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Sample records for fork head transcription

  1. Structural and functional characterisation of the fork head transcription factor-encoding gene, Hc-daf-16, from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus (Strongylida)

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Despite their phylogenetic diversity, parasitic nematodes share attributes of longevity and developmental arrest (=hypobiosis) with free-living nematodes at key points in their life cycles, particularly in larval stages responsible for establishing infection in the host. Insulin-like signalling plays crucial roles in the regulation of life span and arrest (=dauer formation) in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Insulin-like signalling in C. elegans negatively regulates the fork...

  2. Human brain factor 1, a new member of the fork head gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, D.B.; Wiese, S.; Burfeind, P. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of cDNA clones that cross-hybridized with the fork head domain of the rat HNF-3 gene family revealed 10 cDNAs from human fetal brain and human testis cDNA libraries containing this highly conserved DNA-binding domain. Three of these cDNAs (HFK1, HFK2, and HFK3) were further analyzed. The cDNA HFK1 has a length of 2557 nucleotides and shows strong homology at the nucleotide level (91.2%) to brain factor 1 (BF-1) from rat. The HFK1 cDNA codes for a putative 476 amino acid protein. The homology to BF-1 from rat in the coding region at the amino acid level is 87.5%. The fork head homologous region includes 111 amino acids starting at amino acid 160 and has a 97.5% homology to BF-1. Southern hybridization revealed that HFK1 is highly conserved among mammalian species and possibly birds. Northern analysis with total RNA from human tissues and poly(A)-rich RNA from mouse revealed a 3.2-kb transcript that is present in human and mouse fetal brain and in adult mouse brain. In situ hybridization with sections of mouse embryo and human fetal brain reveals that HFK1 expression is restricted to the neuronal cells in the telencepthalon, with strong expression being observed in the developing dentate gyrus and hippocampus. HFK1 was chromosomally localized by in situ hybridization to 14q12. The cDNA clones HFK2 and HFK3 were analyzed by restriction analysis and sequencing. HFK2 and HFK3 were found to be closely related but different from HFK1. Therefore, it would appear that HFK1, HFK2, HFK3, and BF-1 form a new fork head related subfamily. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Computer Aided Design of the Link-Fork Head-Piston Assembly of the Kaplan Turbine with Solidworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Jianu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the steps for 3D computer aided design (CAD of the link-fork head-piston assembly of the Kaplan turbine made in SolidWorks.The present paper is a tutorial for a Kaplan turbine assembly 3D geometry, which is dedicated to the Assembly design and Drawing Geometry and Drawing Annotation.

  4. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  5. Replication Termination: Containing Fork Fusion-Mediated Pathologies in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juachi U. Dimude

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of bacterial chromosomes is initiated via the assembly of two replication forks at a single defined origin. Forks proceed bi-directionally until they fuse in a specialised termination area opposite the origin. This area is flanked by polar replication fork pause sites that allow forks to enter but not to leave. The precise function of this replication fork trap has remained enigmatic, as no obvious phenotypes have been associated with its inactivation. However, the fork trap becomes a serious problem to cells if the second fork is stalled at an impediment, as replication cannot be completed, suggesting that a significant evolutionary advantage for maintaining this chromosomal arrangement must exist. Recently, we demonstrated that head-on fusion of replication forks can trigger over-replication of the chromosome. This over-replication is normally prevented by a number of proteins including RecG helicase and 3’ exonucleases. However, even in the absence of these proteins it can be safely contained within the replication fork trap, highlighting that multiple systems might be involved in coordinating replication fork fusions. Here, we discuss whether considering the problems associated with head-on replication fork fusion events helps us to better understand the important role of the replication fork trap in cellular metabolism.

  6. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  7. Stable Binding of the Conserved Transcription Factor Grainy Head to its Target Genes Throughout Drosophila melanogaster Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevil, Markus; Bondra, Eliana R; Schulz, Katharine N; Kaplan, Tommy; Harrison, Melissa M

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that transcription factor binding is temporally dynamic, and that changes in binding determine transcriptional output. Nonetheless, this model is based on relatively few examples in which transcription factor binding has been assayed at multiple developmental stages. The essential transcription factor Grainy head (Grh) is conserved from fungi to humans, and controls epithelial development and barrier formation in numerous tissues. Drosophila melanogaster, which possess a single grainy head (grh) gene, provide an excellent system to study this conserved factor. To determine whether temporally distinct binding events allow Grh to control cell fate specification in different tissue types, we used a combination of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to elucidate the gene regulatory network controlled by Grh during four stages of embryonic development (spanning stages 5-17) and in larval tissue. Contrary to expectations, we discovered that Grh remains bound to at least 1146 genomic loci over days of development. In contrast to this stable DNA occupancy, the subset of genes whose expression is regulated by Grh varies. Grh transitions from functioning primarily as a transcriptional repressor early in development to functioning predominantly as an activator later. Our data reveal that Grh binds to target genes well before the Grh-dependent transcriptional program commences, suggesting it sets the stage for subsequent recruitment of additional factors that execute stage-specific Grh functions. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. SC tuning fork

    CERN Multimedia

    The tuning fork used to modulate the radiofrequency system of the synchro cyclotron (SC) from 1957 to 1973. This piece is an unused spare part. The SC was the 1st accelerator built at CERN. It operated from August 1957 until it was closed down at the end of 1990. In the SC the magnetic field did not change with time, and the particles were accelerated in successive pulses by a radiofrequency voltage of some 20kV which varied in frequency as they spiraled outwards towards the extraction radius. The frequency varied from 30MHz to about 17Mz in each pulse. The tuning fork vibrated at 55MHz in vacuum in an enclosure which formed a variable capacitor in the tuning circuit of the RF system, allowing the RF to vary over the appropriate range to accelerate protons from the centre of the macine up to 600Mev at extraction radius. In operation the tips of the tuning fork blade had an amplitude of movement of over 1 cm. The SC accelerator underwent extensive improvements from 1973 to 1975, including the installation of a...

  9. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  10. On non-forking spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Chernikov, Artem; Shelah, Saharon

    2012-01-01

    Non-forking is one of the most important notions in modern model theory capturing the idea of a generic extension of a type (which is a far-reaching generalization of the concept of a generic point of a variety). To a countable first-order theory we associate its non-forking spectrum - a function of two cardinals kappa and lambda giving the supremum of the possible number of types over a model of size lambda that do not fork over a sub-model of size kappa. This is a natural generalization of the stability function of a theory. We make progress towards classifying the non-forking spectra. On the one hand, we show that the possible values a non-forking spectrum may take are quite limited. On the other hand, we develop a general technique for constructing theories with a prescribed non-forking spectrum, thus giving a number of examples. In particular, we answer negatively a question of Adler whether NIP is equivalent to bounded non-forking. In addition, we answer a question of Keisler regarding the number of cut...

  11. Discrimination method of forked larch trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wen-bin; Sun Ren-shan; Liu Xu-hua; Liu Yong

    2006-01-01

    For the demands of automatíc pruning, an effective discrimination rule of the forked and non-forked larch trees is established. First, information of trunk and branch diameters of a larch plantations was collected from the west mountain of Beijing. The growth characteristics of the forked and non-forked trees were studied. Given the statistical characteristics of the trunk and branch diameters, a discriminant function of the forked branch and non-forked larch trees was established statistically. Excellent discrimination results were obtained by the function and the rule. The study presents an effective discrimination rule to separate forked trees from straight trees for automatic pruning.

  12. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Head Remodelling and Sperm Tail Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadege Vernet

    Full Text Available A previous study indicated that genetic information encoded on the mouse Y chromosome short arm (Yp is required for efficient completion of the second meiotic division (that generates haploid round spermatids, restructuring of the sperm head, and development of the sperm tail. Using mouse models lacking a Y chromosome but with varying Yp gene complements provided by Yp chromosomal derivatives or transgenes, we recently identified the Y-encoded zinc finger transcription factors Zfy1 and Zfy2 as the Yp genes promoting the second meiotic division. Using the same mouse models we here show that Zfy2 (but not Zfy1 contributes to the restructuring of the sperm head and is required for the development of the sperm tail. The preferential involvement of Zfy2 is consistent with the presence of an additional strong spermatid-specific promotor that has been acquired by this gene. This is further supported by the fact that promotion of sperm morphogenesis is also seen in one of the two markedly Yp gene deficient models in which a Yp deletion has created a Zfy2/1 fusion gene that is driven by the strong Zfy2 spermatid-specific promotor, but encodes a protein almost identical to that encoded by Zfy1. Our results point to there being further genetic information on Yp that also has a role in restructuring the sperm head.

  13. Tuning fork tests: forgotten art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, T F; Shambaugh, G E

    1988-01-01

    Four examples are cited in which tuning fork tests helped in proper selection of patients for surgery, after audiometric air and bone tests were equivocal or gave the wrong diagnostic and prognostic indication.

  14. Replication Fork Protection Factors Controlling R-Loop Bypass and Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-01-14

    Replication-transcription conflicts have been a well-studied source of genome instability for many years and have frequently been linked to defects in RNA processing. However, recent characterization of replication fork-associated proteins has revealed that defects in fork protection can directly or indirectly stabilize R-loop structures in the genome and promote transcription-replication conflicts that lead to genome instability. Defects in essential DNA replication-associated activities like topoisomerase, or the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complex, as well as fork-associated protection factors like the Fanconi anemia pathway, both appear to mitigate transcription-replication conflicts. Here, we will highlight recent advances that support the concept that normal and robust replisome function itself is a key component of mitigating R-loop coupled genome instability.

  15. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Mistrik, Martin; Neelsen, Kai J

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression...... a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks....... of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity...

  16. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Verrucous carcinomas of the head and neck, including those with associated squamous cell carcinoma, lack transcriptionally active high-risk human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kalyani R; Chernock, Rebecca D; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Xiaowei; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S

    2013-11-01

    Most oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and histologic variants harbor transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV). While HPV DNA can be found in many non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, transcriptionally active HPV is rare. Verrucous carcinoma is a variant with bland cytology, warty appearance, locally destructive growth, and lack of metastasis when lacking a frankly invasive carcinoma component. Studies have shown variable rates of HPV DNA and p16 protein expression in such tumors but still have not clearly addressed if the virus has biological activity or clinical relevance in the positive cases. Department files were searched for verrucous neoplasms, including pure verrucous carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma with dysplasia or minimal invasion, and SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma (ie, having a major component of frankly invasive carcinoma). p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and E6/E7 mRNA reverse transcription PCR for high-risk HPV types were performed. Of the 49 cases, 6 (12.2%) showed strong (>50%) staining for p16. HPV DNA was detected in 7/49 (14.3%) cases, but only one case was positive for both p16, and HPV DNA. A total of 36 cases yielded sufficient RNA for RT-PCR (18 verrucous carcinomas, 13 atypical verrucous carcinomas, and 5 SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma). All 36 were negative, including the four p16-positive and three HPV DNA-positive tumors tested. Although a minority of verrucous carcinoma lesions are p16 and HPV DNA positive, transcriptionally active high-risk HPV is uniformly absent. These findings argue that verrucous carcinoma and its related squamous cell carcinomas are not HPV-driven tumors.

  18. FBH1 Catalyzes Regression of Stalled Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Fugger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication fork perturbation is a major challenge to the maintenance of genome integrity. It has been suggested that processing of stalled forks might involve fork regression, in which the fork reverses and the two nascent DNA strands anneal. Here, we show that FBH1 catalyzes regression of a model replication fork in vitro and promotes fork regression in vivo in response to replication perturbation. Cells respond to fork stalling by activating checkpoint responses requiring signaling through stress-activated protein kinases. Importantly, we show that FBH1, through its helicase activity, is required for early phosphorylation of ATM substrates such as CHK2 and CtIP as well as hyperphosphorylation of RPA. These phosphorylations occur prior to apparent DNA double-strand break formation. Furthermore, FBH1-dependent signaling promotes checkpoint control and preserves genome integrity. We propose a model whereby FBH1 promotes early checkpoint signaling by remodeling of stalled DNA replication forks.

  19. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries.

  20. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Wastewater Management Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    denitrification or clinoptilolite ion exchange is required to meet the ammonia and total nitrogen levels. The effluent from these unit processes would be filtered...32 45 Dissolved Oxygen (mg/1) At Grand Forks 6.0 7.0 8.6 i0.0 12.1 At East Grand Forks 6.5 7.4 9.0 11.4 12.7 Ammonia Nitrogen (mg/i) At Grand Forks...Concentration (mg/i) Total Solids 700 Dissolved Solids 500 Suspended Solids 200 BOD5 200 COD 500 Total Nitrogen 40 Organic Nitrogen 15 Ammonia Nitrogen

  1. Thyroid active agents T3 and PTU differentially affect immune gene transcripts in the head kidney of rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-García, Alba; Encinas, Paloma; Valdehita, Ana; Baumann, Lisa; Segner, Helmut; Coll, Julio M; Navas, José M

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, numerous reports describe an immunomodulating effect of thyroid-active compounds. In contrast, only few reports have been published on this subject in fish. We previously demonstrated that immune cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) possess thyroid hormone receptors (THRs) and that exposure of trout to the thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) or the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil (PTU) alters immune cell transcript levels of THR and several immune genes. The present study aims to further characterize the immunomodulating action of thyroid-active compounds in trout immune cells. We report here the use of a custom-designed 60-mer oligo immune-targeted microarray for rainbow trout to analyze the gene expression profiles induced in the head kidney by T3 and PTU. Morphometric analyses of the thyroid showed that PTU exposure increased the size of the epithelial cells, whereas T3 induced no significant effects. Both T3 and PTU had diverse and partly contrasting effects on immune transcript profiles. The strongest differential effects of T3 and PTU on gene expressions were those targeting the Mitogen Associated Protein Kinase (MAPK), NFkB, Natural Killer (NK) and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) pathways, a number of multipath genes (MPG) such as those encoding pleiotropic transcription factors (atf1, junb, myc), as well as important pro-inflammatory genes (tnfa, tnf6, il1b) and interferon-related genes (ifng, irf10). With these results we show for the first time in a fish species that the in vivo thyroidal status modulates a diversity of immune genes and pathways. This knowledge provides the basis to investigate both mechanisms and consequences of thyroid hormone- and thyroid disruptor-mediated immunomodulation for the immunocompetence of fish.

  2. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BcbHLHpol functions as a positive regulator of pollen development in non-heading Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Changwei; Duan, Weike; Huang, Feiyi; Hou, Xilin

    2014-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a common trait in higher plants, and several transcription factors regulate pollen development. Previously, we obtained a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, BcbHLHpol, via suppression subtractive hybridization in non-heading Chinese cabbage. However, the regulatory function of BcbHLHpol during anther and pollen development remains unclear. In this study, BcbHLHpol was cloned, and its tissue-specific expression profile was analyzed. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that BcbHLHpol was highly expressed in maintainer buds and that the transcripts of BcbHLHpol significantly decreased in the buds of pol CMS. A virus-induced gene silencing vector that targets BcbHLHpol was constructed and transformed into Brassica campestris plants to further explore the function of BcbHLHpol. Male sterility and short stature were observed in BcbHLHpol-silenced plants. The degradation of tapetal cells was inhibited in BcbHLHpol-silenced plants, and nutrients were insufficiently supplied to the microspore. These phenomena resulted in pollen abortion. This result indicates that BcbHLHpol functions as a positive regulator in pollen development. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed that BcbHLHpol interacted with BcSKP1 in the nucleus. This finding suggests that BcbHLHpol and BcSKP1 are positive coordinating regulators of pollen development. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that BcbHLHpol and BcSKP1 can be induced at low temperatures. Thus, we propose that BcbHLHpol is necessary for meiosis. This study provides insights into the regulatory functions of the BcbHLHpol network during anther development.

  3. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Forks impacts and motivations in free and open source projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Viseur

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Forking is a mechanism of splitting in a community and is typically found in the free and open source software field. As a failure of cooperation in a context of open innovation, forking is a practical and informative subject of study. In-depth researches concerning the fork phenomenon are uncommon. We therefore conducted a detailed study of 26 forks from popular free and open source projects. We created fact sheets, highlighting the impact and motivations to fork. We particularly point to the fact that the desire for greater technical differentiation and problems of project governance are major sources of conflict.

  5. Ground-Tracking With a Forked Tongue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Scientists since Aristotle’s day have wondered why the tongues of snakes and many lizards——are forked, a trait that dates from at least the Cretaceous,more than 65 million years ago.Now Kurt Schwenk,a University of Connecticut evolutionary biologist, thinks he knows the answer. "It gives them the abil-

  6. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  7. Homologous recombination as a replication fork escort: fork-protection and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-12-27

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  8. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  9. Code Forking, Governance, and Sustainability in Open Source Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Lindman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The right to fork open source code is at the core of open source licensing. All open source licenses grant the right to fork their code, that is to start a new development effort using an existing code as its base. Thus, code forking represents the single greatest tool available for guaranteeing sustainability in open source software. In addition to bolstering program sustainability, code forking directly affects the governance of open source initiatives. Forking, and even the mere possibility of forking code, affects the governance and sustainability of open source initiatives on three distinct levels: software, community, and ecosystem. On the software level, the right to fork makes planned obsolescence, versioning, vendor lock-in, end-of-support issues, and similar initiatives all but impossible to implement. On the community level, forking impacts both sustainability and governance through the power it grants the community to safeguard against unfavourable actions by corporations or project leaders. On the business-ecosystem level forking can serve as a catalyst for innovation while simultaneously promoting better quality software through natural selection. Thus, forking helps keep open source initiatives relevant and presents opportunities for the development and commercialization of current and abandoned programs.

  10. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  11. The forked flap repair for hypospadias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Chadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite the abundance of techniques for the repair of Hypospadias, its problems still persist and a satisfactory design to correct the penile curvature with the formation of neourethra from the native urethral tissue or genital or extragenital tissues, with minimal postoperative complications has yet to evolve. Aim: Persisting with such an endeavor, a new technique for the repair of distal and midpenile hypospadias is described. Materials and Methods: The study has been done in 70 cases over the past 11 years. The "Forked-Flap" repair is a single stage method for the repair of such Hypospadias with chordee. It takes advantage of the rich vascular communication at the corona and capitalizes on the established reliability of the meatal based flip-flap. The repair achieves straightening of the curvature of the penis by complete excision of chordee tissue from the ventral surface of the penis beneath the urethral plate. The urethra is reconstructed using the native plate with forked flap extensions and genital tissue relying on the concept of meatal based flaps. Water proofing by dartos tissue and reinforcement by Nesbit′s prepucial tissue transfer completes the one stage procedure. Statistical Analysis: An analysis of 70 cases of this single stage technique of repair of penile hypospadias with chordee, operated at 3 to 5 years of age over the past 11 years is presented. Results and Conclusion: The Forked Flap gives comparable and replicable results; except for a urethrocutaneous fistula rate of 4% no other complications were observed.

  12. Needs assessment for the Greenway Grand Forks-East Grand Forks development and public education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munski, Laura

    Following the flood of 1997, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers included the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks (the Greenway) as a flood control measure for Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. It extends along both the Red River of the North and the Red Lake River, encompassing 2200 acres of land. The cities of Grand Forks and East Grand Forks hired consultants to assist with the postflood planning process. The planning process culminated with the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report (Flink, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine if the development of the Greenway addressed the objectives of the planning report. The history of the land adjacent to the rivers was reviewed to document the progression of riverfront development. Anecdotal evidence was collected, field observations were made, city council minutes were reviewed, Greenway Technical Committee members were interviewed, Greenway Technical Committee minutes were reviewed, and the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks survey results were reviewed to determine if the objectives of the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report were addressed. A cross section survey was designed by Laura Munski for this dissertation research. The survey was approved by the Greenway Technical Committee. The survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data from the community. The purpose of the survey portion of the research project was to ascertain how residents were kept informed of activities on the Greenway and what amenities residents were using on the Greenway and to solicit their comments regarding the Greenway. The results of the survey research were used in both marketing and event planning for the Greenway. The singular qualitative survey question gave respondents an opportunity to share their comments regarding the Greenway. The qualitative data analysis provided insight to the amenities and educational programs desired by respondents, their concerns regarding the

  13. Code forking in open-source software: a requirements perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Ernst, Neil A; Mylopoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    To fork a project is to copy the existing code base and move in a direction different than that of the erstwhile project leadership. Forking provides a rapid way to address new requirements by adapting an existing solution. However, it can also create a plethora of similar tools, and fragment the developer community. Hence, it is not always clear whether forking is the right strategy. In this paper, we describe a mixed-methods exploratory case study that investigated the process of forking a project. The study concerned the forking of an open-source tool for managing software projects, Trac. Trac was forked to address differing requirements in an academic setting. The paper makes two contributions to our understanding of code forking. First, our exploratory study generated several theories about code forking in open source projects, for further research. Second, we investigated one of these theories in depth, via a quantitative study. We conjectured that the features of the OSS forking process would allow new...

  14. Evolution of tail fork depth in genus Hirundo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masaru; Arai, Emi; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    A classic example of a sexually selected trait, the deep fork tail of the barn swallow Hirundo rustica is now claimed to have evolved and be maintained mainly via aerodynamic advantage rather than sexually selected advantage. However, this aerodynamic advantage hypothesis does not clarify which flight habits select for/against deep fork tails, causing diversity of tail fork depth in hirundines. Here, by focusing on the genus Hirundo, we investigated whether the large variation in tail fork depth could be explained by the differential flight habits. Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we found that migrant species had deeper fork tails, but less colorful plumage, than the other species, indicating that migration favors a specific trait, deep fork tails. At the same time, tail fork depth but not plumage coloration decreased with increasing bill size - a proxy of prey size, suggesting that foraging on larger prey items favors shallower fork tails. Variation of tail fork depth in the genus Hirundo may be explained by differential flight habits, even without assuming sexual selection.

  15. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. Social and Environmental Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    character- ized by wide variations in temperature, light to moderate precipitation, plentiful sunshine and nearly continuous air movement. Weather patterns...Forks Bicentennial Committee for its photo of the University of North Dakota’s Eternal Flame Memorial. 2. To Mr. Dan Metz for the use of his wildlife

  16. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the season of navigation, parties engaged in...

  17. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Jill A.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4–6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome. PMID:28095497

  18. The B. subtilis Accessory Helicase PcrA Facilitates DNA Replication through Transcription Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrikh, Christopher N; Brewer, Bonita J; Merrikh, Houra

    2015-06-01

    In bacteria the concurrence of DNA replication and transcription leads to potentially deleterious encounters between the two machineries, which can occur in either the head-on (lagging strand genes) or co-directional (leading strand genes) orientations. These conflicts lead to replication fork stalling and can destabilize the genome. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells possess resolution factors that reduce the severity of these encounters. Though Escherichia coli accessory helicases have been implicated in the mitigation of head-on conflicts, direct evidence of these proteins mitigating co-directional conflicts is lacking. Furthermore, the endogenous chromosomal regions where these helicases act, and the mechanism of recruitment, have not been identified. We show that the essential Bacillus subtilis accessory helicase PcrA aids replication progression through protein coding genes of both head-on and co-directional orientations, as well as rRNA and tRNA genes. ChIP-Seq experiments show that co-directional conflicts at highly transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and head-on protein coding genes are major targets of PcrA activity on the chromosome. Partial depletion of PcrA renders cells extremely sensitive to head-on conflicts, linking the essential function of PcrA to conflict resolution. Furthermore, ablating PcrA's ATPase/helicase activity simultaneously increases its association with conflict regions, while incapacitating its ability to mitigate conflicts, and leads to cell death. In contrast, disruption of PcrA's C-terminal RNA polymerase interaction domain does not impact its ability to mitigate conflicts between replication and transcription, its association with conflict regions, or cell survival. Altogether, this work establishes PcrA as an essential factor involved in mitigating transcription-replication conflicts and identifies chromosomal regions where it routinely acts. As both conflicts and accessory helicases are found in all domains of life, these results are

  19. The B. subtilis Accessory Helicase PcrA Facilitates DNA Replication through Transcription Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N Merrikh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria the concurrence of DNA replication and transcription leads to potentially deleterious encounters between the two machineries, which can occur in either the head-on (lagging strand genes or co-directional (leading strand genes orientations. These conflicts lead to replication fork stalling and can destabilize the genome. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells possess resolution factors that reduce the severity of these encounters. Though Escherichia coli accessory helicases have been implicated in the mitigation of head-on conflicts, direct evidence of these proteins mitigating co-directional conflicts is lacking. Furthermore, the endogenous chromosomal regions where these helicases act, and the mechanism of recruitment, have not been identified. We show that the essential Bacillus subtilis accessory helicase PcrA aids replication progression through protein coding genes of both head-on and co-directional orientations, as well as rRNA and tRNA genes. ChIP-Seq experiments show that co-directional conflicts at highly transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and head-on protein coding genes are major targets of PcrA activity on the chromosome. Partial depletion of PcrA renders cells extremely sensitive to head-on conflicts, linking the essential function of PcrA to conflict resolution. Furthermore, ablating PcrA's ATPase/helicase activity simultaneously increases its association with conflict regions, while incapacitating its ability to mitigate conflicts, and leads to cell death. In contrast, disruption of PcrA's C-terminal RNA polymerase interaction domain does not impact its ability to mitigate conflicts between replication and transcription, its association with conflict regions, or cell survival. Altogether, this work establishes PcrA as an essential factor involved in mitigating transcription-replication conflicts and identifies chromosomal regions where it routinely acts. As both conflicts and accessory helicases are found in all domains of life

  20. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  1. Wireless tuning fork gyroscope for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, K.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bluetooth enabled wireless tuning fork gyroscope for the biomedical applications, including gait phase detection system, human motion analysis and physical therapy. This gyroscope is capable of measuring rotation rates between -90 and 90 and it can read the rotation information using a computer. Currently, the information from a gyroscope can trigger automobile airbag deployment during rollover, improve the accuracy and reliability of GPS navigation systems and stabilize moving platforms such as automobiles, airplanes, robots, antennas, and industrial equipment. Adding wireless capability to the existing gyroscope could help to expand its applications in many areas particularly in biomedical applications, where a continuous patient monitoring is quite difficult. This wireless system provides information on several aspects of activities of patients for real-time monitoring in hospitals.

  2. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  3. Bacterial global regulators DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghanian, Mohammad; Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-02-18

    Collisions between paused transcription elongation complexes and replication forks inevitably happen, which may lead to collapse of replication fork and could be detrimental to cells. Bacterial transcription factor DksA and its cofactor alarmone ppGpp were proposed to contribute to prevention of such collisions, although the mechanism of this activity remains elusive. Here we show that DksA/ppGpp do not destabilise transcription elongation complexes or inhibit their backtracking, as was proposed earlier. Instead, we show, both in vitro and in vivo, that DksA/ppGpp increase fidelity of transcription elongation by slowing down misincorporation events. As misincorporation events cause temporary pauses, contribution to fidelity suggests the mechanism by which DksA/ppGpp contribute to prevention of collisions of transcription elongation complexes with replication forks. DksA is only the second known accessory factor, after transcription factor Gre, that increases fidelity of RNA synthesis in bacteria.

  4. The Trail Inventory of Deep Fork NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  5. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone...... chaperone Asf1 and MCM2-7, the putative replicative helicase, are connected through a histone H3-H4 bridge. Depletion of Asf1 by RNA interference impedes DNA unwinding at replication sites, and similar defects arise from overproduction of new histone H3-H4 that compromises Asf1 function. These data link Asf......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...

  6. Inventory and Monitoring Plan for Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Inventory and Monitoring Plan (IMP) is prepared to document the inventory and monitoring surveys that will, or could be conducted at Deep Fork National Wildlife...

  7. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  8. An inventory of wildlife resources, Marsh Fork, summer 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife contracted us to do a wildlife resource inventory of the Marsh Fork in summer, 1973. We had planned the inventory in two...

  9. Environmental Assessment: Demolish 452 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants thriving in this...native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View Nature 32 Preserve in the...characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. 31 Wetlands on Grand Forks AFB occur frequently in drainage

  10. Fascin, may the Forked be with you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Llimargas, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The FGFR pathway triggers a wide range of key biological responses. Among others, the Breathless (Btl, Drosophila FGFR1) receptor cascade promotes cell migration during embryonic tracheal system development. However, how the actin cytoskeleton responds to Btl pathway activation to induce cell migration has remained largely unclear. Our recent results shed light into this issue by unveiling a link between the actin-bundling protein Singed (Sn) and the Btl pathway. We showed that the Btl pathway regulates sn, which leads to the stabilization of the actin bundles required for filopodia formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. This regulation contributes to tracheal migration, tracheal branch fusion and tracheal cell elongation. Parallel actin bundles (PABs) are usually cross-linked by more than one actin-bundling protein. Accordingly, we have also shown that sn synergistically interacts with forked (f), another actin crosslinker. In this Extra View we extend f analysis and hypothesize how both actin-bundling proteins may act together to regulate the PABs during tracheal embryonic development. Although both proteins are required for similar tracheal events, we suggest that Sn is essential for actin bundle initiation and stiffening, while F is required for the lengthening and further stabilization of the PABs.

  11. More forks on the road to replication stress recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chris Allen; Amanda K. Ashley; Robert Hromas; Jac A. Nickoloff

    2011-01-01

    High-fidelity replication of DNA, and its accurate segregation to daughter cells, is critical for maintaining genome stability and suppressing cancer. DNA replication forks are stalled by many DNA lesions, activating checkpoint proteins that stabilize stalled forks.Stalled forks may eventually collapse, producing a broken DNA end. Fork restart is typically mediated by proteins initially identified by their rotes in homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In recent years, several proteins involved in DSB repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) have been implicated in the replication stress response, including DNA-PKcs, Ku,DNA Ligase IV-XRCC4, Artemis, XLF and Metnase. It is currently unclear whether NHEJ proteins are involved in the replication stress response through indirect (signaling) roles, and/or direct roles involving DNA end joining. Additional complexity in the replication stress response centers around RPA, which undergoes significant post-translational modification after stress, and RAD52, a conserved HR protein whose role in DSB repair may have shifted to another protein in higher eukaryotes, such as BRCA2, but retained its rote in fork restart. Most cancer therapeutic strategies create DNA reputation stress. Thus, it is imperative to gain a better understanding of replication stress response proteins and pathways to improve cancer therapy.

  12. Anthocyanin Accumulation, Antioxidant Ability and Stability, and a Transcriptional Analysis of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Heading Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Zhang, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Lugang

    2016-01-13

    Heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) is a significant dietary vegetable for its edible heading leaves in Asia countries. The new purple anthocyanin-rich pure line (11S91) was successfully bred, and the anthocyanins were mainly distributed in 2-3 cell layers beneath the leaf epidermis, whereas siliques and stems accumulated only a cell layer of anthocyanins. The anthocyanins of 11S91 were more stable at pHs below 3.0 and temperatures below 45 °C. The total antioxidant ability was highly positive correlated with the anthocyanin content in 11S91. Thirty-two anthocyanins were separated and identified, and 70% of them were glycosylated and acylated cyanidins. The four major anthocyanins present were cyanidin-3-sophoroside(p-coumaroyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl), cyanidin-3-sophoroside(ferulyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl), cyanidin-3-sophoroside(sinapyl-p-coumaroyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl), and cyanidin-3-sophoroside-(sinapyl-ferulyl)-5-glucoside(malonyl). According to the expression of biosynthetic genes and the component profile of anthocyanins in 11S91 and its parents, regulatory genes BrMYB2 and BrTT8 probably activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis but other factors may govern the primary anthocyanins and the distribution.

  13. OK - Establishing a mussel monitoring program to evaluate point-source discharges into Deep Fork NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study incorporating several investigative methods was conducted at the Deep Fork River, Okmulgee, Oklahoma in and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  14. A Multi-Fork Z-Axis Quartz Micromachined Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiying Yang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s.

  15. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance;

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show...... that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation...... of conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA...

  16. A multi-fork z-axis quartz micromachined gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lihui; Zhao, Ke; Sun, Yunan; Cui, Jianmin; Cui, Fang; Yang, Aiying

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s) and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s.

  17. Geometric Metasurface Fork Gratings for Vortex Beam Generation and Manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shumei; Li, Guixin; Zhang, Shuang; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, optical vortex beams possessing orbital angular momentum have caught much attention due to their potential for high capacity optical communications. This capability arises from the unbounded topological charges of orbital angular momentum (OAM) that provides infinite freedoms for encoding information. The two most common approaches for generating vortex beams are through fork diffraction gratings and spiral phase plates. While realization of conventional spiral phase plate requires complicated 3D fabrication, the emerging field of metasurfaces has provided a planar and facile solution for generating vortex beams of arbitrary orbit angular momentum. Here we realize a novel type of geometric metasurface fork grating that seamlessly combine the functionality of a metasurface phase plate for vortex beam generation, and that of a linear phase gradient metasurface for controlling the wave propagation direction. The metasurface fork grating is therefore capable of simultaneously controlling both the...

  18. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01

    Wendy Lopez and Associates, Inc. (WLA) was asked to provide a conservation and ecological restoration overview for the City of Dallas as part of an Elm Fork Floodplain Management Study. This study encompasses a unique portion of the main stem of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas, Texas. The project area includes approximately 8.5 square miles, half of which lie within a 100-year floodplain. Approximately 15% of the project area is mature bottomland hardwood forest and s...

  19. TaLHY, a 1R-MYB Transcription Factor, Plays an Important Role in Disease Resistance against Stripe Rust Fungus and Ear Heading in Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijin Zhang

    Full Text Available LHY (late elongated hypocotyl is an important gene that regulates and controls biological rhythms in plants. Additionally, LHY is highly expressed in the SSH (suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library-induced stripe rust pathogen (CYR32 in our previous research. To identify the function of the LHY gene in disease resistance against stripe rust, we used RACE-PCR technology to clone TaLHY in the wheat variety Chuannong19. The cDNA of TaLHY is 3085 bp long with an open reading frame of 1947 bp. TaLHY is speculated to encode a 70.3 kDa protein of 648 amino acids , which has one typical plant MYB-DNA binding domain; additionally, phylogenetic tree shows that TaLHY has the highest homology with LHY of Brachypodium distachyon(BdLHY-like. Quantitative fluorescence PCR indicates that TaLHY has higher expression in the leaf, ear and stem of wheat but lower expression in the root. Infestation of CYR32 can result in up-regulated expression of TaLHY, peaking at 72 h. Using VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing technology to disease-resistant wheat in the fourth leaf stage, plants with silenced TaLHY cannot complete their heading stage. Through the compatible interaction with the stripe rust physiological race CYR32, Chuannong 19 loses its immune capability toward the stripe rust pathogen, indicating that TaLHY may regulate and participate in the heading of wheat, as well as the defense responses against stripe rust infection.

  20. Forked and Integrated Variants In An Open-Source Firmware Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Schulze, Sandro; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    and interactive source management platforms such as Github. We study advantages and disadvantages of forking using the case of Marlin, an open source firmware for 3D printers. We find that many problems and advantages of cloning do translate to forking. Interestingly, the Marlin community uses both forking...

  1. A novel read-through transcript JMJD7-PLA2G4B regulates head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell proliferation and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingduan; Wang, Yi; Li, Jiong; Chang, Insoon; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings on the existence of oncogenic fusion genes in a wide array of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), suggests that fusion genes have become attractive targets for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we showed for the first time that a read-through fusion gene JMJD7-PLA2G4B is presented in HNSCC, splicing neighboring jumonji domain containing 7 (JMJD7) and phospholipase A2, group IVB (PLA2G4B) genes together. Ablation of JMJD7-PLA2G4B significantly inhibited proliferation of HNSCC cells by promoting G1 cell cycle arrest and increased starvation-induced cell death compared to JMJD7-only knockdown HNSCC cells. Mechanistically, we found that JMJD7-PLA2G4B modulates phosphorylation of Protein Kinase B (AKT) to promote HNSCC cell survival. Moreover, JMJD7-PLA2G4B also regulated an E3 ligase S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) to control the cell cycle progression from G1 phase to S phase by inhibiting Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21) and 1B (p27) expression. Our study provides novel insights into the oncogenic control of JMJD7-PLA2G4B in HNSCC cell proliferation and survival, and suggests that JMJD7-PLA2G4B may serve as an important therapeutic target and prognostic marker for HNSCC development and progression. PMID:28030848

  2. Ten Things You Should Do with a Tuning Fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2013-01-01

    Tuning forks are wonderful tools for teaching physics. Every physics classroom should have several and every physics student should be taught how to use them. In this article, I highlight 10 enriching demonstrations that most teachers might not know, as well as provide tips to enhance the demonstrations teachers might already be doing. Some of…

  3. Accurate aging of juvenile salmonids using fork lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Suresh; Gerken, Jonathon; Ashline, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile salmon life history strategies, survival, and habitat interactions may vary by age cohort. However, aging individual juvenile fish using scale reading is time consuming and can be error prone. Fork length data are routinely measured while sampling juvenile salmonids. We explore the performance of aging juvenile fish based solely on fork length data, using finite Gaussian mixture models to describe multimodal size distributions and estimate optimal age-discriminating length thresholds. Fork length-based ages are compared against a validation set of juvenile coho salmon, Oncorynchus kisutch, aged by scales. Results for juvenile coho salmon indicate greater than 95% accuracy can be achieved by aging fish using length thresholds estimated from mixture models. Highest accuracy is achieved when aged fish are compared to length thresholds generated from samples from the same drainage, time of year, and habitat type (lentic versus lotic), although relatively high aging accuracy can still be achieved when thresholds are extrapolated to fish from populations in different years or drainages. Fork length-based aging thresholds are applicable for taxa for which multiple age cohorts coexist sympatrically. Where applicable, the method of aging individual fish is relatively quick to implement and can avoid ager interpretation bias common in scale-based aging.

  4. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  5. Structure of eukaryotic CMG helicase at a replication fork and implications to replisome architecture and origin initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Roxana; Yuan, Zuanning; Bai, Lin; de Luna Almeida Santos, Ruda; Sun, Jingchuan; Zhang, Dan; Yurieva, Olga; Li, Huilin; O'Donnell, Michael E

    2017-01-31

    The eukaryotic CMG (Cdc45, Mcm2-7, GINS) helicase consists of the Mcm2-7 hexameric ring along with five accessory factors. The Mcm2-7 heterohexamer, like other hexameric helicases, is shaped like a ring with two tiers, an N-tier ring composed of the N-terminal domains, and a C-tier of C-terminal domains; the C-tier contains the motor. In principle, either tier could translocate ahead of the other during movement on DNA. We have used cryo-EM single-particle 3D reconstruction to solve the structure of CMG in complex with a DNA fork. The duplex stem penetrates into the central channel of the N-tier and the unwound leading single-strand DNA traverses the channel through the N-tier into the C-tier motor, 5'-3' through CMG. Therefore, the N-tier ring is pushed ahead by the C-tier ring during CMG translocation, opposite the currently accepted polarity. The polarity of the N-tier ahead of the C-tier places the leading Pol ε below CMG and Pol α-primase at the top of CMG at the replication fork. Surprisingly, the new N-tier to C-tier polarity of translocation reveals an unforeseen quality-control mechanism at the origin. Thus, upon assembly of head-to-head CMGs that encircle double-stranded DNA at the origin, the two CMGs must pass one another to leave the origin and both must remodel onto opposite strands of single-stranded DNA to do so. We propose that head-to-head motors may generate energy that underlies initial melting at the origin.

  6. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  7. Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Greg

    2000-11-28

    Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to

  8. Identification and characterization of the transcription factors involved in T-cell development, t-bet, stat6 and foxp3, within the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Suman; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Secombes, Chris J; Bird, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of cytokines expressed by T-helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17 and T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells has prompted speculation that these types of responses may exist in fish, arising early in vertebrate evolution. In this investigation, we cloned three zebrafish transcription factors, T-box expressed in T cells (t-bet), signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (stat6) and fork-head box p3 (foxp3), in which two transcripts are present, that are important in the development of a number of these cell types. They were found within the zebrafish genome, using a synteny approach in the case of t-bet and foxp3. Multiple alignments of zebrafish t-bet, stat6 and foxp3 amino acids with known vertebrate homologues revealed regions of high conservation, subsequently identified to be protein domains important in the functioning of these transcription factors. The gene organizations of zebrafish t-bet and foxp3 were identical to those of the human genes, with the second foxp3 transcript lacking exons 5, 6, 7 and 8. Zebrafish stat6 (21 exons and 20 introns) was slightly different from the human gene, which contained 22 exons and 21 introns. Immunostimulation of zebrafish head kidney and spleen cells with phytohaemagglutinin, lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C, showed a correlation between the expression of t-bet, stat6 and foxp3 with other genes involved in Th and T(reg) responses using quantitative PCR. These transcription factors, together with many of the cytokines that are expressed by different T-cell subtypes, will aid future investigations into the Th and T(reg) cell types that exist in teleosts.

  9. The Impact of Gross Anatomy on the Future Head and Neck Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, David J.; Carlson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Gross anatomy is not only a rite of passage for medical students as they enter the world of practicing medicine but may also be an unrecognized fork in the road in their pursuit of choosing a medical specialty. Otolaryngology: head and neck surgery tends to be poorly represented in medical school curriculum, often only offered as an elective…

  10. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  11. Arrays of optical vortices formed by "fork" holograms

    CERN Document Server

    Bekshaev, A Ya; Mohammed, K A

    2014-01-01

    Singular light beams with optical vortices (OV) are often generated by means of thin binary gratings with groove bifurcation ("fork holograms") that produce a set of diffracted beams with different OV charges. Usually, only single separate beams are used and investigated; here we consider the whole set of diffracted OV beams that, at certain conditions, are involved in efficient mutual interference to form a characteristic pattern where the ring-like structure of separate OV beams is replaced by series of bright and dark lines between adjacent diffraction orders. This pattern, well developed for high diffraction orders, reflects the main spatial properties of the diffracted beams as well as of the fork grating used for their generation. In particular, it confirms the theoretical model for the diffracted beams (Kummer beam model) and enables to determine the sign and the absolute value of the phase singularity embedded in the hologram.

  12. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia;

    2016-01-01

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3....../4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  13. Environmental Assessment: Demolish 934 of Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    the “ Prairie View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region...buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View...identified as jurisdictional. Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands, and they are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the

  14. Environmental Assessment - Demolish 934 of Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    in the “ Prairie View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region...buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View...identified as jurisdictional. Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands, and they are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the

  15. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddall, Phoebe

    1992-04-01

    In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

  16. 68erne – en forkælet generation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas Ekman; L. B. Jensen, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Kronikken gennemgår beskyldningerne mod 1968erne for at være en forkælet generation, der sidder på magten og pengene i Danmark. De væsentligste argumenter er, at de samfundsændringer, '1968' afstedkom, gav gode chancer for højtuddannede fra alle generationer. Til gengæld har de forringet chancerne...

  17. Environmental Assessment Housing Transfer at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-27

    of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky ...little bluestem, Indian grass, switchgrass, blue gramma, buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. 35 Two hundred and fifty five taxa...were identified in the ND Natural Heritage Inventory and the BS Bioserve biological inventory update for Grand Forks Air Force Base. Two rare orchid

  18. Environmental Assessment Tent City at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-15

    legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet...bluestem, Indian grass, switchgrass, blue gramma, buffalo grass, and many native wildflower species. Two hundred and fifty five taxa were...identified in the ND Natural Heritage Inventory and the BS Bioserve biological inventory update for Grand Forks Air Force Base. Two rare orchid species are

  19. Molecular clock fork phylogenies: closed form analytic maximum likelihood solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Benny; Snir, Sagi

    2004-12-01

    Maximum likelihood (ML) is increasingly used as an optimality criterion for selecting evolutionary trees, but finding the global optimum is a hard computational task. Because no general analytic solution is known, numeric techniques such as hill climbing or expectation maximization (EM) are used in order to find optimal parameters for a given tree. So far, analytic solutions were derived only for the simplest model-three-taxa, two-state characters, under a molecular clock. Quoting Ziheng Yang, who initiated the analytic approach,"this seems to be the simplest case, but has many of the conceptual and statistical complexities involved in phylogenetic estimation."In this work, we give general analytic solutions for a family of trees with four-taxa, two-state characters, under a molecular clock. The change from three to four taxa incurs a major increase in the complexity of the underlying algebraic system, and requires novel techniques and approaches. We start by presenting the general maximum likelihood problem on phylogenetic trees as a constrained optimization problem, and the resulting system of polynomial equations. In full generality, it is infeasible to solve this system, therefore specialized tools for the molecular clock case are developed. Four-taxa rooted trees have two topologies-the fork (two subtrees with two leaves each) and the comb (one subtree with three leaves, the other with a single leaf). We combine the ultrametric properties of molecular clock fork trees with the Hadamard conjugation to derive a number of topology dependent identities. Employing these identities, we substantially simplify the system of polynomial equations for the fork. We finally employ symbolic algebra software to obtain closed formanalytic solutions (expressed parametrically in the input data). In general, four-taxa trees can have multiple ML points. In contrast, we can now prove that each fork topology has a unique(local and global) ML point.

  20. Stalled replication forks within heterochromatin require ATRX for protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, M S; Ivanochko, D; Hashem, L E; Curtin, M; Delorme, M; Goodall, E; Yan, K; Picketts, D J

    2016-05-12

    Expansive growth of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is a prerequisite to the temporal waves of neuronal differentiation that generate the six-layered neocortex, while also placing a heavy burden on proteins that regulate chromatin packaging and genome integrity. This problem is further reflected by the growing number of developmental disorders caused by mutations in chromatin regulators. ATRX gene mutations cause a severe intellectual disability disorder (α-thalassemia mental retardation X-linked (ATRX) syndrome; OMIM no. 301040), characterized by microcephaly, urogenital abnormalities and α-thalassemia. Although the ATRX protein is required for the maintenance of repetitive DNA within heterochromatin, how this translates to disease pathogenesis remain poorly understood and was a focus of this study. We demonstrate that Atrx(FoxG1Cre) forebrain-specific conditional knockout mice display poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) hyperactivation during neurogenesis and generate fewer late-born Cux1- and Brn2-positive neurons that accounts for the reduced cortical size. Moreover, DNA damage, induced Parp-1 and Atm activation is elevated in progenitor cells and contributes to their increased level of cell death. ATRX-null HeLa cells are similarly sensitive to hydroxyurea-induced replication stress, accumulate DNA damage and proliferate poorly. Impaired BRCA1-RAD51 colocalization and PARP-1 hyperactivation indicated that stalled replication forks are not efficiently protected. DNA fiber assays confirmed that MRE11 degradation of stalled replication forks was rampant in the absence of ATRX or DAXX. Indeed, fork degradation in ATRX-null cells could be attenuated by treatment with the MRE11 inhibitor mirin, or exacerbated by inhibiting PARP-1 activity. Taken together, these results suggest that ATRX is required to limit replication stress during cellular proliferation, whereas upregulation of PARP-1 activity functions as a compensatory mechanism to protect stalled forks

  1. Timing, coordination, and rhythm: Acrobatics at the DNA replication fork

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Samir

    2010-04-09

    In DNA replication, the antiparallel nature of the parental duplex imposes certain constraints on the activity of the DNA polymerases that synthesize new DNA. The leading-strand polymerase advances in a continuous fashion, but the lagging-strand polymerase is forced to restart at short intervals. In several prokaryotic systems studied so far, this problem is solved by the formation of a loop in the lagging strand of the replication fork to reorient the lagging-strand DNA polymerase so that it advances in parallel with the leading-strand polymerase. The replication loop grows and shrinks during each cycle of Okazaki fragment synthesis. The timing of Okazaki fragment synthesis and loop formation is determined by a subtle interplay of enzymatic activities at the fork. Recent developments in single-molecule techniques have enabled the direct observation of these processes and have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the replication fork. Here, we will review recent experimental advances, present the current models, and discuss some of the exciting developments in the field. 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Ku stabilizes replication forks in the absence of Brc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Sánchez

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors are a major source of genome instability in all organisms. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the DNA damage response protein Brc1 binds phospho-histone H2A (γH2A-marked chromatin during S-phase, but how Brc1 protects genome integrity remains unclear. Here we report that the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ protein Ku becomes critical for survival of replication stress in brc1∆ cells. Ku's protective activity in brc1∆ cells does not involve its canonical NHEJ function or its roles in protecting telomeres or shielding DNA ends from Exo1 exonuclease. In brc1∆ pku80∆ cells, nuclear foci of Rad52 homologous recombination (HR protein increase and Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase becomes critical, indicating increased replication fork instability. Ku's localization at a ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier associated with frequent replisome-transcriptosome collisions increases in brc1∆ cells and increased collisions correlate with an enhanced requirement for Brc1. These data indicate that Ku stabilizes replication forks in the absence of Brc1.

  3. An hpr1 Point Mutation That Impairs Transcription and mRNP Biogenesis without Increasing Recombination▿

    OpenAIRE

    Huertas Sánchez, Pablo; García Rubio, María Luisa; Wellinger, Ralf Erik; Luna Varo, Rosa María; Aguilera López, Andrés

    2006-01-01

    THO/TREX, a conserved eukaryotic protein complex, is a key player at the interface between transcription and mRNP metabolism. The lack of a functional THO complex impairs transcription, leads to transcriptiondependent hyperrecombination, causes mRNA export defects and fast mRNA decay, and retards replication fork progression in a transcription-dependent manner. To get more insight into the interconnection between mRNP biogenesis and genomic instability, we searched for HPR1 mutati...

  4. Reduced rate of DNA replication fork movement in megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, R G; Hoffbrand, A V

    1980-01-01

    Chromatography on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose has been used to fractionate fully double-stranded from partially single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA was extracted from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes from patients with megaloblastic anemia resulting from vitamin B12 or folate deficiency after pulse-labeling the cells with [3H]thymidine for 5 min and chasing in unlabeled medium for 24 h. No gross accumulation of partially single-stranded material was observed in the DNA of these cells when compared with DNA from similarly labeled control cells obtained by the addition of 5-formyl tetrahydrofolic acid to the culture medium. When DNA from lymphocytes labeled with a 5-min pulse of [3H]thymidine and sheared to fragments of an average length of 18 micrometer was chromatographed on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose, approximately 80% of the label was recovered in the partially single-stranded fraction. After chasing in unlabeled medium the label was progressively transferred to the double-stranded fraction over a period of 2--3 h. The rate of transfer was slower in megaloblastic lymphocytes than in controls. The difference in rate suggested a slower rate of replication fork movement in megaloblastic lymphocytes and so the density shift technique of Painter and schaeffer (J. Mol. Biol. 45: 467--479, 1969) was used to measure the fork rate directly. [3H]Deoxycytidine was used as the labeled nucleoside to avoid possible complications arising from [3H]thymidine labeling of megaloblastic cells. Investigations on the lymphocytes from four patients showed that the replication fork rate in vitamin-treated control lyphocytes was about 1 micrometer/min. The fork rates in the corresponding untreated cells were invariably lower and rates ranging from 40 to 92% of those of controls were observed. Normal lymphocytes treated with the deoxynucleotide pool-depleting drugs methotrexate or hydroxyurea displayed defects in DNA synthesis similar to those of

  5. Take It Slow: can feedback from a smart fork reduce eating speed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Hermsen

    2015-09-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a smart fork that helps people to eat more slowly. This adapted fork records eating speed and delivers vibrotactile feedback if users eat too quickly. In two studies, we tested the acceptability and user experience of the fork (Study 1, and its effect on eating rate and satiety levels in a controlled lab-setting (Study 2. Method: In study 1, 11 participants (all self-reported fast eaters ate a meal using the fork in our laboratory and used the fork for three consecutive days in their home setting. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews after the first meal and upon returning the fork, covering perceived effect on eating rate, comfort of use, accuracy, and motivational and social aspects of fork use. Interviews were coded and a thematic classification analysis was performed. In study 2, 128 participants (all self-reported fast eaters ate a standardized meal using the fork in our laboratory. We used a between-participants design with 2 conditions; participants ate their meal either with vibrotactile feedback from the fork (experimental condition or ate their meal without vibrotactile feedback (control condition. Eating rate, meal duration, error rate (number of bites taken faster than 10 seconds after previous bite, total food intake, and satiety were recorded for every participant. Results: Study 1: All participants felt that the feedback was generally accurate and consistent. Fork size, weight, and intensity of the feedback were seen as comfortable and acceptable. All participants reported a heightened awareness of eating rate and all but one participant reported eating more slowly with the fork. Study 2: Participants in the experimental condition ate significantly slower, and with a lower error rate than those in the control condition. Feedback did not significantly affect the amount of food eaten. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that this smart fork is an acceptable and effective tool to disrupt and

  6. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress.

  7. Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    Prior to 1978, bull trout were commonly known as dolly varden (Salvelinus malma) and were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) described the interior form as a distinct species, classifying it as Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1994). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from latitude 41{sup o}N to 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette subbasins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is likely that bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. McKenzie River bull trout were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls prior to 1963. Three populations were isolated following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs which include the mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir, mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls, and the South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. On June 10, 1998 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act and Buchanan et al. (1997) listed the bull trout population in the mainstem McKenzie as ''of special concern'', the South Fork McKenzie population as ''high risk of extinction,'' and the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as ''high risk of

  8. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  9. Quercetin induces growth arrest through activation of FOXO1 transcription factor in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Chan, Chien-Yi; Chou, I-Tai; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Hsiao-Chi; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2013-09-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHNs) with aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are often associated with poor prognosis and low survival. Therefore, efficient inhibition of the EGFR signaling could intervene with the development of malignancy. Quercetin appears to be antitumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear in oral cancer. Fork-head box O (FOXO) transcription factors, Akt downstream effectors, are important regulators of cell growth. Here, we hypothesized that FOXO1 might be crucial in quercetin-induced growth inhibition in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer. Quercetin treatment suppressed cell growth by inducing G2 arrest and apoptosis in EGFR-overexpressing HSC-3 and TW206 oral cancer cells. Quercetin inhibited EGFR/Akt activation with a concomitant induction of FOXO1 activation. FOXO1 knockdown attenuated quercetin-induced p21 and FasL expression and subsequent G2 arrest and apoptosis, respectively. Likewise, quercetin suppressed tumor growth in HSC-3 xenograft mice. Taken together, our data indicate that quercetin is an effective anticancer agent and that FOXO1 is crucial in quercetin-induced growth suppression in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Precise excision of the retrotransposon gypsy from the forked and cut loci in a genetically unstable D. melanogaster strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, A B; Lyubomirskaya, N V; Khudaibergenova, B M; Ilyin, Y V; Kim, A I

    1994-11-11

    The genetically unstable Mutator Strain of D. melanogaster is characterised by a high frequency of spontaneous mutations and their reversions. Three forked mutants were obtained independently and several reversions arose spontaneously with frequency of 10(-3)-10(-4). The sites of integration and excision of the gypsy retrotransposon were analysed by Southern blot analysis and sequencing of PCR fragments. In all cases gypsy had inserted at the end of the third exon of the major transcript of the forked gene, causing the duplication of TCCA target sequence. All the reversions resulted from precise excision of the gypsy. A double mutant containing ct6 and f1, caused by gypsy insertions into untranslated regions of the corresponding genes, was constructed. Two spontaneous ct6f+ revertants as well as one ct+f1 revertant were obtained from this line. Sequence analysis of gypsy integration and excision sites revealed that in all cases gypsy excision was also precise. These experiments constitute the first demonstration of precise excision of LTR-containing elements from their host genomes.

  11. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  12. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... When this happens, the neck muscles go into spasm, causing the head to tilt to one side. ...

  13. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  14. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart valves Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not ... to: Abnormal blood vessels in the brain ( arteriovenous malformations of the head ) Tumor of the nerve that ...

  15. Implementing farm-to-fork traceability in Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Dyk, FE

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available .csir.co.za Implementing farm-to-fork traceability in Tanzania Esbeth van Dyk CSIR Centre for Logistics ORSSA/SAIIE August 2005 Copyright @ CSIR 2005 www.csir.co.za Structure • Why traceability? • Legislation • Tanzania project • Recordkeeping in coffee...” Copyright @ CSIR 2005 www.csir.co.za Tanzania project Copyright @ CSIR 2005 www.csir.co.za Tanzania project • DANIDA funded (Danish government) • Business Sector Programme Support II • 4 components: Improved access to markets • 3 sub-components...

  16. Ideal synchronizer for marked pairs in fork-join network

    CERN Document Server

    Vyshenski, S V; Dubenskaya, Yu Yu

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a new functional element (synchronizer for marked pairs) meant to join results of parallel processing in two-branch fork-join queueing network. Approximations for distribution of sojourn time at the synchronizer are derived along with a validity domain. Calculations are performed assuming that: arrivals to the network form a Poisson process, each branch operates like an M/M/N queueing system. It is shown that a mean quantity of jobs in the synchronizer is bounded below by the value, defined by parameters of the network (which contains the synchronizer) and does not depend upon performance and particular properties of the synchronizer.

  17. Water-power resources in upper Carson River basin, California-Nevada, A discussion of potential development of power and reservoir sites on east and west forks, Carson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Harold L.

    1955-01-01

    West Fork Carson River offers the best opportunity for power development in the Carson River basin. The Hope Valley reservoir site could be developed to provide adequate storage regulation and concentration of fall would permit utilization of 1,400 feet of head in 51h miles below the clam site, or 1,900 feet of head in about 972 miles below the dam site; however, the average annual runoff susceptible of development is only about 70,000 acre-feet which limits the power that could be developed continuously in an average year with regulation to about 8,700 kilowatts utilizing 1,400 feet of head, or 12,000 kilowatts utilizing 1,900 feet of head. The method and degree of development will be determined to large extent by the method devised to supplement regulated flows from the Hope Valley reservoir to supply the water already appropriated for irrigation. If the Hope Valley site and the Watasheamu site on East Fork Carson River were developed coordinately water could be transferred to the West Fork for distribution through canals leading from that stream thus satisfying the deficiency due to regulation at Hope Valley and release of stored water on a power schedule. This would permit utilization of the entire 1,900 feet of fall. Independent development of the West Fork for optimum power production would require re-regulation of releases from Hope Valley reservoir and storage of a considerable part of the fall and winter flow for use during the irrigation season. Adequate storage capacity is apparently not available on the West Fork below Hope Valley; but offstream storage may be available in Diamond Valley which could be utilized by diversion from the West Fork near Woodfords. This would limit the utilization of the stream for power purposes to the development of the 1,400 feet of head between the Hope Valley dam site and Wood fords. In a year of average discharge East Fork Carson River and three of its principal tributaries could be developed to produce about 13

  18. Atomic Steps with tuning-fork-based noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, W.H.J.; Hulst, van N.F.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; West, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Tuning forks as tip-sample distance detectors are a promising and versatile alternative to conventional cantilevers with optical beam deflection in noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both theory and experiments are presented to make a comparison between conventional and tuning-fork-based AFM.

  19. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... National Recreation Area, TN/KY. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public notice is hereby given that the...] Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY AGENCY: National Park... visitor services within Big South Fork National Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky, for a term not...

  20. 76 FR 6114 - Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, North Fork Eagle Creek Wells Special Use Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Forest Service Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, North Fork Eagle Creek Wells Special Use... Ruidoso (the applicant) for continued operation of their municipal water supply wells on the North Fork of... portion of their water rights for these wells to locations off of National Forest System land; and...

  1. Imaging soft samples in liquid with tuning fork based shear force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, W.H.J.; van Hulst, N.F.; Kammer, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamic behavior of tuning forks and the application of tuning fork based shear force microscopy o­n soft samples in liquid. A shift in resonance frequency and a recovery of the tip vibration amplitude have been observed upon immersion into liquid. Conservation of the

  2. Dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors used in standoff photoacoustic detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhouqiang; Jia, Shuhai; Ma, Binshan; Chen, Hualing [Xi' an Jiao tong University, Xi' an (China); Wei, Yuan [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, a two-degrees-of-freedom model with two coupled oscillators is established to study the dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors. Air squeeze-film damping is considered in this model. When the laser power is 40 mW and the distance between the tuning fork and detected objects is approximately 0.5 m, the resonance amplitude of the tuning fork under the electromagnetic radiation pressure of the laser can reach 0.22 pm. Electromagnetic radiation pressure and resonance amplitude have the tendency to exponentially decay along with the distance between the tuning fork and detected objects. The influence of laser power and distance between the tuning fork and detected objects on electromagnetic radiation pressure is also considered. Lastly, an experimental device is set up to verify the calculation result of the model. Analysis shows that the experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation results.

  3. 59 FR- Prohibited Acts in West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and Scenic River Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-15

    ... INTERIOR [OR-030-03-1220-04: GS-043] Prohibited Acts in West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and... and restrictions within the boundaries of the West Little and North Fork Owyhee Rivers as established in the Main, West Little and North Fork Owyhee National Wild and Scenic Rivers Management...

  4. MRX protects fork integrity at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence causes checkpoint activation dependent on chromatin context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Iben Bach; Nielsen, Ida; Lisby, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To address how eukaryotic replication forks respond to fork stalling caused by strong non-covalent protein–DNA barriers, we engineered the controllable Fob-block system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system allows us to strongly induce and control replication fork barriers (RFB) at their natural...

  5. Break-seq reveals hydroxyurea-induced chromosome fragility as a result of unscheduled conflict between DNA replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; McCulley, Andrew; Haarer, Brian; Arnak, Remigiusz; Feng, Wenyi

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication, checkpoint inactivation via a mec1 mutation leads to chromosome breakage at replication forks initiated from virtually all origins after transient exposure to hydroxyurea (HU), an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase. Here we sought to determine whether all replication forks containing single-stranded DNA gaps have equal probability of producing double-strand breaks (DSBs) when cells attempt to recover from HU exposure. We devised a new methodology, Break-seq, that combines our previously described DSB labeling with next generation sequencing to map chromosome breaks with improved sensitivity and resolution. We show that DSBs preferentially occur at genes transcriptionally induced by HU. Notably, different subsets of the HU-induced genes produced DSBs in MEC1 and mec1 cells as replication forks traversed a greater distance in MEC1 cells than in mec1 cells during recovery from HU. Specifically, while MEC1 cells exhibited chromosome breakage at stress-response transcription factors, mec1 cells predominantly suffered chromosome breakage at transporter genes, many of which are the substrates of those transcription factors. We propose that HU-induced chromosome fragility arises at higher frequency near HU-induced genes as a result of destabilized replication forks encountering transcription factor binding and/or the act of transcription. We further propose that replication inhibitors can induce unscheduled encounters between replication and transcription and give rise to distinct patterns of chromosome fragile sites.

  6. Temperature Regulation in Critical Salmon Habitat of the Middle Fork of the John Day River, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskirk, B. A.; Selker, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Flow and temperature within the Middle Fork of the John Day River, an arid Eastern Oregon river, is dominated primarily by contributions from groundwater fed tributaries. The hydrology of arid streams is an important metric for understanding the critical environment in which salmon spawn and salmonids reside. The regulation of temperature within these streams is considered the primary metric for survival rates of these fish. Since 2007 Oregon State University has conducted stream monitoring efforts on the Middle Fork of the John Day River at the Oxbow and Forrest Conservation Areas. These sites were chosen through collaborative effort with the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, who have been restoring remnant mining canals back to their natural sinuous river pattern. The John Day River is also one of the few undammed reaches in which salmon runs occur. Efforts have focused on fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS), groundwater gradient, stream discharge, bed permeability, GPS location and stream bathymetry across the conservation sites. During the peak of summer, stream temperature exhibits a strong diurnal cycle ranging from 9° C to 23° C depending on the daily maximum observed within the reach. Salmon have been found to be sensitive to stream temperatures above 15° C and are unable to survive temperatures above 24° C (Bell et al, 1991). The synthesis of temperature and stream flow data we collected show that very little groundwater is contributing to flow and temperature in the main channel of our study site while tributaries provide a constant, typically 0.5 to 2° C cooler, input of water to the main river channel and significant source of flow (0.01 - 0.1 m3/s). Due to the minimal rain fall in this arid environment, snow melt infiltration is likely the primary annual source of recharge into the head waters of the tributaries while also providing temperature regulation through input of near 0° C water. This cold water

  7. VIBRATION MEASUREMENT OF DOUBLE-ENDED TUNING FORKS RESONATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To enhance the coherence and reliability of the double-ended tuning fork (DETF) resonator, a measurement system of resonator vibration is presented to check its dynamic characteristics. Laser Doppler techniques are utilized and the relation between DETF vibration velocity and output current of photodetector is obtained. Resonator vibration equation is also analyzed and its driving power only depends on the direct current bias voltage and the amplitude of alternative voltage. Furthermore, a special resonator driving control circuit based on measurement is designed. The amplitude and frequency of circuit is controlled by a computer so that highly stable and strong driving signal can be output. Experiments on driving and measuring double-ended tuning fork have been done. The frequency of driving signal is 8 kHz and the peak-to-peak value of driving voltage is 140 V. Experimental results indicate resonator can be drived stably by driving control circuit and dynamic characteristics of DETF may be measured in real time.

  8. Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

  9. Replication forks reverse at high frequency upon replication stress in Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Chrystelle; Bénard, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    The addition of hydroxyurea after the onset of S phase allows replication to start and permits the successive detecting of replication-dependent joint DNA molecules and chicken foot structures in the synchronous nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. We find evidence for a very high frequency of reversed replication forks upon replication stress. The formation of these reversed forks is dependent on the presence of joint DNA molecules, the impediment of the replication fork progression by hydroxyurea, and likely on the propensity of some replication origins to reinitiate replication to counteract the action of this compound. As hydroxyurea treatment enables us to successively detect the appearance of joint DNA molecules and then of reversed replication forks, we propose that chicken foot structures are formed both from the regression of hydroxyurea-frozen joint DNA molecules and from hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks. These experiments underscore the transient nature of replication fork regression, which becomes detectable due to the hydroxyurea-induced slowing down of replication fork progression.

  10. Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  11. When transcription goes on Holliday: Double Holliday junctions block RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipathsouk, Anne; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2017-02-01

    Non-canonical DNA structures can obstruct transcription. This transcription blockage could have various biological consequences, including genomic instability and gratuitous transcription-coupled repair. Among potential structures causing transcription blockage are Holliday junctions (HJs), which can be generated as intermediates in homologous recombination or during processing of stalled replication forks. Of particular interest is the double Holliday junction (DHJ), which contains two HJs. Topological considerations impose the constraint that the total number of helical turns in the DNA duplexes between the junctions cannot be altered as long as the flanking DNA duplexes are intact. Thus, the DHJ structure should strongly resist transient unwinding during transcription; consequently, it is predicted to cause significantly stronger blockage than single HJ structures. The patterns of transcription blockage obtained for RNA polymerase II transcription in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were in accordance with this prediction. However, we did not detect transcription blockage with purified T7 phage RNA polymerase; we discuss a possible explanation for this difference. In general, our findings implicate naturally occurring Holliday junctions in transcription arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Wavelike movement of bedload sediment, East Fork River, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Bedload is moved down the East Fork River in distinct wavelike pulses that have the form of composite dune fields The moving material consists mostly of coarse sand and fine gravel The wavelengths of the pulses are about 500-600 m, a distance that is predetermined by the pattern of stoage of bed sediment in the river during low water As the river discharge increases, the bed sediment is scoured from the storage areas, and it is moved onto and across the interventing riffles As the river discharge decreases, the bed sediment is scoured off the riffles and moved into the next storage area downstream Each successive pulse of water discharge sets into motion a wave of bedload that continues to move unitil it reaches the next storage area ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  13. Physical Habitat Characteristics on the North Fork Shenandoah River, VA in 2002-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was collected with a PLGR government-issue GPS, and through manual measurement in the field. Points were gathered while canoeing along the North Fork...

  14. Geographic distribution of mercury in asiatic clams, Corbicuia plumihea, from the North Fork Holston River, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study was conducted quantifying mercury concentrations in the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, from the North Fork Holston River, Virginia. The purpose of this...

  15. Assessment of contaminant loads at the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish, sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrate communities were sampled on and near the Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. Collections...

  16. The Frequency Dependence of the Added Mass of Quartz Tuning Fork Immersed in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, I.; Klokol, K.; Sokolov, S.; Sheshin, G.

    2016-11-01

    We measured the dependences of the resonance frequency of tuning forks immersed in liquid helium at T = 0.365 K in the pressure interval from saturated vapor pressure to 24.8 atm. The quartz tuning forks have been studied with different resonance frequencies of 6.65, 8.46, 12.1, 25.0 and 33.6 kHz in vacuum. The measurements were taken in the laminar flow regime. The experimental data allow us to determine the added mass of a quartz tuning fork in He II. It was found that the added mass per unit length of the prong fork is frequency dependent. Some possible qualitative explanations for such dependence are proposed. In addition, we observed, at T = 0.365 K, the changes in added mass with pressure according to the pressure dependence of He II density.

  17. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  18. Theoretical model and optimization of a novel temperature sensor based on quartz tuning fork resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Xu; Bo, You; Xin, Li; Juan, Cui

    2007-12-01

    To accurately measure temperatures, a novel temperature sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator has been designed. The principle of the quartz tuning fork temperature sensor is that the resonant frequency of the quartz resonator changes with the variation in temperature. This type of tuning fork resonator has been designed with a new doubly rotated cut work at flexural vibration mode as temperature sensor. The characteristics of the temperature sensor were evaluated and the results sufficiently met the target of development for temperature sensor. The theoretical model for temperature sensing has been developed and built. The sensor structure was analysed by finite element method (FEM) and optimized, including tuning fork geometry, tine electrode pattern and the sensor's elements size. The performance curve of output versus measured temperature is given. The results from theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that the sensor's sensitivity can reach 60 ppm °C-1 with the measured temperature range varying from 0 to 100 °C.

  19. Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan 1999-2009 and Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Deep Fork NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  1. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy C Ganz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined

  2. Head injury management guidelines for general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2011-07-01

    A complete examination of a head injured patient in the hospital requires a number of instruments. These include a stethoscope, sphygmomanometer, ophthalmoscope, otoscope, cotton wool, safety pin, tuning fork, reflex hammer and a small key to test the plantar response. Few of these are required at the accident scene. This is because, in the hospital, the aim is optimal definitive treatment. At the accident scene, the aim is prevention of secondary injury, rapid recording of the most important findings and safe efficient transport to the hospital. This short paper reviews how the local doctor should undertake a neurosurgical assessment of traumatic brain injury patients. Moreover, the primary management at accident scenes is described and the rationale behind the approach is outlined.

  3. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R McDonald

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A. The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard

  4. Environmental Assessment: Demolish CASS Switch Stations Buildings 644, 645, 646 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Prairie View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants...grass, and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager and volunteers installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie ...are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. Wetlands on Grand Forks AFB occur frequently in

  5. Environmental Assessment: Demolish Buildings 212, 218, 819, 820 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-31

    View Nature Preserve” has been developed to restore a part of the native tallgrass prairie that once was dominant in this region. Plants thriving in...and many native wildflower species. The Grand Forks AFB Natural Resources Manager and volunteers installed a butterfly garden in the Prairie View...characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. Wetlands on Grand Forks AFB occur frequently in drainage

  6. Take It Slow: can feedback from a smart fork reduce eating speed?

    OpenAIRE

    Sander Hermsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reductions in eating rate have been recommended as potential behavioural strategies to prevent and treat overweight [1–4]. Unfortunately, eating rate is difficult to modify, due to its highly automatic nature [5]. Training people to eat more slowly in everyday eating contexts, therefore, requires creative and engaging solutions. Aim: The present study examines the efficacy of a smart fork that helps people to eat more slowly. This adapted fork records eating speed ...

  7. Environmental Assessment: Construct Miscellaneous Services Recreation Area at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-15

    DATA OS Nov03 1ST AJ< ’IT"’"< ~.CL~ "VVI GRANO FORKS AFB, NORTH DAKOTA A TV Trainin /Misc. Services Recreation/ Land Use Chan e/Mass Parkin NA N...PF(AMC) FY 2004 MILITARY CONSTRUCTION DATA 05 Nov03 AS!" .IlLlA TIONNO lCCAliOH GRANO FORKS AFB. NORTH DAKOTA ATV Trainin /Misc. Services

  8. Environmental Assessment: Armory Addition to CATM with Parking at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa. Herbaceous plants include little bluestem, goldenrod, green... wildflower species. Two hundred and fifty five taxa were identified in the ND Natural Heritage Inventory and the BS Bioserve biological inventory update...for Grand Forks Air Force Base. Two rare orchid species are known to exist on Grand Forks AFB, the Large and Small Yellow Lady’s Slipper, identified

  9. The Sound Field around a Tuning Fork and the Role of a Resonance Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical two-tine tuning fork is barely audible when held vibrating at an arm's length. It is enough, however, to touch its base to a table or, better, to a resonance box and the emitted sound becomes much louder. An inquiring student may pose questions: (1) Why is a bare tuning fork such a weak emitter of sound? (2) What is the role of the…

  10. Environmental Assessment: Construct a CDC Main Entry Addition at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants...Included in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous...LAND USE Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops with remaining land used for pasture and hay, urban development

  11. Environmental Assessment: Construct Airfield Lighting Vault and Demolish Building 531 at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included...in the grasses and legumes vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous plants...These are buildings 313, 606, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, and 714. 3.9 LAND USE Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops

  12. Fabrication of SMD 32.768 kHz tuning fork-type crystals: photolithography and selective etching of an array of quartz tuning fork resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. [Dept. of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea); Lee, J.Y.; Park, T.S. [Research and Development Center, Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea)

    2001-09-01

    Negative photoresist photolithography was used to etch array of quartz tuning forks for use in Qualcomm trademark mobile station modem (MSM)-3000{sup TM} central processing unit (CPU) chips of code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) units. It was found superior to positive photoresist photolithography. Quartz tuning fork blanks with optimum shock-resistant characteristics were designed using finite element method (FEM) and processing condition was devised for reproducible precision etching of Z-cut quartz wafer into array of tuning forks. Tuning fork pattern was transferred via ordinary photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. Tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 A chromium/gold mask is coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the backside of the wafer. With protective metallization area of tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through quartz wafer was done at 80 C in a {+-} 1.5 C controlled bath containing concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove unwanted area of the quartz wafer. Surface finish of quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used primarily affected the quality of quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching. At 80 C, selective etching of 100 {mu}m quartz wafer could be effected within 90 min. Reproducible precision selective etching method has thus been established and enables mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators photolithographically. (orig.)

  13. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bradley, Alison Sylvia; Le Masson, Marie; Tsaneva, Irina; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-03-07

    RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs) respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  14. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baharoglu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  15. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel M A; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin A M; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-04-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify downstream neighbor of SON (DONSON) as a novel fork protection factor and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilizes forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR)-dependent signaling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity and the potentiation of chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations in DONSON substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in cells from patients, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we have identified mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism and established DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability.

  16. NCOA4 transcriptional coactivator inhibits activation of DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, Roberto; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guida, Teresa; Limongello, Roberto; Dathan, Nina Alayne; Merolla, Francesco; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Affuso, Andrea; Masai, Hisao; Costanzo, Vincenzo; Grieco, Domenico; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    NCOA4 is a transcriptional coactivator of nuclear hormone receptors that undergoes gene rearrangement in human cancer. By combining studies in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we show here that NCOA4 is a minichromosome maintenance 7 (MCM7)-interacting protein that is able to control DNA replication. Depletion-reconstitution experiments in Xenopus laevis egg extracts indicate that NCOA4 acts as an inhibitor of DNA replication origin activation by regulating CMG (CDC45/MCM2-7/GINS) helicase. NCOA4(-/-) MEFs display unscheduled origin activation and reduced interorigin distance; this results in replication stress, as shown by the presence of fork stalling, reduction of fork speed, and premature senescence. Together, our findings indicate that NCOA4 acts as a regulator of DNA replication origins that helps prevent inappropriate DNA synthesis and replication stress.

  17. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  18. Ultrasonic superlensing jets and acoustic-fork sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org

    2017-05-18

    Focusing acoustical (and optical) beams beyond the diffraction limit has remained a major challenge in imaging instruments and systems, until recent advances on “hyper” or “super” lensing and higher-resolution imaging techniques have shown the counterintuitive violation of this rule under certain circumstances. Nonetheless, the proposed technologies of super-resolution acoustical focusing beyond the diffraction barrier require complex tools such as artificially engineered metamaterials, and other hardware equipment that may not be easily synthesized or manufactured. The present contribution therefore suggests a simple and reliable method of using a sound-penetrable circular cylinder lens illuminated by a nonparaxial Gaussian acoustical sheet (i.e. finite beam in 2D) to produce non-evanescent ultrasonic superlensing jets (or bullets) and acoustical ‘snail-fork’ shaped wavefronts with limited diffraction. The generalized (near-field) scattering theory for acoustical sheets of arbitrary wavefronts and incidence is utilized to synthesize the incident beam based upon the angular spectrum decomposition method and the multipole expansion method in cylindrical wave functions to compute the scattered pressure around the cylinder with particular emphasis on its physical properties. The results show that depending on the beam and lens parameters, a tight focusing (with dimensions much smaller than the beam waist) can be achieved. Subwavelength resolution can be also achieved by selecting a lens material with a speed of sound exceeding that of the host fluid medium. The ultrasonic superlensing jets provide the impetus to develop improved subwavelength microscopy and acoustical image-slicing systems, cell lysis and surgery, and photoacoustic imaging to name a few examples. Moreover, an acoustical fork-sheet generation may open innovative avenues in reconfigurable on-chip micro/nanoparticle tweezers and surface acoustic waves devices. - Highlights: • Ultrasonic

  19. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, S.M.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.

    1998-09-09

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  20. Soil Investigation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Earles, Jennifer E [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    Mercury is regarded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management as a priority contaminant on the Oak Ridge Reservation because of the environmental risks associated with substantial losses from buildings, soils, and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). As a result of historical releases of mercury from Y-12 primarily in the 1950s and early 1960s, the lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) stream channel and bank soil margins are contaminated with mercury (Brooks and Southworth 2011; Tennessee Valley Authority 1985b, a). A Mercury Remediation Technology Development project is underway to evaluate the nature of downstream mercury contamination and to develop targeted site-specific remedial technologies that can mitigate mercury release and biological uptake. It is known that mercury concentration varies longitudinally and with depth in LEFPC bank soils; however, soil types and soil physical properties are not well known, especially relative to the zones of mercury contamination. Moreover, there are no soil maps for the downstream reaches of LEFPC in Roane County (i.e. from the Chestnut Hill Road downstream) and this work represents the first ever soil mapping along this section of LEFPC.

  1. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, S.M.; ASHWOOD, T.L.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.

    1997-10-24

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y- 12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  2. Failure analysis of axle shaft of a fork lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Das

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An axle shaft of fork lift failed at operation within 296 h of service. The shaft transmits torque from discrepancy to wheel through planetary gear arrangement. A section of fractured axle shaft made of induction-hardened steel was analyzed to determine the root cause of the failure. Optical microscopies as well as field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM along with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were carried out to characterize the microstructure. Hardness profile throughout the cross-section was evaluated by micro-hardness measurements. Chemical analysis indicated that the shaft was made of 42CrMo4 steel grade as per specification. Microstructural analysis and micro-hardness profile revealed that the shaft was improperly heat treated resulting in a brittle case, where crack was found to initiate from the case in a brittle mode in contrast to ductile mode within the core. This behaviour was related to differences in microstructure, which was observed to be martensitic within the case with a micro-hardness equivalent to 735 HV, and a mixture of non-homogeneous structure of pearlite and ferrite within the core with a hardness of 210 HV. The analysis suggests that the fracture initiated from the martensitic case as brittle mode due to improper heat treatment process (high hardness. Moreover the inclusions along the hot working direction i.e. in the longitudinal axis made the component more susceptible to failure.

  3. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Bmsage is involved in regulation of fibroin H-chain gene via interaction with SGF1 in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Chun; Li, Qiong-Yan; Hu, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Meng-Ting; Nie, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Yin-Xia; Peng, Zhang-Chuan; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qing-You

    2014-01-01

    Silk glands are specialized in the synthesis of several secretory proteins. Expression of genes encoding the silk proteins in Bombyx mori silk glands with strict territorial and developmental specificities is regulated by many transcription factors. In this study, we have characterized B. mori sage, which is closely related to sage in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. It is termed Bmsage; it encodes transcription factor Bmsage, which belongs to the Mesp subfamily, containing a basic helix-loop-helix motif. Bmsage transcripts were detected specifically in the silk glands of B. mori larvae through RT-PCR analysis. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed the Bmsage protein existed exclusively in B. mori middle and posterior silk gland cells. Bmsage has a low level of expression in the 4th instar molting stages, which increases gradually in the 5th instar feeding stages and then declines from the wandering to the pupation stages. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested the expression level of Bmsage in a high silk strain was higher compared to a lower silk strain on day 3 of the larval 5th instar. Furthermore, far western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed the Bmsage protein interacted with the fork head transcription factor silk gland factor 1 (SGF1). An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins bound to the A and B elements in the promoter of fibroin H-chain gene(fib-H), respectively. Luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the complex of Bmsage and SGF1 proteins increased the expression of fib-H. Together, these results suggest Bmsage is involved in the regulation of the expression of fib-H by being together with SGF1 in B. mori PSG cells.

  4. A Tuning Fork with a Short Fibre Probe Sensor for a Near-FieldScanning Optical Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沛; 鲁拥华; 章江英; 明海; 谢建平; 黄建文; 高宗圣; 蔡定平

    2002-01-01

    We report on a tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope. The method demonstrates how to fabricate the short fibre probe. This tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe can provide stable and high Q at the tapping frequency of the tuning fork, and can give high-quality near-field scanning optical microscope and atomic force microscope images of samples. We present the results of using the tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope performed on an eight-channel silica waveguide.

  5. The contribution of cis-regulatory elements to head-to-head gene pairs’ co-expression pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transcription regulation is one of the most critical pipelines in biological process,in which cis-elements play the role as gene expression regulators.We attempt to deduce the principles underlying the co-expression of "head-to-head" gene pairs by analyzing activities or behaviors of the shared cis-elements.A network component analysis was performed to estimate the impact of cis-elements on gene promoters and their activities under different conditions.Our discoveries reveal how biological system uses those regulatory elements to control the expression pattern of "head-to-head" gene pairs and the whole transcription regulation system.

  6. Transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  7. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young...... patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios...

  8. Molecular recognition imaging using tuning fork-based transverse dynamic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Manuel; Adamsmaier, Stefan [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Zanten, Thomas S. van [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Chtcheglova, Lilia A. [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Manzo, Carlo [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Duman, Memed [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mayer, Barbara [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Ebner, Andreas [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Moertelmaier, Manuel; Kada, Gerald [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, 4040 Linz (Austria); Garcia-Parajo, Maria F. [IBEC-Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and CIBER-Bbn, Baldiri i Reixac 15-21, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Hinterdorfer, Peter, E-mail: peter.hinterdorfer@jku.at [University of Linz, Institute for Biophysics, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Kienberger, Ferry [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate simultaneous transverse dynamic force microscopy and molecular recognition imaging using tuning forks as piezoelectric sensors. Tapered aluminum-coated glass fibers were chemically functionalized with biotin and anti-lysozyme molecules and attached to one of the prongs of a 32 kHz tuning fork. The lateral oscillation amplitude of the tuning fork was used as feedback signal for topographical imaging of avidin aggregates and lysozyme molecules on mica substrate. The phase difference between the excitation and detection signals of the tuning fork provided molecular recognition between avidin/biotin or lysozyme/anti-lysozyme. Aggregates of avidin and lysozyme molecules appeared as features with heights of 1-4 nm in the topographic images, consistent with single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging. Recognition events between avidin/biotin or lysozyme/anti-lysozyme were detected in the phase image at high signal-to-noise ratio with phase shifts of 1-2{sup o}. Because tapered glass fibers and shear-force microscopy based on tuning forks are commonly used for near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), these results open the door to the exciting possibility of combining optical, topographic and biochemical recognition at the nanometer scale in a single measurement and in liquid conditions.

  9. South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  10. RECOVERY FOLLOWING SUBARACHNOID BLOCK : EVALUATION USING 128 HZ TUNING FORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following spinal anesthesia it is very important to see complete recovery before ambulation and discharge of the patient. Conventional methods to see recovery from spinal block use different types of motor power tests like Bromage score or the Formal motor power test system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of one hundred and fifty patients of ASA grade I and II, presenting for lower segment caesarean section under spinal anesthesia were taken up for the study. We compared the use of a 128-Hz tuning fork with the results of conventional evaluation of block recovery. Conventional block recovery testing included Bromage score, Formal muscle power testing according to the British Medical Research Council, pinprick testing, and warm/cold testing. After obtaining base line values, a subarachnoid block was performed and patients were tested every 15 minutes after surgery, till the vibration score of one less than the baseline was achieved. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the results of the different methods to the time at which baseline values of vibration sense were reached. RESULTS: At the time vibration sense testing returned to baseline, 100% of the patients had attained Bromage score of 0 with no residual motor block. 98% of the patients regained foot extension and foot flexion strength completely while 92% of the patients showed complete recovery of the quadriceps strength. CONCLUSION: Recovery of vibration sense corresponds with recovery of motor block after spinal anesthesia and may serve as an easy means of documenting recovery with a single test before discharge.

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  13. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  14. The DNA damage checkpoint response to replication stress: A Game of Forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJossen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions challenging replication fork progression, collectively referred to as replication stress, represent a major source of genomic instability and are associated to cancer onset. The replication checkpoint, a specialized branch of the DNA damage checkpoint, monitors fork problems and triggers a cellular response aimed at preserving genome integrity. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the replication checkpoint monitors and responds to replication stress, focusing on the checkpoint-mediated pathways contributing to protect replication fork integrity. We discuss how cells achieve checkpoint signaling inactivation once replication stress is overcome and how a failure to timely revert checkpoint-mediated changes in cellular physiology might impact on replication dynamics and genome integrity. We also highlight the checkpoint function as an anti-cancer barrier preventing cells malignant transformation following oncogene-induced replication stress.

  15. The Coefficient of the Voltage Induced Frequency Shift Measurement on a Quartz Tuning Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Hou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift (VIFS of a 32.768 KHz quartz tuning fork. Three vibration modes were studied: one prong oscillating, two prongs oscillating in the same direction, and two prongs oscillating in opposite directions. They all showed a parabolic dependence of the eigen-frequency shift on the bias voltage applied across the fork, due to the voltage-induced internal stress, which varies as the fork oscillates. The average coefficient of the VIFS effect is as low as several hundred nano-Hz per millivolt, implying that fast-response voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-locked loops with nano-Hz resolution can be built.

  16. Multiple critical velocities in oscillatory flow of superfluid 4He due to quartz tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, D.; Jackson, M. J.; Tsepelin, V.; Poole, M.; Woods, A. J.; Človečko, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-12-01

    We report recent investigations into the transition to turbulence in superfluid 4He, realized experimentally by measuring the drag forces acting on two custom-made quartz tuning forks with fundamental resonances at 6.5 kHz and 55.5 kHz, in the temperature range 10 mK to 2.17 K. In pure superfluid in the zero temperature limit, three distinct critical velocities were observed with both tuning forks. We discuss the significance of all critical velocities and associate the third critical velocity reported here with the development of large vortical structures in the flow, which thus starts to mimic turbulence in classical fluids. The interpretation of our results is directly linked to previous experimental work with oscillators such as tuning forks, grids, and vibrating wires, focusing on the behavior of purely superfluid 4He at very low temperatures.

  17. Pathological Changes of von Economo Neuron and Fork Neuron in Neuropsychiatric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-ning; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhu, Ming-wei

    2016-02-01

    von Economo neuron (VEN) is a bipolar neuron characterized by a large spindle-shaped soma. VEN is generally distributed in the layer V of anterior insular lobe and anterior cingulate cortex. Fork neuron is another featured bipolar neuron. In recent years,many studies have illustrated that VEN and fork neurons are correlated with complicated cognition such as self-consciousness and social emotion. Studies in the development and morpholigies of these two neurons as well as their pathological changes in various neurological and psychiatric disorders have found that the abnormal number and functions of VEN can cause corresponding dysfunctions in social recognition and emotions both during the neuro-developmental stages of childhood and during the nerve degeneration in old age stage. Therefore, more attentions should be paid on the research of VEN and fork neurons in neuropsychiatric diseases.

  18. Transcription-coupled repair and apoptosis provide specific protection against transcription-associated mutagenesis by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; Jansen, Jacob G; Mullenders, Leon H F; de Wind, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Recent data reveal that gene transcription affects genome stability in mammalian cells. For example, transcription of DNA that is damaged by the most prevalent exogenous genotoxin, UV light, induces nucleotide substitutions and chromosomal instability, collectively called UV-induced transcription-associated mutations (UV-TAM). An important class of UV-TAM consists of nucleotide transitions that are caused by deamination of cytosine-containing photolesions to uracil, presumably occurring at stalled transcription complexes. Transcription-associated deletions and recombinational events after UV exposure may be triggered by collisions of replication forks with stalled transcription complexes. In this Point-of-View we propose that mammalian cells possess two tailored mechanisms to prevent UV-TAM in dermal stem cells. First, the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) pathway removes lesions at transcribed DNA strands, forming the primary barrier against the mutagenic consequences of transcription at a damaged template. Second, when TCR is absent or when the capacity of TCR is exceeded, persistently stalled transcription complexes induce apoptosis, averting the generation of mutant cells following replication. We hypothesize that TCR and the apoptotic response in conjunction reduce the risk of skin carcinogenesis.

  19. 77 FR 66865 - Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River....C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Oil and Gas Management Plan (Plan) for Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area...

  20. 76 FR 50171 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Henrys Fork Salinity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan, Sweetwater and Uinta Counties, WY; Daggett and Summit... Statement (EIS) for the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan (SCPP). The NRCS will be the lead agency... Improvements'' alternative assumes a salinity control project will be implemented. Existing financial...

  1. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  2. Recombination occurs within minutes of replication blockage by RTS1 producing restarted forks that are prone to collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael O; Jalan, Manisha; Morrow, Carl A; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The completion of genome duplication during the cell cycle is threatened by the presence of replication fork barriers (RFBs). Following collision with a RFB, replication proteins can dissociate from the stalled fork (fork collapse) rendering it incapable of further DNA synthesis unless recombination intervenes to restart replication. We use time-lapse microscopy and genetic assays to show that recombination is initiated within ∼10 min of replication fork blockage at a site-specific barrier in fission yeast, leading to a restarted fork within ∼60 min, which is only prevented/curtailed by the arrival of the opposing replication fork. The restarted fork is susceptible to further collapse causing hyper-recombination downstream of the barrier. Surprisingly, in our system fork restart is unnecessary for maintaining cell viability. Seemingly, the risk of failing to complete replication prior to mitosis is sufficient to warrant the induction of recombination even though it can cause deleterious genetic change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04539.001 PMID:25806683

  3. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  4. Multiple genetic pathways for restarting DNA replication forks in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, S J

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the primosome assembly proteins, PriA, PriB, PriC, DnaT, DnaC, DnaB, and DnaG, are thought to help to restart DNA replication forks at recombinational intermediates. Redundant functions between priB and priC and synthetic lethality between priA2::kan and rep3 mutations raise the possibility that there may be multiple pathways for restarting replication forks in vivo. Herein, it is shown that priA2::kan causes synthetic lethality when placed in combination with either Delt...

  5. Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in the Nixon Fork mining district, Medfra Quadrangle, central Alaska, 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Max G.; Stevens, John M.

    1953-01-01

    Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in the Nixon Fork mining district, Medfra quadrangle, central Alaska, in 1949 disclosed the occurrence of allanite in sampled containing as much as 0.05 percent equivalent uranium from the dump of the Whalen mine; the presence of radioactive parisite (a rare-earth fluocarbonate) in a highly altered limestone containing about 0.025 percent equivalent uranium near the Whalen shaft; and radioactive idocrase in samples of altered garnet rock with about 0.025 percent equivalent uranium, form the Crystal shaft of the Nixon Fork mine. This radioactivity is due mostly to thorium rather than uranium. Placer concentrates

  6. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  7. 76 FR 46721 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem Restoration Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... this project area to improve the health of the ecosystem and reach the desired future condition. DATES...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem... the potential for large-scale, high-intensity wildfires that threaten human life, property, and...

  8. Numerical performance analysis of quartz tuning fork-based force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2017-01-01

    Quartz tuning fork-based force sensors where one prong is immobilized onto a holder while the other one is allowed to oscillate freely (‘qPlus’ configuration) are in widespread use for high-resolution scanning probe microscopy applications. Due to the small size of the tuning forks (≈3 mm) and the complexity of the sensor assemblies, the reliable and repeatable manufacturing of the sensors has been challenging. In this paper, we investigate the contribution of the amount and location of the epoxy glue used to attach the tuning fork to its holder on the sensor’s performance. Towards this end, we use finite element analysis to model the entire sensor assembly and to perform static and dynamic numerical simulations. Our analysis reveals that increasing the thickness of the epoxy layer between prong and holder results in a decrease of the sensor’s spring constant, eigenfrequency, and quality factor while showing an increasing deviation from oscillation in its primary modal shape. Adding epoxy at the sides of the tuning fork also leads to a degradation of the quality factor even though in this case, spring constant and eigenfrequency rise in tandem with a lessening of the deviation from its ideal modal shape.

  9. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  10. 77 FR 71611 - Land Acquisitions; North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Tribe's current government headquarters, which are located in the town of North Fork, Madera County, California, described as: Real property in the City of UNINCORPORATED AREA, County of Madera, State of..., AND 8 of PARCEL MAP 3426 IN THE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF THE COUNTY OF MADERA, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS...

  11. From farm to fork and further. Research tackling the grand challenge of food safety in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, M. de; Polchar, J.; Gehem, M.

    2012-01-01

    The study From Farm to Fork and Further shows how, as traditional causes of food safety problems such as basic hygiene are successfully dealt with, future food safety risks become ever harder to manage. European countries may have the highest food safety standards, however the trends that go hand in

  12. Environmental Assessment, Demolition of Alpha Ramp Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    support active cultivation of grass and alfalfa hay, and other areas are undergoing rehabilitation for future haying operations. Any cropping practices...January 2004). 3.10 Land Use Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops, including spring wheat, barley, sunflowers

  13. Final Environmental Assessment Demolition of Alpha Ramp, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    unimproved areas at GFAFB have been used to support active cultivation of grass and alfalfa hay, and other areas are undergoing rehabilitation for...Native American areas of concern on GFAFB (USAF, January 2004). 3.10 Land Use Land use in Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops

  14. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depl...

  15. Bending Forks and Wagging Dogs--It's about the DNA 3' Tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Tainer, John A

    2015-06-18

    Protecting, reversing, and remodeling stalled replication forks are critical to genome stability and require coordinating DNA replication, remodeling, and repair. In this issue, Kile et al. (2015) find that unexpected HLTF specificity for DNA's 3'-hydroxyl tail helps control these biological functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bending forks and wagging dogs – it’s about the DNA 3′ tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Tainer, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Protecting, reversing, and remodeling stalled replication forks are critical to genome stability and require coordinating DNA replication, remodeling, and repair. In this issue, Kile et al. (2015) find unexpected HLTF specificity for DNA’s 3′-hydroxyl tail helps control these biological functions. PMID:26091346

  17. MediaMill: Fast and effective video search using the ForkBrowser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, O.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this technical demonstration we showcase the MediaMill ForkBrowser for video retrieval. It embeds multiple query methods into a single browsing environment. We show that users can switch query methods on demand without the need to adapt to a different interface. This allows for fast and effective

  18. SUMO modification regulates BLM and RAD51 interaction at damaged replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J Ouyang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gene mutated in Bloom's syndrome, BLM, is important in the repair of damaged replication forks, and it has both pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in homologous recombination (HR. At damaged forks, BLM interacts with RAD51 recombinase, the essential enzyme in HR that catalyzes homology-dependent strand invasion. We have previously shown that defects in BLM modification by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO cause increased gamma-H2AX foci. Because the increased gamma-H2AX could result from defective repair of spontaneous DNA damage, we hypothesized that SUMO modification regulates BLM's function in HR repair at damaged forks. To test this hypothesis, we treated cells that stably expressed a normal BLM (BLM+ or a SUMO-mutant BLM (SM-BLM with hydroxyurea (HU and examined the effects of stalled replication forks on RAD51 and its DNA repair functions. HU treatment generated excess gamma-H2AX in SM-BLM compared to BLM+ cells, consistent with a defect in replication-fork repair. SM-BLM cells accumulated increased numbers of DNA breaks and were hypersensitive to DNA damage. Importantly, HU treatment failed to induce sister-chromatid exchanges in SM-BLM cells compared to BLM+ cells, indicating a specific defect in HR repair and suggesting that RAD51 function could be compromised. Consistent with this hypothesis, RAD51 localization to HU-induced repair foci was impaired in SM-BLM cells. These data suggested that RAD51 might interact noncovalently with SUMO. We found that in vitro RAD51 interacts noncovalently with SUMO and that it interacts more efficiently with SUMO-modified BLM compared to unmodified BLM. These data suggest that SUMOylation controls the switch between BLM's pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in HR. In the absence of BLM SUMOylation, BLM perturbs RAD51 localization at damaged replication forks and inhibits fork repair by HR. Conversely, BLM SUMOylation relieves its inhibitory effects on HR, and it promotes RAD51 function.

  19. Force-gradient-induced mechanical dissipation of quartz tuning fork force sensors used in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agrait, N. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA-Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rubio-Bollinger, G., E-mail: gabino.rubio@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales ' Nicolas Cabrera' , Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    We have studied the dynamics of quartz tuning fork resonators used in atomic force microscopy taking into account the mechanical energy dissipation through the attachment of the tuning fork base. We find that the tuning fork resonator quality factor changes even in the case of a purely elastic sensor-sample interaction. This is due to the effective mechanical imbalance of the tuning fork prongs induced by the sensor-sample force gradient, which in turn has an impact on dissipation through the attachment of the resonator base. This effect may yield a measured dissipation signal that can be different from the one exclusively related to the dissipation between the sensor and the sample. We also find that there is a second-order term in addition to the linear relationship between the sensor-sample force gradient and the resonance frequency shift of the tuning fork that is significant even for force gradients usually present in atomic force microscopy, which are in the range of tens of N/m. -- Research Highlights: {yields} Dynamics of miniature tuning fork force sensors: a mechanical model. {yields} Non-linear relationship between resonance frequency shift and applied force gradient. {yields} An apparent mechanical dissipation channel opens even for purely conservative tip-sample interactions. {yields} qPlus tuning forks configuration has lower Q factor but straightforward dynamics.

  20. Evaluation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Mercury Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ketelle, Richard [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year research project undertaken to better understand the nature and magnitude of mercury (Hg) fluxes in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). This project addresses the requirements of Action Plan 1 in the 2011 Oak Ridge Reservation-wide Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Five Year Review (FYR). The Action Plan is designed to address a twofold 2011 FYR issue: (1) new information suggests mobilization of mercury from the upper and lower EFPC streambeds and stream banks is the primary source of mercury export during high-flow conditions, and (2) the current Record of Decision did not address the entire hydrologic system and creek bank or creek bed sediments. To obtain a more robust watershed-scale understanding of mercury sources and processes in lower EFPC (LEFPC), new field and laboratory studies were coupled with existing data from multiple US Department of Energy programs to develop a dynamic watershed and bioaccumulation model. LEFPC field studies for the project focused primarily on quantification of streambank erosion and an evaluation of mercury dynamics in shallow groundwater adjacent to LEFPC and potential connection to the surface water. The approach to the stream bank study was innovative in using imagery from kayak floats’ surveys from the headwaters to the mouth of EFPC to estimate erosion, coupled with detailed bank soil mercury analyses. The goal of new field assessments and modeling was to generate a more holistic and quantitative understanding of the watershed and the sources, flux, concentration, transformation, and bioaccumulation of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg). Model development used a hybrid approach that dynamically linked a spreadsheet-based physical and chemical watershed model to a systems dynamics, mercury bioaccumulation model for key fish species. The watershed model tracks total Hg and MeHg fluxes and concentrations by examining upstream inputs, floodplain

  1. Transcription elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  2. Unligated Okazaki Fragments Induce PCNA Ubiquitination and a Requirement for Rad59-Dependent Replication Fork Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Dang Nguyen

    Full Text Available Deficiency in DNA ligase I, encoded by CDC9 in budding yeast, leads to the accumulation of unligated Okazaki fragments and triggers PCNA ubiquitination at a non-canonical lysine residue. This signal is crucial to activate the S phase checkpoint, which promotes cell cycle delay. We report here that a pol30-K107 mutation alleviated cell cycle delay in cdc9 mutants, consistent with the idea that the modification of PCNA at K107 affects the rate of DNA synthesis at replication forks. To determine whether PCNA ubiquitination occurred in response to nicks or was triggered by the lack of PCNA-DNA ligase interaction, we complemented cdc9 cells with either wild-type DNA ligase I or a mutant form, which fails to interact with PCNA. Both enzymes reversed PCNA ubiquitination, arguing that the modification is likely an integral part of a novel nick-sensory mechanism and not due to non-specific secondary mutations that could have occurred spontaneously in cdc9 mutants. To further understand how cells cope with the accumulation of nicks during DNA replication, we utilized cdc9-1 in a genome-wide synthetic lethality screen, which identified RAD59 as a strong negative interactor. In comparison to cdc9 single mutants, cdc9 rad59Δ double mutants did not alter PCNA ubiquitination but enhanced phosphorylation of the mediator of the replication checkpoint, Mrc1. Since Mrc1 resides at the replication fork and is phosphorylated in response to fork stalling, these results indicate that Rad59 alleviates nick-induced replication fork slowdown. Thus, we propose that Rad59 promotes fork progression when Okazaki fragment processing is compromised and counteracts PCNA-K107 mediated cell cycle arrest.

  3. 用于微机电系统的叉形微铰链%Micro Fork Hinge for MEMS Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Flexible beams are often used for rotation in MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) devices to avoid the friction problems associated with hinge. However, the rotation angle of flexible beam is very limited and not enough for many applications. In this paper, we introduce a quasi hinge structure named as Fork Hinge, which has a larger equivalent rotation angle (e.g.10 times lager) and is more stable than the flexible hinge, while keeping its interesting properties. We develop an analytical model and simulate the Fork hinge behavior with FEM analysis. We find a good correlation with Fork Hinges fabricated using a SOI (Silicon on Insulator) wafer and DRIE (Deep Reactive Ion Etching).

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  5. Evaluation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Mercury Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevelhimer, Mark S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brandt, Craig C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ketelle, Richard [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year research project undertaken to better understand the nature and magnitude of mercury (Hg) fluxes in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). This project addresses the requirements of Action Plan 1 in the 2011 Oak Ridge Reservation-wide Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Five Year Review (FYR). The Action Plan is designed to address a twofold 2011 FYR issue: (1) new information suggests mobilization of mercury from the upper and lower EFPC streambeds and stream banks is the primary source of mercury export during high-flow conditions, and (2) the current Record of Decision did not address the entire hydrologic system and creek bank or creek bed sediments. To obtain a more robust watershed-scale understanding of mercury sources and processes in lower EFPC (LEFPC), new field and laboratory studies were coupled with existing data from multiple US Department of Energy programs to develop a dynamic watershed and bioaccumulation model. LEFPC field studies for the project focused primarily on quantification of streambank erosion and an evaluation of mercury dynamics in shallow groundwater adjacent to LEFPC and potential connection to the surface water. The approach to the stream bank study was innovative in using imagery from kayak floats’ surveys from the headwaters to the mouth of EFPC to estimate erosion, coupled with detailed bank soil mercury analyses. The goal of new field assessments and modeling was to generate a more holistic and quantitative understanding of the watershed and the sources, flux, concentration, transformation, and bioaccumulation of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg). Model development used a hybrid approach that dynamically linked a spreadsheet-based physical and chemical watershed model to a systems dynamics, mercury bioaccumulation model for key fish species. The watershed model tracks total Hg and MeHg fluxes and concentrations by examining upstream inputs, floodplain

  6. Status of fork-tailed and Leach's storm-petrel populations at St. Lazaria Island during the summer of 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purposes of this study were to (1) continue monitoring on Leach's forktail (Oceanadroma furcata) and on fork-tailed storm petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa); (2)...

  7. Using Caffeine as a Water Quality Indicator in the Ambient Monitoring Program for Third Fork Creek Watershed, Durham, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Porché L

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine has been suggested as a chemical indicator for domestic wastewater in freshwater systems, although it is not included in water quality monitoring programs. The Third Fork Creek watershed in Durham, NC, is highly urbanized, with a history of receiving untreated wastewater from leaking and overflowing sanitary sewers. The poor water quality originating in the Third Fork Creek watershed threatens its intended uses and jeopardizes drinking water, aquatic life, and recreational activities provided by Jordan Lake. Organic waste contaminants have been detected in both Third Fork Creek watershed and Jordan Lake; however, the sampling periods were temporary, resulting in a few samples collected during nonstorm periods. It is recommended that (1) the concentration of caffeine and other organic waste contaminants are determined during storm and nonstorm periods and (2) caffeine is monitored regularly with traditional water quality indicators to evaluate the health of Third Fork Creek watershed.

  8. Calibration of piezoelectric positioning actuators using a reference voltage-to-displacement transducer based on quartz tuning forks

    CERN Document Server

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; 10.1017/S1431927611012839

    2012-01-01

    We use a piezoelectric quartz tuning fork to calibrate the displacement of ceramic piezoelectric scanners which are widely employed in scanning probe microscopy. We measure the static piezoelectric response of a quartz tuning fork and find it to be highly linear, non-hysteretic and with negligible creep. These performance characteristics, close to those of an ideal transducer, make quartz transducers superior to ceramic piezoelectric actuators. Furthermore, quartz actuators in the form of a tuning fork have the advantage of yielding static displacements comparable to those of local probe microscope scanners. We use the static displacement of a quartz tuning fork as a reference to calibrate the three axis displacement of a ceramic piezoelectric scanner. Although this calibration technique is a non-traceable method, it can be more versatile than using calibration grids because it enables to characterize the linear and non-linear response of a piezoelectric scanner in a broad range of displacements, spanning fro...

  9. Physical Habitat Characteristics on the North and South Forks of the Shenandoah River, VA in 2002-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The layers within this geodataset describe physical habitat characteristics in the North and South Fork Shenandoah rivers. They represent conditions during summer...

  10. Using Caffeine as a Water Quality Indicator in the Ambient Monitoring Program for Third Fork Creek Watershed, Durham, North Carolina

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine has been suggested as a chemical indicator for domestic wastewater in freshwater systems, although it is not included in water quality monitoring programs. The Third Fork Creek watershed in Durham, NC, is highly urbanized, with a history of receiving untreated wastewater from leaking and overflowing sanitary sewers. The poor water quality originating in the Third Fork Creek watershed threatens its intended uses and jeopardizes drinking water, aquatic life, and recreational activities...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  12. Nuclear insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor phosphorylates proliferating cell nuclear antigen and rescues stalled replication forks after DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waraky, Ahmed; Lin, Yingbo; Warsito, Dudi; Haglund, Felix; Aleem, Eiman; Larsson, Olle

    2017-09-18

    We have previously shown that the insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) translocates to the cell nucleus, where it binds to enhancer like regions and increases gene transcription. Further studies have demonstrated that nuclear IGF1R (nIGF1R) physically and functionally interacts with some nuclear proteins, i.e. the lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1), histone H3, and Brahma related gene 1 proteins. In the present study, we identified the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as a nIGF1R binding partner. PCNA is a pivotal component of the replication fork machinery and a main regulator of the DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathway. We found that IGF1R interacts with and phosphorylates PCNA in human embryonic stem cells and other cell lines. In vitro MS analysis of PCNA coincubated with the IGF1R kinase indicated tyrosine residues 60, 133, and 250 in PCNA as IGF1R targets, and PCNA phosphorylation was followed by mono and poly ubiquitination. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that these ubiquitination events may be mediated by DDT dependent E2/E3 ligases (e.g. RAD18 and SHPRH/HLTF). Absence of IGF1R or mutation of Tyr60, Tyr133, or Tyr250 in PCNA abrogated its ubiquitination. Unlike in cells expressing IGF1R, externally induced DNA damage in IGF1R negative cells caused G1 cell cycle arrest and S phase fork stalling. Taken together, our results suggest a role of IGF1R in DDT. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2016-03-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3' single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks.

  14. Applications of the quartz tuning fork in classical and superfluid hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Mantia Marco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of the multitude of applications of the commercially produced quartz tuning fork in cryogenic fluid dynamics, using cold gaseous, normal liquid and superfluid 4He as working fluids with extraordinary, but well-known and tunable physical properties. While the central focus of this work is the use of the tuning fork as a detector of classical and quantum turbulence, we also report other studies and applications, mainly on cavitation, pressure-, thermo- and viscosimetry. Finally, we mention briefly our recent studies of the acoustic emission due to these high-Q oscillators and its effect on the characteristics of their resonance.

  15. Carbon fibre tips for scanning probe microscopy based on quartz tuning fork force sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A; Agrait, N; Rubio-Bollinger, G, E-mail: gabino.rubio@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-04-09

    We report the fabrication and the characterization of carbon fibre tips for use in combined scanning tunnelling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. We find that the use of carbon fibre tips results in a minimum impact on the dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors, yielding a high quality factor and, consequently, a high force gradient sensitivity. This high force sensitivity, in combination with high electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance of carbon fibre tips, make them very convenient for combined and simultaneous scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Interestingly, these tips are quite robust against occasionally occurring tip crashes. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is presented that produces a sub-100-nm apex radius in a reproducible way which can yield high resolution images.

  16. Turbo Charge CPU Utilization in Fork/Join Using the ManagedBlocker

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Fork/Join is a framework for parallelizing calculations using recursive decomposition, also called divide and conquer. These algorithms occasionally end up duplicating work, especially at the beginning of the run. We can reduce wasted CPU cycles by implementing a reserved caching scheme. Before a task starts its calculation, it tries to reserve an entry in the shared map. If it is successful, it immediately begins. If not, it blocks until the other thread has finished its calculation. Unfortunately this might result in a significant number of blocked threads, decreasing CPU utilization. In this talk we will demonstrate this issue and offer a solution in the form of the ManagedBlocker. Combined with the Fork/Join, it can keep parallelism at the desired level.

  17. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea;

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...... have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...... is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity....

  18. Z-Axis Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscope with Low Air Damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and fabrication of a z-axis tuning fork gyroscope which has a freestanding architecture. In order to improve the performance of the tuning fork gyroscope by eliminating the influence of the squeeze-film air damping, the driving and sensing parts of the gyroscope were designed to oscillate in-plane. Furthermore, by removing the substrate underneath the device, the slide-film air damping in the gap between the proof masses and the substrate was eliminated. The proposed architecture was analyzed by the finite element method using ANSYS software. The simulated frequencies of the driving and sensing modes were 9.788 and 9.761 kHz, respectively. The gyroscope was fabricated using bulk micromachining technology. The quality factor and sensitivity of the gyroscope operating in atmospheric conditions were measured to be 111.2 and 11.56 mV/°/s, respectively.

  19. Gaussian Random Fields Methods for Fork-Join Network with Synchronization Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    research papers, under review in Mathematics of Operations Research (minor revision) and Annals of Applied Probability. One paper was on the finalist...2.00 1.00 Hongyuan Lu, Guodong Pang. Heavy Traffic Limits for A Fork-Join Network In the Halfin-Whitt Regime, Annals of Applied Probability (11 2014...fellowships for further studies in science , mathematics, engineering or technology fields: Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating

  20. Nested Fork-Join Queuing Networks and Their Application to Mobility Airfield Operations Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Method. The accuracy of this approximation is similar to that of its single-class counterpart. A similar approach is used by Di Mascolo, Frein , Baynat and...et en Automatique , 1985. [9] Baccelli, F. and Z. Liu. "On the execution of parallel programs on multipro- cessor systems-a queuing theory approach...Le Chesnay, France: Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique , 1986. [16] Baccelli, F., and others. "Acyclic fork-join

  1. New species of Triplocania Roesler with forewing M3 forked (Psocodea: 'Psocoptera': Ptiloneuridae), from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Neto, Alberto Moreira; Rafael, José Albertino; Aldrete, Alfonso N García

    2014-07-16

    Four new Brazilian species of Triplocania with forewing M3 forked are described and illustrated based on male specimens, namely: Triplocania lamasi n.sp. (Mato Grosso: Brazil), Triplocania mariateresae n.sp. (Rio de Janeiro: Brazil), Triplocania newi n.sp. (Tocantins: Brazil) and Triplocania plaumanni n.sp. (Santa Catarina: Brasil). They differ from all the other species in the genus, in which the males are known, by the hypandrium and phallosome structures.

  2. Chromatin dynamics at the replication fork: there's more to life than histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Iestyn; Smith, Duncan J

    2013-04-01

    Before each division, eukaryotic cells face the daunting task of completely and accurately replicating a heterogeneous, chromatinized genome and repackaging both resulting daughters. Because replication requires strand separation, interactions between the DNA and its many associated proteins--including histones--must be transiently broken to allow the passage of the replication fork. Here, we will discuss the disruption and re-establishment of chromatin structure during replication, and the consequences of these processes for epigenetic inheritance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  4. Environmental Assessment: Landscape Multiple Areas at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous plants. Included in the grasses and legumes...vegetation species are tall wheat grass, brome grass, Kentucky bluegrass, sweet clover, and alfalfa . Herbaceous plants include little bluestem...Grand Forks County consists primarily of cultivated crops with remaining land used for pasture and hay, urban development, recreation, and wildlife

  5. An Archeological Survey in the Gypsum Breaks on the Elm Fork of the Red River,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Hughes (1973). One of the known sites was reported by James Shaeffer in 1960. The Hughes survey was based on an earlier plan to dam Fish Creek, and he...limits. Artifacts recovered include Trinity, Ensor , Darl, Ellis, Gary, Meserve, Frio, and Abasolo projectile points, Clear Fork gouges, burins and...Marcos, Ensor , Palmillas and Trinity. From the material of these four sites an estimated range of dates was proposed at 2000 B.C. to 1000 A.D. Eight

  6. Environmental Assessment: Replace Sanitary Sewer from Building 801 to Lagoons at Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    for Grand Forks AFB include Marsh Milkweed , Bottlebrush Sedge, Prairie Cordgrass, Wooly Sedge, Awl- Fruit Sedge, Baltic Rush, Wool-Grass, Soft-stem...AFB has a humid continental climate that is characterized by frequent and drastic weather changes. The summers are short and humid with frequent...Vegetation is robust at GFAFB wetlands and many are characterized as typical prairie potholes found within the northern plains ecoregion. Wetlands

  7. Nanocharacterization of Soft Biological Samples in Shear Mode with Quartz Tuning Fork Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Manel Puig-Vidal; Laura Gonzalez; Jorge Otero

    2012-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by...

  8. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...... to the high aspect ratio of the CNT probe, the long-range background force was barely detectable in the solvation region. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. Continuous hydrologic simulation of runoff for the Middle Fork and South Fork of the Beargrass Creek basin in Jefferson County, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, G. Lynn; Downs, Aimee C.; Grace-Jarrett, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The Hydrological Simulation Pro-gram-FORTRAN (HSPF) was applied to an urban drainage basin in Jefferson County, Ky to integrate the large amounts of information being collected on water quantity and quality into an analytical framework that could be used as a management and planning tool. Hydrologic response units were developed using geographic data and a K-means analysis to characterize important hydrologic and physical factors in the basin. The Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN Expert System (HSPEXP) was used to calibrate the model parameters for the Middle Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for 3 years (June 1, 1991, to May 31, 1994) of 5-minute streamflow and precipitation time series, and 3 years of hourly pan-evaporation time series. The calibrated model parameters were applied to the South Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for confirmation. The model confirmation results indicated that the model simulated the system within acceptable tolerances. The coefficient of determination and coefficient of model-fit efficiency between simulated and observed daily flows were 0.91 and 0.82, respectively, for model calibration and 0.88 and 0.77, respectively, for model confirmation. The model is most sensitive to estimates of the area of effective impervious land in the basin; the spatial distribution of rain-fall; and the lower-zone evapotranspiration, lower-zone nominal storage, and infiltration-capacity parameters during recession and low-flow periods. The error contribution from these sources varies with season and antecedent conditions.

  10. Vibration amplitude of a tip-loaded quartz tuning fork during shear force microscopy scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, P.; Friedt, J.-M.; Carry, É.

    2008-08-01

    This Note reports on experimental results obtained with a recently published vision method for in-plane vibration measurement [Sandoz et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 023706 (2007)]. The latter is applied to a tip-loaded quartz tuning fork frequently used in scanning probe microscopy for shear-force monitoring of the tip-sample distance. The vibration amplitude of the tip-loaded prong is compared to that of the free one and the damping induced by tip-surface interactions is measured. The tuning-fork behavior is characterized during approaches from free space to surface contact. Tip-surface contact is clearly identified by a drastic reduction in the prong vibration amplitude. However, no differences were observed between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. Experiments reported here show that the vibration amplitude of the quartz tuning fork in free space is a good estimate of the vibration amplitude of the tip interacting with the sample surface during shear force sample-tip feedback. The experimental setup for measuring the amplitude is easily integrated in an inverted microscope setup on which the shear force microscope is installed for simultaneous scanning probe and optical microscopy analysis of the sample.

  11. A secure and efficient cryptographic hash function based on NewFORK-256

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshvardhan Tiwari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cryptographic hash functions serve as a fundamental building block of information security and are used in numerous security applications and protocols such as digital signature schemes, construction of MAC and random number generation, for ensuring data integrity and data origin authentication. Researchers have noticed serious security flaws and vulnerabilities in most widely used MD and SHA family hash functions. As a result hash functions from FORK family with longer digest value were considered as good alternatives for MD5 and SHA-1, but recent attacks against these hash functions have highlighted their weaknesses. In this paper we propose a dedicated hash function MNF-256 based on the design principle of NewFORK-256. It takes 512 bit message blocks and generates 256 bit hash value. A random sequence is added as an additional input to the compression function of MNF-256. Three branch parallel structure and secure compression function make MNF-256 an efficient, fast and secure hash function. Various simulation results indicate that MNF-256 is immune to common cryptanalytic attacks and faster than NewFORK-256.

  12. A tip-attached tuning fork sensor for the control of DNA translocation through a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; Huang, Tao; Li, Jiali

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that a tuning fork can be used as a force detecting sensor for manipulating DNA molecules and for controlling the DNA translocation rate through a nanopore. One prong of a tuning fork is glued with a probe tip which DNA molecules can be attached to. To control the motion and position of the tip, the tuning fork is fixed to a nanopositioning system which has sub-nanometer position control. A fluidic chamber is designed to fulfill many requirements for the experiment: for the access of a DNA-attached tip approaching to a nanopore, for housing a nanopore chip, and for measuring ionic current through a solid-state nanopore with a pair of electrodes. The location of a nanopore is first observed by transmission electron microscopy, and then is determined inside the liquid chambers with an optical microscope combined with local scanning the probe tip on the nanopore surface. When a DNA-immobilized tip approaches a membrane surface near a nanopore, free ends of the immobilized DNA strings can be pulled and trapped into the pore by an applied voltage across the nanopore chip, resulting in an ionic current reduction through the nanopore. The trapped DNA molecules can be lifted up from the nanopore at a user controlled speed. This integrated apparatus allows manipulation of biomolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) attached to a probe tip with sub-nanometer precision, and simultaneously allows measurement of the biomolecules by a nanopore device.

  13. On Bandwidth Characteristics of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope with Mechanically Coupled Sense Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfang Ni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode.

  14. On bandwidth characteristics of tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yunfang; Li, Hongsheng; Huang, Libin; Ding, Xukai; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode.

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  16. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-05-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.9-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. (USGS station number 03373500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS AHPS site SHLI3). NWS AHPS forecast peak stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.Flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation (USGS rating no. 43.0) at USGS streamgage 03373500, East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (10 ft) to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve (35 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM), derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The areal extent of the 24-ft flood-inundation map was

  17. DNAPKcs-dependent arrest of RNA polymerase II transcription in the presence of DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankotai, Tibor; Bonhomme, Céline; Chen, David; Soutoglou, Evi

    2012-02-12

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair interferes with ongoing cellular processes, including replication and transcription. Although the process of replication stalling upon collision of replication forks with damaged DNA has been extensively studied, the fate of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that encounters a DSB is not well understood. We show that the occurrence of a single DSB at a human RNAPII-transcribed gene leads to inhibition of transcription elongation and reinitiation. Upon inhibition of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), RNAPII bypasses the break and continues transcription elongation, suggesting that it is not the break per se that inhibits the processivity of RNAPII, but the activity of DNAPK. We also show that the mechanism of DNAPK-mediated transcription inhibition involves the proteasome-dependent pathway. The results point to the pivotal role of DNAPK activity in the eviction of RNAPII from DNA upon encountering a DNA lesion.

  18. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  19. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  20. Effects of controlled burning of chaparral on streamflow and sediment characteristics, East Fork Sycamore Creek, central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldys, Stanley; Hjalmarson, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of controlled burning of part of a chaparral-covered drainage basin on streamflow and sediment characteristics were studied in the upper reaches of the Sycamore Creek basin in central Arizona. A paired-watershed method was used to analyze data collected in two phases separated by the controlled burning of 45 percent of the East Fork Sycamore Creek drainage basin by the U.S. Forest Service on October 31, 1981. Statistically significant increases in streamflow in East Fork occurred from October 26, 1982, through August 25, 1984. Streamflow for August 26, 1984, through the end of data collection for the study on May 31, 1986, was generally at or less than preburn levels. An increase in the percentage of time that flow occurred in East Fork was noted for water years 1983 and 1984. No increase in the magnitude of instantaneous peak flows as a result of the burn was discernable at statistically significant levels. Suspended-sediment yields computed for data collected during water year 1983 were significantly greater in the East Fork drainage basin, 546 tons per square mile, than in the West Fork drainage basin, 22.6 tons per square mile. Suspended-sediment yields computed for East Fork and West Fork for water year 1985, 38.3 and 13.3 tons per square mile, respectively, were much closer in yield. These more uniform yields indicate a possible return to preburn conditions. Data collection did not begin until 11 months after the burn; therefore, the largest increases in streamflow and sediment yields, which commonly occur during the year after a burn, may not have been measured. During the second through fourth years after the burn, smaller increases in stream- flow and sediment yields were found in this study than were found in similar studies in this region.

  1. Development of CE-QUAL-W2 models for the Middle Fork Willamette and South Santiam Rivers, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccola, Norman L.; Stonewall, Adam J.; Sullivan, Annett B.; Kim, Yoonhee; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic (CE-QUAL-W2) models of Hills Creek Lake (HCL), Lookout Point Lake (LOP), and Dexter Lake (DEX) on the Middle Fork Willamette River (MFWR), and models of Green Peter Lake and Foster Lake on the South Santiam River systems in western Oregon were updated and recalibrated for a wide range of flow and meteorological conditions. These CE-QUAL-W2 models originally were developed by West Consultants, Inc., for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This study by the U.S. Geological Survey included a reassessment of the models’ calibration in more recent years—2002, 2006, 2008, and 2011—categorized respectively as low, normal, high, and extremely high flow calendar years. These years incorporated current dam-operation practices and more available data than the time period used in the original calibration. Modeled water temperatures downstream of both HCL and LOP-DEX on the MFWR were within an average of 0.68 degree Celsius (°C) of measured values; modeled temperatures downstream of Foster Dam on the South Santiam River were within an average of 0.65°C of measured values. A new CE-QUAL-W2 model was developed and calibrated for the riverine MFWR reach between Hills Creek Dam and the head of LOP, allowing an evaluation of the flow and temperature conditions in the entire MFWR system from HCL to Dexter Dam. The complex bathymetry and long residence time of HCL, combined with the relatively deep location of the power and regulating outlet structures at Hills Creek Dam, led to a HCL model that was highly sensitive to several outlet and geometric parameters related to dam structures (STR TOP, STR BOT, STR WIDTH). Release temperatures from HCL were important and often persisted downstream as they were incorporated in the MFWR model and the LOP-DEX model (downstream of MFWR). The models tended to underpredict the measured temperature of water releases from Dexter Dam during the late-September-through-December drawdown period in 2002, and again (to a lesser extent) in

  2. An Optimal Scheduling Algorithm for Fork-Join Task Graphs%一个调度Fork-Join任务图的最优算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆华; 阮幼林; 刘干; 蒋盛益; 杨世达

    2005-01-01

    The Fork-Join structure is one of the basic modeling structures for parallel processing. Although some algorithms are able to find an optimal schedule under certain conditions, they ignore to economize processors and minimize the total completion time. This paper presents a Task Duplication based Balance Scheduling(TDBS)algorithm which can generate an optimal schedule for fork-join task graph with a complexity of O(vq+vlogv), where v and q are the number of tasks and processors respectively. By considering workload and idle time slots of the used processors, TDBS algorithm tries to assign tasks to scheduled processors and maximize their utilization. Simulation results show that TDBS algorithm has better speedup and efficiency than other compared algorithms. Therefore,TDBS algorithm is a viable option for practical high performance applications.%Fork-Join任务图是一种并行处理的基本结构.虽然许多算法在任务满足某些条件时能产生最优调度,但往往没有考虑节省处理器个数和减少任务集的总完成时间,从而降低算法的加速比和效率.因此,提出一种基于任务复制的平衡调度算法,其时间复杂度为O(vq+vlogv),v和q分别表示任务集中任务的个数和使用的处理器个数.通过分析已用处理器的负载和空闲时间段,把任务尽量分配到已用的处理器上以均衡负载,从而提高其利用率.实验结果表明,该算法的加速比和总体效率优于其他算法.因此,该算法对于高性能应用程序的调度是一个较好的选择.

  3. Development of SMD 32.768 kHz tuning fork-type crystals using photolithography and selective etching process. Pt. I. Selective etching of an array of quartz tuning fork resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co., Ltd., Suwon City (Korea); Kang, K.M. [National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    2001-05-01

    Negative photoresist photolithography was found superior to previously used positive photoresist photolithography to etch array of quartz tuning forks for use in Qualcomm trademark mobile station modem (MSM), 3000{sup TM} central processing unit (CPU), chips of code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) units. Optimum processing condition was devised for reproducible precision etching of Z-cut quartz wafer into array of tuning forks. Tuning fork pattern was transferred via ordinary photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. A tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 A chromium/gold mask is coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the backside of the wafer. With protective metallization area of tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through quartz wafer was done at 80 C in a {+-} 1.5 C controlled bath containing concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove unwanted area of the quartz wafer. The quality of quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching depended primarily on the surface finish of quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used. At 80 C, selective etching of 100 {mu}m quartz wafer could be effected within 90 min. Reproducible precision selective etching method has thus been established and enables mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators with electrode patterns on them photolithographically. (orig.)

  4. p53 Maintains Genomic Stability by Preventing Interference between Transcription and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Qiao Xin Yeo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor maintains genomic stability, typically acting through cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. We discovered a function of p53 in preventing conflicts between transcription and replication, independent of its canonical roles. p53 deficiency sensitizes cells to Topoisomerase (Topo II inhibitors, resulting in DNA damage arising spontaneously during replication. Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A-DNA complexes preferentially accumulate in isogenic p53 mutant or knockout cells, reflecting an increased recruitment of TOP2A to regulate DNA topology. We propose that p53 acts to prevent DNA topological stress originating from transcription during the S phase and, therefore, promotes normal replication fork progression. Consequently, replication fork progression is impaired in the absence of p53, which is reversed by transcription inhibition. Pharmacologic inhibition of transcription also attenuates DNA damage and decreases Topo-II-DNA complexes, restoring cell viability in p53-deficient cells. Together, our results demonstrate a function of p53 that may underlie its role in tumor suppression.

  5. Hydrology of the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek, Carbon County, Utah, before, during, and after underground coal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, C.B.; Freethey, G.W.; Spangler, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    From 1988-92 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining, studied the effects of underground coal mining and the resulting subsidence on the hydrologic system near the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek, Carbon County, Utah. The subsidence caused open fractures at land surface, debris slides, and rockfalls in the canyon above the mined area. Land surface subsided and moved several feet horizontally. The perennial stream and a tributary upstream from the mined area were diverted below the ground by surface fractures where the overburden thickness above the Wattis coal seam is 300 to 500 feet. The reach downstream was dry but flow resumed where the channel traversed the Star Point Sandstone, which forms the aquifer below the coal seams where ground-water discharge provides new base flow. Concentrations of dissolved constituents in the stream water sampled just downstream from the mined area increased from about 300 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to more than 1,500 mg/L, and the water changed from primarily a magnesium calcium bicarbonate to primarily a magnesium sulfate type. Monitored water levels in two wells completed in the perched aquifer(s) above the mine indicate that fractures from subsidence- related deformation drained the perched aquifer in the Blackhawk Formation. The deformation also could have contributed to the decrease in discharge of three springs above the mined area, but discharge from other springs in the area did not change ubstantially; thus, the relation between subsidence and spring discharge, if any, is not clear. No significant changes in the chemical character of water discharging from springs were detected, but the dissolved-solids concentration in water collected from a perched sandstone aquifer overlying the mined coal seams increased during mining activity.

  6. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Falter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the “qPlus” design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process.

  7. Silicon carbide resonant tuning fork for microsensing applications in high-temperature and high G-shock environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David R Myers; Kan Bun Cheng; Babak Jamshidi; Robert G Azevedo; Debbie G Senesky; Li Chen; Mehran Mehregany; Muthu B J Wijesundara; Albert P Pisano

    2012-01-01

    We present the fabrication and testing of a silicon carbide (SiC) balanced mass doublended tuning fork that survives harsh environments without compromising the device strain sensitivity and resolution bandwidth. The device features a material stack that survives corrosive environments and enables high-temperature operation. To perform hightemperature testing, a specialized setup was constructed that allows the tuning fork to be characterized using traditional silicon electronics. The tuning fork has been operated at 600°C in the presence of dry steam for short durations. This tuning fork has also been tested to 64 000 G using a hard-launch, soft-catch shock implemented with a light gas gun. However, the device still has a strain sensitivity of 66 Hz/μe and strain resolution of 0. 045 μe in a 10 kHz bandwidth. As such, this balanced-mass double-ended tuning fork can be used to create a variety of different sensors including strain gauges, accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure transducers. Given the adaptable fabrication process flow, this device could be useful to micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) designers creating sensors for a variety of different applications.

  8. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Head Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  10. Water-quality trends and constituent-transport analysis for selected sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, water years 1996–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2016-07-20

    During the extended history of mining in the upper Clark Fork Basin in Montana, large amounts of waste materials enriched with metallic contaminants (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc) and the metalloid trace element arsenic were generated from mining operations near Butte and milling and smelting operations near Anaconda. Extensive deposition of mining wastes in the Silver Bow Creek and Clark Fork channels and flood plains had substantial effects on water quality. Federal Superfund remediation activities in the upper Clark Fork Basin began in 1983 and have included substantial remediation near Butte and removal of the former Milltown Dam near Missoula. To aid in evaluating the effects of remediation activities on water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting streamflow and water-quality data in the upper Clark Fork Basin in the 1980s.Trend analysis was done on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, copper, and zinc), and suspended sediment for seven sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site for water years 1996–2015. The most upstream site included in trend analysis is Silver Bow Creek at Warm Springs, Montana (sampling site 8), and the most downstream site is Clark Fork above Missoula, Montana (sampling site 22), which is just downstream from the former Milltown Dam. Water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends. Trend analysis was done by using a joint time-series model for concentration and streamflow. To provide temporal resolution of changes in water quality, trend analysis was conducted for four sequential 5-year periods: period 1 (water years 1996–2000), period 2 (water years 2001–5), period 3 (water years 2006–10), and period 4 (water years 2011–15). Because of the substantial effect of the intentional breach of Milltown Dam on March 28, 2008, period 3 was subdivided into period 3A (October 1, 2005–March 27, 2008

  11. In-Field Performance Testing of the Fork Detector for Quantitative Spent Fuel Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); De Baere, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Vaccaro, S. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Schwalbach, P. [European Commission (Luxembourg). DG Energy, Directorate Nuclear Safeguards; Liljenfeldt, Henrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (Sweden); Tobin, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Expanding spent fuel dry storage activities worldwide are increasing demands on safeguards authorities that perform inspections. The European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) require measurements to verify declarations when spent fuel is transferred to difficult-to-access locations, such as dry storage casks and the repositories planned in Finland and Sweden. EURATOM makes routine use of the Fork detector to obtain gross gamma and total neutron measurements during spent fuel inspections. Data analysis is performed by modules in the integrated Review and Analysis Program (iRAP) software, developed jointly by EURATOM and the IAEA. Under the framework of the US Department of Energy–EURATOM cooperation agreement, a module for automated Fork detector data analysis has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the ORIGEN code from the SCALE code system and implemented in iRAP. EURATOM and ORNL recently performed measurements on 30 spent fuel assemblies at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The measured assemblies represent a broad range of fuel characteristics. Neutron count rates for 15 measured pressurized water reactor assemblies are predicted with an average relative standard deviation of 4.6%, and gamma signals are predicted on average within 2.6% of the measurement. The 15 measured boiling water reactor assemblies exhibit slightly larger deviations of 5.2% for the gamma signals and 5.7% for the neutron count rates, compared to measurements. These findings suggest that with improved analysis of the measurement data, existing instruments can provide increased verification of operator declarations of the spent fuel and thereby also provide greater ability to confirm integrity of an assembly. These results support the application of the Fork detector as a fully quantitative spent fuel

  12. Photo-thermal quartz tuning fork excitation for dynamic mode atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Teyssieux, Damien; Thiery, Laurent; Hermelin, Damien; Vairac, Pascal [FEMTO-ST Institute UMR 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon (France); Friedt, Jean-Michel [SENSeOR SAS, Besançon (France)

    2014-10-13

    A photo-thermal excitation of a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) for topographic studies is introduced. The non-invasive photo-thermal excitation presents practical advantages compared to QTF mechanical and electrical excitations, including the absence of the anti-resonance and its associated phase rotation. Comparison between our theoretical model and experiments validate that the optical transduction mechanism is a photo-thermal rather than photo-thermoacoustic phenomenon. Topographic maps in the context of near-field microscopy distance control have been achieved to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  13. Performance Characteristics and Temperature Compensation Method of Fluid Property Sensor Based on Tuning-Fork Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid property sensor (FPS based on tuning-fork technology is applied to the measurement of the contaminant level of lubricant oil. The measuring principle of FPS sensor is derived and proved together with its resolution. The performance characteristics of the FPS sensor, such as sensitivity coefficient, resolution, and quality factor, are analyzed. A temperature compensation method is proposed to eliminate the temperature-dependence of the measuring parameters, and its validity is investigated by numerical simulation of sensitivity, oscillating frequency, and dielectric constant. The values of purification efficiency obtained using microwave and without microwave are compared experimentally.

  14. South Fork Zumbro River Stage 1B, Rochester, Minnesota. Design Memorandum Number 2, Flood Control Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Softb AMuchy, lack G M S, Very Dense, Block /00 Bo. 970 =_ Loose, Black-Gray 001, Very Dense, Tan -Gray 20 Very SofC Block TeO of Bedrock 2 , •MI P/a...Env cae,•,+,"’ epd ~-TaP ay. Dwq. 86 -1034e /0 May 49S6 :WS 9743 1 Water I To- of Bedrok -970 3 A/oaes: J .960 I/ ..Fork Zunbro River eev. 974.3: 2. ft

  15. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  16. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spajer, M., E-mail: michel.spajer@univ-fcomte.fr; Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D. [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon cedex (France); Jalocha, A. [CILAS, Département de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orléans (France)

    2013-11-11

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  17. Monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins at replication forks and in assembled chromatin using isolation of proteins on nascent DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbu, Bianca M; Couch, Frank B; Cortez, David

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the processes of DNA replication, chromatin assembly and maturation, and the replication stress response requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks. Detecting protein accumulation at replication forks or damaged sites has primarily relied on immunofluorescence imaging, which is limited in resolution and antibody sensitivity. Here we describe a procedure to isolate proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) that permits a high-resolution spatiotemporal analysis of proteins at replication forks or on chromatin following DNA replication in cultured cells. iPOND relies on labeling of nascent DNA with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Biotin conjugation to EdU-labeled DNA using click chemistry facilitates a single-step streptavidin purification of proteins bound to the nascent DNA. iPOND permits an interrogation of any cellular process linked to DNA synthesis using a 3- to 4-d protocol.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  20. Ulnar head replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  1. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  2. Rad53-Mediated Regulation of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA Helicases Contributes to Prevention of Aberrant Fork Transitions under Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Emma Rossi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress activates the Mec1ATR and Rad53 kinases. Rad53 phosphorylates nuclear pores to counteract gene gating, thus preventing aberrant transitions at forks approaching transcribed genes. Here, we show that Rrm3 and Pif1, DNA helicases assisting fork progression across pausing sites, are detrimental in rad53 mutants experiencing replication stress. Rrm3 and Pif1 ablations rescue cell lethality, chromosome fragmentation, replisome-fork dissociation, fork reversal, and processing in rad53 cells. Through phosphorylation, Rad53 regulates Rrm3 and Pif1; phospho-mimicking rrm3 mutants ameliorate rad53 phenotypes following replication stress without affecting replication across pausing elements under normal conditions. Hence, the Mec1-Rad53 axis protects fork stability by regulating nuclear pores and DNA helicases. We propose that following replication stress, forks stall in an asymmetric conformation by inhibiting Rrm3 and Pif1, thus impeding lagging strand extension and preventing fork reversal; conversely, under unperturbed conditions, the peculiar conformation of forks encountering pausing sites would depend on active Rrm3 and Pif1.

  3. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  4. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  5. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  6. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  7. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  8. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  9. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  10. Stream-Sediment Geochemistry in Mining-Impacted Drainages of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River, Custer County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Thomas P.; Box, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    This reconnaissance study was undertaken at the request of the USDA Forest Service, Region 4, to assess the geochemistry, in particular the mercury and selenium contents, of mining-impacted sediments in the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River in Custer County Idaho. The Yankee Fork has been the site of hard-rock and placer mining, primarily for gold and silver, starting in the 1880s. Major dredge placer mining from the 1930s to 1950s in the Yankee Fork disturbed about a 10-kilometer reach. Mercury was commonly used in early hard-rock mining and placer operations for amalgamation and recovery of gold. During the late 1970s, feasibility studies were done on cyanide-heap leach recovery of gold from low-grade ores of the Sunbeam and related deposits. In the mid-1990s a major open-pit bulk-vat leach operation was started at the Grouse Creek Mine. This operation shut down when gold values proved to be lower than expected. Mercury in stream sediments in the Yankee Fork ranges from below 0.02 ppm to 7 ppm, with the highest values associated with old mill locations and lode and placer mines. Selenium ranges from below the detection limit for this study of 0.2 ppm to 4 ppm in Yankee Fork sediment samples. The generally elevated selenium content in the sediment samples reflect the generally high selenium contents in the volcanic rocks that underlie the Yankee Fork and the presence of gold and silver selenides in some of the veins that were exploited in the early phases of mining.

  11. Photolithography and Selective Etching of an Array of Quartz Tuning Fork Resonators with Improved Impact Resistance Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungkyu

    2001-08-01

    Quartz tuning fork blanks with improved impact-resistant characteristics for use in Qualcomm mobile station modem (MSM)-3000 central processing unit (CPU) chips for code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) systems were designed using finite element method (FEM) analysis and suitable processing conditions were determined for the reproducible precision etching of a Z-cut quartz wafer into an array of tuning forks. Negative photoresist photolithography for the additive process was used in preference to positive photoresist photolithography for the subtractive process to etch the array of quartz tuning forks. The tuning fork pattern was transferred via a conventional photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. A tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 Å chromium/gold mask was coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the back surface of the wafer. With the protective metallization area of the tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through the quartz wafer was performed at 80°C in a ± 1.5°C controlled bath containing a concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove the unwanted areas of the quartz wafer. The quality of the quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching depended primarily on the surface finish of the quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used. Selective etching of a 100 μm quartz wafer could be achieved within 90 min at 80°C. A selective etching procedure with reproducible precision has thus been established and enables the photolithographic mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators.

  12. Maneuvering impact boring head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  13. The Model Analysis of a Complex Tuning Fork Probe and Its Application in Bimodal Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new electromechanical coupling model was built to quantitatively analyze the tuning fork probes, especially the complex ones. A special feature of a novel, soft tuning fork probe, that the second eigenfrequency of the probe was insensitive to the effective force gradient, was found and used in a homemade bimodal atomic force microscopy to measure power dissipation quantitatively. By transforming the mechanical parameters to the electrical parameters, a monotonous and concise method without using phase to calculate the power dissipation was proposed.

  14. Shear Force Detection Using Single-Tine Oscillating Tuning Fork for Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓靖; 孙家林; 刘晟; 郭继华; 孙红三

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to detect near-field by using a single-tine oscillating tuning fork with mechanically asymmetric excitation that exhibits the sensitivity and stability better than that by using a double-tine oscillating one. Comparison of shear forces for the two methods demonstrate that the single-tine oscillating tuning fork provides a simpler and more sensitive method for near-field measurements. A theoretical analysis is presented for explanation to the greater sensitivity. The method is demonstrated by imaging a sparse-packed layer of micro-spheres in size of 200 nm.

  15. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  17. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work together. Head and neck surgeons also perform craniofacial reconstruction operations. The surgery is done while you are deep asleep and pain-free (under general anesthesia ). The surgery may take ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in ... X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head ...

  4. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... hold your breath for short periods. A complete scan usually take only 30 seconds to a few ...

  5. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  7. Quartz Tuning Fork Pressure Gauge for High-Pressure Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botimer, J.; Velasco, A.; Taborek, P.

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the quality factor Q and the frequency f of a 32-kHz quartz tuning fork immersed in liquid ^4He between 0.9 and 3.0 K, over pressures ranging from the saturated vapor pressure to ≈ 25 atm. At constant pressure, as a function of temperature, the quality factor and frequency have strong features related to the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction. At constant temperature, Q depends on the superfluid fraction, while the frequency is a smooth function of pressure. The behavior is explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. The liquid helium viscosity is obtained from measured values of Q, and together with tabulated values of the helium density as a function of pressure and temperature, the frequency shift can be parameterized as a function of temperature and pressure. The observed sensitivity is ≈ 7.8 Hz/atm. The quartz tuning fork provides a compact low power method of measuring the pressure in the bulk liquid.

  8. A paleomagnetic study of the Prince William terrane and Nixon Fork terrane, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, P. W.

    1984-12-01

    The mean paleomagnetic inclination of Paleocene volcanics from two regions on Kodiak Island in the Ghost Rocks Formation suggests that the Prince William terrance originated at mid latitudes, about 25 deg south of its expected Alaskan latitude in Paleocene time. The mean declinations of the two regions, however, differ by approximately 120 deg, suggesting they have rotated with respect to each other, perhaps during emplacement. It is suggested that, despite the lack of evidence for a major Tertiary suture zone between the Prince William terrane and central Alaska, the Prince William and perhaps adjacent terranes may have lain substantially south of their present position in the early Tertiary. Paleomagnetic data from early Ordovician to early Tertiary rocks of the Nixon Fork terrane, central Alaska, provide evidence toward a better understanding of the tectonic evolution of the continental margin of northwestern America. The Nixon fork terrane, a Paleozoic continental margin assemblage, is bordered on the south by proven allochthonous terranes and to the North by provinces with oceanic affinities far younger in age. Paleomagnetic analysis of the Ordovician limestone sections (Lower Ordovician Novi Mountain and Middle to Upper Ordovican Telsitna Formation) are interpreted as having three components of magnetization.

  9. Lentiform fork sign: a magnetic resonance finding in a case of acute metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Daniela; Borreggine, Carmela; Perfetto, Francesco; Bertozzi, Vincenzo; Trivisano, Marina; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Grilli, Gianpaolo; Macarini, Luca

    2014-06-01

    We report a 33 year-old woman addicted to chronic unspecified solvents abuse with stupor, respiratory disorders, tetraplegia and severe metabolic acidosis. On admission an unenhanced cranial CT scan showed symmetrical hypodensities of both lentiform nuclei. MR imaging performed 12 hours after stupor demonstrates bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis, bilateral external capsule, corona radiata and deep cerebellar hyperintensities with right cingulate cortex involvement. DWI reflected bilateral putaminal hyperintensities with restricted water diffusion as to citotoxic edema and development of vasogenic edema in the external capsule recalling a fork. On day twenty, after specific treatments MRI demonstrated a bilateral putaminal marginal enhancement. Bilateral putaminal necrosis is a characteristic but non-specific radiological finding of methanol poisoning. Lentiform Fork sign is a rare MRI finding reported in literature in 22 patients with various conditions characterized by metabolic acidosis. Vasogenic edema may be due to the differences in metabolic vulnerability between neurons and astrocytes. We postulate that metabolic acidosis could have an important role to generate this sign.

  10. The forked tongue and edge detection in snakes (Crotalus oreganus): an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M Rockwell; Young, Bruce A; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2008-02-01

    Many stimulus-detection systems are lateralized to allow for simultaneous comparison of paired stimuli. It has been hypothesized that the deeply forked tongue of snakes and some derived lizards functions as a chemical edge detector where cues gathered by each tine are kept separate to provide two points of lateral odor assessment by the central nervous system via vomeronasal input. While following a chemical trail, one time can be on the trail, the other off, and such differential information prompts the snake to turn back to the trail. The authors tested this hypothesis in rattlesnakes within a predatory context by unilaterally severing the vomeronasal nerves. If edge detection is used by snakes during prey trailing, then unilateral denervation should disrupt trailing ability. The authors found no change in the seven separate trailing parameters measured. Therefore, they found no support for the edge detection hypothesis as it applies to prey trailing behavior. Instead, the deeply forked tongue may represent a chemosensory specialization to increase odor-sampling area, with snakes and derived lizards detecting only the concentration of chemical trails. (c) 2008 APA.

  11. ETAA1 acts at stalled replication forks to maintain genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Thomas E; Luzwick, Jessica W; Kavanaugh, Gina; Carroll, Clinton; Dungrawala, Huzefa; Glick, Gloria G; Feldkamp, Michael D; Putney, Reid; Chazin, Walter J; Cortez, David

    2016-11-01

    The ATR checkpoint kinase coordinates cellular responses to DNA replication stress. Budding yeast contain three activators of Mec1 (the ATR orthologue); however, only TOPBP1 is known to activate ATR in vertebrates. We identified ETAA1 as a replication stress response protein in two proteomic screens. ETAA1-deficient cells accumulate double-strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges, and other hallmarks of genome instability. They are also hypersensitive to replication stress and have increased frequencies of replication fork collapse. ETAA1 contains two RPA-interaction motifs that localize ETAA1 to stalled replication forks. It also interacts with several DNA damage response proteins including the BLM/TOP3α/RMI1/RMI2 and ATR/ATRIP complexes. It binds ATR/ATRIP directly using a motif with sequence similarity to the TOPBP1 ATR-activation domain; and like TOPBP1, ETAA1 acts as a direct ATR activator. ETAA1 functions in parallel to the TOPBP1/RAD9/HUS1/RAD1 pathway to regulate ATR and maintain genome stability. Thus, vertebrate cells contain at least two ATR-activating proteins.

  12. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko, E-mail: arai@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  13. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. The ammonoids from the Three Forks Shale (Late Devonian of Montana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Korn

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The ammonoid fauna from the Late Devonian Three Forks Shale of Montana is revised. Six taxa were recognised, which belong to the genera Tornoceras, Pernoceras, Raymondiceras, Platyclymenia, Pleuroclymenia, and Carinoclymenia. The ammonoid assemblage suggests a stratigraphic position within the middle Famennian, most probably the Platyclymenia annulata Zone. The ammonoids display extreme septal crowding in intermediate as well as adult growth stages, which can be regarded as evidence for instable palaeoecological conditions during lifetime of the animals. Die Ammonoideenfauna aus dem oberdevonischen Three Forks Shale von Montana wird revidiert. Sechs Taxa werden unterschieden; sie gehören zu den Gattungen Tornoceras, Pernoceras, Raymondiceras, Platyclymenia, Pleuroclymenia und Carinoclymenia. Die Ammonoideen-Vergesellschaftung spricht für eine stratigraphische Position im mittleren Famennium, wahrscheinlich in der Platyclymenia annulata Zone. Die Ammonoideen zeigen auffällige Drängung der Septen in intermediären und adulten Wachstumsstadien, die als Hinweis auf instabile Lebensbedingungen für die Tiere gewertet werden kann. doi:10.1002/mmng.200600008

  15. Head and neck teratomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ajaz; Latoo, Suhail; Ahmed, Irshad; Malik, Altaf H

    2009-01-01

    Teratomas are complex lesions composed of diverse tissues from all 3 germinal cell layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. Head and neck teratomas are most commonly cervical with the oropharynx (epignathus) being the second commonest location. In this article, clinical presentation, behaviour and associated significance of head and neck teratomas have been highlightened. Because of their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic cli...

  16. Conflict Resolution in the Genome: How Transcription and Replication Make It Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-12-01

    The complex machineries involved in replication and transcription translocate along the same DNA template, often in opposing directions and at different rates. These processes routinely interfere with each other in prokaryotes, and mounting evidence now suggests that RNA polymerase complexes also encounter replication forks in higher eukaryotes. Indeed, cells rely on numerous mechanisms to avoid, tolerate, and resolve such transcription-replication conflicts, and the absence of these mechanisms can lead to catastrophic effects on genome stability and cell viability. In this article, we review the cellular responses to transcription-replication conflicts and highlight how these inevitable encounters shape the genome and impact diverse cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genes affecting heading date in cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several genes cause well known effects on heading date in cool-season forages: Vrn1, Constans, and FloweringTime. Vrn1 is a MADs box transcription factor that is induced upon vernalization and necessary for flowering. Constans genes are induced upon long days in cool-season grasses and induce exp...

  18. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  20. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  2. Economics of head injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manmohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Head injuries account for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions and bed occupancy. Patients with head injuries also consume significant proportions of neurosurgical resources. A prospective 6-month study has been carried out to evaluate the expenditure incurred on head injury patients in a modern neurosurgical center equipped with state of the art infrastructure. Costing areas included wages / salaries of health care personnel, cost of medicines / surgical items / crystalloids, general store items, stationary, all investigation charges, equipment cost, overhead building cost, maintenance cost, electricity and water charges and cost of medical gases, air conditioning and operation theatre expenses. Expenditure in each area was calculated and apportioned to each bed. The statistical analysis was done using X2 test. The cost of stay in ward was found to be Rs. 1062 / bed / day and in neurosurgical ICU Rs. 3082 / bed / day. The operation theatre cost for each surgery was Rs. 11948. The cost of hospital stay per day for minor, moderate and severe head injury group was found to be Rs. 1921, Rs. 2569 and Rs. 2713 respectively. The patients who developed complications, the cost of stay per day in the hospital were Rs. 2867. In the operative group, the cost of hospital stay per day was Rs. 3804. The total expenditure in minor head injury was Rs. 7800 per patient, in moderate head injury was Rs. 22172 per patient, whereas in severe head injury, it was found to be Rs. 32852 per patient. Patients who underwent surgery, the total cost incurred was Rs. 33100 per operated patient.

  3. Fork2Farmer: Enabling Success of Small Farms through Partnerships with Well-Known Chefs and the Tourism Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Duarte; Jakes, Susan; Bowen, Becky; Lelekacs, Joanna Massey

    2017-01-01

    A team of economic development, local foods, and tourism specialists from North Carolina Cooperative Extension is pursuing an initiative titled Fork2Farmer. The goal is to increase visits to local farms and diversify farm income by leveraging the high visibility of well-known farm-to-table chefs who support local small farms. To do this, those…

  4. 77 FR 26733 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest; Evanston-Mountain View Ranger District; Utah; Smiths Fork...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... appeal process found at 36 CFR part 215. Rather, it is subject to the predecisional administrative review... environmental impact statement is expected November 2012. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to: Smiths Fork... hand delivered Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the following physical address: 1565...

  5. Environmental Assessment - Construct a Ground-to-Air Transmitter and Receiver (GATR) Facility at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-06

    for wildlife in Grand Forks County. Pastures, meadows, and other non- cultivated areas create a prairie-land mosaic of grasses, legumes, and wild... alfalfa . Herbaceous plants include little bluestem, goldenrod, green needle grass, western wheat grass, and bluegrama. Shrubs such as Juneberry...consists primarily of cultivated crops with remaining land used for pasture and hay, urban development, recreation, and wildlife habitat. Principal

  6. Reliability and responsiveness of a graduated tuning fork in immune mediated polyneuropathies. The Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar); P.I.M. Schmitz (Paul); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the Rydel-Seiffer (RS) graduated tuning fork was evaluated in 113 patients with a clinically stable immune mediated polyneuropathy (83 patients who had had Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in the past, 22 with

  7. Water-quality trends and constituent-transport analysis for selected sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, water years 1996–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    2016-07-20

    During the extended history of mining in the upper Clark Fork Basin in Montana, large amounts of waste materials enriched with metallic contaminants (cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc) and the metalloid trace element arsenic were generated from mining operations near Butte and milling and smelting operations near Anaconda. Extensive deposition of mining wastes in the Silver Bow Creek and Clark Fork channels and flood plains had substantial effects on water quality. Federal Superfund remediation activities in the upper Clark Fork Basin began in 1983 and have included substantial remediation near Butte and removal of the former Milltown Dam near Missoula. To aid in evaluating the effects of remediation activities on water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting streamflow and water-quality data in the upper Clark Fork Basin in the 1980s.Trend analysis was done on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, copper, and zinc), and suspended sediment for seven sampling sites in the Milltown Reservoir/Clark Fork River Superfund Site for water years 1996–2015. The most upstream site included in trend analysis is Silver Bow Creek at Warm Springs, Montana (sampling site 8), and the most downstream site is Clark Fork above Missoula, Montana (sampling site 22), which is just downstream from the former Milltown Dam. Water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends. Trend analysis was done by using a joint time-series model for concentration and streamflow. To provide temporal resolution of changes in water quality, trend analysis was conducted for four sequential 5-year periods: period 1 (water years 1996–2000), period 2 (water years 2001–5), period 3 (water years 2006–10), and period 4 (water years 2011–15). Because of the substantial effect of the intentional breach of Milltown Dam on March 28, 2008, period 3 was subdivided into period 3A (October 1, 2005–March 27, 2008

  8. Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the Black Fork Mohican River Basin in and near Shelby, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huitger, Carrie A.; Ostheimer, Chad J.; Koltun, G.F.

    2016-05-06

    Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses were done for selected reaches of five streams in and near Shelby, Richland County, Ohio. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District, conducted these analyses on the Black Fork Mohican River and four tributaries: Seltzer Park Creek, Seltzer Park Tributary, Tuby Run, and West Branch. Drainage areas of the four stream reaches studied range from 0.51 to 60.3 square miles. The analyses included estimation of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual-exceedance probability (AEP) flood-peak discharges using the USGS Ohio StreamStats application. Peak discharge estimates, along with cross-sectional and hydraulic structure geometries, and estimates of channel roughness coefficients were used as input to step-backwater models. The step-backwater water models were used to determine water-surface elevation profiles of four flood-peak discharges and a regulatory floodway. This study involved the installation of, and data collection at, a streamflow-gaging station (Black Fork Mohican River at Shelby, Ohio, 03129197), precipitation gage (Rain gage at Reservoir Number Two at Shelby, Ohio, 405209082393200), and seven submersible pressure transducers on six selected river reaches. Two precipitation-runoff models, one for the winter events and one for nonwinter events for the headwaters of the Black Fork Mohican River, were developed and calibrated using the data collected. With the exception of the runoff curve numbers, all other parameters used in the two precipitation-runoff models were identical. The Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficients were 0.737, 0.899, and 0.544 for the nonwinter events and 0.850 and 0.671 for the winter events. Both of the precipitation-runoff models underestimated the total volume of water, with residual runoff ranging from -0.27 inches to -1.53 inches. The results of this study can be used to assess possible mitigation options and define flood hazard areas that

  9. Transcription in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  10. Pediatric head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  11. Hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow and availability in the North Fork Red River aquifer, southwest Oklahoma, 1980–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Ellis, John H.; Wagner, Derrick L.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2017-09-28

    On September 8, 1981, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board established regulatory limits on the maximum annual yield of groundwater (343,042 acre-feet per year) and equal-proportionate-share (EPS) pumping rate (1.0 acre-foot per acre per year) for the North Fork Red River aquifer. The maximum annual yield and EPS were based on a hydrologic investigation that used a numerical groundwater-flow model to evaluate the effects of potential groundwater withdrawals on groundwater availability in the North Fork Red River aquifer. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is statutorily required (every 20 years) to update the hydrologic investigation on which the maximum annual yield and EPS were based. Because 20 years have elapsed since the final order was issued, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, conducted an updated hydrologic investigation and evaluated the effects of potential groundwater withdrawals on groundwater flow and availability in the North Fork Red River aquifer in Oklahoma. This report describes a hydrologic investigation of the North Fork Red River aquifer that includes an updated summary of the aquifer hydrogeology. As part of this investigation, groundwater flow and availability were simulated by using a numerical groundwater-flow model.The North Fork Red River aquifer in Beckham, Greer, Jackson, Kiowa, and Roger Mills Counties in Oklahoma is composed of about 777 square miles (497,582 acres) of alluvium and terrace deposits along the North Fork Red River and tributaries, including Sweetwater Creek, Elk Creek, Otter Creek, and Elm Fork Red River. The North Fork Red River is the primary source of surface-water inflow to Lake Altus, which overlies the North Fork Red River aquifer. Lake Altus is a U.S. Bureau of Reclamation reservoir with the primary purpose of supplying irrigation water to the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District.A hydrogeologic framework was developed for the North Fork Red River aquifer and included a

  12. Head First Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  13. Head first Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Rebecca M

    2008-01-01

    Ajax is no longer an experimental approach to website development, but the key to building browser-based applications that form the cornerstone of Web 2.0. Head First Ajax gives you an up-to-date perspective that lets you see exactly what you can do -- and has been done -- with Ajax. With it, you get a highly practical, in-depth, and mature view of what is now a mature development approach. Using the unique and highly effective visual format that has turned Head First titles into runaway bestsellers, this book offers a big picture overview to introduce Ajax, and then explores the use of ind

  14. Rocket injector head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A high number of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen orifices per unit area are provided in an injector head designed to give intimate mixing and more thorough combustion. The injector head comprises a main body portion, a cooperating plate member as a flow chamber for one propellant, a cooperating manifold portion for the second propellant, and an annular end plate for enclosing an annular propellant groove formed around the outer edge of the body. All the openings for one propellant are located at the same angle with respect to a radial plane to permit a short combustion chamber.

  15. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2013 through September 2014) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.

    2015-12-24

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork Basin of western Montana. The sampling program was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork Basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2013 through September 2014. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 14 sites during August 2014.

  16. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2012 through September 2013) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork Basin of western Montana. The sampling program was led by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork Basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2012 through September 2013. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2013.

  17. Design and simulation of a tuning fork micromachined gyroscope with slide film damping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE Lu-feng; XIONG Bin; JIAO Ji-wei; WANG Yue-lin

    2005-01-01

    A novel tuning fork micromachined gyroscope, based on slide-film damping, is presented. The electrostatic driving gyroscope consists of two driving masses each of which supports one sensitive mass. The angular rate is sensed by the differential capacitances consisted of movable bar electrodes and fixed bar electrodes located on the glass wafer. The gyroscope can operate at atmospheric pressure with slide film damping in the driving and sensing directions, eliminate vacuum packaging and restrain cross-axis acceleration signal. The results of design and simulation show that the driving and sensing mode frequencies are 3 106 Hz and 3 175 Hz,respectively, and the Q-values in driving and sensitive modes are 1 721 and 1 450 respectively. The design resolution is 0.025°/s.

  18. Optimizing Data Locality for Fork/Join Programs Using Constrained Work Stealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2014-11-16

    We present an approach to improving data locality across different phases of fork/join programs scheduled using work stealing. The approach consists of: (1) user-specified and automated approaches to constructing a steal tree, the schedule of steal operations and (2) constrained work stealing algorithms that constrain the actions of the scheduler to mirror a given steal tree. These are combined to construct work stealing schedules that maximize data locality across computation phases while ensuring load balance within each phase. These algorithms are also used to demonstrate dynamic coarsening, an optimization to improve spatial locality and sequential overheads by combining many finer-grained tasks into coarser tasks while ensuring sufficient concurrency for locality-optimized load balance. Implementation and evaluation in Cilk demonstrate performance improvements of up to 2.5x on 80 cores. We also demonstrate that dynamic coarsening can combine the performance benefits of coarse task specification with the adaptability of finer tasks.

  19. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment

  20. Quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy based trace gas sensors using different quartz tuning forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Yu, Guang; Zhang, Jingbo; Yu, Xin; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-03-27

    A sensitive trace gas sensor platform based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is reported. A 1.395 μm continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback pigtailed diode laser was used as the excitation source and H2O was selected as the target analyte. Two kinds of quartz tuning forks (QTFs) with a resonant frequency (f0) of 30.72 kHz and 38 kHz were employed for the first time as an acoustic wave transducer, respectively for QEPAS instead of a standard QTF with a f0 of 32.768 kHz. The QEPAS sensor performance using the three different QTFs was experimentally investigated and theoretically analyzed. A minimum detection limit of 5.9 ppmv and 4.3 ppmv was achieved for f0 of 32.768 kHz and 30.72 kHz, respectively.

  1. Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - FY 2015 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Brooks, Scott C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Mathews, Teresa J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Mayes, Melanie [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Watson, David B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Poteat, Monica D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Mehlhorn, Tonia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Lester, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Morris, Jesse [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Lowe, Kenneth [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Dickson, Johnbull O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eller, Virginia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DeRolph, Christopher R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2016-04-01

    Mercury remediation is a high priority for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) because of large historical losses of mercury within buildings and to soils and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Because of the extent of mercury losses and the complexities of mercury transport and fate in the downstream environment, the success of conventional options for mercury remediation in lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) is uncertain. A phased, adaptive management approach to remediation of surface water includes mercury treatment actions at Y-12 in the short-term and research and technology development (TD) to evaluate longer-term solutions in the downstream environment (US Department of Energy 2014b).

  2. Chronology of Deformation Near the Iditarod-Nixon Fork Fault, West-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perttu, B. K.; Wallace, W. K.; Newberry, R. J.; Layer, P. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Nixon Fork Mine is a Cu-Au deposit located 7 km south of the Iditarod-Nixon Fork (I-NF) fault. This fault strikes at ~060°, and can be traced for ~400 km, with a minimum dextral displacement of ~90 km. Proximity to the I-NF fault suggests it would be a dominant influence on deformation of the deposit, but the extent and timing of disruption are unknown. In order to reconstruct strain history and eventually understand structural evolution, we analyzed the orientations of geologic structures and dated representative K-bearing minerals and rocks. Felsic dikes, with 40Ar/39Ar ages of 69.6 ± 0.5 Ma and arc-type signatures, are cut by faults apparently related to the I-NF fault, but do not obviously cut such faults. Since no dikes are seen to cut faults, we know of no local fault motion prior to their intrusion. The northeast strike of the felsic dikes (n = 102; mean = 034° ± 10° ) requires σ3 oriented ~124°, at odds with the ~0° orientation inferred from the strike of the I-NF fault (~60°). The Nixon Fork pluton has approximately the same age and an overall elongation compatible with the felsic dikes. Mafic dikes, with 40Ar/39Ar ages of 62.8 ± 0.6 Ma, have within-plate signatures (average TiO2 = 2.48 wt%, Zr = 172 ppm, Nb = 58 ppm, Y = 25 ppm) and require a change in overall tectonic regime. Additionally, their north strike (n = 44; mean = 013° ± 10°) requires σ3 oriented ~103°, which is not compatible with σ3 (~0°) inferred from the right-lateral I-NF fault, and requires a different extension direction from the felsic dikes. We observed mafic dikes cut by faults with orientations compatible with right-lateral motion on the I-NF fault, and we propose that right-lateral motion on the I-NF fault began after mafic dike emplacement. Outcrop-scale fold axes trend north (n = 136; mean = 355° ± 10°). They are preferentially aligned perpendicular to the σ1 inferred for right-lateral motion on the I-NF fault and so are plausibly related to the I-NF fault

  3. Study on digital correlation demodulation technology of micro quartz tuning fork gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixiong; Feng, Lihui; Sun, Yu-Nan

    2010-11-01

    A signal demodulation scheme for micro quartz tuning fork gyroscope based on digital correlation demodulation technology is proposed. In the operation of quartz gyroscope the reference signal should be in the resonance state with steady amplitude and the reference signal should be in-phase and has the same frequency with the driving signal. The quartz gyroscope signal processing platform is designed on the foundation of DEC6713 DSP development board successfully. The adaptive algorithm including the reference signal frequency tacking, the amplitude automatic gain controlling, the reference signal phase locking, and complex correlation demodulation are devised, and the algorithm is programmed. It is proved that the digital signal process scheme is feasible by means of experimentation.

  4. Streaming flow due to a quartz tuning fork oscillating in normal and superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, D.; La Mantia, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2017-07-01

    We visualize the streaming flow due to a rapidly oscillating quartz tuning fork, in both normal He I and superfluid He II, by following the flow-induced motions of relatively small particles suspended in the liquid. Over the investigated temperature range, between 1.2 and 2.3 K, at the experimentally probed length scales, the streaming patterns observed in He II appear identical to those seen in He I and are very similar to those reported to occur in water, outside the Stokes boundary layer. The outcome strongly supports the view that, at scales larger than the quantum length scale of the flow, the mean distance between quantized vortices, mechanically forced turbulent coflows of He II behave classically, due to the dynamical locking of the two components of superfluid 4He by the action of the mutual friction force.

  5. Water quality and streamflow data for the West Fork Trinity River in Forth Worth, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Water-quality data were collected on a 13.6-mile reach of the West Fork Trinity River in Fort Worth, Texas to test a dynamic Lagrangian model. Flow was steady. Loads of dissolved constituents varied with time at the beginning of the study reach and in the reach, primarily because of photosynthesis. River quality was fairly good despite low dissolved oxygen measured in the headwaters and the significant sewage load from the tributaries. Diel and longitudinal trends were defined by sampling at fixed sites and by following dyed parcels of water. Nitrification, deoxygenation, reaeration, and photosynthesis affected the dissolved oxygen balance. Independent estimates of some of the rate coefficients were 0.1 to 0.2, 0.8, and 0 to 3.6 , all per day, for deoxygenation, nitrification, and reaeration, respectively. (USGS)

  6. Flow regimes of the superfluid helium caused by oscillating quartz tuning fork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagovets, V; Gritsenko, I; Rudavskii, E; Sheshin, G; Zadorozhko, A; Verkin, B [Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering 47 Lenin Ave., Kharkov 61103 (Ukraine)], E-mail: sheshin@ilt.kharkov.ua

    2009-02-01

    The laminar-turbulent flow transition in HeII was studied with an oscillating quartz tuning fork. At temperatures from 200 mK to 3.0 K a current-voltage characteristic were recorded with varying driving voltage from 10{sup -5} to 10 V. A resonance frequency and a width of the resonance curve were also registered. It is found that at temperatures below {approx} 0.8 K the laminar-turbulent transition proceeds through an intermediate region clearly seen in the current - voltage characteristic curves. In this case the resonance curve changes in its shape - there appears a plateau near the maximum. An increase in the resonance curve width suggests the existence of excess dissipation related to the generation of quantized vortices in HeII in the vicinity of the oscillating surface. Estimation of the possible size of the vortices may suggest that these are generated on the oscillating surface roughness.

  7. Ultrafine anaphase bridges, broken DNA and illegitimate recombination induced by a replication fork barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofueva, Sevil; Osman, Fekret; Lorenz, Alexander; Steinacher, Roland; Castagnetti, Stefania; Ledesma, Jennifer; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Most DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S- and G2-phase cells are repaired accurately by Rad51-dependent sister chromatid recombination. However, a minority give rise to gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs), which can result in disease/death. What determines whether a DSB is repaired accurately or inaccurately is currently unclear. We provide evidence that suggests that perturbing replication by a non-programmed protein–DNA replication fork barrier results in the persistence of replication intermediates (most likely regions of unreplicated DNA) into mitosis, which results in anaphase bridge formation and ultimately to DNA breakage. However, unlike previously characterised replication-associated DSBs, these breaks are repaired mainly by Rad51-independent processes such as single-strand annealing, and are therefore prone to generate GCRs. These data highlight how a replication-associated DSB can be predisposed to give rise to genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. PMID:21576223

  8. Nanocharacterization of soft biological samples in shear mode with quartz tuning fork probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jorge; Gonzalez, Laura; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation.

  9. Nanocharacterization of Soft Biological Samples in Shear Mode with Quartz Tuning Fork Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Puig-Vidal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Quartz tuning forks are extremely good resonators and their use is growing in scanning probe microscopy. Nevertheless, only a few studies on soft biological samples have been reported using these probes. In this work, we present the methodology to develop and use these nanosensors to properly work with biological samples. The working principles, fabrication and experimental setup are presented. The results in the nanocharacterization of different samples in different ambients are presented by using different working modes: amplitude modulation with and without the use of a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL and frequency modulation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria are imaged in nitrogen using amplitude modulation. Microcontact printed antibodies are imaged in buffer using amplitude modulation with a PLL. Finally, metastatic cells are imaged in air using frequency modulation.

  10. Waste management plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Plant Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain. The waste management plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the LEFPC remedial action. Most of the solid wastes will be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y- 12 facilities. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, along with possible low-level or mixed wastes (> 35 pCi/g). Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary and capable of being disposed of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant, except sanitary sewage.

  11. Constraints to microbial food safety policy: opinions from stakeholder groups along the farm to fork continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, J M; Ramsingh, B; Wilkins, A; Travis, R G; Gavrus, D; Snelgrove, J W

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study was conducted to identify constraints to microbial food safety policy in Canada and the USA from the perspective of stakeholder groups along the farm to fork continuum. Thirty-seven stakeholders participated in interviews or a focus group where semi-structured questions were used to facilitate discussion about constraints to policy development and implementation. An emergent grounded theory approach was used to determine themes and concepts that arose from the data (versus fitting the data to a hypothesis or a priori classification). Despite the plurality of stakeholders and the range of content expertise, participant perceptions emerged into five common themes, although, there were often disagreements as to the positive or negative attributes of specific concepts. The five themes included challenges related to measurement and objectives of microbial food safety policy goals, challenges arising from lack of knowledge, or problems with communication of knowledge coupled with current practices, beliefs and traditions; the complexity of the food system and the plurality of stakeholders; the economics of producing safe food and the limited resources to address the problem; and, issues related to decision-making and policy, including ownership of the problem and inappropriate inputs to the decision-making process. Responsibilities for food safety and for food policy failure were attributed to all stakeholders along the farm to fork continuum. While challenges regarding the biology of food safety were identified as constraints, a broader range of policy inputs encompassing social, economic and political considerations were also highlighted as critical to the development and implementation of effective food safety policy. Strategies to address these other inputs may require new, transdisciplinary approaches as an adjunct to the traditional science-based risk assessment model.

  12. Characterization of ecological risks at the Milltown Reservoir-Clark Fork River Sediments Superfund Site, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Gary A.; Blanchet, Richard J.; Linder, Greg L.; Palawski, Don; Brumbaugh, William G.; Canfield, Tim J.; Kemble, Nile E.; Ingersoll, Chris G.; Farag, Aïda M.; DalSoglio, Julie A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive field and laboratory approach to the ecological risk assessment for the Milltown Reservoir-Clark Fork River Sediments Site, a Superfund site in the Rocky Mountains of Montana, has been described in the preceding reports of this series. The risk assessment addresses concerns over the ecological impacts of upstream releases of mining wastes to fisheries of the upper Clark Fork River (CFR) and the benthic and terrestrial habitats further downstream in Milltown Reservoir. The risk characterization component of the process integrated results from a triad of information sources: (a) chemistry studies of environmental media to identify and quantify exposures of terrestrial and aquatic organisms to site-related contaminants; (b) ecological or population studies of terrestrial vegetation, birds, benthic communities, and fish; and (c) in situ and laboratory toxicity studies with terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates and plants, small mammals, amphibians, and fish exposed to contaminated surface water, sediments, wetland soils, and food sources. Trophic transfer studies were performed on waterfowl, mammals, and predatory birds using field measurement data on metals concentrations in environmental media and lower trophic food sources. Studies with sediment exposures were incorporated into the Sediment Quality Triad approach to evaluate risks to benthic ecology. Overall results of the wetland and terrestrial studies suggested that acute adverse biological effects were largely absent from the wetland; however, adverse effects to reproductive, growth, and physiological end points of various terrestrial and aquatic species were related to metals exposures in more highly contaminated depositional areas. Feeding studies with contaminated diet collected from the upper CFR indicated that trout are at high risk from elevated metals concentrations in surface water, sediment, and aquatic invertebrates. Integration of chemical analyses with toxicological and ecological

  13. Orbital angular momentum generation and mode transformation with high efficiency using forked polarization gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanming; Kim, Jihwan; Escuti, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel optical element that efficiently generates orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light and transforms light between OAM modes based on a polarization grating with a fork-shaped singularity. This forked polarization grating (FPG) is composed of liquid crystalline materials, and can be made either static or switchable with high diffraction efficiency (i.e., 100% theoretically) into a single order. By spatially varying the Pancharatnam-Berry phase, FPGs shape the wavefront and thus control the OAM mode. We demonstrate theoretically and empirically that a charge l(g) FPG creates helical modes with OAM charge ±l(g) when a gaussian beam is input, and more generally, transforms the incident helical mode with OAM charge l(in) into output modes with OAM charge l(in)±l(g). We also show for the first time that this conversion into a single mode can be very efficient (i.e., ∼95% experimentally) at visible wavelengths, and the relative power between the two possible output modes is polarization-controllable from 0% to ∼100%. We developed a fabrication method that substantially improves FPG quality and efficiency over prior work. We also successfully fabricated switchable FPGs, which can be electrically switched between an OAM generating/transforming state and a transmissive state. Our experimental results showed >92% conversion efficiency for both configurations at 633 nm. These holographically fabricated elements are compact (i.e., thin glass plates), lightweight, and easily optimized for nearly any wavelength from ultraviolet to infrared, for a wide range of OAM charge, and for large or small clear apertures. They are ideal elements for enhanced control of OAM, e.g., in optical trapping and high-capacity information.

  14. Tectonic controls on large landslide complex: Williams Fork Mountains near Dillon, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    An extensive (~ 25 km2) landslide complex covers a large area on the west side of the Williams Fork Mountains in central Colorado. The complex is deeply weathered and incised, and in most places geomorphic evidence of sliding (breakaways, hummocky topography, transverse ridges, and lobate distal zones) are no longer visible, indicating that the main mass of the slide has long been inactive. However, localized Holocene reactivation of the landslide deposits is common above the timberline (at about 3300 m) and locally at lower elevations. Clasts within the complex, as long as several tens of meters, are entirely of crystalline basement (Proterozoic gneiss and granitic rocks) from the hanging wall of the Laramide (Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary), west-directed Williams Range thrust, which forms the western structural boundary of the Colorado Front Range. Late Cretaceous shale and sandstone compose most footwall rocks. The crystalline hanging-wall rocks are pervasively fractured or shattered, and alteration to clay minerals is locally well developed. Sackung structures (trenches or small-scale grabens and upslope-facing scarps) are common near the rounded crest of the range, suggesting gravitational spreading of the fractured rocks and oversteepening of the mountain flanks. Late Tertiary and Quaternary incision of the Blue River Valley, just west of the Williams Fork Mountains, contributed to the oversteepening. Major landslide movement is suspected during periods of deglaciation when abundant meltwater increased pore-water pressure in bedrock fractures. A fault-flexure model for the development of the widespread fracturing and weakening of the Proterozoic basement proposes that the surface of the Williams Range thrust contains a concave-downward flexure, the axis of which coincides approximately with the contact in the footwall between Proterozoic basement and mostly Cretaceous rocks. Movement of brittle, hanging-wall rocks through the flexure during Laramide

  15. Heading in soccer: dangerous play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiotta, Alejandro M; Bartsch, Adam J; Benzel, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Soccer is the world's most popular sport and unique in that players use their unprotected heads to intentionally deflect, stop, or redirect the ball for both offensive and defensive strategies. Headed balls travel at high velocity pre- and postimpact. Players, coaches, parents, and physicians are justifiably concerned with soccer heading injury risk. Furthermore, risk of long-term neurocognitive and motor deficits caused by repetitively heading a soccer ball remains unknown. We review the theoretical concerns, the results of biomechanical laboratory experiments, and the available clinical data regarding the effects of chronic, subconcussive head injury during heading in soccer.

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. guide the ... RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  17. Head space analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stekelenburg, G.J. van; Koorevaar, G.

    Additional analytical information is given about the method of head space analysis. From the data presented it can be concluded that this technique may be advantageous for enzyme kinetic studies in turbid solutions, provided a volatile organic substance is involved in the chemical reaction. Also

  18. Sculpting Ceramic Heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiro, Maurice

    1983-01-01

    Clay sculpture is difficult to produce because of the requirements of kiln firing. The problems can be overcome by modeling the original manikin head and making a plaster mold, pressing molding slabs of clay into the plaster mold to form the hollow clay armature, and sculpting on the armature. (IS)

  19. Lubricating the swordfish head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, John J.; Haydar, Deniz; Snoek, Roelant; Hoving, Henk-Jan T.; Szabo, Ben G.

    2016-01-01

    The swordfish is reputedly the fastest swimmer on Earth. The concave head and iconic sword are unique characteristics, but how they contribute to its speed is still unknown. Recent computed tomography scans revealed a poorly mineralised area near the base of the rostrum. Here we report, using magnet

  20. Prognosis in head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, J A; Rimel, R W

    1982-01-01

    The prognosis of head injury when viewed from the perspective of the Glasgow Coma Scale confirms the utility of this measure. In particular, decrease in mortality is associated with an increase in GCS. In addition, the motor score portion of the GCS was of predictive value when taken alone. The outcome of patients in coma (GCS less than 8) was closely related to three preventable or treatable factors, namely, hypoxia, shock, and increased intracranial pressure. These three factors, when considered in combination, powerfully predicted mortality. Of considerable interest was the finding that moderate head injury (GCS 9-12) was associated with a small but perhaps preventable mortality. The morbidity was intermediate between that of severe and minor and was surprisingly high. Minor head injury, while not associated with significant mortality, also resulted in considerable morbidity. Neuropsychological evaluation of the patients and an experimental study suggests that an organic component may be involved even in this group. To deal with head injury, distinctions must be made between grades of severity. The Glasgow Coma Scale is suited for this task. Nonetheless, the recognition of this basic continuity should elicit the further recognition that different health providers may be involved in the case of, say, severe, as opposed to mild, injury, and that different outcome measures are suitable for one group but not another.

  1. Mass loading of selected major and trace elements in Lake Fork Creek near Leadville, Colorado, September-October 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Day, Katherine; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Kimball, Briant A.; Runkel, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A mass-loading study of Lake Fork Creek of the Arkansas River between Sugarloaf Dam and the mouth was completed in September-October 2001 to help ascertain the following: (1) variation of pH and aqueous constituent concentrations (calcium, sulfate, alkalinity, aluminum, cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, and zinc) and their relation to toxicity standards along the study reach; (2) location and magnitude of sources of metal loading to Lake Fork Creek; (3) amount and locations of metal attenuation; (4) the effect of streamside wetlands on metal transport from contributing mine tunnels; and (5) the effect of organic-rich inflow from the Leadville National Fish Hatchery on water quality in Lake Fork Creek. The study was done in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Constituent concentrations and pH showed variable patterns over the study reach. Hardness-based acute and chronic toxicity standards were exceeded for some inflows and some constituents. However, stream concentrations did not exceed standards except for zinc starting in the upper parts of the study reach and extending to just downstream from the inflow from the Leadville National Fish Hatchery. Dilution from that inflow lowered stream zinc concentrations to less than acute and chronic toxicity standards. The uppermost 800 meters of the study reach that contained inflow from the Bartlett, Dinero, and Nelson mine tunnels and the Dinero wetland was the greatest source of loading for manganese and zinc. A middle section of the study reach that extended approximately 2 kilometers upstream from the National Fish Hatchery inflow to just downstream from that inflow was the largest source of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead loading. The loading was partially from the National Fish Hatchery inflow but also from unknown sources upstream from that inflow, possibly ground water. The largest sources for calcium and sulfate

  2. Water-quality trends for selected sampling sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin, Montana, water years 1996-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Lorenz, David L.; Barnhart, Elliott P.

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale trend analysis was done on specific conductance, selected trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, and zinc), and suspended-sediment data for 22 sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin for water years 1996–2010. Trend analysis was conducted by using two parametric methods: a time-series model (TSM) and multiple linear regression on time, streamflow, and season (MLR). Trend results for 1996–2010 indicate moderate to large decreases in flow-adjusted concentrations (FACs) and loads of copper (and other metallic elements) and suspended sediment in Silver Bow Creek upstream from Warm Springs. Deposition of metallic elements and suspended sediment within Warm Springs Ponds substantially reduces the downstream transport of those constituents. However, mobilization of copper and suspended sediment from floodplain tailings and stream banks in the Clark Fork reach from Galen to Deer Lodge is a large source of metallic elements and suspended sediment, which also affects downstream transport of those constituents. Copper and suspended-sediment loads mobilized from within this reach accounted for about 40 and 20 percent, respectively, of the loads for Clark Fork at Turah Bridge (site 20); whereas, streamflow contributed from within this reach only accounted for about 8 percent of the streamflow at Turah Bridge. Minor changes in FACs and loads of copper and suspended sediment are indicated for this reach during 1996–2010. Clark Fork reaches downstream from Deer Lodge are relatively smaller sources of metallic elements than the reach from Galen to Deer Lodge. In general, small decreases in loads and FACs of copper and suspended sediment are indicated for Clark Fork sites downstream from Deer Lodge during 1996–2010. Thus, although large decreases in FACs and loads of copper and suspended sediment are indicated for Silver Bow Creek upstream from Warm Springs, those large decreases are not translated to the more downstream reaches largely

  3. Head injuries, heading, and the use of headgear in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedfeldt, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    Soccer has more than 265 million players around the world and is the only contact sport with purposeful use of the head for controlling and advancing the ball. Head contact in soccer has the potential to cause acute traumatic brain injury including concussion or, potentially, a pattern of chronic brain injury. Although early retrospective research on the effects of soccer heading seemed to suggest that purposeful heading may contribute to long-term cognitive impairment, prospective controlled studies do not support this and, in fact, suggest that purposeful heading may not be a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Headgear has not been shown to be effective in reducing ball impact but may be helpful in reducing the force of non-ball-related impacts to the head. There are concerns that universal use of headgear may cause more aggressive heading and head challenges, leading to increased risk of injury.

  4. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshOR: Flood-Inundation Maps for the Coast Fork Willamette River from Creswell, Oregon to Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents inundated area for the Coast Fork of the Willamette River, the Row River and Silk Creek (west of Cottage Grove, OR) for eight different...

  5. sir2016-5029_Low_Res_Extents: Flood-Inundation Maps for the Coast Fork Willamette River from Creswell, Oregon to Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) utilized for this Willamette FIS submittal was produced by combining multiple overlapping topographic surveys for the Middle Fork...

  6. Analysis of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) camera survey data on Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, 2012-2103 final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes justification, methods, and results for white-tailed deer camera surveys conducted on Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge during late summer of...

  7. sir2016-5029_Hi_Res_Extents: Flood-Inundation Maps for the Coast Fork Willamette River from Creswell, Oregon to Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) utilized for this Willamette FIS submittal was produced by combining multiple overlapping topographic surveys for the Middle Fork...

  8. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshOR_breach: Flood-Inundation Maps for the Coast Fork Willamette River from Creswell, Oregon to Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents inundated area for the Coast Fork of the Willamette River, the Row River and Silk Creek (west of Cottage Grove, OR) for eight different...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  10. Head Lice: Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Prevention & Control Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of head lice: Avoid head-to- ...

  11. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to remain perfectly still and follow breath-holding instructions while the images are being recorded. If you ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  14. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oncologist will listen to the history of your problem and perform a physical examination. Consultations with other members of the head and neck team, such as the head and neck surgeon, pathologist, ...

  15. Sports-related Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficulty expressing words or thoughts; dysarthric speech Head Injury Prevention Tips Buy and use helmets or protective head gear approved by the ASTM for specific sports 100 percent of the time. The ASTM has ...

  16. Preventing head injuries in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... Helmets help to prevent head injuries. Your child should wear a ... sports or activities: Playing contact sports, such as lacrosse, ...

  17. Replication and transcription on a collision course: eukaryotic regulation mechanisms and implications for DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambati, Alessandra; Colosio, Arianna; Zardoni, Luca; Galanti, Lorenzo; Liberi, Giordano

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and transcription are vital cellular processes during which the genetic information is copied into complementary DNA and RNA molecules. Highly complex machineries required for DNA and RNA synthesis compete for the same DNA template, therefore being on a collision course. Unscheduled replication-transcription clashes alter the gene transcription program and generate replication stress, reducing fork speed. Molecular pathways and mechanisms that minimize the conflict between replication and transcription have been extensively characterized in prokaryotic cells and recently identified also in eukaryotes. A pathological outcome of replication-transcription collisions is the formation of stable RNA:DNA hybrids in molecular structures called R-loops. Growing evidence suggests that R-loop accumulation promotes both genetic and epigenetic instability, thus severely affecting genome functionality. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge related to replication and transcription conflicts in eukaryotes, their consequences on genome stability and the pathways involved in their resolution. These findings are relevant to clarify the molecular basis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Replication and transcription on a collision course: eukaryotic regulation mechanisms and implications for DNA stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eBrambati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication and transcription are vital cellular processes during which the genetic information is copied into complementary DNA and RNA molecules. Highly complex machineries required for DNA and RNA synthesis compete for the same DNA template, therefore being on a collision course. Unscheduled replication-transcription clashes alter the gene transcription program and generate replication stress, reducing fork speed. Molecular pathways and mechanisms that minimize the conflict between replication and transcription have been extensively characterized in prokaryotic cells and recently identified also in eukaryotes. A pathological outcome of replication-transcription collisions is the formation of stable RNA:DNA hybrids in molecular structures called R-loops. Growing evidence suggests that R-loop accumulation promotes both genetic and epigenetic instability, thus severely affecting genome functionality. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge related to replication and transcription conflicts in eukaryotes, their consequences on genome instability and the pathways involved in their resolution. These findings are relevant to clarify the molecular basis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Water temperature effects from simulated dam operations and structures in the Middle Fork Willamette River, western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccola, Norman L.; Turner, Daniel F.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2016-09-14

    Significant FindingsStreamflow and water temperature in the Middle Fork Willamette River (MFWR), western Oregon, have been regulated and altered since the construction of Lookout Point, Dexter, and Hills Creek Dams in 1954 and 1961, respectively. Each year, summer releases from the dams typically are cooler than pre-dam conditions, with the reverse (warmer than pre-dam conditions) occurring in autumn. This pattern has been detrimental to habitat of endangered Upper Willamette River (UWR) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and UWR winter steelhead (O. mykiss) throughout multiple life stages. In this study, scenarios testing different dam-operation strategies and hypothetical dam-outlet structures were simulated using CE-QUAL-W2 hydrodynamic/temperature models of the MFWR system from Hills Creek Lake (HCR) to Lookout Point (LOP) and Dexter (DEX) Lakes to explore and understand the efficacy of potential flow and temperature mitigation options.Model scenarios were run in constructed wet, normal, and dry hydrologic calendar years, and designed to minimize the effects of Hills Creek and Lookout Point Dams on river temperature by prioritizing warmer lake surface releases in May–August and cooler, deep releases in September–December. Operational scenarios consisted of a range of modified release rate rules, relaxation of power-generation constraints, variations in the timing of refill and drawdown, and maintenance of different summer maximum lake levels at HCR and LOP. Structural scenarios included various combinations of hypothetical floating outlets near the lake surface and hypothetical new outlets at depth. Scenario results were compared to scenarios using existing operational rules that give temperature management some priority (Base), scenarios using pre-2012 operational rules that prioritized power generation over temperature management (NoBlend), and estimated temperatures from a without-dams condition (WoDams).Results of the tested model scenarios led

  20. "Head versus heart"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this study that American adults and undergraduates are substantially less likely to acknowledge magical effects when the judgments involve money (amount willing to pay to avoid an ``unpleasant'' magical contact than they are when using preference or rating measures. We conclude that in ``head-heart'' conflicts of this type, money tips the balance towards the former, or, in other words, that money makes the mind less magical.

  1. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  2. "Head versus heart"

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach) are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this ...

  3. Environmental settings of the South Fork Iowa River basin, Iowa, and the Bogue Phalia basin, Mississippi, 2006-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Rose, Claire E.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals in different environmental settings were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's Agricultural Chemicals Team (ACT) at seven sites across the Nation, including the South Fork Iowa River basin in central Iowa and the Bogue Phalia basin in northwestern Mississippi. The South Fork Iowa River basin is representative of midwestern agriculture, where corn and soybeans are the predominant crops and a large percentage of the cultivated land is underlain by artificial drainage. The Bogue Phalia basin is representative of corn, soybean, cotton, and rice cropping in the humid, subtropical southeastern United States. Details of the environmental settings of these basins and the data-collection activities conducted by the USGS ACT over the 2006-10 study period are described in this report.

  4. Excess Cdt1 inhibits nascent strand elongation by repressing the progression of replication forks in Xenopus egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazaki, Yuta; Tsuyama, Takashi; Seki, Masayuki; Takahashi, Mikiko; Enomoto, Takemi; Tada, Shusuke

    2016-02-01

    Cdt1 is a protein essential for initiation of DNA replication; it recruits MCM helicase, a core component of the replicative DNA helicase, onto replication origins. In our previous study, we showed that addition of excess Cdt1 inhibits nascent strand elongation during DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism behind the inhibitory effect of Cdt1. We found that addition of recombinant Cdt1 inhibited nascent DNA synthesis in a reinitiation-independent manner. To identify the mechanism by which Cdt1 inhibits nascent strand elongation, the effect of Cdt1 on loading of Mcm4 and Rpa70 onto chromatin was examined. The results showed that Cdt1 suppressed the excessive Rpa70 binding caused by extensive, aphidicolin-induced DNA unwinding; this unwinding occurs between stalled DNA polymerases and advancing replication forks. These findings suggested that excess Cdt1 suppressed the progression of replication forks.

  5. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  6. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout (MASTER): Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R.; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 47 (~16,000) bar-coded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields ("massively systematic transcript end readout," MASTER). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo, we define the TSS-region DNA-sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield, and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching"). PMID:26626484

  7. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout, "MASTER": Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2015-12-17

    We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 4(7) (∼ 16,000) barcoded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields (massively systematic transcript end readout, "MASTER"). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo; we define the TSS-region DNA sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield; and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching").

  8. Bed-material entrainment potential, Roaring Fork River at Basalt, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John G.

    2002-01-01

    The Roaring Fork River at Basalt, Colorado, has a frequently mobile streambed composed of gravel, cobbles, and boulders. Recent urban and highway development on the flood plain, earlier attempts to realign and confine the channel, and flow obstructions such as bridge openings and piers have altered the hydrology, hydraulics, sediment transport, and sediment deposition areas of the Roaring Fork. Entrainment and deposition of coarse sediment on the streambed and in large alluvial bars have reduced the flood-conveying capacity of the river. Previous engineering studies have identified flood-prone areas and hazards related to inundation and high streamflow velocity, but those studies have not evaluated the potential response of the channel to discharges that entrain the coarse streambed. This study builds upon the results of earlier flood studies and identifies some potential areas of concern associated with bed-material entrainment. Cross-section surveys and simulated water-surface elevations from a previously run HEC?RAS model were used to calculate the boundary shear stress on the mean streambed, in the thalweg, and on the tops of adjacent alluvial bars for four reference streamflows. Sediment-size characteristics were determined for surficial material on the streambed, on large alluvial bars, and on a streambank. The median particle size (d50) for the streambed samples was 165 millimeters and for the alluvial bars and bank samples was 107 millimeters. Shear stresses generated by the 10-, 50-, and 100-year floods, and by a more common flow that just inundated most of the alluvial bars in the study reach were calculated at 14 of the cross sections used in the Roaring Fork River HEC?RAS model. The Shields equation was used with a Shields parameter of 0.030 to estimate the critical shear stress for entrainment of the median sediment particle size on the mean streambed, in the thalweg, and on adjacent alluvial bar surfaces at the 14 cross sections. Sediment

  9. Spatially detailed quantification of metal loading for decision making: Metal mass loading to American fork and Mary Ellen Gulch, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Effective remediation requires an understanding of the relative contributions of metals from all sources in a catchment, and that understanding must be based on a spatially detailed quantification of metal loading. A traditional approach to quantifying metal loading has been to measure discharge and chemistry at a catchment outlet. This approach can quantify annual loading and the temporal changes in load, but does not provide the needed spatial detail to evaluate specific sources, which is needed to support remediation decisions. A catchment or massloading approach provides spatial detail by combining tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling methods to quantify loading. Examples of studies in American Fork, Utah, and its tributary Mary Ellen Gulch illustrate this different approach. The mass-loading study in American Fork treated Mary Ellen Gulch as a single inflow. From that point of view, Mary Ellen Gulch was one of the greatest sources of Fe, Mn, Zn, and colloidal Pb loads to American Fork. But when Mary Ellen Gulch was evaluated in a separate catchment study, the detailed locations of metal loading were identified, and the extent of metal attenuation upstream from the mouth of Mary Ellen Gulch was quantified. The net, instantaneous load measured at the mouth of Mary Ellen Gulch for remediation planning would greatly underestimate the contributions of principal sources within the catchment. Extending the detailed sampling downstream from Mary Ellen Gulch indicated the possibility of diffuse groundwater inflow from Mary Ellen Gulch to American Fork. Comparing loads for Mary Ellen Gulch in the two studies indicates that metal loads could be substantially underestimated for planning purposes without the detailed catchment approach for the low-flow conditions in these studies. A mass-loading approach provides both the needed quantification of metal loading and the spatial detail to guide remediation decisions that would be the most effective in the catchments

  10. Environmental Assessment Addressing the Integrated Control of Nuisance Species at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    consists of binding diquat in the gut with suspensions of activated charcoal or bentonite clay , adminis- tration of cathartics to enhance elimination...begin IMMEDIATELY. Treatment consists of binding diquat in the gut with suspensions of activated charcoal or bentonite clay , administration of...deposits. The glacial deposits are composed of silts and clays with occasional sand and gravel lenses (CBP 2008). Topography. Grand Forks AFB is

  11. Demonstration of Advanced Geophysics and Classification Methods on Munitions Response Sites - East Fork Valley Range Complex, Former Camp Hale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    ESTCP to test the effectiveness of advanced geophysical sensors and physics -based data analysis tools for anomaly classification . The project purpose is...the project data. 50 10.0 REFERENCES ESTCP. 2009. “Geophysical System Verification (GSV): A Physics -Based Alternative to Geophysical Prove-Outs for...Technical Report Demonstration of Advanced Geophysics and Classification Methods on Munitions Response Sites - East Fork Valley

  12. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

  13. Rho-dependent transcription termination is essential to prevent excessive genome-wide R-loops in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leela, J Krishna; Syeda, Aisha H; Anupama, K; Gowrishankar, J

    2013-01-02

    Two pathways of transcription termination, factor-independent and -dependent, exist in bacteria. The latter pathway operates on nascent transcripts that are not simultaneously translated and requires factors Rho, NusG, and NusA, each of which is essential for viability of WT Escherichia coli. NusG and NusA are also involved in antitermination of transcription at the ribosomal RNA operons, as well as in regulating the rates of transcription elongation of all genes. We have used a bisulfite-sensitivity assay to demonstrate genome-wide increase in the occurrence of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), including from antisense and read-through transcripts, in a nusG missense mutant defective for Rho-dependent termination. Lethality associated with complete deficiency of Rho and NusG (but not NusA) was rescued by ectopic expression of an R-loop-helicase UvsW, especially so on defined growth media. Our results suggest that factor-dependent transcription termination subserves a surveillance function to prevent translation-uncoupled transcription from generating R-loops, which would block replication fork progression and therefore be lethal, and that NusA performs additional essential functions as well in E. coli. Prevention of R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts by cotranscriptional protein engagement of nascent RNA is emerging as a unifying theme among both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  14. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best

  15. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-07-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  16. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  17. Vibration Sensitivity Reduction of Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscopes through Stiffness Match Method with Negative Electrostatic Spring Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Guan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a stiffness match method is proposed to reduce the vibration sensitivity of micromachined tuning fork gyroscopes. Taking advantage of the coordinate transformation method, a theoretical model is established to analyze the anti-phase vibration output caused by the stiffness mismatch due to the fabrication imperfections. The analytical solutions demonstrate that the stiffness mismatch is proportional to the output induced by the external linear vibration from the sense direction in the anti-phase mode frequency. In order to verify the proposed stiffness match method, a tuning fork gyroscope (TFG with the stiffness match electrodes is designed and implemented using the micromachining technology and the experimental study is carried out. The experimental tests illustrate that the vibration output can be reduced by 73.8% through the stiffness match method than the structure without the stiffness match. Therefore, the proposed stiffness match method is experimentally validated to be applicable to vibration sensitivity reduction in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS tuning fork gyroscopes without sacrificing the scale factor.

  18. Vibration Sensitivity Reduction of Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscopes through Stiffness Match Method with Negative Electrostatic Spring Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanwei; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yaping

    2016-07-22

    In this paper, a stiffness match method is proposed to reduce the vibration sensitivity of micromachined tuning fork gyroscopes. Taking advantage of the coordinate transformation method, a theoretical model is established to analyze the anti-phase vibration output caused by the stiffness mismatch due to the fabrication imperfections. The analytical solutions demonstrate that the stiffness mismatch is proportional to the output induced by the external linear vibration from the sense direction in the anti-phase mode frequency. In order to verify the proposed stiffness match method, a tuning fork gyroscope (TFG) with the stiffness match electrodes is designed and implemented using the micromachining technology and the experimental study is carried out. The experimental tests illustrate that the vibration output can be reduced by 73.8% through the stiffness match method than the structure without the stiffness match. Therefore, the proposed stiffness match method is experimentally validated to be applicable to vibration sensitivity reduction in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) tuning fork gyroscopes without sacrificing the scale factor.

  19. Bioaccumulation of metals by Hyalella azteca exposed to contaminated sediments from the upper Clark Fork River, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Dwyer, F. James; Kemble, Nile E.

    1994-01-01

    Macroinvertebrates contaminated with metals in the Clark Fork River of Montana have been demonstrated to be a potentially toxic component in the diet of trout Because sediment was the suspected source of metals to these invertebrates, bioaccumulation of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn from sediment was evaluated by exposing the amphipod Hyalella azteca for 28 d in the laboratory to samples of sediment collected from depositional areas of the Clark Fork River Benthic invertebrates collected from riffles adjacent to the depositional areas were also analyzed for metals The pattern of metal accumulation between laboratory-exposed and field-collected animals was similar, however, the concentrations of metals in laboratory exposed amphipods were often 50 to 75% less than were the concentrations of metals in the field collected invertebrates These findings indicate that sediment is a significant source of metals to invertebrates in the Clark Fork River Additional studies should be conducted to determine threshold concentrations for effects of dietary metals on fish Long-term monitoring of the river should include sampling benthic invertebrates for metal accumulation.

  20. A tuning fork based wide range mechanical characterization tool with nanorobotic manipulators inside a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, Juan Camilo; Hwang, Gilgueng; Regnier, Stephane [Institut des Systemes Intelligents et de Robotique Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 7222 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex (France); Polesel-Maris, Jerome [CEA, IRAMIS, Service de Physique et Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-03-15

    This study proposes a tuning fork probe based nanomanipulation robotic system for mechanical characterization of ultraflexible nanostructures under scanning electron microscope. The force gradient is measured via the frequency modulation of a quartz tuning fork and two nanomanipulators are used for manipulation of the nanostructures. Two techniques are proposed for attaching the nanostructure to the tip of the tuning fork probe. The first technique involves gluing the nanostructure for full range characterization whereas the second technique uses van der Waals and electrostatic forces in order to avoid destroying the nanostructure. Helical nanobelts (HNB) are proposed for the demonstration of the setup. The nonlinear stiffness behavior of HNBs during their full range tensile studies is clearly revealed for the first time. Using the first technique, this was between 0.009 N/m for rest position and 0.297 N/m before breaking of the HNB with a resolution of 0.0031 N/m. For the second experiment, this was between 0.014 N/m for rest position and 0.378 N/m before detaching of the HNB with a resolution of 0.0006 N/m. This shows the wide range sensing of the system for potential applications in mechanical property characterization of ultraflexible nanostructures.

  1. Integrated tuning fork nanocavity optomechanical transducers with high $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product and stress-engineered frequency tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, R; Davanco, M I; Ren, Y; Aksyuk, V; Liu, Y; Srinivasan, K

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanical systems are being widely developed for precision force and displacement measurements. For nanomechanical transducers, there is usually a trade-off between the frequency ($f_{M}$) and quality factor ($Q_{M}$), which limits temporal resolution and sensitivity. Here, we present a monolithic cavity optomechanical transducer supporting both high $f_{M}$ and high $Q_{M}$. By replacing the common doubly-clamped, Si$_3$N$_4$ nanobeam with a tuning fork geometry, we demonstrate devices with the fundamental $f_{M}\\approx29$ MHz and $Q_{M}\\approx2.2$$\\times10^5$, corresponding to an $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product of 6.35$\\times10^{12}$ Hz, comparable to the highest values previously demonstrated for room temperature operation. This high $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product is partly achieved by engineering the stress of the tuning fork to be 3 times the residual film stress through clamp design, which results in an increase of $f_{M}$ up to 1.5 times. Simulations reveal that the tuning fork design simultaneously reduces the...

  2. Metals-contaminated benthic invertebrates in the Clark Fork River, Montana: Effects on age-0 brown trout and rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Daniel F.; Farag, Aïda M.; Bergman, Harold L.; Delonay, Aaron J.; Little, Edward E.; Smiths, Charlie E.; Barrows, Frederic T.

    1995-01-01

    Benthic organisms in the upper Clark Fork River have recently been implicated as a dietary source of metals that may be a chronic problem for young-of-the-year rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In this present study, early life stage brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout were exposed for 88 d to simulated Clark Fork River water and a diet of benthic invertebrates collected from the river. These exposures resulted in reduced growth and elevated levels of metals in the whole body of both species. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb increased in whole brown trout; in rainbow trout, As and Cd increased in whole fish, and As also increased in liver. Brown trout on the metals-contaminated diets exhibited constipation, gut impaction, increased cell membrane damage (lipid peroxidation), decreased digestive enzyme production (zymogen), and a sloughing of intestinal mucosal epithelial cells. Rainbow trout fed the contaminated diets exhibited constipation and reduced feeding activity. We believe that the reduced standing crop of trout in the Clark Fork River results partly from chronic effects of metals contamination in benthic invertebrates that are important as food for young-of-the-year fish.

  3. Vibration Sensitivity Reduction of Micromachined Tuning Fork Gyroscopes through Stiffness Match Method with Negative Electrostatic Spring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanwei; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a stiffness match method is proposed to reduce the vibration sensitivity of micromachined tuning fork gyroscopes. Taking advantage of the coordinate transformation method, a theoretical model is established to analyze the anti-phase vibration output caused by the stiffness mismatch due to the fabrication imperfections. The analytical solutions demonstrate that the stiffness mismatch is proportional to the output induced by the external linear vibration from the sense direction in the anti-phase mode frequency. In order to verify the proposed stiffness match method, a tuning fork gyroscope (TFG) with the stiffness match electrodes is designed and implemented using the micromachining technology and the experimental study is carried out. The experimental tests illustrate that the vibration output can be reduced by 73.8% through the stiffness match method than the structure without the stiffness match. Therefore, the proposed stiffness match method is experimentally validated to be applicable to vibration sensitivity reduction in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) tuning fork gyroscopes without sacrificing the scale factor. PMID:27455272

  4. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2-FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM-BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs.

  5. Fork-join and data-driven execution models on multi-core architectures: Case study of the FMM

    KAUST Repository

    Amer, Abdelhalim

    2013-01-01

    Extracting maximum performance of multi-core architectures is a difficult task primarily due to bandwidth limitations of the memory subsystem and its complex hierarchy. In this work, we study the implications of fork-join and data-driven execution models on this type of architecture at the level of task parallelism. For this purpose, we use a highly optimized fork-join based implementation of the FMM and extend it to a data-driven implementation using a distributed task scheduling approach. This study exposes some limitations of the conventional fork-join implementation in terms of synchronization overheads. We find that these are not negligible and their elimination by the data-driven method, with a careful data locality strategy, was beneficial. Experimental evaluation of both methods on state-of-the-art multi-socket multi-core architectures showed up to 22% speed-ups of the data-driven approach compared to the original method. We demonstrate that a data-driven execution of FMM not only improves performance by avoiding global synchronization overheads but also reduces the memory-bandwidth pressure caused by memory-intensive computations. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Syntactic-Head-Driven Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Koenig, E

    1994-01-01

    The previously proposed semantic-head-driven generation methods run into problems if none of the daughter constituents in the syntacto-semantic rule schemata of a grammar fits the definition of a semantic head given in Shieber et al. 1990. This is the case for the semantic analysis rules of certain constraint-based semantic representations, e.g. Underspecified Discourse Representation Structures (UDRSs) (Frank/Reyle 1992). Since head-driven generation in general has its merits, we simply return to a syntactic definition of `head' and demonstrate the feasibility of syntactic-head-driven generation. In addition to its generality, a syntactic-head-driven algorithm provides a basis for a logically well-defined treatment of the movement of (syntactic) heads, for which only ad-hoc solutions existed, so far.

  7. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  8. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  9. Mechanical Properties of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart A.; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  10. Convergent transcription confers a bistable switch in Enterococcus faecalis conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anushree; Johnson, Christopher M; Shu, Che-Chi; Kaznessis, Yiannis N; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Dunny, Gary M; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2011-06-07

    Convergent gene pairs with head-to-head configurations are widespread in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and are speculated to be involved in gene regulation. Here we present a unique mechanism of gene regulation due to convergent transcription from the antagonistic prgX/prgQ operon in Enterococcus faecalis controlling conjugative transfer of the antibiotic resistance plasmid pCF10 from donor cells to recipient cells. Using mathematical modeling and experimentation, we demonstrate that convergent transcription in the prgX/prgQ operon endows the system with the properties of a robust genetic switch through premature termination of elongating transcripts due to collisions between RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribing from opposite directions and antisense regulation between complementary counter-transcripts. Evidence is provided for the presence of truncated RNAs resulting from convergent transcription from both the promoters that are capable of sense-antisense interactions. A mathematical model predicts that both RNAP collision and antisense regulation are essential for a robust bistable switch behavior in the control of conjugation initiation by prgX/prgQ operons. Moreover, given that convergent transcription is conserved across species, the mechanism of coupling RNAP collision and antisense interaction is likely to have a significant regulatory role in gene expression.

  11. Comparison between Measured and Calculated Sediment Transport Rates in North Fork Caspar Creek, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. W.; Yarnell, S. M.; Yager, E.; Leidman, S. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Caspar Creek is a gravel-bedded stream located in the Jackson Demonstration State Forest in the coast range of California. The Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed has been actively monitored and studied by the Pacific Southwest Research Station and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection for over five decades. Although total annual sediment yield has been monitored through time, sediment transport during individual storm events is less certain. At a study site on North Fork Caspar Creek, cross-section averaged sediment flux was collected throughout two storm events in December 2014 and February 2015 to determine if two commonly used sediment transport equations—Meyer-Peter-Müller and Wilcock—approximated observed bedload transport. Cross-section averaged bedload samples were collected approximately every hour during each storm event using a Helley-Smith bedload sampler. Five-minute composite samples were collected at five equally spaced locations along a cross-section and then sieved to half-phi sizes to determine the grain size distribution. The measured sediment flux values varied widely throughout the storm hydrographs and were consistently less than two orders of magnitude in value in comparison to the calculated values. Armored bed conditions, changing hydraulic conditions during each storm and variable sediment supply may have contributed to the observed differences.

  12. Chronic toxicity of Clark Fork River invertebrates to rainbow trout when administered via the diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, A.; Cohen, A.; Stubblefield, W. [ENSR, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 46-day exposure examined the effects of metals contamination in a live natural freshwater diet on rainbow trout fry. Survival, growth, and whole-body tissue metals were compared among groups of trout fed live planktonic invertebrates (primarily Daphnia pulex) collected from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana and trout fed live laboratory-reared D. pulex. Metals of interest in the diets were As, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn. In addition to dietary exposure, treatments included simultaneous exposure to a mixture of waterborne metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn) at sublethal concentrations. Trout showed no statistically significant effects on survival or growth from mean CFR invertebrate metal concentrations of 20.1 mg As/kg dwt, 60.7 mg Cu/kg dwt, 4.0 mg Cd/kg dwt, 4.9 mg Pb/kg dwt, and 249 mg Zn/kg dwt. Waterborne and dietary Cd and Pb appeared to result in increased tissue concentrations of these metals, while only dietary As resulted in increased tissue As. Neither dietary nor waterborne copper or zinc had a substantial effect on tissue levels of these metals. Results were consistent, in terms of the lack of statistically significant growth and survival effects, with those of previous in-house studies exposing rainbow trout to metals-enriched Artemia sp. (brine shrimp) diets.

  13. Research on the Sensing Performance of the Tuning Fork-Probe as a Micro Interaction Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengli Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The shear force position system has been widely used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM and recently extended into the force sensing area. The dynamic properties of a tuning fork (TF, the core component of this system, directly determine the sensing performance of the shear positioning system. Here, we combine experimental results and finite element method (FEM analysis to investigate the dynamic behavior of the TF probe assembled structure (TF-probe. Results from experiments under varying atmospheric pressures illustrate that the oscillation amplitude of the TF-probe is linearly related to the quality factor, suggesting that decreasing the pressure will dramatically increase the quality factor. The results from FEM analysis reveal the influences of various parameters on the resonant performance of the TF-probe. We compared numerical results of the frequency spectrum with the experimental data collected by our recently developed laser Doppler vibrometer system. Then, we investigated the parameters affecting spatial resolution of the SNOM and the dynamic response of the TF-probe under longitudinal and transverse interactions. It is found that the interactions in transverse direction is much more sensitive than that in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the TF-probe was used to measure the friction coefficient of a silica–silica interface.

  14. Genome-wide association of functional traits linked with Campylobacter jejuni survival from farm to fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, Koji; Méric, Guillaume; Taylor, Aidan J; de Vries, Stefan P W; Murray, Susan; Pascoe, Ben; Mageiros, Leonardos; Torralbo, Alicia; Vidal, Ana; Ridley, Anne; Komukai, Sho; Wimalarathna, Helen; Cody, Alison J; Colles, Frances M; McCarthy, Noel; Harris, David; Bray, James E; Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian; Bayliss, Christopher D; Grant, Andrew; Maskell, Duncan; Didelot, Xavier; Kelly, David J; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, primarily associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry. C. jejuni lineages vary in host range and prevalence in human infection, suggesting differences in survival throughout the poultry processing chain. From 7343 MLST-characterised isolates, we sequenced 600 C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from various stages of poultry processing and clinical cases. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) in C. jejuni ST-21 and ST-45 complexes identified genetic elements over-represented in clinical isolates that increased in frequency throughout the poultry processing chain. Disease-associated SNPs were distinct in these complexes, sometimes organised in haplotype blocks. The function of genes containing associated elements was investigated, demonstrating roles for cj1377c in formate metabolism, nuoK in aerobic survival and oxidative respiration, and cj1368-70 in nucleotide salvage. This work demonstrates the utility of GWAS for investigating transmission in natural zoonotic pathogen populations and provides evidence that major C. jejuni lineages have distinct genotypes associated with survival, within the host specific niche, from farm to fork. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Remedial design work plan for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The Remedial Design Work Plan (RDWP) for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) Operable Unit (OU) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This remedial action fits into the overall Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) cleanup strategy by addressing contaminated floodplain soil. The objective of this remedial action is to minimize the risk to human health and the environment from contaminated soil in the Lower EFPC floodplain pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (1992). In accordance with the FFA, a remedial investigation (RI) (DOE 1994a) and a feasibility study (DOE 1994b) were conducted to assess contamination of the Lower EFPC and propose remediation alternatives. The remedial investigation determined that the principal contaminant is mercury, which originated from releases during Y-12 Plant operations, primarily between 1953 and 1963. The recommended alternative by the feasibility study was to excavate and dispose of floodplain soils contaminated with mercury above the remedial goal option. Following the remedial investigation/feasibility study, and also in accordance with the FFA, a proposed plan was prepared to more fully describe the proposed remedy.

  16. Design of a compact tuning fork-shaped notched ultrawideband antenna for wireless communication application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, M N; Moghavvemi, M; Mahadi, W N L

    2014-01-01

    A new compact planar notched ultrawideband (UWB) antenna is designed for wireless communication application. The proposed antenna has a compact size of 0.182λ × 0.228λ × 0.018λ where λ is the wavelength of the lowest operating frequency. The antenna is comprised of rectangular radiating patch, ground plane, and an arc-shaped strip in between radiating patch and feed line. By introducing a new Tuning Fork-shaped notch in the radiating plane, a stopband is obtained. The antenna is tested and measured. The measured result indicated that fabricated antenna has achieved a wide bandwidth of 4.33-13.8 GHz (at -10 dB return loss) with a rejection frequency band of 5.28-6.97 GHz (WiMAX, WLAN, and C-band). The effects of the parameters of the antenna are discussed. The experiment results demonstrate that the proposed antenna can well meet the requirement for the UWB communication in spite of its compactness and small size.

  17. A Z-axis Quartz Cross-fork Micromachined Gyroscope Based on Shear Stress Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peitao Dong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose a novel quartz micromachined gyroscope. The sensor has a simple cross-fork structure in the x-y plane of quartz crystal. Shear stress rather than normal stress is utilized to sense Coriolis’ force generated by the input angular rate signal. Compared to traditional quartz gyroscopes, which have two separate sense electrodes on each sidewall, there is only one electrode on each sidewall of the sense beam. As a result, the fabrication of the electrodes is simplified and the structure can be easily miniaturized. In order to increase sensitivity, a pair of proof masses is attached to the ends of the drive beam, and the sense beam has a tapered design. The structure is etched from a z-cut quartz wafer and the electrodes are realized by direct evaporation using the aperture mask method. The drive mode frequency of the prototype is 13.38 kHz, and the quality factor is approximately 1,000 in air. Therefore, the gyroscope can work properly without a vacuum package. The measurement ability of the shear stress detection design scheme is validated by the Coriolis’ force test. The performance of the sensor is characterized on a precision rate table using a specially designed readout circuit. The experimentally obtained scale factor is 1.45 mV/°/s and the nonlinearity is 3.6% in range of ±200 °/s.

  18. Quarterly Progress Report on the Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-12-30

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program ( BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  19. A Network of Multi-Tasking Proteins at the DNA Replication Fork Preserves Genome Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the network that maintains high fidelity genome replication, we have introduced two conditional mutant alleles of DNA2, an essential DNA replication gene, into each of the approximately 4,700 viable yeast deletion mutants and determined the fitness of the double mutants. Fifty-six DNA2-interacting genes were identified. Clustering analysis of genomic synthetic lethality profiles of each of 43 of the DNA2-interacting genes defines a network (consisting of 322 genes and 876 interactions whose topology provides clues as to how replication proteins coordinate regulation and repair to protect genome integrity. The results also shed new light on the functions of the query gene DNA2, which, despite many years of study, remain controversial, especially its proposed role in Okazaki fragment processing and the nature of its in vivo substrates. Because of the multifunctional nature of virtually all proteins at the replication fork, the meaning of any single genetic interaction is inherently ambiguous. The multiplexing nature of the current studies, however, combined with follow-up supporting experiments, reveals most if not all of the unique pathways requiring Dna2p. These include not only Okazaki fragment processing and DNA repair but also chromatin dynamics.

  20. A network of multi-tasking proteins at the DNA replication fork preserves genome stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin E Budd

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the network that maintains high fidelity genome replication, we have introduced two conditional mutant alleles of DNA2, an essential DNA replication gene, into each of the approximately 4,700 viable yeast deletion mutants and determined the fitness of the double mutants. Fifty-six DNA2-interacting genes were identified. Clustering analysis of genomic synthetic lethality profiles of each of 43 of the DNA2-interacting genes defines a network (consisting of 322 genes and 876 interactions whose topology provides clues as to how replication proteins coordinate regulation and repair to protect genome integrity. The results also shed new light on the functions of the query gene DNA2, which, despite many years of study, remain controversial, especially its proposed role in Okazaki fragment processing and the nature of its in vivo substrates. Because of the multifunctional nature of virtually all proteins at the replication fork, the meaning of any single genetic interaction is inherently ambiguous. The multiplexing nature of the current studies, however, combined with follow-up supporting experiments, reveals most if not all of the unique pathways requiring Dna2p. These include not only Okazaki fragment processing and DNA repair but also chromatin dynamics.

  1. Montana's Clark Fork River Basin Task Force: a vehicle for integrated water resources management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, David D; Mueller, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    This article examines what is generally considered to be an unattainable goal in the western United States: integrated water resources management (IWRM). Specifically, we examine an organization that is quite unique in the West, Montana's Clark Fork River Basin Task Force (Task Force), and we analyze its activities since its formation in 2001 to answer the question: are the activities and contributions of the Task Force working to promote a more strongly integrated approach to water resources management in Montana? After reviewing the concepts underlying IWRM, some of the issues that have been identified for achieving IWRM in the West, and the Montana system of water right allocation and issues it faces, we adapt Mitchell's IWRM framework and apply it to the analysis of the Task Force's activities in the context of IWRM. In evaluating the physical, interaction, and protocol/planning/policy components of IWRM, we find that the Task Force has been contributing to the evolution of Montana's water resources management towards this framework, though several factors will likely continue to prevent its complete realization. The Task Force has been successful in this regard because of its unique nature and charge, and because of the authority and power given it by successive Montana legislatures. Also critical to the success of the organization is its ability to help translate into policy the outcomes of legal and quasi-judicial decisions that have impacted the state's water resources management agency.

  2. Rock fall simulation at Timpanogos Cave National Monument, American Fork Canyon, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Edwin L.; Dart, Richard L.; Reichenbach, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Rock fall from limestone cliffs at Timpanogos Cave National Monument in American Fork Canyon east of Provo, Utah, is a common occurrence. The cave is located in limestone cliffs high on the southern side of the canyon. One fatality in 1933 led to the construction of rock fall shelters at the cave entrance and exit in 1976. Numerous rock fall incidents, including a near miss in 2000 in the vicinity of the trail below the cave exit, have led to a decision to extend the shelter at the cave exit to protect visitors from these ongoing rock fall events initiating from cliffs immediately above the cave exit. Three-dimensional rock fall simulations from sources at the top of these cliffs have provided data from which to assess the spatial frequencies and velocities of rock falls from the cliffs and to constrain the design of protective measures to reduce the rock fall hazard. Results from the rock fall simulations are consistent with the spatial patterns of rock fall impacts that have been observed at the cave exit site.

  3. Waste Management Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain upon completion of remediation activities. This effort will be conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for LEFPC as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) action. The Waste Management Plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the remedial action for the LEFPC Project Most of the solid wastes will be considered to be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y-12 facilities for those types of waste. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, and the possibility of low- level or mixed waste exists (greater than 35 pCi/g), although these are not expected. Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary in nature and which will be capable of being disposed 0214 of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant.

  4. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Brian

    2004-02-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

  5. Post construction report for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Project, Phase 1, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This Phase 1 Remedial Action (RA) effort was conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act action. The LEFPC, Phase 1 RA removed approximately 5,560 yd{sup 3} of mercury-contaminated soils, {ge} 400 ppm, from selected portions of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) site LEFPC floodplain from July 8, 1996--September 14, 1996. During excavation activities, pockets of elevated radiologically contaminated soils (greater than 35 pCi/g) were located by the continuous monitoring of the excavation areas and contaminated soils with radiological monitoring instruments. Through characterization sampling it has been determined that {approximately} 90 yd{sup 3} are less than 35 pCi/g uranium contaminated and will be transported to the Y-12 Landfill V for disposal and the remaining {approximately}40 yd{sup 3} do not meet the WAC for radiological constituents included in the Special Waste Permit for Landfill V. The radiologically contaminated soil will be placed in 21st Century containers for storage at the K-25 site.

  6. Head first C#

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Head First C# is a complete learning experience for object-oriented programming, C#, and the Visual Studio IDE. Built for your brain, this book covers C# 3.0 and Visual Studio 2008, and teaches everything from language fundamentals to advanced topics including garbage collection, extension methods, and double-buffered animation. You'll also master C#'s hottest and newest syntax, LINQ, for querying SQL databases, .NET collections, and XML documents. By the time you're through, you'll be a proficient C# programmer, designing and coding large-scale applications. Every few chapters you will come

  7. Head first C#

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    You want to learn C# programming, but you're not sure you want to suffer through another tedious technical book. You're in luck: Head First C# introduces this language in a fun, visual way. You'll quickly learn everything from creating your first program to learning sophisticated coding skills with C# 4.0, Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4, while avoiding common errors that frustrate many students. The second edition offers several hands-on labs along the way to help you build and test programs using skills you've learned up to that point. In the final lab, you'll put everything together. From o

  8. Head First Python

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Ever wished you could learn Python from a book? Head First Python is a complete learning experience for Python that helps you learn the language through a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals, helping you understand how to be a great Python programmer. You'll quickly learn the language's fundamentals, then move onto persistence, exception handling, web development, SQLite, data wrangling, and Google App Engine. You'll also learn how to write mobile apps for Android, all thanks to the power that Python gives you. We think your time is too valuable to waste struggling with

  9. Head First Web Design

    CERN Document Server

    Watrall, Ethan

    2008-01-01

    Want to know how to make your pages look beautiful, communicate your message effectively, guide visitors through your website with ease, and get everything approved by the accessibility and usability police at the same time? Head First Web Design is your ticket to mastering all of these complex topics, and understanding what's really going on in the world of web design. Whether you're building a personal blog or a corporate website, there's a lot more to web design than div's and CSS selectors, but what do you really need to know? With this book, you'll learn the secrets of designing effecti

  10. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  11. Direct non transcriptional role of NF-Y in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Belluti, Silvia; Miotto, Benoit; Neusiedler, Julia; Dolfini, Diletta; Drac, Marjorie; Basile, Valentina; Schwob, Etienne; Mantovani, Roberto; Blow, J Julian; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-04-01

    NF-Y is a heterotrimeric transcription factor, which plays a pioneer role in the transcriptional control of promoters containing the CCAAT-box, among which genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and DNA damage response. The knock-down of the sequence-specific subunit NF-YA triggers defects in S-phase progression, which lead to apoptotic cell death. Here, we report that NF-Y has a critical function in DNA replication progression, independent from its transcriptional activity. NF-YA colocalizes with early DNA replication factories, its depletion affects the loading of replisome proteins to DNA, among which Cdc45, and delays the passage from early to middle-late S phase. Molecular combing experiments are consistent with a role for NF-Y in the control of fork progression. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrate a direct non-transcriptional role of NF-Y in the overall efficiency of DNA replication, specifically in the DNA elongation process, using a Xenopus cell-free system. Our findings broaden the activity of NF-Y on a DNA metabolism other than transcription, supporting the existence of specific TFs required for proper and efficient DNA replication.

  12. Accelerated gene evolution through replication-transcription conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sandip; Million-Weaver, Samuel; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Merrikh, Houra

    2013-03-28

    Several mechanisms that increase the rate of mutagenesis across the entire genome have been identified; however, how the rate of evolution might be promoted in individual genes is unclear. Most genes in bacteria are encoded on the leading strand of replication. This presumably avoids the potentially detrimental head-on collisions that occur between the replication and transcription machineries when genes are encoded on the lagging strand. Here we identify the ubiquitous (core) genes in Bacillus subtilis and determine that 17% of them are on the lagging strand. We find a higher rate of point mutations in the core genes on the lagging strand compared with those on the leading strand, with this difference being primarily in the amino-acid-changing (nonsynonymous) mutations. We determine that, overall, the genes under strong negative selection against amino-acid-changing mutations tend to be on the leading strand, co-oriented with replication. In contrast, on the basis of the rate of convergent mutations, genes under positive selection for amino-acid-changing mutations are more commonly found on the lagging strand, indicating faster adaptive evolution in many genes in the head-on orientation. Increased gene length and gene expression amounts are positively correlated with the rate of accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations in the head-on genes, suggesting that the conflict between replication and transcription could be a driving force behind these mutations. Indeed, using reversion assays, we show that the difference in the rate of mutagenesis of genes in the two orientations is transcription dependent. Altogether, our findings indicate that head-on replication-transcription conflicts are more mutagenic than co-directional conflicts and that these encounters can significantly increase adaptive structural variation in the coded proteins. We propose that bacteria, and potentially other organisms, promote faster evolution of specific genes through orientation

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles ... Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  14. DNA Replication Forks Pause at Silent Origins near the HML Locus in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yangzhou; Vujcic, Marija; Kowalski, David

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal replicators in budding yeast contain an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) that functions in a plasmid, but certain ARSs are silent as replication origins in their natural chromosomal context. In chromosome III, the HML ARS cluster (ARS302-ARS303-ARS320) and ARS301 flank the transcriptionally silent mating-type locus HML, and all of these ARSs are silent as replication origins. ARS301 and ARS302 function in transcriptional silencing mediated by the origin recognition complex ...

  15. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  16. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  17. HEADS UP: Sensorimotor control of the head-neck system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Head-neck stabilization is inherently challenging even when stationary, requiring constant vigilance to counter the downward pull of gravity. It involves a highly complex biomechanical system comprised of a large mass (the head) balanced on top of seven vertebrae (the neck), that are in turn connect

  18. Bedload and river hydraulics - Inferences from the East Fork River, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Emmett, William W.

    1997-01-01

    During 1973-79, bedload data were collected in a sophisticated trap on a river of moderate size, the East Fork. The transport rate was measured most days through a full snowmelt season, and the rate was determined separately for eight zones across the channel width. The quantitative data are unique and unlikely to be repeated. Nor need they be, because as a result of this effort a practical bedload sampler was adequately tested against full river measurement.It was shown that bedload moves sporadically and randomly on the river bed. Therefore, transport rate is highly variable in short periods of time. There is also a wide variance from day to day. Yet, different rivers have transport rates, which are functions of discharge, depth, and sediment size, that are clearly distinct. Comparison of computed and measured transport rates indicates that a major problem remains: What grain size is representative of the bedload when there is a wide or heterogeneous particle-size distribution? Size of the bedload in motion may be very different from the size of bed material obtained from samples of the streambed.For general computation, the river channel slope may be averaged, and it may be assumed that water-surface slope does not change materially with changing discharge. Indeed, this generality is correct, in that, compared with depth, velocity, and width, slope is conservative at-a-station. However, in more detail, slope changes importantly with discharge in short reaches of channel, and those changes are very different in pool and riffle.These local changes in slope are not merely an aspect of a detailed longitudinal profile but involve cross-channel as well as down-channel components. The pool and riffle sequence involves not only undulation of bed elevation and bar formation on alternate sides of the channel, but alternation of the zone of superovulation of the water surface, and changing relation of watersurface slope to discharge. These details can be seen only in the

  19. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  20. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  1. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  2. NASA head sworn in

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Fletcher was sworn in on May 12, 1986, as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At a news conference after he was sworn in, Fletcher said that NASA would deal with both its technical problems and its procedural problems before the shuttle will fly again. According to press accounts, he stressed that funds should be made available to replace the Challenger orbiter, which was lost in an explosion on January 28.Fletcher, who had also headed the agency from 1971 to 1977, succeeds James M. Beggs, who was indicted in December 1985 for conspiring to defraud the federal government while serving as a senior executive at the General Dynamics Corporation.

  3. Quality control mechanisms exclude incorrect polymerases from the eukaryotic replication fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Grant D.; O’Donnell, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is primarily replicated by two DNA polymerases, Pol ε and Pol δ, that function on the leading and lagging strands, respectively. Previous studies have established recruitment mechanisms whereby Cdc45-Mcm2-7-GINS (CMG) helicase binds Pol ε and tethers it to the leading strand, and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) binds tightly to Pol δ and recruits it to the lagging strand. The current report identifies quality control mechanisms that exclude the improper polymerase from a particular strand. We find that the replication factor C (RFC) clamp loader specifically inhibits Pol ε on the lagging strand, and CMG protects Pol ε against RFC inhibition on the leading strand. Previous studies show that Pol δ is slow and distributive with CMG on the leading strand. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ–PCNA is a rapid and processive enzyme, suggesting that CMG may bind and alter Pol δ activity or position it on the lagging strand. Measurements of polymerase binding to CMG demonstrate Pol ε binds CMG with a Kd value of 12 nM, but Pol δ binding CMG is undetectable. Pol δ, like bacterial replicases, undergoes collision release upon completing replication, and we propose Pol δ–PCNA collides with the slower CMG, and in the absence of a stabilizing Pol δ–CMG interaction, the collision release process is triggered, ejecting Pol δ on the leading strand. Hence, by eviction of incorrect polymerases at the fork, the clamp machinery directs quality control on the lagging strand and CMG enforces quality control on the leading strand. PMID:28069954

  4. The poultry-associated microbiome: network analysis and farm-to-fork characterizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B Oakley

    Full Text Available Microbial communities associated with agricultural animals are important for animal health, food safety, and public health. Here we combine high-throughput sequencing (HTS, quantitative-PCR assays, and network analysis to profile the poultry-associated microbiome and important pathogens at various stages of commercial poultry production from the farm to the consumer. Analysis of longitudinal data following two flocks from the farm through processing showed a core microbiome containing multiple sequence types most closely related to genera known to be pathogenic for animals and/or humans, including Campylobacter, Clostridium, and Shigella. After the final stage of commercial poultry processing, taxonomic richness was ca. 2-4 times lower than the richness of fecal samples from the same flocks and Campylobacter abundance was significantly reduced. Interestingly, however, carcasses sampled at 48 hr after processing harboured the greatest proportion of unique taxa (those not encountered in other samples, significantly more than expected by chance. Among these were anaerobes such as Prevotella, Veillonella, Leptrotrichia, and multiple Campylobacter sequence types. Retail products were dominated by Pseudomonas, but also contained 27 other genera, most of which were potentially metabolically active and encountered in on-farm samples. Network analysis was focused on the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter and revealed a majority of sequence types with no significant interactions with other taxa, perhaps explaining the limited efficacy of previous attempts at competitive exclusion of Campylobacter. These data represent the first use of HTS to characterize the poultry microbiome across a series of farm-to-fork samples and demonstrate the utility of HTS in monitoring the food supply chain and identifying sources of potential zoonoses and interactions among taxa in complex communities.

  5. New observations on the Middle Fork Eel River coal-bearing beds, Mendocino County, California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Russell H. [Mendocino County Museum, 400 East Commercial Street, Willits, CA 95490 (United States); Bartley, Sylvia E. [Noyo Hill House, 28953 Highway 20, Fort Bragg, CA 95437 (United States); Springer, David J. [College of the Redwoods-Mendocino Coast, 1211 Del Mar Drive, Fort Bragg, CA 95437 (United States); Erwin, Diane M. [Museum of Paleontology, 1101 Valley Life Sciences Building, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Mid-19th century reports of ''immense'' coal outcrops in the Middle Fork Eel River (MFER) drainage near Round Valley in California's northern Coast Ranges fueled the early geological interest in this area, with mine development the primary focus of many studies. It was not until Samuel G. Clark's 1940 ''Geology of the Covelo District, Mendocino County, California,'' that the coal was placed in its regional geologic context and assigned to the Miocene, a determination that relied primarily on a Desmostylus hesperus molar found in shale overlying the coal and an associated equivocal, though Miocene-compatible, marine molluscan fauna. Our investigation of the MFER coal-bearing beds has provided new data from foraminifera, marine mollusks, fish remains, and the first reported fossil plants, which as a whole support Clark's Miocene age assignment. We also present an updated stratigraphy proposing under modern-day stratigraphic protocols that the informal name Sand Bank beds (SBb) be used in place of the Temblor Formation to refer to the SBb coal-bearing fluvial-marine unit. Analysis of the SBb stratigraphy and sedimentology reveals the presence of a fluvial system that flowed from a distal upland region southward toward the paleocoast of California. An abundant diverse palynoflora containing lycophytes, ferns, conifers, and mesic, thermophillic herbaceous and woody angiosperms indicates the drainage flowed through a coastal swampy forested bottomland and estuarine environment before emptying into a coastal basin. Presence of Taxodium-like wood, foliage, pollen, and other ''hydrophiles'' suggests the MFER coal was a local mire buried by the progradation of the SBb fluvial system during a regressive phase, an interpretation to be tested with future field work and detailed compositional analysis of the coal. (author)

  6. Speaking with forked tongues - Swedish public administration and the European employment strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Casula Vifell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand how decision making processes within the EU comes to affect the structures for national policy making within the employment field. The paper addresses the question of how the process of writing new employment guidelines for the EES – European employment strategy, has affected the work of the Swedish public administration. Through applying a neo-institutionalist perspective, it contributes to the understanding of effects that the increased embededness of states, often characterized as Europeanization, invoke on national administrations. I argue that the way the process has been managed can be analyzed from an organizational perspective where conflicting demands on the Swedish state has led to a certain organization of the work activities. On the one hand, Swedish representatives have to act according to the norms of the European cooperation in order to be seen as a legitimate actor. On the other hand, EU and European influence on Swedish employment policy is not a legitimate concept at national level. In order to satisfy these two seemingly incompatible demands the organizing principle of decoupling is being used to create space for maneuvering for the administration. However, through participation at EU-level organizational identities are partly transformed which in time leads to a situation where changed practices are not met by changes in formal structures. As a consequence the Swedish representatives are in a manner ‘speaking with forked tongue’ and obscuring the new way in which policy making is conducted thus introducing democratic shortcomings in terms of transparency and accountability.

  7. Geomorphic Effects of Engineered Log Jams in River Restoration, Middle Fork John Day River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffin, J.; McDowell, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Fork of the John Day River (MFJD) Intensively Monitored Watershed in eastern Oregon is a multi-phase restoration implementation and monitoring project. MFJD is a tributary to the Colombia and is part of one of the longest free flowing rivers systems in the continental United States. It is a gravel and cobble bed river with a drainage area of 2,100 km2. The river has endured extensive channel and floodplain degradation from years of channel alteration and straightening due to human influences including dredge mining, ranching, and farming. As part of the river restoration project on the MFJD, engineered log jams have been constructed to address many of the restoration goals including creating scour pools, inhibiting bank erosion, creating and maintaining a sinuous river planform, and increasing complexity of fish habitat. There is a need for more detailed understanding on ELJ channel morphologic effects and how site-specific characteristics and differences in log jam infrastructure interact to create the in-channel features over timescales longer than a few years. This study uses detailed channel bed topographic surveys collected either with a total station or RTK-GPS technology. Geomorphic change detection techniques are utilized to monitor topographic change under and around the 26 log structures in two different river reaches over a six to seven year period The log structures are often associated with deepening of pools as desired, but also some structures show sedimentation under the structure. Differences in the patterns will be assessed based on the design, location, and specific characteristics of the log structures; variables include number and placement of logs, volume of structure, location on meander bend, and sediment sizes.

  8. Comparing effects of active and passive restoration on the Middle Fork John Day River, NE Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, P. F.; Goslin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, cattle grazing has been eliminated on over 14 km of the upper Middle Fork John Day. Starting in 2008, active restoration (log structures with dug pools, woody vegetation planting, and modifications to increase channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity) was implemented on nearly 6 km within the cattle exclosure length. Implementation of active and passive restoration strategies in the same and adjacent reaches allows comparison of these two approaches. We have been monitoring these reaches since 2008. Unexpectedly in response to grazing exclosure, a native sedge, Carex nudata (torrent sedge), has exploded in population. C. nudata grows in the active channel, anchoring itself tightly to the gravel-cobble river bed with a dense root network. As a result, C. nudata has changed erosion and sedimentation patterns including bank erosion, channel bed scour, and island formation. We present data on fish cover increases due to C. nudata and log structures, and on channel complexity before and after restoration. Both active and passive restorations are increasing channel complexity and juvenile fish cover, although in different ways. Fish cover provided by active and passive restoration are similar in area but different in depth and position, with C. nudata fish cover generally shallower and partly mid-channel. Residual pool depth is larger in log structure pools than in C. nudata scour pools, but C. nudata pools are more numerous in some reaches. By producing frequent, small scour features and small islands, it can be argued that C. nudata is increasing hydraulic complexity more than the large, meander-bend pools at log structures, but this is hard to quantify. C. nudata has also stabilized active bars, perhaps changing the bedload sediment budget. Positive habitat benefits of active restoration appear to be greater in the short term, but over the long term (20 years or more) effects of C. nudata may be comparable or greater.

  9. Groundwater and climate change: a sensitivity analysis for the Grand Forks aquifer, southern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. M.; Mackie, D. C.; Wei, M.

    The Grand Forks aquifer, located in south-central British Columbia, Canada was used as a case study area for modeling the sensitivity of an aquifer to changes in recharge and river stage consistent with projected climate-change scenarios for the region. Results suggest that variations in recharge to the aquifer under the different climate-change scenarios, modeled under steady-state conditions, have a much smaller impact on the groundwater system than changes in river-stage elevation of the Kettle and Granby Rivers, which flow through the valley. All simulations showed relatively small changes in the overall configuration of the water table and general direction of groundwater flow. High-recharge and low-recharge simulations resulted in approximately a +0.05 m increase and a -0.025 m decrease, respectively, in water-table elevations throughout the aquifer. Simulated changes in river-stage elevation, to reflect higher-than-peak-flow levels (by 20 and 50%), resulted in average changes in the water-table elevation of 2.72 and 3.45 m, respectively. Simulated changes in river-stage elevation, to reflect lower-than-baseflow levels (by 20 and 50%), resulted in average changes in the water-table elevation of -0.48 and -2.10 m, respectively. Current observed water-table elevations in the valley are consistent with an average river-stage elevation (between current baseflow and peak-flow stages). L'aquifère de Grand Forks, situé en Colombie britannique (Canada), a été utilisé comme zone d'étude pour modéliser la sensibilité d'un aquifère à des modifications de la recharge et du niveau de la rivière, correspondant à des scénarios envisagés de changement climatique dans cette région. Les résultats font apparaître que les variations de recharge de l'aquifère pour différents scénarios de changement climatique, modélisées pour des conditions de régime permanent, ont un impact sur le système aquifère beaucoup plus faible que les changements du niveau des

  10. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Eye-based head gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbegi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan; Pederson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for video-based head gesture recognition using eye information by an eye tracker has been proposed. The method uses a combination of gaze and eye movement to infer head gestures. Compared to other gesture-based methods a major advantage of the method is that the user keeps the gaze...

  12. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  14. Clinical trials in head injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayan, RK; Michel, ME

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000,

  15. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-08-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing.

  16. Development of an empirical nonlinear model for mercury bioaccumulation in the South and South Fork Shenandoah rivers of Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Robert N; Kain, Donald G

    2011-11-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed pollutant that biomagnifies in aquatic food webs. In the United States, 3781 water bodies fail to meet criteria for safe fish consumption due to mercury bioaccumulation. In the risk assessment and management of these impairments (through the total maximum daily load program), an important step is evaluating the relationship between aqueous mercury and mercury in fish tissue. Often, this relationship is simplified to a bioaccumulation factor (BAF): the ratio of fish tissue mercury to aqueous mercury. This article evaluates the relationship between aqueous mercury and fish tissue mercury across a contamination gradient in the South and South Fork Shenandoah rivers of Virginia. The relationship was found to be nonlinear, with BAFs decreasing as the level of contamination increased. This means that protective water column mercury concentration targets established from site-specific BAFs will be overestimated in contaminated areas and will not be sufficiently protective. To avoid this over-prediction in the South and South Fork Shenandoah rivers, an empirical nonlinear Michaelis-Menten model was used to establish a protective water-quality target. Among other models and variables, the Michaelis-Menten model, relating total mercury in the water column to methylmercury in fish tissue, achieved the best empirical fit (r(2) = 0.9562). The resulting water-quality targets using this model were 3.8 and 3.2 ng/l for the South and South Fork Shenandoah rivers, respectively. These values are 2.1-2.5 times lower than the water-quality target developed using a site-specific BAF. These findings demonstrate the need to consider nonlinear BAF relationships in mercury-contaminated areas.

  17. A new modified forked flap and a reverse V shaped flap for secondary correction of bilateral cleft lip nasal deformities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wei; ZHAO Zhen-min; YIN Ning-bei; SONG Tao; LI Hai-dong; WU Di; GAO Feng; WANG Xin-gang

    2011-01-01

    Background The columella,nasal tip,lip relationship in the bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity remains a great challenge for plastic surgeon.An esthetically satisfying result is difficult to obtain.A subset of patients with bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity still require columellar lengthening and nasal correction and philtrial construction.This study aimed to provide a new method based on the forked flap to improve the final appearance of these patients.Methods A technique to correct this deformity is described.This consists of (1) a newly modified forked flap including the orbicularis oris muscle and nasalis muscle along the whole flap for columellar lengthening,(2) a reverse V shaped flap from the lower portion of the columella and the prolabium for normal size phitrum construction,(3) inserting the vermilion portion of the forked flap and advancing the nasal floor medially and anteriorly to lengthen and maintain the nasal septum side of the columella for proper tip positioning,(4) open rhinoplasty,allowing definitive repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages,(5) reconstruction of the orbicularis orismuscle as required,and (6) the flaring nostril floor advancing medially and constructing the sill.Results This technique was applied to 15 cases of secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity.All the flaps took without signs of partial necrosis.In all cases,the nasal tip was projected forward with adequate columella elongation,and the height of the prolabium was added with normal size philtrial dimensions.Conclusions This method makes maximum use of the tissue containing the scar in the lip and limits tissues in the lower portion of the columella and the prolabium for adequate columella elongation and reconstruction with normal size philtrial dimensions.It is a very reasonable and useful method in correction of secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformities.

  18. Flood-inundation map library for the Licking River and South Fork Licking River near Falmouth, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2016-09-19

    Digital flood inundation maps for a 17-mile reach of Licking River and 4-mile reach of South Fork Licking River near Falmouth, Kentucky, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Pendleton County and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers–Louisville District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Licking River at Catawba, Ky., (station 03253500) and the USGS streamgage on the South Fork Licking River at Hayes, Ky., (station 03253000). Current conditions (2015) for the USGS streamgages may be obtained online at the USGS National Water Information System site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis). In addition, the streamgage information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The flood hydrograph forecasts provided by the NWS are usually collocated with USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the NWS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.In this study, flood profiles were computed for the Licking River reach and South Fork Licking River reach by using a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (2015) stage-discharge relations for the Licking River at Catawba, Ky., and the South Fork Licking River at Hayes, Ky., USGS streamgages. The calibrated model was then used to calculate 60 water-surface profiles for a sequence of flood stages, at 2-foot intervals, referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from an elevation near bankfull to the elevation associated with a major flood that

  19. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal [FEMTO-ST Institute UMR 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, F-25030 Besançon (France)

    2016-06-15

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  20. Environmental compliance plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Remedial action for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, as defined by the Record of Decision, requires that soil contaminated with >400 ppM mercury be excavated and disposed. Based on the remediation goal, soil will be excavated from areas located at the NOAA site and the Bruner site and disposed at the Industrial Landfill V at the Y-12 Plant. Objective is to minimize the risk to human health and the environment from contaminated soil in the lower EFPC floodplain pursuant to CERCLA and the Federal Facility Agreement (DOE 1992).

  1. Baseline and Postremediation Monitoring Program Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements to present the plan for baseline and postremediation monitoring as part of the selected remedy. It provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the requirements to monitor for soil and terrestrial biota in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain; sediment, surface water, and aquatic biota in LEFPC; wetland restoration in the LEFPC floodplain; and human use of shallow groundwater wells in the LEFPC floodplain for drinking water. This document describes the monitoring program that will ensure that actions taken under Phases I and II of the LEFPC remedial action are protective of human health and the environment.

  2. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus......, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither...

  3. First Overtone Frequency Stimulated Quartz Tuning Fork Used for Shear-Force Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晟; 孙家林; 孙红三; 谭晓靖; 时硕; 郭继华; 赵钧

    2003-01-01

    The conventional 32.768 kHz tuning fork is stimulated at its first overtone resonant frequency of ~190 kHz for shear-force distance control.The time constant is measured to be 0.54 ms and it decreases about 40 times faster than that of the fundamental frequency(20.76ms).The cross section of a corn root with a height difference of ~ 3μm is imaged at a scan speed of 12μm/s for 256 × 256 pixels.

  4. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a quartz tuning fork and a micro-thermocouple in active mode (2ω method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Nguyen, Tran Phong; Salut, Roland; Thiery, Laurent; Teyssieux, Damien; Vairac, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    A novel probe for scanning thermal microscope using a micro-thermocouple probe placed on a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) is presented. Instead of using an external deflection with a cantilever beam for contact detection, an original combination of piezoelectric resonator and thermal probe is employed. Due to a non-contact photothermal excitation principle, the high quality factor of the QTF allows the probe-to-surface contact detection. Topographic and thermal scanning images obtained on a specific sample points out the interest of our system as an alternative to cantilevered resistive probe systems which are the most spread.

  5. Flood-inundation maps for an 8.9-mile reach of the South Fork Little River at Hopkinsville, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.9-mile reach of South Fork Little River at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Hopkinsville Community Development Services. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at South Fork Little River at Highway 68 By-Pass at Hopkinsville, Kentucky (station no. 03437495). Current conditions for the USGS streamgage may be obtained online at the USGS National Water Information System site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory?agency_code=USGS&site_no=03437495). In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the South Fork Little River reach by using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (2012) stage-discharge relation at the South Fork Little River at Highway 68 By-Pass at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, streamgage and measurements collected during recent flood events. The calibrated model was then used to calculate 13 water-surface profiles for a sequence of flood stages, most at 1-foot intervals, referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from a stage near bank full to the estimated elevation of the 1.0-percent annual exceedance

  6. Research on the influence of transparent vacuum encapsulation quartz tuning fork on the photo-thermoelastic spectroscopy of acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhouqiang; Jia, Shuhai; Wang, Yonglin; Tang, Zhenhua; Wang, Fei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a transparent vacuum-encapsulated quartz tuning fork (QTF) is proposed for the first time to improve the quality factor and sensitivity of QTF sensors. Increasing the vacuum considerably improved the quality factor of QTF, and the resonance frequency was also shifted to higher values to 10 Hz. Subsequently, the spectroscopy detection of acetylene gas using an exposed QTF and a transparent vacuum-encapsulated QTF was investigated. The sensitivity of the detection system improved in the presence of the transparent vacuum-sealed QTF. The current findings represent a gateway to subsequent research in photo-thermoelastic spectroscopy.

  7. South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-07-01

    The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

  8. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  9. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  10. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  11. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  12. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  13. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  14. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  15. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  16. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory experimental set - up for studying the behaviour of sediment in presence of a turbulent field with zero mean flow is compared with the behaviour of turbidity currents [1] . Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the sediment lift - off. The behaviour of the turbidity current in a flat ground is compared with the zero mean flow oscilating grid generated turbulence as when wave flow lifts off suspended sediments [2,3]. Some examples of the results obtained with this set-up relating the height of the head of the turbidity current to the equilibrium level of stirred lutoclines are shown. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', and the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size [1,3]. Combining grid stirring and turbidty current head shapes analyzed by means of advanced image analysis, sediment vertical fluxes and settling speeds can be measured [4,5]. [1] D. Hernandez Turbulent structure of turbidity currents and sediment transport Ms Thesis ETSECCPB, UPC. Barcelona 2009. [2] A. Sánchez-Arcilla; A. Rodríguez; J.C. Santás; J.M. Redondo; V. Gracia; R. K'Osyan; S. Kuznetsov; C. Mösso. Delta'96 Surf-zone and nearshore measurements at the Ebro Delta. A: International Conference on Coastal Research through large Scale Experiments (Coastal Dynamics '97). University of Plymouth, 1997, p. 186-187. [3] P. Medina, M. A. Sánchez and J. M. Redondo. Grid stirred turbulence: applications to the initiation of sediment motion and lift-off studies Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part B: Hydrology, Oceans and Atmosphere. 26, Issue 4, 2001, Pages 299-304 [4] M.O. Bezerra, M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. Study on the influence of waves on

  17. Hydraulic, geomorphic, and trout habitat conditions of the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River in Hinsdale County, Lake City, Colorado, Water Years 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cory A.; Richards, Rodney J.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2015-01-01

    Channel rehabilitation, or reconfiguration, to mitigate a variety of riverine problems has become a common practice in the western United States. However, additional work to monitor and assess the channel response to, and the effectiveness of, these modifications over longer periods of time (decadal or longer) is still needed. The Lake Fork of the Gunnison River has been an area of active channel modification to accommodate the needs of the Lake City community since the 1950s. The Lake Fork Valley Conservancy District began a planning process to assess restoration options for a reach of the Lake Fork in Lake City to enhance hydraulic and ecologic characteristics of the reach. Geomorphic channel form is affected by land-use changes within the basin and geologic controls within the reach. The historic channel was defined as a dynamic, braided channel with an active flood plain. This can result in a natural tendency for the channel to braid. A braided channel can affect channel stability of reconfigured reaches when a single-thread meandering channel is imposed on the stream. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board and Colorado River Water Conservation District, began a study in 2010 to quantify existing hydraulic and habitat conditions for a reach of the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River in Lake City, Colorado. The purpose of this report is to quantify existing Lake Fork hydraulic and habitat conditions and establish a baseline against which post-reconfiguration conditions can be compared. This report (1) quantifies the existing hydraulic and geomorphic conditions in a 1.1-kilometer section of the Lake Fork at Lake City that has been proposed as a location for future channel-rehabilitation efforts, (2) characterizes the habitat suitability of the reach for two trout species based on physical conditions within the stream, and (3) characterizes the current riparian canopy density.

  18. SMARCAL1 Negatively Regulates C-Myc Transcription By Altering The Conformation Of The Promoter Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tapan; Bansal, Ritu; Haokip, Dominic Thangminlen; Goel, Isha; Muthuswami, Rohini

    2015-12-09

    SMARCAL1, a member of the SWI2/SNF2 protein family, stabilizes replication forks during DNA damage. In this manuscript, we provide the first evidence that SMARCAL1 is also a transcriptional co-regulator modulating the expression of c-Myc, a transcription factor that regulates 10-15% genes in the human genome. BRG1, SMARCAL1 and RNAPII were found localized onto the c-myc promoter. When HeLa cells were serum starved, the occupancy of SMARCAL1 on the c-myc promoter increased while that of BRG1 and RNAPII decreased correlating with repression of c-myc transcription. Using Active DNA-dependent ATPase A Domain (ADAAD), the bovine homolog of SMARCAL1, we show that the protein can hydrolyze ATP using a specific region upstream of the CT element of the c-myc promoter as a DNA effector. The energy, thereby, released is harnessed to alter the conformation of the promoter DNA. We propose that SMARCAL1 negatively regulates c-myc transcription by altering the conformation of its promoter region during differentiation.

  19. Smad transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massagué, Joan; Seoane, Joan; Wotton, David

    2005-12-01

    Smad transcription factors lie at the core of one of the most versatile cytokine signaling pathways in metazoan biology-the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) pathway. Recent progress has shed light into the processes of Smad activation and deactivation, nucleocytoplasmic dynamics, and assembly of transcriptional complexes. A rich repertoire of regulatory devices exerts control over each step of the Smad pathway. This knowledge is enabling work on more complex questions about the organization, integration, and modulation of Smad-dependent transcriptional programs. We are beginning to uncover self-enabled gene response cascades, graded Smad response mechanisms, and Smad-dependent synexpression groups. Our growing understanding of TGFbeta signaling through the Smad pathway provides general principles for how animal cells translate complex inputs into concrete behavior.

  20. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Groundwater and surface water monitoring in the East Fork Regime are performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on August 30, 1996. The post-closure permit addresses post-closure monitoring requirements for two closed RCRA-regulated surface impoundments: the S-3 Ponds and New Hope Pond.

  1. Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome) KidsHealth > For Parents > Abusive Head ... babies tend to cry the most. How These Injuries Happen Abusive head trauma results from injuries caused ...

  2. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn More about the Brain and How it Works Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational ... Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS "Heads ...

  3. Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill head lice? Which medicine is best? Is mayonnaise effective for treating head lice? CDC does not ... to determine if suffocation of head lice with mayonnaise, olive oil, margarine, butter, or similar substances is ...

  4. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  5. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  6. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  7. Return of the talking heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth; Bro, Peter; Andersson, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The present article suggests that the brief history of Western television news dramaturgy can be expounded as three major waves: from the early days of the talking heads in the studio, over the narrativization of the field report to a (re-)current studio- and field-based talking heads format....... In order to analyze the latest development entering the third wave, we propose a theoretically based dramaturgical model for the television news item. The analysis concludes that, with the current ‘return’ of the talking heads format, the pre-produced and pre-packaged bulletin program about past events...

  8. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruner, Heather C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:435–437.

  9. Boxing-related head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarao, Mayur; Chin, Lawrence S; Cantu, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    Fatalities in boxing are most often due to traumatic brain injury that occurs in the ring. In the past 30 years, significant improvements in ringside and medical equipment, safety, and regulations have resulted in a dramatic reduction in the fatality rate. Nonetheless, the rate of boxing-related head injuries, particularly concussions, remains unknown, due in large part to its variability in clinical presentation. Furthermore, the significance of repeat concussions sustained when boxing is just now being understood. In this article, we identify the clinical manifestations, pathophysiology, and management of boxing-related head injuries, and discuss preventive strategies to reduce head injuries sustained by boxers.

  10. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  11. Helicase and Polymerase Move Together Close to the Fork Junction and Copy DNA in One-Nucleotide Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Pandey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available By simultaneously measuring DNA synthesis and dNTP hydrolysis, we show that T7 DNA polymerase and T7 gp4 helicase move in sync during leading-strand synthesis, taking one-nucleotide steps and hydrolyzing one dNTP per base-pair unwound/copied. The cooperative catalysis enables the helicase and polymerase to move at a uniformly fast rate without guanine:cytosine (GC dependency or idling with futile NTP hydrolysis. We show that the helicase and polymerase are located close to the replication fork junction. This architecture enables the polymerase to use its strand-displacement synthesis to increase the unwinding rate, whereas the helicase aids this process by translocating along single-stranded DNA and trapping the unwound bases. Thus, in contrast to the helicase-only unwinding model, our results suggest a model in which the helicase and polymerase are moving in one-nucleotide steps, DNA synthesis drives fork unwinding, and a role of the helicase is to trap the unwound bases and prevent DNA reannealing.

  12. Comparison of Stream Restoration and Vegetation Restoration on Stream Temperature in the Middle Fork John Day River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabat, M.; Wondzell, S. M.; Haggerty, R.

    2013-12-01

    Stream temperature is an important component of aquatic ecosystems. During the past century, various anthropogenic activities (such as timber harvest, mining, and agriculture) reduced riparian vegetation and channel complexity along many streams around the world. As a result, stream temperature increased and suitable habitat for cool- and cold-water organisms declined. Stream temperatures are expected to increase even more under future climate. The effects of warmer climate and anthropogenic activities are proposed to be mitigated by restoration projects aimed to reduce stream temperatures. Common restoration practices are replanting natural vegetation along stream banks and restoring channel complexity. The Middle Fork John Day River, in northeastern Oregon, USA is an example of such a process. We modeled stream temperature along a 37-km section of the Middle Fork John Day River for current and projected conditions of climate, restored riparian vegetation along 6.6-km, and restored channel meanders along 1.5 km. Preliminary simulations suggest that if current riparian vegetation remains unchanged, an average summertime air warming of 4°C increased the 7-day average daily maximum (7DADM) by about 1.3°C. However, restored riparian vegetation reduced the 7DADM by about 0.7°C relative to the current temperature. Restored channel meanders reduced the 7DADM by less than 0.05°C relative to the current temperature. These preliminary simulations assume no hyporheic exchange and riparian vegetation that is 10 m tall and has 30% canopy density.

  13. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

  14. Rhythm quantization for transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.; Desain, P.W.M.; Kappen, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Music Transcription is the extraction of an acceptable notation from performed music. One important task in this problem is rhythm quantization which refers to categorization of note durations. Although quantization of a pure mechanical performance is rather straightforward, the task becom

  15. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any a

  16. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  17. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  18. Zero torque gear head wrench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... copied to a CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a bright light and a mirror: Remove any dentures Look and feel inside the lips and the ... Early treatment may well be the key to complete recovery. Head, Neck & Oral Cancer Facts The information ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  8. New Russian science head named

    CERN Multimedia

    Levitin, C

    2000-01-01

    Ilya Klebanov, a deputy prime minister, has been appointed the country's new head of industrial and scientific policy. He will control the new Ministry for Industry, Science and Technologies (4 paragraphs).

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist if you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before ... imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... is positioned around the head. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... head is performed for a number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose ... often within less than 30 minutes from the onset of symptoms. Risks The MRI examination poses almost ...

  13. Montessori Head Start Implementation Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Alcillia; Kahn, David

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Montessori method in Head Start programs, focusing on educational environment, teacher training, parent involvement, and funding. Outlines the phased implementation of a Montessori program and provides a list of Montessori publications and organizations. (MDM)

  14. Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symmetrical, but for a variety of reasons the asymmetry becomes less apparent as well. For example, in ... a flattened head does not affect a child's brain growth or cause developmental delays or brain damage. ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  19. Heater head for stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1985-07-09

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  1. challenges facing child headed households

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    This research employed qualitative methods to establish the daily experiences ... family support systems that view children as society's future and as an .... children's decision-making in 30 child-headed .... fetching water from nearby boreholes.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  4. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  5. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahari Taha; Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan; Iskandar Hasanuddin

    2015-08-01

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model consists of a mass–spring–damper system, in which the skull, the brain and the soccer ball are modelled as a mass and the neck modelled as a spring–damper system. The proposed model was compared with previous dynamic model for soccer ball-to-head impact. Moreover, it was also validated against drop ball experiment on an instrumented dummy skull and also compared with head acceleration data from previous studies. Comparison shows that our proposed model is capable of describing both the skull and brain accelerations qualitatively and quantitatively. This study shows that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on the kinematics of human skull and brain during a ball-to-head impact. The model can be used to investigate the important parameters during soccer heading that affect the brain displacement and acceleration, thus providing better understanding of the mechanics behind it.

  6. Ghost Head Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth. The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas. NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000. The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas. In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars. The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The

  7. Summary of environmental flow monitoring for the Sustainable Rivers Project on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, western Oregon, 2014–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Krista L.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose; Bervid, Heather D.; Olson, Melissa; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Bach, Leslie

    2016-11-07

    This report presents the results of an ongoing environmental flow monitoring study by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and U.S. Geological Survey in support of the Sustainable Rivers Project (SRP) of TNC and USACE. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and characterize relations between streamflow, geomorphic processes, and black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) recruitment on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, western Oregon, that were hypothesized in earlier investigations. The SRP can use this information to plan future monitoring and scientific investigations, and to help mitigate the effects of dam operations on streamflow regimes, geomorphic processes, and biological communities, such as black cottonwood forests, in consultation with regional experts. The four tasks of this study were to:Compare the hydrograph from Water Year (WY) 2015 with hydrographs from WYs 2000–14 and the SRP flow recommendations,Assess short-term and system-wide changes in channel features and vegetation throughout the alluvial valley section of the Middle Fork Willamette River (2005–12),Examine changes in channel features and vegetation over two decades (1994–2014) for two short mapping zones on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, andComplete a field investigation of summer stage and the growth of black cottonwood and other vegetation on the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers in summer 2015.

  8. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2011 through September 2012) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork Basin of western Montana. The sampling program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork Basin, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2011 through September 2012. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2012. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2011 through September 2012. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity was analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined. Daily values of suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork Basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

  9. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data (October 2009 through September 2010) and statistical summaries of data for streams in the Clark Fork basin, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kent A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Dyke, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Water, bed sediment, and biota were sampled in streams from Butte to near Missoula, Montana, as part of a monitoring program in the upper Clark Fork basin. The sampling program was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to characterize aquatic resources in the Clark Fork basin of western Montana, with emphasis on trace elements associated with historic mining and smelting activities. Sampling sites were located on the Clark Fork and selected tributaries. Water samples were collected periodically at 20 sites from October 2009 through September 2010. Bed-sediment and biota samples were collected once at 13 sites during August 2010. This report presents the analytical results and quality-assurance data for water-quality, bed-sediment, and biota samples collected at sites from October 2009 through September 2010. Water-quality data include concentrations of selected major ions, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Turbidity was analyzed for water samples collected at the four sites where seasonal daily values of turbidity were being determined. Daily values of suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge were determined for four sites. Bed-sediment data include trace-element concentrations in the fine-grained fraction. Biological data include trace-element concentrations in whole-body tissue of aquatic benthic insects. Statistical summaries of water-quality, bed-sediment, and biological data for sites in the upper Clark Fork basin are provided for the period of record since 1985.

  10. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 5. Appendix V-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 5, Appendix V - D. This appendix includes the final verification run data package (PAH, TCLP herbicides, TCLP pesticides).

  11. Efficient expression and purification of human replication fork-stabilizing factor, Claspin, from mammalian cells: DNA-binding activity and novel protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Syuzi; Masai, Hisao

    2011-08-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins of a large size often poses problems of instability or low expression in bacterial or insect cells. Here, we established a method for a high-level expression of large-sized recombinant proteins in mammalian cells and subsequent purification of the full-length proteins. We applied this method to express human Claspin and Tim-Tipin complex, which play important roles in replication checkpoint responses as fork-stabilizing factors, and successfully purified them in functional forms in amount sufficient for enzymatic characterization. Purified Claspin behaves as a monomer and binds preferentially to fork-like DNA. Over-expression of tagged Claspin in mammalian cells facilitated the detection of its interacting factors. Claspin interacts with many factors involved in checkpoint regulation and replication fork machinery, including ATR, ATM, Chk1, Tim, MCM4, MCM10, Cdc45, DNA polymerases α, δ, ε and Cdc7 kinase. We will discuss the potential implication of these findings in architecture of replication fork. We will also discuss the advantage of this system for purification and characterization of those proteins that are large and have been difficult to deal with.

  12. Habitat selection influences sex distribution, morphology, tissue biochemistry, and parasite load of juvenile coho salmon in the West Fork Smith River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given the strong influence of water temperature on salmonid physiology and behavior, in the summers of 2004 and 2005 we studied juvenile male and female coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch in two reaches of Oregon’s West Fork Smith River with different thermal profiles. Our goals we...

  13. Genome-wide localization of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA helicases at stalled active and inactive DNA replication forks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Emma Rossi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sequenced and the location and dynamic of activation of DNA replication origins are known. G1 synchronized yeast cells can be released into S-phase in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU (1, which slows down DNA replication and retains replication forks in proximity of DNA replication origins. In this condition, the Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ChIP on chip (2–4 of replisome components allows the precise localization of all active DNA replication forks. This analysis can be coupled with the ssDNA-BromodeoxyUridine (ssDNA-BrdU Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ssDNA-BrdU IP on chip technique (5–7, which detects the location of newly synthesized DNA. Comparison of binding and BrdU incorporation profiles allows to locate a factor of interest at DNA replication forks genome wide. We present datasets deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE68214, which show how the DNA helicases Rrm3 and Pif1 (8 associate to active and inactive DNA replication forks.

  14. Water quality and relation to taste-and-odor compounds in North Fork Ninnescah River and Cheney Reservoir, south-central Kansas, 1997-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Milligan, Chad R.; Pope, Larry M.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    Cheney Reservoir, the primary water supply for the city of Wichita in south-central Kansas, and its main source of inflow, the North Fork Ninnescah River, were sampled between 1997 and 2003 for sediment, nutrients, and the taste-and-odor-causing compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB). It is believed that objectionable tastes and odors in Cheney Reservoir result from cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), and there is concern with proliferation of algal growth. Both nutrients and suspended solids affect algal growth and may be a concern for taste-and-odor issues. The transport of nutrients and suspended solids from the North Fork Ninnescah River to Cheney Reservoir was monitored as part of an effort to understand and thereby mitigate algal proliferation. The regression-estimated concentrations of total phosphorus in water entering the reservoir from the North Fork Ninnescah River during 2001–03 exceeded the base-flow, runoff, and long-term goals established by the Cheney Reservoir Task Force. Total suspended-solids concentrations in water from the North Fork Ninnescah River during 2001–03 generally exceeded long-term goals only during periods of runoff.

  15. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  16. Optimization of an Image-Based Talking Head System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image-based talking head system, which includes two parts: analysis and synthesis. The audiovisual analysis part creates a face model of a recorded human subject, which is composed of a personalized 3D mask as well as a large database of mouth images and their related information. The synthesis part generates natural looking facial animations from phonetic transcripts of text. A critical issue of the synthesis is the unit selection which selects and concatenates these appropriate mouth images from the database such that they match the spoken words of the talking head. Selection is based on lip synchronization and the similarity of consecutive images. The unit selection is refined in this paper, and Pareto optimization is used to train the unit selection. Experimental results of subjective tests show that most people cannot distinguish our facial animations from real videos.

  17. A fork in the path: Developing therapeutic inroads with FoxO proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Hou, Jinling; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen

    2009-01-01

    Advances in clinical care for disorders involving any system of the body necessitates novel therapeutic strategies that can focus upon the modulation of cellular proliferation, metabolism, inflammation and longevity. In this respect, members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) that include FoxO1, FoxO3, FoxO4 and FoxO6 are increasingly being recognized as exciting prospects for multiple disorders. These transcription factors govern development, proliferation, survival and longevity during multiple cellular environments that can involve oxidative stress. Furthermore, these transcription factors are closely integrated with several novel signal transduction pathways, such as erythropoietin and Wnt proteins, that may influence the ability of FoxOs to act as a "double-edge sword" to sometimes promote cell survival, but at other times lead to cell injury. Here we discuss the fascinating but complex role of FoxOs during cellular injury and oxidative stress, progenitor cell development, fertility, angiogenesis, cardiovascular function, cellular metabolism and diabetes, cell longevity, immune surveillance and cancer.

  18. A Fork in the Path: Developing Therapeutic Inroads with FoxO Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Maiese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in clinical care for disorders involving any system of the body necessitates novel therapeutic strategies that can focus upon the modulation of cellular proliferation, metabolism, inflammation and longevity. In this respect, members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs that include FoxO1, FoxO3, FoxO4 and FoxO6 are increasingly being recognized as exciting prospects for multiple disorders. These transcription factors govern development, proliferation, survival and longevity during multiple cellular environments that can involve oxidative stress. Furthermore, these transcription factors are closely integrated with several novel signal transduction pathways, such as erythropoietin and Wnt proteins, that may influence the ability of FoxOs to act as a “double-edge sword” to sometimes promote cell survival, but at other times lead to cell injury. Here we discuss the fascinating but complex role of FoxOs during cellular injury and oxidative stress, progenitor cell development, fertility, angiogenesis, cardiovascular function, cellular metabolism and diabetes, cell longevity, immune surveillance and cancer.

  19. [Illustrations of visceral referred pain. "Head-less" Head's zones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, C; Beissner, F

    2011-04-01

    Reviewing anatomical, physiological and neurological standard literature for illustrations of referred visceral pain only one type of illustration can frequently be found, which is referred to as Treves and Keith. In fact, the original illustration as a model for most current pictures stems from the German edition of Sir Frederick Treves' famous book "Surgical Applied Anatomy" from 1914, which was reillustrated for didactical reasons for the German readership. While neither Treves and Keith nor the German illustrator Otto Kleinschmidt ever published any work on referred pain this illustration must have been adapted or copied from older sources by the illustrator. Therefore the comprehensive systematic original works before 1914 were reviewed, namely those of Sir Henry Head and Sir James Mackenzie. Due to the name of the phenomenon in the German literature of Head's zones, the illustrations were expected to be based mainly on Head's work. However, a comparison of all available illustrations led to the conclusion that Kleinschmidt chiefly used information from Mackenzie as a model for his illustration. Due to the inexact reproduction of Mackenzie's work by the illustrator some important features were lost that had been reported by the original authors. These include the phenomenon of Head's maximum points, which nowadays has fallen into oblivion.Therefore current charts, based on the illustration by Kleinschmidt from 1914, lack experimental evidence and appear to be a simplification of the observational results of both Head's and Mackenzie's original systematic works.

  20. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...