested under different conditions of project realisation, numerical method of assessment would be the guarantee of applicability of the of the proposed measures.

  12. Living with the Dead or Communicating with the dead: media practices of continuing bonds among bereaved parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    John Durham Peters argues that media as communicational tools not only enables dialogues with the living, but also with the dead. He argues that “every new medium is a machine for the production of ghosts”; the recordings of people who have passed away fixed in photographs, sound tapes, film...... and in all kinds of digitized formats for registering and archiving, thus overcoming time and space is a one of the “key existential facts about modern media”: the possibilities for the living to interact with “the communicable traces of the dead” (Peters 1999:149). This argument will make a starting point...... for this paper analyzing bereaved parent’ communicational practices in order to create continuing bonds (Klass et.al. 1996) to their dead children. The use of media and materialities ascribed with media qualities allows us to “deal with and come to terms with death without being dead ourselves” (Christensen...

  13. The formation of post-spreading volcanic ridges in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; He, Enyuan; Tan, Pingchuan; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Xuelin

    2016-04-01

    In the South China Sea (SCS), the post-spreading magmatism (˜8-13 Ma) largely masks the previous spreading fabric. The resulting post-spreading seamounts are more numerous in the northern part than in the southern part of the East sub-basin. In the eastern part of the East sub-basin, the post-spreading volcanic ridge (PSVR) is approximately N055° oriented and follows the extinct spreading ridge (ESR). In the western part of the East sub-basin, the PSVR, called the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, is E-W oriented and hides the ESR. Based on swath bathymetric and magnetic data, the ESR in the eastern part of the East basin is also N055° oriented and thus is oblique the E-W Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain (Sibuet et al., 2016). We conducted a seismic refraction survey covering both the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain and the adjacent ESR, providing new constraints for understanding the relationship between the PSVR and the ESR. The detailed velocity structure shows that the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain was emplaced through a typical oceanic crust. The thicknesses of Zhenbei (14 km) and Huangyan seamounts (8 km) are larger than the ones of the normal oceanic crust. The correlation between crustal thicknesses and mean lower-crustal seismic velocities suggest that an asymmetric generation of seamounts in the East sub-basin where active upwelling mantle (Holbrook et al., 2001), the presence of a fertile mantle component (Korenaga et al., 2002), or buoyancy-driven decompression melting may happened (Castillo et al., 2010). Below the seamounts, the thickened lower crust is probably due to secondary magmatic intrusions and the large thickness of upper crust is possibly due to volcanic extrusions. The crustal thicknesses as well as the mean lower-crustal velocities of the Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts are different, suggesting an independent origin for magmatic feeding. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 91428204

  14. The formation and fate of internal waves in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Matthew H.; Peacock, Thomas; MacKinnon, Jennifer A.; Nash, Jonathan D.; Buijsman, Maarten C.; Centuroni, Luca R.; Chao, Shenn-Yu; Chang, Ming-Huei; Farmer, David M.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Fu, Ke-Hsien; Gallacher, Patrick C.; Graber, Hans C.; Helfrich, Karl R.; Jachec, Steven M.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Klymak, Jody M.; Ko, Dong S.; Jan, Sen; Johnston, T. M. Shaun; Legg, Sonya; Lee, I.-Huan; Lien, Ren-Chieh; Mercier, Matthieu J.; Moum, James N.; Musgrave, Ruth; Park, Jae-Hun; Pickering, Andrew I.; Pinkel, Robert; Rainville, Luc; Ramp, Steven R.; Rudnick, Daniel L.; Sarkar, Sutanu; Scotti, Alberto; Simmons, Harper L.; St Laurent, Louis C.; Venayagamoorthy, Subhas K.; Wang, Yu-Huai; Wang, Joe; Yang, Yiing J.; Paluszkiewicz, Theresa; (David) Tang, Tswen-Yung

    2015-05-01

    Internal gravity waves, the subsurface analogue of the familiar surface gravity waves that break on beaches, are ubiquitous in the ocean. Because of their strong vertical and horizontal currents, and the turbulent mixing caused by their breaking, they affect a panoply of ocean processes, such as the supply of nutrients for photosynthesis, sediment and pollutant transport and acoustic transmission; they also pose hazards for man-made structures in the ocean. Generated primarily by the wind and the tides, internal waves can travel thousands of kilometres from their sources before breaking, making it challenging to observe them and to include them in numerical climate models, which are sensitive to their effects. For over a decade, studies have targeted the South China Sea, where the oceans' most powerful known internal waves are generated in the Luzon Strait and steepen dramatically as they propagate west. Confusion has persisted regarding their mechanism of generation, variability and energy budget, however, owing to the lack of in situ data from the Luzon Strait, where extreme flow conditions make measurements difficult. Here we use new observations and numerical models to (1) show that the waves begin as sinusoidal disturbances rather than arising from sharp hydraulic phenomena, (2) reveal the existence of >200-metre-high breaking internal waves in the region of generation that give rise to turbulence levels >10,000 times that in the open ocean, (3) determine that the Kuroshio western boundary current noticeably refracts the internal wave field emanating from the Luzon Strait, and (4) demonstrate a factor-of-two agreement between modelled and observed energy fluxes, which allows us to produce an observationally supported energy budget of the region. Together, these findings give a cradle-to-grave picture of internal waves on a basin scale, which will support further improvements of their representation in numerical climate predictions.

  15. The formation and fate of internal waves in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Matthew H; Peacock, Thomas; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Nash, Jonathan D; Buijsman, Maarten C; Centurioni, Luca R; Centuroni, Luca R; Chao, Shenn-Yu; Chang, Ming-Huei; Farmer, David M; Fringer, Oliver B; Fu, Ke-Hsien; Gallacher, Patrick C; Graber, Hans C; Helfrich, Karl R; Jachec, Steven M; Jackson, Christopher R; Klymak, Jody M; Ko, Dong S; Jan, Sen; Johnston, T M Shaun; Legg, Sonya; Lee, I-Huan; Lien, Ren-Chieh; Mercier, Matthieu J; Moum, James N; Musgrave, Ruth; Park, Jae-Hun; Pickering, Andrew I; Pinkel, Robert; Rainville, Luc; Ramp, Steven R; Rudnick, Daniel L; Sarkar, Sutanu; Scotti, Alberto; Simmons, Harper L; St Laurent, Louis C; Venayagamoorthy, Subhas K; Wang, Yu-Huai; Wang, Joe; Yang, Yiing J; Paluszkiewicz, Theresa; Tang, Tswen-Yung David

    2015-05-07

    Internal gravity waves, the subsurface analogue of the familiar surface gravity waves that break on beaches, are ubiquitous in the ocean. Because of their strong vertical and horizontal currents, and the turbulent mixing caused by their breaking, they affect a panoply of ocean processes, such as the supply of nutrients for photosynthesis, sediment and pollutant transport and acoustic transmission; they also pose hazards for man-made structures in the ocean. Generated primarily by the wind and the tides, internal waves can travel thousands of kilometres from their sources before breaking, making it challenging to observe them and to include them in numerical climate models, which are sensitive to their effects. For over a decade, studies have targeted the South China Sea, where the oceans' most powerful known internal waves are generated in the Luzon Strait and steepen dramatically as they propagate west. Confusion has persisted regarding their mechanism of generation, variability and energy budget, however, owing to the lack of in situ data from the Luzon Strait, where extreme flow conditions make measurements difficult. Here we use new observations and numerical models to (1) show that the waves begin as sinusoidal disturbances rather than arising from sharp hydraulic phenomena, (2) reveal the existence of >200-metre-high breaking internal waves in the region of generation that give rise to turbulence levels >10,000 times that in the open ocean, (3) determine that the Kuroshio western boundary current noticeably refracts the internal wave field emanating from the Luzon Strait, and (4) demonstrate a factor-of-two agreement between modelled and observed energy fluxes, which allows us to produce an observationally supported energy budget of the region. Together, these findings give a cradle-to-grave picture of internal waves on a basin scale, which will support further improvements of their representation in numerical climate predictions.

  16. Global risk of deadly heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Camilo; Dousset, Bénédicte; Caldwell, Iain R.; Powell, Farrah E.; Geronimo, Rollan C.; Bielecki, Coral R.; Counsell, Chelsie W. W.; Dietrich, Bonnie S.; Johnston, Emily T.; Louis, Leo V.; Lucas, Matthew P.; McKenzie, Marie M.; Shea, Alessandra G.; Tseng, Han; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Leon, Lisa R.; Hawkins, Ed; Trauernicht, Clay

    2017-07-01

    Climate change can increase the risk of conditions that exceed human thermoregulatory capacity. Although numerous studies report increased mortality associated with extreme heat events, quantifying the global risk of heat-related mortality remains challenging due to a lack of comparable data on heat-related deaths. Here we conducted a global analysis of documented lethal heat events to identify the climatic conditions associated with human death and then quantified the current and projected occurrence of such deadly climatic conditions worldwide. We reviewed papers published between 1980 and 2014, and found 783 cases of excess human mortality associated with heat from 164 cities in 36 countries. Based on the climatic conditions of those lethal heat events, we identified a global threshold beyond which daily mean surface air temperature and relative humidity become deadly. Around 30% of the world's population is currently exposed to climatic conditions exceeding this deadly threshold for at least 20 days a year. By 2100, this percentage is projected to increase to ~48% under a scenario with drastic reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and ~74% under a scenario of growing emissions. An increasing threat to human life from excess heat now seems almost inevitable, but will be greatly aggravated if greenhouse gases are not considerably reduced.

  17. Formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum in marine methane hydrate settings: Evidence from the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qi; Wang, Jiasheng; Algeo, Thomas J.; Su, Pibo; Hu, Gaowei

    2016-09-01

    During the last decade, gypsum has been discovered widely in marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments. However, whether this gypsum is an in-situ authigenic precipitate remains controversial. The GMGS2 expedition carried out in 2013 by the Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS) in the northern South China Sea provided an excellent opportunity for investigating the formation of authigenic minerals and, in particular, the relationship between gypsum and methane hydrate. In this contribution, we analyzed the morphology and sulfur isotope composition of gypsum and authigenic pyrite as well as the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of authigenic carbonate in a drillcore from Site GMGS2-08. These methane-derived carbonates have characteristic carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C: -57.9‰ to -27.3‰ VPDB; δ18O: +1.0‰ to +3.8‰ VPDB) related to upward seepage of methane following dissociation of underlying methane hydrates since the Late Pleistocene. Our data suggest that gypsum in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) of this core precipitated as in-situ authigenic mineral. Based on its sulfur isotopic composition, the gypsum sulfur is a mixture of sulfate derived from seawater and from partial oxidation of authigenic pyrite. Porewater Ca2+ ions for authigenic gypsum were likely generated from carbonate dissolution through acidification produced by oxidation of authigenic pyrite and ion exclusion during methane hydrate formation. This study thus links the formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum with the oxidation of authigenic pyrite and evolution of underlying methane hydrates. These findings suggest that authigenic gypsum may be a useful proxy for recognition of SMTZs and methane hydrate zones in modern and ancient marine methane hydrate geo-systems.

  18. Realistic Basis and Ways of Regional Tourism Cooperation--Cultural Tourism of Zigong Salt City and Daying Dead Sea as an Example%区域旅游合作的现实基础与途径探讨--以自贡“盐都”、大英“死海”盐文化旅游为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    练红宇; 王玉琼; 夏敬标

    2013-01-01

    In the context of regional economic integration,regional tourism cooperation has become the general trend of China’s tourism development.In this paper,Zi-gong salt city and da-ying dead sea cultural tourism as the example,this paper examines the realistic basis of regional cooperation in tourism.On this basis,authors proposed a corresponding collaborative approaches.The author hopes this paper can provide a reference for the coordinated development of regional tourism.%  在区域经济一体化背景下,区域旅游合作成为中国旅游发展的总体趋势。自贡盐都和大英死海都在打造盐文化旅游品牌,这种资源类似地区存在旅游合作的基础,可以采取以政府为主导,旅游管理经营部门密切合作;实施差异化主题定位,发挥整合效应;加大整体营销力度,建立良好的市场运作机制等相应的合作途径,达到区域旅游协调发展。

  19. 77 FR 14347 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Reporting of Sea Turtle Incidental Take in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... of Sea Turtle Incidental Take in Virginia Chesapeake Bay Pound Net Operations AGENCY: National... endangered and threatened sea turtles, found both live and dead, in their pound net operations. When a live or dead sea turtle is discovered during a pound net trip, the Virginia pound net fisherman...

  20. Leatherback sea turtle age and growth

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study involves analysis of skeletal growth marks in scleral ossicle bones of 33 leatherback sea turtles stranded dead along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico US...

  1. Southern North Sea Basin in Europe: Biodiversity of the Marine Fürstenau Formation Including Early White and Megatooth Sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Diedrich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fürstenau Formation (Lutetian, Paleogene, Eocene is based on type sections near Fürstenau in Germany (central Europe and is built of 22 meter thick marine glauconitic and strongly bioturbated sands, clays, and a vertebrate-rich conglomerate bed. The conglomerate layer from the Early Lutetian transgression reworked Lower Cretaceous, and Paleogene marine sediments. It is dominated by pebbles from the locally mountains which must have been transported by an ancient river in a delta fan. Marine reworked Lower Cretaceous and Paleogen pebbles/fossils, were derived from the underlying deposits of northern Germany (= southern pre North Sea basin. The benthic macrofauna is cold upwelling water influenced and non-tropical, and medium divers. The vertebrate fish fauna is extremely rich in shark teeth, with about 5,000 teeth per cubic meter of gravel. The most dominant forms are teeth from sand shark ancestors Striatolamia macrota, followed by white shark ancestors Carcharodon auriculatus. Even teeth from the magatooth shark ancestor Carcharocles sokolovi are present in a moderately diverse and condensed Paleogene fish fauna that also includes rays, chimaeras, and more then 80 different bony fish. Fragmentary turtle remains are present, and few terrestrial vertebrates and even marine mammals with phocids, sirenians and possibly whales.

  2. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation. [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Lytechinus pictus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farach, M.C.; Valdizan, M.; Park, H.R.; Decker, G.L.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with (/sup 3/H) leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts.

  3. Is Piaget's epistemic subject dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Niaz (1990) presents arguments in favor of the retention of Piaget's epistemic subject as a theoretical construct to guide research and practice in science education and psychology. The intent of this article is to point out the weaknesses of those arguments and to suggest that the weight of evidence argues against the existence of the logical thinker postulated by Piaget. Therefore, contrary to Niaz's conclusion that the acceptance of Piaget's epistemic subject will facilitate the development of cognitive theories with greater explanatory power, the conclusion is reached that Piaget's epistemic subject is dead and that continued acceptance of this aspect of Piagetian theory would be counterproductive.

  4. Sea level rise and inundation of island interiors: Assessing impacts of lake formation and evaporation on water resources in arid climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, J. D.; Mayer, A. S.; Martin, J. B.; Bedekar, V.

    2016-09-01

    Coasts of many low-lying islands will be inundated should sea level rise by 1 m by 2100 as projected, thereby decreasing water resources through aquifer salinization. A lesser known impact occurs if rising sea level elevates water tables above interior topographic lows to form lakes. Impacts of lake formation on water resources, however, remain unquantified. Here we use hydrological models, based on islands in the Bahamian archipelago, to demonstrate that on islands with negative water budgets, evaporation following lake inundation can cause more than twice the loss of fresh groundwater resources relative to an equivalent amount of coastal inundation. This result implies that in dry climates, low-lying islands with inland depressions could face substantially greater threats to their water resources from sea level rise than previously considered.

  5. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Xiquan [Beijing Normal Univ. (China); Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Zib, Benjamin J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Xi, Baike [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Stanfield, Ryan [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Deng, Yi [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhang, Xiangdong [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Lin, B. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Long, Charles N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-29

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the

  6. Dense water cascading, bottom currents and sediment wave formation at the exit of the Bari canyon (Southern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Leonardo; Miserocchi, Stefano; Boldrin, Alfredo; Turchetto, Margherita; Foglini, Federica; Trincardi, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    The dense water forming in the North Adriatic (NAdDW) spreading southward along the Italian continental shelf, sinks in the Southern Adriatic basin through particular cascading events. Such events are seasonal, occurring specially in April, with variable intensity. These phenomena control the water mass mixing, the deep ocean ventilation, the behaviour of deep ecosystems, the formation of complex erosive and depositional bedforms and the abyssal export and burial of nutrients and carbon. Because of the NadDW formation is linked to climate factors (frequency, duration and size of Bura winds), the temporal variations of the NadDW dispersion into the Southern Adriatic allow to make inferences of the impact of recent climate changes on the ecosystems of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Previous research projects (EuroStrataform, HERMES) acquired a large data set of bathymetric, side-scan sonar (TOBI) and Chirp sonar profiles, which were used to build detailed morpho-bathymetric maps of the Southern Adriatic margin. There, the seabed is extremely complex, characterized by a large variety of bedforms (sediment waves, erosive scours, longitudinal furrows and giant comet marks). A branch of the cascading NAdDW is confined and accelerated through the Bari canyon where it produces a strong current capable of reaching down-slope velocities greater than 60 cm s-1 near the bottom at ~600 m of water depth, eroding the canyon thalweg and entraining large amounts of fine-grained sediment. At the exit of the canyon, in water depth greater than 800 m, the current becomes less confined, spreads laterally and generates an 80-km2-wide field of mud waves; these bedforms migrate up current and show amplitudes up to 50 m and wavelengths of about 1 km. Cruise IMPACT-09 of RV Urania was carried out in the Southern Adriatic Sea from 17-30 March 2009 with main scope of studying the impact of NadDW cascading events on the deep ecosystems of the Southern Adriatic. Experiments planned in the cruise

  7. Sea Turtle Interaction Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Turtle Interaction Report is a report sent out in pdf format to authorized individuals that summarizes sea turtle interactions in the longline fishery. The...

  8. Sea Turtle Interaction Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Turtle Interaction Report is a report sent out in pdf format to authorized individuals that summarizes sea turtle interactions in the longline fishery. The...

  9. Decadal shifts in autumn migration timing by Pacific Arctic beluga whales are related to delayed annual sea ice formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Donna D W; Laidre, Kristin L; Stafford, Kathleen M; Stern, Harry L; Suydam, Robert S; Richard, Pierre R

    2016-12-21

    Migrations are often influenced by seasonal environmental gradients that are increasingly being altered by climate change. The consequences of rapid changes in Arctic sea ice have the potential to affect migrations of a number of marine species whose timing is temporally matched to seasonal sea ice cover. This topic has not been investigated for Pacific Arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) that follow matrilineally maintained autumn migrations in the waters around Alaska and Russia. For the sympatric Eastern Chukchi Sea ('Chukchi') and Eastern Beaufort Sea ('Beaufort') beluga populations, we examined changes in autumn migration timing as related to delayed regional sea ice freeze-up since the 1990s, using two independent data sources (satellite telemetry data and passive acoustics) for both populations. We compared dates of migration between 'early' (1993-2002) and 'late' (2004-2012) tagging periods. During the late tagging period, Chukchi belugas had significantly delayed migrations (by 2 to >4 weeks, depending on location) from the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Spatial analyses also revealed that departure from Beaufort Sea foraging regions by Chukchi whales was postponed in the late period. Chukchi beluga autumn migration timing occurred significantly later as regional sea ice freeze-up timing became later in the Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering seas. In contrast, Beaufort belugas did not shift migration timing between periods, nor was migration timing related to freeze-up timing, other than for southward migration at the Bering Strait. Passive acoustic data from 2008 to 2014 provided independent and supplementary support for delayed migration from the Beaufort Sea (4 day yr(-1) ) by Chukchi belugas. Here, we report the first phenological study examining beluga whale migrations within the context of their rapidly transforming Pacific Arctic ecosystem, suggesting flexible responses that may enable their persistence yet also complicate predictions of how

  10. Cropping Intensity in the Aral Sea Basin and Its Dependency from the Runoff Formation 2000–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Conrad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at a better understanding of how upstream runoff formation affected the cropping intensity (CI: number of harvests in the Aral Sea Basin (ASB between 2000 and 2012. MODIS 250 m NDVI time series and knowledge-based pixel masking that included settlement layers and topography features enabled to map the irrigated cropland extent (iCE. Random forest models supported the classification of cropland vegetation phenology (CVP: winter/summer crops, double cropping, etc.. CI and the percentage of fallow cropland (PF were derived from CVP. Spearman’s rho was selected for assessing the statistical relation of CI and PF to runoff formation in the Amu Darya and Syr Darya catchments per hydrological year. Validation in 12 reference sites using multi-annual Landsat-7 ETM+ images revealed an average overall accuracy of 0.85 for the iCE maps. MODIS maps overestimated that based on Landsat by an average factor of ~1.15 (MODIS iCE/Landsat iCE. Exceptional overestimations occurred in case of inaccurate settlement layers. The CVP and CI maps achieved overall accuracies of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. The Amu Darya catchment disclosed significant positive (negative relations between upstream runoff with CI (PF and a high pressure on the river water resources in 2000–2012. Along the Syr Darya, reduced dependencies could be observed, which is potentially linked to the high number of water constructions in that catchment. Intensified double cropping after drought years occurred in Uzbekistan. However, a 10 km × 10 km grid of Spearman’s rho (CI and PF vs. upstream runoff emphasized locations at different CI levels that are directly affected by runoff fluctuations in both river systems. The resulting maps may thus be supportive on the way to achieve long-term sustainability of crop production and to simultaneously protect the severely threatened environment in the ASB. The gained knowledge can be further used for investigating climatic impacts

  11. Children, death, and the dead: the Mebengokré-Xikrin case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Cohn

    Full Text Available This article approaches the relations children entertain with the dead, as well as with their own death risk, among the Mebenkogré-Xikrin, an indigenous Jê-speaking Indigenous group living in the North of Brazil. These themes are developed by analyzing the fabrication of the body, the formation of the self and the person, and the relations with the dead, with a special focus on children. Mebengokré-Xikrin notions of childhood are therefore discussed in an innovative manner through the formation of the self and the child's relations with the cosmos and the dead, by looking at the eventuality of caputre by the spirits of the dead, their adoption in the after-life, the mourning of children, their bodily adornments and painting, how they should be taken care of in life in order to prevent death, and their bodies and social interactions.

  12. Tracks, intersections and dead ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Skjeie, Hege

    2008-01-01

    of organisations of civil society in political power. The second part explores the framing of the hijab as a political issue of "intersections" of gender equality versus religious belongings. The third part investigates what we see as a "dead end" in policy making to prevent violations of women's rights......The article discusses multicultural challenges to state feminism in Denmark and Norway focusing both on similarities and differences in the two countries policy responses.  In spite of important differences, we point towards similar problems and dilemmas in the public responses to multiculturalism......; that is the general, age based, restrictions on family unification as a means to combat forced marriages. Finally, in the conclusion, we emphasise the importance of participatory women-friendly politics that include all who are affected by political decisions.    ...

  13. More Dead than Dead: Perceptions of Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kurt; Knickman, T. Anne; Wegner, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients in persistent vegetative state (PVS) may be biologically alive, but these experiments indicate that people see PVS as a state curiously more dead than dead. Experiment 1 found that PVS patients were perceived to have less mental capacity than the dead. Experiment 2 explained this effect as an outgrowth of afterlife beliefs, and the…

  14. New constraints on the formation and evolution of the Andaman Sea, a sedimented back arc spreading center in the South East Asia, from seismic reflection studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, A.; Singh, S. C.; Klinger, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Andaman Sea is an enigmatic feature in the Indian Ocean region. To the west, it is bounded by a near arc parallel Andaman subduction system and to the east by the Malaya Peninsula. It hosts volcanic provinces like Alcock and Sewell Rises and the Andaman Sea Spreading Center (ASSC) that connects the sliver strike-slip Sagaing Fault in the north with the Andaman Nicobar and Great Sumatra Faults in the south. The actual spreading center follows a succession of basins, starting by the spreading of the Mergui basin in the south-east, 32 Ma ago, that shifted to the actual position of the spreading closer to the subduction trench. Several hypotheses have been proposed for the formation of the Andaman Sea basins: (a) Pull-apart basin along the Sagaing-Sumatra fault system, driven by the collision-extrusion mechanism and/or by the slip-partitioning induced by the oblique subduction, (b) Back-arc spreading due to the subduction. There is a debate about the orientation of the present spreading/extension between the North-South motion along the strike-slip faults and the NW-SE opening of the ASSC. We have access to 7000 km of high-resolution deep seismic reflection data, and high-resolution bathymetry data, which we combine with relocated earthquake data to shed light upon the formation and evolution of the Andaman Sea Basin. The central basin contains up to 4 km thick sediments. The crustal thickness is about 5-8 km in the central basin and increases to 13-15 km beneath the Alcock and Sewell Rises, which are devoid of sediments. Here we show how both the collision and the subduction play a role in the position and orientation of the extension in the Andaman Sea Basin, and how they influence the accretion at the spreading center.

  15. Characteristics of Sea Breeze Front Development with Various Synoptic Conditions and Its Impact on Lower Troposphere Ozone Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo-Eun JI; Soon-Hwan LEE; Hwa-Woon LEE

    2013-01-01

    To examine the correlation between the sizes of sea breeze fronts and pollutants under the influence of synoptic fields,a numerical simulation was conducted in the southeast coastal area of the Korean Peninsula,where relatively high concentrations of pollutants occur because of the presence of various kinds of industrial developments.Sea breeze and sea breeze front days during the period 2005-09 were identified using wind profiler data and,according to the results,the number of days were 72 and 53,respectively.When synoptic forcing was weak,sea breeze fronts moved fast both in horizontal fields and in terms of wind velocity,while in thc case of strong synoptic forcing,sea breeze fronts remained at the coast or moved slowly due to strong opposing flows.In this case,the sea breeze front development function and horizontal potential temperature difference were larger than with weak synoptic forcing.The ozone concentration that moves together with sea breeze fronts was also formed along the frontal surfaces.Ozone advection and diffusion in the case of strong synoptic forcing was suppressed at the frontal surface and the concentration gradient was large.The vertical distribution of ozone was very low due to the Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL) being low.

  16. 49 CFR 236.798 - Section, dead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Section, dead. 236.798 Section 236.798 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Section, dead. A section of track, either within a track circuit or between two track circuits, the rails...

  17. Characterizing, modelling and understanding the climate variability of the deep water formation in the North-Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somot, Samuel; Houpert, Loic; Sevault, Florence; Testor, Pierre; Bosse, Anthony; Taupier-Letage, Isabelle; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Waldman, Robin; Cassou, Christophe; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Adloff, Fanny; Nabat, Pierre; Herrmann, Marine

    2016-08-01

    Observing, modelling and understanding the climate-scale variability of the deep water formation (DWF) in the North-Western Mediterranean Sea remains today very challenging. In this study, we first characterize the interannual variability of this phenomenon by a thorough reanalysis of observations in order to establish reference time series. These quantitative indicators include 31 observed years for the yearly maximum mixed layer depth over the period 1980-2013 and a detailed multi-indicator description of the period 2007-2013. Then a 1980-2013 hindcast simulation is performed with a fully-coupled regional climate system model including the high-resolution representation of the regional atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and rivers. The simulation reproduces quantitatively well the mean behaviour and the large interannual variability of the DWF phenomenon. The model shows convection deeper than 1000 m in 2/3 of the modelled winters, a mean DWF rate equal to 0.35 Sv with maximum values of 1.7 (resp. 1.6) Sv in 2013 (resp. 2005). Using the model results, the winter-integrated buoyancy loss over the Gulf of Lions is identified as the primary driving factor of the DWF interannual variability and explains, alone, around 50 % of its variance. It is itself explained by the occurrence of few stormy days during winter. At daily scale, the Atlantic ridge weather regime is identified as favourable to strong buoyancy losses and therefore DWF, whereas the positive phase of the North Atlantic oscillation is unfavourable. The driving role of the vertical stratification in autumn, a measure of the water column inhibition to mixing, has also been analyzed. Combining both driving factors allows to explain more than 70 % of the interannual variance of the phenomenon and in particular the occurrence of the five strongest convective years of the model (1981, 1999, 2005, 2009, 2013). The model simulates qualitatively well the trends in the deep waters (warming, saltening, increase in the

  18. Influenza A virus H10N7 detected in dead harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) at several locations in Denmark 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Krog, Jesper Schak; Hansen, Mette Sif

    initially found dead on the Danish island Anholt in Kattegat, which is the sea surrounded by Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Between June and August, 152 harbor seals were found dead. Four seals were submitted to the National Veterinary Institute in Dennmark and diagnosed with severe pneumonia. Influenza...... A virus of the subtype H10N7 was detected in two out of four seals. Subsequently IAV was detected in dead harbor seals at several locations in Denmark. The IAV outbreak appeared to move with time to the west through the Limfjord to the North Sea and further down south along the west coast of Jutland...... to the Wadden Sea. Outbreaks were subsequently reported from Germany and The Netherlands. The aim of this study was to characterize the viruses detected at the several locations by molecular and phylogenetic analysis. All viruses were subtyped as H10N7 with genes of avian origin. The HA and NA genes...

  19. Nodal expression and heterochrony in the evolution of dorsal-ventral and left-right axes formation in the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Margaret S; Turner, F Rudolf; Raff, Rudolf A

    2008-12-15

    To understand the role of body axes in the evolution of larval form, we use the two sea urchins in the genus Heliocidaris, which have distinctly different larval morphologies. Heliocidaris tuberculata is an indirect-developing sea urchin, which forms a pluteus larva, whereas its sister species, Heliocidaris erythrogramma, exhibits direct development and forms a nonfeeding, ovoid larva. Changes along all three larval axes underlie the differences in larval form associated with each developmental mode. Nodal signaling has recently been implicated as important in establishing the dorsal-ventral (D-V) and left-right (L-R) axes in the indirect-developing sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. However, because of changes in morphology and timing of morphogenetic events associated with the D-V and L-R axes, respectively, in H. erythrogramma, it was unclear whether nodal played the same roles during direct development. We show that the expression patterns and functions of nodal during H. erythrogramma development are similar to its roles in indirect-developing sea urchins in both D-V and L-R axes formation. However, there are profound changes in gene expression downstream of nodal signaling along the D-V axis and major heterochronies in the execution of the function of nodal along the L-R axis. These highly modified events are linked to the dramatic modifications of larval morphology that have occurred during the evolution of direct development in H. erythrogramma.

  20. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  1. Chemical and isotopic ( 87Sr/ 86Sr, δ 18O, δD) constraints to the formation processes of Red-Sea brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, M. C.; Clauer, N.; Bosch, D.; Blanc, G.; France-Lanord, C.

    2001-04-01

    About twenty deeps filled with hot brines and/or metalliferous sediments, are located along the Red-Sea axis. These brines present a well-suited framework to study the hydrothermal activity in such a young ocean. The present study outlines the results of a geochemical approach combining major-, trace-element and isotopic (oxygen, hydrogen, strontium) analyses of brines in six of the deeps, to evaluate different processes of brine formation and to compare the evolution of each deep. Important heterogeneities in temperature, salinity, hydrographic structure and chemistry are recorded, each brine having its own characteristics. The intensity of hydrothermal circulation varies among the deeps and ranges from being strong (Atlantis II and Nereus) to weak (Port-Soudan) and even to negligible (Valdivia and Suakin) and it varies along the entire Red-Sea axis. These observations do not favour a unique formational model for all of the brines. For example, the brines of the Suakin deep appear to have been formed by an old sea water which dissolved evaporite beds, without significant fluid circulation and hydrothermal input, while others such as Atlantis II or Nereus Deeps appear to be dominated by hydrothermal influences. A striking feature is the absence of a relationship between the position of the deeps along the axis and their evolutionary maturity.

  2. Integrated borehole and outcrop study for documentation of sea level cycles within the Early Eocene Naredi Formation,western Kutch,India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Urbashi; Sarkar; Santanu; Banerjee; P.K.Saraswati

    2012-01-01

    A combined micropalaeontological and sedimentological investigation of the Early Eocene Naredi Formation (thickness varying between 20 m and 60 m) reveals a complete third-order cycle and six fourth-order sea level cycles. Within the third-order cycle the foraminiferal abundance and diversity gradually increase upwards and reach their maximum values at about 41 m thickness above the base of the formation and subsequently decrease upward and finally give way upward to an unfossiliferous zone at the topmost part. Within a fourth-order cycle foraminiferal abundance and diversity exhibit a similar increasing and decreasing pattern. Bounded between two unconformities the Naredi Formation represents a sequence. A highly fossiliferous Assilinabearing limestone interval represents the maximum flooding zone which separates the transgressive systems tract at the base from the highstand systems tract at the top.

  3. A multidisciplinary environmental integrated approach to better understand the Tegnue Reefs formation, offshore Chioggia, Northern Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Andrea; Donnici, Sandra; Tosi, Luigi; Tagliapietra, Davide; Zaggia, Luca; Bonaldo, Davide; Braga, Federica; Da Lio, Cristina; Keppel, Erica; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Manfè, Giorgia; Franceschini, Gianluca; Giovanardi, Otello; Carol, Eleonora; Fornaro, Elena; Grant, Carley

    2014-05-01

    Several hard substrata cover the northwestern Adriatic shelf around 20 m depth as patchy reefs called 'Tegnue'. These submerged reefs form many discrete sets from offshore Grado south to the Po river delta with a large field located off Chioggia. Even if the outer part of the reef is constituted by a thick biogenic formation the underlying structure, mainly buried, is made by cemented sand and this seems to be correlated with its origin not yet fully understood. Different genetic interpretations have been proposed thus far, contemplating among other cementation due to beach-rock like processes (e.g., Stefanon, 1969, Bonardi and Tosi, 2002, Bonardi et al., 2006) or the action of ascending fluids enriched in hydrocarbons (e.g., Gabbianelli et al., 1997, Casellato and Stefanon, 2008). An on-going project, mainly a multidisciplinary integrated approach, combining physical, biological, geological, geomorphological, hydrogeological and geochemical data, supported by a detailed bathymetric mapping, an overall general circulation modeling at high resolution, a robust geophysical evidence, and detailed underwater surveys performed by a team of scuba-diver scientists, aims to better understand the genetic processes backing the distribution, early genesis and evolution of such relevant habitats. Actually, using all the new available data, our plan is to verify which previous interpretations on the origin of the Tegnue core better match with the diagenetic processes that led to the cementation of the sand layers lying at the base of the organic reefs. Preliminary results suggest that the Tegnue reefs formed along paleochannels features related to the former alluvial plain and submerged by the Holocene transgression. Whatever their genesis, once exposed such rocky substrata are then quickly colonized by living organisms, which contribute to the growth and expansion of the reef. Calcareous algae and in general the organic concretion could have a role during the reef accretion

  4. Measurement of the Dead-Time in a Multichannel Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, L.; Olsen, J.

    1973-01-01

    By means of two simple measurements three different dead-times are determined: the normal dead-time, a dead-time coming from the pile-up, and a dead-time due to the finite width of the timing pulses.......By means of two simple measurements three different dead-times are determined: the normal dead-time, a dead-time coming from the pile-up, and a dead-time due to the finite width of the timing pulses....

  5. Effect of dead carbon on the 14C dating of the speleothem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yanjun; Warren Beck; PENG Zicheng; ZHANG Zhaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Based on the comparison of dating results among high-precision TIMS U-series and AMS 14C as well as the published 14C dating results and their band counting ages (i.e. calendar ages), this paper discusses the effect of dead carbon on the speleothem 14C dating. The result shows that the fraction of incorporated dead carbon during the formation of speleothem varies. The change in the fraction of dead carbon would result in big deviation in the 14C age of the speleothem. It is indispensable to take the dead carbon into consideration when dating the speleothem using the 14C method or studying the atmospheric 14C concentration during the past with the speleothem.

  6. Dead lithium phase investigation of Sn-Zn alloy as anode materials for lithium ion battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhaoWen; HU SheJun; HOU XianHua; RU Qiang; YU HongWen; ZHAO LingZhi; LI WeiShan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, based on First-principle plane wave pseudo-potential method, we have carried out an in-depth study on the possible dead lithium phase of Sn-Zn alloy as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Through investigation, we found that the phases LixSn4Zn4(x = 2, 4, 6, 8) contributed to reversible capacity, while the phases LixSn4Zns-(x-4)(x = 4.74, 7.72) led to capacity loss due to high formation energy, namely, they were the dead lithium phases during the charge/discharge process. And we come up with a new idea that stable lithium alloy phase with high lithiation formation energy (dead lithium phase) can also result in high loss of active lithium ion, besides the traditional expression that the formation of solid electrolyte interface film leads to high capacity loss.

  7. The contribution to nitrogen deposition and ozone formation in South Norway from atmospheric emissions related to the petroleum activity in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, S.; Walker, S.-E.; Knudsen, S.; Lazaridis, M.; Beine, H.J.; Semb, A

    1999-03-01

    A photochemical plume model has been developed and refined. The model is designed to simulate the advection and photochemistry for several simultaneous point sources as well as the atmospheric mixing. the model has been used to calculate nitrogen deposition and ozone formation due to offshore emissions in the North Sea. Based on meteorological data for 1992 the calculations give a total contribution of 60-80 mg (N)/m{sub 2} at most in South Norway. Emission from British and Norwegian sector is calculated to contribute less than 5% each to the AOT40 index for ozone. (author)

  8. Extreme Heat in Southwest a Deadly Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166797.html Extreme Heat in Southwest a Deadly Threat Here's how to ... t take off in Phoenix on Tuesday, the heat wave scorching the Southwest for the next week ...

  9. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  10. Process modeling studies of physical mechanisms of the formation of an anticyclonic eddy in the central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Changsheng

    2014-02-01

    Surface drifters released in the central Red Sea during April 2010 detected a well-defined anticyclonic eddy around 23°N. This eddy was ∼45–60 km in radius, with a swirl speed up to ∼0.5 m/s. The eddy feature was also evident in monthly averaged sea surface height fields and in current profiles measured on a cross-isobath, shipboard CTD/ADCP survey around that region. The unstructured-grid, Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) was configured for the Red Sea and process studies were conducted to establish the conditions necessary for the eddy to form and to establish its robustness. The model was capable of reproducing the observed anticyclonic eddy with the same location and size. Diagnosis of model results suggests that the eddy can be formed in a Red Sea that is subject to seasonally varying buoyancy forcing, with no wind, but that its location and structure are significantly altered by wind forcing, initial distribution of water stratification and southward coastal flow from the upstream area. Momentum analysis indicates that the flow field of the eddy was in geostrophic balance, with the baroclinic pressure gradient forcing about the same order of magnitude as the surface pressure gradient forcing.

  11. Correlation analyses of Baltic Sea winter water mass formation and its impact on secondary and tertiary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Schmidt

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal stratification of the upper water layers in the BalticSea varies seasonally in response to the annual cycle of solarheating and wind-induced mixing. In winter, the stratificationdown to the halocline is almost completely eroded by convectionand strong wind mixing. Monthly averaged temperature profilesobtained from the ICES hydrographic database were used to studythe long-term variability (1950 to 2005 of winter water massformation in different deep basins of the Baltic Sea east ofthe island of Bornholm. Besides strong interannual variabilityof deep winter water temperatures, the last two decades showa positive trend (increase of 1-1.5°C. Correlationsof winter surface temperatures to temperatures of the winterwater body located directly above or within the top of the haloclinewere strongly positive until the autumn months. Such a closecoupling allows sea surface temperatures in winter to be usedto forecast the seasonal development of the thermal signaturein deeper layers with a high degree of confidence. The most significantimpact of winter sea surface temperatures on the thermal signaturein this depth range can be assigned to February/March. Strongersolar heating during spring and summer results in thermal stratificationof the water column leading to a complete decoupling of surfaceand deep winter water temperatures. Based on laboratory experiments,temperature-dependent relationships were utilised to analyseinterannual variations of biological processes with special emphasison the upper trophic levels (e.g., stage-specific developmentalrates of zooplankton and survival rates of fish eggs.

  12. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, Albert; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform u...

  13. Iron and manganese shuttles control the formation of authigenic phosphorus minerals in the euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.; Slomp, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Microanalysis of epoxy resin-embedded sediments is used to demonstrate the presence of authigenic iron (Fe) (II) phosphates and manganese (Mn)-calcium (Ca)-carbonate-phosphates in the deep euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea. These minerals constitute major burial phases of phosphorus (P) in this area,

  14. Rock magnetic and other geophysical signatures of relative sea level change in the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, Drum Mountains, West-Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgedahl, S. L.; Jarrard, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Wheeler Formation of West-Central Utah is a succession of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic rocks deposited during the Middle Cambrian along a passive continental margin of Laurentia (western margin, in today's coordinates). The depositional setting was a gentle ramp, bounded by a normal fault on the south. The present study focuses on the Wheeler Formation in the Drum Mountains, Utah, which is thought to have recorded Middle Cambrian sea level changes and which is known to yield exceptionally-preserved fossils with soft parts, similar to the famed Burgess shale. An integrated approach has been used here to investigate the following: (1) high-resolution changes in water depth (sea level changes?) with stratigraphic position; (2) where exceptionally preserved fossils are most likely to occur; and (3) mineralogical indicators of sea level change, such as magnetic susceptibility and other rock magnetic properties. Rocks consist of limestones, argillaceous limestones, and finely-bedded mudstones (shales). Methods used here are: measurements of magnetic susceptibility, natural remanent magnetization, and viscous remanent magnetization; hysteresis loops; spectral gamma ray; coulometry to determine calcite content; X-ray diffraction; and field mapping. In these rocks, mineralogical analyses indicate primarily a 2-component system of calcite and terrigenous minerals, mainly illite. Magnetic susceptibility, gamma ray, and coulometry results strongly indicate that magnetic susceptibility stems primarily from the paramagnetic clay component, namely, illite. Thus, both magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray increase linearly with decreasing calcite content throughout the section studied. Deep-water shales yield very high values of gamma ray and magnetic susceptibility; by contrast, carbonates with low gamma ray and low magnetic susceptibilities were deposited in relatively shallow water. These results lead to the following conclusions: (1) changes in relative water depth have

  15. Gulf of Mexico Kemps ridley sea turtle age and growth

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study involves analysis of skeletal growth marks in humerus bones of 340 Kemps ridley sea turtles stranded dead along the Gulf of Mexico US coast (hatchling to...

  16. Summary of bacteria found in captive sea turtles 2002-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database contains a summary of bacteria which have been isolated in sea turtles dead and alive at the NOAA Galveston Laboratory and is based on reports received...

  17. Formation processes of sea ice floe size distribution in the interior pack and its relationship to the marginal ice zone off East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Takenobu; Kohout, Alison; Fraser, Alexander D.

    2016-09-01

    To understand the behavior of the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ), which is composed of sea-ice floes of various sizes, knowledge of the floe size distribution (FSD) is important. In particular, FSD in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), controlled by wave-ice interaction, plays an important role in determining the retreating rates of sea-ice extent on a global scale because the cumulative perimeter of floes enhances melting. To improve the understanding of wave-ice interaction and subsequent effects on FSD in the MIZ, FSD measurements were conducted off East Antarctica during the second Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment (SIPEX-2) in late winter 2012. Since logistical reasons limited helicopter operations to two interior ice regions, FSD in the interior ice region was determined using a combination of heli-photos and MODIS satellite visible images. The possible effect of wave-ice interaction in the MIZ was examined by comparison with past results obtained in the same MIZ, with our analysis showing: (1) FSD in the interior ice region is basically scale invariant for both small- (large- (>1 km) scale regimes; (2) although fractal dimensions are quite different between these two regimes, they are both rather close to that in the MIZ; and (3) for floes <100 m in diameter, a regime shift which appeared at 20-40 m in the MIZ is absent. These results indicate that one role of wave-ice interaction is to modulate the FSD that already exists in the interior ice region, rather than directly determine it. The possibilities of floe-floe collisions and storm-induced lead formation are considered as possible formation processes of FSD in the interior pack.

  18. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  19. Field and Satellite Observations of the Formation and Distribution of Arctic Atmospheric Bromine Above a Rejuvenated Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Rigor, Ignatius G.; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Shepson, Paul B.; Bottenheim, Jan; Barber, David G.; Steffen, Alexandra; Latonas, Jeff; Wang, Feiyue; Stern, Gary; Clemente-Colon, Pablo; Martin, Seelye; Hall, Dorothy K.; Kaleschke, Lars; Tackett, Philip; Neumann, Gregory; Asplin, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent drastic reduction of the older perennial sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has resulted in a vast expansion of younger and saltier seasonal sea ice. This increase in the salinity of the overall ice cover could impact tropospheric chemical processes. Springtime perennial ice extent in 2008 and 2009 broke the half-century record minimum in 2007 by about one million km2. In both years seasonal ice was dominant across the Beaufort Sea extending to the Amundsen Gulf, where significant field and satellite observations of sea ice, temperature, and atmospheric chemicals have been made. Measurements at the site of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen ice breaker in the Amundsen Gulf showed events of increased bromine monoxide (BrO), coupled with decreases of ozone (O3) and gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), during cold periods in March 2008. The timing of the main event of BrO, O3, and GEM changes was found to be consistent with BrO observed by satellites over an extensive area around the site. Furthermore, satellite sensors detected a doubling of atmospheric BrO in a vortex associated with a spiral rising air pattern. In spring 2009, excessive and widespread bromine explosions occurred in the same region while the regional air temperature was low and the extent of perennial ice was significantly reduced compared to the case in 2008. Using satellite observations together with a Rising-Air-Parcel model, we discover a topographic control on BrO distribution such that the Alaskan North Slope and the Canadian Shield region were exposed to elevated BrO, whereas the surrounding mountains isolated the Alaskan interior from bromine intrusion.

  20. Variability in frontal zone formation and distribution of gadoid fish larvae at the shelf break in the northeastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Larsson, P.O.; Danielssen, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    by CTD casts, and the abundance of fish larvae was measured by depth integrating tows of a 2 m ring net. Five species of gadoid larvae and small juveniles were found in the area: cod Gadus morhua, whiting Merlangius merlangus, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, Norway pout Trisopterus esmarki and saithe....... Emphasis was placed on the year-to-year variation in frontal characteristics and distributional patterns of larvae. An area of about 67000 km2 covering the northeastern North Sea, the Skagerrak and the Kattegat was surveyed by grid or transect sampling. At each sampling station the hydrography was studied...... of gadoid larvae from the area....

  1. Virtually Dead: Digital Public Mortuary Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, the ethics, politics and public engagements of mortuary archaeology have received sustained scrutiny, including how we handle, write about and display the archaeological dead. Yet the burgeoning use of digital media to engage different audiences in the archaeology of death and burial have so far escaped attention. This article explores categories and strategies by which digital media create virtual communities engaging with mortuary archaeology. Considering digital public mortuary archaeology (DPMA as a distinctive theme linking archaeology, mortality and material culture, we discuss blogs, vlogs and Twitter as case studies to illustrate the variety of strategies by which digital media can promote, educate and engage public audiences with archaeological projects and research relating to death and the dead in the human past. The article then explores a selection of key critical concerns regarding how the digital dead are currently portrayed, identifying the need for further investigation and critical reflection on DPMA’s aims, objectives and aspired outcomes.

  2. Soft-sediment deformation structures in the Mio-Pliocene Misaki Formation within alternating deep-sea clays and volcanic ashes (Miura Peninsula, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Rajat; van Loon, A. J. (Tom); Malviya, Vivek P.; Arima, Makoto; Ogawa, Yujuro

    2016-10-01

    The Mio-Pliocene Misaki Formation of the Miura Group (Miura Peninsula, Japan) shows an extremely wide variety of soft-sediment deformation structures. The most common deformation structures are load casts and associated flame structures, dish-and-pillar structures, synsedimentary faults, multilobated convolutions, chaotic deformation structures, sedimentary veins and dykes, and large-scale slides and slump scars. The formation, which accumulated in a deep-sea environment (2000-3000 m), is well exposed in and around Jogashima; it consists of relative thin (commonly dm-scale) alternations of deep-marine fine-grained sediments and volcanic ejecta that are, as a rule, coarse-grained. Since the formation represents fore-arc deposits of the Izu-Bonin and the Honsu arc collision zone, it might be expected that tectonic activity also played a role as a trigger of the soft-sediment deformation structures that abound in these sediments. This is indicated, indeed, by the abundance of soft-sediment deformations over large lateral distances that occur in numerous beds that are sandwiched between undeformed beds. On the basis of their characteristics and the geological context, these layers can be explained satisfactorily only by assuming deformation triggered by seismicity, which must be related to the Izu-Bonin and Honsu arc collision. The layers thus form deep-marine seismites.

  3. Pressure Prediction for High-Temperature and High-Pressure Formation and Its Application to Drilling in the Northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhenfeng; XIE Xinong

    2004-01-01

    There are plentiful potential hydrocarbon resources in the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan basins in the northern South China Sea. However, the special petrol-geological condition with high formation temperature and pressure greatly blocked hydrocarbon exploration. The conventional means of drills, including methods in the prediction and monitoring of underground strata pressure, can no longer meet the requirements in this area. The China National Offshore Oil Corporation has allocated one well with a designed depth of 3200 m and pressure coefficient of 2.3 in the Yinggehai Basin (called test well in the paper) in order to find gas reservoirs in middle-deep section in the Miocene Huangliu and analyzed the distribution of overpressure in the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan basins, and set up a series of key technologies and methods to predict and monitor formation pressure, and then apply the results to pressure prediction of the test well. Because of the exact pressure prediction before and during drilling, associated procedure design of casing and their allocation in test well has been ensured to be more rational. This well is successfully drilled to the depth of 3485 m (nearly 300 m deeper than the designed depth) under the formation pressure about 2.3 SG (EMW), which indicate that a new step in the technology of drilling in higher temperature and pressure has been reached in the China National Offshore Oil Corporation.

  4. Patterning mechanisms in the evolution of derived developmental life histories: the role of Wnt signaling in axis formation of the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Jeffrey S; Raff, Rudolf A

    2003-12-01

    A number of echinoderm species have replaced indirect development with highly modified direct-developmental modes, and provide models for the study of the evolution of early embryonic development. These divergent early ontogenies may differ significantly in life history, oogenesis, cleavage pattern, cell lineage, and timing of cell fate specification compared with those of indirect-developing species. No direct-developing echinoderm species has been studied at the level of molecular specification of embryonic axes. Here we report the first functional analysis of Wnt pathway components in Heliocidaris erythrogramma, a direct-developing sea urchin. We show by misexpression and dominant negative knockout construct expression that Wnt8 and TCF are functionally conserved in the generation of the primary (animal/vegetal) axis in two independently evolved direct-developing sea urchins. Thus, Wnt pathway signaling is an overall deeply conserved mechanism for axis formation that transcends radical changes to early developmental ontogenies. However, the timing of expression and linkages between Wnt8, TCF, and components of the PMC-specification pathway have changed. These changes correlate with the transition from an indirect- to a direct-developing larval life history.

  5. Delineating chalk sand distribution of Ekofisk formation using probabilistic neural network (PNN) and stepwise regression (SWR): Case study Danish North Sea field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, A.; Nafian, M.; Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    Danish North Sea Fields consist of several formations (Ekofisk, Tor, and Cromer Knoll) that was started from the age of Paleocene to Miocene. In this study, the integration of seismic and well log data set is carried out to determine the chalk sand distribution in the Danish North Sea field. The integration of seismic and well log data set is performed by using the seismic inversion analysis and seismic multi-attribute. The seismic inversion algorithm, which is used to derive acoustic impedance (AI), is model-based technique. The derived AI is then used as external attributes for the input of multi-attribute analysis. Moreover, the multi-attribute analysis is used to generate the linear and non-linear transformation of among well log properties. In the case of the linear model, selected transformation is conducted by weighting step-wise linear regression (SWR), while for the non-linear model is performed by using probabilistic neural networks (PNN). The estimated porosity, which is resulted by PNN shows better suited to the well log data compared with the results of SWR. This result can be understood since PNN perform non-linear regression so that the relationship between the attribute data and predicted log data can be optimized. The distribution of chalk sand has been successfully identified and characterized by porosity value ranging from 23% up to 30%.

  6. CCS in the North Sea region: A comparison on the cost-effectiveness of storing CO2 in the Utsira formation at regional and national scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strachan, N.; Hoefnagels, R.; Ramirez, A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential scale of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) under long-term decarbonisation scenarios means that analysis on the contribution of large international CO2 storage reservoirs is critical. This paper compares the potentially key role of CCS within cost-optimizing energy systems...... modelling at the national level (ensuring country-specific technical, economic and policy detail), and the regional level (ensuring transboundary electricity and CO2 trade). Analysis at alternate model scales investigates the full range of drivers on the feasibility and trade-offs in using the Utsira...... formation as a common North Sea CO2 storage resource. A robust finding is that low carbon electricity is a primary decarbonisation pathway and that CCS plays a key role (32–40%) within this portfolio. This paper confirms that the overall driver of the amount of CCS utilized is the climate policy...

  7. Tunnel Diode Discriminator with Fixed Dead Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A solid state discriminator for the range 0.4 to 10 V is described. Tunnel diodes are used for the discriminator element and in a special fixed dead time circuit. An analysis of temperature stability is presented. The regulated power supplies are described, including a special negative resistance...

  8. Unethical and Deadly Symbiosis in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbley, D. Larry; Flinn, Ronald; Reichelt, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    As administrators are pressured to increase retention rates in accounting departments, and higher education in general, a deadly symbiosis is occurring. Most students and parents only wish for high grades, so year after year many educators engage in unethical grade inflation and course work deflation. Since administrators use the students to audit…

  9. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit...

  10. Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemence, Caulle; Meryem, Mojtahid; Karoliina, Koho; Andy, Gooday; Gert-Jan, Reichart; Gerhard, Schmiedl; Frans, Jorissen

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy. C. Caulle1, M. Mojtahid1, K. Koho2,3, A. Gooday4, G. J. Reichart2,3, G. Schmiedl5, F. Jorissen1 1UMR CNRS 6112 LPG-BIAF, University of Angers, 2 bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers Cedex 2Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands 3Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (Royal NIOZ), Landsdiep 4, 1797 SZ 't Horntje (Texel) 4Southampton Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 5Department of Geosciences, University of Hamburg, Bundesstraße 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany The thermohaline circulation oxygenates the deep ocean sediment and therefore enables aerobic life on the sea-floor. In the past, interruption of this deep water formation occurred several times causing hypoxic to anoxic conditions on the sea-floor leading to major ecological turnover. A better understanding of the interaction between climate and bottom water oxygenation is therefore essential in order to predict future oceanic responses. Presently, permanent (stable over decadal timescale) low-oxygen conditions occur naturally at mid-water depths in the northern Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea). Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) are key areas to understand the hypoxic-anoxic events and their impact on the benthic ecosystem. In this context, a good knowledge of the ecology and life cycle adaptations of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages living in these low oxygen areas is essential. A series of multicores were recovered from three transects showing an oxygen gradient across the OMZ: the Murray Ridge, the Oman margin and the Indian margin. The stations located at the same depths showed slightly different oxygen concentrations and large differences in organic matter content. These differences are mainly related to the geographic location in the Arabian Sea. We investigated at these stations live and dead benthic

  11. Astronomical forcing of sedimentary cycles of Late Eocene Liushagang Formation in the Bailian Sag, Fushan Depression, Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹海洋; 金思丁; 孙鸣; 王华

    2016-01-01

    Sediments in the Liushagang Formation of Late Eocene form a group of key hydrocarbon play fairways in the Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea. As an important reservoir-forming combination, the Liushagang Formation consists of deltaic siliciclastic and show clear sedimentary cyclicity. According to paleontology research and stratigraphic correlation, the boundary between Liushagang Formation (Els) and Weizhou Formation (Ewz) is regarded as the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. The oxygen isotope dating for well cores from the top of the first Member of Liushagang Formation (Els1) and the bottom of the third Member of Weizhou Formation (Ewz3) give an isochron age of 35.2 Ma. Here, we use GR logging data as a paleoenvironmental proxy to conduct a detailed cyclostratigraphic study of the Els1 in the Bailian Sag, Fushan Depression. Power spectra, evolutionary fast Fourier transformation and wavelet analysis all reveal significant sedimentary cycles in Els1. The ratios of cycle wavelengths in these stratigraphic units are 21׃5׃2.8׃1.2׃1, and are interpreted as Milankovitch cycles of 400 ka and 96 ka eccentricity, 52 ka obliquity, 22 ka and 19 ka precession cycles, respectively. An astronomical time scale is established by tuning filtered 96 ka eccentricity cycles to a target curve of Well L2 in the Bailian Sag. Based on regional stratigraphic framework, combined with seismic, cores and logging data, the HST of the first member of the Liushagang Formation (Els1) delta in Well L2 was divided into six parasequence sets named Ps1-Ps6. According to the spectrum analysis by Simple Lomb periodogram from PAST program packages, the sediment accumulation rate of each parasequence sets first increased and then decreased as time went by. The sediment accumulation rate of Ps4 reached the maximum (0.127 m/ka) during the most prosperous period of delta prograding. Finally, the duration of each period of parasequence sets and more accurate geological age were calculated on the basis of

  12. Identification methods of coal-bearing source rocks for Yacheng Formation in the western deepwater area of South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Jinfeng; ZHANG Yingzhao; WANG Hua; WANG Yahui; GAN Huajun; HE Weijun; SUN Ming; SONG Guangzeng

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the fact that the coal-beds are with the characteristics of multi-beds, thin single-bed, rapid lateral changes and deep burial, coal-bearing source rocks are difficult to be identified and predicted, especially in the lower exploration deepwater area. In this paper, a new integrative process utilizing geology and geophysics is proposed for better predicting the distribution of coal-bearing source rocks. Coal-beds were identified by the logging responses of“three higher, three lower, and one expand”and carbargilite were recognized by the characteristics of“four higher and one lower”. Based on the above logical decision, coal-beds and carbargilite can be distinguished automatically by cluster analysis of logging curves in verticality. Within the constraints of well-seismic calibration, the coal-beds group also can be detected in horizontality by the integrated representation of“negative phase, higher Q, lower impedance and lower frequency”within the seismic data. However, the distribution of coal-bearing source rocks utilizing geophysical methodology may do not conform to the geological rules of coal accumulation. And then the main geological controlling factors of coal accumulation are comprehensively analyzed as follows:(1) Paleotopography and tectonic subsidence determine the planar range of terrestrial-marine transitional facies markedly;(2) The relative sea level changes affect the accommodation space and shoreline migration, and limit the vertical range of coal-beds. More specifically, the relationship between the accommodation creation rate and the peat accumulation rate is a fundamental control on coal accumulation. The thickest and most widespread coals form where those two factors reached a state of balance;(3) The supply of autochthonous clasts and the distance between deposition places and paleovegetation accumulated area are the critical factor to form abundant coal, which means that if deposition area is close to paleouplift, there

  13. Tidal current-induced formation——storm-induced change——tidal current-induced recovery——Interpretation of depositional dynamics of formation and evolution of radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张长宽; 张东生; 张君伦; 王震

    1999-01-01

    The results of simulated tidal current field, wave field and storm-induced current field are employed to interpret the depositional dynamic mechanism of formation and evolution of the radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor. The anticlockwise rotary tidal wave to the south of Shandong Peninsula meets the following progressive tidal wave from the South Yellow Sea, forming a radial current field outside Jianggang. This current field provides a necessary dynamic condition for the formation and existence of the radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor. The results of simulated "old current field (holocene)" show that there existed a convergent-divergent tidal zone just outside the palaeo-Yangtze River estuary where a palaeo-underwater accumulation was developed. The calculated results from wave models indicate that the wave impact on the topography, under the condition of high water level and strong winds, is significant. The storm current induced by typhoons landing in the Yangtze River estuary<