WorldWideScience

Sample records for format mid-wavelength infrared

  1. Demonstration of large format mid-wavelength infrared focal plane arrays based on superlattice and BIRD detector structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J.; Soibel, Alexander; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Ting, David Z.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-11-01

    We have demonstrated the use of bulk antimonide based materials and type-II antimonide based superlattices in the development of large area mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs). Barrier infrared photodetectors (BIRDs) and superlattice-based infrared photodetectors are expected to outperform traditional III-V MWIR and LWIR imaging technologies and are expected to offer significant advantages over II-VI material based FPAs. We have used molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technology to grow InAs/GaSb superlattice pin photodiodes and bulk InAsSb structures on GaSb substrates. The coupled quantum well superlattice device offers additional control in wavelength tuning via quantum well sizes and interface composition, while the BIRD structure allows for device fabrication without additional passivation. As a demonstration of the large area imaging capabilities of this technology, we have fabricated mid-wavelength 1024 × 1024 pixels superlattice imaging FPAs and 640 × 512 MWIR arrays based on the BIRD concept. These initial FPA have produced excellent infrared imagery.

  2. Mid-wavelength infrared unipolar nBp superlattice photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Alireza; Myers, Stephen; Taghipour, Zahra; Mathews, Sen; Schuler-Sandy, Ted; Lee, Seunghyun; Cowan, Vincent M.; Garduno, Eli; Steenbergen, Elizabeth; Morath, Christian; Ariyawansa, Gamini; Scheihing, John; Krishna, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    We report a Mid-Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) barrier photodetector based on the InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattice (T2SL) material system. The nBp design consists of a single unipolar barrier (InAs/AlSb SL) placed between a 4 μm thick p-doped absorber (InAs/GaSb SL) and an n-type contact layer (InAs/GaSb SL). At 80 K, the device exhibited a 50% cut-off wavelength of 5 μm, was fully turned-ON at zero bias and the measured QE was 50% (front side illumination with no AR coating) at 4.5 μm with a dark current density of 4.7 × 10-6 A/cm2 at Vb = 50 mV. At 150 K and Vb = 50 mV, the 50% cut-off wavelength increased to 5.3 μm, and the QE was 54% at 4.5 μm with a dark current of 5.0 × 10-4 A/cm2.

  3. Real-time mid-wavelength infrared scene rendering with a feasible BRDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jianqi; Chen, Yang; Huang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Practically modeling and rendering the surface-leaving radiance of large-scale scenes in mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) is an important feature of Battlefield Environment Simulation (BES). Since radiation transfer in realistic scenes is complex, it is difficult to develop real-time simulations directly from first principle. Nevertheless, it is crucial to minimize distortions in the rendering of virtual scenes. This paper proposes a feasible bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model to deal with a large-scale scene in the MWIR band. Our BRDF model is spectrally dependent and evolved from previous BRDFs, and meets both Helmholtz reciprocity and energy conservation. We employ our BRDF model to calculate the direct solar and sky contributions. Both of them are added to the surface thermal emission in order to give the surface-leaving radiance. Atmospheric path radiance and transmission are pre-calculated to speed up the programming for rendering large scale scenes. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons with MWIR field data are made to assess the render results of our proposed method.

  4. High quantum efficiency N-structure type-II superlattice mid-wavelength infrared detector with resonant cavity enhanced design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoyue; Xu, Yun; Li, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Bai, Lin; Yu, Hailong; Fu, Dong; Zhu, Haijun; Song, Guofeng

    2017-05-01

    We propose a resonant cavity enhanced (RCE) N-structure type-II superlattice (T2SL) mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) photodetector which can be used for the detection of methane gas at 3.3 μm. The theoretical analysis of quantum efficiency (QE) shows that the peak QE can be enhanced from 0.45 to 0.80 at 3.3 μm after 12 period AlAs0.09Sb0.91/GaSb DBR is introduced to the N-structure T2SL detector and QE exhibits the narrow bandwidth characteristic near the target wavelength. By analyzing the refractive indices of different materials and the reflectance of different DBRs, we also discuss how to determine the component materials of quarter-wavelength DBR reflectors.

  5. Theoretical performance of mid wavelength HgCdTe(1 0 0) heterostructure infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytko, M.

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents a theoretical study of the p+BpnN+ design based on HgCdTe(1 0 0) layers, which significantly improves the performance of detectors optimized for the mid-wave infrared spectral range. p+BpnN+ design combines the concept of a high impedance photoconductor with double layer hetero-junction device. Zero valence band offset approximation throughout the p+Bpn heterostructure allows flow of only minority holes generated in the absorber, what in a combination with n-N+ exclusion junction provides the Auger suppression. Modeling shows that by applying a low doping active layer, it is possible to achieve an order of magnitude lower dark current densities than those determined by ;Rule 07;. A key to its success is a reduction of Shockley-Read-Hall centers associated with native defects, residual impurities and misfit dislocations. Reduction of metal site vacancies below 1012 cm-3 and dislocation density to 105 cm-2 allow to achieve a background limited performance at 250 K. If the background radiation can be reduced, operation with a three- or four-stage thermo-electric-cooler may be possible.

  6. Performance of dual-band short- or mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InGaAsSb bulk materials and InAs/GaSb superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yao-yao; Lv Yue-xi; Han Xi; Guo Chun-yan; Jiang Zhi; Hao Hong-yue; Jiang Dong-wei; Wang Guo-wei; Xu Ying-qiang; Niu Zhi-chuan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate bias-selectable dual-band short- or mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on In 0.24 Ga 0.76 As 0.21 Sb 0.79 bulk materials and InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices with cutoff wavelengths of 2.2 μm and 3.6 μm, respectively. At 200 K, the short-wave channel exhibits a peak quantum efficiency of 42% and a dark current density of 5.93 × 10 −5 A/cm 2 at 500 mV, thereby providing a detectivity of 1.55 × 10 11 cm⋅Hz 1/2 /W. The mid-wave channel exhibits a peak quantum efficiency of 31% and a dark current density of 1.22 × 10 −3 A/cm 2 at −300 mV, thereby resulting in a detectivity of 2.71 × 10 10 cm⋅Hz 1/2 /W. Moreover, we discuss the band alignment and spectral cross-talk of the dual-band n-i-p-p-i-n structure. (paper)

  7. Bias-selectable three-color short-, extended-short-, and mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Abbas; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-11-01

    A bias-selectable, high operating temperature, three-color short-, extended-short-, and mid-wavelength infrared photodetector based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattices on GaSb substrate has been demonstrated. The short-, extended-short-, and mid-wavelength channels' 50% cutoff wavelengths were 2.3, 2.9, and 4.4 μm, respectively, at 150 K. The mid-wavelength channel exhibited a saturated quantum efficiency of 34% at 4 μm under +200  mV bias voltage in a front-side illumination configuration and without any antireflection coating. At 200 mV, the device exhibited a dark current density of 8.7×10 -5   A/cm 2 providing a specific detectivity of ∼2×10 11   cm·Hz 1/2 /W at 150 K. The short-wavelength channel achieved a saturated quantum efficiency of 20% at 1.8 μm. At -10  mV, the device's dark current density was 5.5×10 -8   A/cm 2 . At zero bias, its specific detectivity was 1×10 11   cm·Hz 1/2 /W at 150 K. The extended short-wavelength channel achieved a saturated quantum efficiency of 22% at 2.75 μm. Under -2  V bias voltage, the device exhibited a dark current density of 1.8×10 -6   A/cm 2 providing a specific detectivity of 6.3×10 11   cm·Hz 1/2 /W at 150 K.

  8. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  9. Ultraluminous Infrared Mergers: Elliptical Galaxies in Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Lutz, D.; Tecza, M.

    2001-12-01

    We report high-quality near-IR spectroscopy of 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxy mergers (ULIRGs). Our new VLT and Keck data provide ~0.5" resolution, stellar and gas kinematics of these galaxies, most of which are compact systems in the last merger stages. We confirm that ULIRG mergers are ``ellipticals in formation.'' Random motions dominate their stellar dynamics, but significant rotation is common. Gasdynamics and stellar dynamics are decoupled in most systems. ULIRGs fall on or near the fundamental plane of hot stellar systems, and especially on its less evolution-sensitive, reff-σ projection. The ULIRG velocity dispersion distribution, their location in the fundamental plane, and their distribution of vrotsini/σ closely resemble those of intermediate-mass (~L*), elliptical galaxies with moderate rotation. As a group ULIRGs do not resemble giant ellipticals with large cores and little rotation. Our results are in good agreement with other recent studies indicating that disky ellipticals with compact cores or cusps can form through dissipative mergers of gas-rich disk galaxies while giant ellipticals with large cores have a different formation history. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO 65.N-0266, 65.N-0289), and on observations at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, The University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the general financial support by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Upconversion based continuous-wave mid-infrared detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present theoretical and experimental work on upconversion based mid-wavelength infrared detection using silicon detectors without the need for cryogenic cooling. We consider both multi-spectral imaging and point spectroscopy targeting several specific applications.......We present theoretical and experimental work on upconversion based mid-wavelength infrared detection using silicon detectors without the need for cryogenic cooling. We consider both multi-spectral imaging and point spectroscopy targeting several specific applications....

  11. Demonstration of mid and long-wavelength infrared antimonide-based focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J.; Soibel, Alexander; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Ting, David Z.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Rhiger, David R.; Kvaas, Robert E.; Harris, Sean F.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the use of bulk antimonide based materials and type-II antimonide based superlattices in the development of large area mid wavelength infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) as well as smaller format long wavelength infrared (LWIR) arrays. Barrier infrared photodetectors (BIRDs) and superlattice-based infrared photodetectors are expected to outperform traditional III-V MWIR and LWIR imaging technologies and are expected to offer significant advantages over II-VI material based FPAs. We have used molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technology to grow InAs/GaSb superlattice pin photodiode and bulk InAsSb structures on GaSb substrates. The coupled quantum well superlattice device offers additional control in wavelength tuning via quantum well sizes and ternary composition. Furthermore, we have fabricated mid-wavelength 1024x1024 pixels superlattice imaging FPAs, 640x512 MWIR arrays based on the BIRD concept, and 256x256 LWIR arrays based on pin superlattice structures. These initial FPA have produced excellent infrared imagery.

  12. Neuroimaging with functional near infrared spectroscopy: From formation to interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Vega, Javier; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos G.; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe

    2017-09-01

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is gaining momentum as a functional neuroimaging modality to investigate the cerebral hemodynamics subsequent to neural metabolism. As other neuroimaging modalities, it is neuroscience's tool to understand brain systems functions at behaviour and cognitive levels. To extract useful knowledge from functional neuroimages it is critical to understand the series of transformations applied during the process of the information retrieval and how they bound the interpretation. This process starts with the irradiation of the head tissues with infrared light to obtain the raw neuroimage and proceeds with computational and statistical analysis revealing hidden associations between pixels intensities and neural activity encoded to end up with the explanation of some particular aspect regarding brain function.To comprehend the overall process involved in fNIRS there is extensive literature addressing each individual step separately. This paper overviews the complete transformation sequence through image formation, reconstruction and analysis to provide an insight of the final functional interpretation.

  13. Clumpy Star Formation in Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kirsten; Armus, Lee; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; GOALS Team

    2018-01-01

    We present HST narrow-band imaging of Paβ and Paα emission in 50 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies from the Great Observatory All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). These data allow us to study spatially resolved star forming regions and directly compare to star forming clumps found in both local and high-redshift galaxies. We find that the ionized gas is concentrated in star-forming clumps with sizes ranging from 70-700pc and star formation rates (SFRs) of .001 to 5 Msun yr-1. The SFRs of the clumps in GOALS spans the range from normal local galaxies to clump SFRs found in z=1-3 galaxies. The clumps have stellar ages of 5 x 106 to 4.5 x 107 yr with a median age of 8.6 x 106 yr and stellar masses of 106 to 109 Msun. The LIRGs in our sample cover the entire merger sequence from isolated galaxies to advanced staged mergers and allow us to study how the size, number, luminosity, and distribution of the clumpy star formation varies with the galaxy's merger stage, mass, and global star formation rates. Finally, we compare our results to clumpy star formation in high resolution hydrodynamical FIRE simulations and find that observed star forming clumps match the same size and star formation rate properties of those found in simulations.

  14. Polarization and infrared imaging of regions of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneti, A.

    1985-01-01

    Observational studies of two regions of star formation, the Taurus cloud and the BN-KL region of Orion, are presented. The magnetic field structure in the Taurus cloud was studied in order to investigate its possible role in the evolution of the cloud. It was found that the magnetic field is generally perpendicular to the elongated structures that make up the cloud, and it is deduced that the observed structure could be due to the effects of the magnetic field during the early stages of collapse. In addition, it was found that the magnetic field may have prevented the formation of massive stars by inhibiting the collapse of large cores, while not affecting the collapse of the small ones. Using a new near-infrared array camera, high resolution (1'') images of several young stars embedded in the cloud were obtained. Most of these sources have extended, spatially resolved circumstellar shells. High resolution images of the BN-KL region of Orion at four wavelengths between 1.65 and 4.7 μm were also obtained. At 1.65 μm a large trough is seen in the overall nebulosity; it is suggested that the observed trough is due to the doughnut of material around IRc2 as it obscures the background nebulosity

  15. Formation of stellar clusters in magnetized, filamentary infrared dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2018-01-01

    Star formation in a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) is simulated over the dynamic range of 4.2 pc to 28 au for a period of 3.5 × 105 yr, including magnetic fields and both radiative and outflow feedback from the protostars. At the end of the simulation, the star formation efficiency is 4.3 per cent and the star formation rate per free-fall time is εff ≃ 0.04, within the range of observed values. The total stellar mass increases as ∼t2, whereas the number of protostars increases as ∼t1.5. We find that the density profile around most of the simulated protostars is ∼ρ ∝ r-1.5. At the end of the simulation, the protostellar mass function approaches the Chabrier stellar initial mass function. We infer that the time to form a star of median mass 0.2 M⊙ is about 1.4 × 105 yr from the median mass accretion rate. We find good agreement among the protostellar luminosities observed in the large sample of Dunham et al., our simulation and a theoretical estimate, and we conclude that the classical protostellar luminosity problem is resolved. The multiplicity of the stellar systems in the simulation agrees, to within a factor of 2, with observations of Class I young stellar objects; most of the simulated multiple systems are unbound. Bipolar protostellar outflows are launched using a subgrid model, and extend up to 1 pc from their host star. The mass-velocity relation of the simulated outflows is consistent with both observation and theory.

  16. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY OF CORES WITHIN INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, E. T.; Jackson, J. M.; Rathborne, J. M.; Simon, R.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) contain compact cores which probably host the early stages of high-mass star formation. Many of these cores contain regions of extended, enhanced 4.5 μm emission, the so-called 'green fuzzies', which indicate shocked gas. Many cores also contain 24 μm emission, presumably from heated dust which indicates embedded protostars. Because 'green fuzzies' and 24 μm point sources both indicate star formation, we have developed an algorithm to identify star-forming cores within IRDCs by searching for the simultaneous presence of these two distinct indicators. We employ this algorithm on a sample of 190 cores found toward IRDCs, and classify the cores as 'active' if they contain a green fuzzy coincident with an embedded 24 μm source, and as 'quiescent' if they contain neither IR signature. We hypothesize that the 'quiescent' cores represent the earliest 'preprotostellar' (starless) core phase, before the development of a warm protostar, and that the 'active' cores represent a later phase, after the development of a protostar. We test this idea by comparing the sizes, densities, and maser activity of the 'active' and 'quiescent' cores. We find that, on average, 'active' cores have smaller sizes, higher densities, and more pronounced water and methanol maser activity than the 'quiescent' cores. This is expected if the 'quiescent' cores are in an earlier evolutionary state than the 'active' cores. The masses of 'active' cores suggest that they may be forming high-mass stars. The highest mass 'quiescent' cores are excellent candidates for the elusive high-mass starless cores.

  17. Joint de-blurring and nonuniformity correction method for infrared microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Anselmo; Torres, Sergio; Machuca, Guillermo; Ramírez, Wagner; Gutiérrez, Pablo A.; Viafora, Laura A.; Godoy, Sebastián E.; Vera, Esteban

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we present a new technique to simultaneously reduce two major degradation artifacts found in mid-wavelength infrared microscopy imagery, namely the inherent focal-plane array nonuniformity noise and the scene defocus presented due to the point spread function of the infrared microscope. We correct both nuisances using a novel, recursive method that combines the constant range nonuniformity correction algorithm with a frame-by-frame deconvolution approach. The ability of the method to jointly compensate for both nonuniformity noise and blur is demonstrated using two different real mid-wavelength infrared microscopic video sequences, which were captured from two microscopic living organisms using a Janos-Sofradir mid-wavelength infrared microscopy setup. The performance of the proposed method is assessed on real and simulated infrared data by computing the root mean-square error and the roughness-laplacian pattern index, which was specifically developed for the present work.

  18. Formation and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Halite Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    Efflorescent salt crusts form as groundwater evaporates from capillary updraw of brine through sediment. Salts precipitate at the surface, coating and cementing the upper few layers of sediment. If enough brine is present to completely saturate and pond on top of the surface, halite will precipitate at the surface of the brine and settle out as layers of crystalline salt on top of the sediment. In playa environments, salts such as sulfates, carbonates and halides, and forms such crusts. In remote sensing studies of such surfaces, it is important to understand how the presence of salt crusts affects the spectral features of the surrounding sediment. This is especially true when the crusts form from a non-absorbing salt such as halite. Halite has been observed to exhibit unusual spectral properties in the thermal infrared. Specifically, granular mixtures of minerals with halite produced spectra in which the spectral features inverted form reflectivity, shifted to shorter wavelengths and the spectral contrast increased near absorption bands. However, in crusted surfaces, in which the halite cements, coats or overlays the mineral grains, the presence of halite has a different affect on the spectra. This work will examine the precipitation of halite and the formation of salt crusts for several sediment and brine mixtures. Laboratory measurements of thermal emission spectra for the crusts will be compared to previous studies for particulate mixtures of halite with minerals and well as to natural surface crusts. Detailed knowledge of such surfaces will allow for their discrimination and identification in terrestrial playa settings as well as in paleo-environments on Mars.

  19. New format presentation for infrared spectral emittance data. Infrared spectrometry studies, phase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. J. P.; Green, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Methods for infrared radiance measurements from geological materials were studied for airborne use over terrains with minimal vegetation. The tasks of the investigation were: (1) calculation of emittance ratios, (2) comparison of IR spectral emittance data with K-band scatterometer data over Pisgah Crater, and (3) standard infrared spectral file. Published papers reporting the research are included.

  20. The Early Stages of Star Formation in Infrared Dark Clouds : Characterizing the Core Dust Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Chambers, E. T.; Stojimirovic, I.; Simon, R.; Shipman, R.; Frieswijk, W.

    2010-01-01

    Identified as extinction features against the bright Galactic mid-infrared background, infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are thought to harbor the very earliest stages of star and cluster formation. In order to better characterize the properties of their embedded cores, we have obtained new 24 mu m,

  1. Characterizing star formation activity in infrared dark cloud MSXDC G048.65-00.29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Shipman, R. F.

    2008-01-01

    Context. Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), condensed regions of the ISM with high column densities, low temperatures and high masses, are suspected sites of star formation. Thousands of IRDCs have already been identified. To date, it has not been resolved whether IRDCs always show star formation

  2. Approach jamming effectiveness evaluation for surface-type infrared decoy in network centric warship formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mingshan

    2015-10-01

    The passive and photoelectrical jamming to anti-ship missile in the condition of network centric warship formation is an important research issue of fleet EW operation. An approach jamming method of shipborne surface-type infrared decoy countering the infrared image guided anti-ship missile is put forward. By analyzing the countering process the jamming effectiveness evaluation model is constructed. By simulation the method is proved t reasonable and effective. This method breaks through the traditional restrict that the passive and photoelectricity jamming measure can only be used in the end self-defence and provides a new method for network centric worship formation to support each other.

  3. Low Size, Weight and Power Concept for Mid-Wave Infrared Optical Communication Transceivers Based on Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhanskiy, Edward; Choa, Fow-Sen; Merritt, Scott; Yu, Anthony; Krainak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The low complexity, low size, weight and power Mid-Wavelength Infra-Red optical communications transceiver concept presented, realized and tested in the laboratory environment. Resilience to atmospheric impairments analyzed with simulated turbulence. Performance compared to typical telecom based Short Wavelength Infra-Red transceiver.

  4. Estimating Star Formation Rates from Infrared and Radio Luminosities: The Origin of the Radio-Infrared Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Eric F.

    2002-01-01

    I have assembled a diverse sample of galaxies from the literature with far-ultraviolet (FUV), optical, infrared (IR) and radio luminosities to explore the calibration of radio-derived and IR-derived star formation (SF) rates, and the origin of the radio-IR correlation. By comparing the 8-1000 micron IR, which samples dust-reprocessed starlight, with direct stellar FUV emission, I show that the IR traces most of the SF in luminous L* galaxies but traces only a small fraction of the SF in faint...

  5. The star formation history of the universe as viewed in the infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnelli, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the estimation of the cosmic star formation history of the Universe through the study of spectral properties of galaxies observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-and-far- infrared. My work begins with the extraction of sources contained in the Spitzer images and with the creation of multi- wavelengths catalogs. Using those catalogs I study the spectral properties of infrared galaxies and their evolution with redshift. From the comparison of these properties with the predictions of standard spectral libraries, I show that galaxies situated beyond z∼1.3 present significant evolutions in their spectral properties. Based on these spectral properties, I estimate the cosmic star formation history of the Universe from z∼0 to z∼2.3. This history is characterized by a sharp increase of the star formation density of the Universe form z∼0 and z∼1, followed by a stabilisation phase up to z∼2. This star formation density is dominated between z∼0.8 and z∼2 by luminous infrared galaxies with high star formation rate. Finally, I study the presence of the 3.3 um PAH signature in the spectrum of distant galaxies (0.5 infrared luminosity of these galaxies indicates that this signature could be used in the future to estimate the star formation rate of galaxies observed at z>3. (author) [fr

  6. Modulation Transfer Function of Infrared Focal Plane Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Hill, C. J.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hoglund, L.; Luong, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels mid -wavelength and long- wavelength quantum well infrared photodetector, and 320x256 pixels long- wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). Long wavelength Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) based on InAs/GaSb superlattice material is hybridized to recently designed and fabricated 320x256 pixel format ROIC. The n-type CBIRD was characterized in terms of performance and thermal stability. The experimentally measured NE delta T of the 8.8 micron cutoff n-CBIRD FPA was 18.6 mK with 300 K background and f/2 cold stop at 78K FPA operating temperature. The horizontal and vertical MTFs of this pixel fully delineated CBIRD FPA at Nyquist frequency are 49% and 52%, respectively.

  7. MIRAGE WF infrared scene projector system, with 1536 x 768 wide format resistive array, performance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkman, Kevin; Laveigne, Joe; Oleson, Jim; Franks, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Lannon, John; Woode, Brian; Greer, Derek; Bui, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    MIRAGE WF is the latest high definition version of the MIRAGE infrared scene projector product line from Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR). MIRAGE WF is being developed under the Wide Format Resistive Array (WFRA) program. The WFRA development is one of several efforts within the Infrared Sensor Simulator - Preplanned Product Improvement (IRSS P3I) umbrella funded by the Central Test and Evaluation Investment Program (CTEIP) and led by the US Navy at Patuxent River, MD. Three MIRAGE WF infrared scene projection systems are being delivered as part of the WFRA program. The main differences between the MIRAGE XL (1024x1024) and MIRAGE WF are a 1536x768 emitter array and 100Hz true raster capability. The key emitter requirements that have been measured and will be discussed include: Operability, Maximum Apparent Temperature, Rise Time and Array Uniformity. Key System specifications are: 1536x768 pixels, maximum apparent temperature of 600K, maximum frame rate of 100Hz, raster and snap shot updating, radiance rise and fall time less than 5 ms and windowed mode (1024x768) operation at up to 200 Hz.

  8. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P.; Escala, A.; Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S.

    2013-01-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M K ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency

  9. Origins Space Telescope: 3D infrared surveys of star formation and black hole growth in galaxies over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alexandra; Armus, Lee; bradford, charles; Origins Space Telescope STDT

    2018-01-01

    In the coming decade, new telescope facilities and surveys aim to provide a 3D map of the unobscured Universe over cosmic time. However, much of galaxy formation and evolution occurs behind dust, and is only observable through infrared observations. Previous extragalactic infrared surveys were fundamentally limited to a 2D mapping of the most extreme populations of galaxies due to spatial resolution and sensitivity. The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, one of the four science and technology definition studies sponsored by NASA to provide input to the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal survey. OST is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum, which will achieve spectral line sensitivities up to 1000 times deeper than previous infrared facilities. With powerful instruments such as the Medium Resolution Survey Spectrometer (MRSS), capable of simultaneous imaging and spectroscopy, the extragalactic infrared sky can finally be surveyed in 3D. In addition to spectroscopic redshifts, the rich suite of lines in the infrared provides unique diagnostics of the ongoing star formation (both obscured and unobscured) and the central supermassive black hole growth. In this poster, we present a simulated extragalactic survey with OST/MRSS which will detect millions of galaxies down to well below the knee of the infrared luminosity function. We demonstrate how this survey can map the coeval star formation and black hole growth in galaxies over cosmic time.

  10. Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  11. High-Mass Star Formation and Infrared Dark Clouds in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Susanna C.

    2011-05-01

    Massive stars play many important roles in the universe. However, while massive stars are very luminous and thus easy to observe from large distances, the early stages of the formation of high-mass stars are difficult to observe and therefore not well-understood. In the 1990s, a new class of interstellar clouds called infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) was discovered in mid-IR surveys of the Galactic Plane. These clouds are dense (nH2 > 10^5 cm^-3), cold (T sausage instability" as a possible mechanism for the formation of high-mass star and cluster-forming cores within these filaments. The filament properties in a few cases I have observed roughly agree with theoretical predictions for this fluid instability.

  12. Multi-wavelength study of triggered star formation around the mid-infrared bubble N14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.

    2013-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength analysis around the mid-infrared (MIR) bubble N14 to probe the signature of triggered star formation as well as the formation of new massive star(s) and/or cluster(s) at the borders of the bubble by the expansion of the H II region. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera ratio maps reveal that the bubble is traced by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission following an almost circular morphology except in the south-west direction towards the low molecular density environment. The observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material have been found around the bubble. We have detected 418 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the selected region around the bubble N14. Interestingly, the detected YSO clusters are associated with the collected molecular and cold dust material at the borders of the bubble. One of the clusters is found with deeply embedded intermediate mass and massive Class I YSOs associated with one of the dense dust clumps in the east of the bubble N14. We do not find good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain the possible `collect-and-collapse' process around the bubble N14. Therefore, we suggest the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave and/or small-scale Jeans gravitational instabilities in the collected materials. We have also investigated 5 young massive embedded protostars (8-10 M⊙) and 15 intermediate mass (3-7 M⊙) Class I YSOs which are associated with the dust and molecular fragmented clumps at the borders of the bubble. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these intermediate and massive Class I YSOs around the bubble N14.

  13. The Modes of Star Formation in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Candels Team

    2015-01-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, LIR>1012 Lsun) are all interacting and merging systems. To date, studies of ULIRGs at high redshift have found a variety of results due to their varying selection effects and small sample sizes. Some studies have found that mergers still dominate the galaxy morphology while others have found a high fraction of morphologically normal or clumpy star forming disks. Near-infrared imaging is crucial for interpreting galaxy structure at high redshift since it probes the rest frame optical light of a galaxy and thus we can compare directly to studies in the local universe. We explore the evolution of the morphological properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Herschel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z~2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy's position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers?

  14. An Infrared Spectroscopic Study Toward the Formation of Alkylphosphonic Acids and Their Precursors in Extraterrestrial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Blair, Tyler J.; Dayuha, Remwilyn; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2018-01-01

    The only known phosphorus-containing organic compounds of extraterrestrial origin, alkylphosphonic acids, were discovered in the Murchison meteorite and have accelerated the hypothesis that reduced oxidation states of phosphorus were delivered to early Earth and served as a prebiotic source of phosphorus. While previous studies looking into the formation of these alkylphosphonic acids have focused on the iron–nickel phosphide mineral schreibersite and phosphorous acid as a source of phosphorus, this work utilizes phosphine (PH3), which has been discovered in the circumstellar envelope of IRC +10216, in the atmosphere of Jupiter and Saturn, and believed to be the phosphorus carrier in comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Phosphine ices prepared with interstellar molecules such as carbon dioxide, water, and methane were subjected to electron irradiation, which simulates the secondary electrons produced from galactic cosmic rays penetrating the ice, and probed using infrared spectroscopy to understand the possible formation of alkylphosphonic acids and their precursors on interstellar icy grains that could become incorporated into meteorites such as Murchison. We present the first study and results on the possible synthesis of alkylphosphonic acids produced from phosphine-mixed ices under interstellar conditions. All functional groups of alkylphosphonic acids were detected through infrared spectroscopically, suggesting that this class of molecules can be formed in interstellar ices.

  15. Star Formation and AGN Activity in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2015-08-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, L_IR > 10^12 L⊙) are all interacting and merging systems. We explore the evolution of the morphological and nuclear properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Her- schel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z ˜ 2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We also use rest-frame optical emission line diagnostics, X-ray luminosity, and MIR colors to separate AGN from star-formation dominated galaxies. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy’s position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers? We investigate how AGN identified with different methods correspond to different morphologies and merger stages as well as position on the star formation rate - stellar mass plane.

  16. Planck 2013 results. XXX. Cosmic infrared background measurements and implications for star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Blagrave, K.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Welikala, N.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Winkel, B.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies using Planck. Combining HFI data with IRAS, the angular auto- and cross-frequency power spectrum is measured from 143 to 3000 GHz, and the auto-bispectrum from 217 to 545 GHz. The total areas used to compute the CIB power spectrum and bispectrum are about 2240 and 4400 deg2, respectively. After careful removal of the contaminants (cosmic microwave background anisotropies, Galactic dust, and Sunyaev-Zeldovich emission), and a complete study of systematics, the CIB power spectrum is measured with unprecedented signal to noise ratio from angular multipoles ℓ ~ 150 to 2500. The bispectrum due to the clustering of dusty, star-forming galaxies is measured from ℓ ~ 130 to 1100, with a total signal to noise ratio of around 6, 19, and 29 at 217, 353, and 545 GHz, respectively. Two approaches are developed for modelling CIB power spectrum anisotropies. The first approach takes advantage of the unique measurements by Planck at large angular scales, and models only the linear part of the power spectrum, with a mean bias of dark matter haloes hosting dusty galaxies at a given redshift weighted by their contribution to the emissivities. The second approach is based on a model that associates star-forming galaxies with dark matter haloes and their subhaloes, using a parametrized relation between the dust-processed infrared luminosity and (sub-)halo mass. The two approaches simultaneously fit all auto- and cross-power spectra very well. We find that the star formation history is well constrained up to redshifts around 2, and agrees with recent estimates of the obscured star-formation density using Spitzer and Herschel. However, at higher redshift, the accuracy of the star formation history measurement is strongly degraded by the uncertainty in the spectral energy distribution of CIB galaxies. We also find that the mean halo mass which is most efficient at hosting star formation is log (Meff/M⊙) = 12

  17. Sub-picosecond time resolved infrared spectroscopy of high-spin state formation in Fe(II) spin crossover complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Anders Rørbæk; Wolf, Matthias M. N.; Gross, Ruth

    2008-01-01

      The photoinduced low-spin (S = 0) to high-spin (S = 2) transition of the iron(II) spin-crossover systems [Fe(btpa)](PF6)2 and [Fe(b(bdpa))](PF6)2 in solution have been studied for the first time by means of ultrafast transient infrared spectroscopy at room temperature. Negative and positive inf...... absorption cross sections. The simulated infrared difference spectra are dominated by an increase of the absorption cross section upon high-spin state formation in accordance with the experimental infrared spectra.......  The photoinduced low-spin (S = 0) to high-spin (S = 2) transition of the iron(II) spin-crossover systems [Fe(btpa)](PF6)2 and [Fe(b(bdpa))](PF6)2 in solution have been studied for the first time by means of ultrafast transient infrared spectroscopy at room temperature. Negative and positive...... infrared difference bands between 1000 and 1065 cm-1 that appear within the instrumental system response time of 350 fs after excitation at 387 nm display the formation of the vibrationally unrelaxed and hot high-spin 5T2 state. Vibrational relaxation is observed and characterized by the time constants 9...

  18. Circumnuclear star formation in Mrk 42 mapped with Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Moiré G.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Dors, O. L.; Riffel, Rogerio; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Colina, Luis

    2018-03-01

    We present Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) observations of the inner 1.5 × 1.5 kpc2 of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 42 at a spatial resolution of 60 pc and spectral resolution of 40 km s^{-1}. The emission-line flux and equivalent width maps clearly show a ring of circumnuclear star formation regions (CNSFRs) surrounding the nucleus with radius of ˜ 500 pc. The spectra of some of these regions show molecular absorption features which are probably of CN, TiO or VO, indicating the presence of massive evolved stars in the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. The gas kinematics of the ring is dominated by rotation in the plane of the galaxy, following the large scale disk geometry, while at the nucleus an additional outflowing component is detected blueshifted by 300-500 km s^{-1}, relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Based on the equivalent width of Brγ we find evidences of gradients in the age of H II regions along the ring of Mrk 42, favoring the pearls on a string scenario of star formation. The broad component of Paβ emission line presents a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of ˜ 1480 km s^{-1}, implying in a mass of ˜ 2.5 × 106 M⊙ for the central supermassive black hole. Based on emission-line ratios we conclude that besides the active galactic nucleus, Mrk 42 presents nuclear Starburst activity.

  19. THE 'NESSIE' NEBULA: CLUSTER FORMATION IN A FILAMENTARY INFRARED DARK CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Chambers, Edward T.; Rathborne, Jill M.; Simon, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The 'Nessie' Nebula is a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) with a large aspect ratio of over 150:1 (1. 0 5 x 0. 0 01 or 80 pc x 0.5 pc at a kinematic distance of 3.1 kpc). Maps of HNC (1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, made with the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra telescope, show an excellent morphological match to the mid-IR extinction. Moreover, because the molecular line emission from the entire nebula has the same radial velocity to within ±3.4 km s -1 , the nebula is a single, coherent cloud and not the chance alignment of multiple unrelated clouds along the line of sight. The Nessie Nebula contains a number of compact, dense molecular cores which have a characteristic projected spacing of ∼4.5 pc along the filament. The theory of gravitationally bound gaseous cylinders predicts the existence of such cores, which, due to the 'sausage' or 'varicose' fluid instability, fragment from the cylinder at a characteristic length scale. If turbulent pressure dominates over thermal pressure in Nessie, then the observed core spacing matches theoretical predictions. We speculate that the formation of high-mass stars and massive star clusters arises from the fragmentation of filamentary IRDCs caused by the 'sausage' fluid instability that leads to the formation of massive, dense molecular cores. The filamentary molecular gas clouds often found near high-mass star-forming regions (e.g., Orion, NGC 6334, etc.) may represent a later stage of IRDC evolution.

  20. The "Nessie" Nebula: Cluster Formation in a Filamentary Infrared Dark Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Chambers, Edward T.; Rathborne, Jill M.; Simon, Robert

    2010-08-01

    The "Nessie" Nebula is a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) with a large aspect ratio of over 150:1 (1fdg5 × 0fdg01 or 80 pc × 0.5 pc at a kinematic distance of 3.1 kpc). Maps of HNC (1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, made with the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra telescope, show an excellent morphological match to the mid-IR extinction. Moreover, because the molecular line emission from the entire nebula has the same radial velocity to within ±3.4 km s-1, the nebula is a single, coherent cloud and not the chance alignment of multiple unrelated clouds along the line of sight. The Nessie Nebula contains a number of compact, dense molecular cores which have a characteristic projected spacing of ~4.5 pc along the filament. The theory of gravitationally bound gaseous cylinders predicts the existence of such cores, which, due to the "sausage" or "varicose" fluid instability, fragment from the cylinder at a characteristic length scale. If turbulent pressure dominates over thermal pressure in Nessie, then the observed core spacing matches theoretical predictions. We speculate that the formation of high-mass stars and massive star clusters arises from the fragmentation of filamentary IRDCs caused by the "sausage" fluid instability that leads to the formation of massive, dense molecular cores. The filamentary molecular gas clouds often found near high-mass star-forming regions (e.g., Orion, NGC 6334, etc.) may represent a later stage of IRDC evolution.

  1. The Inception of Star Cluster Formation Revealed by [CII] Emission Around an Infrared Dark Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbas, Thomas G.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Csengeri, Timea; Wu, Benjamin; Lim, Wanggi; Caselli, Paola; Güsten, Rolf; Ricken, Oliver; Riquelme, Denise

    2018-03-01

    We present SOFIA-upGREAT observations of [CII] emission of Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G035.39-00.33, designed to trace its atomic gas envelope and thus test models of the origins of such clouds. Several velocity components of [CII] emission are detected, tracing structures that are at a wide range of distances in the Galactic plane. We find a main component that is likely associated with the IRDC and its immediate surroundings. This strongest emission component has a velocity similar to that of the 13CO(2-1) emission of the IRDC, but offset by ˜3 km s-1 and with a larger velocity width of ˜9 km s-1. The spatial distribution of the [CII] emission of this component is also offset predominantly to one side of the dense filamentary structure of the IRDC. The CII column density is estimated to be of the order of ˜1017 - 1018 cm-2. We compare these results to the [CII] emission from numerical simulations of magnetized, dense gas filaments formed from giant molecular cloud (GMC) collisions, finding similar spatial and kinematic offsets. These observations and modeling of [CII] add further to the evidence that IRDC G035.39-00.33 has been formed by a process of GMC-GMC collision, which may thus be an important mechanism for initiating star cluster formation.

  2. A Submillimetre Study of Massive Star Formation Within the W51 Complex and Infrared Dark Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Harriet Alice Louise

    Despite its importance the fundamental question of how massive stars form remains unanswered, with improvements to both models and observations having crucial roles to play. To quote Bate et al. (2003) computational models of star formation are limited because "conditions in molecular clouds are not sufficiently well understood to be able to select a representative sample of cloud cores for the initial conditions". It is this notion that motivates the study of the environments within Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) and Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), known sites of massive star formation, at the clump and core level. By studying large populations of these objects, it is possible to make conclusions based on global properties. With this in mind I study the dense molecular clumps within one of the most massive GMCs in the Galaxy: the W51 GMC. New observations of the W51 GMC in the 12CO, 13CO and C18O (3-2) transitions using the HARP instrument on the JCMT are presented. With the help of the clump finding algorithm CLUMPFIND a total of 1575 dense clumps are identified of which 1130 are associated with the W51 GMC, yielding a dense mass reservoir of 1.5 × 10^5 M contained within these clumps. Of these clumps only 1% by number are found to be super-critical, yielding a super-critical clump formation efficiency of 0.5%, below current SFE estimates of the region. This indicates star formation within the W51 GMC will diminish over time although evidence from the first search for molecular outflows presents the W51 GMC in an active light with a lower limit of 14 outflows. The distribution of the outflows within the region searched found them concentrated towards the W51A region. Having much smaller sizes and masses, obtaining global properties of clumps and cores within IRDCs required studying a large sample of these objects. To do this pre-existing data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue was utilised to study IRDCs within a catalogues based on 8 μm data. This data identified

  3. Star Formation In Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs): X-Ray and Infrared Source Catalogs and Membership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Richert, Alexander J. W.; Ota, Yosuke [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kuhn, Michael A. [Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Gran Bretana 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaiso (Chile); Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, MAS (Chile); Bate, Matthew R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, Devon EX4 4SB (United Kingdom); Garmire, Gordon P. [Huntingdon Institute for X-Ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Star Formation in Nearby Clouds (SFiNCs) project is aimed at providing a detailed study of the young stellar populations and of star cluster formation in the nearby 22 star-forming regions (SFRs) for comparison with our earlier MYStIX survey of richer, more distant clusters. As a foundation for the SFiNCs science studies, here, homogeneous data analyses of the Chandra X-ray and Spitzer mid-infrared archival SFiNCs data are described, and the resulting catalogs of over 15,300 X-ray and over 1,630,000 mid-infrared point sources are presented. On the basis of their X-ray/infrared properties and spatial distributions, nearly 8500 point sources have been identified as probable young stellar members of the SFiNCs regions. Compared to the existing X-ray/mid-infrared publications, the SFiNCs member list increases the census of YSO members by 6%–200% for individual SFRs and by 40% for the merged sample of all 22 SFiNCs SFRs.

  4. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Synthetic Allophane and its Potential Formation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is a poorly-crystalline, hydrous aluminosilicate with variable Si/Al ratios approx.0.5-1 and a metastable precursor of clay minerals. On Earth, it forms rapidly by aqueous alteration of volcanic glass under neutral to slightly acidic conditions [1]. Based on in situ chemical measurements and the identification of alteration phases [2-4], the Martian surface is interpreted to have been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical models of altered surfaces detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater suggest the presence of an allophane-like alteration product [3]. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution models are primary tools for determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface [5]. Spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate a global compositional dichotomy, where high latitudes tend to be enriched in a high-silica material [6,7], interpreted as high-silica, K-rich volcanic glass [6,8]. However, later interpretations proposed that the high-silica material may be an alteration product (such as amorphous silica, clay minerals, or allophane) and that high latitude surfaces are chemically weathered [9-11]. A TIR spectral library of pure minerals is available for the public [12], but it does not contain allophane spectra. The identification of allophane on the Martian surface would indicate high water activity at the time of its formation and would help constrain the aqueous alteration environment [13,14]. The addition of allophane to the spectral library is necessary to address the global compositional dichotomy. In this study, we characterize a synthetic allophane by IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to create an IR emission spectrum of pure allophane for the Mars science community to use in Martian spectral models.

  5. Coronene and pyrene (5, 7)-member ring defects. Infrared spectra, energetics, and alternative formation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öttl, S.; Huber, S. E.; Kimeswenger, S.; Probst, M.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known today to be one of the carriers of the ubiquitous aromatic infrared (IR) bands. The IR spectra of many astrophysical objects show IR emission features derived from PAH molecules of different size. Space-based observations have shown that these IR emission features are omnipresent and can be found in most objects. However, some of the characteristics of the emitting population remain unclear. The emission bands show details that cannot be explained so far. These unidentified IR features require more laboratory and observational investigations. Aims: We present a theoretical study of the IR spectra of PAHs containing (5, 7)-member ring defects, focusing on pyrene (C16H10) and coronene (C24H12). Methods: Using density functional theory, we investigated the effects of these defects on the IR spectra of pyrene and coronene and their cations and anions. In addition, we explored parts of the potential energy surface of the neutral species and discuss alternative formation pathways. Results: The addition of (5, 7)-membered ring defects in pyrene and coronene results in a change of the IR spectra: both molecules lose their typical spectroscopic signature. We find shifts in the positions of the band as well as different intensities and an increase in the number of features. The boundaries in terms of the size of the PAHs exhibiting a (5, 7)-membered ring defect are studied and shown. Investigating the minimum energy pathway leads to a result of 8.21 eV for pyrene and 8.41 eV for coronene as the minimum activation barriers for the transformation from ground to defected state. Whereas pyrene retains some of its symmetry because of the symmetry exhibited by the Stone-Wales defect itself, coronene loses much more of its symmetry. The formation of these (5, 7)-ring defects in PAHs may be well supported in asymptotic giant branch stars or planetary nebulae. These environments strongly enable the transition from the ground

  6. Triggered star formation around mid-infrared bubbles in G8.14+0.23 H II region

    OpenAIRE

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.; Chakraborti, S.

    2012-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming (MSF) region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust ...

  7. STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES IN BARRED GALAXIES (SFB). I. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF NGC 7479

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhimin; Meng Xianmin; Wu Hong; Cao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale bars and minor mergers are important drivers for the secular evolution of galaxies. Based on ground-based optical images and spectra as well as ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present a multi-wavelength study of star formation properties in the barred galaxy NGC 7479, which also has obvious features of a minor merger. Using various tracers of star formation, we find that under the effects of both a stellar bar and a minor merger, star formation activity mainly takes place along the galactic bar and arms, while the star formation rate changes from the bar to the disk. With the help of spectral synthesis, we find that strong star formation took place in the bar region about 100 Myr ago, and the stellar bar might have been ∼10 Gyr old. By comparing our results with the secular evolutionary scenario from Jogee et al., we suggest that NGC 7479 is possibly in a transitional stage of secular evolution at present, and it may eventually become an earlier type galaxy or a luminous infrared galaxy. We also note that the probable minor merger event happened recently in NGC 7479, and we find two candidates for minor merger remnants.

  8. Thermal Imaging with Novel Infrared Focal Plane Arrays and Quantitative Analysis of Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Soibel, A.; Ting, D. Z.; Tidrow, Meimei

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a single long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) camera for thermography. This camera has been used to measure the temperature profile of patients. A pixel coregistered simultaneously reading mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR)/LWIR dual-band QWIP camera was developed to improve the accuracy of temperature measurements especially with objects with unknown emissivity. Even the dualband measurement can provide inaccurate results due to the fact that emissivity is a function of wavelength. Thus we have been developing a four-band QWIP camera for accurate temperature measurement of remote object.

  9. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Aggregation and Cluster Formation in Argon Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, J. E.; Allamondola, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier-transform mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 micron emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 micron emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  11. The Formation of Massive Stars: from Herschel to Near-Infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Persi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied a number of selected high mass star forming regions, including high resolution near-infrared broad- and narrow-band imaging, Herschel (70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm and Spitzer (3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 m images. The preliminary results of one of this region, IRAS 19388+2357(MOL110 are discussed. In this region a dense core has been detected in the far-infrared, and a young stellar cluster has been found around this core. Combining near-IR data with Spitzer and Herschel photometry we have derived the spectral energy distribution of Mol110. Finally comparing our H2 and Kc narrow-band images, we have found an H2 jet in this region.

  12. A MID-INFRARED VIEW OF THE HIGH MASS STAR FORMATION REGION W51A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, C. L. [Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica, R. dos Estados Unidos, Bairro das Nações, CEP 37504-364, Itajubá—MG (Brazil); Blum, R. D. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Damineli, A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, R. do Matão, 1226, Cid. Universitária, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Conti, P. S. [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Gusmão, D. M., E-mail: cassio.barbosa@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: rblum@noao.edu, E-mail: augusto.damineli@iag.usp.br, E-mail: pconti@jila.colorado.edu, E-mail: danilo@univap.br [IP and D—Universidade do Vale do Paraíba, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911. São José dos Campos, SP, 12244-000 (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the results of a mid-infrared study of G49.5-0.4, or W51A, part of the massive starbirth complex W51. Combining public data from the Spitzer IRAC camera, and Gemini mid-infrared camera T-ReCS at 7.73, 9.69, 12.33, and 24.56 μ m, with a spatial resolution of ∼0.″5, we have identified the mid-infrared counterparts of eight ultracompact H ii regions, showing that two radio sources are deeply embedded in molecular clouds and another is a cloud of ionized gas. From the T-ReCS data we have unveiled the central core of the W51 region, revealing massive young stellar candidates. We modeled the spectral energy distribution of the detected sources. The results suggest that the embedded objects are sources with spectral types ranging from B3 to O5, but the majority of the fits indicate stellar objects with B1 spectral types. We also present an extinction map of IRS 2, showing that a region with lower extinction corresponds to the region where a proposed jet of gas has impacted the foreground cloud. From this map, we also derived the total extinction toward the enigmatic source IRS 2E, which amounts to ∼60 mag in the V band. We calculated the color temperature due to thermal emission of the circumstellar dust of the detected sources; the temperatures are in the interval of ∼100–150 K, which corresponds to the emission of dust located at 0.1 pc from the central source. Finally, we show a possible mid-infrared counterpart of a detected source at millimeter wavelengths that was found by Zapata et al. to be a massive young stellar object undergoing a high accretion rate.

  13. Role of excipients in hydrate formation kinetics of theophylline in wet masses studied by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna C; Airaksinen, Sari; Karjalainen, Milja

    2004-01-01

    . Anhydrous theophylline was chosen as the hydrate-forming model drug compound and two excipients, silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) and alpha-lactose monohydrate, with different water absorbing properties, were used in formulation. An early stage of wet massing was studied with anhydrous...... theophylline and its 1:1 (w/w) mixtures with alpha-lactose monohydrate and SMCC with 0.1g/g of purified water. The changes in the state of water were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy, and the conversion of the crystal structure was verified using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). SMCC decreased...... the hydrate formation rate by absorbing water, but did not inhibit it. The results suggest that alpha-lactose monohydrate slightly increased the hydrate formation rate in comparison with a mass comprising only anhydrous theophylline....

  14. Time-resolved and spatially-resolved infrared spectroscopic observation of seeded nucleation controlling geopolymer gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimohammadi, Ailar; Provis, John L; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2011-05-15

    The effect of seeded nucleation on the formation and structural evolution of one-part ("just add water") geopolymer gels is investigated. Gel-forming systems are seeded with each of three different oxide nanoparticles, and seeding is shown to have an important role in controlling the silica release rate from the solid geothermal silica precursor, and in the development of physical properties of the gels. Nucleation accelerates the chemical changes taking place during geopolymer formation. The nature of the seeds affects the structure of the growing gel by affecting the extent of phase separation, identified by the presence of a distinct silica-rich gel in addition to the main, more alumina-rich gel phase. Synchrotron radiation-based infrared microscopy (SR-FTIR) shows the effect of nucleation on the heterogeneous nanostructure and microstructure of geopolymer gels, and is combined with data obtained by time-resolved FTIR analysis to provide a more holistic view of the reaction processes at a level of detail that has not previously been available. While spatially averaged (ATR-FTIR) infrared results show similar spectra for seeded and unseeded samples which have been cured for more than 3 weeks, SR-FTIR results show marked differences in gel structure as a result of seeding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Planck 2013 results. XXX. Cosmic infrared background measurements and implications for star formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2014-01-01

    spectrum anisotropies. The first approach takes advantage of the unique measurements by Planck at large angular scales, and models only the linear part of the power spectrum, with a mean bias of dark matter haloes hosting dusty galaxies at a given redshift weighted by their contribution to the emissivities....... The second approach is based on a model that associates star-forming galaxies with dark matter haloes and their subhaloes, using a parametrized relation between the dust-processed infrared luminosity and (sub-) halo mass. The two approaches simultaneously fit all auto-and cross-power spectra very well. We...

  16. The UK Infrared Telescope M 33 monitoring project - V. The star formation history across the galactic disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Atefeh; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh; Hamedani Golshan, Roya; Rashidi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared monitoring campaign at the UK Infrared Telescope of the Local Group spiral galaxy M 33 (Triangulum). On the basis of their variability, we have identified stars in the very final stage of their evolution, and for which the luminosity is more directly related to the birth mass than the more numerous less-evolved giant stars that continue to increase in luminosity. In this fifth paper of the series, we construct the birth mass function and hence derive the star formation history across the galactic disc of M 33. The star formation rate has varied between ˜0.010 ± 0.001 (˜0.012 ± 0.007) and 0.060±0.005 (0.052±0.009) M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 statistically (systematically) in the central square kiloparsec of M 33, comparable with the values derived previously with another camera. The total star formation rate in M 33 within a galactocentric radius of 14 kpc has varied between ˜0.110 ± 0.005 (˜0.174 ± 0.060) and ˜0.560 ± 0.028 (˜0.503 ± 0.100) M⊙ yr-1 statistically (systematically). We find evidence of two epochs during which the star formation rate was enhanced by a factor of a few - one that started ˜6 Gyr ago and lasted ˜3 Gyr and produced ≥71 per cent of the total mass in stars, and one ˜250 Myr ago that lasted ˜200 Myr and formed ≤13 per cent of the mass in stars. Radial star formation history profiles suggest that the inner disc of M 33 was formed in an inside-out formation scenario. The outskirts of the disc are dominated by the old population, which may be the result of dynamical effects over many Gyr. We find correspondence to spiral structure for all stars, but enhanced only for stars younger than ˜100 Myr; this suggests that the spiral arms are transient features and not a part of a global density wave potential.

  17. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  18. Effect of infrared heating on the formation of sesamol and quality of defatted flours from Sesamum indicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C Mahendra; Appu Rao, A G; Singh, Sridevi Annapurna

    2009-01-01

    Infrared (IR) heating offers several advantages over conventional heating in terms of heat transfer efficiency, compactness of equipment, and quality of the products. Roasting of sesame seeds degrades the lignan sesamolin to sesamol, which increases the oxidative stability of sesame oil synergistically with tocopherols. IR (near infrared, 1.1 to 1.3 microm, 6 kW power) roasting conditions were optimized for the conversion of sesamolin to sesamol. The resultant oil was evaluated for sesamol and tocopherol content as well as oxidative stability. The defatted flours were evaluated for their nutritional content and functionality. IR roasting of sesame seeds at 200 degrees C for 30 min increased the efficiency of conversion of sesamolin to sesamol (51% to 82%) compared to conventional heating. The gamma-tocopherol content decreased by 17% and 25% in oils treated at 200 and 220 degrees C for 30 min, respectively. There were no significant differences in the tocopherol content and oxidative stability of the oil. Methionine and cysteine content of the flours remained unchanged due to roasting. The functional properties of defatted flours obtained from either IR roasted or conventionally roasted sesame seeds remained the same. Practical Applications: Sesame oil is stable to oxidation compared to other vegetable oils. This stability can be attributed to the presence of tocopherols and the formation of sesamol, the thermal degradation product of sesamolin-a lignan present in sesame. Roasting of sesame seeds before oil extraction increases sesamol content which is a more potent antioxidant than the parent molecule. The conversion efficiency of sesamolin to sesamol is increased by 31% by infrared roasting of seeds compared to electric drum roasting. This can be used industrially to obtain roasted oil with greater oxidative stability.

  19. Study of inclusion complex formation between tropaeolin OO and beta-cyclodextrin by spectrophotometry and Infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai You; Han, Juan; Feng, Xia Guang; Pang, Yan Ling

    2006-09-01

    The mechanism of the inclusion of tropaeolin OO (TPOO) and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) has been studied by spectrophotometry. The inclusion depth of the guest molecule in the host molecule was demonstrated by infrared spectrometry. Effect of the pH, concentrations of beta-CD, solvents and ionic strength on the inclusion of TPOO and beta-CD were examined. The result showed that TPOO reacts with beta-CD to form a 1:1 host-guest complex with an apparent formation constant of 1.50 x 10(3) l mol(-1). The thermodynamic parameters of inclusion reaction, DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees were obtained.

  20. Triggered Star Formation around Mid-infrared Bubbles in the G8.14+0.23 H II Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.; Chakraborti, S.

    2012-09-01

    Mid-infrared shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material along the bubbles and the 12CO(J = 3-2) velocity map reveals that the molecular gas in the bubbles is physically associated around the G8.14+0.23 region. We have detected 244 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region and about 37% of these YSOs occur in clusters. Interestingly, these YSO clusters are associated with the collected material on the edges of the bubbles. We have found good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the kinematical timescale of bubbles (from the 12CO(J = 3-2) line data) with the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain possible "collect and collapse" process around the G8.14+0.23 region. However, one cannot entirely rule out the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave. We have also found two massive embedded YSOs (about 10 and 22 M ⊙) which are associated with the dense fragmented clump at the interface of the bubbles. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these two young massive embedded YSOs in the G8.14+0.23 region.

  1. YSOVAR: MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY AMONG YSOs IN THE STAR FORMATION REGION GGD12-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, Scott J.; Günther, H. Moritz; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Forbrich, J. [Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cody, A. M. [NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-5 Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gutermuth, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hillenbrand, L. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Plavchan, P. [Department of Physics Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States); Covey, K. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA 98225-9164 (United States); Song, Inseok, E-mail: swolk@cfa.harvard.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    We present an IR-monitoring survey with the Spitzer Space Telescope of the star-forming region GGD 12-15. More than 1000 objects were monitored, including about 350 objects within the central 5′, which is found to be especially dense in cluster members. The monitoring took place over 38 days and is part of the Young Stellar Object VARiability project. The region was also the subject of a contemporaneous 67 ks Chandra observation. The field includes 119 previously identified pre-main sequence star candidates. X-rays are detected from 164 objects, 90 of which are identified with cluster members. Overall, we find that about half the objects in the central 5′ are young stellar objects (YSOs) based on a combination of their spectral energy distribution, IR variability, and X-ray emission. Most of the stars with IR excess relative to a photosphere show large amplitude (>0.1 mag) mid-infrared (mid-IR) variability. There are 39 periodic sources, and all but one is found to be a cluster member. Almost half of the periodic sources do not show IR excesses. Overall, more than 85% of the Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II sources are found to vary. The amplitude of the variability is larger in more embedded YSOs. Most of the Class I/II objects exhibit redder colors in a fainter state, which is compatible with time-variable extinction. A few become bluer when fainter, which can be explained with significant changes in the structure of the inner disk. A search for changes in the IR due to X-ray events is carried out, but the low number of flares prevented an analysis of the direct impact of X-ray flares on the IR light curves. However, we find that X-ray detected Class II sources have longer timescales for change in the MIR than a similar set of non-X-ray detected Class IIs.

  2. Face recognition in the thermal infrared domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, M.; Grudzień, A.; Palka, N.; Szustakowski, M.

    2017-10-01

    Biometrics refers to unique human characteristics. Each unique characteristic may be used to label and describe individuals and for automatic recognition of a person based on physiological or behavioural properties. One of the most natural and the most popular biometric trait is a face. The most common research methods on face recognition are based on visible light. State-of-the-art face recognition systems operating in the visible light spectrum achieve very high level of recognition accuracy under controlled environmental conditions. Thermal infrared imagery seems to be a promising alternative or complement to visible range imaging due to its relatively high resistance to illumination changes. A thermal infrared image of the human face presents its unique heat-signature and can be used for recognition. The characteristics of thermal images maintain advantages over visible light images, and can be used to improve algorithms of human face recognition in several aspects. Mid-wavelength or far-wavelength infrared also referred to as thermal infrared seems to be promising alternatives. We present the study on 1:1 recognition in thermal infrared domain. The two approaches we are considering are stand-off face verification of non-moving person as well as stop-less face verification on-the-move. The paper presents methodology of our studies and challenges for face recognition systems in the thermal infrared domain.

  3. The Ultraviolet and Infrared Star Formation Rates of Compact Group Galaxies: An Expanded Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkic, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Cardiff, Ann H.; Durell, Pat R.

    2016-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 m photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 m photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-red), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-blue) have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in Hi-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M yr1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  4. The onset of massive star formation: The evolution of temperature and density structure in an infrared dark cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battersby, Cara [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Darling, Jeremy [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Longmore, Steve [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Dunham, Miranda [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present new NH{sub 3} (1, 1), (2, 2), and (4, 4) observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array compiled with work in the literature to explore the range of conditions observed in young, massive star-forming regions. To sample the effects of evolution independent from those of distance/resolution, abundance, and large-scale environment, we compare clumps in different evolutionary stages within a single infrared dark cloud (IRDC), G32.02+0.06. We find that the early stages of clustered star formation are characterized by dense, parsec-scale filamentary structures interspersed with complexes of dense cores (<0.1 pc cores clustered in complexes separated by ∼1 pc) with masses from about 10 to 100 M {sub ☉}. The most quiescent core is the most extended while the star forming cores are denser and more compact, showing very similar column density structure before and shortly after the onset of massive star formation, with peak surface densities Σ ≳ 1 g cm{sup –2}. Quiescent cores and filaments show smoothly varying temperatures from 10 to 20 K, rising to over 40 K in star-forming cores. We calculate virial parameters for 16 cores and find that the level of support provided by turbulence is generally insufficient to support them against gravitational collapse ((α{sub vir}) ∼ 0.6). The star-forming filaments show smooth velocity fields, punctuated by discontinuities at the sites of active star formation. We discuss the massive molecular filament (M ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}, length >60 pc) hosting the IRDC, hypothesizing that it may have been shaped by previous generations of massive stars.

  5. MAPPING SPATIAL/TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF GREEN MACROALGAE IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST COASTAL ESTUARY VIA SMALL FORMAT COLOR INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A small format 35 mm hand-held camera with color infrared slide film was used to map blooms of benthic green macroalgae upon mudflats of Yaquina Bay estuary on the central Oregon coast, U.S.A. Oblique photographs were taken during a series of low tide events, when the intertidal...

  6. Infrared microscopy imaging applied to obtain the index finger pad's thermoregulation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viafora, Laura A.; Torres, Sergio N.; Ramírez, Wagner; Gutiérrez, Pablo A.; Machuca, Guillermo; Jara, Anselmo

    2017-03-01

    In this work, mid wavelength infrared microscopy imaging videos of several index finger pads, from voluntary people, are recorded to obtain their thermoregulation curves. The proposed non-invasive technique is able to capture spatial and temporal thermal information emitted from blood vessels under-skin, and the irrigation finger pad system, making possible to capture features that a visual-spectrum microscopy cannot detect. Using an infrared laboratory prepared method several voluntary patients exposed theirs fingers to thermal stress while the infrared data is recorded. Using standard infrared imaging and signal processing techniques the thermoregulation curves are estimated. The Cold/Hot Stress experiments have shown infrared data with exponential trend curves, with different recovering slopes for each voluntary person, and sometimes with two steps increasing slope in one person thermoregulation curve response.

  7. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lisenfeld, U. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bitsakis, T. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guillard, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-Sud XI, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Charmandaris, V. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T. [Astrophysics Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Dept of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, 7701, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Freeland, E. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Rasmussen, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Verdes-Montenegro, L. [Departamento Astronomía Extragaláctica, Instituto Astrofísica Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Yun, M., E-mail: kalatalo@ipac.caltech.edu [University of Massachusetts, Astronomy Department, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  8. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T.; Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Freeland, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Yun, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L FIR and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H 2 emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  9. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF THE QUIESCENT MEDIUM OF NEARBY CLOUDS. I. ICE FORMATION AND GRAIN GROWTH IN LUPUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogert, A. C. A. [IPAC, NASA Herschel Science Center, Mail Code 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Knez, C.; Mundy, L. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Öberg, K. I. [Departments of Chemistry and Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Pendleton, Y. J. [Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Van Dishoeck, E. F., E-mail: aboogert@ipac.caltech.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-11-01

    Infrared photometry and spectroscopy (1-25 μm) of background stars reddened by the Lupus molecular cloud complex are used to determine the properties of grains and the composition of ices before they are incorporated into circumstellar envelopes and disks. H{sub 2}O ices form at extinctions of A{sub K} = 0.25 ± 0.07 mag (A{sub V} = 2.1 ± 0.6). Such a low ice formation threshold is consistent with the absence of nearby hot stars. Overall, the Lupus clouds are in an early chemical phase. The abundance of H{sub 2}O ice (2.3 ± 0.1 × 10{sup –5} relative to N{sub H}) is typical for quiescent regions, but lower by a factor of three to four compared to dense envelopes of young stellar objects. The low solid CH{sub 3}OH abundance (<3%-8% relative to H{sub 2}O) indicates a low gas phase H/CO ratio, which is consistent with the observed incomplete CO freeze out. Furthermore it is found that the grains in Lupus experienced growth by coagulation. The mid-infrared (>5 μm) continuum extinction relative to A{sub K} increases as a function of A{sub K}. Most Lupus lines of sight are well fitted with empirically derived extinction curves corresponding to R{sub V} ∼ 3.5 (A{sub K} = 0.71) and R{sub V} ∼ 5.0 (A{sub K} = 1.47). For lines of sight with A{sub K} > 1.0 mag, the τ{sub 9.7}/A{sub K} ratio is a factor of two lower compared to the diffuse medium. Below 1.0 mag, values scatter between the dense and diffuse medium ratios. The absence of a gradual transition between diffuse and dense medium-type dust indicates that local conditions matter in the process that sets the τ{sub 9.7}/A{sub K} ratio. This process is likely related to grain growth by coagulation, as traced by the A{sub 7.4}/A{sub K} continuum extinction ratio, but not to ice mantle formation. Conversely, grains acquire ice mantles before the process of coagulation starts.

  10. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .5. Spectral energy distributions, starburst models and star formation history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowan Robinson, M.; Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    the star formation rate can be deduced from the far-infrared luminosity, and derive star formation rates for these galaxies of 8-1000 phi M. yr(-1), where phi takes account of the uncertainty in the initial mass function, The HDF galaxies detected by ISO are clearly forming stars at, a prodigious rate...... compared with nearby normal galaxies, We discuss the implications of our detections for the history of star and heavy element formation in the Universe, Although uncertainties in the calibration, reliability of source detection, associations and starburst models remain, it is clear that dust plays...

  11. STAR FORMATION IN THE MASSIVE ''STARLESS'' INFRARED DARK CLOUD G0.253+0.016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: lrodriguez@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: lzapata@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2013-04-10

    G0.253+0.016 is a remarkable massive infrared dark cloud located within {approx}100 pc of the galactic center. With a high mass of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, a compact average radius of {approx}2.8 pc, and a low dust temperature of 23 K, it has been believed to be a yet starless precursor to a massive Arches-like stellar cluster. We present sensitive JVLA 1.3 and 5.6 cm radio continuum observations that reveal the presence of three compact thermal radio sources projected against this cloud. These radio sources are interpreted as H II regions powered by {approx}B0.5 zero-age main sequence stars. We conclude that although G0.253+0.016 does not show evidence of O-type star formation, there are certainly early B-type stars embedded in it. We detect three more sources in the periphery of G0.253+0.016 with non-thermal spectral indices. We suggest that these sources may be related to the galactic center region and deserve further study.

  12. Using THEMIS thermal infrared observations of rays from Corinto crater to study secondary crater formation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Corinto crater (16.95°N, 141.72°E), a 13.8 km diameter crater in Elysium Planitia, displays dramatic rays in Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) nighttime infrared imagery where high concentrations of secondary craters have altered the thermophysical properties of the martian surface. The THEMIS observations provide a record of secondary crater formation in the region and ray segments are identified up to 2000 km ( 145 crater radii) distance [1][2]. Secondary craters are likely to have the largest influence on model surfaces ages between 0.1 to a few Myr as there is the potential for one or two sizeable craters to project secondary craters onto those surfaces and thus alter the crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) with an instantaneous spike in crater production [3]. Corinto crater is estimated to be less than a few Ma [4] placing the formation of its secondaries within this formative time period. Secondary craters superposed on relatively young impact craters that predate Corinto provide observations of the secondary crater populations. Crater counts at 520 and 660 km distance from Corinto (38 and 48 crater radii respectively), were conducted. Higher crater densities were observed within ray segments, however secondary craters still influenced the CSFD where ray segments were not apparent, resulting in steepening in the CSFD. Randomness analysis confirms an increase in clustering as diameters decrease suggesting an increasing fraction of secondary craters at smaller diameters, both within the ray and outside. The counts demonstrate that even at nearly 50 crater radii, Corinto secondaries still influence the observed CSFD, even outside of any obvious rays. Crater populations used to derive model ages on many geologically young regions on Mars, such as glacial and periglacial landforms related to obliquity excursions that occur on 106 - 107 yr cycles, should be used cautiously and analyzed for any evidence, either morphologic or

  13. GROUND-BASED Paα NARROW-BAND IMAGING OF LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. I. STAR FORMATION RATES AND SURFACE DENSITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateuchi, Ken; Konishi, Masahiro; Motohara, Kentaro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kato, Natsuko Mitani; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Todo, Soya; Toshikawa, Koji; Sako, Shigeyuki; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Ohsawa, Ryou; Asano, Kentaro; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Okada, Kazushi [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ita, Yoshifusa [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Komugi, Shinya [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 2665-1, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Koshida, Shintaro [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Manabe, Sho [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Nakashima, Asami, E-mail: tateuchi@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are enshrouded by a large amount of dust produced by their active star formation, and it is difficult to measure their activity in optical wavelengths. We have carried out Paα narrow-band imaging observations of 38 nearby star forming galaxies including 33 LIRGs listed in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample catalog with the Atacama Near InfraRed camera on the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 1.0 m telescope (miniTAO). Star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from the Paα fluxes, corrected for dust extinction using the Balmer decrement method (typically A{sub V} ∼ 4.3 mag), show a good correlation with those from the bolometric infrared luminosity of the IRAS data within a scatter of 0.27 dex. This suggests that the correction of dust extinction for the Paα flux is sufficient in our sample. We measure the physical sizes and surface densities of infrared luminosities (Σ{sub L(IR)}) and the SFR (Σ{sub SFR}) of star forming regions for individual galaxies, and we find that most of the galaxies follow a sequence of local ultra-luminous or luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) on the L(IR)-Σ{sub L(IR)} and SFR-Σ{sub SFR} plane. We confirm that a transition of the sequence from normal galaxies to U/LIRGs is seen at L(IR) = 8 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}. Also, we find that there is a large scatter in physical size, different from normal galaxies or ULIRGs. Considering the fact that most U/LIRGs are merging or interacting galaxies, this scatter may be caused by strong external factors or differences in their merging stages.

  14. Extragalactic infrared astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1985-05-01

    The paper concerns the field of Extragalactic Infrared Astronomy, discussed at the Fourth RAL Workshop on Astronomy and Astrophysics. Fifteen papers were presented on infrared emission from extragalactic objects. Both ground-(and aircraft-) based and IRAS infrared data were reviewed. The topics covered star formation in galaxies, active galactic nuclei and cosmology. (U.K.)

  15. Star formation in the inner galaxy: A far-infrared and radio study of two H2 regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. F.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Werner, M. W.; Harvey, P. M.; Evans, N. J., II; Brown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Far-infrared and radio continuum maps have been made of the central 6' of the inner-galaxy H II regions G30.8-0.0 (in the W43 complex) and G25.4-02., along with radio and molecular line measurements at selected positions. An effort is made to understand far infrared wavelingths allow the dust temperature structures and total far infrared fluxes to be determined. Comparison of the radio and infrared maps shows a close relationship between the ionized gas and the infrared-emitting material. There is evidence that parts of G30.8 are substantially affected by extinction, even at far-infrared wavelengths. For G25.4-0.2, the radio recombination line and CO line data permit resolution of the distance ambiguity for this source. The confusion in distance determination is found to result from an extraordinary near-superposition of two bright H II regions. Using revised distances of 4.3 kpc for G26.4SE and 12 kpc for G25.4NW, that the latter, which is apparently the fainter of the two sources, is actually the more luminous. Though it is not seen on the Palomar Sky Survey, G25.4SE is easily visible in the 9532A line of S III and is mapped in this line. The ratio of total luminosity to ionizing luminosity is very similar to that of H II regions in the solar circle. Assuming a coeval population of ionizing stars, a normal initial mass function is indicated.

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  17. Understanding the formation and evolution of early-type galaxies based on newly developed single-burst stellar population synthesis models in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeck, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    whole optical and infrared wavelength range between 3500 and 50000Å which are almost completely based on spectra of observed stars (apart from two gaps which were fitted with theoretical stellar spectra) . We analyze the behaviour of the near-infrared (J - K) and the Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour calculated from our models. For ages older than 3 Gyr, both colours depend only slightly on age and metallicity. However, for younger ages, both colours become redder which is caused by the asymptotic giant branch stars contributing significantly to the light in the infrared at ages between 0.1 and 3 Gyr. Furthermore, we find a satisfactory agreement between the optical and near-infrared colours measured from our models and the colours observed from various samples of globular clusters and early-type x galaxies. However, our model predictions are only able to reproduce correctly the Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colours of older, more massive galaxies that resemble a single-burst population. Younger, less massive and more metal-poor galaxies show redder colours than our models. This mismatch can be explained by a more extended star formation history of these galaxies which includes a metal-poor or/and young population. The Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colours derived from our models also agree very well with those from most other models available in this wavelength range as long as they also correctly take into account a strong CO absorption band situated at 4.5 μm. The model predictions for colours in the near-infrared, such as (J - K), differ more between the different sets of models, depending on the underlying prescriptions for the asymptotic giant branch stellar evolutionary phase. Compared to other authors, we adopt only a moderate contribution of asymptotic giant branch stars to our models. Our stellar population models allow us also to determine mass-to-light ratios in different infrared bands. Consequently, we can confirm that the massto- light ratio determined in the Spitzer [3

  18. STAR-FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF W–R 1503-160L STAR IN THE MID-INFRARED BUBBLE N46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Janardhan, P.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used 13 CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ∼4 × 10 37 erg s 1 . A deviation of the H -band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ∼18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H 2 ) ∼9.2 × 10 22 cm 2 and A V ∼ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (∼1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (∼4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  19. STAR-FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF W–R 1503-160L STAR IN THE MID-INFRARED BUBBLE N46

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Janardhan, P. [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad—380 009 (India); Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Luna, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis Enrique Erro #1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, C.P. 72840, México (Mexico); Zinchenko, I., E-mail: lokeshd@prl.res.in [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-20

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used {sup 13}CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ∼4 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup 1}. A deviation of the H -band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ∼18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H{sub 2}) ∼9.2 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup 2} and A{sub V} ∼ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (∼1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (∼4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  20. A CHANDRA PERSPECTIVE ON GALAXY-WIDE X-RAY BINARY EMISSION AND ITS CORRELATION WITH STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS: NEW RESULTS FROM LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Jenkins, L. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Goulding, A. D.; Roberts, T. P.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Ptak, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations that complete a sample of seventeen (17) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with D H ∼ 20 cm -2 . The LIRGs in our sample have total infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities in the range of L IR ∼ (1-8) x 10 11 L sun . The high-resolution imaging and X-ray spectral information from our Chandra observations allow us to measure separately X-ray contributions from active galactic nuclei and normal galaxy processes (e.g., X-ray binaries and hot gas). We utilized total infrared plus UV luminosities to estimate star formation rates (SFRs) and K-band luminosities and optical colors to estimate stellar masses (M * ) for the sample. Under the assumption that the galaxy-wide 2-10 keV luminosity (L gal HX ) traces the combined emission from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low-mass X-ray binaries, and that the power output from these components is linearly correlated with SFR and M * , respectively, we constrain the relation L gal HX = αM * + βSFR. To achieve this, we construct a Chandra-based data set composed of our new LIRG sample combined with additional samples of less actively star-forming normal galaxies and more powerful LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) from the literature. Using these data, we measure best-fit values of α = (9.05 ± 0.37) x 10 28 erg s -1 M -1 sun and β = (1.62 ± 0.22) x 10 39 erg s -1 (M sun yr -1 ) -1 . This scaling provides a more physically meaningful estimate of L gal HX , with ∼0.1-0.2 dex less scatter, than a direct linear scaling with SFR. Our results suggest that HMXBs dominate the galaxy-wide X-ray emission for galaxies with SFR/M * ∼>5.9 x 10 -11 yr -1 , a factor of ∼2.9 times lower than previous estimates. We find that several of the most powerful LIRGs and ULIRGs, with SFR/M * ∼> 10 -9 yr -1 , appear to be X-ray underluminous with respect to our best-fit relation. We argue that these galaxies are likely to contain X-ray binaries residing in compact star-forming regions

  1. A PAT approach for the on-line monitoring of pharmaceutical co-crystals formation with near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraguça, Mafalda C; Ribeiro, Paulo R S; Santos, Adenilson O; Silva, Marta C D; Lopes, João A

    2014-08-25

    Cocrystals represent a class of crystalline solids consisting of two or more molecular species usually held together by non-covalent bonds. Pharmaceutical cocrystals can alter the physicochemical properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to improve solubility, dissolution rate, particle properties and stability. This work presents a process analytical technology (PAT) approach to monitor on-line the cocrystallization of furosemide and adenine by solvent evaporation using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Furosemide and adenine were added to a small volume of methanol in a beaker and stirred on an orbital stirring table during 8h at room temperature. The on-line monitoring was performed with a FT-NIR spectrometer fitted with a reflectance fiber optic probe. Monitoring was performed with the probe tip placed 1cm above the cocrystallization medium to avoid interference with the cocrystallization process. Cocrystals were vacuum dried to remove residual solvent and characterized off-line by NIRS, MIRS, DSC and XRPD. Results demonstrate that it was possible to follow the main cocrystallization events on-line. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling Microalgal Biosediment Formation Based on Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogburn, Zachary L; Vogt, Frank

    2018-03-01

    With increasing amounts of anthropogenic pollutants being released into ecosystems, it becomes ever more important to understand their fate and interactions with living organisms. Microalgae play an important ecological role as they are ubiquitous in marine environments and sequester inorganic pollutants which they transform into organic biomass. Of particular interest in this study is their role as a sink for atmospheric CO 2 , a greenhouse gas, and nitrate, one cause of harmful algal blooms. Novel chemometric hard-modeling methodologies have been developed for interpreting phytoplankton's chemical and physiological adaptations to changes in their growing environment. These methodologies will facilitate investigations of environmental impacts of anthropogenic pollutants on chemical and physiological properties of marine microalgae (here: Nannochloropsis oculata). It has been demonstrated that attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy can gain insights into both and this study only focuses on the latter. From time-series of spectra, the rate of microalgal biomass settling on top of a horizontal ATR element is derived which reflects several of phytoplankton's physiological parameters such as growth rate, cell concentrations, cell size, and buoyancy. In order to assess environmental impacts on such parameters, microalgae cultures were grown under 25 different chemical scenarios covering 200-600 ppm atmospheric CO 2 and 0.35-0.75 mM dissolved NO 3 - . After recording time-series of ATR FT-IR spectra, a multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm extracted spectroscopic and time profiles from each data set. From the time profiles, it was found that in the considered concentration ranges only NO 3 - has an impact on the cells' physiological properties. In particular, the cultures' growth rate has been influenced by the ambient chemical conditions. Thus, the presented spectroscopic

  3. High mass star formation to the extremes: NGC 3603 at high angular resolution in the near-infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberger, Dieter E A

    2008-01-01

    High angular resolution observations play a decisive role for our understanding of high mass star formation processes, both within our Galaxy and in extragalactic starburst regions. We take the Galactic starburst template NGC 3603 as paradigm and report here on high angular resolution JHK s L' observations of the enigmatic, highly reddened sources IRS 9A-C in the NGC 3603 region, which were performed with NACO at ESO's Very Large Telescope Yepun. These broad-band imaging data strongly support the classification of IRS 9A-C as high mass protostellar candidates. We also confirm unambiguously the membership of IRS 9A-C with the NGC 3603 region as gas and dust is seen to be stripped off from their circumstellar envelopes by strong stellar winds, originating from the high mass main sequence stars of the nearby OB cluster. The orientation of these gas and dust streamers coincides with that of a very faint, only marginally detected mini-pillar protruding from the adjacent molecular clump NGC 3603 MM 2. The L' data show extended envelopes around IRS 9A-C and reveal sub-structures therein which are indicative for non-spherically distributed material. It seems obvious that protostellar mass outflows are at work to clear cavities along the polar axes of the central protostar, and / or that circumstellar disks are taking shape.

  4. High mass star formation to the extremes: NGC 3603 at high angular resolution in the near-infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuernberger, Dieter E A [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)], E-mail: dnuernbe@eso.org

    2008-10-15

    High angular resolution observations play a decisive role for our understanding of high mass star formation processes, both within our Galaxy and in extragalactic starburst regions. We take the Galactic starburst template NGC 3603 as paradigm and report here on high angular resolution JHK{sub s}L' observations of the enigmatic, highly reddened sources IRS 9A-C in the NGC 3603 region, which were performed with NACO at ESO's Very Large Telescope Yepun. These broad-band imaging data strongly support the classification of IRS 9A-C as high mass protostellar candidates. We also confirm unambiguously the membership of IRS 9A-C with the NGC 3603 region as gas and dust is seen to be stripped off from their circumstellar envelopes by strong stellar winds, originating from the high mass main sequence stars of the nearby OB cluster. The orientation of these gas and dust streamers coincides with that of a very faint, only marginally detected mini-pillar protruding from the adjacent molecular clump NGC 3603 MM 2. The L' data show extended envelopes around IRS 9A-C and reveal sub-structures therein which are indicative for non-spherically distributed material. It seems obvious that protostellar mass outflows are at work to clear cavities along the polar axes of the central protostar, and / or that circumstellar disks are taking shape.

  5. The evolution of and starburst-agn connection in luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies and their link to globular cluster formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Stephanie Lynn

    The evolutionary connection between nuclear starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN) in luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs; 1011 diagrams. I show that for the U/LIRGs in my sample the properties that describe their nuclear starbursts and AGN (e.g. star formation rate (SFR), L[O III], optical D parameter, D4000, and EW(Hdelta)) are independent of one another, ensuring that no biases affect correlations between these properties and objects' locations on the BPT diagrams. I then derive evolutionary paths on the BPT diagram involving [N II]/Halpha that are based on how these properties vary between two U/LIRGs positioned at the end-points. The paths involve U/LIRGs that decrease in SFR and increase in AGN activity. Paths with U/LIRGs that evolve into high luminosity AGN likely do so due to recent, strong starbursts. Second, to study how the properties of the IR power sources in U/LIRGs vary, I use a combination of photometric data points that I carefully measure (using photometry from SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and Spitzer) and that I retrieve from catalogues (IRAS, AKARI, and ISO) to perform UV to FIR SED-fitting with CIGALE (Code Investigating GALaxy Emission) for 34 U/LIRGs from the IRAS 2 Jy Redshift Survey with 0.01 125 Myr) agree with previous results, while those with younger starbursts show a large dispersion in Mstar. I conclude that this is supporting evidence that the star formation histories and timescales at which the IR power sources in U/LIRGs evolve are responsible for the scatter found for the SFR-Mstar relationship. U/LIRGs that form from merging gas-rich disk galaxies could also represent a stage of galaxy evolution involving heavy formation of globular clusters (GCs). It has been suggested that a large number of stellar clusters form during the merging of two gas-rich disk galaxies, leading to open and young massive clusters with the latter likely evolving into GCs. Furthering our understanding of GC formation can uncover the connection between GCs and

  6. Effects of water-filtered infrared-A and of heat on cell death, inflammation, antioxidative potential and of free radical formation in viable skin--first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Pittermann, Wolfgang; Müller, Werner; Jung, Katinka; Kelleher, Debra K; Herrling, Thomas; Meffert, Peter; Uebelhack, Ralf; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    The effects of water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) and of convective heat on viability, inflammation, inducible free radicals and antioxidative power were investigated in natural and viable skin using the ex vivo Bovine Udder System (BUS) model. Therefore, skin samples from differently treated parts of the udder of a healthy cow were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measurement and by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Neither cell viability, the inflammation status, the radical status or the antioxidative defence systems of the skin were significantly affected by wIRA applied within 30 min by using an irradiance of 1900 W m(-2) which is of relevance for clinical use, but which exceeded the maximum solar IR-A irradiance at the Earth's surface more than 5 times and which resulted in a skin surface temperature of about 45 °C without cooling and of about 37 °C with convective cooling by air ventilation. No significant effects on viability and on inflammation were detected when convective heat was applied alone under equivalent conditions in terms of the resulting skin surface temperatures and exposure time. As compared with untreated skin, free radical formation was almost doubled, whereas the antioxidative power was reduced to about 50% after convective heating to about 45 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .5. Spectral energy distributions, starburst models and star formation history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowan Robinson, M.; Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We have modelled the spectral energy distributions of the 13 Hubble Deep Field (HDF) galaxies reliably detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For two galaxies the emission detected by ISO is consistent with being starlight or the infrared 'cirrus' in the galaxies. For the remaining II...

  8. Optimized mid-infrared thermal emitters for applications in aircraft countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón G. Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an optimized aperiodic multilayer structure capable of broad angle and high temperature thermal emission over the 3 μm to 5 μm atmospheric transmission band. This aperiodic multilayer structure composed of alternating layers of silicon carbide and graphite on top of a tungsten substrate exhibits near maximal emittance in a 2 μm wavelength range centered in the mid-wavelength infrared band traditionally utilized for atmospheric transmission. We optimize the layer thicknesses using a hybrid optimization algorithm coupled to a transfer matrix code to maximize the power emitted in this mid-infrared range normal to the structure’s surface. We investigate possible applications for these structures in mimicking 800–1000 K aircraft engine thermal emission signatures and in improving countermeasure effectiveness against hyperspectral imagers. We find these structures capable of matching the Planck blackbody curve in the selected infrared range with relatively sharp cutoffs on either side, leading to increased overall efficiency of the structures. Appropriately optimized multilayer structures with this design could lead to matching a variety of mid-infrared thermal emissions. For aircraft countermeasure applications, this method could yield a flare design capable of mimicking engine spectra and breaking the lock of hyperspectral imaging systems.

  9. Infrared thermography

    CERN Document Server

    Meola, Carosena

    2012-01-01

    This e-book conveys information about basic IRT theory, infrared detectors, signal digitalization and applications of infrared thermography in many fields such as medicine, foodstuff conservation, fluid-dynamics, architecture, anthropology, condition monitoring, non destructive testing and evaluation of materials and structures.

  10. Quantum efficiency investigations of type-II InAs/GaSb midwave infrared superlattice photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giard, E., E-mail: edouard.giard@onera.fr; Ribet-Mohamed, I.; Jaeck, J.; Viale, T.; Haïdar, R. [ONERA, DOTA, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Taalat, R.; Delmas, M.; Rodriguez, J.-B.; Christol, P. [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, UMR-CNRS 5214, Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Steveler, E.; Bardou, N. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN-CNRS), Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Boulard, F. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 Avenue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-28

    We present in this paper a comparison between different type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) photodiodes and focal plane array (FPA) in the mid-wavelength infrared domain to understand which phenomenon drives the performances of the T2SL structure in terms of quantum efficiency (QE). Our measurements on test photodiodes suggest low minority carrier diffusion length in the “InAs-rich” design, which penalizes carriers' collection in this structure for low bias voltage and front side illumination. This analysis is completed by a comparison of the experimental data with a fully analytic model, which allows to infer a hole diffusion length shorter than 100 nm. In addition, measurements on a FPA with backside illumination are finally presented. Results show an average QE in the 3–4.7 μm window equal to 42% for U{sub bias} = −0.1 V, 77 K operating temperature and no anti-reflection coating. These measurements, completed by modulation transfer function and noise measurements, reveal that the InAs-rich design, despite a low hole diffusion length, is promising for high performance infrared imaging applications.

  11. A HERSCHEL SURVEY OF THE [N II] 205 {mu}m LINE IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: THE [N II] 205 {mu}m EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin; Lord, S.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Mazzarella, J.; Schulz, B. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Isaak, K. G. [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and ITCP, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Diaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Iwasawa, K. [ICREA and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Leech, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Petric, A. O. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sanders, D. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Van der Werf, P. P., E-mail: yhzhao@ipac.caltech.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, PO Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    We present, for the first time, a statistical study of [N II] 205 {mu}m line emission for a large sample of local luminous infrared galaxies using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) data. For our sample of galaxies, we investigate the correlation between the [N II] luminosity (L{sub [N{sub II]}}) and the total infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}), as well as the dependence of L{sub [N{sub II]}}/L{sub IR} ratio on L{sub IR}, far-infrared colors (IRAS f{sub 60}/f{sub 100}), and the [O III] 88 {mu}m to [N II] luminosity ratio. We find that L{sub [N{sub II]}} correlates almost linearly with L{sub IR} for non-active galactic nucleus galaxies (all having L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) in our sample, which implies that L{sub [N{sub II]}} can serve as a star formation rate tracer which is particularly useful for high-redshift galaxies that will be observed with forthcoming submillimeter spectroscopic facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Our analysis shows that the deviation from the mean L{sub [N{sub II]}}-L{sub IR} relation correlates with tracers of the ionization parameter, which suggests that the scatter in this relation is mainly due to the variations in the hardness, and/or ionization parameter, of the ambient galactic UV field among the sources in our sample.

  12. Infrared Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Diatek Corporation, San Diego, CA and the Jet Propulsion Lab developed the Diatek Model 7000 aural thermometer which weighs only eight ounces, and measures temperature in less than two seconds using infrared astronomy technology to measure the amount of infrared energy emitted by the eardrum (the same way temperature of stars and planets is measured). This method avoids contact with mucous membranes, virtually eliminating the possibility of cross infection, and permits temperature measurement of newborn, critically ill, or incapacitated patients. Diatek Corporation was purchased by Welch Allyn Inc. The Diatek Model 7000 is now marketed as SureTemp.

  13. Two-dimensional network formation of cardiac myocytes in agar microculture chip with 1480 nm infrared laser photo-thermal etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kensuke; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2003-11-01

    We have developed a new method that enables agar microstructures to be used to cultivate cells and that allows cell network patterns to be controlled. The method makes use of non-contact three-dimensional photo-thermal etching with a 1480 nm infrared focused laser beam, which is strongly absorbed by water and agar gel, to form the shapes of agar microstructures. It allows microstructures to be easily formed in an agar layer within a few minutes, with cell-culture holes formed by the spot heating of a 100 mW laser and tunnels by the tracing of a 100 microm s(-1), 40 mW laser. We cultivated rat cardiac myocytes in adjacent microstructures and observed synchronized beating in them 90 min after they had made physical contact. Our results indicate that the system can make and use microstructures for cell-network cultivation in a minimal amount of time without any expensive microfabrication facilities or complicated procedures.

  14. The infrared retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    As infrared imaging systems have evolved from the first generation of linear devices to the second generation of small format staring arrays to the present 'third-gen' systems, there is an increased emphasis on large area focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multicolour operation and higher operating temperature. In this paper, we discuss how one needs to develop an increased functionality at the pixel level for these next generation FPAs. This functionality could manifest itself as spectral, polarization, phase or dynamic range signatures that could extract more information from a given scene. This leads to the concept of an infrared retina, which is an array that works similarly to the human eye that has a 'single' FPA but multiple cones, which are photoreceptor cells in the retina of the eye that enable the perception of colour. These cones are then coupled with powerful signal processing techniques that allow us to process colour information from a scene, even with a limited basis of colour cones. Unlike present day multi or hyperspectral systems, which are bulky and expensive, the idea would be to build a poor man's 'infrared colour' camera. We use examples such as plasmonic tailoring of the resonance or bias dependent dynamic tuning based on quantum confined Stark effect or incorporation of avalanche gain to achieve embodiments of the infrared retina.

  15. The identification of filaments on far-infrared and submillimiter images: Morphology, physical conditions and relation with star formation of filamentary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schisano, E.; Carey, S.; Paladini, R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rygl, K. L. J. [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA-ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Busquet, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía, s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Polychroni, D. [Departement of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Billot, N. [Instituto de RadioAstronomía Milimétrica Avenida Divina Pastora, 7, Núcleo Central, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Noriega-Crespo, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Moore, T. J. T. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Plume, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Space Imaging Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N IN4 (Canada); Glover, S. C. O. [Zentrüm für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Vázquez-Semadeni, E., E-mail: eugenio@ipac.caltech.edu [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (CRyA), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 58190 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-08-10

    Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary, rather than spherical geometries. The association of pre- and proto-stellar cores with the filaments suggests a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires representative samples from different environments for an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic, filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ∼500 filaments, in the longitude range of l = 216.°5 to l = 225.°5, with lengths from ∼1 pc up to ∼30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} and 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N{sub H{sub 2}} > 6 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.

  16. Progress on type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) infrared photodetector : from MWIR to VLWIR spectral domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christol, P.; Rodriguez, J.-B.

    2017-11-01

    Infrared photodetectors based on type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) material has been given a lot of attention this past decade, in particular by U.S. laboratories. Among the advantages of this material system, one can cite the possibility to span a large Infrared (IR) range (3μm to 30 μm) by tailoring the band-gap independently from the lattice constant, allowing addressing many applications by the same fabrication process and the realization of multi-color IR sensors for high performance imaging systems. Recently, the maturity of the growth of the quantum structure by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and progress on the processing resulted in the demonstration of high-performance mega-pixel focal plane arrays (FPA) in both the mid-wavelength (MWIR) and the long-wavelength (LWIR) infrared spectral bands [1]. Consequently, InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetector can be now considered as a new infrared technology which can be complementary to InSb, MCT or QWIPs technologies. After some reminders on InAs/GaSb T2SL quantum structure properties, we present in this communication the results obtained by the IES laboratory, from Montpellier University, France, for photodiodes operating in the MWIR spectral domains. We then complete the paper by the main results reached by others laboratories for T2SL detectors operating from MWIR to VLWIR spectral ranges.

  17. Infrared Observations of Ongoing Star Formation in the 30 Doradus Nebula and a Comparison with Hubble Space Telescope WFPC 2 Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Mónica; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Probst, Ronald G.; García, Jorge; Roth, Miguel R.

    1998-10-01

    Intercomparisons of ground-based IR continuum and H_2 images with Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images of the 30 Dor Nebula reveal detailed structural relationships, which provide new information about current star formation there. Numerous stellar IR sources have been discovered in or near the bright nebular filaments west and northeast of R136; their locations are intimately connected with the nebular microstructures, as well as with early O stars in dense nebular knots whose optical spectral classifications indicate extreme youth. The H_2 emission predominates in the dust clouds beyond the bright nebulosity and IR sources with respect to R136. The emerging picture suggests that a new stellar generation is being triggered by the energetic activity of the massive central cluster in the remanent interstellar material around its periphery. 30 Dor will likely evolve into a giant shell H ii region similar to N11 in the LMC, containing an older association inside an evacuated central cavity, which is surrounded by H ii regions ionized by a younger population. Such ``two-stage starbursts'' may be characteristic of massive-star formation on this scale. Based in part on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. Uv-bright Nearby Early-type Galaxies Observed in the Mid-infrared: Eidence for a Multi-stage Formation History by Way of WISE and GALEX Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, S. M.; Neill, J. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Blain, A. W.; Farrah, D. G.; Rich, R. M.; Tsai, C.-W.; Benford, D. J.; Bridge, C. R.; Lake, S. E.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In the local universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission than what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for this ultraviolet excess (UVX) have been proposed including a population of hot young stars and a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of UVX in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring their extended photometry in the UV through mid-infrared (mid-IR) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis models, which allow for the inclusion of EHB stars. We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to the EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients, with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by approx.1 mag. This color difference is easily accounted for with an increase in the BHB fraction of 0.25 with radius. We estimated that the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0 +/- 0.3 Gyr, and 6.2 +/- 0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed approx. 1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the approx. 0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core at early

  19. Formation and infrared absorption of protonated naphthalenes (1-C10H9+ and 2-C10H9+) and their neutral counterparts in solid para-hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahou, Mohammed; Wu, Yu-Jong; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2013-02-14

    Protonated naphthalene (C(10)H(9)(+)) and its neutral counterparts (hydronaphthyl radicals, C(10)H(9)) are important intermediates in the reactions of aromatic compounds and in understanding the unidentified infrared (IR) emissions from interstellar media. We report the IR spectra of 1-C(10)H(9)(+), 2-C(10)H(9)(+), 1-C(10)H(9), and 2-C(10)H(9) trapped in solid para-hydrogen (p-H(2)); the latter three are new. These species were produced upon electron bombardment of a mixture of naphthalene (C(10)H(8)) and p-H(2) during matrix deposition. The intensities of IR features of 1-C(10)H(9)(+) decreased after the matrix was maintained in darkness for 19 h, whereas those of 1-C(10)H(9) and 2-C(10)H(9) increased. Irradiation of this matrix sample with light at 365 nm diminished lines of 1-C(10)H(9)(+) and 2-C(10)H(9) and enhanced lines of 1-C(10)H(9) and 2-C(10)H(9)(+); the latter species was unstable and converted to 1-C(10)H(9)(+) in less than 30 min and 2-C(10)H(9) was converted to 1-C(10)H(9) at 365 nm. Observed wavenumbers and relative intensities of these species agree satisfactorily with the anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers and IR intensities predicted with the B3PW91/6-311++G(2d,2p) method. Compared with spectra recorded previously with IR photodissociation of Ar-tagged C(10)H(9)(+) or IR multiphoton dissociation of C(10)H(9)(+), our method has the advantages of producing high-resolution IR spectra with a wide spectral coverage, true IR intensity and excellent ratio of signal to noise; both protonated species and their neutral counterparts are produced with little interference from other fragments. With these advantages, the IR spectra of 1-C(10)H(9)(+), 2-C(10)H(9)(+), 1-C(10)H(9), and 2-C(10)H(9) are here clearly characterized.

  20. Thermoanalytical and Fourier transform infrared spectral curve-fitting techniques used to investigate the amorphous indomethacin formation and its physical stability in Indomethacin-Soluplus® solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Hong-Liang; Chi, Ying-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ting; Kao, Chi-Yu; Hsieh, Wei-Hsien

    2015-12-30

    The amorphous form of a drug has higher water solubility and faster dissolution rate than its crystalline form. However, the amorphous form is less thermodynamically stable and may recrystallize during manufacturing and storage. Maintaining the amorphous state of drug in a solid dosage form is extremely important to ensure product quality. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the amount of amorphous indomethacin (INDO) formed in the Soluplus® solid dispersions using thermoanalytical and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral curve-fitting techniques. The INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions with various weight ratios of both components were prepared by air-drying and heat-drying processes. A predominate IR peak at 1683cm(-1) for amorphous INDO was selected as a marker for monitoring the solid state of INDO in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The physical stability of amorphous INDO in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions prepared by both drying processes was also studied under accelerated conditions. A typical endothermic peak at 161°C for γ-form of INDO (γ-INDO) disappeared from all the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves of INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions, suggesting the amorphization of INDO caused by Soluplus® after drying. In addition, two unique IR peaks at 1682 (1681) and 1593 (1591)cm(-1) corresponded to the amorphous form of INDO were observed in the FTIR spectra of all the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The quantitative amounts of amorphous INDO formed in all the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions were increased with the increase of γ-INDO loaded into the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions by applying curve-fitting technique. However, the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between Soluplus® and INDO were only observed in the samples prepared by heat-drying process, due to a marked spectral shift from 1636 to 1628cm(-1) in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The INDO/Soluplus® solid

  1. Infrared retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sanjay [Albuquerque, NM; Hayat, Majeed M [Albuquerque, NM; Tyo, J Scott [Tucson, AZ; Jang, Woo-Yong [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  2. Quantum Infrared Photodetectors for Long Wavelength Infrared Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, S.; Gunapala, S. D.; Liu, J. K.; Luong, M.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hong, W.; McKelvey, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Long wavelength Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) cameras developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory demonstrate the potential of GaAs/A1xGa1-xAs QWIP technology for highly sensitive, low power, low cost, and highly uniform large format FPA imaging systems.

  3. RMS noise modeling and detection for high-reliability HgCdTe infrared focal plane arrays development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathignol, A.; Vauquelin, G.; Brunner, A.; Destefanis, V.; Rubaldo, L.; Maillard, M.; Runtz, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents recent improvements introduced in production lines of Mid-Wavelength Infra-Red (MWIR) and Long-Wavelength Infra-Red (LWIR) HgCdTe detectors that increase performances, image quality, and reliability. This was achieved thanks to accurate characterization of RMS noise distributions. Based on many MWIR and LWIR devices RMS distributions, a RMS noise distribution model that accounts for both Background Limited diodes and 1/f noise affected isolated diodes is first proposed. Then, a figure of merit for quantifying the defective pixels is introduced. This figure of merit is shown to be easy to use and robust to statistical variability. Moreover, it does also very well correlate with physics : there is high correlation between the total number of calculated defects and other figures of merit that gauge the material quality or the low frequency noise. The ability to accurately and efficiently quantify RMS noise benefits to Sofradir in its development of highly reliable and performant technologies. Such benefits are illustrated on the latest Sofradir MWIR and LWIR technologies that are demonstrated to be very robust regarding thermal stress and thermal cycling. Finally those technologies are shown to reach high image quality and stability.

  4. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  5. Plasmon polariton enhanced mid-infrared photodetectors based on Ge quantum dots in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, A. I.; Kirienko, V. V.; Bloshkin, A. A.; Armbrister, V. A.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum dot based infrared (IR) photodetectors (QDIPs) have the potential to provide meaningful advances to the next generation of imaging systems due to their sensitivity to normal incidence radiation, large optical gain, low dark currents, and high operating temperature. SiGe-based QDIPs are of particular interest as they are compatible with silicon integration technology but suffer from the low absorption coefficient and hence small photoresponse in the mid-wavelength IR region. Here, we report on the plasmonic enhanced Ge/Si QDIPs with tailorable wavelength optical response and polarization selectivity. Ge/Si heterostructures with self-assembled Ge quantum dots are monolithically integrated with periodic two-dimensional arrays of subwavelength holes (2DHAs) perforated in gold films to convert the incident electromagnetic IR radiation into the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waves. The resonant responsivity of the plasmonic detector at a wavelength of 5.4 μm shows an enhancement of up to thirty times over a narrow spectral bandwidth (FWHM = 0.3 μm), demonstrating the potentiality of this approach for the realization of high-performance Ge/Si QDIPs that require high spectral resolution. The possibility of the polarization-sensitive detection in Ge/Si QDIPs enhanced with a stretched-lattice 2DHA is reported. The excitation of SPP modes and the near-field components are investigated with the three-dimensional finite-element frequency-domain method. The role that plasmonic electric field plays in QDIP enhancement is discussed.

  6. In-line near infrared spectroscopy during freeze-drying as a tool to measure efficiency of hydrogen bond formation between protein and sugar, predictive of protein storage stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, Maarten A; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Pieters, Sigrid; De Meyer, Laurens; Frijlink, Henderik W; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; De Beer, Thomas

    2015-12-30

    Sugars are often used as stabilizers of protein formulations during freeze-drying. However, not all sugars are equally suitable for this purpose. Using in-line near-infrared spectroscopy during freeze-drying, it is shown here that hydrogen bond formation during freeze-drying, under secondary drying conditions in particular, can be related to the preservation of the functionality and structure of proteins during storage. The disaccharide trehalose was best capable of forming hydrogen bonds with the model protein, lactate dehydrogenase, thereby stabilizing it, followed by the molecularly flexible oligosaccharide inulin 4kDa. The molecularly rigid oligo- and polysaccharides dextran 5kDa and 70kDa, respectively, formed the least amount of hydrogen bonds and provided least stabilization of the protein. It is concluded that smaller and molecularly more flexible sugars are less affected by steric hindrance, allowing them to form more hydrogen bonds with the protein, thereby stabilizing it better. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of reflectance micro-Fourier Transform infrared analysis to the study of coal macerals: An example from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous coals of the Mist Mountain Formation, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Bustin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of the reflectance micro-Fourier Transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) technique for analyzing the distribution of functional groups in coal macerals is discussed. High quality of spectra, comparable to those obtained using other FTIR techniques (KBr pellet and transmission micro-FTIR), indicate this technique can be applied to characterizing functional groups under most conditions. The ease of sample preparation, the potential to analyze large intact samples, and ability to characterize organic matter in areas as small as 20 ??m are the main advantages of reflectance micro-FTIR. The quantitative aspects of reflectance micro-FTIR require further study. The examples from the coal seams of the Mist Mountain Formation, British Columbia show that at high volatile bituminous rank, reflectance micro-FTIR provides valuable information on the character of aliphatic chains of vitrinite and liptinite macerals. Because the character of aliphatic chains influences bond disassociation energies, such information is useful from a hydrocarbon generation viewpoint. In medium volatile bituminous coal liptinite macerals are usually not detectable but this technique can be used to study the degree of oxidation and reactivity of vitrinite and semifusinite.

  8. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Bock, James; Battle, John; Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hea; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Pak, Soojong; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Watabe, Toyoki

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a rocket-borne instrument (the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment, or CIBER) to search for signatures of primordial galaxy formation in the cosmic near-infrared extra-galactic background. CIBER consists of a wide-field two-color camera, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer, and a high-resolution narrow-band imaging spectrometer. The cameras will search for spatial fluctuations in the background on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees over a range of angular sca...

  9. The void galaxy survey: Star formation properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Peletier, R.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from H α and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer emission is

  10. Infrared cryoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolik, E.V.

    1989-01-01

    The use of cryospectroscopy for investigating the structure of compounds with a developed system of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds is discussed. The changes in the H-bond energy observed on cooling, which are due to the conformation ordering of hydroxyl groups, make IR cryospectroscopy an effective method for studying the structure carbohydrates. In the present work, using an example of carbohydrates, the main directions of cryospectroscopy are analyzed: experimental procedure, peculiarities and interpretation of spectra, structural-analytical application. To this end, vibrational spectra of a number of mono-, di- and polysaccharides have been obtained and interpreted at liquid-helium temperature. Comparative analysis of the experimental data and theoretical calculations allowed a number of important problems to be solved involving the detailed interpretation of spectra of these complex compounds, among them those of the formation of intra- and intermolecular H-bonds. Correlation have been established between the structure of the carbohydrates studied and their spectral characteristics at liquid-helium temperatures. IR cryospectroscopy is shown to open up unique possibilities of revealing defects of carbohydrate crystalline structures. (author)

  11. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  12. Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The end goal of this project is to develop proof-of-concept infrared detectors which can be integrated in future infrared instruments engaged in remote...

  13. Infrared thermography; Thermographie infrarouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrysochoos, A.; Wattrisse, B. [Montpellier-2 Univ., Lab. de Mecanique et Genie Civil, UMR 5508 CNRS (France); Feldheim, V.; Lybaert, P. [Faculte Polytechnique de Mons, Service de Thermique et Combustion, Mons (Belgium); Batsale, J.Ch.; Mourand, D. [Trefle, UMR 8508, Cellule Thermicar, UMR 8508, 33 - Talence (France)

    2005-07-01

    This session about infrared thermography gathers 3 articles dealing with: the use of thermo-mechanical measurement fields for the characterization of materials behaviour; the application of infrared thermography to the study of convective transfers; and some data processing methods for the characterization of fields of thermophysical properties of materials or for the infrared thermography analysis of thermal processes. (J.S.)

  14. Synthesis and infrared spectra of alkaline earth metal carbonates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ... Sr2+ and Ba2+ salts with urea at high temperature, ~ 80°C. The reaction products were characterized through elemental analysis and infrared spectra. The infrared spectra of the products are the same as those of the corresponding commercially obtained carbonates. A general reaction describing the formation of MCO3 ...

  15. The cosmic infrared background experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; Battle, John; Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hea; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Pak, Soojong; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Watabe, Toyoki

    2006-03-01

    The extragalactic background, based on absolute measurements reported by DIRBE and IRTS at 1.2 and 2.2 μm, exceeds the brightness derived from galaxy counts by up to a factor 5. Furthermore, both DIRBE and the IRTS report fluctuations in the near-infrared sky brightness that appear to have an extra-galactic origin, but are larger than expected from local ( z = 1-3) galaxies. These observations have led to speculation that a new class of high-mass stars or mini-quasars may dominate primordial star formation at high-redshift ( z ˜ 10-20), which, in order to explain the excess in the near-infrared background, must be highly luminous but produce a limited amount of metals and X-ray photons. Regardless of the nature of the sources, if a significant component of the near-infrared background comes from first-light galaxies, theoretical models generically predict a prominent near-infrared spectral feature from the redshifted Lyman cutoff, and a distinctive fluctuation power spectrum. We are developing a rocket-borne instrument (the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment, or CIBER) to search for signatures of primordial galaxy formation in the cosmic near-infrared extra-galactic background. CIBER consists of a wide-field two-color camera, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer, and a high-resolution narrow-band imaging spectrometer. The cameras will search for spatial fluctuations in the background on angular scales from 7″ to 2°, where a first-light galaxy signature is expected to peak, over a range of angular scales poorly covered by previous experiments. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by the IRTS arise from first-light galaxies or have a local origin. In a short rocket flight CIBER has sensitivity to probe fluctuations 100× fainter than IRTS/DIRBE, with sufficient resolution to remove local-galaxy correlations. By jointly observing regions of the sky studied by Spitzer and ASTRO-F, CIBER will build a multi-color view of the near-infrared

  16. FAR-INFRARED EXTINCTION MAPPING OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Wanggi [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Progress in understanding star formation requires detailed observational constraints on the initial conditions, i.e., dense clumps and cores in giant molecular clouds that are on the verge of gravitational instability. Such structures have been studied by their extinction of near-infrared and, more recently, mid-infrared (MIR) background light. It has been somewhat more of a surprise to find that there are regions that appear as dark shadows at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths as long as ∼100 μm! Here we develop analysis methods of FIR images from Spitzer-MIPS and Herschel-PACS that allow quantitative measurements of cloud mass surface density, Σ. The method builds on that developed for MIR extinction mapping by Butler and Tan, in particular involving a search for independently saturated, i.e., very opaque, regions that allow measurement of the foreground intensity. We focus on three massive starless core/clumps in the Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G028.37+00.07, deriving mass surface density maps from 3.5 to 70 μm. A by-product of this analysis is the measurement of the spectral energy distribution of the diffuse foreground emission. The lower opacity at 70 μm allows us to probe to higher Σ values, up to ∼1 g cm{sup –2} in the densest parts of the core/clumps. Comparison of the Σ maps at different wavelengths constrains the shape of the MIR-FIR dust opacity law in IRDCs. We find that it is most consistent with the thick ice mantle models of Ossenkopf and Henning. There is tentative evidence for grain ice mantle growth as one goes from lower to higher Σ regions.

  17. Infrared-Bright Interacting Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Ruiz, Sofia; Murphy, Eric Joseph; Armus, Lee; Smith, John-David; Bradford, Charles Matt; Stierwalt, Sabrina

    2018-01-01

    We present the mid-infrared spectral mapping of eight LIRG-class interacting galaxies: NGC 6670, NGC 7592, IIZw 96, IIIZw 35, Arp 302, Arp 236, Arp 238, Arp 299. The properties of galaxy mergers, which are bright and can be studied at high resolutions at low-z, provide local analogs for sources that may be important contributors to the Far Infrared Background (FIRB.) In order to study star formation and the physical conditions in the gas and dust in our sample galaxies, we used the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) to map the galaxies over the 5-35 μm window to trace the PAH, molecular hydrogen, and atomic fine structure line emission on scales of 1.4 – 5.3 kpc. Here we present the reduction for low and high-resolution data, and preliminary results in the analysis of fine structure line ratios and dust features in the two nuclei and interacting regions from one of our sample galaxies, NGC 6670.

  18. Mid-Infrared Lasers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mid infrared solid state lasers for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems required for understanding atmospheric chemistry are not available. This program...

  19. Multispectral infrared imaging interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Device permitting simultaneous viewing of infrared images at different wavelengths consists of imaging lens, Michelson interferometer, array of infrared detectors, data processing equipment for Fourier transformation of detector signal, and image display unit. Invention is useful in earth resources applications, nondestructive testing, and medical diagnoses.

  20. Multi-wavelength study of infrared galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcillac, Delphine

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with a panchromatic study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) detected at 15 microns by ISOCAM (camera aboard ISO) and at 24 microns by MIPS (camera aboard the recently launched Spitzer satellite). These galaxies are today considered to be the Rosetta Stone of galaxy evolution since they are found to be far more numerous at high redshift and it is thought that a large part of stars seen in the local universe are born in such phases. The first part of this thesis presents a new study dedicated to dust emission of distant LIRGs in the mid-infrared range. Their dust emission has been compared to those of a local sample of LIRGs in addition to the prediction of several spectral energy distributions (SEDs) built on data available in the local universe. It has been shown that distant and local LIRGs present similar mid infrared spectral energy distribution: similar PAH bumps are detected in both local and distant LIRGs, however distant LIRGs show evidence of a stronger silicate absorption at 10 microns associated silicate grains. It also shows that distant LIRG mid infrared emission can be used together with local SEDs in order to estimate the total infrared luminosity. The second part of this thesis is dedicated to the burst of star formation and to the recent star formation history of these galaxies, which is responsible for the dust emission. This study was done thanks to a combination of high resolution spectra (R=2000 in the rest frame) obtained at VLT/FORS2 and the stellar population synthesis models called GALAXEV (Bruzual and Charlot, 2003). It has been shown that the burst of star formation has a duration of about 0.1 Gyear. About 10 % of the stellar content is formed during this burst of star formation. (author) [fr

  1. Barrier Infrared Detector (BIRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in MWIR detector design, has resulted in a high operating temperature (HOT) barrier infrared detector (BIRD) that is capable of spectral...

  2. Infrared Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2009-02-01

    A retrospective is given on infrared sky surveys from Thomas Edison’s proposal in the late 1870s to IRAS, the first sensitive mid- to far-infrared all-sky survey, and the mid-1990s experiments that filled in the IRAS deficiencies. The emerging technology for space-based surveys is highlighted, as is the prominent role the US Defense Department, particularly the Air Force, played in developing and applying detector and cryogenic sensor advances to early mid-infrared probe-rocket and satellite-based surveys. This technology was transitioned to the infrared astronomical community in relatively short order and was essential to the success of IRAS, COBE and ISO. Mention is made of several of the little known early observational programs that were superseded by more successful efforts.

  3. Infrared spectra of zinc doped lead borate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The infrared spectra of zinc-doped lead borate glasses (10–30 mol% ZnO) were measured over a continuous spectral range (400–4000 cm–1) in an attempt to study their structure systematically. No boroxol ring formation was observed in the structure of these glasses. The formation of Zn in tetrahedral ...

  4. Short- and mid-wavelength artificial light influences the flash signals of Aquatica ficta fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avalon Celeste Stevahn Owens

    Full Text Available Urbanization can radically disrupt natural ecosystems through alteration of the sensory environment. Habitat disturbances are predicted to favor behaviorally flexible species capable of adapting to altered environments. When artificial light at night (ALAN is introduced into urban areas, it has the potential to impede reproduction of local firefly populations by obscuring their bioluminescent courtship signals. Whether individual fireflies can brighten their signals to maintain visibility against an illuminated background remains unknown. In this study, we exposed male Aquatica ficta fireflies to diffused light of varying wavelength and intensity, and recorded their alarm flash signals. When exposed to wavelengths at or below 533 nm, males emitted brighter signals with decreased frequency. This is the first evidence of individual-level light signal plasticity in fireflies. In contrast, long wavelength ambient light (≥ 597 nm did not affect signal morphology, likely because A. ficta cannot perceive these wavelengths. These results suggest long wavelength lighting is less likely to impact firefly courtship, and its use in place of broad spectrum white lighting could augment firefly conservation efforts. More generally, this study demonstrates benefits of bioluminescent signal plasticity in a "noisy" signaling environment, and sheds light on an important yet understudied consequence of urbanization.

  5. Short- and mid-wavelength artificial light influences the flash signals of Aquatica ficta fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Avalon Celeste Stevahn; Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Yang, En-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Urbanization can radically disrupt natural ecosystems through alteration of the sensory environment. Habitat disturbances are predicted to favor behaviorally flexible species capable of adapting to altered environments. When artificial light at night (ALAN) is introduced into urban areas, it has the potential to impede reproduction of local firefly populations by obscuring their bioluminescent courtship signals. Whether individual fireflies can brighten their signals to maintain visibility against an illuminated background remains unknown. In this study, we exposed male Aquatica ficta fireflies to diffused light of varying wavelength and intensity, and recorded their alarm flash signals. When exposed to wavelengths at or below 533 nm, males emitted brighter signals with decreased frequency. This is the first evidence of individual-level light signal plasticity in fireflies. In contrast, long wavelength ambient light (≥ 597 nm) did not affect signal morphology, likely because A. ficta cannot perceive these wavelengths. These results suggest long wavelength lighting is less likely to impact firefly courtship, and its use in place of broad spectrum white lighting could augment firefly conservation efforts. More generally, this study demonstrates benefits of bioluminescent signal plasticity in a "noisy" signaling environment, and sheds light on an important yet understudied consequence of urbanization.

  6. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  7. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection Task started the development of a real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record for the additive manufacturing process using infrared camera imaging and processing techniques. This project will benefit additive manufacturing by providing real-time inspection of internal geometry that is not currently possible and reduce the time and cost of additive manufactured parts with automated real-time dimensional inspections which deletes post-production inspections.

  8. Micro and Nano Electromechanical Systems for Near-Zero Power Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhenyun

    . Furthermore, the spectral selectivity of the proposed IR detector technology is investigated and demonstrated by the seamless integration of ultra-thin plasmonic absorbers. The first prototypes show strong absorption (> 92%) in mid-wavelength infrared range with a narrow bandwidth (full width at half maximum, FWHM 1012 and subthreshold slope > 9 dec/nW) when exposed to IR radiation in a specific narrow spectral band (˜ 900 nm bandwidth in the mid-IR) with intensity above a power threshold of only ˜ 500 nW, which is not achievable with any existing photoswitch technologies. The two IR sensing elements presented here set a stepping stone towards the development of highly sensitive and persistent IR sensor nodes that required for the future event-driven wireless sensor networks.

  9. Hyperluminous Infrared Galaxies: The QSO-2's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, D. C.

    1998-12-01

    QSO-like nuclei have been detected in the most luminous infrared galaxies known, and in many other ultraluminous infrared galaxies with ``warm'' far-IR colors. These misdirected QSOs are revealed by the morphology and spectrum of light polarized by scattering. In particular, P09104+4109 and F15307+3252 exhibit spectacular bipolar morphology in WFPC2 and NICMOS images, and broad, polarized emission-lines in their polarized spectra. This strongly suggests that the QSO nuclei are surrounded by dusty tori which obscure our direct view, but allow nuclear emission to escape through the open poles to be subsequently scattered (thus polarized) into our line of sight. Even though the radio-infrared correlation indicates ongoing star formation, if viewed from the vantage point of the scattering material, these objects would be indistinguishable from typical luminous QSOs. Hence, they should be classified as ``QSO-2's.'' These results imply that: QSO activity is intimately related to the ultraluminous infrared galaxy phenomenon. A significant fraction of the total luminosity can be generated by the non-stellar central engines. QSOs may contribute significantly to the cosmic infrared background.

  10. Spectral Energy Distribution of Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz, A.; Miniutti, G.; Panessa, F.; Carrera, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    [Aims]: The relationship between star formation and super-massive black hole growth is central to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HLIRG) are unique laboratories to investigate the connection between starburst (SB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN), because they exhibit extreme star-formation rates, and most of them show evidence of harbouring powerful AGN. [Methods]: Our previous X-ray study of a sample of HLIRG shows that the X-ray emis...

  11. Far-infrared spectroscopy of thermally annealed tungsten silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiotti, M.; Borghesi, A.; Guizzetti, G.; Nava, F.; Santoro, G.

    1991-01-01

    The far-infrared transmittance spectrum of tungsten silicide has been observed for the first time. WSi 2 polycrystalline films were prepared by coevaporation and chemical-vapour deposition on silicon wafers, and subsequently thermally annealed at different temperatures. The observed structures are interpreted, on the basis of the symmetry properties of the crystal, such as infrared-active vibrational modes. Moreover, the marked lineshape dependence on annealing temperature enables this technique to analyse the formation of the solid silicide phases

  12. Infrared source test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  13. Variable waveband infrared imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  14. Powerful infrared emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogan L. M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Powerful infrared LEDs with emission wavelength 805 ± 10, 870 ± 20 and 940 ± 10 nm developed at SPC OED "OPTEL" are presented in the article. The radiant intensity of beam diode is under 4 W/sr in the continuous mode and under 100 W/sr in the pulse mode. The radiation power of wide-angle LEDs reaches 1 W in continuous mode. The external quantum efficiency of emission IR diodes runs up to 30%. There also has been created infrared diode modules with a block of flat Fresnel lenses with radiant intensity under 70 W/sr.

  15. A Matrix Isolation Infrared

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The elusive ≡C-H· · ·O complex in the hydrogen bonded systems of Phenylacetylene: A Matrix Isolation Infrared and Ab Initio Study ... A comparison of the spectral shifts observed in the features of PhAc-MeOH and PhAc-DEE would therefore independently confirm the existence or not of n-σ* complex in both these systems.

  16. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the compression of infrared images with three codecs: JPEG2000, JPEG-XT and HEVC. Results are evaluated in terms of SNR, Mean Relative Squared Error (MRSE) and the HDR-VDP2 quality metric. JPEG2000 and HEVC perform fairy similar and better than JPEG-XT. JPEG2000 performs...

  17. SPIRITS: Uncovering Unusual Infrared Transients with Spitzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Jencson, Jacob E.; Tinyanont, Samaporn; Cao, Yi; Cook, David [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bally, John [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Masci, Frank; Armus, Lee [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cody, Ann Marie [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Bond, Howard E. [Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Contreras, Carlos [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Dykhoff, Devin A.; Amodeo, Samuel; Carlon, Robert L.; Cass, Alexander C.; Corgan, David T.; Faella, Joseph [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Boyer, Martha [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC 665, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cantiello, Matteo [Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute, 162 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Fox, Ori D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2017-04-20

    We present an ongoing, five-year systematic search for extragalactic infrared transients, dubbed SPIRITS—SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey. In the first year, using Spitzer /IRAC, we searched 190 nearby galaxies with cadence baselines of one month and six months. We discovered over 1958 variables and 43 transients. Here, we describe the survey design and highlight 14 unusual infrared transients with no optical counterparts to deep limits, which we refer to as SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate-luminosity Transient Events). SPRITEs are in the infrared luminosity gap between novae and supernovae, with [4.5] absolute magnitudes between −11 and −14 (Vega-mag) and [3.6]–[4.5] colors between 0.3 mag and 1.6 mag. The photometric evolution of SPRITEs is diverse, ranging from <0.1 mag yr{sup −1} to >7 mag yr{sup −1}. SPRITEs occur in star-forming galaxies. We present an in-depth study of one of them, SPIRITS 14ajc in Messier 83, which shows shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. This shock may have been triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars that led to either the formation of a binary or a protostellar merger.

  18. Infrared thermography of loose hangingwalls

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kononov, VA

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This project is the continuation of GAP706 “Pre-feasibility investigation of infrared thermography for the identification of loose hangingwall and impending falls of ground”. The main concept behind the infrared thermography method...

  19. Bringing the infrared to light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    Infrared imaging is usually done by use of infrared cameras. We present an effective alternative approach where infrared light is converted to near visible light in a non-linear process, and then detected by low cost, high performance camera. The approach is generic and can be applied towards many...

  20. Incubation and nanostructure formation on n- and p-type Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) at various doping levels induced by sub-nanojoule femto- and picosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüle, M.; Afshar, M.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; König, K.; Straub, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanorifts, ripples of period 130 nm and randomly nanoporous surface structures were generated. • Such nanostructures emerged on heavily and lightly n- and p-doped Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) surfaces. • Strong incubation occurred irrespective of dopant type and concentration or surface orientation. • Incubation is attributed to photoexcitation from laser-induced defect states in the bandgap. • Aggregation of defects results in nanocracks, which turn into nanorift and nanoripple patterns. • Ablation involved predominantly single-photon processes but also multiphoton absorption. - Abstract: N- and p-doped Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) surfaces with dopant concentrations of 2 × 10 14 –1 × 10 19 cm −3 were irradiated by tightly focused 85-MHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser light (central wavelength 800 nm, bandwidth 120 nm) at pulse durations of 12 fs to 1.6 ps. Dependent on pulse peak intensity and exposure time nanorifts, ripples of period 130 nm as well as sponge-like randomly nanoporous surface structures were generated with water immersion and, thereafter, laid bare by etching off aggregated oxide nanoparticles. The same structure types emerged in air or water with transform-limited 100-fs pulses. At a pulse length of 12 fs pronounced incubation occurred with incubation coefficients S = 0.66–0.85, whereas incubation was diminished for picosecond pulses (S > 0.95). The ablation threshold strongly rose with dopant concentration. At similar doping level it was higher for n-type than for p-type samples and for Si(1 0 0) compared to Si(1 1 1) surfaces. These observations are attributed to laser-induced defect states in the bandgap which participate in photoexcitation, deactivation of dopants by complex formation, and different densities of interface states at the boundary with the ultrathin native silicon dioxide surface layer. The threshold increase with pulse length revealed predominant single-photon excitation as well as multiphoton

  1. Memory and the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Cesar; Letschka, Raoul

    2017-10-01

    Memory effects in scattering processes are described in terms of the asymptotic retarded fields. These fields are completely determined by the scattering data and the zero mode part is set by the soft photon theorem. The dressed asymptotic states defining an infrared finite S-matrix for charged particles can be defined as quantum coherent states using the corpuscular resolution of the asymptotic retarded fields. Imposing that the net radiated energy in the scattering is zero leads to the new set of conservation laws for the scattering S-matrix which are equivalent to the decoupling of the soft modes. The actual observability of the memory requires a non-vanishing radiated energy and could be described using the infrared part of the differential cross section that only depends on the scattering data and the radiated energy. This is the IR safe cross section with any number of emitted photons carrying total energy equal to the energy involved in the actual memory detection.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy in astronomy has increased dramatically in the past ten years. The broad design considerations are discussed in terms of wavelength coverage and resolution. Three rough resolution ranges, lambda/Delta lambda of approximately 100, 1000 and 10,000, are identified in which various types of astronomical problems can be studied. Numerous existing systems are briefly discussed and references are given to more complete descriptions.

  3. Infrared Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the rapid development of monitoring and detecting technology of indoor air quality have been observed. We have seen the two major streams of detection technology introduced so far: Acoustic wave sensor and Infrared gas sensor. The use of a gas monitoring system in the case of that dangerous levels of gases are detected, can help to prevent an explosion or can help to prevent worker injury or exposure to toxic gases.

  4. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  5. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals,

  6. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  7. Infrared upconversion hyperspectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2015-01-01

    conversion process. From this, a sequence of monochromatic images in the 3.2-3.4 mu m range is generated. The imaged object consists of a standard United States Air Force resolution target combined with a polystyrene film, resulting in the presence of both spatial and spectral information in the infrared......In this Letter, hyperspectral imaging in the mid-IR spectral region is demonstrated based on nonlinear frequency upconversion and subsequent imaging using a standard Si-based CCD camera. A series of upconverted images are acquired with different phase match conditions for the nonlinear frequency...... image. (C) 2015 Optical Society of America...

  8. SPITZER'S MID-INFRARED VIEW ON AN OUTER-GALAXY INFRARED DARK CLOUD CANDIDATE TOWARD NGC 7538

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frieswijk, W. F.; Spaans, M.; Shipman, R. F.; Teyssier, D.; Carey, S. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent the earliest observed stages of clustered star formation, characterized by large column densities of cold and dense molecular material observed in silhouette against a bright background of mid-IR emission. Up to now, IRDCs were predominantly known toward the

  9. Infrared Devices And Techniques (Revision)

    OpenAIRE

    Rogalski A.; Chrzanowski K.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to produce an applications-oriented review covering infrared techniques and devices. At the beginning infrared systems fundamentals are presented with emphasis on thermal emission, scene radiation and contrast, cooling techniques, and optics. Special attention is focused on night vision and thermal imaging concepts. Next section concentrates shortly on selected infrared systems and is arranged in order to increase complexity; from image intensifier systems,...

  10. Enhanced throughput for infrared automated DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Lyle R.; Gartside, Bill O.; Humphrey, Pat G.; Roemer, Stephen C.; Sorensen, David R.; Steffens, David L.; Sutter, Scott L.

    1995-04-01

    Several enhancements have been developed and applied to infrared automated DNA sequencing resulting in significantly higher throughput. A 41 cm sequencing gel (31 cm well- to-read distance) combines high resolution of DNA sequencing fragments with optimized run times yielding two runs per day of 500 bases per sample. A 66 cm sequencing gel (56 cm well-to-read distance) produces sequence read lengths of up to 1000 bases for ds and ss templates using either T7 polymerase or cycle-sequencing protocols. Using a multichannel syringe to load 64 lanes allows 16 samples (compatible with 96-well format) to be visualized for each run. The 41 cm gel configuration allows 16,000 bases per day (16 samples X 500 bases/sample X 2 ten hour runs/day) to be sequenced with the advantages of infrared technology. Enhancements to internal labeling techniques using an infrared-labeled dATP molecule (Boehringer Mannheim GmbH, Penzberg, Germany; Sequenase (U.S. Biochemical) have also been made. The inclusion of glycerol in the sequencing reactions yields greatly improved results for some primer and template combinations. The inclusion of (alpha) -Thio-dNTP's in the labeling reaction increases signal intensity two- to three-fold.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of fluid lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Marshall C; Cambrea, Lee R; Hovis, Jennifer S

    2005-09-15

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for examining lipid bilayers; however, it says little about the fluidity of the bilayer-a key physical aspect. It is shown here that it is possible to both acquire spectroscopic data of supported lipid bilayer samples and make measurements of the membrane fluidity. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) is used to obtain the spectroscopic information and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is used to determine the fluidity of the samples. In the infrared spectra of lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the following major peaks were observed; nu(as)(CH3) 2954 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH3) 2870 cm(-1), nu(as)(CH2) 2924 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH2) 2852 cm(-1), nu(C=O) 1734 cm(-1), delta(CH2) 1463-1473 cm(-1), nu(as)(PO2-) 1226 cm(-1), nu(s)(PO2-) 1084 cm(-1), and nu(as)(N+(CH3)3) 973 cm(-1). The diffusion coefficient of the same lipid bilayer was measured to be 3.5 +/- 0.5 micom(2)/s with visual recovery also noted through use of epifluorescence microscopy. FRAP and visual data confirm the formation of a uniform, mobile supported lipid bilayer. The combination of ATR-FT-IR and FRAP provides complementary data giving a more complete picture of fully hydrated model membrane systems.

  12. Galaxy Zoo: Infrared and Optical Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carla Shanahan, Jesse; Lintott, Chris; Zoo, Galaxy

    2018-01-01

    We present the detailed, visual morphologies of approximately 60,000 galaxies observed by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey and then classified by participants in the Galaxy Zoo project. Our sample is composed entirely of nearby objects with redshifts of z ≤ 0.3, which enables us to robustly analyze their morphological characteristics including smoothness, bulge properties, spiral structure, and evidence of bars or rings. The determination of these features is made via a consensus-based analysis of the Galaxy Zoo project data in which inconsistent and outlying classifications are statistically down-weighted. We then compare these classifications of infrared morphology to the objects’ optical classifications in the Galaxy Zoo 2 release (Willett et al. 2013). It is already known that morphology is an effective tool for uncovering a galaxy’s dynamical past, and previous studies have shown significant correlations with physical characteristics such as stellar mass distribution and star formation history. We show that majority of the sample has agreement or expected differences between the optical and infrared classifications, but also present a preliminary analysis of a subsample of objects with striking discrepancies.

  13. Thermography by Infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, W.; Allouch, Y.; Altahan, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study focused on the principle’s explanation of metallic components and structures testing by thermography method using infrared waves. The study confirmed that, thermal waves testing technique as one of the most important method among the modern non-destructive testing methods. It is characterized by its economy, easy to apply and timely testing of components and metallic structures. This method is applicable to a wide variety of components such as testing pieces of planes, power plants, electric transmission lines and aerospace components, in order to verify their structures and fabrication quality and their comformance to the international standards.Testing the components by thermography using infrared radiation is easy and rapid if compared to other NDT methods. The study included an introduction to the thermography testing method, its equipements, components and the applied technique. Finally, two practical applications are given in order to show the importance of this method in industry concerned with determining the liquid level in a tank and testing the stability of the control box of electrical supply.(author)

  14. Heterostructure infrared photovoltaic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Antoni

    2000-08-01

    HgCdTe remains the most important material for infrared (IR) photodetectors despite numerous attempts to replace it with alternative materials such as closely related mercury alloys (HgZnTe, HgMnTe), Schottky barriers on silicon, SiGe heterojunctions, GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells, InAs/GaInSb strained layer superlattices, high temperature superconductors and especially two types of thermal detectors: pyroelectric detectors and silicon bolometers. It is interesting, however, that none of these competitors can compete in terms of fundamental properties. In addition, HgCdTe exhibits nearly constant lattice parameter which is of extreme importance for new devices based on complex heterostructures. The development of sophisticated controllable vapour phase epitaxial growth methods, such as MBE and MOCVD, has allowed fabrication of almost ideally designed heterojunction photodiodes. In this paper, examples of novel devices based on heterostructures operating in the long wavelength, middle wavelength and short wavelength spectral ranges are presented. Recently, more interest has been focused on p-n junction heterostructures. As infrared technology continues to advance, there is a growing demand for multispectral detectors for advanced IR systems with better target discrimination and identification. HgCdTe heterojunction detectors offer wavelength flexibility from medium wavelength to very long wavelength and multicolour capability in these regions. Recent progress in two-colour HgCdTe detectors is also reviewed.

  15. Low background infrared (LBIR) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Low background infrared (LBIR) facility was originally designed to calibrate user supplied blackbody sources and to characterize low-background IR detectors and...

  16. Dual Channel Remote Infrared Thermographer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rentz, Julia

    2001-01-01

    .... We have successfully demonstrated a color temperature measurement using two infrared interference filters with neighboring spectral passbands alternating in front of an uncooled amorphous silicon...

  17. Star Formation Rate Indicators in Wide-Field Infrared Survey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Since January 2016, the Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy has moved to Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) mode. This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1. Articles are also visible in Web of Science ...

  18. Star Formation Rate Indicators in Wide-Field Infrared Survey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, USTC, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012, China. 4National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road,. Beijing 100012, China. 5Department of Physics and Electronics, Guangxi Teachers Education University,.

  19. Star Formation Rate Indicators in Wide-Field Infrared Survey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on the WISE Preliminary Data Release, we present a sample to derive our SFR index calibration (§2). ... the 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm SFR index. In §4, we study the origin of dispersion between .... the Special fund for Ph.D. of North China Institute of Aerospace Engineering. (KY-2010-02-B). This publication makes use ...

  20. LUMINOUS BURIED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AS A FUNCTION OF GALAXY INFRARED LUMINOSITY REVEALED THROUGH SPITZER LOW-RESOLUTION INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 5-35 μm low-resolution spectroscopic energy diagnostics of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z> 0.15, classified optically as non-Seyferts. Based on the equivalent widths of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and the optical depths of silicate dust absorption features, we searched for signatures of intrinsically luminous, but optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in these optically non-Seyfert ULIRGs. We then combined the results with those of non-Seyfert ULIRGs at z IR 12 L sun . We found that the energetic importance of buried AGNs clearly increases with galaxy infrared luminosity, becoming suddenly discernible in ULIRGs with L IR > 10 12 L sun . For ULIRGs with buried AGN signatures, a significant fraction of infrared luminosities can be accounted for by the detected buried AGN and modestly obscured (A V < 20 mag) starburst activity. The implied masses of spheroidal stellar components in galaxies for which buried AGNs become important roughly correspond to the value separating red massive and blue less-massive galaxies in the local universe. Our results may support the widely proposed AGN-feedback scenario as the origin of galaxy downsizing phenomena, where galaxies with currently larger stellar masses previously had higher AGN energetic contributions and star formation originating infrared luminosities, and have finished their major star formation more quickly, due to stronger AGN feedback.

  1. Infrared laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  2. Terahertz and Mid Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Shulika, Oleksiy; Detection of Explosives and CBRN (Using Terahertz)

    2014-01-01

    The reader will find here a timely update on new THz sources and detection schemes as well as concrete applications to the detection of Explosives and CBRN. Included is a method to identify hidden RDX-based explosives (pure and plastic ones) in the frequency domain study by Fourier Transformation, which has been complemented by the demonstration of improvement of the quality of the images captured commercially available THz passive cameras. The presented examples show large potential for the detection of small hidden objects at long distances (6-10 m).  Complementing the results in the short-wavelength range, laser spectroscopy with a mid-infrared, room temperature, continuous wave, DFB laser diode and high performance DFB QCL have been demonstrated to offer excellent enabling sensor technologies for environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, industrial and security applications.  From the new source point of view a number of systems have been presented - From superconductors to semiconductors, e.g. Det...

  3. Near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue ischaemia can be a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional oxygenation monitoring modalities measure systemic oxygenation, but regional tissue oxygenation is not monitored. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive monitor for measuring regional oxygen saturation which provides real-time information. There has been increased interest in the clinical application of NIRS following numerous studies that show improved outcome in various clinical situations especially cardiac surgery. Its use has shown improved neurological outcome and decreased postoperative stay in cardiac surgery. Its usefulness has been investigated in various high risk surgeries such as carotid endarterectomy, thoracic surgeries, paediatric population and has shown promising results. There is however, limited data supporting its role in neurosurgical population. We strongly feel, it might play a key role in future. It has significant advantages over other neuromonitoring modalities, but more technological advances are needed before it can be used more widely into clinical practice.

  4. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  5. Infrared laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Carbone, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture

  6. Laboratory infrared spectroscopy of PAHs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Joblin, C.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that polyaromatic molecules are the carriers of the infrared interstellar emission bands has spurred the laboratory spectroscopy of this class of molecules. Here we will give an overview of the infrared spectroscopic methods that have been applied over the past two decades to

  7. The infrared-ultraviolet connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Physics below 300 GeV is termed infrared, and physics above 1 TeV is called ultraviolet. Some aspects of the relation between these two regions are discussed. It is argued that the symmetries of the infrared must be symmetries in the ultraviolet. Furthermore, naturalness within the context of the

  8. Mid-infrared upconversion spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Andersen, H. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is emerging as an attractive alternative to near-infrared or visible spectroscopy. MIR spectroscopy offers a unique possibility to probe the fundamental absorption bands of a large number of gases as well as the vibrational spectra of complex molecules. In this paper...

  9. Infrared Devices And Techniques (Revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogalski A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to produce an applications-oriented review covering infrared techniques and devices. At the beginning infrared systems fundamentals are presented with emphasis on thermal emission, scene radiation and contrast, cooling techniques, and optics. Special attention is focused on night vision and thermal imaging concepts. Next section concentrates shortly on selected infrared systems and is arranged in order to increase complexity; from image intensifier systems, thermal imaging systems, to space-based systems. In this section are also described active and passive smart weapon seekers. Finally, other important infrared techniques and devices are shortly described, among them being: non-contact thermometers, radiometers, LIDAR, and infrared gas sensors.

  10. Semiconductor optoelectronic infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingworth, A.R.

    2001-08-01

    We use spectroscopy to study infrared optoelectronic inter and intraband semiconductor carrier dynamics. The overall aim of this thesis was to study both III-V and Pb chalcogenide material systems in order to show their future potential use in infrared emitters. The effects of bandstructure engineering have been studied in the output characteristics of mid-IR III-V laser diodes to show which processes (defects, radiative, Auger and phonon) dominate and whether non-radiative processes can be suppressed. A new three-beam pump probe experiment was used to investigate interband recombination directly in passive materials. Experiments on PbSe and theory for non-parabolic near-mirror bands and non-degenerate statistics were in good agreement. Comparisons with HgCdTe showed a reduction in the Auger coefficient of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the PbSe. Using Landau confinement to model spatial confinement in quantum dots (QDs) 'phonon bottlenecking' was studied. The results obtained from pump probe and cyclotron resonance saturation measurements showed a clear suppression in the cooling of carriers when Landau level separation was not resonant with LO phonon energy. When a bulk laser diode was placed in a magnetic field to produce a quasi quantum wire device the resulting enhanced differential gain and reduced Auger recombination lowered I th by 30%. This result showed many peaks in the light output which occurred when the LO phonon energy was a multiple of the Landau level separation. This showed for the first time evidence of the phonon bottleneck in a working laser device. A new technique called time resolved optically detected cyclotron resonance, was used as a precursor to finding the carrier dynamics within a spatially confined quantum dot. By moving to the case of a spatial QD using an optically detected intraband resonance it was possible to measure the energy separation interband levels and conduction and valence sublevels within the dot simultaneously. Furthermore

  11. INFRARED GLOBAL GEOSTATIONARY COMPOSITE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Infrared Global Geostationary Composite dataset contains global composite images from the infrared channels of multiple weather satellites in geosynchronous...

  12. Mid-infrared tunable metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Igal; Miao, Xiaoyu; Shaner, Eric A; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Jun, Young Chul

    2015-04-28

    A mid-infrared tunable metamaterial comprises an array of resonators on a semiconductor substrate having a large dependence of dielectric function on carrier concentration and a semiconductor plasma resonance that lies below the operating range, such as indium antimonide. Voltage biasing of the substrate generates a resonance shift in the metamaterial response that is tunable over a broad operating range. The mid-infrared tunable metamaterials have the potential to become the building blocks of chip based active optical devices in mid-infrared ranges, which can be used for many applications, such as thermal imaging, remote sensing, and environmental monitoring.

  13. Mid-infrared tunable metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brener, Igal; Miao, Xiaoyu; Shaner, Eric A.; Passmore, Brandon Scott

    2017-07-11

    A mid-infrared tunable metamaterial comprises an array of resonators on a semiconductor substrate having a large dependence of dielectric function on carrier concentration and a semiconductor plasma resonance that lies below the operating range, such as indium antimonide. Voltage biasing of the substrate generates a resonance shift in the metamaterial response that is tunable over a broad operating range. The mid-infrared tunable metamaterials have the potential to become the building blocks of chip based active optical devices in mid-infrared ranges, which can be used for many applications, such as thermal imaging, remote sensing, and environmental monitoring.

  14. Infrared up-conversion telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented to an up-conversion infrared telescope (110) arranged for imaging an associated scene (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared telescope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein a first optical...... at the plane of the external image) which is denominated D2 and wherein D1 is larger than a second diameter D2 and wherein the telescope further comprises a third optical component (103) and a fourth optical component (104); arranged for re-imaging the first image into a second image of the back-focal plane...

  15. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...... component (100) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an external image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...

  16. Infrared up-conversion telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented to an up-conversion infrared telescope (110) arranged for imaging an associated scene (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared telescope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein a first optical...... component (101) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an first image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...

  17. Infrared techniques for comet observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, Martha S.; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    1991-01-01

    The infrared spectral region (1-1000 microns) is important for studies of both molecules and solid grains in comets. Infrared astronomy is in the midst of a technological revolution, with the development of sensitive 2D arrays leading to IR cameras and spectrometers with vastly improved sensitivity and resolution. The Halley campaign gave us tantalizing first glimpses of the comet science possible with this new technology, evidenced, for example, by the many new spectral features detected in the infrared. The techniques of photometry, imaging, and spectroscopy are reviewed in this chapter and their status at the time of the Halley observations is described.

  18. Solar and infrared radiation measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vignola, Frank; Michalsky, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The rather specialized field of solar and infrared radiation measurement has become more and more important in the face of growing demands by the renewable energy and climate change research communities for data that are more accurate and have increased temporal and spatial resolution. Updating decades of acquired knowledge in the field, Solar and Infrared Radiation Measurements details the strengths and weaknesses of instruments used to conduct such solar and infrared radiation measurements. Topics covered include: Radiometer design and performance Equipment calibration, installation, operati

  19. Wavelength standards in the infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, KN

    2012-01-01

    Wavelength Standards in the Infrared is a compilation of wavelength standards suitable for use with high-resolution infrared spectrographs, including both emission and absorption standards. The book presents atomic line emission standards of argon, krypton, neon, and xenon. These atomic line emission standards are from the deliberations of Commission 14 of the International Astronomical Union, which is the recognized authority for such standards. The text also explains the techniques employed in determining spectral positions in the infrared. One of the techniques used includes the grating con

  20. Science with High Spatial Resolution Far-Infrared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terebey, Susan (Editor); Mazzarella, Joseph M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to discuss new science and techniques relevant to high spatial resolution processing of far-infrared data, with particular focus on high resolution processing of IRAS data. Users of the maximum correlation method, maximum entropy, and other resolution enhancement algorithms applicable to far-infrared data gathered at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for two days in June 1993 to compare techniques and discuss new results. During a special session on the third day, interested astronomers were introduced to IRAS HIRES processing, which is IPAC's implementation of the maximum correlation method to the IRAS data. Topics discussed during the workshop included: (1) image reconstruction; (2) random noise; (3) imagery; (4) interacting galaxies; (5) spiral galaxies; (6) galactic dust and elliptical galaxies; (7) star formation in Seyfert galaxies; (8) wavelet analysis; and (9) supernova remnants.

  1. The Far Infrared Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, John; Carli, Bruno; Rizzi, Rolando; Serio, Carmine; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Palchetti, Luca; Maestri, T.; Brindley, H.; Masiello, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the far infrared (FIR) properties of the Earth's atmosphere, and the role of these properties in climate. These properties have been relatively poorly understood, and it is one of the purposes of this review to demonstrate that, in recent years, we have made great strides in improving this understanding. Seen from space, the Earth is a cool object, with an effective emitting temperature of about 255 K. This contrasts with a global mean surface temperature of 288 K, and is due primarily to strong absorption of outgoing longwave energy by water vapour, carbon dioxide and clouds (especially ice). A large fraction of this absorption occurs in the FIR, and so the Earth is effectively a FIR planet. The FIR is important in a number of key climate processes, for example the water vapour and cloud feedbacks (especially ice clouds). The FIR is also a spectral region which can be used to remotely sense and retrieve atmospheric composition in the presence of ice clouds. Recent developments in instrumentation have allowed progress in each of these areas, which are described, and proposals for a spaceborne FIR instrument are being formulated. It is timely to review the FIR properties of the clear and cloudy atmosphere, the role of FIR processes in climate, and its use in observing our planet from space.

  2. EVOLVING STARBURST MODELING OF FAR-INFRARED/SUBMILLIMETER/MILLIMETER LINE EMISSION. III. APPLICATION TO NEARBY LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lihong

    2010-01-01

    In a previous work, we showed that the observed far-infrared/submillimeter/millimeter line spectra of a starburst galaxy (M82) can be successfully modeled in terms of the evolutionary scheme of an ensemble of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and shells, and such studies can usefully constrain the age(s) or star formation history of a starburst galaxy. In this paper, we present a preliminary study of using the template of an ensemble of evolving GMCs/shells we developed for M82. We apply the model to represent various stages of starburst evolution in a well-known sample of nearby luminous infrared galaxies. In this way, we attempt to interpret the relationship between the degree of molecular excitation and ratio of far-infrared (FIR) to 12 CO (or simply CO) luminosity to possibly reflect different stages of the evolution of star-forming activity within their nuclear regions.

  3. Retinex enhancement of infrared images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; He, Renjie; Xu, Guizhi; Hou, Changzhi; Sun, Yunyan; Guo, Lei; Rao, Liyun; Yan, Weili

    2008-01-01

    With the ability of imaging the temperature distribution of body, infrared imaging is promising in diagnostication and prognostication of diseases. However the poor quality of the raw original infrared images prevented applications and one of the essential problems is the low contrast appearance of the imagined object. In this paper, the image enhancement technique based on the Retinex theory is studied, which is a process that automatically retrieve the visual realism to images. The algorithms, including Frackle-McCann algorithm, McCann99 algorithm, single-scale Retinex algorithm, multi-scale Retinex algorithm and multi-scale Retinex algorithm with color restoration, are experienced to the enhancement of infrared images. The entropy measurements along with the visual inspection were compared and results shown the algorithms based on Retinex theory have the ability in enhancing the infrared image. Out of the algorithms compared, MSRCR demonstrated the best performance.

  4. Near-infrared to Mid-infrared Observations of Galaxy Mergers: NGC 2782 and NGC 7727

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Wu, Ronin; Ohsawa, Ryou; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Roellig, Thomas L.

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of near-infrared-to-mid-infrared (NIR-to-MIR) imaging and NIR spectroscopic observations of two galaxy mergers, NGC 2782 (Arp 215) and NGC 7727 (Arp 222), with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. NGC 2782 shows extended MIR emission in the eastern side of the galaxy, which corresponds to the eastern tidal tail seen in the H I 21 cm map, while NGC 7727 shows extended MIR emission in the north of the galaxy, which is similar to the plumes seen in the residual image at the K-band after subtracting a galaxy model. Both extended structures are thought to have formed in association with their merger events. They show excess emission at 7–15 μm, which can be attributed to emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), while the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) decline longward of 24 μm, suggesting that very small grains (VSGs) are deficient. These characteristics of the observed MIR SED may be explained if PAHs are formed by fragmentation of VSGs during merger events. The star formation rate is estimated from the MIR PAH emission in the eastern tail region of NGC 2782 and it is in fair agreement with those estimated from Hα and [C II] 158 μm. MIR observations are efficient for the study of dust processing and structures formed during merger events.

  5. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.; Vergo, N.; Salisbury, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed

  6. Space Infrared Extragalactic Surveys : Results from ISO and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Mattia

    2004-02-01

    This Thesis deals with the exploitation of space infrared extragalactic surveys as a powerful tool for astronomical investigation. More precisely, it deals with the development of a new method (LARI Method) for the reduction and analysis of data obtained by an infrared satellite (ISO), the application of this method to data obtained within the most ambitious extragalactic survey carried out with this satellite (ELAIS), the first scientific results obtained through this application, and finally the possible applications of such technical and scientific contributions to an infrared satellite which has recently started operations (Spitzer) as well as to future infrared missions. As a testimony to the particularly heterogeneous nature of the skills that are necessary in order to realize a successful space project, the Thesis stands at the boundary between several significantly different disciplines, such as detector physics, signal analysis and image processing, software engineering, galaxy formation and evolution and observational cosmology. Although focusing on a particular mission (ISO), throughout an attempt was made at putting the work into an "historical" perspective, with a keen eye both for the efforts of the "pioneers" of infrared astronomy and for the exciting prospects that space missions will offer to this dicipline in the years to come.

  7. Contribution of infrared observations to the study of supernovae remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douvion, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of dust in young supernovae remnants observed in middle infrared, mainly by means of the ISOCAM instrument installed on the ISO satellite. The author first presents the supernovae physics and the studied young remnants, describes dusts and the main sites of formation and destruction, and outlines the difficulties and benefits of observations performed in the middle infrared. Then, the author reports acquired evidences related to the formation of dusts in supernovae, and the search for a millimetre emission by cold dust contained in regions which are not yet excited by the shock, in order to better assess the overall quantities created by supernovae. He reports the use of observations of dust and neon in Cassiopeia A to perform a diagnosis on the mixture of elements during the supernovae explosion [fr

  8. Photothermoelastic contrast in nanoscale infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Borodinov, Nikolay; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Morozovsky, Nicholas V.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2018-01-01

    The contrast formation mechanism in nanoscale Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy is analyzed. The temperature distribution and elastic displacement across the illuminated T-shape boundary between two materials with different IR-radiation absorption coefficients and thermo-physical and elastic properties located on a rigid substrate are calculated self-consistently for different frequencies f ˜ (1 kHz-1 MHz) of IR-radiation modulation (fully coupled problem). Analytical expressions for the temperature and displacement profiles across the "thermo-elastic step" are derived in the decoupling approximation for f = 0 ("static limit"), and conditions for approximation validity at low frequencies of IR-modulation are established. The step height was found to be thickness-independent for thick layers and proportional to the square of the thickness for very thin films. The theoretical results will be of potential interest for applications in the scanning thermo-ionic and thermal infrared microscopies for relatively long sample thermalization times and possibly for photothermal induced resonance microscopy using optomechanical probes.

  9. Micromachined silicon grisms for infrared optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Douglas J; Marsh, Jasmina P; Deen, Casey P; Ling, Hao; Choo, Hosung; Jaffe, Daniel T

    2009-02-20

    We demonstrate the successful fabrication of large format (approximately 50 mm × 50 mm) gratings in monolithic silicon for use as high-efficiency grisms at infrared wavelengths. The substrates for the grisms were thick (8-16 mm) disks of precisely oriented single-crystal silicon (refractive index, n ~ 3.42). We used microlithography and chemical wet etching techniques to produce the diffraction gratings on one side of these substrates. These techniques permitted the manufacture of coarse grooves (as few as 7 grooves/mm) with precise control of the blaze angle and groove profile and resulted in excellent groove surface quality. Profilometric measurements of the groove structure of the gratings confirm that the physical dimensions of the final devices closely match their design values. Optical performance of these devices exceeds the specifications required for diffraction-limited performance (RMS wave surface error silicon transmits well, the blaze control and high index permit high-resolution, high-order dispersion in a compact space. The first application of these grisms is to provide FORCAST, a mid-infrared camera on NASA's airborne observatory, with a moderate resolution (R=100-1000) spectroscopic capability.

  10. Chemistry and infrared spectroscopy of interstellar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, W.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis focuses on three aspects of interstellar grains: the photochemistry of the grain mantles, their infrared spectroscopy and the surface chemistry that takes place during mantle accretion. It provides a combination of pure and applied chemistry and spectroscopy. The experiments described in this thesis have been carried out with low temperature (10 K) solid molecular mixtures representing the mantles of interstellar grains. The samples have been prepared by slowly condensing gaseous mixtures of simple molecules (e.g. CO, H 2 O, NH 3 , CH 4 ) on a cold substrate (mirror or window) cooled by a cryogenic refrigerator mounted in a high vacuum chamber. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the sample. A laboratory study of the photochemistry in interstellar grain mantles is described. It shows that irradiation of solid binary mixtures of CO with H 2 O, NH 3 or CH 4 with 1600 A vacuum ultraviolet light, which is representative of the interstellar ultraviolet field, gives rise to the formation of a number of large molecules as well as radicals. Moreover, a theoretical study is given of the chemical composition of grain mantles accreted in dense clouds. (Auth.)

  11. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  12. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... is important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function...

  13. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  14. A Micromachined Infrared Senor for an Infrared Focal Plane Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong M. Cho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A micromachined infrared sensor for an infrared focal plane array has been designed and fabricated. Amorphous silicon was used as a sensing material, and silicon nitride was used as a membrane material. To get a good absorption in infrared range, the sensor structure was designed as a l/4 cavity structure. A Ni-Cr film was selected as an electrode material and mixed etching scheme was applied in the patterning process of the Ni-Cr electrode. All the processes were made in 0.5 μm iMEMS fabricated in the Electronics and Telecommunication Research Institute (ETRI. The processed MEMS sensor had a small membrane deflection less than 0.15 μm. This small deflection can be attributed to the rigorous balancing of the stresses of individual layers. The efficiency of infrared absorption was more than 75% in the wavelength range of 8 ~ 14 μm. The processed infrared sensor showed high responsivity of ~230 kV/W at 1.0V bias and 2 Hz operation condition. The time constant of the sensor was 8.6 msec, which means that the sensor is suitable to be operated in 30 Hz frame rate.

  15. Infrared Drying Parameter Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    In recent years, much research has been done to explore direct printing methods, such as screen and inkjet printing, as alternatives to the traditional lithographic process. The primary motivation is reduction of the material costs associated with producing common electronic devices. Much of this research has focused on developing inkjet or screen paste formulations that can be printed on a variety of substrates, and which have similar conductivity performance to the materials currently used in the manufacturing of circuit boards and other electronic devices. Very little research has been done to develop a process that would use direct printing methods to manufacture electronic devices in high volumes. This study focuses on developing and optimizing a drying process for conductive copper ink in a high volume manufacturing setting. Using an infrared (IR) dryer, it was determined that conductive copper prints could be dried in seconds or minutes as opposed to tens of minutes or hours that it would take with other drying devices, such as a vacuum oven. In addition, this study also identifies significant parameters that can affect the conductivity of IR dried prints. Using designed experiments and statistical analysis; the dryer parameters were optimized to produce the best conductivity performance for a specific ink formulation and substrate combination. It was determined that for an ethylene glycol, butanol, 1-methoxy 2- propanol ink formulation printed on Kapton, the optimal drying parameters consisted of a dryer height of 4 inches, a temperature setting between 190 - 200°C, and a dry time of 50-65 seconds depending on the printed film thickness as determined by the number of print passes. It is important to note that these parameters are optimized specifically for the ink formulation and substrate used in this study. There is still much research that needs to be done into optimizing the IR dryer for different ink substrate combinations, as well as developing a

  16. Exploring process dynamics by near infrared spectroscopy in lactic fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Carina; Cieplak, Tomasz; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2016-01-01

    the chemical composition, physical/textural properties and/or microbial contamination. In this study lactic fermentation batches with the starter bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus are explored by in-line near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The dynamics obtained...... and absorption, where the scatter gives us information about the textural change happening, and the absorption gives us information about the biomass formation plus the conversion of sugar into lactic acid....

  17. Infrared spectra of lunar soils. [using a Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Measured data obtained by Michelson interferometer spectrometer were stored in a computer file and smoothed by being passed forward and backward through a digital four-pole low pass filter. Infrared spectra of the 10 lunar samples are presented in the format of brightness temperature versus frequency. The mol % of feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, ilmenite and ferromagnetic silicate in each sample is presented in tables. The reflectance spectra of ilmenite and enstatite are shown in graphs.

  18. Planck 2013 results. XVIII. Gravitational lensing-infrared background correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-frequency capability of the Planck satellite provides information both on the integrated history of star formation (via the cosmic infrared background, or CIB) and on the distribution of dark matter (via the lensing effect on the cosmic microwave background, or CMB). The conjunction of these two unique probes allows us to measure directly the connection between dark and luminous matter in the high redshift (1 1. We measure directly the SFR density with around 2 sigma significance for three redshift bins between z=1 and 7, thus opening a new window into the study of the formation of stars at early times.

  19. Molecular line observations of infrared dark clouds in the galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Susanna C.

    Although massive stars play many important roles in the universe, their formation is poorly understood. Recently, a class of interstellar clouds known as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) has been identified as likely progenitors of massive stars and clusters. These clouds are dense (nH 2 > 105 cm--3), cold (T Nessie Nebula," an extreme case of a filamentary IRDC, with predictions from the theory of the fluid instability and then expand the sample to other filamentary IRDCs. The observations are consistent with theoretical predictions of clump spacing, clump masses, and linear mass density. Fragmentation of filaments due to the sausage instability might be the dominant mode of star formation in the Universe.

  20. New maxillofacial infrared detection technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshetnikov, A. P.; Kopylov, M. V.; Nasyrov, M. R., E-mail: marat.1994@me.com; Fisher, E. L.; Chernova, L. V. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Izhevsk, Russia (426034, Izhevsk, Kommunarov street, 281) (Russian Federation); Soicher, E. M. [Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry named after A.I. Evdokimov of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia, (127473, Moscow, Delegatskaya str., 20/1) (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    At the dental clinic the infrared range radiation spectrum of tissues was used to study the dynamics of local temperature and structure of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and other tissues of the maxillofacial area in adult healthy volunteers and patients. In particular, we studied the dynamics of local temperature of mucous membranes of the mouth, teeth, and places in the mouth and dental structures in the norm and in various pathological conditions of the lips, gums, teeth, tongue, palate, and cheeks before, during and after chewing food, drinking water, medication, and inhalation of air. High safety and informational content of infrared thermography are prospective for the development of diagnostics in medicine. We have 3 new methods for infrared detection protected by patents in Russia.

  1. New maxillofacial infrared detection technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, A. P.; Kopylov, M. V.; Nasyrov, M. R.; Soicher, E. M.; Fisher, E. L.; Chernova, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    At the dental clinic the infrared range radiation spectrum of tissues was used to study the dynamics of local temperature and structure of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and other tissues of the maxillofacial area in adult healthy volunteers and patients. In particular, we studied the dynamics of local temperature of mucous membranes of the mouth, teeth, and places in the mouth and dental structures in the norm and in various pathological conditions of the lips, gums, teeth, tongue, palate, and cheeks before, during and after chewing food, drinking water, medication, and inhalation of air. High safety and informational content of infrared thermography are prospective for the development of diagnostics in medicine. We have 3 new methods for infrared detection protected by patents in Russia.

  2. Mid-infrared Semiconductor Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Krier, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The practical realisation of optoelectronic devices operating in the 2–10 µm (mid-infrared) wavelength range offers potential applications in a variety of areas from environmental gas monitoring around oil rigs and landfill sites to the detection of pharmaceuticals, particularly narcotics. In addition, an atmospheric transmission window exists between 3 µm and 5 µm that enables free-space optical communications, thermal imaging applications and the development of infrared measures for "homeland security". Consequently, the mid-infrared is very attractive for the development of sensitive optical sensor instrumentation. Unfortunately, the nature of the likely applications dictates stringent requirements in terms of laser operation, miniaturisation and cost that are difficult to meet. Many of the necessary improvements are linked to a better ability to fabricate and to understand the optoelectronic properties of suitable high-quality epitaxial materials and device structures. Substantial progress in these m...

  3. KIC 8462852: THE INFRARED FLUX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marengo, Massimo; Hulsebus, Alan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Willis, Sarah [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We analyzed the warm Spitzer/IRAC data of KIC 8462852. We found no evidence of infrared excess at 3.6 μm and a small excess of 0.43 ± 0.18 mJy at 4.5 μm below the 3σ threshold necessary to claim a detection. The lack of strong infrared excess 2 years after the events responsible for the unusual light curve observed by Kepler further disfavors the scenarios involving a catastrophic collision in a KIC 8462852 asteroid belt, a giant impact disrupting a planet in the system or a population of dust-enshrouded planetesimals. The scenario invoking the fragmentation of a family of comets on a highly elliptical orbit is instead consistent with the lack of strong infrared excess found by our analysis.

  4. Infrared Transceiver for Home Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Stankovski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In home automation there is often a need for control of devices that have a built-in receiver for infrared communication with a remote controller. When trying to integrate such devices in a single control system, it is possible to substitute the remote controller with another infrared transmitter which automatically controls the device. This paper suggests a solution with an infrared transceiver which isconnected to a computer via the USB interface. The receiving part records commands from the remote controller, while the transmitting part takes the role of the remote controller, and provides direct device control from the computer, or indirect control through the computer network. This system provides efficient and simple control of the home devices in the absence of the user.

  5. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...... component (100) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an external image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...... at the plane of the 10 external image) which is denominated D2 and wherein D1 is larger than a second diameter D2....

  6. Characterization of exorings in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, C.; Pantin, E.; Ferrari, C.

    2012-04-01

    After the discovery of more than 700 exoplanets, numerous future instruments are now designed to characterize their atmospheres, surfaces and surroundings. Do they have moons or rings, like the planets of our solar system? In the solar system, all giant planets are surrounded by rings, so that exorings can be expected around giant exoplanets. Their presence around telluric planets, like super Earths is also an exciting possibility. Indeed, some theories of the formation of the Moon (Cameron & Ward, 1976 [1]) assume Earth once had a ring, and super Earths could even support naturally more extended rings because of their greater density. Moreover, the presence of exorings is closely linked to theories of planetary formation. Since the study of extra-solar planetary systems enables to see planets at different moments of their evolution, being able to also observe rings could contribute to the development of formation theories not only of rings themselves, but also of planets. Different methods can be used to detect and characterize exorings. The transit of an exoplanet similar to Saturn in front of a solar type star could reveal rings like those of Saturn with the Kepler instrument (Barnes and Fortney, 2004[2]). In visible light, a planet with rings would show a lot of signatures when studying the light reflected by the whole system. However, there is no instrument currently capable of seeing them, nor will there be any in the coming years (Arnold and Schneider, 2004 [3]). We chose to study exorings in the infrared, first because the instrumental context is propitious, with forthcoming instruments expected in the infrared domain like MIRI/JWST and METIS/E-ELT, and second, because of the favorable contrast in the infrared between stars and planets. The effects that rings could produce on the observables have been quantified. In particular, spectral signatures are expected, together with longitudinal effects caused by their variable aspect along the planet orbit as

  7. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration

  8. Comparison of stellar population model predictions using optical and infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, C.; McDermid, R. M.; Kuntschner, H.; Maraston, C.; Conroy, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present Gemini/GNIRS cross-dispersed near-infrared spectra of 12 nearby early-type galaxies, with the aim of testing commonly used stellar population synthesis models. We select a subset of galaxies from the ATLAS3D sample which span a wide range of ages (single stellar population equivalent ages of 1-15 Gyr) at approximately solar metallicity. We derive star formation histories using four different stellar population synthesis models, namely those of Bruzual & Charlot, Conroy, Gunn & White, Maraston & Strömbäck and Vazdekis et al. We compare star formation histories derived from near-infrared spectra with those derived from optical spectra using the same models. We find that while all models agree in the optical, the derived star formation histories vary dramatically from model to model in the near-infrared. We find that this variation is largely driven by the choice of stellar spectral library, such that models including high-quality spectral libraries provide the best fits to the data, and are the most self-consistent when comparing optically derived properties with near-infrared ones. We also find the impact of age variation in the near-infrared to be subtle, and largely encoded in the shape of the continuum, meaning that the common approach of removing continuum information with a high-order polynomial greatly reduces our ability to constrain ages in the near-infrared.

  9. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekant, Steven I; Lyons, Mark A; Pacheco, Juan M; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in body surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to a myriad of diseases of various etiologies across a wide range of host species in veterinary medicine. It is used to monitor the physiologic status of individual animals, such as measuring feed efficiency or diagnosing pregnancy. Infrared thermography has applications in the assessment of animal welfare, and has been used to detect soring in horses and monitor stress responses. This review addresses the variety of uses for IRT in veterinary medicine, including disease detection, physiologic monitoring, welfare assessment, and potential future applications.

  10. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA): Infrared Sensor Development and Science Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J.; Ruzek, M.

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a unique airborne observatory designed to operate in the lower stratosphere to altitudes as high as 45,000 feet and above 99.8 percent of Earths obscuring atmospheric water vapor. SOFIA's capabilities enable science and observations that will complement and extend past, present and future infrared (IR) telescopes in wavelength range, angular and spectral resolution, and observing flexibility. The joint U.S. and German SOFIA project to develop and operate a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747-SP is nearing readiness for for open door flights and demonstration of early science results. Flying in the stratosphere, SOFIA allows observations throughout the infrared and submillimeter region. The SOFIA instrument complement includes broadband imagers, moderate resolution spectrographs capable of resolving broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers suitable for kinematic studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at high resolution. First science flights will begin in early 2010. A great strength of SOFIA is the enormous breadth of its capabilities and the flexibility with which those capabilities can be modified and improved to take advantage of advances in infrared technology. This paper and presentation will highlight the following points: A 2.5-meter effective-diameter optical-quality telescope for diffraction-limited imaging beyond 25 micrometers, giving the sharpest view of the sky provided by any current or developmental IR telescope operating in the 30-60 micrometers region; Wavelength coverage from 0.3 micrometers to 1.6 mm and high resolution spectroscopy (R to 105) at wavelengths between 5 and 150 micrometers; An 8 arcmin FOV allowing use of very large detector arrays; Ready observer access to science instruments which can be serviced in flight and changed between flights; A low-risk ability to incorporate new science-enabling instrument

  11. Advances in near-infrared measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Patonay, Gabor

    1991-01-01

    Advances in Near-Infrared Measurements, Volume 1 provides an overview of near-infrared spectroscopy. The book is comprised of six chapters that tackle various areas of near-infrared measurement. Chapter 1 discusses remote monitoring techniques in near-infrared spectroscopy with an emphasis on fiber optics. Chapter 2 covers the applications of fibers using Raman techniques, and Chapter 3 tackles the difficulties associated with near-infrared data analysis. The subsequent chapters present examples of the capabilities of near-infrared spectroscopy from various research groups. The text wi

  12. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  13. Violent Adolescent Planet Caught Infrared Handed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, D.; Gaidos, E.

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing view of planet formation depicts accumulation of progressively larger objects, culminating in accretionary impacts between Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets. Cosmochemists have found evidence in chondritic meteorites for such violent events, and the Moon is thought to have involved a huge impact between a Mars-sized object and the still-growing proto-Earth. Now we may have evidence for a large impact during planet formation around another star. Carey Lisse (Applied Physics Lab of the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore) and colleagues from the Space Telescope Science Institute (Baltimore), the University of Cambridge (UK), the Open University (Milton Keyes, UK), the University of Georgia (Athens, GA), Jet Propulsion Lab (Pasadena, CA), and the University of Rochester (New York) analyzed infrared spectra obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope. They found a prominent peak in the spectrum at 9.3 micrometers, and two smaller ones at slightly lower and higher wavelengths. These peaks are consistent with the presence of SiO gas, a product expected to be produced by a highly energetic impact. The spectral measurements also allowed Lisse and his colleagues to estimate the size of the dust and they found that there is an abundance of micrometer-sized dust grains. This argues for a fresh source of fine material during the past 0.1 million years. That source may have been an impact between two protoplanets surrounding this young star.

  14. The formation of cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancone, Conor L.

    2012-06-01

    In this work I sought to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies. Specifically, I studied three key aspects of galaxy formation: star formation, mass assembly, and structural evolution. Past research has shown that the formation of a galaxy is strongly coupled to its local environment (i.e. the local galaxy density). Therefore, I studied the evolution of cluster galaxies because clusters are the highest density environments that exist in the universe. In turn, the observational results found herein form a foundation upon which to test theories of galaxy formation in the densest environments. I used the latest sample of galaxy clusters from the Bootes region to measure the near-infrared luminosity function (NIR LF) of cluster galaxies from 0 1.3. I used deeper IRAC imaging to study the NIR LF of high redshift cluster galaxies (1 pulsating AGB stars, which are poorly understood observationally but contribute substantially to the NIR light of a stellar population. I also created the Python Galaxy Fitter (PyGFit), a program which measures PSF matched photometry from crowded imaging with disparate PSFs and resolutions. This enabled accurate measurement of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in crowded cluster fields.

  15. ESA joins forces with Japan on new infrared sky surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Prof. David Southwood, ESA’s Director of Science, said: “The successful launch of ASTRO-F(Akari) is a big step. A decade ago, our Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) opened up this field of astronomy, and the Japanese took part then. It is wonderful to be cooperating again with Japan in this discipline.” “Our involvement with the Japanese in this programme responds to our long-term commitment in infrared astronomy, whose potential for discovery is huge. We are now off and rolling with ASTRO-F/Akari, but we are also working extremely hard towards the launch of the next-generation infrared telescope, ESA’s Herschel spacecraft, which will go up in the next two years”, he continued. “This will still not be the end of the story. Infrared astronomy is also a fundamental part of the future vision for ESA’s space research, as outlined in the ‘Cosmic Vision 2015-2025’ programme. The truth is, subjects such as the formation of stars and exoplanets, or the evolution of the early universe, are themes at the very core of our programme.” The mission : On 21 February, at 22:28 Central European Time, (22 February, 06:28 local time), a Japanese M-V rocket blasted off from the Uchinoura Space Centre, in the Kagoshima district of Japan, carrying the new infrared satellite into space. In about two weeks' time, ASTRO-F will be in polar orbit around the Earth at an altitude of 745 kilometres. From there, after two months of system check-outs and performance verification, it will survey the whole sky in about half a year, with much better sensitivity, spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than its only infrared surveyor predecessor, the Anglo-Dutch-US IRAS satellite (1983). The all-sky survey will be followed by a ten-month phase during which thousands of selected astronomical targets will be observed in detail. This will enable scientists to look at these individual objects for a longer time, and thus with increased sensitivity, to conduct their spectral

  16. WINGS: WFIRST Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin

    WFIRST's combination of wide field and high resolution will revolutionize the study of nearby galaxies. We propose to produce and analyze simulated WFIRST data of nearby galaxies and their halos to maximize the scientific yield in the limited observing time available, ensuring the legacy value of WFIRST's eventual archive. We will model both halo structure and resolved stellar populations to optimize WFIRST's constraints on both dark matter and galaxy formation models in the local universe. WFIRST can map galaxy structure down to ~35 mag/square arcsecond using individual stars. The resulting maps of stellar halos and accreting dwarf companions will provide stringent tests of galaxy formation and dark matter models on galactic (and even sub-galactic) scales, which is where the most theoretical tension exists with the Lambda-CDM model. With a careful, coordinated plan, WFIRST can be expected to improve current sample sizes by 2 orders of magnitude, down to surface brightness limits comparable to those currently reached only in the Local Group, and that are >4 magnitudes fainter than achievable from the ground due to limitations in star-galaxy separation. WFIRST's maps of galaxy halos will simultaneously produce photometry for billions of stars in the main bodies of galaxies within 10 Mpc. These data will transform studies of star formation histories that track stellar mass growth as a function of time and position within a galaxy. They also will constrain critical stellar evolution models of the near-infrared bright, rapidly evolving stars that can contribute significantly to the integrated light of galaxies in the near-infrared. Thus, with WFIRST we can derive the detailed evolution of individual galaxies, reconstruct the complete history of star formation in the nearby universe, and put crucial constraints on the theoretical models used to interpret near-infrared extragalactic observations. We propose a three-component work plan that will ensure these gains by

  17. Fifty-four Years of Adventures in Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklin, Eric Eric

    2018-01-01

    My adventures in infrared astronomy started when I was a grad student in 1965 with the discovery of an infrared-bright object (now known as the Becklin-Neugebauer Object) in the Orion Nebula. In 1966, I made the first measurements of the infrared radiation from the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. I was fortunate enough to be able to take advantage of the 2.2 micron sky survey carried out by Neugebauer and Leighton (1969), which produced many remarkable discoveries, the most spectacular being the heavily dust-embedded carbon star IRC+10216, thebrightest object in the sky at 5 microns outside the solar system. In the 1970’s there was a growth in Infrared astronomy with the availability of many new facilities such as the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, (KAO) which I used extensively with Mike Werner and Ian Gatley for many unique observations. In 1977, I moved to Hawaii to work on the NASA IRTF 3- meter telescope. Many discoveries were made, including the first direct measurements of the rings of Jupiter at 2.2 microns (with Gareth Wynn-Williams) and the discovery of the first L dwarf star around a white dwarf (with Ben Zuckerman). In the 1980’s the introduction of large format arrays changed the way we did infrared astronomy. With Ian McLean, I moved to UCLA in 1990 to start the IR lab and get involved in Keck development and science. In 1995, Andrea, Ghez, Mark Morris and I started looking for evidence of a possible massive Black Hole in the Galactic Center. Spectacular observations using the Keck10 meter telescopes with large format near-infrared arrays and adaptive optics led to the confirmation of the presence of such a black hole and an estimate of its mass (4xE6 M (Sun)). In 1996, I began working on the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and I will finish my talk by discussing SOFIA observations of the ring of dust and gas orbiting the massive black hole in the center

  18. Design and Analysis of a Multicolor Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alves, Fabio D. P

    2005-01-01

    .... These characteristics have been found in quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP). Driven by these applications, a QWIP photodetector capable of detecting simultaneously infrared emissions within near infrared (NIR...

  19. The infrared astronomical mission AKARI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Barthel, Peter; Clements, David L.; Cohen, Martin; Doi, Yasuo; Enya, Keigo; Figueredo, Elysandra; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Garcia-Lario, Pedro; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hibi, Yasunori; Hirao, Takanori; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Hong, Seung Soo; Imai, Koji; Ishigaki, Miho; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Ita, Yoshifusa; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Jeong, Kyung Sook; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kataza, Hirokazu; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kawai, Toshihide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kessler, Martin F.; Kester, Do; Kii, Tsuneo; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Wjung; Kobayashi, Hisato; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Suk Minn; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lorente, Rosario; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shuji; Mueller, Thomas G.; Murakami, Noriko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Nakagawa, Takao; Naoi, Takahiro; Narita, Masanao; Noda, Manabu; Oh, Sang Hoon; Ohnishi, Akira; Ohyama, Youichi; Okada, Yoko; Okuda, Haruyuki; Oliver, Sebastian; Onaka, Takashi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Oyabu, Shinki; Pak, Sojong; Park, Yong-Sun; Pearson, Chris P.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Saito, Toshinobu; Sakon, Itsuki; Salama, Alberto; Sato, Shinji; Savage, Richard S.; Serjeant, Stephen; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Mai; Sohn, Jungjoo; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Takita, Satoshi; Thomson, Matthew; Uemizu, Kazunori; Ueno, Munetaka; Usui, Fumihiko; Verdugo, Eva; Wada, Takehiko; Wang, Lingyu; Watabe, Toyoki; Watarai, Hidenori; White, Glenn J.; Yamamura, Issei; Yamauchi, Chisato; Yasuda, Akiko

    2007-01-01

    AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from mid- to

  20. Flexible optical-infrared metafilter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Jean-Baptiste; Brissonneau, Vincent; Le Rouzo, Judikaël.; Ferchichi, Abdelkerim; Gourgon, Cécile; Dubarry, Christophe; Berginc, Gérard; Escoubas, Ludovic

    2014-02-01

    By combining the antireflective properties from gradual changes in the effective refractive index and cavity coupling from cone gratings, and the efficient optical behavior of a tungsten film, we have conceived a flexible filter showing very broad antireflective (AR) properties from the visible to short wavelength infrared region (SWIR: 0.7-1.5 μm) and simultaneously a mirror-like behavior in the mid-infrared wavelength region (MWIR: 3-5 μm) and long-infrared wavelength region (LWIR: 8 to 15 μm). Nanoimprint technology has permitted us to replicate inverted cone patterns on a large scale on a flexible polymer, afterwards coated with a thin tungsten film. This optical metafilter is of great interest in the stealth domain where optical signature reduction from the optical to SWIR region is an important matter. As it also acts as selective thermal emitter offering a good solar-absorption/ infrared-emissivity ratio, interests are found as well for solar heating applications.

  1. GRB Optical and Infrared Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical and infra-red afterglow observations are reviewed. I will also discuss the indications that long-duration GRBs seem to favour the `collapsar' model. Among these are the debated connection between GRBs and supernovae, and the location of GRB afterglows with respect to their host galaxies. PMV is supported by the NWO Spinoza grant.

  2. Landsat and Thermal Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, Terry; Barsi, Julia; Jhabvala, Murzy; Reuter, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the collection of thermal images by Landsat sensors already on orbit and to introduce the new thermal sensor to be launched in 2013. The chapter describes the thematic mapper (TM) and enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) sensors, the calibration of their thermal bands, and the design and prelaunch calibration of the new thermal infrared sensor (TIRS).

  3. Visualizing Chemistry with Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Almost all chemical processes release or absorb heat. The heat flow in a chemical system reflects the process it is undergoing. By showing the temperature distribution dynamically, infrared (IR) imaging provides a salient visualization of the process. This paper presents a set of simple experiments based on IR imaging to demonstrate its enormous…

  4. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  5. Digtets formater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Kallesøe; Rasmussen, Krista Stinne Greve; Skriver, Svend

    2017-01-01

    definition of text and work can be supplemented by a hermeneutical dimension, thus taking various versions of works and the influence of their respective media (blog, book etc.) on the percipient into account. In connection with the theoretical considerations, a handful of recent works by Lea Marie...... Løppenthin, Olga Ravn, Mikkel Thykier, Caspar Eric, and Simon Grotrian are discussed. By using the format as a point of departure rather than applying a more conventional practice of close reading, the authors argue for a broad-spectred approach to literary analysis which focuses on aspects of the conception...

  6. Far-Infrared Interferometric Telescope Experiment (FITE): II. Sensor Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Tsunehito; Shibai, Hiroshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Watabe, Toyoki; Matsuo, Taro; Mochizuki, Shun; Matsumoto, Yuka; Morishita, Hirono; Doi, Yasuo

    We developed the sensor optics of the Far Infrared Interferometric Telescope (FITE). The spatial resolution of FITE is expected to be 2.5 arcseconds. In order to reconstruct images, precise measurements of the visibility of the interference are necessary. For this purpose, we designed the focal plane of FITE. The focal plane is the entrance focus of the sensor optics. Its camera optics has the F/106 beam for each beam of the interferometer. The PSF is dominated by diffraction, and its size corresponds approximately to the array size so that the fringe pattern can be measured by the array in the sheet. The sensor optics consists of two infrared detectors and the optical CCD. Each detector is installed on the final focal plane of the sensor optics. The far-infrared detector has the format of 15 pixels with 1.5 mm pitch. The mid-infrared detector and the optical CCD are developed as the sensor for the interferometer alignment. The sensor optics and the detectors are installed on the cryostat. Because of their sufficient specifications, we believe to achieve the 2.5 arcsecond spatial resolution.

  7. Deepest Infrared View of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    years old. The nature of the galaxies Two conclusions drawn so far about the nature of these galaxies are therefore all the more important in the context of formation and evolution of galaxies. One is that a few of them are clearly rather large and show spiral structure similar to that seen in very nearby galaxies, cf. PR Photo 28d/02. It is not obvious that current theoretical models can easily account for such galaxies having evolved to this stage so early in the life of the Universe. Another conclusion is that, in contrast to the galaxies at similar redshifts (and hence, at this early epoch) found most commonly in surveys at optical wavelengths, most of the 'infrared-selected' galaxies show relatively little visible star-forming activity. They appear in fact to have already formed most of their stars and in quantities sufficient to account for at least half the total luminous mass of the Universe at that time. Given the time to reach this state they must clearly have formed even earlier in the life of the Universe and are thus probably amongst the "oldest" galaxies now known. Rather than being randomly distributed in space, these red galaxies are also found to prefer company, i.e., they tend to cluster close to each other. In general terms this can be taken as support for the latest theoretical models in which galaxies, which consist of "normal" matter, form in the highest-density regions of the much more pervasive "dark" matter. Although the latter accounts for most of the mass of the universe, its origin so far is completely unknown. These new observations may, therefore, also add new insight into one of the biggest mysteries currently confronting cosmologists. Marijn Franx agrees, but also cautions against drawing firm conclusions on this aspect too quickly: "We now need similar images of a considerably larger region of the sky. We will soon follow-up these first, tantalizing results with more observations of other sky fields." More information The information

  8. Non-collinear upconversion of infrared light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian; Hu, Qi; Høgstedt, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Two dimensional mid-infrared upconversion imaging provides unique spectral and spatial information showing good potential for mid- infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging. However, to extract spectral or spatial information from the upconverted images an elaborate model is needed, which...

  9. WARM MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, N.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, C. K.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Lord, S.; Schulz, B. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gao, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Isaak, K. G. [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, P.O. Box 299, 2200-AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Petric, A. O. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Iwasawa, K. [ICREA and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Leech, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Sanders, D. B., E-mail: lu@ipac.caltech.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    We present our initial results on the CO rotational spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of the J to J–1 transitions from J = 4 up to 13 from Herschel SPIRE spectroscopic observations of 65 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey. The observed SLEDs change on average from one peaking at J ≤ 4 to a broad distribution peaking around J ∼ 6 to 7 as the IRAS 60-to-100 μm color, C(60/100), increases. However, the ratios of a CO line luminosity to the total infrared luminosity, L {sub IR}, show the smallest variation for J around 6 or 7. This suggests that, for most LIRGs, ongoing star formation (SF) is also responsible for a warm gas component that emits CO lines primarily in the mid-J regime (5 ≲ J ≲ 10). As a result, the logarithmic ratios of the CO line luminosity summed over CO (5–4), (6–5), (7–6), (8–7) and (10–9) transitions to L {sub IR}, log R {sub midCO}, remain largely independent of C(60/100), and show a mean value of –4.13 (≡log R{sub midCO}{sup SF}) and a sample standard deviation of only 0.10 for the SF-dominated galaxies. Including additional galaxies from the literature, we show, albeit with a small number of cases, the possibility that galaxies, which bear powerful interstellar shocks unrelated to the current SF, and galaxies, in which an energetic active galactic nucleus contributes significantly to the bolometric luminosity, have their R {sub midCO} higher and lower than R{sub midCO}{sup SF}, respectively.

  10. Star & Planet Formation Studies and Opportunities with SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly Ennico

    2018-01-01

    Star formation, the most fundamental process in the universe, is linked to planet formation and thus to the origin and evolution of life. We have a general outline of how planets and stars form, yet unraveling the details of the physics and chemistry continues to challenge us. The infrared and submillimeter part of the spectrum hold the most promise for studying the beginnings of star formation. The observational landscape recently shaped by Spitzer, Herschel and ALMA, continues to challenge our current theories. SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, equipped with state-of-the-art infrared instrumentation to a vantage point at 45,000 feet (13.7 kilometers) flight altitude that is above 99.9 percent of the Earth's water vapor, enables observations in the infrared through terahertz frequencies not possible from the ground. SOFIA is a community observatory, about to start its sixth annual observing cycle. My talk will focus on recent results in advancing star and planet formation processes using SOFIA's imaging and polarimetric capabilities, and the upcoming science enabled by the 3rd generation instrument High-Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectrometer (HIRMES) to be commissioned in 2019. I will show how mid-infrared imaging is used to test massive star formation theories, how far-infrared polarimetry on sub-parsec scales is directly testing the role of magnetic fields in molecular clouds, and how velocity-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy will push forward our understanding of proto-planetary disk science. I will also summarize upcoming opportunities with the SOFIA observatory. For the latest news about your flying observatory, see https://sofia.usra.edu/.

  11. Infrared landmine detection and thermal model analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Kokonozi, A.; Carter, L.J.; Lensen, H.A.; Franken, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared imagers are capable of the detection of surface laid mines. Several sensor fused land mine detection systems make use of metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and infrared imagers. Infrared detection systems are sensitive to apparent temperature contrasts and their detection

  12. Star Formation Beyond the Solar Circle: A Survey of Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerton, Charles R.

    2013-06-01

    This talk will review and distill the results of major radio, infrared, and combined radio/IR, surveys that have focused on the identification and characterization of active regions of star formation in the outer Galaxy. These surveys reveal that, in terms of star formation activity, the Milky Way beyond the solar circle is not a vast wasteland, but rather it is an area containing numerous regions of star formation well placed for detailed individual study, for large-scale studies of star formation within spiral arms, and for comparative studies with star formation occurring in different environments such as the inner Galaxy and Galactic center.

  13. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  14. Measuring cloud thermodynamic phase with shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; McCubbin, Ian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA; Gao, Bo Cai [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington District of Columbia USA; Green, Robert O. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Matthews, Alyssa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Mei, Fan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Meyer, Kerry G. [Goddard Earth Science Technology and Research, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia Maryland USA; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Platnick, Steven [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Schmid, Beat [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Tomlinson, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Wilcox, Eric [Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA

    2016-08-12

    Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy enables accurate remote mapping of cloud thermodynamic phase at high spatial resolution. We describe a measurement strategy to exploit signatures of liquid and ice absorption in cloud top apparent reflectance spectra from 1.4 to 1.8 μm. This signal is generally insensitive to confounding factors such as solar angles, view angles, and surface albedo. We first evaluate the approach in simulation and then apply it to airborne data acquired in the Calwater-2/ACAPEX campaign of Winter 2015. Here NASA’s “Classic” Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) remotely observed diverse cloud formations while the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 aircraft measured cloud integral and microphysical properties in situ. Finally, the coincident measurements demonstrate good separation of the thermodynamic phases for relatively homogeneous clouds.

  15. Infrared monitoring of gyrotron windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huey, H.; Lopez, N.; Hu, G.; Choi, E.; Mundie, L.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for monitoring the gyrotron output window surface temperature with an infrared camera while the gyrotron is in operation has been developed. The IR camera views the window through a perforated waveguide wall, and serves both as a guide for the safe operation at high average power of the tube, as well as an aid in the analysis of new window designs. Window temperatures were studied as a function of a number of parameters, including gun anode voltage, beam current, magnetic field, coolant flow, and load matching. The IR technique is applicable to many types of high average power microwave and millimeter wave tubes. Successful operation of the Varian 60 GHz gyrotron to 214 kW CW was guided by the infrared camera. Analyses on 28, 56 and 60 GHz gyrotrons have led to a number of design changes. A comparison with computer calculations is also presented

  16. Interstellar extinction in the infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    Extinction by insterstellar dust at infrared wavelengths is reviewed. For 0.7 λ proportional to λ -1.75 , although the observational uncertainties remain appreciable. In the 8-30 μ m region interstellar extinction is dominated by the 9.7 μ m and 18 μ m silicate features; the absolute strength (relative to the continuum extinction at shorter wavelengths), the detailed wavelength-dependence of these features, and the possible variation of the profile shape from diffuse clouds to dense clouds, all remain somewhat controversial. In the farinfrared λ > ∼ 30 μ m grain emissivity estimates by different authors vary considerably; future observations of thermal emission from diffuse clouds in the 300 μ m region offer the prospect of substantially reducing uncertainties in far-infrared emissivities

  17. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  18. HIGH-EFFICIENCY INFRARED RECEIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Esman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research and development show promising use of high-performance solid-state receivers of the electromagnetic radiation. These receivers are based on the low-barrier Schottky diodes. The approach to the design of the receivers on the basis of delta-doped low-barrier Schottky diodes with beam leads without bias is especially actively developing because for uncooled receivers of the microwave radiation these diodes have virtually no competition. The purpose of this work is to improve the main parameters and characteristics that determine the practical relevance of the receivers of mid-infrared electromagnetic radiation at the operating room temperature by modifying the electrodes configuration of the diode and optimizing the distance between them. Proposed original design solution of the integrated receiver of mid-infrared radiation on the basis of the low-barrier Schottky diodes with beam leads allows to effectively adjust its main parameters and characteristics. Simulation of the electromagnetic characteristics of the proposed receiver by using the software package HFSS with the basic algorithm of a finite element method which implemented to calculate the behavior of electromagnetic fields on an arbitrary geometry with a predetermined material properties have shown that when the inner parts of the electrodes of the low-barrier Schottky diode is performed in the concentric elliptical convex-concave shape, it can be reduce the reflection losses to -57.75 dB and the standing wave ratio to 1.003 while increasing the directivity up to 23 at a wavelength of 6.09 μm. At this time, the rounded radii of the inner parts of the anode and cathode electrodes are equal 212 nm and 318 nm respectively and the gap setting between them is 106 nm. These parameters will improve the efficiency of the developed infrared optical-promising and electronic equipment for various purposes intended for work in the mid-infrared wavelength range. 

  19. Infrared slavery and quark confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Alabiso, C

    1976-01-01

    The question is considered of whether the so-called infrared slavery mechanism as, e.g., being manifest in non-Abelian gauge theories, necessarily confines quarks. Making a specific ansatz for the long- range forces, the Schwinger-Dyson equation is solved for the quark Green function. Besides having a confining solution, it appears that quarks may by-pass the long-range forces and be produced. (20 refs).

  20. Infrared signatures for remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, R.S.; Sharpe, S.W.; Kelly, J.F.

    1994-04-01

    PNL`s capabilities for infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy include tunable-diode-laser (TDL) systems covering 300--3,000 cm{sup {minus}1} at <10-MHz bandwidth; a Bruker Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for the near- to far-infrared at 50-MHz resolution; and a stable line-tunable, 12-w cw CO{sub 2} laser. PNL also has a beam expansion source with a 12-cm slit, which provides a 3-m effective path for gases at {approximately}10 K, giving a Doppler width of typically 10 MHz; and long-path static gas cells (to 100 m). In applying this equipment to signatures work, the authors emphasize the importance of high spectral resolution for detecting and identifying atmospheric interferences; for identifying the optimum analytical frequencies; for deriving, by spectroscopic analysis, the molecular parameters needed for modeling; and for obtaining data on species and/or bands that are not in existing databases. As an example of such spectroscopy, the authors have assigned and analyzed the C-Cl stretching region of CCl{sub 4} at 770--800 cm{sup {minus}1}. This is an important potential signature species whose IR absorption has remained puzzling because of the natural isotopic mix, extensive hot-band structure, and a Fermi resonance involving a nearby combination band. Instrument development projects include the IR sniffer, a small high-sensitivity, high-discrimination (Doppler-limited) device for fence-line or downwind monitoring that is effective even in regions of atmospheric absorption; preliminary work has achieved sensitivities at the low-ppb level. Other work covers trace species detection with TDLs, and FM-modulated CO{sub 2} laser LIDAR. The authors are planning a field experiment to interrogate the Hanford tank farm for signature species from Rattlesnake Mountain, a standoff of ca. 15 km, to be accompanied by simultaneous ground-truthing at the tanks.

  1. Towards the mid-infrared optical biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seddon, Angela B.; Benson, Trevor M.; Sujecki, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    of external cancers, mid-infrared detection of cancer-margins during external surgery for precise removal of diseased tissue, in one go during the surgery, and mid-infrared endoscopy for early diagnosis of internal cancers and their precision removal. The mid-infrared spectral region has previously lacked......, agriculture and in manufacturing and chemical processing. This work is in part supported by the European Commission: Framework Seven (FP7) Large-Scale Integrated Project MINERVA: MId-to-NEaR-infrared spectroscopy for improVed medical diAgnostics (317803; www.minerva-project.eu).......We are establishing a new paradigm in mid-infrared molecular sensing, mapping and imaging to open up the mid-infrared spectral region for in vivo (i.e. in person) medical diagnostics and surgery. Thus, we are working towards the mid-infrared optical biopsy ('opsy' look at, bio the biology) in situ...

  2. Wound healing monitoring using near infrared fluorescent fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chia-Pin; Shi, Yihui; Amin, Khalid; Greenberg, Charles S; Haroon, Zishan; Faris, Gregory W

    2010-07-27

    We demonstrate a method for imaging the wound healing process with near infrared fluorescent fibrinogen. Wound healing studies were performed on a rat punch biopsy model. Fibrinogen was conjugated with a near infrared fluorescent dye and injected into the tail vein. Fibrinogen is a useful protein for tracking wound healing because it is involved in fibrin clot formation and formation of new provisional matrix through transglutaminase's crosslinking activity. Strong fluorescence specific to the wound was observed and persisted for several days, indicating that the fibrinogen is converted to crosslinked fibrin. Administration of contrast agent simultaneously with wound creation led to primary labeling of the fibrin clot, indicating that the wound was in its early phase of healing. Administration on the following day showed labeling on the wound periphery, indicating location of formation of a new provisional matrix. This method may prove to be useful as a diagnostic for basic studies of the wound healing process, in drug development, or in clinical assessment of chronic wounds.

  3. Kinetic inductance detectors for far-infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlis, A., E-mail: abarlis@physics.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Aguirre, J. [University of Pennsylvania Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stevenson, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)

    2016-07-11

    The star formation mechanisms at work in the early universe remain one of the major unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. Many of the luminous galaxies present during the period of peak star formation (at redshift of about 2.5) were heavily enshrouded in dust, which makes observing their properties difficult at optical wavelengths. However, many spectral lines exist at far-infrared wavelengths that serve as tracers of star formation. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a balloon-borne spectroscopic intensity mapping experiment at far-infrared wavelengths. The system uses lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs), which have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. KIDs consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements, and use the inductive element as the radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels. - Highlights: • We describe a concept for a balloon-borne telescope for far-IR wavelengths. • Telescope would use high-sensitivity kinetic inductance detectors. • Design considerations and fabrication process for prototype detectors.

  4. Infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis of prepared cation exchangers from cellulosic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, A.M.A.; EI-Sherief, S.; Nasr, A.; Kamel, M.

    2005-01-01

    Different cation exchangers were prepared by incorporation of phosphate and sulfate groups into acid or alkali treated wood pulp. The molecular structure of these cation exchangers were followed by infrared spectroscopy and thermal degradation analysis technique. From infrared spectra, a new bands are seen at 1200 and 980 cm-1 in phosphorylated wood pulp due to the formation of C-O-P bond. Another bands were seen at 1400, 1200 and 980 cm-1 in phospho sulfonated wood pulp due to the formation of CO- P and C-O-S bonds. Also, it is seen from infrared spectra that the crystallinity index for acid treated wood pulp has a higher value than untreated and alkali treated wood pulp. On the other hand, the acid treated and phosphorylated acid treated wood pulp have a higher activation energy than untreated and phosphorylated alkali treated wood pulp

  5. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    redshift; and (d) scaled and dust-obscured radio-loud quasars or compact steep spectrum sources. We estimated upper limits on the infrared luminosity, the black hole accretion rate, and the star formation rate of IFRS, which all agreed with corresponding numbers of HzRGs. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Improved Ultraviolet and Infrared Oscillator Strengths for OH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; Bittner, Dror M.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular ions are key reaction intermediates in the interstellar medium. OH+ plays a central role in the formation of more complex chemical species and for estimating the cosmic ray ionization rate in astrophysical environments. Here, we use a recent analysis of a laboratory spectrum in conjunction with ab initio methods to calculate infrared and ultraviolet oscillator strengths. These new oscillator strengths include branch dependent intensity corrections, arising from the Herman–Wallis effect, that have not been included before. We estimate 10% total uncertainty in the UV and 6% total uncertainty in the IR for the oscillator strengths.

  7. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY-BASED PROPERTY-REACTIVITY CORRELATIONS FOR PREDICTING ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A conventional structure-activity relationship (SAP) has been established between the alkaline hydrolysis rate constant (kOH) of 12 alkyl and aryl formates and acetates and the linear combination GE the frequencies of the and infrared (SR) absorbance peaks. he inability of this r...

  8. Microprocessing of human hard tooth tissues surface by mid-infrared erbium lasers radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of hard tooth tissues laser treatment is described. The method consists in formation of regular microdefects on tissue surface by mid-infrared erbium laser radiation with propagation ratio M2caries prevention as a result of increasing microhardness and acid resistance of tooth enamel.

  9. Infrared imaging of extrasolar planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, David J.; Tubbs, Eldred F.; Gaiser, Steven L.; Korechoff, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    An optical system for direct detection, in the infrared, of planets orbiting other stars is described. The proposed system consists of a large aperture (about 16 m) space-based telescope to which is attached a specialized imaging instrument containing a set of optical signal processing elements to suppress diffracted light from the central star. Starlight suppression is accomplished using coronagraphic apodization combined with rotational shearing interferometry. The possibility of designing the large telescope aperture to be of a deployable, multiarm configuration is examined, and it is shown that there is some sacrifice in performance relative to a filled, circular aperture.

  10. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  11. Measuring Collimator Infrared (IR) Spectral Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT RDMR-WD-16-15 MEASURING COLLIMATOR INFRARED ( IR ) SPECTRAL TRANSMISSION Christopher L. Dobbins Weapons...AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Collimator Infrared ( IR ) Spectral Transmission 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Christopher L...release; distribution is unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Several Infrared ( IR ) imaging systems have been measured

  12. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A; Martyniuk, P; Kopytko, M

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology-HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)-have been investigated.

  13. Quantum-Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) Focal Plane Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Hess, Larry A.; Hartmann, Thomas M.; La, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), a QWIP-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 microns. The focal plane will contain three 640x512 QWIP arrays mounted on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is a custom-fabricated carrier board with a single layer of aluminum interconnects. The general fabrication process starts with a 4-in. (approx.10-cm) diameter silicon wafer. The wafer is oxidized, a single substrate contact is etched, and aluminum is deposited, patterned, and alloyed. This technology development is aimed at incorporating three large-format infrared detecting arrays based on GaAs QWIP technology onto a common focal plane with precision alignment of all three arrays. This focal plane must survive the rigors of flight qualification and operate at a temperature of 43 K (-230 C) for five years while orbiting the Earth. The challenges presented include ensuring thermal compatibility among all the components, designing and building a compact, somewhat modular system and ensuring alignment to very tight levels. The multi-array focal plane integrated onto a single silicon substrate is a new application of both QWIP array development and silicon wafer scale integration. The Invar-based assembly has been tested to ensure thermal reliability.

  14. THE YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION OF LYNDS 1340. AN INFRARED VIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kun, M.; Moór, A. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege út 15-17 (Hungary); Wolf-Chase, G. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium, 1300 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Apai, D. [Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Balog, Z. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); O’Linger-Luscusk, J. [On leave from California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Moriarty-Schieven, G. H., E-mail: kun@konkoly.hu [National Research Council—Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    We present results of an infrared study of the molecular cloud Lynds 1340, forming three groups of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our goals are to identify and characterize the young stellar population of the cloud, study the relationships between the properties of the cloud and the emergent stellar groups, and integrate L1340 into the picture of the star-forming activity of our Galactic environment. We selected candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) from the Spitzer and WISE databases using various published color criteria and classified them based on the slope of the spectral energy distribution (SED). We identified 170 Class II, 27 flat SED, and 45 Class 0/I sources. High angular resolution near-infrared observations of the RNO 7 cluster, embedded in L1340, revealed eight new young stars of near-infrared excess. The surface density distribution of YSOs shows three groups, associated with the three major molecular clumps of L1340, each consisting of ≲100 members, including both pre-main-sequence stars and embedded protostars. New Herbig–Haro objects were identified in the Spitzer images. Our results demonstrate that L1340 is a prolific star-forming region of our Galactic environment in which several specific properties of the intermediate-mass mode of star formation can be studied in detail.

  15. Infrared multiphoton absorption and decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.; McAlpine, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The discovery of infrared laser induced multiphoton absorption (IRMPA) and decomposition (IRMPD) by Isenor and Richardson in 1971 generated a great deal of interest in these phenomena. This interest was increased with the discovery by Ambartzumian, Letokhov, Ryadbov and Chekalin that isotopically selective IRMPD was possible. One of the first speculations about these phenomena was that it might be possible to excite a particular mode of a molecule with the intense infrared laser beam and cause decomposition or chemical reaction by channels which do not predominate thermally, thus providing new synthetic routes for complex chemicals. The potential applications to isotope separation and novel chemistry stimulated efforts to understand the underlying physics and chemistry of these processes. At ICOMP I, in 1977 and at ICOMP II in 1980, several authors reviewed the current understandings of IRMPA and IRMPD as well as the particular aspect of isotope separation. There continues to be a great deal of effort into understanding IRMPA and IRMPD and we will briefly review some aspects of these efforts with particular emphasis on progress since ICOMP II. 31 references

  16. Next decade in infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2017-10-01

    Fundamental and technological issues associated with the development and exploitation of the most advanced infrared technologies is discussed. In these classes of detectors both photon and thermal detectors are considered. Special attention is directed to HgCdTe ternary alloys, type II superlattices (T2SLs), barrier detectors, quantum wells, extrinsic detectors, and uncooled thermal bolometers. The sophisticated physics associated with the antimonide-based bandgap engineering will give a new impact and interest in development of infrared detector structures. Important advantage of T2SLs is the high quality, high uniformity and stable nature of the material. In general, III-V semiconductors are more robust than their II-VI counterparts due to stronger, less ionic chemical bonding. As a result, III-V-based FPAs excel in operability, spatial uniformity, temporal stability, scalability, producibility, and affordability - the so-called "ibility" advantages. In well established uncooled imaging, microbolometer arrays are clearly the most used technology. The microbolometer detectors are now produced in larger volumes than all other IR array technologies together. Present state-of-the-art microbolometers are based on polycrystalline or amorphous materials, typically vanadium oxide (VOx) or amorphous silicon (a-Si), with only modest temperature sensitivity and noise properties. Basic efforts today are mainly focused on pixel reduction and performance enhancement.

  17. The Infrared Astronomical Mission AKARI*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Barthel, Peter; Clements, David L.; Cohen, Martin; Doi, Yasuo; Enya, Keigo; Figueredo, Elysandra; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Garcia-Lario, Pedro; Goto, Tomotsugu; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hibi, Yasunori; Hirao, Takanori; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Hong, Seung Soo; Imai, Koji; Ishigaki, Miho; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Ita, Yoshifusa; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Jeong, Kyung Sook; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kataza, Hirokazu; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kawai, Toshihide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kessler, Martin F.; Kester, Do; Kii, Tsuneo; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Woojung; Kobayashi, Hisato; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Suk Minn; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lorente, Rosario; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shuji; MÜller, Thomas G.; Murakami, Noriko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Nakagawa, Takao; Naoi, Takahiro; Narita, Masanao; Noda, Manabu; Oh, Sang Hoon; Ohnishi, Akira; Ohyama, Youichi; Okada, Yoko; Okuda, Haruyuki; Oliver, Sebastian; Onaka, Takashi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Oyabu, Shinki; Pak, Soojong; Park, Yong-Sun; Pearson, Chris P.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Saito, Toshinobu; Sakon, Itsuki; Salama, Alberto; Sato, Shinji; Savage, Richard S.; Serjeant, Stephen; Shibai, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Mai; Sohn, Jungjoo; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Takahashi, Hidenori; TanabÉ, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Takita, Satoshi; Thomson, Matthew; Uemizu, Kazunori; Ueno, Munetaka; Usui, Fumihiko; Verdugo, Eva; Wada, Takehiko; Wang, Lingyu; Watabe, Toyoki; Watarai, Hidenori; White, Glenn J.; Yamamura, Issei; Yamauchi, Chisato; Yasuda, Akiko

    2007-10-01

    AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional future heritage of this mission.

  18. Mid-Infrared Graphene Photoresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Allen; Herring, Patrick; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kim, Ki Kang; Kong, Jing; Marcus, Charlie; Gabor, Nathaniel; Palacios, Tomas; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) material that has attracted great interest for electronic devices since its discovery in 2004. Due to its zero band gap band structure, it has a broad-band optical absorption ranging from the far-infrared all the way to the visible making it potentially useful for infrared photodetectors. Electrostatically gated p-n junctions have demonstrated photocurrents in the near-IR (λ = 850nm), primarily due to hot carrier mechanisms. In order to study these mechanisms at longer wavelengths (λ = 10 μm), high quality chemically vapor grown (CVD) graphene is necessary to fabricate electrostatically controlled p-n junctions due to the longer optical length scales. Moreover, at these low energies (~ 125 meV), optical phonon scattering is suppressed and is predicted to lead to increased carrier lifetimes and enhanced photo-response. Using electrostatic gating, we are able to study the absorption mechanisms in graphene by selecting between conventional photovoltaic effects and photo-thermoelectric effects. Experiments suggest that the photocurrent signal is enhanced by electrostatic gating near the Dirac peak and reduced disorder in the graphene sample. Institute for Solder Nanotechnologies, GATE MURI, MSD Focus Center

  19. Measurements of Near Sea Surface Infrared Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frost, Shaun

    1999-01-01

    .... Measurements have been made of the atmospheric infrared transmission near the sea surface. Spectral transmission profiles were measured for a number of ranges using a fourier transform spectrometer...

  20. An infrared view of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, D.B.; Timusk, T.; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the infrared properties of the high T c superconductors are reviewed, with particular emphasis on attempts to determine the energy gap by far infrared spectroscopy and on the properties of the strong absorption that occurs in the mid infrared. The authors argue that this mid-infrared absorption is a direct particle-hole excitation rather than a Holstein emission process. In addition, they conclude that although the energy gap is not easily observed, several recent experiments place it in the weak to moderate strong coupling range

  1. INFRARED GLOBAL GEOSTATIONARY COMPOSITE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Center for Environmental Prediction/Aviation Weather Center Infrared Global Geostationary Composite data set contains global composite images from the...

  2. Spectrally-Tunable Infrared Camera Based on Highly-Sensitive Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a SPECTRALLY-TUNABLE INFRARED CAMERA based on quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array (FPA) technology. This will build on...

  3. Handheld Longwave Infrared Camera Based on Highly-Sensitive Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact handheld longwave infrared camera based on quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array (FPA) technology. Based on...

  4. Far-Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy with SAFIRE on SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Richard A.; Benford, D. J.; Irwin, K. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Pajot, F.; Stacey, G. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The SOFIA airborne observatory will provide a high spatial resolution, low background telescope for far-infrared astrophysical investigations. Selected as a PI instrument for SOFIA, SAFIRE is an imaging Fabry-Perot spectrograph covering 100 micrometers - 655 micrometers, with spectral resolving power of approx. 1500 (200 kilometers per second). This resolution is well matched to extragalactic emission lines and yields the greatest sensitivity for line detection. SAFIRE will make important scientific contributions to the study of the powering of ULIRGs and AGN, the role of CII cooling in extragalactic star formation, the evolution of matter in the early Universe, and the energetics of the Galactic center. SAFIRE will employ a two-dimensional pop-up barometer array in a 16 x 32 format to provide background-limited imaging spectrometry. Superconducting transition edge barometers and SQUID amplifiers have been developed for these detectors.

  5. Visible-Near Infrared (VNIR) and Shortwave Infrared (SWIR) Spectral Variability of Urban Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Spectrometry) The theory behind hyperspectral remote sensing is that the reflected solar radiation from Earth surfaces can be measured in hundreds of...INFRARED (VNIR) AND SHORTWAVE INFRARED (SWIR) SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF URBAN MATERIALS by Kenneth G Fairbarn Jr March 2013 Thesis Advisor...2013 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VISIBLE–NEAR INFRARED (VNIR) AND SHORTWAVE INFRARED (SWIR) SPECTRAL

  6. LOCUSS: THE MID-INFRARED BUTCHER-OEMLER EFFECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, C. P.; Smith, G. P.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Egami, E.; Ellis, R. S.; Moran, S. M.; Merluzzi, P.; Busarello, G.; Smith, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    We study the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies in 30 massive galaxy clusters at 0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.40, using panoramic Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and near-infrared data, including 27 new observations from the LoCuSS and ACCESS surveys. This is the largest sample of clusters to date with such high-quality and uniform MIR data covering not only the cluster cores, but extending into the infall regions. We use these data to revisit the so-called Butcher-Oemler (BO) effect, measuring the fraction of massive infrared luminous galaxies (K IR > 5 x 10 10 L sun ) within r 200 , finding a steady increase in the fraction with redshift from ∼3% at z = 0.02 to ∼10% by z = 0.30, and an rms cluster-to-cluster scatter about this trend of 0.03. The best-fit redshift evolution model of the form f SF ∝ (1 + z) n has n = 5.7 +2.1 -1.8 , which is stronger redshift evolution than that of L* IR in both clusters and the field. We find that, statistically, this excess is associated with galaxies found at large cluster-centric radii, specifically r 500 200 , implying that the MIR BO effect can be explained by a combination of both the global decline in star formation in the universe since z ∼ 1 and enhanced star formation in the infall regions of clusters at intermediate redshifts. This picture is supported by a simple infall model based on the Millennium Simulation semianalytic galaxy catalogs, whereby star formation in infalling galaxies is instantaneously quenched upon their first passage through the cluster, in that the observed radial trends of f SF trace those inferred from the simulations. The observed f SF values, however, lie systematically above the predictions, suggesting an overall excess of star formation, either due to triggering by environmental processes, or a gradual quenching. We also find that f SF does not depend on simple indicators of the dynamical state of clusters, including the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the peak of the X-ray emission

  7. Propionaldehyde infrared cross-sections and band strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köroğlu, Batikan; Loparo, Zachary; Nath, Janardan; Peale, Robert E.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of oxygenated biofuels reduces the greenhouse gas emissions; however, they also result in increased toxic aldehyde by-products, mainly formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and propionaldehyde. These aldehydes are carcinogenic and/or toxic and therefore it is important to understand their formation and destruction pathways in combustion and atmospheric systems. Accurate information about their infrared cross-sections and integrated strengths are crucially needed for development of quantitative detection schemes and modeling tools. Critical to the development of such diagnostics are accurate characterization of the absorption features of these species. In this study, the gas phase infrared spectra of propionaldehyde (also called propanal, CH 3 –CH 2 –CHO), a saturated three carbon aldehyde found in the exhaust emissions of biodiesel or diesel fuels, was studied using high resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over the wavenumber range of 750−3300 cm −1 and at room temperature 295 K. The absorption cross sections of propionaldehyde were recorded at resolutions of 0.08 and 0.096 cm −1 and at seven different pressures (4−33 Torr). The calculated band-strengths were reported and the integrated band intensity results were compared with values taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) database (showing less than 2% discrepancy). The peak positions of the 19 different vibrational bands of propionaldehyde were also compared with previous studies taken at a lower resolution of 1 cm −1 . To the best of our knowledge, the current FTIR measurements provide the first highest resolution infrared cross section data for propionaldehyde. - Highlights: • High resolution IR spectra of propionaldehyde were measured by FTIR spectrometer. • The discrepancy between the present study and PNNL database was less than 2%. • The fundamental vibrational frequencies were reported at high resolution. • The rovibrational Q

  8. Propionaldehyde infrared cross-sections and band strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köroğlu, Batikan; Loparo, Zachary; Nath, Janardan; Peale, Robert E.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2015-02-01

    The use of oxygenated biofuels reduces the greenhouse gas emissions; however, they also result in increased toxic aldehyde by-products, mainly formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and propionaldehyde. These aldehydes are carcinogenic and/or toxic and therefore it is important to understand their formation and destruction pathways in combustion and atmospheric systems. Accurate information about their infrared cross-sections and integrated strengths are crucially needed for development of quantitative detection schemes and modeling tools. Critical to the development of such diagnostics are accurate characterization of the absorption features of these species. In this study, the gas phase infrared spectra of propionaldehyde (also called propanal, CH3-CH2-CHO), a saturated three carbon aldehyde found in the exhaust emissions of biodiesel or diesel fuels, was studied using high resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over the wavenumber range of 750-3300 cm-1 and at room temperature 295 K. The absorption cross sections of propionaldehyde were recorded at resolutions of 0.08 and 0.096 cm-1 and at seven different pressures (4-33 Torr). The calculated band-strengths were reported and the integrated band intensity results were compared with values taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) database (showing less than 2% discrepancy). The peak positions of the 19 different vibrational bands of propionaldehyde were also compared with previous studies taken at a lower resolution of 1 cm-1. To the best of our knowledge, the current FTIR measurements provide the first highest resolution infrared cross section data for propionaldehyde.

  9. Combined infrared and Raman study of solid CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, R. G.; Scirè, C.; Baratta, G. A.; Compagnini, G.; Palumbo, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Knowledge about the composition and structure of interstellar ices is mainly based on the comparison between astronomical and laboratory spectra of astrophysical ice analogues. Carbon monoxide is one of the main components of the icy mantles of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Because of its relevance, several authors have studied the spectral properties of solid CO both pure and in mixtures. Aims: The aim of this work is to study the profile (shape, width, peak position) of the solid CO band centered at about 2140 cm-1 at low temperature, during warm up, and after ion irradiation to search for a structural variation of the ice sample. We also report on the appearance of the longitudinal optical-transverse optical (LO-TO) splitting in the infrared spectra of CO films to understand if this phenomenon can be related to a phase change. Methods: We studied the profile of the 2140 cm-1 band of solid CO by means of infrared and Raman spectroscopy. We used a free web interface that we developed that allows us to calculate the refractive index of the sample to measure the thickness of the film. Results: The profile of the fundamental band of solid CO obtained with infrared and Raman spectroscopy does not show any relevant modification after warm up or ion bombardment in the dose range investigated. We explain that the LO-TO splitting is not connected to a structural variation of the film. Ion irradiation causes the formation of new molecular species. Raman spectroscopy allowed us to detect, among other bands, a band centered at 1817 cm-1 that has been attributed to the infrared inactive species C2 and a band centered at 1767 cm-1 that remains unidentified.

  10. INTERACTIONS OF THE INFRARED BUBBLE N4 WITH ITS SURROUNDINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong-Li; Li, Jin-Zeng; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Huang, Maohai; Huang, Ya-Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Wu, Yuefang [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Liu, Tie [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Dubner, G.; Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E. [1Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Sergio [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali—IAPS, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica—INAF, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Zavagno, Annie; Samal, Manash R., E-mail: hlliu@nao.cas.cn [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France)

    2016-02-10

    The physical mechanisms that induce the transformation of a certain mass of gas in new stars are far from being well understood. Infrared bubbles associated with H ii regions have been considered to be good samples for investigating triggered star formation. In this paper we report on the investigation of the dust properties of the infrared bubble N4 around the H ii region G11.898+0.747, analyzing its interaction with its surroundings and star formation histories therein, with the aim of determining the possibility of star formation triggered by the expansion of the bubble. Using Herschel PACS and SPIRE images with a wide wavelength coverage, we reveal the dust properties over the entire bubble. Meanwhile, we are able to identify six dust clumps surrounding the bubble, with a mean size of 0.50 pc, temperature of about 22 K, mean column density of 1.7 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −2}, mean volume density of about 4.4 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3}, and a mean mass of 320 M{sub ⊙}. In addition, from PAH emission seen at 8 μm, free–free emission detected at 20 cm, and a probability density function in special regions, we could identify clear signatures of the influence of the H ii region on the surroundings. There are hints of star formation, though further investigation is required to demonstrate that N4 is the triggering source.

  11. FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W. [Cornell University, CRSR, Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Rigopoulou, D. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Clements, D. L. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Cormier, D. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Afonso, J. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Hurley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Borys, C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Verma, A. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, University of Oxford, Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 μm, [N III]57 μm, [O I]63 μm, [N II]122 μm, [O I]145 μm, and [C II]158 μm, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ☉}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

  12. Infrared absorption spectra of nanosized silica with organic additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaria О. Savchenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The prospects of using of silica nanoparticles modified with urea-formaldehyde polymers which is obtained by sulfuric acid sol-gel technology are shown. The aim is a detailed research on the infrared absorption spectra of nanodispersed silica modified with urea-formaldehyde polymers with identification of the absorption bands of the spectrum. The method of infrared spectroscopy is used to research spectral characteristics of nanosized silica, urea-formaldehyde polymer and nanodispersed silica modified with urea-formaldehyde polymers in different ratio. It is found that interaction of initial ingredients occurs at the stage of phase formation in solutions in colloidal silica products containing urea-formaldehyde polymers. Organic components are localized on the surface of the globules and in the interglobular space. This result of such interaction is the physical and structural transformation of globular surfaces of silica and new chemical compounds formation. This allows to give to final product a variety of properties required for practical use in many industries.

  13. Cosmic PAHs: from infrared astronomy to laboratory astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joblin, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Astronomers consider polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to be the smallest dust particles and they use their infrared emission features, the aromatic infrared bands (AIBs), as a diagnostic of physical conditions in regions of star formation from the small scales of protoplanetary disks to the large scales of galaxies. This topic has to face several obstacles. One is the lack of identification of specific PAH species. Another one is that the AIB features carry not only information on the chemical diversity of species but also on photophysical processes involved in the relaxation of PAHs after having been energized by the absorption of UV photons from stars. In this presentation, I will discuss how we can progress in the analysis of the observed AIB spectrum by addressing both the photophysics of isolated PAHs and the formation and evolution of these molecules in cosmic environments. This is achieved by the combination of astronomical models with detailed investigation of molecular processes. The study of these processes has stimulated the development of dedicated laboratory setups and theoretical simulations at the forefront of molecular physics. I will more specifically present the opening given by ERC Synergy project Nanocosmos and the perspectives with the coming James Webb telescope.

  14. [Infrared videonystagmography in vestibular diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, A; Piazza, F; Quaranta, N

    2000-01-01

    Vestibular examination relied upon electronystagmography (ENG) for more than 50 years. This method is based on recording of nystagmus (Ny) without any possibility to see the ocular movements directly. More recently, infrared videonystagmography (VNG) entered the diagnostic protocol of vestibular disorders. VNG permits to record and visualize Ny, both in the darkness and with open eyes. Aim of the present study was to verify the possible advantages of VNG versus ENG for functional evaluation of the vestibular system in patients suffering from otoneurological disorders. To that purpose, VNG and ENG tracings were recorded in 12 patients. The preliminary results show that there are not significant differences in quantitative evaluation of Ny between the two methods. Anyhow, VNG has some technical and clinical advantages that make it the method of choice.

  15. Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm -1 region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H 3 O + (H 2 O) 3 -10 , ammoniated ammonium ions, NH 4 + (NH 3 ) 1 -10 and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH 4 + (NH 3 ) n (H 2 O) m (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J.M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. The mean star formation rates of unobscured QSOs: searching for evidence of suppressed or enhanced star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanley, F.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, C. M.; Rosario, D. J.; Wang, L.; Aird, J. A.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Knudsen, K. K.; Michałowski, M. J.; Valiante, E.; De Zotti, G.; Furlanetto, C.; Ivison, R.; Maddox, S.; Smith, M. W. L.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the mean star formation rates (SFRs) in the host galaxies of ˜3000 optically selected quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey within the Herschel-ATLAS fields, and a radio-luminous subsample covering the redshift range of z = 0.2-2.5. Using Wide-field Infrared

  18. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  19. Uncooled infrared photodetectors in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, J.; Piotrowski, A.

    2006-03-01

    The history and present status of the middle and long wavelength Hg1-xCdxTe infrared detectors in Poland are reviewed. Research and development efforts in Poland were concentrated mostly on uncooled market niche. Technology of the infrared photodetectors has been developed by several research groups. The devices are based on mercury-based variable band gap semiconductor alloys. Modified isothermal vapour phase epitaxy (ISOVPE) has been used for many years for research and commercial fabrication of photoconductive, photoelectromagnetic and other devices. Bulk growth and liquid phase epitaxy was also used. At present, the fabrication of IR devices relies on low temperature epitaxial technique, namely metalorganic vapour phase deposition (MOCVD), frequently in combination with the ISOVPE. Photoconductive and photoelectromagnetic detectors are still in production. The devices are gradually replaced with photovoltaic devices which offer inherent advantages of no electric or magnetic bias, no heat load and no flicker noise. Potentially, the PV devices could offer high performance and very fast response. At present, the uncooled long wavelength devices of conventional design suffer from two issues; namely low quantum efficiency and very low junction resistance. It makes them useless for practical applications. The problems have been solved with advanced 3D band gap engineered architecture, multiple cell heterojunction devices connected in series, monolithic integration of the detectors with microoptics and other improvements. Present fabrication program includes devices which are optimized for operation at any wavelength within a wide spectral range 1-15 μm and 200-300 K temperature range. Special solutions have been applied to improve speed of response. Some devices show picoseconds range response time. The devices have found numerous civilian and military applications.

  20. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...... in feldspar. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  2. INFRARED AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF ION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both n (CN) and n (CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  3. Infrared scintillation in gases, liquids and crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belogurov, S.; Bressi, G; Carugno, G.; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, AT

    2000-01-01

    We report about experimental evidences of infrared scintillation in gaseous, liquid and crystal samples. We firstly studied noble gases at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure in the wavelength range between 0.7 and 1.81 mum. Ar gas emits infrared photons when irradiated by a proton beam.

  4. Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and

  5. Infrared Radiative Properties of Food Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precisely, infrared radiation is electromagnetic radiation whose wavelength is longer than that of visible light, but shorter than that of terahertz radiation and microwaves. The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum spans roughly three orders of magnitude (750 nm to 100 µm) and has been...

  6. Infrared clutter measurements of marine backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, Piet B.

    1991-01-01

    Observations in the infrared wavelength band between 8 and 12 μm of sea backgrounds have been recorded with a CCIR compatible imager for a large number of sea states (0 - 6). Recordings took place in coastal areas as well as on open seas. The behavior of clutter in the infrared data was analyzed in

  7. Experimental evidence of infrared scintillation in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Belogurov, S; Carugno, Giovanni; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa

    2000-01-01

    We present experimental results on infrared emission induced by protons in some solid-state samples. Infrared scintillation occurs in many crystals, with different yield values and time-response behaviours. A rough measurement of the emission wavelength of CsI(Tl) is also reported.

  8. Application of infrared to biomedical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Etehadtavakol, Mahnaz

    2017-01-01

    The book covers the latest updates in the application of infrared to biomedical sciences, a non-invasive, contactless, safe and easy approach imaging of skin and tissue temperatures. Its diagnostic procedure allows practitioners to identify the locations of abnormal chemical and blood vessel activity such as angiogenesis in body tissue. Its non-invasive approach works by applying the technology of the infrared camera and state-of-the-art software, where high-resolution digital infrared imaging technology benefits highly from enhanced image production, standardized image interpretation protocols, computerized comparison and storage, and sophisticated image enhancement and analysis. The book contains contributions from global prominent scientists in the area of infrared applications in biomedical studies. The target audience includes academics, practitioners, clinicians and students working in the area of infrared imaging in biomedicine.

  9. FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  10. Infrared Optical Response of Metallic Graphene Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigang Duan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the infrared optical response characteristics of metallic armchair/zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons (A/ZGNRs to an external longitudinally polarized electromagnetic field at low temperatures. Within the framework of linear response theory at the perturbation regime, we examine the optical infrared absorption threshold energy, absorption power, dielectric function, and electron energy loss spectra near the neutrality points of the systems. It is demonstrated that, by some numerical examples, the photon-assisted direct interband absorptions for AGNR exist with different selection rules from those for ZGNR and single-walled carbon nanotube at infrared regime. This infrared optical property dependence of GNRs on field frequency may be used to design graphene-based nanoscale optoelectronic devices for the detection of infrared electromagnetic irradiations.

  11. The IRTS (Infrared Telescope in Space) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Freund, Minoru M.; Ganga, Ken; Guo, Hongfeng; Hirao, Takanori; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Lange, Andrew E.; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Murakami, Masahide; Nakagawa, Takao; Narita, Masanao; Noda, Manabu; Okuda, Haruyuki; Okumura, Ken'ichi; Onaka, Takashi; Roellig, Thomas L.; Sato, Shinji; Shibai, Hiroshi; Smith, Beverly J.; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Watabe, Toyoki; Yamamura, Issei; Yuen, Lunming

    1996-10-01

    The Japanese satellite-borne infrared telescope, the Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS), has completed a successful survey of a portion of the infrared sky. The IRTS consists of a 15 cm telescope cooled with superfluid liquid helium, and is installed on board the Space Flyer Unit (SFU) spacecraft. The SFU was launched on 1995 March 18 UT. The sky survey by the IRTS started on March 29 UT, and was completed on April 25 UT after exhausting its liquid helium. The cryogenic system operated as designed, and maintained the telescope and the focal-plane instruments at a stable temperature of 1.9 K for 38 days. The four focal-plane instruments, which together covered almost the entire infrared wavelength range, observed a sky area of about 2700 deg(2) and returned a wealth of new data on a variety of objects, including the zodiacal light, interstellar gas and dust, near-infrared cosmic background light and point sources.

  12. Study by infrared spectroscopy of coordination compounds of some ethers with aluminium chloride and bromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derouault, Jean

    1968-01-01

    After having recalled some thermodynamic aspects related to electron donor-acceptor compounds, this research thesis reports the study of infrared spectra of 1-1R 2 O-AlX 3 complexes in a condensed state (X is either bromine or chlorine). The next part reports the study of infrared spectra of 2-1(R 2 O) 2 -AlX 3 complexes in a condensed state (X is also either bromine or chlorine), and the third part addresses the study of the formation of complexes of aluminium halides with ethers, in a dissolved state

  13. Mathematical modeling of heat transfer in production premises heated by gas infrared emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical modeling of the process of free convective heat transfer in the regime of turbulent convection in a closed rectangular region heated by an infrared radiator are presented. The system of Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation is solved, the energy equation for the gas and the heat conduction equations for the enclosing vertical and horizontal walls. A comparative analysis of the heat transfer regimes in the considered region for different Grashof numbers is carried out. The features of the formation of heated air flows relative to the infrared emitter located at some distance from the upper horizontal boundary of the region are singled out.

  14. Overview of benefits, challenges, and requirements of wheeled-vehicle mounted infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John Lester; Clayton, Paul; Olsson, Stefan F.

    2013-06-01

    Requirements for vehicle mounted infrared sensors, especially as imagers evolve to high definition (HD) format will be detailed and analyzed. Lessons learned from integrations of infrared sensors on armored vehicles, unarmored military vehicles and commercial automobiles will be discussed. Comparisons between sensors for driving and those for situation awareness, targeting and other functions will be presented. Conclusions will be drawn regarding future applications and installations. New business requirements for more advanced digital image processing algorithms in the sensor system will be discussed. Examples of these are smarter contrast/brightness adjustments algorithms, detail enhancement, intelligent blending (IR-Vis) modes, and augmented reality.

  15. FY 2005 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Bradley M.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and

  16. Close Formation Flight Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Proud, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    ... in the formation's drag is achieved. A controller, i.e., a formation-hold autopilot for the wing aircraft, is designed such that the formation's geometry is maintained in the face of lead aircraft maneuvers...

  17. INFRARED SPECTRA, THERMOGRAVIMETRIC ANALYSIS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    methyl- quinazolinone in coordination and the formation of a bond between the oxygen of L with the central metal ions, and that nitrogen atom was not the donor atom. For. [Cu(CH3COO)2(L)3]⋅2H2O complex the stretching asymmetric (νas) of ...

  18. Very-Long-Wavelength Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tidrow, Meimei

    1999-01-01

    Infrared detector is a very important part of infrared sensor technology. In ballistic missile defense, infrared sensors play an important role in missile seeking, tracking, guiding, discriminating, and intercepting...

  19. A Novel Infrared Gas Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingding; Zhong, Hongjie

    2000-03-01

    In the paper a novel non-dispersive infrared(IR) gas monitor is described.It is based on the principle that certain gases absorb IR radiation at specific(and often unique) wavelengths.Conventional devices typically include several primary components:a broadband source, usually an incandescent filament,a rotating chopper shutter,a narrow-band filter,a sample tube and a detector. We have developed a number of IR light emitting diodes(LED) having narrow optical bandwidths and which can be intensity modulated by electrical means,for example InAsSbP(4.2 micron)LED.The IR LED can thus replace the thermal source,narrow-band filter and chopper assembly of the conventional IR gas monitor,yielding a solid state,low- powered,compact and almost maintenance-free instrument with high sensitivity and stability and which free of the effects of mechanical vibration too. The detector used in the IR gas monitor is the solid-state detector,such as PbS,PbSe, InSb,HgCdTe,TGS,LT and PZT detector etc. The different configuration of the IR gas monitor is designed.For example,two-path version for measuring methane concentration by monitoring the 3.31 micron absorption band,it can eliminate the interference effects,such as to compensate for LED intensity changes caused by power and temperature variations,and for signal fluctuations due to changes in detector bias. we also have designed portable single-beam version without the sample tube.Its most primary advantage is very cheap(about cost USD 30 ).It measures carbon dioxide concentration by monitoring the 4.25 micron absorption band.Thought its precisions is low,it is used to control carbon dioxide concentration in the air in the green houses and plastic houses(there are about twenty millon one in the China).Because more carbon dioxide will increase the quanity of vegetable and flower production to a greatextent. It also is used in medical,sanitary and antiepidemic applications,such as hospital, store,hotel,cabin and ballroom etc. Key words:infrared

  20. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  1. Nanoantenna-Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Lucca; Hentschel, Mario; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Vogt, Jochen; Huck, Christian; Giessen, Harald; Neubrech, Frank

    2017-05-26

    Spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging is ideally suited for label-free and spatially resolved characterization of molecular species, but often suffers from low infrared absorption cross sections. Here, we overcome this limitation by utilizing confined electromagnetic near-fields of resonantly excited plasmonic nanoantennas, which enhance the molecular absorption by orders of magnitude. In the experiments, we evaporate microstructured chemical patterns of C 60 and pentacene with nanometer thickness on top of homogeneous arrays of tailored nanoantennas. Broadband mid-infrared spectra containing plasmonic and vibrational information were acquired with diffraction-limited resolution using a two-dimensional focal plane array detector. Evaluating the enhanced infrared absorption at the respective frequencies, spatially resolved chemical images were obtained. In these chemical images, the microstructured chemical patterns are only visible if nanoantennas are used. This confirms the superior performance of our approach over conventional spectroscopic infrared imaging. In addition to the improved sensitivity, our technique provides chemical selectivity, which would not be available with plasmonic imaging that is based on refractive index sensing. To extend the accessible spectral bandwidth of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic imaging, we employed nanostructures with dual-band resonances, providing broadband plasmonic enhancement and sensitivity. Our results demonstrate the potential of nanoantenna-enhanced spectroscopic infrared chemical imaging for spatially resolved characterization of organic layers with thicknesses of several nanometers. This is of potential interest for medical applications which are currently hampered by state-of-art infrared techniques, e.g., for distinguishing cancerous from healthy tissues.

  2. Target detection and tracking in infrared video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhihui; Zhu, Jihong

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for target detection and tracking in infrared video. The target is defined by its location and extent in a single frame. In the initialization process, we use an adaptive threshold to segment the target and then extract the fern feature and normalize it as a template. The detector uses the random forest and fern to detect the target in the infrared video. The random forest and fern is a random combination of 2bit Binary Pattern, which is robust to infrared targets with blurred and unknown contours. The tracker uses the gray-value weighted mean-Shift algorithm to track the infrared target which is always brighter than the background. And the tracker can track the deformed target efficiently and quickly. When the target disappears, the detector will redetect the target in the coming infrared image. Finally, we verify the algorithm on the real-time infrared target detection and tracking platform. The result shows that our algorithm performs better than TLD in terms of recall and runtime in infrared video.

  3. Infrared and visual image fusion through infrared feature extraction and visual information preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Lijia; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    The ideal fusion of the infrared image and visual image should integrate the important bright features of the infrared image, and preserve much original visual information of the visual image. To achieve this purpose, we propose a simple, fast yet effective infrared and visual image fusion algorithm through infrared feature extraction and visual information preservation. Firstly, we take advantage of quadtree decomposition and B e ´ zier interpolation to reconstruct the infrared background. Secondly, the infrared bright features are extracted by subtracting the reconstructed background from the infrared image and then refined by reducing the redundant background information. To inhibit the over-exposure problem, the refined infrared features are adaptively suppressed and then added on the visual image to achieve the final fusion image. In this way, the fusion image could not only reveal the invisible but important infrared objects by integrating the infrared bright features, but also show good visual quality by preserving much original visual information. Experiments performed on the commonly used image sets validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms several representative image fusion algorithms in most of the cases.

  4. Detecting Population III Stars through Observations of Near-Infrared Cosmic Infrared Background Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Mather, John C.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2004-06-01

    Following the successful mapping of the last scattering surface by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and balloon experiments, the epoch of the first stars, when Population III stars formed, is emerging as the next cosmological frontier. It is not clear what these stars' properties were, when they formed, or how long their era lasted before leading to the stars and galaxies we see today. We show that these questions can be answered with the current and future measurements of the near-IR cosmic infrared background (CIB). Theoretical arguments suggest that Population III stars were very massive and short-lived stars that formed at z~10-20 at rare peaks of the density field in the cold dark matter universe. Because Population III stars probably formed individually in small minihalos, they are not directly accessible to current telescopic studies. We show that these stars left a strong and measurable signature via their contribution to the CIB anisotropies for a wide range of their formation scenarios. The excess in the recently measured near-IR CIB anisotropies over that from normal galaxies can be explained by contribution from early Population III stars. These results imply that Population III were indeed very massive stars and that their epoch started at z~20 and lasted past zfuture space-based missions.

  5. Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) deployed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a Solmirus Corp. All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer. The IRSI is an automatic, continuously operating, digital imaging and software system designed to capture hemispheric sky images and provide time series retrievals of fractional sky cover during both the day and night. The instrument provides diurnal, radiometrically calibrated sky imagery in the mid-infrared atmospheric window and imagery in the visible wavelengths for cloud retrievals during daylight hours. The software automatically identifies cloudy and clear regions at user-defined intervals and calculates fractional sky cover, providing a real-time display of sky conditions.

  6. Infrared propagator corrections for constant deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, T M; Miao, S P; Prokopec, T [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Woodard, R P [Department of Physics, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: T.M.Janssen@uu.nl, E-mail: S.Miao@uu.nl, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: woodard@phys.ufl.edu

    2008-12-21

    We derive the propagator for a massless, minimally coupled scalar on a D-dimensional, spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic background with arbitrary constant deceleration parameter. Our construction uses the operator formalism by integrating the Fourier mode sum. We give special attention to infrared corrections from the nonzero lower limit associated with working on finite spatial sections. These corrections eliminate infrared divergences that would otherwise be incorrectly treated by dimensional regularization, resulting in off-coincidence divergences for those special values of the deceleration parameter at which the infrared divergence is logarithmic. As an application we compute the expectation value of the scalar stress-energy tensor.

  7. The Physics of Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, K K

    1999-01-01

    In the past, infrared imaging has been used exclusively for military applications. In fact, it can also be useful in a wide range of scientific and commercial applications. However, its wide spread use was impeded by the scarcity of the imaging systems and its high cost. Recently, there is an emerging infrared technology based on quantum well intersubband transition in III-V compound semiconductors. With the new technology, these impedances can be eliminated and a new era of infrared imaging is in sight. This book is designed to give a systematic description on the underlying physics of the ne

  8. Infrared thermography on TFR 600 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romain, Roland.

    1980-06-01

    Infrared thermography with a single InSb detector and with a scanning camera has been performed on the TFR fusion device. High power neutral beam injection diagnostic by means of an infrared periscope is showed to be possible. Surface temperature measurements on the limiter during the discharge have been made in order to evaluate the power deposited by the plasma on this part of the inner wall. Various attempts of infrared detection on the high power neutral injector prototype vessel are described, particularly the measurement of the power deposited on one of the extraction grids of the ion source [fr

  9. Optics Alignment of a Balloon-Borne Far-Infrared Interferometer BETTII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabal, Arnab; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Rizzo, Maxime J.; Mundy, Lee; Sampler, Henry; Juanola Parramon, Roser; Veach, Todd; Fixsen, Dale; Vila Hernandez De Lorenzo, Jor; Silverberg, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-m baseline far-infrared (FIR: 30 90 micrometer) interferometer providing spatially resolved spectroscopy. The initial scientific focus of BETTII is on clustered star formation, but this capability likely has a much broader scientific application.One critical step in developing an interferometer, such as BETTII, is the optical alignment of the system. We discuss how we determine alignment sensitivities of different optical elements on the interferogram outputs. Accordingly, an alignment plan is executed that makes use of a laser tracker and theodolites for precise optical metrology of both the large external optics and the small optics inside the cryostat. We test our alignment on the ground by pointing BETTII to bright near-infrared sources and obtaining their images in the tracking detectors.

  10. Investigation of carbonates in the Sutter's Mill meteorite grains with hyperspectral infrared imaging micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Mehmet

    2018-04-01

    Synchrotron-based high spatial resolution hyperspectral infrared imaging technique provides thousands of infrared spectra with high resolution, thus allowing us to acquire detailed spatial maps of chemical molecular structures for many grains in short times. Utilizing this technique, thousands of infrared spectra were analyzed at once instead of inspecting each spectrum separately. Sutter's Mill meteorite is a unique carbonaceous type meteorite with highly heterogeneous chemical composition. Multiple grains from the Sutter's Mill meteorite have been studied using this technique and the presence of both hydrous and anhydrous silicate minerals have been observed. It is observed that the carbonate mineralogy varies from simple to more complex carbonates even within a few microns in the meteorite grains. These variations, the type and distribution of calcite-like vs. dolomite-like carbonates are presented by means of hyperspectral FTIR imaging spectroscopy with high resolution. Various scenarios for the formation of different carbonate compositions in the Sutter's Mill parent body are discussed.

  11. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  12. Infrared thermography quantitative image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouroliakou, A.; Kalatzis, I.; Kalyvas, N.; Grivas, TB

    2017-11-01

    Infrared thermography is an imaging technique that has the ability to provide a map of temperature distribution of an object’s surface. It is considered for a wide range of applications in medicine as well as in non-destructive testing procedures. One of its promising medical applications is in orthopaedics and diseases of the musculoskeletal system where temperature distribution of the body’s surface can contribute to the diagnosis and follow up of certain disorders. Although the thermographic image can give a fairly good visual estimation of distribution homogeneity and temperature pattern differences between two symmetric body parts, it is important to extract a quantitative measurement characterising temperature. Certain approaches use temperature of enantiomorphic anatomical points, or parameters extracted from a Region of Interest (ROI). A number of indices have been developed by researchers to that end. In this study a quantitative approach in thermographic image processing is attempted based on extracting different indices for symmetric ROIs on thermograms of the lower back area of scoliotic patients. The indices are based on first order statistical parameters describing temperature distribution. Analysis and comparison of these indices result in evaluating the temperature distribution pattern of the back trunk expected in healthy, regarding spinal problems, subjects.

  13. Infrared Constraint on Ultraviolet Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yuhsin [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    While our current paradigm of particle physics, the Standard Model (SM), has been extremely successful at explaining experiments, it is theoretically incomplete and must be embedded into a larger framework. In this thesis, we review the main motivations for theories beyond the SM (BSM) and the ways such theories can be constrained using low energy physics. The hierarchy problem, neutrino mass and the existence of dark matter (DM) are the main reasons why the SM is incomplete . Two of the most plausible theories that may solve the hierarchy problem are the Randall-Sundrum (RS) models and supersymmetry (SUSY). RS models usually suffer from strong flavor constraints, while SUSY models produce extra degrees of freedom that need to be hidden from current experiments. To show the importance of infrared (IR) physics constraints, we discuss the flavor bounds on the anarchic RS model in both the lepton and quark sectors. For SUSY models, we discuss the difficulties in obtaining a phenomenologically allowed gaugino mass, its relation to R-symmetry breaking, and how to build a model that avoids this problem. For the neutrino mass problem, we discuss the idea of generating small neutrino masses using compositeness. By requiring successful leptogenesis and the existence of warm dark matter (WDM), we can set various constraints on the hidden composite sector. Finally, to give an example of model independent bounds from collider experiments, we show how to constrain the DM–SM particle interactions using collider results with an effective coupling description.

  14. Submonolayer Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Chang, Yia-Chang

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for inserting submonolayer (SML) quantum dots (QDs) or SML QD stacks, instead of conventional Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) QDs, into the active region of intersubband photodetectors. A typical configuration would be InAs SML QDs embedded in thin layers of GaAs, surrounded by AlGaAs barriers. Here, the GaAs and the AlGaAs have nearly the same lattice constant, while InAs has a larger lattice constant. In QD infrared photodetector, the important quantization directions are in the plane perpendicular to the normal incidence radiation. In-plane quantization is what enables the absorption of normal incidence radiation. The height of the S-K QD controls the positions of the quantized energy levels, but is not critically important to the desired normal incidence absorption properties. The SML QD or SML QD stack configurations give more control of the structure grown, retains normal incidence absorption properties, and decreases the strain build-up to allow thicker active layers for higher quantum efficiency.

  15. Mid infrared MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M.; Mortada, Bassem; Sharaf, Khaled; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a bulk-micromachined wideband MEMS-based spectrometer covering both the NIR and the MIR ranges and working from 1200 nm to 4800 nm. The core engine of the spectrometer is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. The spectrum is obtained using the Fourier Transform techniques that allows covering a very wide spectral range limited by the detector responsivity. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator. Zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) multimode optical fibers are used to connect light between the white light source and the interferometer input, as well as the interferometer output to a PbSe photoconductive detector. The recorded signal-to-noise ratio is 25 dB at the wavelength of 3350 nm. The spectrometer is successfully used in measuring the absorption spectra of methylene chloride, quartz glass and polystyrene film. The presented solution provides a low cost method for producing miniaturized spectrometers in the near-/mid-infrared.

  16. Infrared rays stimulate silkworm productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolov, A.

    1977-01-01

    The tests involving the hybrids 48-I x 157-K and J-124 x C-122 were conducted at the experimental base of the Sericulture Experiment Station in Vratza. Silkworm seed was irradiated once daily from the first day of incubation to whitening of the seed at 60 and 80 min exposure. The combined quartz lamp, type ''MLKK-5'' (500 W, 220 V) was used. Seed was irradiated at a distance of 100 cm from the burner after its preliminary heating in the course of at least 10 min. Silkworm infrared irradiation exerts a stimulatory effect on embryonal and larval development, silkworm viability, and row cocoon yield. Sixty minutes irradiation exposure proved to be more effective for the native hybrid 48-I x 157-K, silkworm viability increasing by 3.75% and row cocoon yield per g silkworm seed - by 0.37 kg. On the contrary, 80 min irradiation exposure proved more effective in the case of the Japanese hybrid J-124 x C-122. (B.Ch.)

  17. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  18. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  19. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    OpenAIRE

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is...

  20. Introductory survey for wireless infrared communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munsif Ali Jatoi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless infrared communications can be defined as the propagation of light waves in free space using infrared radiation whose range is 400–700 nm. This range corresponds to frequencies of hundreds of terahertz, which is high for higher data rate applications. Wireless infrared is applied for higher data rates applications such as wireless computing, wireless video and wireless multimedia communication applications. Introduced by Gfeller, this field has grown with different link configurations, improved transmitter efficiency, increased receiver responsivity and various multiple access techniques for improved quality. Errors are caused because of background light, which causes degradation overall system performance. Error correction techniques are used to remove the errors caused during transmission. This study provides a brief account on field theory used for error correction in wireless infrared systems. The results are produced in terms of bit error rate and signal-to-noise ratio for various bit lengths to show the ability of encoding and decoding algorithms.

  1. Far infrared peculiar behavior of quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yulin; Liu Jiying

    1988-09-01

    Many quasars possibly have nebulous envelopes with far infrared radiation. These nebulosities may be similar to fuzz in the optical region in morphology. These quasars have many properties in common. (author). Refs, 3 figs

  2. Measurement of Low-Altitude Infrared Transmission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeisse, C

    1999-01-01

    Infrared propagation at low altitudes is determined by extinction caused by molecules, aerosol particles, and ray bending by refraction, three effects that control the mean value of the signal (the transmission...

  3. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hyper Velocity Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdman, Peter

    2004-01-01

    .... We have developed the experimental techniques and the instruments necessary to expand those earlier experiments into the infrared portion of the spectrum where ground-state, molecular, ro-vibrational...

  4. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  5. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Eric; Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  6. Mid Infrared Laser Sources for Remote Sensing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mid infrared solid-state lasers are made possible by using innovative low phonon energy materials. Until recently, such lasers were not feasible because they...

  7. Infrared synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.D.; Williams, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Simple and useful approximations, valid at infrared wavelengths, to the equations for synchrotron radiation are presented and used to quantify the brightness and power advantage of current synchrotron radiation light sources over conventional infrared broadband laboratory sources. The Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) and the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (vacuum ultraviolet) [NSLS(VUV)] storage rings are used as examples in the calculation of the properties of infrared synchrotron radiation. The pulsed nature of the emission is also discussed, and potential areas of application for the brightness, power, and time structure advantages are presented. The use of infrared free electron lasers and undulators on the next generation of storage ring light sources is briefly considered

  8. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  9. Mesoporous Silicon Far Infrared Filters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a novel method to make optical filters based on mesoporous silicon multilayers, for use at cold temperatures in the far infrared...

  10. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  11. Mesoporous Silicon Far Infrared Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a novel method to make optical filters based on mesoporous silicon multilayers, for use at cold temperatures in the far infrared...

  12. NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IRSA is chartered to curate the calibrated science products from NASAs infrared and sub-millimeter missions, including five major large-area/all-sky surveys. IRSA...

  13. Far-infrared spectroscopy of HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, R.J.; Kessler, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Interest has developed rapidly in the astrophysics associated with far-infrared line emission from ionised regions, following the development of spectroscopic instruments and observing facilities appropriate to those wavelengths. Far-infrared observations and their interpretation are now at the stage where the need for specific developments in theoretical and laboratory work have been identified. The need is also apparent for the development of models dealing with more realistic astrophysical situations. (Auth.)

  14. A new technique for infrared scintillation measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Chiossi, F.; Brylew, K.; Borghesani, A. F.; Braggio, C.; Carugno, G.; Drozdowski, W.; Guarise, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new technique to measure the infrared scintillation light yield of rare earth (RE) doped crystals by comparing it to near UV-visible scintillation of a calibrated Pr:(Lu$_{0.75}$Y$_{0.25}$)$_{3}$Al$_5$O$_{12}$ sample. As an example, we apply this technique to provide the light yield in visible and infrared range up to \\SI{1700}{nm} of this crystal.

  15. A new technique for infrared scintillation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiossi, F., E-mail: federico.chiossi@studenti.unipd.it [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Brylew, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Borghesani, A.F. [CNISM Unit and Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Braggio, C.; Carugno, G. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Drozdowski, W. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Guarise, M. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, University of Padua, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2017-05-21

    We propose a new technique to measure the infrared scintillation light yield of rare earth doped crystals by comparing it to near UV–visible scintillation of a calibrated Pr:(Lu{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.25}){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} sample. As an example, we apply this technique to provide the light yield in visible and infrared range up to 1700 nm of this crystal.

  16. Effects of extrusion, infrared and microwave processing on Maillard reaction products and phenolic compounds in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilić, Slađana; Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Akıllıoğlu, Gül; Serpen, Arda; Delić, Nenad; Gökmen, Vural

    2014-01-15

    The Maillard reaction indicators furosine, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), acrylamide and color were determined to evaluate heat effects induced during extrusion, infrared and microwave heating of soybean. In addition, the present paper aimed to study changes in the phenolic compounds, as well as in the overall antioxidant properties of different soybean products in relation to heating at 45-140 °C during the processes. Soybean proteins were highly sensible to Maillard reaction and furosine was rapidly formed under slight heating conditions during extrusion and infrared heating. Microwave heating at lower temperatures for a longer time yielded lower acrylamide levels in the final soybean products, as a result of its partial degradation. However, during infrared heating, acrylamide formation greatly increased with decreasing moisture content. After a short time of extrusion and infrared heating at 140 °C and microwave heating at 135 °C for 5 min, concentrations of HMF increased to 11.34, 26.21 and 34.97 µg g(-1), respectively. The heating conditions caused formation of acrylamide, HMF and furosine in high concentration. The results indicate that the complex structure of soybeans provides protection of phenolic compounds from thermal degradation, and that Maillard reaction products improved the antioxidant properties of heat-treated soybean. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Novel use of infrared thermal imaging to predict arteriovenous fistula patency and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shakarchi, Julien; Hodson, James; Field, Melanie; Inston, Nicholas

    2017-07-14

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred method of long-term haemodialysis. However, it has been shown to have a substantial rate of maturation failure. The formation of an AVF creates haemodynamic changes to blood flow in the arm with diversion of blood away from the distal circulation into the low pressure venous system, in turn, leading to thermal changes distally. In this study, we aimed to assess the novel use of infrared thermal imaging as a predictor of arteriovenous maturation. A prospective cohort study was conducted on 100 consecutive patients who had AVF formation from December 2015 to June 2016. Infrared thermal imaging was undertaken pre- and post-operatively on the day of surgery to assess thermal changes to the arms and to assess them as predictors of clinical patency and functional maturation. For clinical patency, infrared thermal imaging was found to have a positive predictive value of 88% and a negative predictive value of 86%. For functional maturation, it was found to have a positive predictive value of 84%, a negative predictive value of 95%. In addition, it was shown to have superiority to the commonly used intra-operative predictor of thrill as well as other independent pre-operative patient factors. Infrared thermal imaging has been found to be a very useful tool in accurately predicting fistula patency and maturation.

  18. New infrared solid state laser materials for CALIOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L.D.; Page, R.H.; Wilke, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser light may serve as a useful means by which to detect the presence of the targeted effluents. Since optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have proven to be a versatile method of generating coherent light from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, this technology is a promising choice by which to service the CALIOPE applications. In addition, since some uncertainty remains regarding the precise wavelengths and molecules that will be targeted, the deployment of OPOs retains the greatest amount of wavelength flexibility. Another approach that the authors are considering is that of generating tunable infrared radiation directly with a diode-pumped solid state laser (DPSSL). One important advantage of a DPSSL is that it offers flexible pulse format modes that can be tailored to meet the needs of a particular application and target molecule. On the other hand, direct generation by a tunable DPSSL will generally be able to cover a more limited wavelength range than is possible with OPO technology. In support of the CALIOPE objectives the authors are exploring the potential for laser action among a class of materials comprised of transition metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals (i.e., ZnS, ZnSe and ZnTe). The Cr 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ dopants were selected as the most favorable candidates, on the basis of their documented spectral properties in the scientific literature. Thus far, the authors have characterized the absorption and emission properties of these ions in the ZnS and ZnSe crystals. The absorption spectra are used to determine the preferred wavelength at which the crystal should be pumped, while the emission spectra reveal the extent of the tuning range potentially offered by the material. In addition, measurements of the emission lifetime as a function of temperature turn out to be quite useful, since this data is suggestive of the room temperature emission yield

  19. Development of Thermal Infrared Sensor to Supplement Operational Land Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Peter; Waczynski, Augustyn; Kan, Emily; Wen, Yiting; Rosenberry, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) is a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP)-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 m. The focal plane will contain three 640 512 QWIP arrays mounted onto a silicon substrate. The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) addresses each pixel on the QWIP arrays and reads out the pixel value (signal). The ROIC is controlled by the focal plane electronics (FPE) by means of clock signals and bias voltage value. The means of how the FPE is designed to control and interact with the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA) is the basis for this work. The technology developed under the FPE is for the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA). The FPE must interact with the FPA to command and control the FPA, extract analog signals from the FPA, and then convert the analog signals to digital format and send them via a serial link (USB) to a computer. The FPE accomplishes the described functions by converting electrical power from generic power supplies to the required bias power that is needed by the FPA. The FPE also generates digital clocking signals and shifts the typical transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) to }5 V required by the FPA. The FPE also uses an application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) named System Image, Digitizing, Enhancing, Controlling, And Retrieving (SIDECAR) from Teledyne Corp. to generate the clocking patterns commanded by the user. The uniqueness of the FPE for TIRS lies in that the TIRS FPA has three QWIP detector arrays, and all three detector arrays must be in synchronization while in operation. This is to avoid data skewing while observing Earth flying in space. The observing scenario may be customized by uploading new control software to the SIDECAR.

  20. Indium antimonide infrared CCD linear imaging arrays with on-chip preprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, R. D.; Koch, T. L.; Parrish, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the fabrication of a new InSb CCD chip based on an improved process which eliminates the limitations inherent with the earlier techniques. This process includes planar junction formation and an aluminum and SiO2 material system which is amenable to state-of-the-art chemical and plasma delineation techniques. Further, the new chip integrates for the first time in monolithic format InSb IR detectors with an InSb CCD. The reported experiments represent the first operation of an InSb infrared CCD array. In addition to fuller characterization of the 20-element charge-coupled infrared imaging device, several factors which influence device performance are currently being addressed. These include surface state density, the CCD output circuit, and storage time (dark current).

  1. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue.

  2. Developing infrared array controller with software real time operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Shigeyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Motohara, Kentaro; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Onaka, Takashi; Kataza, Hirokazu

    2008-07-01

    Real-time capabilities are required for a controller of a large format array to reduce a dead-time attributed by readout and data transfer. The real-time processing has been achieved by dedicated processors including DSP, CPLD, and FPGA devices. However, the dedicated processors have problems with memory resources, inflexibility, and high cost. Meanwhile, a recent PC has sufficient resources of CPUs and memories to control the infrared array and to process a large amount of frame data in real-time. In this study, we have developed an infrared array controller with a software real-time operating system (RTOS) instead of the dedicated processors. A Linux PC equipped with a RTAI extension and a dual-core CPU is used as a main computer, and one of the CPU cores is allocated to the real-time processing. A digital I/O board with DMA functions is used for an I/O interface. The signal-processing cores are integrated in the OS kernel as a real-time driver module, which is composed of two virtual devices of the clock processor and the frame processor tasks. The array controller with the RTOS realizes complicated operations easily, flexibly, and at a low cost.

  3. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Chlorite Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineral chemistry of twenty chlorite samples from the United States Geological Survey (USGS spectral library and two other regions, having a wide range of Fe and Mg contents and relatively constant Al and Si contents, was studied via infrared (IR spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF analysis. Five absorption features of the twenty samples near 4525, 4440, 4361, 4270, and 4182 cm−1 were observed, and two diagnostic features at 4440 and 4280 cm−1 were recognized. Assignments of the two diagnostic features were made for two combination bands (ν+δAlAlO−OH and ν+δSiAlO−OH by regression with IR fundamental absorptions. Furthermore, the determinant factors of the NIR band position were found by comparing the band positions with relative components. The results showed that Fe/(Fe + Mg values are negatively correlated with the two NIR combination bands. The findings provide an interpretation of the NIR band formation and demonstrate a simple way to use NIR spectroscopy to discriminate between chlorites with different components. More importantly, spectroscopic detection of mineral chemical variations in chlorites provides geologists with a tool with which to collect information on hydrothermal alteration zones from hyperspectral-resolution remote sensing data.

  4. Very high-luminosity infrared galaxies - are they very young?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbidge, G.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that most of the very high-luminosity IRAS galaxies, those which emit greater than or equal to 10 to the 12th solar luminosities nearly all in the far infrared out to 100 microns, are very young systems with ages less than or equal to 10 to the 9th years. The luminosity comes largely from stars with masses near 100 solar masses which evolve rapidly, ejecting much of their mass as elements heavier than hydrogen. The gas ejected condenses into dust in circumstellar shells. The prototype star in the Galaxy which shows all of these attributes is Eta Car. It is shown that total masses of order 10 to the 7th-10 to the 8th solar masses condensed into such stars can produce the observed luminosities, and that 10-100 generations of such stars will produce enough dust (about 10 to the 8th solar masses) to explain the observed infrared luminosities. If this hypothesis is correct the composition of gas and dust may well be highly anomalous, and there should be no old stars with ages about 10 to the 10th years present. Initial star formation is probably triggered by interactions with close companion galaxies. 40 references

  5. Infrared emission spectra of candidate interstellar aromatic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Interstellar dust is responsible, through surface reactions, for the creation of molecular hydrogen, the main component of the interstellar clouds in which new stars form. Intermediate between small, gas-phase molecules and dust are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Such molecules could account for 2-30% of the carbon in the Galaxy, and may provide nucleation sites for the formation of carbonaceous dust. Although PAHs have been proposed as the sources of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in the spectra of a variety of interstellar sources, the emission characteristics of such molecules are still poorly understood. Here we report laboratory emission spectra of several representative PAHs, obtained in conditions approximating those of the interstellar medium, and measured over the entire spectral region spanned by the unidentified infrared bands. We find that neutral PAHs of small and moderate size can at best make only a minor contribution to these emission bands. Cations of these molecules, as well as much larger PAHs and their cations, remain viable candidates for the sources of these bands.

  6. Far-Infrared Interferometeric Telescope Experiment (FITE): sensor optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Tsunehito; Shibai, Hiroshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Watabe, Toyoki; Matsuo, Taro; Ohkubo, Atsushi; Katoh, Eri; Kanoh, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Miki; Mochizuki, Shun; Matsumoto, Yuka; Morishita, Hirono; Yamamoto, Koudai; Kanoh, Ryoko; Nakashima, Asami; Tanabe, Mitsuhiro; Doi, Yasuo; Narita, Masanao

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a sensor optical system for the Far Infrared Interferometric Telescope (FITE). The spatial resolution of FITE is expected to be 2.5 arcseconds. In order to derive the spatial extent of target objects, the visibility of interference fringes has to be measured precisely. For this purpose, we constructed the focal plane assembly of the FITE interferometer with the sensor optics. The focal plane is the entrance focus of the sensor optics. A far-infrared (FIR) array detector is installed on the final focal plane of the sensor optics. Its camera optics has F/106 beam for each beam of the interferometer. The PSF is dominated by diffraction, and its size corresponds approximately to the array size so that the fringe pattern can be measured by the array in real time. This system employs of two IR detectors and an optical CCD. The FIR detector has a format of 1.5mm ×15 pixels. In addition to the FIR array detector, we have a mid-IR detector and an optical CCD. They are also installed on the final focal plane of the sensor optics. These two detectors are used for the precise alignment of the interferometer optics.

  7. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  8. Bolometers for far-infrared and submillimetre astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Important scientific goals of far-infrared and submillimetre astronomy include measurements of anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation, deep imaging surveys for detection of high-red-shift galaxies, and imaging and spectroscopy of star formation regions and the interstellar medium in the milky way and nearby galaxies. Use of sensitive bolometer arrays leads to very large improvements in observing speed. Recent progress in the development of bolometric detector systems for ground-based and space-borne far-infrared and submillimetre astronomical observations is reviewed, including spider-web NTD bolometers, transition-edge superconducting sensors, and micromachined planar arrays of ion-implanted silicon bolometers. Future arrays may be based on planar absorbers without feedhorns, which offer potential advantages including more efficient use of space in the focal plane and improved instantaneous sampling of the telescope point spread function, but present challenges in suppression of stray light and RF interference. FIRST and Planck Surveyor are planned satellite missions involving passively cooled (∼70 K) telescopes, and bolometer array developments for these missions are described

  9. MTG infrared sounder detection chain: first radiometric test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumestier, D.; Pistone, F.; Dartois, T.; Blazquez, E.

    2017-11-01

    Europe's next fleet of geostationary meteorological satellites, MeteoSat Third Generation, will introduce new functions in addition to continuity of high-resolution meteorological data. The atmosphere Infrared Sounder (IRS), as high -end instrument, is part of this challenging program. IRS principle is a Fourier Transform Interferometer, which allows recomposing atmospheric spectrum after infrared photons detection. Transmission spectrums will be used to support numerical weather prediction. IRS instrument is able to offer full disk coverage in one hour, an on-ground resolution of 4 by 4 km, in two spectral bands (MWIR: 1600 to 2175cm-1 and LWIR: 700 to 1210cm-1) with a spectral resolution of 0.6cm-1. Among critical technologies and processes, IRS detection chain shall offer outstanding characteristics in terms of radiometric performance like Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), dynamic range and linearity. Selected detectors are HgCdTe two-dimensions arrays, cooled at 55 Kelvins, hybridized on snapshot silicon read-out circuit at 160x160 format. Video electronics present 16 bits resolution, and the whole detection chain (Detectors and electronics) permits to reach SNR between 2 000 and 10 000 as requested by the application. Radiometric onground test results performed on design representative detection chains are presented and are confirming the challenging phase A design choices.

  10. A WISE Survey of Star Formation in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Tracy

    During the last decade, sensitive mid-infrared observations obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope significantly increased the known population of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) associated with nearby molecular clouds. With such a census, recent studies have derived efficiencies of the star formation rates in the different environments. Given the small Spitzer coverage of these molecular clouds, relative to their large extended regions, these YSO populations may represent a limited view of star formation in these regions. We propose to take advantage of mid-infrared observations from the recent WISE mission, which provides an all-sky view and therefore full coverage of the nearby molecular clouds, to assess the degree to which their currently known YSO populations may be under-representative of the extended, more complete populations. We will extend and apply the well established classification method, developed by Spitzer Legacy teams, to archived WISE observations in order to identify and assemble a more complete census of YSOs associated with nearby clouds. Large-scale, high angular resolution extinction maps covering the full extent of these clouds will also be constructed in a uniform manner to enable cross-comparison studies of star formation rates in these different environments. Finally, we plan to provide enhanced WISE data products to the community through the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, which will promote a diversity of studies by a wider group of investigators, facilitate star-formation studies across different environments, and help ensure the legacy of WISE data.

  11. Far-infrared line images of dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poglitsch, A.; Geis, N.; Herrmann, F.; Madden, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Townes, C. H.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Irregular dwarf galaxies are about ten times more widespread in the universe than regular spiral galaxies. They are characterized by a relatively low metallicity, i.e., lower abundance of the heavier elements (metals) with respect to hydrogen than in the solar neighborhood. These heavier elements in the form of molecules, atoms, or ions, which have radiative transitions in the infrared play a decisive role in the energy balance of the ISM and thereby for the formation of stars. Dwarf galaxies are thus model cases for the physical conditions in the early phase of the universe. Large Magellanic Cloud: 30 Doradus. The two nearest dwarf galaxies are the Magellanic clouds at a distance approximately 50 kpc. The LMC contains 30 Dor, a region with young, extremely massive stars which strongly interact with the surrounding ISM on account of their stellar winds and intense UV radiation. 30 Dor is the brightest object in the LMC at almost all wavelengths.

  12. Near infrared spectroscopy and exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, Caroline

    2002-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method for the continuous monitoring of changes in tissue oxygenation and blood volume during aerobic exercise. During incremental exercise in adult subjects there was a positive correlation between lactate threshold (measured by blood sampling) and changes in the rate of muscle deoxygenation (measured by NIRS). However, the 7% failure rate for the NIRS test mitigated against the general use of this method. NIRS did not provide a valid method for LT determination in an adolescent population. NIRS was then used to examine whether haemodynamic changes could be a contributing factor to the mechanism underlying the cross-transfer effect. During a one-legged incremental aerobic exercise test the muscle was more deoxygenated in the exercising leg than in the non-exercising leg, consistent with oxygen consumption outstripping blood flow to the exercising limb. However, muscle blood volume increased equally in both legs. This suggests that blood flow may be raised to similar levels in both the legs; although local factors may signal an increase in blood volume, this effect is expressed in both legs. Muscle blood flow and changes in muscle blood volume were then measured directly by NIRS during an incremental one-arm aerobic exercise test. There was no significant difference in either blood volume or blood flow in the two arms at the end of the test. In the non-exercising arm changes in blood flow and blood volume were measured throughout the protocol. At higher exercise intensities, blood volume continued to rise as muscle blood flow plateaued, indicating that blood volume changes become independent of changes in blood flow. Finally, the effect of different training regimes on changes in muscle blood volume was examined. Subjects were assigned to a training group; two-arm training, one-arm training or a control group. Training did not affect blood volume changes during two-arm exercise. However, during one

  13. Near infrared spectroscopy and exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, Caroline

    2002-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method for the continuous monitoring of changes in tissue oxygenation and blood volume during aerobic exercise. During incremental exercise in adult subjects there was a positive correlation between lactate threshold (measured by blood sampling) and changes in the rate of muscle deoxygenation (measured by NIRS). However, the 7% failure rate for the NIRS test mitigated against the general use of this method. NIRS did not provide a valid method for LT determination in an adolescent population. NIRS was then used to examine whether haemodynamic changes could be a contributing factor to the mechanism underlying the cross-transfer effect. During a one-legged incremental aerobic exercise test the muscle was more deoxygenated in the exercising leg than in the non-exercising leg, consistent with oxygen consumption outstripping blood flow to the exercising limb. However, muscle blood volume increased equally in both legs. This suggests that blood flow may be raised to similar levels in both the legs; although local factors may signal an increase in blood volume, this effect is expressed in both legs. Muscle blood flow and changes in muscle blood volume were then measured directly by NIRS during an incremental one-arm aerobic exercise test. There was no significant difference in either blood volume or blood flow in the two arms at the end of the test. In the non-exercising arm changes in blood flow and blood volume were measured throughout the protocol. At higher exercise intensities, blood volume continued to rise as muscle blood flow plateaued, indicating that blood volume changes become independent of changes in blood flow. Finally, the effect of different training regimes on changes in muscle blood volume was examined. Subjects were assigned to a training group; two-arm training, one-arm training or a control group. Training did not affect blood volume changes during two-arm exercise. However, during one

  14. The First Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxy Discovered by WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Assef, Roberto; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie; Condon, J. J.; Cushing, Michael C.; Cutri, Roc; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer of the z = 2.452 source WISEJ181417.29+341224.9, the first hyperluminous source found in the WISE survey. WISE 1814+3412 is also the prototype for an all-sky sample of approximately 1000 extremely luminous "W1W2-dropouts" (sources faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers and well detected at 12 or 22 micrometers). The WISE data and a 350 micrometers detection give a minimum bolometric luminosity of 3.7 x 10(exp 13) solar luminosity, with approximately 10(exp 14) solar luminosity plausible. Followup images reveal four nearby sources: a QSO and two Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z = 2.45, and an M dwarf star. The brighter LBG dominates the bolometric emission. Gravitational lensing is unlikely given the source locations and their different spectra and colors. The dominant LBG spectrum indicates a star formation rate approximately 300 solar mass yr(exp -1), accounting for less than or equal to 10 percent of the bolometric luminosity. Strong 22 micrometer emission relative to 350 micrometer implies that warm dust contributes significantly to the luminosity, while cooler dust normally associated with starbursts is constrained by an upper limit at 1.1 mm. Radio emission is approximately 10? above the far-infrared/radio correlation, indicating an active galactic nucleus is present. An obscured AGN combined with starburst and evolved stellar components can account for the observations. If the black hole mass follows the local MBH-bulge mass relation, the implied Eddington ratio is approximately greater than 4. WISE 1814+3412 may be a heavily obscured object where the peak AGN activity occurred prior to the peak era of star formation.

  15. Near infrared lasers in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G

    2015-07-01

    Technology development in flow cytometry has closely tracked laser technology, the light source that flow cytometers almost exclusively use to excite fluorescent probes. The original flow cytometers from the 1970s and 1980s used large water-cooled lasers to produce only one or two laser lines at a time. Modern cytometers can take advantage of the revolution in solid state laser technology to use almost any laser wavelength ranging from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Commercial cytometers can now be equipped with many small solid state lasers, providing almost any wavelength needed for cellular analysis. Flow cytometers are now equipped to analyze 20 or more fluorescent probes simultaneously, requiring multiple laser wavelengths. Instrument developers are now trying to increase this number by designing fluorescent probes that can be excited by laser wavelength at the "edges" of the visible light range, in the near ultraviolet and near-infrared region. A variety of fluorescent probes have been developed that excite with violet and long wavelength ultraviolet light; however, the near-infrared range (660-800 nm) has yet seen only exploitation in flow cytometry. Fortunately, near-infrared laser diodes and other solid state laser technologies appropriate for flow cytometry have been in existence for some time, and can be readily incorporated into flow cytometers to accelerate fluorescent probe development. The near infrared region represents one of the last "frontiers" to maximize the number of fluorescent probes that can be analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, near infrared fluorescent probes used in biomedical tracking and imaging could also be employed for flow cytometry with the correct laser wavelengths. This review describes the available technology, including lasers, fluorescent probes and detector technology optimal for near infrared signal detection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Stanford, Spencer A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jarrett, Thomas, E-mail: schung@astro.ufl.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  17. The Format Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  18. Interpreting the cosmic far-infrared background anisotropies using a gas regulator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Doré, Olivier; Teyssier, Romain; Serra, Paolo

    2018-04-01

    Cosmic far-infrared background (CFIRB) is a powerful probe of the history of star formation rate (SFR) and the connection between baryons and dark matter across cosmic time. In this work, we explore to which extent the CFIRB anisotropies can be reproduced by a simple physical framework for galaxy evolution, the gas regulator (bathtub) model. This model is based on continuity equations for gas, stars, and metals, taking into account cosmic gas accretion, star formation, and gas ejection. We model the large-scale galaxy bias and small-scale shot noise self-consistently, and we constrain our model using the CFIRB power spectra measured by Planck. Because of the simplicity of the physical model, the goodness of fit is limited. We compare our model predictions with the observed correlation between CFIRB and gravitational lensing, bolometric infrared luminosity functions, and submillimetre source counts. The strong clustering of CFIRB indicates a large galaxy bias, which corresponds to haloes of mass 1012.5 M⊙ at z = 2, higher than the mass associated with the peak of the star formation efficiency. We also find that the far-infrared luminosities of haloes above 1012 M⊙ are higher than the expectation from the SFR observed in ultraviolet and optical surveys.

  19. Oxygen impact on the electronic and vibrational properties of black phosphorus probed by synchrotron infrared nanospectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasseschi, D.; Bahamon, D. A.; Maia, F. C. B.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Freitas, R. O.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) is a layered crystalline structure presenting a thickness-tunable direct bandgap and a high charge carrier mobility, with, therefore, enormous interest to photonics, optoelectronics and electronics. However, BP’s high susceptibility to oxidation when exposed to ambient conditions is a critical challenge for its implementation into functional systems. Here, we investigate the degradation of BP flakes exposed to various environmental conditions by synchrotron infrared nanospectroscopy (SINS). As a near-field based technique, SINS provides sub-diffractional mid-infrared images and spectra from nano-sized domains. Supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, our SINS spectra reveal the formation of nanoscale PO x domains, with x between 0.5 and 1, and a 100 meV red shift in the bandgap of flakes exposed to air for a few minutes. On the other hand, exposure to air for 24 h led to the preferential formation of H3PO4, with complete removal of the electronic transitions from the mid-infrared spectral window, while a long (1 month) exposure to low O2 levels mainly led to the formation of P4O8 and P4O9 species. The SINS analysis allows correlating the morphology of oxidized samples to the oxide type, thus, contributing to a comprehensive characterization of the BP degradation process.

  20. [Advances in infrared spectrum zoom imaging system research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Xing, Ting-wen; Jiang, Ya-dong

    2014-12-01

    Compared with the infrared spectrum fixed focal length system and infrared spectrum dual-zoom system, infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system which has continuous variational field of view can track targets sequentially, so it is a research direction in infrared spectrum imaging technology. Some new technologies are presented overseas in order to improve the detection performance, reduce cost and have good athermalized performance in infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system. Infrared material, infrared detector and variable aperture, those new technologies are su mmarized and the idiographic application of those new technologies in infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system are presented in the paper, for example athermalization of an infrared spectrum zoom lens system with new infrared material for target detection, dual band infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system with mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared, infrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system with high ratio, nfrared spectrum continuous zoom imaging system with dual F/number. It is useful for the development of chinese infrared continuous zoom imaging system.

  1. Importance of Surface Texture to Infrared Remote Sensing Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Adams, P. M.; Herr, K. C.; Salisbury, J. W.

    2001-11-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing may be used to identify minerals present on the surface using diagnostic spectral bands. As band depth (spectral contrast) exhibited by the mineral increases, the mineral is easier to detect. In order to determine the expected spectral contrast, thermal infrared spectra of typical mineral endmembers are commonly measured in the laboratory. For example, for calcite, well-crystalline limestone is commonly studied. However, carbonates occur in several forms, including thin coatings, indurated carbonate (calcrete), and hot springs deposits. Different formation pathways may cause different microstructures and surface textures. This in turn can also affect the surface texture of the weathered material. Different surface textures can affect the measured band contrast, through roughness that causes a cavity (hohlraum) effect, and particle size and roughness on a scale that causes volume scattering. Thus since detection limits vary with the spectral contrast, surface texture can be an important variable in how detectable a mineral is. To study these issues, we have examined limestone and calcrete deposits at Mormon Mesa, Nevada that have two distinctly different microstructures and surface texture [Kirkland et al., 2001]. The limestone studied has larger grains and the grains frequently have flat, smooth surfaces on the order of 10-50 microns in cross-section length. The calcrete has smaller, more angular calcite grains, which exhibit almost no flat surfaces longer than 5 microns in cross-section length. We will show scanning electron microscope images to compare the different microstructures and surface textures of both the fresh and weathered surfaces, and we will show corresponding thermal infrared spectra to illustrate the different spectral signatures. The results demonstrate the importance of understanding the microstructure of mineral deposits to accurately interpret infrared remote sensing data, especially for studies that lack ground

  2. Fullerene decomposition induced by near-infrared laser radiation studied by real-time turbidimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juha, L.; Ehrenberg, B.; Couris, S.; Koudoumas, E.; Hamplová, V.; Pokorná, Z.; Müllerová, A.; Pavel, M.

    1999-11-01

    C 60 and C 70 fullerenes dissolved in toluene or n-hexane have been found to be decomposed by near-infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation even at moderate intensities ( λ=1064 nm, I=35-70 MW/cm 2) quite effectively. Formation of a fine precipitate, occurring during the photolysis, has been studied turbidimetrically. Cubic intensity dependence of the decomposition efficiency was found. The multiphoton dissociation of fullerenes leads to a formation of the fine black precipitate whose particles, overheated by the pulsed laser radiation, cause further decomposition of fullerene cages.

  3. Adaptive algorithm of infrared target enhancement for target recognition of infrared detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Liu, Wei-guo; Gao, Jiao-bo; Qin, Wen-gang

    2009-05-01

    The algorithm of infrared image enhancement directly impacts on the veracity of target recognition. However, traditional histogram equalization and gray-scale transformation algorithms can't realize the enhancement of the target in the infrared image effectively. Consequently, an adaptive algorithm for infrared target enhancement has been presented. The experimental result shows that this algorithm could automatically choose the threshold of histogram segmentation according to the gray characteristic of the target. It can also increase the contrast and decrease the noise while suppressing the background. In addition, this algorithm could be used for target enhancement of other infrared images, and had small computation, especially suitable for real-time processing of infrared images.

  4. The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS), Pathfinder for the Earth Observing Nanosatellite-Infrared (EON-IR)

    OpenAIRE

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Rider, David; Teixeira, Joao; Aumann, Hartmut; Rud, Mayer; Pereira, John; Furlong, David; Mamula, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS) will measure upwelling infrared radiation of the Earth in the Midwave Infrared (MWIR) region of the spectrum from space on a CubeSat. CIRAS will demonstrate two new infrared sounding technologies. The first is a 2D array of High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector (HOT-BIRD) material, selected for its high uniformity, low cost, low noise and higher operating temperatures than traditional materials. The detectors are hybridized to a ...

  5. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, René; Miranda, René; Martínez, Joel

    2016-03-26

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included.

  7. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Escobedo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included.

  8. Infrared: A Key Technology for Security Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Corsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared science and technology has been, since the first applications, mainly dedicated to security and surveillance especially in military field, besides specialized techniques in thermal imaging for medical diagnostic and building structures and recently in energy savings and aerospace context. Till recently the security applications were mainly based on thermal imaging as surveillance and warning military systems. In all these applications the advent of room temperature, more reliable due to the coolers avoidance, low cost, and, overall, completely integrable with Silicon technology FPAs, especially designed and tailored for specific applications, smart sensors, has really been impacted with revolutionary and new ideas and system concepts in all the infrared fields, especially for security applications. Lastly, the advent of reliable Infrared Solid State Laser Sources, operating up to the Long Infrared Wavelength Band and the new emerging techniques in Far Infrared Submillimeter Terahertz Bands, has opened wide and new areas for developing new, advanced security systems. A review of all the items with evidence of the weak and the strong points of each item, especially considering possible future developments, will be reported and discussed.

  9. Infrared exploration of the architectural heritage: from passive infrared thermography to hybrid infrared thermography (HIRT approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sfarra, S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, infrared thermographic approaches have been considered either passive or active. In the latter case, the heat flux is historically attributed to a non-natural heat source. The use of the sun has recently been incorporated into the active approach thanks to multi-temporal inspections. In this paper, an innovative hybrid thermographic (HIRT approach is illustrated. It combines both the time component and the solar source to obtain quantitative information such as the defect depth. Thermograms were obtained by inspecting the facade of the Santa Maria Collemaggio church (L’Aquila, Italy, whereas quantitative results related to the sub-superficial discontinuities were obtained thanks to the use of advanced techniques. Experimental results linked to passive approach (i.e., the mosaicking procedure of the thermograms performed by selecting a set of historic churches are also included in order to explain, when and where, the hybrid procedure should be used.Hasta la fecha, los enfoques sobre la termografía infrarroja han sido considerados, o pasivos, o activos. En este último caso, el flujo de calor se obtiene a través de una fuente de calor no natural. El uso de energía solar ha sido recientemente incorporado al enfoque activo gracias a los estudios multitemporales. En este trabajo, se ilustra un enfoque innovador de la termografía híbrida (HIRT. Se combina tanto el componente de tiempo y la fuente de energía solar para recuperar la información cuantitativa así como la profundidad del defecto. Las imágenes térmicas se obtuvieron mediante el análisis de la fachada de la Iglesia de Santa María Collemaggio (L’Aquila, Italia, mientras que los resultados cuantitativos inherentes a las discontinuidades sub-superficiales se obtuvieron gracias al uso de otras técnicas avanzadas. Los resultados experimentales vinculados al enfoque pasivo (es decir, el proceso de mosaico de las imágenes térmicas derivan de un conjunto de Iglesias

  10. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crable, B.R.; Plugge, C.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the

  11. Infrared Absorption by Atmospheric Aerosols in Mexico City during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2007-12-01

    found as colloidal materials in surface and groundwaters (4). Examples of the IR spectra obtained and variance as a function of time at the two sites will be presented. The spectra are taken in Kubelka - Munk format, which also allows the infrared absorption strengths to be evaluated as function of wavelength. The wavelength dependence of the aerosol complex refractive index (m = n + ik) in the infrared spectral region is determined by application of the Kramers Kronig function. The importance of the aerosol absorption in the infrared spectral region to radiative forcing will be discussed. 1. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and M.M. Cunningham,Environ. Sci. Technol. 27 2864-2869 (1993). 2. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and M.M. Cunningham, Spectroscopy 7 44-53 (1992). 3. J.S. Gaffney and N.A. Marley, Atmospheric Environment, New Directions contribution, 32, 2873-2874 (1998). 4. N.A. Marley, J.S. Gaffney, and K.A. Orlandini, Chapter 7 in Humic/Fulvic Acids and Organic Colloidal Materials in the Environment, ACS Symposium Series 651, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., pp. 96-107, 1996. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX- Mex) under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328.

  12. Infrared Images of an Infant Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    understanding of the formation of solar-type stars and planetary systems from the interstellar medium. However, in most cases the large difference of brightness between the young star and its surrounding material makes it impossible to image directly the circumstellar disk. But when the disk is seen nearly edge-on, the light from the central star will be blocked out by the dust grains in the disk. Other grains below and above the disk midplane scatter the stellar light, producing a typical pattern of a dark lane between two reflection nebulae. The first young stellar object (YSO) found to display this typical pattern, HH 30 IRS in the Taurus dark cloud at a distance of about 500 light-years (140 pc), was imaged by the Hubble Space telescope (HST) in 1996. Edge-on disks have since also been observed with ground-based telescopes in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, sometimes by means of adaptive optics techniques or speckle imaging, or under very good sky image quality, cf. ESO PR Photo 03d/01 with a VLT image of such an object in the Orion Nebula. A surprise discovery ESO PR Photo 12a/02 ESO PR Photo 12a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 459 pix - 55k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 918 pix - 352k] Caption : PR Photo 12a/02 shows a three-colour reproduction of the discovery image of strange-looking object (nicknamed the "Flying Saucer" by the astronomers), obtained with the SOFI multi-mode instrument at the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory. Compared to the unresolved stars in the field, the image of this object appears extended. Two characteristic reflection nebulae are barely visible, together with a marginally resolved dark dust lane in front of the star and oriented East-West. Technical information about the photo is available below. Last year, a group of astronomers [1] carried out follow-up observations of new X-ray sources found by the ESA XMM-Newton and NASA Chandra X-ray satellites. They were looking at the periphery of the so-called Rho

  13. Infrared point sensors for homeland defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ross C.; Carter, Michael T.; Homrighausen, Craig L.

    2004-03-01

    We report recent progress toward the development of infrared point sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents and explosive related chemicals, which pose a significant threat to both health and environment. Technical objectives have focused on the development of polymer sorbents to enhance the infrared response of these hazardous organic compounds. For example, infrared point sensors which part-per-billion detection limits have been developed that rapidlypartition chemical warfare agents and explosive related chemicals into polymer thin films with desirable chemical and physical properties. These chemical sensors demonstrate novel routes to reversible sensing of hazardous organic compounds. The development of small, low-power, sensitive, and selective instruments employing these chemical sensors would enhance the capabilities of federal, state, and local emergency response to incidents involving chemical terrorism. Specific applications include chemical defense systems for military personnel and homeland defense, environmental monitors for remediation and demilitarization, and point source detectors for emergency and maintenance response teams.

  14. Infrared thermal imaging in connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging (IRT) is a non-invasive, non-contact technique which allows one to measure and visualize infrared radiation. In medicine, thermal imaging has been used for more than 50 years in various clinical settings, including Raynaud's phenomenon and systemic sclerosis. Imaging and quantification of surface body temperature provides an indirect measure of the microcirculation's overall performance. As such, IRT is capable of confirming the diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon, and, with additional cold or heat challenge, of differentiating between the primary and secondary condition. In systemic sclerosis IRT has a potential role in assessing disease activity and monitoring treatment response. Despite certain limitations, thermal imaging can find a place in clinical practice, and with the introduction of small, low-cost infrared cameras, possibly become a part of routine rheumatological evaluation.

  15. Mastitis detection in sheep by infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Rafhael Felipe Saraiva; do Prado Paim, Tiago; de Abreu Cardoso, Cyntia; Stéfano Lima Dallago, Bruno; de Melo, Cristiano Barros; Louvandini, Helder; McManus, Concepta

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of an infrared thermograph for mastitis diagnosis in sheep. Thirty-seven Santa Inês ewes were evaluated weekly through infrared images obtained with thermograph FLIR System Series-i®. Milk was collected for somatic cell count and milk compound level determination. The clinical mastitis group had the highest fat and protein level, as well as the lowest lactose level. The udder temperatures were higher for subclinical mastitis group. The udder temperature data was able to correctly classify the animals into the mastitis groups and the canonical analysis showed that these temperatures clearly differentiated the subclinical mastitis groups from the others. Therefore, this study showed that udder infrared temperatures can be used as diagnostic method to mastitis in sheep. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy And The Art Of Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Stephen

    1989-12-01

    There are many museums and art galleries in the world devoted to the preservation of paintings, sculptures and articles of cultural importance. In some cases the preservation of the museum itself as an architectural inheritance is equally important. Infrared Spectrometry is a powerful tool in the fight to prevent the decay of many works of art. Infrared Spectroscopy can be used to identify many important constituents of the original paints and then used to test the new products used for restoration. Another example is measuring the depth of penetration of preservatives in various materials. For example, building materials can be sectioned to give 30 micron slices that can be subsequently examined by transmission infrared microscopy. This yields information on the types of material present but also on the penetration depth of various preservatives.

  17. Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data was gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using AC and DC currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process

  18. Infrared problems in field perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Francois.

    1982-12-01

    The work presented mainly covers questions related to the presence of ''infrared'' divergences in perturbation expansions of the Green functions of certain massless field theories. It is important to determine the mathematical status of perturbation expansions in field theory in order to define the region in which they are valid. Renormalization and the symmetry of a theory are important factors in infrared problems. The main object of this thesis resides in the mathematical techniques employed: integral representations of the Feynman amplitudes; methods for desingularization, regularization and dimensional renormalization. Nonlinear two dimensional space-time sigma models describing Goldstone's low energy boson dynamics associated with a breaking of continuous symmetry are studied. Random surface models are then investigated followed by infrared divergences in super-renormalizable theories. Finally, nonperturbation effects in massless theories are studied by expanding the two-dimensional nonlinear sigma model in 1/N [fr

  19. Infrared sensing techniques for adaptive robotic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.T.; Groom, K.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using infrared sensors to monitor the welding process. Data were gathered using an infrared camera which was trained on the molten metal pool during the welding operation. Several types of process perturbations which result in weld defects were then intentionally induced and the resulting thermal images monitored. Gas tungsten arc using ac and dc currents and gas metal arc welding processes were investigated using steel, aluminum and stainless steel plate materials. The thermal images obtained in the three materials and different welding processes revealed nearly identical patterns for the same induced process perturbation. Based upon these results, infrared thermography is a method which may be very applicable to automation of the welding process

  20. Integrated photonics for infrared spectroscopic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongtao; Kita, Derek; Han, Zhaohong; Su, Peter; Agarwal, Anu; Yadav, Anupama; Richardson, Kathleen; Gu, Tian; Hu, Juejun

    2017-05-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is widely recognized as a gold standard technique for chemical analysis. Traditional IR spectroscopy relies on fragile bench-top instruments located in dedicated laboratory settings, and is thus not suitable for emerging field-deployed applications such as in-line industrial process control, environmental monitoring, and point-ofcare diagnosis. Recent strides in photonic integration technologies provide a promising route towards enabling miniaturized, rugged platforms for IR spectroscopic analysis. Chalcogenide glasses, the amorphous compounds containing S, Se or Te, have stand out as a promising material for infrared photonic integration given their broadband infrared transparency and compatibility with silicon photonic integration. In this paper, we discuss our recent work exploring integrated chalcogenide glass based photonic devices for IR spectroscopic chemical analysis, including on-chip cavityenhanced chemical sensing and monolithic integration of mid-IR waveguides with photodetectors.

  1. Teaching physics and understanding infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2017-08-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a very rapidly evolving field. The latest trends are small smartphone IR camera accessories, making infrared imaging a widespread and well-known consumer product. Applications range from medical diagnosis methods via building inspections and industrial predictive maintenance etc. also to visualization in the natural sciences. Infrared cameras do allow qualitative imaging and visualization but also quantitative measurements of the surface temperatures of objects. On the one hand, they are a particularly suitable tool to teach optics and radiation physics and many selected topics in different fields of physics, on the other hand there is an increasing need of engineers and physicists who understand these complex state of the art photonics systems. Therefore students must also learn and understand the physics underlying these systems.

  2. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging.

  3. Advanced infrared optically black baffle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Egert, C.M.; Allred, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared optically black baffle surfaces are an essential component of many advanced optical systems. All internal surfaces in advanced infrared optical sensors that require stray light management to achieve resolution are of primary concern in baffle design. Current industrial materials need improvements to meet advanced optical sensor systems requirements for optical, survivability, and endurability. Baffles are required to survive and operate in potentially severe environments. Robust diffuse-absorptive black surfaces, which are thermally and mechanically stable to threats of x-ray, launch, and in-flight maneuver conditions, with specific densities to allow an acceptable weight load, handleable during assembly, cleanable, and adaptive to affordable manufacturing, are required as optical baffle materials. In this paper an overview of recently developed advanced infrared optical baffle materials, requirements, manufacturing strategies, and the Optics MODIL (Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory) Advanced Baffle Program are discussed

  4. Infrared Imaging Sharpens View in Critical Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Innovative Engineering and Consulting (IEC) Infrared Systems, a leading developer of thermal imaging systems and night vision equipment, received a Glenn Alliance for Technology Exchange (GATE) award, half of which was in the form of additional NASA assistance for new product development. IEC Infrared Systems worked with electrical and optical engineers from Glenn's Diagnostics and Data Systems Branch to develop a commercial infrared imaging system that could differentiate the intensity of heat sources better than other commercial systems. The research resulted in two major thermal imaging solutions: NightStalkIR and IntrudIR Alert. These systems are being used in the United States and abroad to help locate personnel stranded in emergency situations, defend soldiers on the battlefield abroad, and protect high-value facilities and operations. The company is also applying its advanced thermal imaging techniques to medical and pharmaceutical product development with a Cleveland-based pharmaceutical company.

  5. Light-driven formation and rupture of droplet bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sanhita S; Kim, Hanyoup; Vasilyev, Arseny; Eid, Aya; Faris, Gregory W

    2010-05-04

    We demonstrate the optical manipulation of nanoliter aqueous droplets containing surfactant or lipid molecules and immersed in an organic liquid using near-infrared light. The resulting emulsion droplets are manipulated using both the thermocapillary effect and convective fluid motion. Droplet-pair interactions induced in the emulsion upon optical initiation and control provide direct observations of the coalescence steps in intricate detail. Droplet-droplet adhesion (bilayer formation) is observed under several conditions. Selective bilayer rupture is also realized using the same infrared laser. The technique provides a novel approach to studying thin film drainage and interface stability in emulsion dynamics. The formation of stable lipid bilayers at the adhesion interface between interacting water droplets can provide an optical platform on which to build droplet-based lipid bilayer assays. The technique also has relevance to understanding and improving microfluidics applications by devising Petri dish-based droplet assays requiring no substrate fabrication.

  6. Infrared sensor for water pollution and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudet, E.; Gutierrez-Arrovo, A.; Bailleul, M.; Rinnert, E.; Nemec, P.; Charrier, J.; Bodiou, L.; Colas, F.; Compère, C.; Boussard, C.; Bureau, B.; Michel, K.; Nazabal, V.

    2017-05-01

    Development of Mid-infrared sensors for the detection of biochemical molecules is a challenge of great importance. Mid-infrared range (4000 - 400 cm-1) contains the absorption bands related to the vibrations of organic molecules (nitrates, hydrocarbons, pesticides, etc.). Chalcogenide glasses are an important class of amorphous materials appropriate for sensing applications. Indeed, they are mainly studied and used for their wide transparency in the infrared range (up to 15 μm for selenide glasses) and high refractive index (between 2 and 3). The aim of this study is to synthesize and characterize chalcogenide thin films for developing mid-IR optical waveguides. Therefore, two (GeSe2)100-x(Sb2Se3)x chalcogenide glasses, where x=10 and 50 were chosen for their good mid-IR transparency, high stability against crystallization and their refractive index contrast suitable for mid-IR waveguiding. Chalcogenide glasses were prepared using the conventional melting and quenching method and then used for RF magnetron sputtering deposition. Sputtered thin films were characterized in order to determine dispersion of refractive index in UV-Vis-NIR-MIR. Obtained results were used for the simulation of the optical design in mid-infrared (λ = 7.7 μm). Selenide ridge waveguide were prepared by RIE-ICP dry etching process. Single-mode propagation at 7.7 μm was observed. Optical losses of 0.7 +/- 0.3 and 2.5 +/- 0.1 dB.cm-1 were measured in near-infrared (λ = 1.55 μm) and midinfrared (λ = 7.7 μm), respectively. Achieved results are promising for the fabrication of an integrated optical sensor operating in the mid-infrared.

  7. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (nano-crystals in a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase is zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  8. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri, E-mail: henri.benisty@institutoptique.fr; Greffet, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d’Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad [Office National d’Études et de Recherches Aérospatiales, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-02-24

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  9. Infrared spectral reflectances of asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H. P.; Veeder, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    This review compares the types of compositional information produced by three complementary techniques used in infrared observations of asteroid surfaces: broadband JHKL photometry, narrow band photometry, and multiplex spectroscopy. The high information content of these infrared observations permits definitive interpretations of asteroid surface compositions in terms of the major meteoritic minerals (olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar, hydrous silicates, and metallic Ni-Fe). These studies emphasize the individuality of asteroid surface compositions, the inadequacy of simple comparisons with spectra of meteorites, and the need to coordinate spectral measurements of all types to optimize diagnostic capabilities.

  10. Infrared drying of herbs (Research Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PÄÄKKÖNEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Drying experiments on peppermint (Mentha piperita L., anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum L., parsley (Petroselinum crispum L. and garden angelica (Angelica archangelica L. were conducted using near infrared drying, operating at a product temperature of 35-50°C. The oil content, composition and residual water content of the dried herbs were determined. The microbiological quality of the fresh and the dried material was determined for total bacterial count and coliforms, moulds and yeasts. The results indicate that infrared radiation is has potential for drying herbs since it is gentle and shortens the processing time.

  11. Results with the UKIRT infrared camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mclean, I.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in focal plane array technology have made an immense impact on infrared astronomy. Results from the commissioning of the first infrared camera on UKIRT (the world's largest IR telescope) are presented. The camera, called IRCAM 1, employs the 62 x 58 InSb DRO array from SBRC in an otherwise general purpose system which is briefly described. Several imaging modes are possible including staring, chopping and a high-speed snapshot mode. Results to be presented include the first true high resolution images at IR wavelengths of the entire Orion nebula

  12. The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H.; Bock, J.; Freund, M. M.; Guo, H.; Hirao, T.; Lange, A. E.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; McMahon, T. J.; Murakami, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Noda, M.; Noguchi, K.; Okuda, H.; Okumura, K.; Onaka, T.; Roellig, T. L.; Sato, S.; Shibai, H.; Tanabe, T.; Watabe, T.; Yagi, T.; Yajima, N.; Yui, M.

    1994-06-01

    The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) is a cryogenically cooled small infrared telescope that will fly aboard the small space platform Space Flyer Unit. It will survey approximately 10% of the sky with a relatively wide beam during its 20 day emission. Four focal-plane instruments will make simultaneous observations of the sky at wavelengths ranging from 1 to 1000 microns. The IRTS will provide significant information on cosmology, interstellar matter, late-type stars, and interplanetary dust. This paper describes the instrumentation and mission.

  13. Infrared control coating of thin film devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne; Hollingsworth, Russell

    2017-02-28

    Systems and methods for creating an infrared-control coated thin film device with certain visible light transmittance and infrared reflectance properties are disclosed. The device may be made using various techniques including physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, sputter deposition, and sol-gel processes. In particular, a pulsed energy microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process may be used. Production of the device may occur at speeds greater than 50 Angstroms/second and temperatures lower than 200.degree. C.

  14. A GLIMPSE of Star Formation in the Outer Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Elaine; Hora, Joseph L.; Tolls, Volker

    2018-01-01

    The wealth of infrared data provided by recent infrared missions such as Spitzer, Herschel, and WISE has yet to be fully mined in the study of star formation in the outer galaxy. The nearby galaxy and massive star forming regions towards the galactic center have been extensively studied. However the outer regions of the Milky Way, where the metallicity is intermediate in value between the inner galactic disk and the Magellanic Clouds, has not been systematically studied. We are using Spitzer/IRAC’s GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-plane Survey Extraordinaire) observations of the galactic plane at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns to identify young stellar objects (YSOs) via their disk emission in the mid-infrared. A tiered clustering analysis is then performed: preliminary large scale clustering is identified across the field using a Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) technique. Smaller scale sub clustering within these regions is performed using an implementation of the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) technique. The YSOs are then compared to known objects in the SIMBAD catalogue and their photometry and cluster membership is augmented using available Herschel and WISE photometry. We compare our results to those in the inner galaxy to determine how dynamical processes and environmental factors affect the star formation efficiency. These results will have applications to the study of star formation in other galaxies, where only global properties can be determined. We will present here the results of our initial investigation into star formation in the outer galaxy using the Spitzer/GLIMPSE observations of the SMOG field.

  15. Integrated visible and near-infrared, shortwave infrared, and longwave infrared full-range hyperspectral data analysis for geologic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Fred A.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and spatially coincident hyperspectral thermal emission spectrometer (HyTES) data were used to map geology and alteration for a site in northern Death Valley, California and Nevada. AVIRIS with 224 bands from 0.4 to 2.5 μm were converted to reflectance. HyTES data with 256 bands covering 8 to 12 μm were converted to emissivity. Two approaches were investigated for integration of the datasets for full spectrum analysis. A combined (integrated) bands method utilized 332 spectral bands spanning both datasets. Spectral endmembers were extracted, and the predominant material at each pixel was mapped for the full spectral range using partial unmixing. This approach separated a variety of materials, but it was difficult to directly relate mapping results to surface properties. The second method used visible to near-infrared, shortwave infrared, and longwave infrared data independently to determine and map key endmembers in each spectral range. AVIRIS directly mapped a variety of specific minerals, while HyTES separated and mapped several igneous rock phases. Individual mapping results were then combined using geologically directed logical operators. The full-range results illustrate that integrated analysis provides advantages over use of just one spectral range, leading to improved understanding of the distribution of geologic units and alteration.

  16. Formation Flying Concept Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Palkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “formation flying” implies coordinated movement of at least two satellites on coplanar and non-coplanar orbits with a maximum distance between them being much less than the length of the orbit. Peculiarities of formation flying concept also include:- automatic coordination of satellites;- sub-group specialization of formation flying satellites;- equipment and data exchange technology unification in each specialized group or subgroup.Formation flying satellites can be classified according to the configuration stability level (order (array, cluster («swarm», intergroup specialization rules («central satellite», «leader», «slave», manoeuvrability («active» and «passive» satellites.Tasks of formation flying include:- experiments with payload, distributed in formation flying satellites;- various near-earth space and earth-surface research;- super-sized aperture antenna development;- land-based telescope calibration;- «space advertisement» (earth-surface observable satellite compositions of a logotype, word, etc.;- orbital satellite maintenance, etc.Main issues of formation flying satellite system design are:- development of an autonomous satellite group manoeuvring technology;- providing a sufficient characteristic velocity of formation flying satellites;- ballistic and navigation maintenance for satellite formation flying;- technical and economic assessment of formation flying orbital delivery and deployment;- standardization, unification, miniaturization and integration of equipment;- intergroup and intersatellite function redistribution.

  17. Challenges to Global Implementation of Infrared Thermography Technology: Current Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shterenshis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Medical infrared thermography (IT) produces an image of the infrared waves emitted by the human body as part of the thermoregulation process that can vary in intensity based on the health of the person. This review analyzes recent developments in the use of infrared thermography as a screening and diagnostic tool in clinical and nonclinical settings, and identifies possible future routes for improvement of the method. Currently, infrared thermography is not considered to be a fully reliable diagnostic method. If standard infrared protocol is established and a normative database is available, infrared thermography may become a reliable method for detecting inflammatory processes.

  18. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF PASSIVE AND STAR-FORMING EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: AN INFRARED COLOR-COLOR SEQUENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temi, Pasquale; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the infrared properties of a large sample of early-type galaxies, comparing data from the Spitzer archive with Ks-band emission from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. While most representations of this data result in correlations with large scatter, we find a remarkably tight relation among colors formed by ratios of luminosities in Spitzer-Multiband Imaging Photometer bands (24, 70, and 160 μm) and the Ks band. Remarkably, this correlation among E and S0 galaxies follows that of nearby normal galaxies of all morphological types. In particular, the tight infrared color-color correlation for S0 galaxies alone follows that of the entire Hubble sequence of normal galaxies, roughly in order of galaxy type from ellipticals to spirals to irregulars. The specific star formation rate (SFR) of S0 galaxies estimated from the 24 μm luminosity increases with decreasing K-band luminosity (or stellar mass) from essentially zero, as with most massive ellipticals, to rates typical of irregular galaxies. Moreover, the luminosities of the many infrared-luminous S0 galaxies can significantly exceed those of the most luminous (presumably post-merger) E galaxies. SFRs in the most infrared-luminous S0 galaxies approach 1-10 solar masses per year. Consistently, with this picture we find that while most early-type galaxies populate an infrared red sequence, about 24% of the objects (mostly S0s) are in an infrared blue cloud together with late-type galaxies. For those early-type galaxies also observed at radio frequencies, we find that the far-infrared luminosities correlate with the mass of neutral and molecular hydrogen, but the scatter is large. This scatter suggests that the star formation may be intermittent or that similar S0 galaxies with cold gaseous disks of nearly equal mass can have varying radial column density distributions that alter the local and global SFRs.

  19. From Sermon Formation to Preacher Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaarden, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    today is less about exercising the authority of an office and more about embodying authenticity. I argue that traditional homiletic education can benefit from implementing a learner-centered approach to teaching moving from sermon formation towards preacher formation, in order to develop and train...... judged, evaluated, or critiqued. In this paper, I explain how a learner-centered approach to education works in practice and show how pastors experience the teaching method and the congregations’ positive response to their improvements. I shall present the results of a focus-group interview with pastors...

  20. Primary Formation Dynamics of Peroxynitrite Following Photolysis of Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen, Jan; Gadegaard, Ane; Nielsen, Jakob; Jensen, Svend Knak; Petersen, Christian; Keiding, Søren R.

    2009-09-01

    The photolysis of nitrate, NO3-, in D2O solution has been investigated by femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. In accordance with previous investigations, we observe that the peroxynitrite ion, ONOO-, is the dominant photochemical product following the excitation of nitrate at 200 nm. Moreover, we are able to identify the cis/trans isomers of peroxynitrite and the dynamics of their formation in solution. We observe that the trans-ONOO- isomer is formed directly and solely from the excited NO3- ion within the first two picoseconds after excitation. Subsequently, about half of the trans-ONOO- isomerizes to cis-ONOO- in 25 ps; thereafter, the ratio between the two isomers remains constant for the 300 ps duration of the experiment. The observed vibrational frequencies of the terminal O═N bonds are at 1515 and 1580 cm-1 for trans- and cis-peroxynitrite, respectively. The detailed analysis of the infrared bands of cis- and trans-peroxynitrite is facilitated by electronic structure calculations on the conformers in a cluster of 11 D2O molecules and by steady-state infrared spectroscopy of ONOO- in D2O. In addition to the formation of ONOO-, the experiments also reveal a slow ˜50 ps formation of NO2 following the photolysis of nitrate.

  1. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  2. Ketene Formation in Interstellar Ices: A Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark Josiah

    2013-01-01

    The formation of ketene (H2CCO, ethenone) in polar and apolar ices was studied with in situ 0.8 MeV proton irradiation, far-UVphotolysis, and infrared spectroscopic analyses at 10-20 K. Using isotopically enriched reagents, unequivocal evidencewas obtained for ketene synthesis in H2O-rich and CO2-rich ices, and several reaction products were identified. Results from scavenging experiments suggested that ketene was formed by free-radical pathways, as opposed to acid-base processes or redox reactions. Finally, we use our results to draw conclusions about the formation and stability of ketene in the interstellar medium.

  3. Analysis of Spitzer-IRS spectra of hyperluminous infrared galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A.; Risaliti, G.; Nardini, E.; Panessa, F.; Carrera, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Hyperluminous infrared galaxies (HLIRG) are the most luminous persistent objects in the Universe. They exhibit extremely high star formation rates, and most of them seem to harbour an active galactic nucleus (AGN). They are unique laboratories for investigating the most extreme star formation and its connection to super-massive black hole growth. Aims: The relative AGN and starburst (SB) contributions to the total output in these objects is still debated. Our aim is to disentangle the AGN and SB emission of a sample of thirteen HLIRG. Methods: We studied the MIR low-resolution spectra of a sample of thirteen HLIRG obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on board Spitzer. The 5-8 μm range is an optimal window for detecting AGN activity even in a heavily obscured environment. We performed an SB/AGN decomposition of the continuum using templates, which has been successfully applied for ULIRG in previous works. Results: The MIR spectra of all sources is largely dominated by AGN emission. By converting the 6 μm luminosity into IR luminosity, we found that ~80% of the sample shows an IR output dominated by the AGN emission. However, the SB activity is significant in all sources (mean SB contribution ~30%), showing star formation rates ~300-3000 M⊙ yr-1. With X-ray and MIR data we estimated the dust covering factor (CF) of these HLIRG, finding that a significant fraction presents a CF consistent with unity. Along with the high X-ray absorption shown by these sources, this suggests that large amounts of dust and gas enshroud the nucleus of these HLIRG, as also observed in ULIRG. Conclusions: Our results agree with previous studies of the IR SED of HLIRG using radiative transfer models, and we find strong evidence that all HLIRG harbour an AGN. Moreover, this work provides further support for the idea that AGN and SB are both crucial to understanding the properties of HLIRG. Our study of the CF supports the hypothesis that HLIRG can be divided into two

  4. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  5. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    might take a different trend in different eras, in which it is either positive, leading to a bigger chance of alliance formation , or negative, leading...of war and peace with regard to systemic analysis. Therefore, it is reasonable that there is a deviation in the trends of alliance formation during...ALLIANCE FORMATION PATTERNS by Wael Abbas Zoltan Schneider December 2015 Thesis Advisor: William P. Fox Second Reader: Heather S. Gregg

  6. Dense gas in luminous infrared galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, W. A.; Henkel, C.; Loenen, A. F.; Baudry, A.; Wiklind, T.

    Aims. Molecules that trace the high-density regions of the interstellar medium have been observed in (ultra-) luminous (far-) infrared galaxies, in order to initiate multiple-molecule multiple-transition studies to evaluate the physical and chemical environment of the nuclear medium and its response

  7. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Prostate Pathology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    imaging data for biochemical markers of tumor and develop numerical algorithms for grading cancer Goal: Develop algorithm for malignancy recognition...genetic algorithm based method to distinguish benign from malignant epithelium using infrared spectroscopic imaging data was shown to be effective...of existing practice. Larger validation studies are needed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spectroscopy, prostate, histopathology, cancer , optimization

  9. Infrared Absorption in Acetanilide by Solitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Careri, G.; Buontempo, U.; Carta, F.

    1983-01-01

    The infrared spectrum of acetanilide shows a new band that is red shifted from the main amide-I maximum by about 15 cm-1, the intensity of which increases at low temperature. It is suggested that this band may arise from the creation of amide-I solitons that are similar (but not identical) to those...

  10. Infrared Attenuation Of Thallium Bromoiodide Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, John; Magilavy, Beryl

    1988-01-01

    Report presents measurements of attenuation of infrared signals in unclad 381-micrometer-diameter optical fibers of thallium bromoiodide. Measurements of attentuation in TI(Br,I) fibers in wavelength ranges of 1.2 to 3.4 micrometer and 3 to 11 micrometer compare with those of two other groups of researchers.

  11. Oxidation of carbynes: signatures in infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cinquanta, Eugenio; Manini, Nicola; Ravagnan, Luca; Caramella, Lucia; Onida, Giovanni; Milani, Paolo; Rudolf, Petra

    2014-01-01

    We report and solidly interpret the infrared spectrum of both pristine and oxidized carbynes embedded in a pure-carbon matrix. The spectra probe separately the effects of oxidation on sp- and on sp 2-hybridized carbon, and provide information on the stability of the different structures in an

  12. Interstellar ice : The Infrared Space Observatory legacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibb, EL; Whittet, DCB; Boogert, ACA; Tielens, AGGM

    We present 2.5-30 mum spectra from the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory for a total of 23 sources. The sources include embedded young stellar objects spanning a wide range of mass and luminosity, together with field stars sampling quiescent dark clouds and the diffuse

  13. Infrared tympanic temperature and ear canal morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Several publications indicate that the infrared tympanic temperature (IRTT) underestimates the core temperature of the body when the ear canal is long, curvy and narrow. In order to quantify these observations, a study was performed in 10 subjects. The IRTT was determined and compared to the

  14. [Infrared spectral analysis for calcined borax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Ren, Li-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Bo-Tao

    2011-08-01

    To valuate the quality of calcined borax which is sold in the market, 18 samples of calcined borax were studied using the Fourier transform infrared, and samples with different water content were selected and analyzed. Then, the results of analysis were used to evaluate the quality of calcined borax. Results show that the infrared spectra of calcined borax include OH vibration, BO3(-3) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration absorption bands. The position and width of OH vibration absorption band depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, the wider the absorption band. The number of BO3(3-) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration bands also depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, and the stronger the hydrogen bond and the lower the symmetry of B atoms, the more the number of infrared absorption peaks. It was concluded that because the quality of calcined borax has direct correlation with water content, the infrared spectroscopy is an express and objective approach to quality analysis and evaluation of calcined borax.

  15. Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy of Biopolymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis Marcott; Michael Lo; Kevin Kjoller; Craig Prater; Roshan Shetty; Joseph Jakes; Isao Noda

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been combined in a single instrument capable of producing 100 nm spatial resolution IR spectra and images. This new capability enables the spectroscopic characterization of biomaterial domains at levels not previously possible. A tunable IR laser source generating pulses on the order of 10 ns was used...

  16. Absorber Coatings for Mid-Infrared Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dahlia Anne; Wollack, Edward; Rostem, Karwan

    2017-01-01

    Control over optical response is an important aspect of instrument design for astrophysical imaging. Here we consider a mid-infrared absorber coating proposed for use on HIRMES (High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectrometer), a cryogenic spectrometer which will fly on the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) aircraft. The aim of this effort is to develop an absorptive coating for the 20-200 microns spectral range based on a graphene loaded epoxy binder (Epotek 377H) and glass microsphere scatterers (3M K1). The coatings electromagnetic response was modeled using a Matlab script and the glass microspheres were characterized by the measured size distribution, the dielectric constant, and the filling fraction. Images of the microspheres taken by a microscope were used to determine the size distribution with an ImageJ particle analysis program. Representative test samples for optical evaluation were fabricated for characterization via infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. The optical tests will determine the material’s absorptance and reflectance. These test results will be compared to the modeled response.

  17. Infrared behaviors of SU(2 gauge theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuominen Kimmo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We will discuss some recent results in the determination of the location of the conformal window in SU(2 gauge theory with Nf fermions in the fundamental representation of the gauge group. In particular, we will demonstrate that the long distance behavior of the continuum theory with Nf = 6 is governed by an infrared stable fixed point.

  18. Near infrared face recognition: A literature survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farokhi, Sajad; Flusser, Jan; Sheikh, U. U.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-17 ISSN 1574-0137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Literature survey * Biometrics * Face recognition * Near infrared * Illumination invariant Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/flusser-0461834.pdf

  19. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  20. Anomalous infrared absorption in granular superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G.L.; Garland, J.C.; Tanner, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Granular superconductors are shown to have a far-infrared absorption that is larger when the samples are superconducting than when they are normal. By constrast, theoretical models for these materials predict that when the samples become superconducting, the absorption should decrease

  1. Thermal Infrared Anomalies of Several Strong Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congxin Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1 There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of “time-frequency relative power spectrum.” (2 There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3 Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4 Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  2. An infrared study of the Magellanic clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, Petrus Bernardus Wilhelmus

    1988-01-01

    The thesis describes infrared radiation and dust properties of the Magellanic Clouds, together with comparisons with emission at other wavelength regimes. Observations of the SMC and LMC were made with the IRAS satellite. Maps are presented at wavelengths of 12, 25, 60 and 100 μm. From these maps a

  3. Thermal resolution specification in infrared scene projectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVeigne, Joe; Franks, Greg; Danielson, Tom

    2015-05-01

    Infrared scene projectors (IRSPs) are a key part of performing dynamic testing of infrared (IR) imaging systems. Two important properties of an IRSP system are apparent temperature and thermal resolution. Infrared scene projector technology continues to progress, with several systems capable of producing high apparent temperatures currently available or under development. These systems use different emitter pixel technologies, including resistive arrays, digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs), liquid crystals and LEDs to produce dynamic infrared scenes. A common theme amongst these systems is the specification of the bit depth of the read-in integrated circuit (RIIC) or projector engine , as opposed to specifying the desired thermal resolution as a function of radiance (or apparent temperature). For IRSPs, producing an accurate simulation of a realistic scene or scenario may require simulating radiance values that range over multiple orders of magnitude. Under these conditions, the necessary resolution or "step size" at low temperature values may be much smaller than what is acceptable at very high temperature values. A single bit depth value specified at the RIIC, especially when combined with variable transfer functions between commanded input and radiance output, may not offer the best representation of a customer's desired radiance resolution. In this paper, we discuss some of the various factors that affect thermal resolution of a scene projector system, and propose some specification guidelines regarding thermal resolution to help better define the real needs of an IR scene projector system.

  4. Visual Infrared Color Gradients in Elliptical Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, R. F.; Valentijn, E. A.; Jameson, R. F.; de Zeeuw, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements for visual and visual-infrared colors provide the means to determine both the average temperature of the giant branch and the turnoff-temperature of the main sequence. This allows to model fractional contributions of different populations, including age- and

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of interstellar apolar ice analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrenfreund, P; Boogert, ACA; Gerakines, PA; Tielens, AGGM; van Dishoeck, EF

    1997-01-01

    Apolar ices have been observed in several regions in dense clouds and are likely dominated by molecules such as CO, CO(2) and the infrared inactive molecules O(2) and N(2). Interstellar solid CO has been well characterized by ground-based high resolution measurements. Recent ISO results showed the

  6. Infrared shield facilitates optical pyrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Illg, W.

    1965-01-01

    Water-cooled shield facilitates optical pyrometer high temperature measurements of small sheet metal specimens subjected to tensile stress in fatigue tests. The shield excludes direct or reflected radiation from one face of the specimen and permits viewing of the infrared radiation only.

  7. MID-INFRARED QUANTUM CASCADE LASERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... Abstract. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) based on intersubband transitions operating at room temperature in the mid-infrared or 'molecular fingerprint' spectral region (3.4–17 im) have been found useful for several applications including environmental sensing, pollution monitoring, and medical appli-.

  8. Narrowband infrared emitters for combat ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Puscasu, Irina; Daly, James; Fallon, Keith; Loges, Peter; Greenwald, Anton; Johnson, Edward

    2007-04-01

    There is a strong desire to create narrowband infrared light sources as personnel beacons for application in infrared Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) systems. This demand has augmented dramatically in recent years with the reports of friendly fire casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq. ICx Photonics' photonic crystal enhanced TM (PCE TM) infrared emitter technology affords the possibility of creating narrowband IR light sources tuned to specific IR wavebands (near 1-2 microns, mid 3-5 microns, and long 8-12 microns) making it the ideal solution for infrared IFF. This technology is based on a metal coated 2D photonic crystal of air holes in a silicon substrate. Upon thermal excitation the photonic crystal modifies the emitted yielding narrowband IR light with center wavelength commensurate with the periodicity of the lattice. We have integrated this technology with microhotplate MEMS devices to yield 15mW IR light sources in the 3-5 micron waveband with wall plug efficiencies in excess of 10%, 2 orders of magnitude more efficient that conventional IR LEDs. We have further extended this technology into the LWIR with a light source that produces 9 mW of 8-12 micron light at an efficiency of 8%. Viewing distances >500 meters were observed with fielded camera technologies, ideal for ground to ground troop identification. When grouped into an emitter panel, the viewing distances were extended to 5 miles, ideal for ground to air identification.

  9. Infrared emission from electronically excited biacetyl molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, E.; Kommandeur, J.

    1971-01-01

    The infrared emission of electronically excited biacetyl molecules in the gas phase at low pressure was observed. Some experimental details are given, and it is shown that the emission derives from biacetyl molecules in their triplet state. The emission is dependent on the wavelength of excitation.

  10. Visual Alinement Technique for Infrared LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.; Oppenheim, U. P.

    1984-01-01

    Visible He/Ne laser beam substituted for invisible CO2 beam during alinement. System accomplished visually by using low-power He/Ne laser previously adjusted to visible beam parallel to invisible infrared CO2 laser beam. Method used to aline adjacent telescopes in other optical systems.

  11. Software toolkit for evaluating infrared imaging seeker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degache, M.A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Modern infrared imaging seekers can nowadays deal with higher resolution and less noisy sensor images. The testing of new image processing or tracking algorithms requires a fitted set of relevant sensor images. When no actual recordings are available, when experimental benches are not adapted or at

  12. Infrared Imaging for Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles; Hazzard, Edmund

    2011-01-01

    Based on detecting long-wavelength infrared (IR) radiation emitted by the subject, IR imaging shows temperature distribution instantaneously and heat flow dynamically. As a picture is worth a thousand words, an IR camera has great potential in teaching heat transfer, which is otherwise invisible. The idea of using IR imaging in teaching was first…

  13. Thermal (Infrared) Imaging Sensors (Review Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhir Khare; S. S. Negi

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in improved type of infrared detector technologies focal plane arrays,signal processing techniques, and innovative optical designs have enabled thermal imagingtechnology to undergo revolutionary advancement, leading to realisation of high performanceand compact thermal cameras for surveillance, target acquisition, tracking, and guidance.Instruments Research and Development Establishment (IRDE), Dehradun, has designed anddeveloped a variety of thermal imaging sights for dif...

  14. Multiple photon infrared processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Butcher, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current understanding of the process of multiple photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules, whereby in the presence of an intense infrared laser field a molecule may absorb upwards of 30 photons. The application of this process to new photochemistry and in particular laser isotope separation is also discussed. (author)

  15. Thermal Infrared Anomalies of Several Strong Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Congxin; Guo, Xiao; Qin, Manzhong

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of “time-frequency relative power spectrum.” (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting. PMID:24222728

  16. Exploring Opponent Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    of how the opponent format and relationships impact a game are almost absent in current research. Thus, this paper aims to elucidate how the perception of a competition differs, depending on the opponent format, by presenting a game mechanic framework. The paper furthermore presents an interactive...... football-training platform, as well as games designed to explore the different opponent formats. The games are qualitatively evaluated to illuminate the qualities of and distinctions between different types of opponent formats, proposed by the framework terminology....

  17. ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-09-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B. This format, originally designed for the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File, is recommended for international use. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-NCS-50496 (ENDF 102) should be consulted. An Appendix to the present document gives a summary of the format differences between ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5. (author)

  18. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  19. Infrared transient-liquid-phase joining of SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Materials Processing Group; Blue, R.A.; Lin, R.Y. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are among the advanced materials being considered for use in the aerospace industry due to their light weight, high strength, and high modulus. A rapid infrared joining process has been developed for the joining of composites and advanced materials. Rapid infrared joining has been shown not to have many of the problems associated with conventional joining methods. Two models were utilized to predict the joint evolution and fiber reaction zone growth. TMC, 16-ply SCS-6/{beta}21S, has been successfully joined with total processing times of under 2 min utilizing the rapid infrared joining technique. The process utilizes a 50 C/sec ramping rate, 17-{micro}m Ti-15Cu-15Ni wt % filler material between the faying surfaces; a joining temperature of 1,100 C; and 120 sec of time to join the composite material. Joint shear strength testing of the rapid infrared joints at temperatures as high as 800 C has revealed no joint failures. Also, due to the rapid cooling of the process, no poststabilization of the matrix material is necessary to prevent the formation of a brittle omega phase during subsequent use of the TMC at intermediate temperatures, 270 to 430 C, for up to 20 h.

  20. [Study and analysis of light infrared detection system with dual spectrum and wide temperature range].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Man-De; Jiang, Qing-Xiu; Ren, Huan-Huan; Li, Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Because harmonic diffractive optics elements has special achromatism, athermalization and arbitrary phase modulation characteristics, an infrared detection system method with dual spectrum and wide temperature range was presented based on the most advanced infrared dual color detector which had a format of 320 X 240 and the pixel pitch of 30 microm. A hybrid refractive/ harmonic diffractive infrared detection system with dual spectrum and wide temperature range was designed. The working wavelength range was 3. 8 - 4. 2 and 8. 8 -11. 2 microm. The system was only consisted of three lenses, including one aspheric surfaces and a harmonic diffraction surface, which made the system have compact structure and light weight. In the temperature range -120 -200 degreesC, the RMS radius of spot diagram in 3. 8 approximately 4. 2 and 8. 8-11. 2 pm was 19. 07 and 17. 75 microm respectively, which is less than the pixel size of infrared detector with 30 m, the enclosed energy in 30 microm, the enclosed energy in 3. 8-4. 2 and 8. 8-11. 2 microm is 88. 7% and 82. 4% in two pixel size. The method and structure was convenient and predominant. It was proved that the design was feasible.

  1. UNVEILING THE σ-DISCREPANCY IN INFRARED-LUMINOUS MERGERS. I. DUST AND DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothberg, Barry; Fischer, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Mergers in the local universe present a unique opportunity for studying the transformations of galaxies in detail. Presented here are recent results, based on multi-wavelength, high-resolution imaging and medium resolution spectroscopy, which demonstrate how star formation and the presence of red supergiants and/or asymptotic giant branch stars have led to a serious underestimation of the dynamical masses of infrared-bright galaxies. The dominance of a nuclear disk of young stars in the near-infrared bands, where dust obscuration does not block their signatures, can severely bias the global properties measured in a galaxy, including mass. This explains why past studies of gas-rich luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, which have measured dynamical masses using the 1.62 or 2.29 μm CO band heads, have found that these galaxies are forming m m* ellipticals. Moreover, merger remnants, including LIRGs, are placed on the I-band fundamental plane for the first time and appear to be virtually indistinguishable from elliptical galaxies.

  2. Synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy as a novel bioanalytical microprobe for individual living cells: Cytotoxicity considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; McNamara, Morgan P.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2001-12-12

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging analytical tool capable of monitoring the biochemistry within an individual living mammalian cell in real time. This unique technique provides infrared (IR)spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05-0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization, and the synchrotron IR beam has been shown to produce minimal sample heating. However, an important question remains, ''Does the intense synchrotron beam induce any cytotoxic effects in living cells?'' In this work, we present the results from a series of standard biological assays to evaluate any short-and/or long-term effects on cells exposed to the synchrotron radiation-based infrared (SR-IR) beam. Cell viability was tested using alcian blue dye-exclusion and colony formation assays. Cell-cycle progression was tested with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake during DNA synthesis. Cell metabolism was tested using an 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. All control, 5-, 10-, and 20-minute SR-IR exposure tests (267 total and over 1000 controls) show no evidence of cytotoxic effects. Concurrent infrared spectra obtained with each experiment confirm no detectable chemistry changes between control and exposed cells.

  3. Hyperspectral Longwave Infrared Focal Plane Array and Camera Based on Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a hyperspectral focal plane array and camera imaging in a large number of sharp hyperspectral bands in the thermal infrared. The camera is...

  4. Hyperspectral Longwave Infrared Focal Plane Array and Camera Based on Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a hyperspectral camera imaging in a large number of sharp hyperspectral bands in the thermal infrared. The camera is particularly suitable for...

  5. Conceptual thermal design and analysis of a far-infrared/mid-infrared remote sensing instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettker, William A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual thermal design and analysis results for the Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far-Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) instrument. SAFIRE has been proposed for Mission to Planet Earth to study ozone chemistry in the middle atmosphere using remote sensing of the atmosphere in the far-infrared (21-87 microns) and mid-infrared (9-16 microns) spectra. SAFIRE requires that far-IR detectors be cooled to 3-4 K and mid-IR detectors to 80 K for the expected mission lifetime of five years. A superfluid helium dewar and Stirling-cycle cryocoolers provide the cryogenic temperatures required by the infrared detectors. The proposed instrument thermal design uses passive thermal control techniques to reject 465 watts of waste heat from the instrument.

  6. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas: final report for LDRD 105749

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-01-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  7. Infrared 3-4 um Spectroscopic Investigation of a Large Sample of Nearby Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Dodley, C. C; Maloney, Philip R

    2005-01-01

    .... The 3.3 m PAH emission, the signatures of starbursts, is detected in all but two non-Seyfert ULIRGs, but the estimated starburst magnitudes can account for only a small fraction of the infrared luminosities...

  8. IHW COMET HALLEY INFRARED SPECTRA, V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set presents the infrared spectroscopy of Comet 1P/Halley archived with the Infrared Studies Network (IRSN) of the International Halley Watch (IHW). 59...

  9. TCSP GOES VISIBLE AND INFRARED IMAGES V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TCSP GOES Visible and Infrared Images dataset was collected in support of the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) mission, visible and infrared imagery...

  10. The Far-Infrared Spectrum of ARP 220

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Smith, Howard A; Fischer, Jacqueline; Cernicharo, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer grating observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 shows absorption in molecular lines of OH, H2O, CH, NH, and NH3, as well as in the...

  11. Neuronal Mechanisms and Bloodflow Control of Infrared Reception in Snakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goris, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The infrared pit organs of pit vipers and pythons were studied with emphasis on bloodflow in the capillary bed and its possible role as a cooling mechanism for the pit receptors stimulated by infrared (= heat...

  12. IHW COMET HALLEY INFRARED POLARIMETRY, V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains all the infrared polarimetry data archived as part of the International Halley Watch (IHW) Infrared Studies Network (IRSN). Data span the...

  13. Remote infrared audible signage (RIAS) pilot program report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Remote Infrared Audible Sign Model Accessibility Program (RIAS MAP) is a program funded by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to evaluate the effectiveness of remote infrared audible sign systems in enabling persons with visual and cognitiv...

  14. MSX INFRARED MINOR PLANET SURVEY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Midcourse Space Experiment Infrared Minor Planet Survey (MIMPS) includes infrared data for 168 main-belt asteroids serendipitously observed by the Midcourse...

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Parent Volatiles in Comets: Implications for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSanti, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Current cometary orbits provide information on their recent dynamical history. However, determining a given comet's formation region from its current dynamical state alone is complicated by radial migration in the proto-planetary disk and by dynamical interactions with the growing giant planets. Because comets reside for long periods of time in the outer Solar System, the ices contained in their nuclei (native ices) retain a relatively well-preserved footprint of when and where they formed, and this in turn can provide clues to conditions in the formation epoch. As a comet approaches the Sun, sublimation of its native ices releases parent volatiles into the coma where they can be measured spectroscopically. The past to - 15 years have seen the advent of infrared spectrometers with high sensitivity between about 2.8 and 5.0 micron, enabling a taxonomy among comets based on abundances of parent volatiles (e.g., H2O, CO, CH4, C2H6, HCN, CH30H, H2CO, NH3). Such molecules are of keen interest to Astrobiology, as they include important pre-biotic species that likely were required for the emergence of life on Earth and perhaps elsewhere. Approximately 20 comets have thus far been characterized, beginning with C/1996 82 (Hyakutake) in 1996. Molecular production rates are established through comparison of observed emission line intensities with those predicted by quantum mechanical fluorescence models. Abundances of parent volatiles (relative to H2O) vary among even the relatively small number of comets sampled, with the most volatile species (CO and CH4) displaying the largest variations. Techniques developed for measuring parent volatile abundances in comets will be discussed, as will possible implications for their formation.

  16. The Relationship Between Infrared Dark Cloud and Stellar Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahan, Jenny; Hora, Joseph L.

    2018-01-01

    Massive stars are known to form within infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), but many details about how molecular clouds collapse and form stars remain poorly understood.We determine the relationship between the dark cloud mass and the population of young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with the cloud to shed light on the physical processes occurring within these star forming regions. We chose to use a sample of IRDCs and YSOs within the Cygnus-X region, a close-by giant star formation complex that has every stage of star formation represented. Using observations from IRAC, MIPS, PACS, and SPIRE on Spitzer and Herschel we identified a sample of 30,903 YSOs and 167 IRDCs. We derived the class of each YSO as well as the mass of YSO and IRDCs from the flux information. Using these parameters, as well as their locations in the cloud, we were sorted IRDC fragments into larger filaments and associate a set of YSOs with each IRDC. By measuring and comparing parameters such as YSO total mass, number of YSOs, Class 0, Class I, and Class II populations, distance from host filament, and filament mass we tested for correlations between the YSO and IRDC parameters. Using this treasure trove of information, we find that Class 0 and I objects are located more closely to their host IRDC than their Class II counterparts. We also find that high-density IRDCs are better environments for star formation than low-density IRDCs. However, we find no correlation between the total mass of the IRDC and the largest YSO mass in the IRDC, suggesting that IRDCs of any mass can have massive YSOs associated with them.The SAO REU program is funded by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant AST-1659473, and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  17. Hybrid infrared scene projector (HIRSP): a high dynamic range infrared scene projector, part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Thomas M.; Bowden, Mark; Cosby, David; Ballard, Gary

    2008-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of the merging of two dynamic infrared scene projector technologies to provide a unique and innovative solution for the simulation of high dynamic temperature ranges for testing infrared imaging sensors. This paper will present some of the challenges and performance issues encountered in implementing this unique projector system into a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation facility. The projection system combines the technologies of a Honeywell BRITE II extended voltage range emissive resistor array device and an optically scanned laser diode array projector (LDAP). The high apparent temperature simulations are produced from the luminescent infrared radiation emitted by the high power laser diodes. The hybrid infrared projector system is being integrated into an existing HWIL simulation facility and is used to provide real-world high radiance imagery to an imaging infrared unit under test. The performance and operation of the projector is presented demonstrating the merit and success of the hybrid approach. The high dynamic range capability simulates a 250 Kelvin apparent background temperature to 850 Kelvin maximum apparent temperature signatures. This is a large increase in radiance projection over current infrared scene projection capabilities.

  18. An infrared diagnostic for magnetism in hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksala, M. E.; Grunhut, J. H.; Kraus, M.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Neiner, C.; Condori, C. A. H.; Campagnolo, J. C. N.; Souza, T. B.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetospheric observational proxies are used for indirect detection of magnetic fields in hot stars in the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio wavelength ranges. To determine the viability of infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines as a magnetic diagnostic for these stars, we have obtained low-resolution (R~ 1200), near-IR spectra of the known magnetic B2V stars HR 5907 and HR 7355, taken with the Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrometer (OSIRIS) attached to the 4.1 m Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope. Both stars show definite variable emission features in IR hydrogen lines of the Brackett series, with similar properties as those found in optical spectra, including the derived location of the detected magnetospheric plasma. These features also have the added advantage of a lowered contribution of stellar flux at these wavelengths, making circumstellar material more easily detectable. IR diagnostics will be useful for the future study of magnetic hot stars, to detect and analyze lower-density environments, and to detect magnetic candidates in areas obscured from UV and optical observations, increasing the number of known magnetic stars to determine basic formation properties and investigate the origin of their magnetic fields. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  19. NIRAC: Near Infrared Airglow Camera for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Rudy, R. J.; Hecht, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    NIRAC is a space based infrared airglow imager that will be deployed to the International Space Station in late 2018, under the auspices of the Space Test Program. NIRAC will survey OH airglow emissions in the 1.6 micron wavelength regime, exploring the spatial and temporal variability of emission intensities at latitudes from 51° south to 51° north. Atmospheric perturbations in the 80-100 km altitude range, including those produced by atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs), are observable in the OH airglow. The objective of the NIRAC experiment is to make near global measurement of the OH airglow and airglow perturbations. These emissions also provide a bright source of illumination at night, allowing for nighttime detection of clouds and surface characteristics. The instrument, developed by the Aerospace Space Science Applications Laboratory, employs a space-compatible FPGA for camera control and data collection and a novel, custom optical system to eliminate image smear due to orbital motion. NIRAC utilizes a high-performance, large format infrared focal plane array, transitioning technology used in the existing Aerospace Corporation ground-based airglow imager to a space based platform. The high-sensitivity, four megapixel imager has a native spatial resolution of 100 meters at ISS altitudes. The 23° x 23° FOV sweeps out a 150 km swath of the OH airglow layer as viewed from the ISS, and is sensitive to OH intensity perturbations down to 0.1%. The detector has a 1.7 micron cutoff that precludes the need for cold optics and reduces cooling requirements (to 180 K). Detector cooling is provided by a compact, lightweight cryocooler capable of reaching 120K, providing a great deal of margin.

  20. ENDF/B Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B, the evaluated neutron nuclear data library of the US National Nuclear Data Center. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-50274 (ENDF-102) should be consulted. (author)

  1. Diminutive formations in Xitsonga

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Introduction. In Xitsonga diminutive formation, the juncture between the root and the suffix undergoes various phonological processes: glide formation, velarisation and vowel deletion. We argue that these seemingly disjointed processes are results of repair strategies that apply in order to avoid a sequence of labial sounds.

  2. Divisions-ST Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Henny, L

    2001-01-01

    Au CERN la formation est une partie intégrante des activités de l'Organisation. Mentionnée dans le Statut du Personnel depuis l'origine, elle figure au Règlement depuis 1981 et est largement explicitée dans la Circulaire Administrative N° 16. L'organe réglementaire est constitué par la Commission Paritaire de Formation (Joint Training Board dont le sigle est JTB) qui a pour but de conseiller le Directeur Général en matière de formation, de définir la politique de formation et d'en faire l'évaluation. Des organes spécifiques ont été mis en place pour organiser les différents programmes : le Groupe Formation et Développement, le Comité exécutif de formation (sigle TEC), le Comité d'enseignement académique. Des délégués divisionnaires à la formation (sigle DTO) servent de courroie de transmission entre ces organes, le personnel et le Service de l'Enseignement (Div. HR). La Division ST dont les activités présentent une grande variété se doit de poursuivre une politique de formation s...

  3. Advances in SELEX ES infrared detectors for space and astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, P.; Hipwood, L.; Baker, I.; Weller, H.

    2017-11-01

    Selex ES produces a wide range of infrared detectors from mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and triglycine sulfate (TGS), and has supplied both materials into space programmes spanning a period of over 40 years. Current development activities that underpin potential future space missions include large format arrays for near- and short-wave infrared (NIR and SWIR) incorporating radiation-hard designs and suppression of glow. Improved heterostructures are aimed at the reduction of dark currents and avalanche photodiodes (APDs), and parallel studies have been undertaken for low-stress MCT array mounts. Much of this development work has been supported by ESA, UK Space, and ESO, and some has been performed in collaboration with the UK Astronomy Technology Centre and E2V. This paper focuses on MCT heterostructure developments and novel design elements in silicon read-out chips (ROICs). The 2048 x 2048 element, 17um pitch ROIC for ESA's SWIR array development forms the basis for the largest cooled infrared detector manufactured in Europe. Selex ES MCT is grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), currently on 75mm diameter GaAs substrates. The MCT die size of the SWIR array is 35mm square and only a single array can be printed on the 75mm diameter wafer, utilising only 28% of the wafer area. The situation for 100mm substrates is little better, allowing only 2 arrays and 31% utilisation. However, low cost GaAs substrates are readily available in 150mm diameter and the MCT growth is scalable to this size, offering the real possibility of 6 arrays per wafer with 42% utilisation. A similar 2k x 2k ROIC is the goal of ESA's NIR programme, which is currently in phase 2 with a 1k x 1k demonstrator, and a smaller 320 x 256 ROIC (SAPHIRA) has been designed for ESO for the adaptive optics application in the VLT Gravity instrument. All 3 chips have low noise source-follower architecture and are enabled for MCT APD arrays, which have been demonstrated by ESO to be capable of

  4. First THEMIS Infrared and Visible Images of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This picture shows both a visible and a thermal infrared image taken by the thermal emission imaging system on NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft on November 2, 2001. The images were taken as part of the ongoing calibration and testing of the camera system as the spacecraft orbited Mars on its 13threvolution of the planet.The visible wavelength image, shown on the right in black and white, was obtained using one of the instrument's five visible filters. The spacecraft was approximately 22,000 kilometers (about 13,600 miles) above Mars looking down toward the south pole when this image was acquired. It is late spring in the martian southern hemisphere.The thermal infrared image, center, shows the temperature of the surface in color. The circular feature seen in blue is the extremely cold martian south polar carbon dioxide ice cap. The instrument has measured a temperature of minus 120 degrees Celsius (minus 184 degrees Fahrenheit) on the south polar ice cap. The polar cap is more than 900 kilometers (540 miles) in diameter at this time.The visible image shows additional details along the edge of the ice cap, as well as atmospheric hazes near the cap. The view of the surface appears hazy due to dust that still remains in the martian atmosphere from the massive martian dust storms that have occurred over the past several months.The infrared image covers a length of over 6,500 kilometers (3,900 miles)spanning the planet from limb to limb, with a resolution of approximately 5.5 kilometers per picture element, or pixel, (3.4 miles per pixel) at the point directly beneath the spacecraft. The visible image has a resolution of approximately 1 kilometer per pixel (.6 miles per pixel) and covers an area roughly the size of the states of Arizona and New Mexico combined.An annotated image is available at the same resolution in tiff format. Click the image to download (note: it is a 5.2 mB file) [figure removed for brevity, see original site] NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  5. Uncooled emissive infrared imagers for CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschell, Jeffery J.; Masini, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Raytheon's fourth generation uncooled microbolometer array technology with digital output, High Definition (HD) 1920 × 1200 format and 12 μm cell size enables uncooled thermal infrared (TIR) multispectral imagers with the sensitivity and spatial sampling needed for a variety of Earth observation missions in LEO, GEO and HEO. A powerful combination of small detector cell size, fast optics and high sensitivity achieved without cryogenic cooling leads to instruments that are much smaller than current TIR systems, while still offering the capability to meet challenging measurement requirements for Earth observation missions. To consider how this technology could be implemented for Earth observation missions, we extend our previous studies with visible wavelength CubeSat imagers for environmental observations from LEO and examine whether small thermal infrared imagers based on fourth generation uncooled technology could be made small enough to fit onboard a 3U CubeSat and still meet challenging requirements for legacy missions. We found that moderate spatial resolution (~200 m) high sensitivity cloud and surface temperature observations meeting legacy MODIS/VIIRS requirements could be collected successfully with CubeSat-sized imagers but that multiple imagers are needed to cover the full swath for these missions. Higher spatial resolution land imagers are more challenging to fit into the CubeSat form factor, but it may be possible to do so for systems that require roughly 100 m spatial resolution. Regardless of whether it can fit into a CubeSat or not, uncooled land imagers meeting candidate TIR requirements can be implemented with a much smaller instrument than previous imagers. Even though this technology appears to be very promising, more work is needed to qualify this newly available uncooled infrared technology for use in space. If these new devices prove to be as space worthy as the first generation arrays that Raytheon qualified and built into the THEMIS imager

  6. Looking Forward - A Next Generation of Thermal Infrared Planetary Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P. R.; Hamilton, V. E.; Edwards, C. S.; Spencer, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal infrared measurements have provided important information about the physical properties of planetary surfaces beginning with the initial Mariner spacecraft in the early 1960's. These infrared measurements will continue into the future with a series of instruments that are now on their way or in development that will explore a suite of asteroids, Europa, and Mars. These instruments are being developed at Arizona State University, and are next-generation versions of the TES, Mini-TES, and THEMIS infrared spectrometers and imagers. The OTES instrument on OSIRIS-REx, which was launched in Sept. 2016, will map the surface of the asteroid Bennu down to a resolution of 40 m/pixel at seven times of day. This multiple time of day coverage will be used to produce global thermal inertia maps that will be used to determine the particle size distribution, which will in turn help select a safe and appropriate sample site. The EMIRS instrument, which is being built in partnership with the UAE's MBRSC for the Emirates Mars Mission, will measure martian surface temperatures at 200-300 km/pixel scales at over the full diurnal cycle - the first time the full diurnal temperature cycle has been observed since the Viking mission. The E-THEMIS instrument on the Europa Clipper mission will provide global mapping at 5-10 km/pixel scale at multiple times of day, and local observations down to resolutions of 50 m/pixel. These measurements will have a precision of 0.2 K for a 90 K scene, and will be used to map the thermal inertia and block abundances across Europa and to identify areas of localized endogenic heat. These observations will be used to investigate the physical processes of surface formation and evolution and to help select the landing site of a future Europa lander. Finally, the LTES instrument on the Lucy mission will measure temperatures on the day and night sides of the target Trojan asteroids, again providing insights into their surface properties and evolution

  7. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  8. 40 CFR 1065.250 - Nondispersive infra-red analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nondispersive infra-red analyzer. 1065... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Co and Co2 Measurements § 1065.250 Nondispersive infra-red analyzer. (a) Application. Use a nondispersive infra-red (NDIR) analyzer to measure CO...

  9. Development and Testing of Infrared Water Current Meter | Ezenne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The digital water current meter with infrared display velocity readings obtained per second. To confirm the accuracy of the infrared current meter, it was tested alongside with a conventional water current meter. The measurements performed with the infrared current meter compared well with the measurement performed with ...

  10. Infrared Fourier spectres of pectin obtained from pumpkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanova, S.R.; Dzhonmurodov, A.S.; Nazirova, Kh.I.; Mukhidinov, Z.K.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to infrared Fourier spectres of pectin obtained from pumpkin. The analysis of pectin obtained from pumpkin was conducted by means of infrared spectrophotometer with Fourier transformation. The infrared spectroscopic study of pectin polysaccharide fraction of pectin matter, as well as pectin helium and micro helium obtained by means of fast extraction was conducted.

  11. Search for infrared counterparts of gamma-ray bursters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.; Cline, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The result of two searches for infrared counterparts of Gamma-ray Bursters (GRB's) is reported. The first search was made using data from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and covered 23 positions. The second search was made with the Kitt Peak 1.5 m telescope and covered 3 positions. In neither of these two searches was any infrared candidate detected

  12. Infrared imaging of the crime scene: possibilities and pitfalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Gerda J.; Hoveling, Richelle J. M.; Roos, Martin; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2013-01-01

    All objects radiate infrared energy invisible to the human eye, which can be imaged by infrared cameras, visualizing differences in temperature and/or emissivity of objects. Infrared imaging is an emerging technique for forensic investigators. The rapid, nondestructive, and noncontact features of

  13. Toolset for evaluating infrared countermeasures and signature reduction for ships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The protection of ships against infrared guided missiles is a concern for modern naval forces. The vulnerability of ships can be reduced by applying countermeasures such as infrared decoys and infrared signature reduction. This paper presents a set of simulation tools which can be used for assessing

  14. Infrared spectroscopy of ionized corannulene in the gas phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvaro Galué, H.; Rice, C.A.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.

    2011-01-01

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of radical cationic and protonated corannulene were recorded by infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the IR free electron laser for infrared experiments. Electrospray ionization was used to generate protonated corannulene and an IRMPD

  15. Next-generation mid-infrared sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, D.; Bank, S.; Lee, M. L.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-12-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR) is a wavelength range with a variety of technologically vital applications in molecular sensing, security and defense, energy conservation, and potentially in free-space communication. The recent development and rapid commercialization of new coherent mid-infrared sources have spurred significant interest in the development of mid-infrared optical systems for the above applications. However, optical systems designers still do not have the extensive optical infrastructure available to them that exists at shorter wavelengths (for instance, in the visible and near-IR/telecom wavelengths). Even in the field of optoelectronic sources, which has largely driven the growing interest in the mid-infrared, the inherent limitations of state-of-the-art sources and the gaps in spectral coverage offer opportunities for the development of new classes of lasers, light emitting diodes and emitters for a range of potential applications. In this topical review, we will first present an overview of the current state-of-the-art mid-IR sources, in particular thermal emitters, which have long been utilized, and the relatively new quantum- and interband-cascade lasers, as well as the applications served by these sources. Subsequently, we will discuss potential mid-infrared applications and wavelength ranges which are poorly served by the current stable of mid-IR sources, with an emphasis on understanding the fundamental limitations of the current source technology. The bulk of the manuscript will then explore both past and recent developments in mid-infrared source technology, including narrow bandgap quantum well lasers, type-I and type-II quantum dot materials, type-II superlattices, highly mismatched alloys, lead-salts and transition-metal-doped II-VI materials. We will discuss both the advantages and limitations of each of the above material systems, as well as the potential new applications which they might serve. All in all, this topical review does not aim

  16. Serendipity Observations of Far Infrared Cirrus Emission in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey: Analysis of Far-Infrared Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Caroline; Helou, George; Boulanger, François; Lagache, Guilaine; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Draine, Bruce; Martin, Peter

    2009-04-01

    We present an analysis of far-infrared (FIR) dust emission from diffuse cirrus clouds. This study is based on serendipitous observations at 160 μm at high-galactic latitude with the Multiband Imaging Photometer onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope by the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. These observations are complemented with IRIS data at 100 and 60 μm and constitute one of the most sensitive and unbiased samples of FIR observations at a small scale of diffuse interstellar clouds. Outside regions dominated by the cosmic infrared background fluctuations, we observe a substantial scatter in the 160/100 colors from cirrus emission. We compared the 160/100 color variations to 60/100 colors in the same fields and find a trend of decreasing 60/100 with increasing 160/100. This trend cannot be accounted for by current dust models by changing solely the interstellar radiation field. It requires a significant change of dust properties such as grain size distribution or emissivity or a mixing of clouds in different physical conditions along the line of sight. These variations are important as a potential confusing foreground for extragalactic studies. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA.

  17. SERENDIPITY OBSERVATIONS OF FAR INFRARED CIRRUS EMISSION IN THE SPITZER INFRARED NEARBY GALAXIES SURVEY: ANALYSIS OF FAR-INFRARED CORRELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, Caroline; Helou, George; Boulanger, Francois; Lagache, Guilaine; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Draine, Bruce; Martin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of far-infrared (FIR) dust emission from diffuse cirrus clouds. This study is based on serendipitous observations at 160 μm at high-galactic latitude with the Multiband Imaging Photometer onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope by the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. These observations are complemented with IRIS data at 100 and 60 μm and constitute one of the most sensitive and unbiased samples of FIR observations at a small scale of diffuse interstellar clouds. Outside regions dominated by the cosmic infrared background fluctuations, we observe a substantial scatter in the 160/100 colors from cirrus emission. We compared the 160/100 color variations to 60/100 colors in the same fields and find a trend of decreasing 60/100 with increasing 160/100. This trend cannot be accounted for by current dust models by changing solely the interstellar radiation field. It requires a significant change of dust properties such as grain size distribution or emissivity or a mixing of clouds in different physical conditions along the line of sight. These variations are important as a potential confusing foreground for extragalactic studies.

  18. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kawamura, Akiko; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2013-01-01

    We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of ∼10 deg 2 of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R ∼ 20) spectra in 2-5 μm for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 μm, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 μm. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 μm can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the LMC in the near-infrared

  19. Alanes formation on the Al(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Veyan, Jean-Francois; Chabal, Yves J.; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James T.

    2008-03-01

    Alane clusters (AlxHy) are believed to be the ubiquitous intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for a wide variety of alanates (LiAlH4, NaAlH4) currently considered for hydrogen storage. The formation and behavior of alanes at surfaces appear to control and limit the efficiency of hydrogen storage. In particular, hydrogen adsorption on the Al(111) surface leads to the coexistence of several adsorbed species, the concentration of which is affected by the step density, the surface coverage and the temperature. We combine density functional theory (DFT) and surface infra-red (IR) absorption spectroscopy to uncover the mechanisms for alane formation on Al(111) surfaces. At low coverage, DFT predicts a two-fold bridge site adsorption for atomic hydrogen, consistent with previous Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements. At higher coverage, the formation of small chemisorbed AlH3 occurs at the step edges. With increasing coverage AlH3 is extracted from the step edge and becomes highly mobile on the terraces in a weakly bound state. This mobility is the key factor leading to the growth of larger alanes through AlH3 oligomerization. For these large alanes, previous Thermal Programmed Desorption studies are discussed and compared to the thermal stability observed in IR.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional calculations on titanium-dinitrogen complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hae-Wook; Choi, Changhyeok; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Jung, Yousung; Choi, Myong Yong

    2018-04-01

    Titanium-nitrogen complexes were generated by laser ablated titanium (Ti) atoms and N2 gas molecules in this study. These complexes were isolated on the pre-deposited solid Ar matrix on the pre-cooled KBr window (T ∼ 5.4 K), allowing infrared spectra to be measured. Laser ablation experiments with 15N2 isotope provided distinct isotopic shifts in the infrared spectra that strongly implicated the formation of titanium-nitrogen complexes, Ti(NN)x. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the molecular structures, electronic ground state, relative energies, and IR frequencies of the anticipated Ti(NN)x complexes. Based on laser ablation experiments and DFT calculations, we were able to assign multiple Ti(NN)x (x = 1-6) species. Particularly, Ti(NN)5 and Ti(NN)6, which have high nitrogen content, may serve as good precursors in preparing polynitrogens.

  1. Rapidly measuring temperature and software optimization used in infrared thermography during laser repairing cracks processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongke; Ye, Hequing; Zhang, Hailiang; Lei, Junpeng; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Shuyi, Huang; Shu, Xuefeng

    2002-09-01

    Infrared thermograph technology in the research of laser-matter interaction was discussed. The formation of molten pool and heat transfer and matter transfer in laser repairing cracks of components were investigated using infrared thermal imaging system. Because the software system of HWRX-3 thermovision is not compatible with the present computer and operation system, we discussed several methods, where the compatibility has been solved and the image processing system can be transformed to windows operation system by the redesign software. The friendly user interface and very high visibility of the optimized software have been testified during laser repairing cracks of components processing. One practical method of digital process for the investigation on heat transfer and matter transfer in laser repairing cracks of components has been developed.

  2. Near-infrared sources in the molecular cloud G35.2-0.74

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia, M.; Roth, M.; Persi, P.; Ferrari-Toniolo, M.

    1985-01-01

    Near-infrared (1-4 μm) observations of the molecular cloud G35.2-0.74 reveal the presence of four infrared sources in the vicinity of two previously reported centres of recent star formation. The northern part of G35.2-0.74 contains three point sources which are interpreted as highly obscured stars. Irs 1 coincides with H 2 O and OH maser sources and seems to be a very young early-type star. The southern part of G35.2-0.74 shows a diffuse 2.2-μm source with a flux distribution in the short-wavelength region compatible with free-free emission and a large excess at lambda > or approx. 3 μm attributed to warm dust mixed with the gas. These data are consistent with a fully developed HII region. (author)

  3. Comparison of vehicle-mounted forward-looking polarimetric infrared and downward-looking infrared sensors for landmine detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, F.; Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Jong, W. de; Schutte, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives a comparison of two vehicle-mounted infrared systems for landmine detection. The first system is a down-ward looking standard infrared camera using processing methods developed within the EU project LOTUS. The second system is using a forward-looking polarimetric infrared camera.

  4. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  5. Infrared thermography in the architectural field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Carosena

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is becoming ever more popular in civil engineering/architecture mainly due to its noncontact character which includes two great advantages. On one side, it prevents the object, under inspection, from any alteration and this is worthwhile especially in the presence of precious works of art. On the other side, the personnel operate in a remote manner far away from any hazard and this complies well with safety at work regulations. What is more, it offers the possibility to quickly inspect large surfaces such as the entire facade of a building. This paper would be an overview of the use of infrared thermography in the architectural and civil engineering field. First, some basic testing procedures are described, and then some key examples are presented owing to both laboratory tests and applications in situ spanning from civil habitations to works of art and archaeological sites.

  6. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller,D.; Ediss, G.; Mihaly, L.; Carr, G.

    2006-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 ({approx}1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 ({approx}150 THz), Z-cut quartz, Gore-Tex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  7. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  8. Infrared dust emission from globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeletti, L.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.; Giannone, P.; Blanco, A.; Bussoletti, E.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of the presence of a central cloud in the cores of globular clusters were investigated recently. A possible mechanism of confinement of dust in the central region of our cluster models was also explored. The grain temperature and infrared emission have now been computed for rather realistic grain compositions. The grain components were assumed to be graphite and/or silicates. The central clouds turned out to be roughly isothermal. The wavelengths of maximum emission came out to be larger than 20 μm in all studied cases. An application of the theoretical results to five globular clusters showed that the predictable infrared emission for 47 Tuc, M4 and M22 should be detectable by means of present instrumentation aboard flying platforms. (author)

  9. Theoretical design of near - infrared organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Ducasse, Laurent; Dautel, Olivier; Lartigau-Dagron, Christine; Castet, FréDéRic

    The world follows the path of digital development faster than ever before. In consequence, the Human Machine Interfaces (HMI) market is growing as well and it requires some innovations. The goal of our work is to achieve an organic Infra-Red (IR) photodetectors hitting the performance requirements for HMI applications. The quantum chemical calculations are used to guide the synthesis and technology development. In this work, in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), we consider a large variety of materials exploring small donor-acceptor-donor molecules and copolymers alternating donor and acceptor monomers. We provide a structure-property relationship in view of designing new Near-Infrared (NIR) absorbing organic molecules and polymers.

  10. Infrared Supercontinuum Generation in Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Sune Vestergaard Lund

    During my PhD studies I have worked with intense lasers and optical fibres. In our conceptual universe the colour of light (wavelength) does not depend on the material in which it propagates. At high intensities however, nonlinear effects change the behaviour of light and rise of new wavelength...... with laser-like intensity is obtained, which otherwise is impossible without the use of more complicated equipment. Until recently, supercontinuum covering the mid-infrared was not possible due to absorption in the silica glass optical fibres are made of. In our project infrared transparent materials...... such as ZBLAN and chalcogenide have been investigated. Using ZBLAN it has been possible to generated a supercontinuum stretching beyond 4200 nm. Supercontinuum generation requires knowledge about the physical properties of the optical fibre in which the pulse-broadening takes place. Consequently thorough...

  11. CVD molybdenum films of high infrared reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum thin films of high infrared reflectance have been deposited by pyrolytic decomposition of molybdenum carbonyl (Mo(CO)/sub 6/), and by hydrogen reduction of molybdenum pentachloride (MoCl/sub 5/). Reflectance values within 0.7% of the reflectance of supersmooth bulk molybdenum have been attained by annealing films of lower reflectance in both reducing and non-reducing atmospheres. All depositions and anneals proceed at atmospheric pressure, facilitating a continuous, flow-through fabrication. These reflectors combine the high temperature stability of molybdenum thin films with the infrared reflectance of a material such as aluminum. Deposition from Mo(CO)/sub 6/ under oxidizing conditions, and subsequent anneal in a reducing atmosphere, results in films that combine high solar absorptance with low thermal emittance. If anti-reflected, black molybdenum films can serve as highly selective single layer photothermal converters. Structural, compositional, and crystallographic properties have been measured after both deposition and anneal.

  12. Infrared photometry of cool white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, D.T.; Allen, D.A.; Bessell, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The results are presented of a search for the effects of pressure induced H 2 dipole opacity on the infrared JHK magnitudes of cool white dwarfs. LHS 1126 is found to be a very cool (Tsub(e) approximately 4250 K) DC white dwarf with a H rich atmospheric composition dominated by H 2 dipole opacity in the infrared. JHK photometry also favours a H rich atmospheric composition for the DK white dwarfs LP 658-2 and W 489. The surprisingly high proportion of hydrogen rich white dwarfs in the sample appears to suggest that the mechanism which inhibits the accretion of hydrogen in the hotter helium stars becomes less effective at low (Tsub(e) approximately 3 + ion in cool hydrogen rich white dwarf atmospheres is pointed out and it is suggested that the opacity due to this ion may be responsible for the blanketing observed in the U and B magnitudes of some cool white dwarfs. (author)

  13. Infrared Thermography of Thermomechanical Couplings in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, M. P.; Parganin, D.; Loizeau, J.

    The present paper aims to illustrate three advantages of infrared thermography as a non destructive, real-time and non-contact technique to mechanically characterise solid materials. It permits observation of the macrostructural aspects of. thermoplasticity describing damage and failure processes in diverse and various engineering materials and their components subjected to monotonous, cyclic or vibratory loading. It usefully suggests the definition of a threshold of acceptable damage TAD for materials related to sport equipment such as leather shoe, leather-like composites or sail synthetics. Particularly in case of metallic products or automotive components subjected to fatigue loading, this newly proposed method could evaluate in a non-destructive manner the fatigue limit FL in a very short time compared to traditional fatigue testing techniques that are much more time-consuming and excessively expensive. In addition owing to the thermomechanical coupling, infrared thermography readily describes the damage location, the dissipative regime and the evolution of structural failure.

  14. A genetically targetable near-infrared photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianjun; Wang, Yi; Missinato, Maria A; Onuoha, Ezenwa; Perkins, Lydia A; Watkins, Simon C; St Croix, Claudette M; Tsang, Michael; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2016-03-01

    Upon illumination, photosensitizer molecules produce reactive oxygen species that can be used for functional manipulation of living cells, including protein inactivation, targeted-damage introduction and cellular ablation. Photosensitizers used to date have been either exogenous, resulting in delivery and removal challenges, or genetically encoded proteins that form or bind a native photosensitizing molecule, resulting in a constitutively active photosensitizer inside the cell. We describe a genetically encoded fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) that binds a heavy atom-substituted fluorogenic dye, forming an 'on-demand' activated photosensitizer that produces singlet oxygen and fluorescence when activated with near-infrared light. This targeted and activated photosensitizer (TAPs) approach enables protein inactivation, targeted cell killing and rapid targeted lineage ablation in living larval and adult zebrafish. The near-infrared excitation and emission of this FAP-TAPs provides a new spectral range for photosensitizer proteins that could be useful for imaging, manipulation and cellular ablation deep within living organisms.

  15. Application of infrared thermography in sports science

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the application of infrared thermography in sports, examining the main benefits of this non-invasive, non-radiating and low-cost technique. Aspects covered include the detection of injuries in sports medicine, the assessment of sports performance due to the existing link between physical fitness and thermoregulation and the analysis of heat transfer for sports garments and sports equipment. Although infrared thermography is broadly considered to be a fast and easy-to-use tool, the ability to deliver accurate and repeatable measurements is an important consideration. Furthermore, it is important to be familiar with the latest sports studies published on this technique to understand its potential and limitations. Accordingly, this book establishes a vital link between laboratory tests and the sports field. .

  16. Infrared Thermography in the Architectural Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is becoming ever more popular in civil engineering/architecture mainly due to its noncontact character which includes two great advantages. On one side, it prevents the object, under inspection, from any alteration and this is worthwhile especially in the presence of precious works of art. On the other side, the personnel operate in a remote manner far away from any hazard and this complies well with safety at work regulations. What is more, it offers the possibility to quickly inspect large surfaces such as the entire facade of a building. This paper would be an overview of the use of infrared thermography in the architectural and civil engineering field. First, some basic testing procedures are described, and then some key examples are presented owing to both laboratory tests and applications in situ spanning from civil habitations to works of art and archaeological sites. PMID:24319358

  17. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  18. Infrared processing of magnesium wrought alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton Jr, Joe A [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Muth, T [Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.; Bowles, Amanda L [ORNL; Agnew, Sean R [University of Virginia

    2005-01-01

    High density infrared (HDI) processing of magnesium alloy sheet allows rapid heat up and cool down and may facilitate a continuous cast/roll process, thereby reducing costs. In a previous study, a plasma arc lamp resulted in an anneal in seconds that compared well to a normal 1 h 500 C anneal. The current study on AZ31 used a bank of quartz infrared lamps both in a lab setting and in a demonstration test at a commercial facility (Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.). Typical reheats and anneals between rolling passes required 2 to 5 minutes for rolling 6 mm sheet down to 1 mm. Tensile tests showed comparable results to normal processing. The near surface microstructure was similar to the center of the sheets. No gross progressive or cumulative effect on mechanical properties was observed from pass to pass. Good surface quality with minimal edge cracking was produced.

  19. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Systems for Tissue Oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Dahl

    We present exible silicon device platforms, which combine polyimide with polydimethylsiloxane in order to add flexibility and biocompatibility to the silicon devices. The device platforms are intended as tissue oximeters, using near infrared spectroscopy, but could potentially also be used...... for other medical applications. The tissue oximeters are realised by incorporation of pn-diodes into the silicon in order to form arrays of infrared detectors. These arrays can then be used for spatially resolved spectroscopy measurements, with the targeted end user being prematurely born infant children....... Monte Carlo simulations have been performed on a model of a neonatal head and they show only weak changing signals as function of changes in cerebral oxygenation. A mechanical and electrical analysis of the device platforms, both by analytical expressions and numerical simulation, indicated...

  20. Design of a compact athermalized infrared seeker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing-jia; Wang, Jian; Sun, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    In order to meet the application requirement of a certain long wavelength infrared (LWIR) seeker, a small volume, light weight and passively athermalized infrared (IR) objective is designed in this paper. The two-lens telephoto structure is adopted by merely using aluminum alloy as the housing material. By balancing the thermo-optical coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of materials, an athermalized IR seeker with effective focal length of 90 mm and F number of 1.2 is achieved. The whole optical length is 75 mm, and the weight is only 234 g. The objective can remain fine imaging quality under temperature range from -40 °C to 60 °C, which is beneficial to the lightweight design of IR seekers.